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Sample records for nonstationary fractured media

  1. Elastic fracture in driven media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung Chiwei; Wang Shenggang; Long Qiyi

    1999-08-01

    Fracture as one of the mechanical properties of materials is structurally dependent. Defects, defect assemblies, grain boundaries and sub-boundaries materials, modify the local stress intensity factors intensively. Brittle fracture prefers to confine to the grain boundary where the specific surface energy is lower than that in the grain. Again, transgranular cracking may occur on the crystal cleavage plane or planes where the local toughness is lowered by dislocation interaction and motion. This paper shows the complexity of the fractal dimension or roughness index of fractured surfaces in materials with metallographic structures or in inhomogeneous media. (author)

  2. Colloid migration in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, J.R. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  3. Fluid transfers in fractured media: scale effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bour, Olivier

    1996-01-01

    As there has been a growing interest in the study of fluid circulations in fractured media for the last fifteen years, for example for projects of underground storage of different waste types, or to improve water resources, or for exploitation of underground oil products or geothermal resources, this research thesis first gives a large overview of the modelling and transport properties of fractured media. He presents the main notions related to fluid transfers in fractured media (structures of fracture networks, hydraulic properties of fractured media), and the various adopted approaches (the effective medium theory, the percolation theory, double porosity models, deterministic discrete fracture models, equivalent discontinuous model, fractal models), and outlines the originality of the approach developed in this research: scale change, conceptual hypotheses, methodology, tools). The second part addresses scale rules in fracture networks: presentation of fracture networks (mechanical aspects, statistical analysis), distribution of fracture lengths and of fracture networks, length-position relationship, modelling attempt, lessons learned and consequences in terms of hydraulic and mechanical properties, and of relationship between length distribution and fractal dimension. The third part proposes two articles published by the author and addressing the connectivity properties of fracture networks. The fifth chapter reports the application to natural media. It contains an article on the application of percolation theory to 2D natural fracture networks, and reports information collected on a site [fr

  4. Radionuclide transport in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, the classical advective-dispersive transport equation was considered to be an adequate model for describing the motion of a solute (e.g. radionuclides) in porous and fractured media. In this model, the dispersion coefficient is either obtained from a microscopic model of the porous medium or by carefully controlled experiments. As a result of such experiments, a large body of data has been accumulated on the dispersivity. Detailed examination of these data has resulted in a curious phenomenon being discovered; namely, that the longitudinal dispersion length is 'scale-dependent'. That is to say the value deduced depends on the 'size' of the experiment, i.e. on the distance over which measurements are made. Several interesting attempts have been made to develop theories which explain this phenomenon, all based on treating the velocity of the water in the porous medium as a spatially random variable, but retaining the advective-dispersive balance equation. In this work we present an entirely new approach to the problem of solute transport in fractured media based upon an analogy with neutron transport. The new method has several advantages over the previous theories and these will be explained below. Results from the new theory are in agreement with experimental trends and do not require any further adjustment to explain the scale-dependent effect

  5. Well test analysis in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K.

    1987-04-01

    The behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. These models are based on the assumption that a fracture system under well test conditions may be represented by two concentric regions, one representing a small number of fractures that dominates flow near the well, and the other representing average conditions farther away from the well. Type curves are presented that can be used to find the flow parameters of these two regions and the extent of the inner concentric region. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented.

  6. Well test analysis in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K.

    1986-04-01

    In this study the behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented. This model develops an explicit solution in the porous matrix as well as in the discrete fractures. Because the model does not require the assumptions of the conventional double porosity approach, it may be used to simulate cases where double porosity models fail.

  7. Thermal convection in three-dimensional fractured porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezon, C.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Thovert, J.-F.; Antoine, R.; Fontaine, F.; Finizola, A.; Adler, P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Thermal convection is numerically computed in three-dimensional (3D) fluid saturated isotropically fractured porous media. Fractures are randomly inserted as two-dimensional (2D) convex polygons. Flow is governed by Darcy's 2D and 3D laws in the fractures and in the porous medium, respectively; exchanges take place between these two structures. Results for unfractured porous media are in agreement with known theoretical predictions. The influence of parameters such as the fracture aperture (or fracture transmissivity) and the fracture density on the heat released by the whole system is studied for Rayleigh numbers up to 150 in cubic boxes with closed-top conditions. Then, fractured media are compared to homogeneous porous media with the same macroscopic properties. Three major results could be derived from this study. The behavior of the system, in terms of heat release, is determined as a function of fracture density and fracture transmissivity. First, the increase in the output flux with fracture density is linear over the range of fracture density tested. Second, the increase in output flux as a function of fracture transmissivity shows the importance of percolation. Third, results show that the effective approach is not always valid, and that the mismatch between the full calculations and the effective medium approach depends on the fracture density in a crucial way.

  8. Pneumatic fractures in Confined Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Turkaya, Semih

    2016-04-01

    We will present our ongoing study of the patterns formed when air flows into a dry, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. This is an optically transparent system consisting of two glass plates separated by 0.5 to 1 mm, containing a packing of dry 80 micron beads in between. The cell is rectangular and has an air-permeable boundary (blocking beads) at one short edge, while the other three edges are completely sealed. The granular medium is loosely packed against the semi-permeable boundary and fills about 80 % of the cell volume. This leaves an empty region at the sealed side, where an inlet allows us to set and maintain the air at a constant overpressure (0.1 - 2 bar). For the air trapped inside the cell to relax its overpressure it has to move through the deformable granular medium. Depending on the applied overpressure and initial density of the medium, we observe a range of different behaviors such as seepage through the pore-network with or without an initial compaction of the solid, formation of low density bubbles with rearrangement of particles, granular fingering/fracturing, and erosion inside formed channels/fractures. The experiments are recorded with a high-speed camera at a framerate of 1000 images/s and a resolution of 1024x1024 pixels. We use various image processing techniques to characterize the evolution of the air invasion patterns and the deformations in the surrounding material. The experiments are similar to deformation processes in porous media which are driven by pore fluid overpressure, such as mud volcanoes and hydraulic or pneumatic (gas-induced) fracturing, and the motivation is to increase the understanding of such processes by optical observations. In addition, this setup is an experimental version of the numerical models analyzed by Niebling et al. [1,2], and is useful for comparison with their results. In a directly related project [3], acoustic emissions from the cell plate are recorded during

  9. Benchmarks for single-phase flow in fractured porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemisch, Bernd; Berre, Inga; Boon, Wietse; Fumagalli, Alessio; Schwenck, Nicolas; Scotti, Anna; Stefansson, Ivar; Tatomir, Alexandru

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents several test cases intended to be benchmarks for numerical schemes for single-phase fluid flow in fractured porous media. A number of solution strategies are compared, including a vertex and two cell-centred finite volume methods, a non-conforming embedded discrete fracture model, a primal and a dual extended finite element formulation, and a mortar discrete fracture model. The proposed benchmarks test the schemes by increasing the difficulties in terms of network geometry, e.g. intersecting fractures, and physical parameters, e.g. low and high fracture-matrix permeability ratio as well as heterogeneous fracture permeabilities. For each problem, the results presented are the number of unknowns, the approximation errors in the porous matrix and in the fractures with respect to a reference solution, and the sparsity and condition number of the discretized linear system. All data and meshes used in this study are publicly available for further comparisons.

  10. Geological structure impact on the exchange between fractures and matrix for the fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roubinet, D.

    2010-01-01

    Fractured porous media are characterized by the presence of fractures at several scales with heterogeneous properties implying areas highly permeable by comparison with the rock. Hydraulically, these media are characterized by short reaction times, due to the fractures, and long reaction times, due to the rock. These media are important for several topics as contaminated sites, element storage and resources exploitation. The main challenge of fracture porous media modeling is the representation of the geometrical and physical heterogeneities. As an exact representation of the medium is not possible, it is necessary to determine the key properties of the medium. This study aims at determining the impact of the geometrical and physical properties of the fractures and the matrix from the local to the global scales. A first part consists in creating methods to evaluate structure effects on the exchange between the fractures and the matrix and a second part consists in using these methods on several media. Finally, we describe a new discrete dual-porosity model taking into account the properties of the media characterizing its behavior. (author)

  11. TOUGH-RBSN simulator for hydraulic fracture propagation within fractured media: Model validations against laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kunhwi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Nakagawa, Seiji; Birkholzer, Jens

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents coupled hydro-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in complex fractured media using a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. The individual physical processes in the fracture propagation are represented by separate program modules: the TOUGH2 code for multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) model for mechanical and fracture-damage behavior, which are coupled with each other. Fractures are modeled as discrete features, of which the hydrological properties are evaluated from the fracture deformation and aperture change. The verification of the TOUGH-RBSN code is performed against a 2D analytical model for single hydraulic fracture propagation. Subsequently, modeling capabilities for hydraulic fracturing are demonstrated through simulations of laboratory experiments conducted on rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed network of pre-existing fractures. Sensitivity analyses are also conducted by changing the modeling parameters, such as viscosity of injected fluid, strength of pre-existing fractures, and confining stress conditions. The hydraulic fracturing characteristics attributed to the modeling parameters are investigated through comparisons of the simulation results.

  12. Scaling of fracture systems in geological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, E.; Bour, O.; Odling, N. E.; Davy, P.; Main, I.; Cowie, P.; Berkowitz, B.

    2001-08-01

    Scaling in fracture systems has become an active field of research in the last 25 years motivated by practical applications in hazardous waste disposal, hydrocarbon reservoir management, and earthquake hazard assessment. Relevant publications are therefore spread widely through the literature. Although it is recognized that some fracture systems are best described by scale-limited laws (lognormal, exponential), it is now recognized that power laws and fractal geometry provide widely applicable descriptive tools for fracture system characterization. A key argument for power law and fractal scaling is the absence of characteristic length scales in the fracture growth process. All power law and fractal characteristics in nature must have upper and lower bounds. This topic has been largely neglected, but recent studies emphasize the importance of layering on all scales in limiting the scaling characteristics of natural fracture systems. The determination of power law exponents and fractal dimensions from observations, although outwardly simple, is problematic, and uncritical use of analysis techniques has resulted in inaccurate and even meaningless exponents. We review these techniques and suggest guidelines for the accurate and objective estimation of exponents and fractal dimensions. Syntheses of length, displacement, aperture power law exponents, and fractal dimensions are found, after critical appraisal of published studies, to show a wide variation, frequently spanning the theoretically possible range. Extrapolations from one dimension to two and from two dimensions to three are found to be nontrivial, and simple laws must be used with caution. Directions for future research include improved techniques for gathering data sets over great scale ranges and more rigorous application of existing analysis methods. More data are needed on joints and veins to illuminate the differences between different fracture modes. The physical causes of power law scaling and

  13. Poroelastic Response of Orthotropic Fractured Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, James G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2011-12-16

    In this paper, an algorithm is presented for inverting either laboratory or field poroelastic data for all the drained constants of an anisotropic (specifically orthotropic) fractured poroelastic system. While fractures normally weaken the system by increasing the mechanical compliance, any liquids present in these fractures are expected to increase the stiffness somewhat, thus negating to some extent the mechanical weakening influence of the fractures themselves. The analysis presented in this article quantifies these effects and shows that the key physical variable needed to account for the pore-fluid effects is a factor of (1 - B), where B is Skempton’s second coefficient and satisfies 0 ≤ B < 1. This scalar factor uniformly reduces the increase in compliance due to the presence of communicating fractures, thereby stiffening the fractured composite medium by a predictable amount. One further aim of the discussion is to determine the number of the poroelastic constants that needs to be known by other means to determine the rest from remote measurements, such as seismic wave propagation data in the field. Quantitative examples arising in the analysis show that, if the fracture aspect ratio af ≃ 0.1 and the pore fluid is liquid water, then for several cases considered, Skempton’s B ≃ 0.9, and so the stiffening effect of the pore-liquid reduces the change in compliance due to the fractures by a factor 1-B ≃ 0.1, in these examples. The results do, however, depend on the actual moduli of the unfractured elastic material, as well as on the pore-liquid bulk modulus, so these quantitative predictions are just examples, and should not be treated as universal results. Attention is also given to two previously unremarked poroelastic identities, both being useful variants of Gassmann’s equations for homogeneous—but anisotropic—poroelasticity. Relationships to Skempton’s analysis of saturated soils are also noted. Finally, the article concludes

  14. GENERATION OF TRANSPORT PATHS IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Říha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a method for generation of transport paths in combined equivalent porous media / discrete fracture network computational meshes is proposed as an alternative to a particle tracking method. It is based on a computation of the functional of the velocity and concentration individually for each element of a mesh. Its functionality is demonstrated on two test cases.

  15. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, I.

    2002-10-01

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  16. Fluid-driven fracture propagation in heterogeneous media: Probability distributions of fracture trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán, David; Mosquera, Juan-Carlos; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2017-11-01

    Hydraulic fracture trajectories in rocks and other materials are highly affected by spatial heterogeneity in their mechanical properties. Understanding the complexity and structure of fluid-driven fractures and their deviation from the predictions of homogenized theories is a practical problem in engineering and geoscience. We conduct a Monte Carlo simulation study to characterize the influence of heterogeneous mechanical properties on the trajectories of hydraulic fractures propagating in elastic media. We generate a large number of random fields of mechanical properties and simulate pressure-driven fracture propagation using a phase-field model. We model the mechanical response of the material as that of an elastic isotropic material with heterogeneous Young modulus and Griffith energy release rate, assuming that fractures propagate in the toughness-dominated regime. Our study shows that the variance and the spatial covariance of the mechanical properties are controlling factors in the tortuousness of the fracture paths. We characterize the deviation of fracture paths from the homogenous case statistically, and conclude that the maximum deviation grows linearly with the distance from the injection point. Additionally, fracture path deviations seem to be normally distributed, suggesting that fracture propagation in the toughness-dominated regime may be described as a random walk.

  17. Osmosis, filtration and fracture of porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2001-01-01

    Filtration was produced in a small scale physical model of a granular porous medium of cylindrical shape.The same volume flow was obtained either applying a difference in hydrostatic pressure or in osmotic pressure.In the first case a process of sustained erosion ending in an hydraulic short circuit was observed,while in the second case the material remained stable.This paradoxical strength behaviour is explained using some results from differential geometry,classical field theory and thermo-kinetic theory.The fracture process of a continuous matrix in a porous medium under the combined effect of filtration and external mechanical loads in then considered.The obtained results can be applied to the textural and compressive strength of wet concrete

  18. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media; Modelisation hydromecanique des milieux fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiri, I

    2002-10-15

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  19. Groundwater modelling for fractured and porous media: HYDROCOIN Level 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The report describes work carried out as part of the 'Hydrocoin' project to verify some of the models used by the British Geological Survey on its radioactive waste disposal programme. The author's work on Hydrocoin Level 1 concerned groundwater modelling for fractured and porous media. The overall conclusions arising from the work were: a) pressure fields in saturated media can be reliably calculated by existing programmes, b) three techniques for deriving the flow fields are described, and c) severe practical limitations exist as to the ability of current programs to model variably saturated conditions over moderate distances. (U.K.)

  20. Multiscale model reduction for shale gas transport in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Akkutlu, I. Y.

    2016-05-18

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale model reduction technique that describes shale gas transport in fractured media. Due to the pore-scale heterogeneities and processes, we use upscaled models to describe the matrix. We follow our previous work (Akkutlu et al. Transp. Porous Media 107(1), 235–260, 2015), where we derived an upscaled model in the form of generalized nonlinear diffusion model to describe the effects of kerogen. To model the interaction between the matrix and the fractures, we use Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (Efendiev et al. J. Comput. Phys. 251, 116–135, 2013, 2015). In this approach, the matrix and the fracture interaction is modeled via local multiscale basis functions. In Efendiev et al. (2015), we developed the GMsFEM and applied for linear flows with horizontal or vertical fracture orientations aligned with a Cartesian fine grid. The approach in Efendiev et al. (2015) does not allow handling arbitrary fracture distributions. In this paper, we (1) consider arbitrary fracture distributions on an unstructured grid; (2) develop GMsFEM for nonlinear flows; and (3) develop online basis function strategies to adaptively improve the convergence. The number of multiscale basis functions in each coarse region represents the degrees of freedom needed to achieve a certain error threshold. Our approach is adaptive in a sense that the multiscale basis functions can be added in the regions of interest. Numerical results for two-dimensional problem are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of proposed approach. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  1. Computational models of the hydrodynamics of fractured-porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The prediction of the flow pattern in fractured-porous media has great importance in the assessment of the local thermohydrological effects of the siting of a nuclear waste repository, among many other technological applications. Computational models must be used due to the complexity of the different phenomena involved which restricts the use of analytical techniques. A new numerical method, based on the boundary-fitted finite-difference technique, is presented in this thesis. The boundaries are external (the boundary of the physical domain), and internal (which correspond to the fracture network). The inclusion of the discrete fracture representation in the volume that represents the porous medium is the difference between the usual approach and the present one. The numerical model has been used in the prediction of the flow pattern in several internationally recognized verification cases and to hypothetical problems of our interest. The results obtained proved that the numerical approach considered gives accurate and reliable predictions of the hydrodynamics of fractured-porous media, allowing its use for the above mentioned studies. (Author) [es

  2. Coupled models in porous media: reactive transport and fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, L.

    2008-12-01

    This thesis deals with numerical simulation of coupled models for flow and transport in porous media. We present a new method for coupling chemical reactions and transport by using a Newton-Krylov method, and we also present a model of flow in fractured media, based on a domain decomposition method that takes into account the case of intersecting fractures. This study is composed of three parts: the first part contains an analysis, and implementation, of various numerical methods for discretizing advection-diffusion problems, in particular by using operator splitting methods. The second part is concerned with a fully coupled method for modeling transport and chemistry problems. The coupled transport-chemistry model is described, after discretization in time, by a system of nonlinear equations. The size of the system, namely the number of grid points times the number a chemical species, precludes a direct solution of the linear system. To alleviate this difficulty, we solve the system by a Newton-Krylov method, so as to avoid forming and factoring the Jacobian matrix. In the last part, we present a model of flow in 3D for intersecting fractures, by using a domain decomposition method. The fractures are treated as interfaces between sub-domains. We show existence and uniqueness of the solution, and we validate the model by numerical tests. (author)

  3. Synthetic benchmark for modeling flow in 3D fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Pichot, Géraldine; Poirriez, Baptiste; Erhel, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Intensity and localization of flows in fractured media have promoted the development of a large range of different modeling approaches including Discrete Fracture Networks, pipe networks and equivalent continuous media. While benchmarked usually within site studies, we propose an alternative numerical benchmark based on highly-resolved Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) and on a stochastic approach. Test cases are built on fractures of different lengths, orientations, aspect ratios and hydraulic apertures, issuing the broad ranges of topological structures and hydraulic properties classically observed. We present 18 DFN cases, with 10 random simulations by case. These 180 DFN structures are provided and fully documented. They display a representative variety of the configurations that challenge the numerical methods at the different stages of discretization, mesh generation and system solving. Using a previously assessed mixed hybrid finite element method (Erhel et al., 2009a), we systematically provide reference flow and head solutions. Because CPU and memory requirements stem mainly from system solving, we study direct and iterative sparse linear solvers. We show that the most cpu-time efficient method is a direct multifrontal method for small systems, while conjugate gradient preconditioned by algebraic multrigrid is more relevant at larger sizes. Available results can be used further as references for building up alternative numerical and physical models in both directions of improving accuracy and efficiency.

  4. Pneumatic fractures in confined granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K; Toussaint, Renaud; Turquet, Antoine L; Måløy, Knut J; Flekkøy, Eirik G

    2017-06-01

    We perform experiments where air is injected at a constant overpressure P_{in}, ranging from 5 to 250 kPa, into a dry granular medium confined within a horizontal linear Hele-Shaw cell. The setup allows us to explore compacted configurations by preventing decompaction at the outer boundary, i.e., the cell outlet has a semipermeable filter such that beads are stopped while air can pass. We study the emerging patterns and dynamic growth of channels in the granular media due to fluid flow, by analyzing images captured with a high speed camera (1000 images/s). We identify four qualitatively different flow regimes, depending on the imposed overpressure, ranging from no channel formation for P_{in} below 10 kPa, to large thick channels formed by erosion and fingers merging for high P_{in} around 200 kPa. The flow regimes where channels form are characterized by typical finger thickness, final depth into the medium, and growth dynamics. The shape of the finger tips during growth is studied by looking at the finger width w as function of distance d from the tip. The tip profile is found to follow w(d)∝d^{β}, where β=0.68 is a typical value for all experiments, also over time. This indicates a singularity in the curvature d^{2}d/dw^{2}∼κ∼d^{1-2β}, but not of the slope dw/dd∼d^{β-1}, i.e., more rounded tips rather than pointy cusps, as they would be for the case β>1. For increasing P_{in}, the channels generally grow faster and deeper into the medium. We show that the channel length along the flow direction has a linear growth with time initially, followed by a power-law decay of growth velocity with time as the channel approaches its final length. A closer look reveals that the initial growth velocity v_{0} is found to scale with injection pressure as v_{0}∝P_{in}^{3/2}, while at a critical time t_{c} there is a cross-over to the behavior v(t)∝t^{-α}, where α is close to 2.5 for all experiments. Finally, we explore the fractal dimension of the fully

  5. Numerical simulation on ferrofluid flow in fractured porous media based on discrete-fracture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Water flooding is an efficient approach to maintain reservoir pressure and has been widely used to enhance oil recovery. However, preferential water pathways such as fractures can significantly decrease the sweep efficiency. Therefore, the utilization ratio of injected water is seriously affected. How to develop new flooding technology to further improve the oil recovery in this situation is a pressing problem. For the past few years, controllable ferrofluid has caused the extensive concern in oil industry as a new functional material. In the presence of a gradient in the magnetic field strength, a magnetic body force is produced on the ferrofluid so that the attractive magnetic forces allow the ferrofluid to be manipulated to flow in any desired direction through the control of the external magnetic field. In view of these properties, the potential application of using the ferrofluid as a new kind of displacing fluid for flooding in fractured porous media is been studied in this paper for the first time. Considering the physical process of the mobilization of ferrofluid through porous media by arrangement of strong external magnetic fields, the magnetic body force was introduced into the Darcy equation and deals with fractures based on the discrete-fracture model. The fully implicit finite volume method is used to solve mathematical model and the validity and accuracy of numerical simulation, which is demonstrated through an experiment with ferrofluid flowing in a single fractured oil-saturated sand in a 2-D horizontal cell.

  6. Numerical simulation on ferrofluid flow in fractured porous media based on discrete-fracture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Yao, Jun; Huang, Zhaoqin; Yin, Xiaolong; Xie, Haojun; Zhang, Jianguang

    2017-06-01

    Water flooding is an efficient approach to maintain reservoir pressure and has been widely used to enhance oil recovery. However, preferential water pathways such as fractures can significantly decrease the sweep efficiency. Therefore, the utilization ratio of injected water is seriously affected. How to develop new flooding technology to further improve the oil recovery in this situation is a pressing problem. For the past few years, controllable ferrofluid has caused the extensive concern in oil industry as a new functional material. In the presence of a gradient in the magnetic field strength, a magnetic body force is produced on the ferrofluid so that the attractive magnetic forces allow the ferrofluid to be manipulated to flow in any desired direction through the control of the external magnetic field. In view of these properties, the potential application of using the ferrofluid as a new kind of displacing fluid for flooding in fractured porous media is been studied in this paper for the first time. Considering the physical process of the mobilization of ferrofluid through porous media by arrangement of strong external magnetic fields, the magnetic body force was introduced into the Darcy equation and deals with fractures based on the discrete-fracture model. The fully implicit finite volume method is used to solve mathematical model and the validity and accuracy of numerical simulation, which is demonstrated through an experiment with ferrofluid flowing in a single fractured oil-saturated sand in a 2-D horizontal cell. At last, the water flooding and ferrofluid flooding in a complex fractured porous media have been studied. The results showed that the ferrofluid can be manipulated to flow in desired direction through control of the external magnetic field, so that using ferrofluid for flooding can raise the scope of the whole displacement. As a consequence, the oil recovery has been greatly improved in comparison to water flooding. Thus, the ferrofluid

  7. A Multiscale Time-Splitting Discrete Fracture Model of Nanoparticles Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed F.

    2017-06-06

    Recently, applications of nanoparticles have been considered in many branches of petroleum engineering, especially, enhanced oil recovery. The current paper is devoted to investigate the problem of nanoparticles transport in fractured porous media, numerically. We employed the discrete-fracture model (DFM) to represent the flow and transport in the fractured formations. The system of the governing equations consists of the mass conservation law, Darcy\\'s law, nanoparticles concentration in water, deposited nanoparticles concentration on the pore-wall, and entrapped nanoparticles concentration in the pore-throat. The variation of porosity and permeability due to the nanoparticles deposition/entrapment on/in the pores is also considered. We employ the multiscale time-splitting strategy to control different time-step sizes for different physics, such as pressure and concentration. The cell-centered finite difference (CCFD) method is used for the spatial discretization. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed multiscale time splitting approach.

  8. Modeling of 1D Anomalous Diffusion in Fractured Nanoporous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albinali Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractured nanoporous reservoirs include multi-scale and discontinuous fractures coupled with a complex nanoporous matrix. Such systems cannot be described by the conventional dual-porosity (or multi-porosity idealizations due to the presence of different flow mechanisms at multiple scales. More detailed modeling approaches, such as Discrete Fracture Network (DFN models, similarly suffer from the extensive data requirements dictated by the intricacy of the flow scales, which eventually deter the utility of these models. This paper discusses the utility and construction of 1D analytical and numerical anomalous diffusion models for heterogeneous, nanoporous media, which is commonly encountered in oil and gas production from tight, unconventional reservoirs with fractured horizontal wells. A fractional form of Darcy’s law, which incorporates the non-local and hereditary nature of flow, is coupled with the classical mass conservation equation to derive a fractional diffusion equation in space and time. Results show excellent agreement with established solutions under asymptotic conditions and are consistent with the physical intuitions.

  9. Modeling of flow in faulted and fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeian, Erlend

    2004-03-01

    The work on this thesis has been done as part of a collaborative and inter disciplinary effort to improve the understanding of oil recovery mechanisms in fractured reservoirs. This project has been organized as a Strategic University Program (SUP) at the University of Bergen, Norway. The complex geometries of fractured reservoirs combined with flow of several fluid phases lead to difficult mathematical and numerical problems. In an effort to try to decrease the gap between the geological description and numerical modeling capabilities, new techniques are required. Thus, the main objective has been to improve the ATHENA flow simulator and utilize it within a fault modeling context. Specifically, an implicit treatment of the advection dominated mass transport equations within a domain decomposition based local grid refinement framework has been implemented. Since large computational tasks may arise, the implicit formulation has also been included in a parallel version of the code. Within the current limits of the simulator, appropriate up scaling techniques has also been considered. Part I of this thesis includes background material covering the basic geology of fractured porous media, the mathematical model behind the in-house flow simulator ATHENA and the additions implemented to approach simulation of flow through fractured and faulted porous media. In Part II, a set of research papers stemming from Part I is presented. A brief outline of the thesis follows below. In Chapt. 1 important aspects of the geological description and physical parameters of fractured and faulted porous media is presented. Based on this the scope of this thesis is specified having numerical issues and consequences in mind. Then, in Chapt. 2, the mathematical model and discretizations in the flow simulator is given followed by the derivation of the implicit mass transport formulation. In order to be fairly self-contained, most of the papers in Part II also includes the mathematical model

  10. An efficient hydro-mechanical model for coupled multi-porosity and discrete fracture porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xia; Huang, Zhaoqin; Yao, Jun; Li, Yang; Fan, Dongyan; Zhang, Kai

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is developed for coupled analysis of deforming fractured porous media with multiscale fractures. In this model, the macro-fractures are modeled explicitly by the embedded discrete fracture model, and the supporting effects of fluid and fillings in these fractures are represented explicitly in the geomechanics model. On the other hand, matrix and micro-fractures are modeled by a multi-porosity model, which aims to accurately describe the transient matrix-fracture fluid exchange process. A stabilized extended finite element method scheme is developed based on the polynomial pressure projection technique to address the displacement oscillation along macro-fracture boundaries. After that, the mixed space discretization and modified fixed stress sequential implicit methods based on non-matching grids are applied to solve the coupling model. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and application of the proposed method to capture the coupled hydro-mechanical impacts of multiscale fractures on fractured porous media.

  11. Continuous time random walks for the evolution of Lagrangian particle velocities in heterogeneous porous and fractured media flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, M.; Kang, P. K.; Comolli, A.; Le Borgne, T.; Lester, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steadyheterogeneous porous and fractured media flows based on a stochastic relaxation process.This approach describes persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods,which model persistence over a characteristic time scale.We first establish the relations between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochronal sampling along streamlines,under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop the CTRW approach for the spatial and temporaldynamics of Lagrangian velocities. Unlike classical CTRW formulations, the proposed approach quantifies both stationaryand non-stationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, and their evolution from arbitraryinitial velocity distributions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity distributions,and determine the behaviors of the mean particle velocity, velocity covariance andparticle dispersion. We find strong correlation and anomalous dispersion for velocity distributions which are tailedtoward low velocities. The developed CTRW approach and thus the Lagrangian particle dynamics are fully determined by the Eulerian velocitydistribution and the characteristic correlation scale. The developed framework is applied to particle transport in two-dimensionalrandom fracture networks.

  12. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs

  13. A generalized multiscale finite element method for elastic wave propagation in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Eric T.

    2016-02-26

    In this paper, we consider elastic wave propagation in fractured media applying a linear-slip model to represent the effects of fractures on the wavefield. Fractured media, typically, are highly heterogeneous due to multiple length scales. Direct numerical simulations for wave propagation in highly heterogeneous fractured media can be computationally expensive and require some type of model reduction. We develop a multiscale model reduction technique that captures the complex nature of the media (heterogeneities and fractures) in the coarse scale system. The proposed method is based on the generalized multiscale finite element method, where the multiscale basis functions are constructed to capture the fine-scale information of the heterogeneous, fractured media and effectively reduce the degrees of freedom. These multiscale basis functions are coupled via the interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method, which provides a block-diagonal mass matrix. The latter is needed for fast computation in an explicit time discretization, which is used in our simulations. Numerical results are presented to show the performance of the presented multiscale method for fractured media. We consider several cases where fractured media contain fractures of multiple lengths. Our numerical results show that the proposed reduced-order models can provide accurate approximations for the fine-scale solution.

  14. A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Binning, Philip John; Jørgensen, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media is developed, based on simple transient and steady-state analytical solutions. The discrete fracture (DF) tool, which explicitly accounts for the transport along fractures, covers different source geometries...

  15. Adaptive mixed finite element methods for Darcy flow in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we propose adaptive mixed finite element methods for simulating the single-phase Darcy flow in two-dimensional fractured porous media. The reduced model that we use for the simulation is a discrete fracture model coupling Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures, and the fractures are modeled by one-dimensional entities. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are utilized for the solution of the coupled Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures. In order to improve the efficiency of the simulation, we use adaptive mixed finite element methods based on novel residual-based a posteriori error estimators. In addition, we develop an efficient upscaling algorithm to compute the effective permeability of the fractured porous media. Several interesting examples of Darcy flow in the fractured porous media are presented to demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm.

  16. Evaluation of the conditions imposed by the fracture surface geometry on water seepage through fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, Nestor O.; Faybishenko, B.

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine the geometric patterns of the fracture surfaces that imposes conditions on the fluid flow through fractured porous media, a series a fracture models have been analyzed using the RIMAPS technique and the variogram method. Results confirm that the main paths followed by the fluid channels are determined by the surface topography and remain constant during water seepage evolution. Characteristics scale lengths of both situations: fracture surface and the flow of water, are also found. There exists a relationship between the scale lengths corresponding to each situation. (author)

  17. From Multi-Porosity to Multiple-Scale Permeability Models of Natural Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dreuzy, J. R.; Davy, P.; Meheust, Y.; Bour, O.

    2014-12-01

    Classical dual-porosity models and homogenization approaches fail to represent the permeability scaling, the high flow channeling and the broad variability observed in natural fractured media. More critically, most modeling frameworks cannot restitute simultaneously the permeability increase with scale and the persistence of channeling. In fact, channeling enhances the impact of bottlenecks, reduces permeability, and increases permeability variability with scale. It is the case of percolation theory but also of more advanced large-range correlated theories including power-law scaling of some of the fracture properties including their length or their mutual distances. More generally, we show with extensive numerical studies on 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) that hydraulic behaviors come from a number of local and global fracture characteristics. The concept of effective properties like effective permeability itself appears quite weak and should be replaced by new modeling frameworks. We propose three alternative approaches combining the specificies of fracture flow and transport of DFNs and the simplicity of continuum approaches: 1- Discrete dual porosity media for high flow localization in a subset of the fracture network. 2- Structured Interacting Continua for highly organized diffusive processes in poorly connected fracture structures. 3- Multiple-scale permeability models for hierarchically structured fractured media with 3D concurrent fracture percolating networks. These different approaches can be combined and specified with a limited number of parameters. They are also efficient in representing the potentially large hydraulic impact of minor modification of the fracture network geometry and local connectivity.

  18. FEFLOW finite element modeling of flow, mass and heat transport in porous and fractured media

    CERN Document Server

    Diersch, Hans-Jörg G

    2013-01-01

    Placing advanced theoretical and numerical methods in the hands of modeling practitioners and scientists, this book explores the FEFLOW system for solving flow, mass and heat transport processes in porous and fractured media. Offers applications and exercises.

  19. A Two-Scale Reduced Model for Darcy Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a two-scale reduced model for simulating the Darcy flow in two-dimensional porous media with conductive fractures. We apply the approach motivated by the embedded fracture model (EFM) to simulate the flow on the coarse scale, and the effect of fractures on each coarse scale grid cell intersecting with fractures is represented by the discrete fracture model (DFM) on the fine scale. In the DFM used on the fine scale, the matrix-fracture system are resolved on unstructured grid which represents the fractures accurately, while in the EFM used on the coarse scale, the flux interaction between fractures and matrix are dealt with as a source term, and the matrix-fracture system can be resolved on structured grid. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are used for the solution of the coupled flows in the matrix and the fractures on both fine and coarse scales. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model for simulation of flow in fractured porous media.

  20. Multi-scale modelling of transfers in fractured media: application to the Aspo site (Sweden)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourno, A.

    2005-06-01

    In the field of nuclear waste storage, the geological barrier is the last transfer zone for radio-elements. Since fractures are to be found in geological media, especially for granitic fractured media, special emphasis is put on improving modeling approaches to transfer processes in fractured media. It remains a challenging task due to the large contrasts in the properties of different units of the medium, the geometrical complexity of the system and strong level of uncertainties for flow and transport parameters. In addition, for post closure natural flow conditions, flow is slow and diffusion processes play a major role contributing to the retention of the plume. In this context, a Smeared Fractures approach was developed for a Mixed and Hybrid Finite Element scheme and implemented in our code, Cast3M. This approach allows for explicit representation of major fractures while adopting an homogenized representation of lower levels of fracturing. This Smeared Fracture approach does not require explicit meshing of the complex fracture network geometry. The fractured block is represented on regular mesh, the presence of the fracture being taken into account through an heterogeneous field of parameters. Considering conservation of flow and mass fluxes for each fracture, these parameters are derived. The performances of Smeared Fractures approach are comparable to discrete modeling for flow and presents in addition the advantage of taking full 3D matrix block geometry into account for transport. The size of the mesh as well as temporal discretization have to comply with criteria that were established. Nevertheless, within these boundaries coarser discretization is possible allowing for notable computing costs. The validation and qualification phase was conducted for 2D and 3D cases. These include results on synthetics and realistic systems, for different flow regimes and parameter values. The approach is finally applied on several cases from the Aspo site, Sweden

  1. Design and construction of an experiment for two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, R.E.G.; Aziz, K.

    1993-08-01

    In numerical reservoir simulation naturally fractured reservoirs are commonly divided into matrix and fracture systems. The high permeability fractures are usually entirely responsible for flow between blocks and flow to the wells. The flow in these fractures is modeled using Darcy`s law and its extension to multiphase flow by means of relative permeabilities. The influence and measurement of fracture relative permeability for two-phase flow in fractured porous media have not been studied extensively, and the few works presented in the literature are contradictory. Experimental and numerical work on two-phase flow in fractured porous media has been initiated. An apparatus for monitoring this type of flow was designed and constructed. It consists of an artificially fractured core inside an epoxy core holder, detailed pressure and effluent monitoring, saturation measurements by means of a CT-scanner and a computerized data acquisition system. The complete apparatus was assembled and tested at conditions similar to the conditions expected for the two-phase flow experiments. Fine grid simulations of the experimental setup-were performed in order to establish experimental conditions and to study the effects of several key variables. These variables include fracture relative permeability and fracture capillary pressure. The numerical computations show that the flow is dominated by capillary imbibition, and that fracture relative permeabilities have only a minor influence. High oil recoveries without water production are achieved due to effective water imbibition from the fracture to the matrix. When imbibition is absent, fracture relative permeabilities affect the flow behavior at early production times.

  2. Connectivity, flow and transport in network models of fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.C.

    1984-10-01

    In order to evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal underground it is important to understand the way in which radioactive material is transported through the rock to the surface. If the rock is fractured the usual models may not be applicable. In this work we look at three aspects of fracture networks: connectivity, flow and transport. These are studied numerically by generating fracture networks in a computer and modelling the processes which occur. Connectivity relates to percolation theory, and critical densities for fracture systems are found in two and three dimensions. The permeability of two-dimensional networks is studied. The way that permeability depends on fracture density, network size and spread of fracture length can be predicted using a cut lattice model. Transport through the fracture network by convection through the fractures and mixing at the intersections is studied. The Fickian dispersion equation does not describe the resulting hydrodynamic dispersion. Extensions to the techniques to three dimensions and to include other processes are discussed. (author)

  3. Simulation of density-driven flow in heterogeneous and fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, A.; Stichel, S.; Wittum, G.

    2015-01-01

    The study of fractured porous media is an important and challenging problem in hydrogeology. One of the difficulties is that mathematical models have to account for heterogeneity introduced by fractures in hydrogeological media. Heterogeneity may strongly influence the physical processes taking place in these media. Moreover, the thickness of the fractures, which is usually negligible in comparison with the size of the whole domain, and the complicated geometry of fracture networks reduce essentially the efficiency of numerical methods. In order to overcome these difficulties, fractures are sometimes considered as objects of reduced dimensionality (surfaces in three dimensions), and the field equations are averaged along the fracture width. Fractures are assumed to be thin regions of space filled with a porous material whose properties differ from those of the porous medium enclosing them. The interfaces separating the fractures from the embedding medium are assumed to be ideal. We consider two approaches: (i) the fractures have the same dimension, d, as the embedding medium and are said to be d-dimensional; (ii) the fractures are considered as (d-1)-dimensional manifolds, and the equations of density-driven flow are found by averaging the d-dimensional laws over the fracture width. We show that the second approach is a valid alternative to the first one. For this purpose, we perform numerical experiments using a finite-volume discretization for both approaches. The results obtained by the two methods are in good agreement with each other. We derive a criterion for the validity of the simplified representation. The criterion characterizes the transition of a mainly parallel flow to a rotational flow, which cannot be reasonably approximated using a d-1 dimensional representation. We further present a numerical algorithm using adaptive dimensional representation.

  4. Gas-Driven Fracturing of Saturated Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James M.; Ozturk, Deren; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2017-12-01

    Multiphase flows in deformable porous materials are important in numerous geological and geotechnical applications; however, the complex flow behavior makes subsurface transport processes difficult to control—or even characterize. Here, we study gas-driven (pneumatic) fracturing of a wet unconsolidated granular packing confined in a Hele-Shaw cell, and we present an in-depth analysis of both pore-scale phenomena and large-scale pattern formation. The process is governed by a complex interplay among pressure, capillary, frictional, and viscous forces. At low gas-injection rates, fractures grow in a stick-slip fashion and branch out to form a simply connected network. We observe the emergence of a characteristic length scale—the separation distance between fracture branches—creating an apparent uniform spatial fracture density. We conclude that the well-defined separation distance is the result of local compaction fronts surrounding fractures and keeping them apart. A scaling argument is presented that predicts fracture density as a function of granular friction, grain size, and capillary interactions. We study the influence of the gas-injection rate and find that the system undergoes a fluidization transition above a critical injection rate, resulting in directional growth of the fractures, and a fracture density that increases with an increasing rate. A dimensionless fluidization number F is defined as the ratio of viscous to frictional forces, and our experiments reveal a frictional regime for F growth, with a transition to a viscous regime (F >1 ) characterized by continuous growth in several fracture branches simultaneously.

  5. A discrete fracture model for two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, Dennis; Helmig, Rainer; Flemisch, Bernd; Class, Holger

    2017-12-01

    A discrete fracture model on the basis of a cell-centered finite volume scheme with multi-point flux approximation (MPFA) is presented. The fractures are included in a d-dimensional computational domain as (d - 1)-dimensional entities living on the element facets, which requires the grid to have the element facets aligned with the fracture geometries. However, the approach overcomes the problem of small cells inside the fractures when compared to equi-dimensional models. The system of equations considered is solved on both the matrix and the fracture domain, where on the prior the fractures are treated as interior boundaries and on the latter the exchange term between fracture and matrix appears as an additional source/sink. This exchange term is represented by the matrix-fracture fluxes, computed as functions of the unknowns in both domains by applying adequate modifications to the MPFA scheme. The method is applicable to both low-permeable as well as highly conductive fractures. The quality of the results obtained by the discrete fracture model is studied by comparison to an equi-dimensional discretization on a simple geometry for both single- and two-phase flow. For the case of two-phase flow in a highly conductive fracture, good agreement in the solution and in the matrix-fracture transfer fluxes could be observed, while for a low-permeable fracture the discrepancies were more pronounced. The method is then applied two-phase flow through a realistic fracture network in two and three dimensions.

  6. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  7. Migration of Water Pulse Through Fractured Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterle, S.; Fabryka-Martin, J. T.; Wang, J. S. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport from waste-disposal sites is strongly affected by the presence of fractures and the degree of fracture-matrix interaction. Characterization of potential contaminant plumes at such sites is difficult, both experimentally and numerically. Simulations of water flow through fractured rock were performed to examine the penetration depth of a large pulse of water entering such a system. Construction water traced with lithium bromide was released during the excavation of a tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is located in an unsaturated fractured tuff formation. Modeling of construction-water migration is qualitatively compared with bromide-to-chloride (Br/CI) ratio data for pore-water salts extracted from drillcores. The influences of local heterogeneities in the fracture network and variations in hydrogeologic parameters were examined by sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with the observed Br/CI signals, although these data may only indicate a minimum penetration depth, and water may have migrated further through the fracture network

  8. Modelisation of transport in fractured media with a smeared fractures modeling approach: special focus on matrix diffusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourno, A.; Grenier, C.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2003-04-01

    Modeling flow and transport in natural fractured media is a difficult issue due among others to the complexity of the system, the particularities of the geometrical features, the strong parameter value contrasts between the fracture zones (flow zones) and the matrix zones (no flow zones). This lead to the development of dedicated tools like for instance discrete fracture network models (DFN). We follow here another line applicable for classical continuous modeling codes. The fracture network is not meshed here but presence of fractures is taken into account by means of continuous heterogeneous fields (permeability, porosity, head, velocity, concentration ...). This line, followed by different authors, is referred as smeared fracture approach and presents the following advantages: the approach is very versatile because no dedicated spatial discretization effort is required (we use a basic regular mesh, simulations can be done on a rough mesh saving computer time). This makes this kind of approach very promising for taking heterogeneity of properties as well as uncertainties into account within a Monte Carlo framework for instance. Furthermore, the geometry of the matrix blocks where transfers proceed by diffusion is fully taken into account contrary to classical simplified 1D approach for instance. Nevertheless continuous heterogeneous field representation of a fractured medium requires a homogenization process at the scale of the mesh considered. Literature proves that this step of homogenization for transport is still a challenging task. Consequently, the level precision of the results has to be estimated. We precedently proposed a new approach dedicated to Mixed and Hybrid Finite Element approach. This numerical scheme is very interesting for such highly heterogeneous media and in particular guaranties exact conservation of mass flow for each mesh leading to good transport results. We developed a smeared fractures approach to model flow and transport limited to

  9. Porous media fracturing dynamics: stepwise crack advancement and fluid pressure oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Toan D.; Hussain, Fazle; Schrefler, Bernhard A.

    2018-02-01

    We present new results explaining why fracturing in saturated porous media is not smooth and continuous but is a distinct stepwise process concomitant with fluid pressure oscillations. All exact solutions and almost all numerical models yield smooth fracture advancement and fluid pressure evolution, while recent experimental results, mainly from the oil industry, observation from geophysics and a very few numerical results for the quasi-static case indeed reveal the stepwise phenomenon. We summarize first these new experiments and these few numerical solutions for the quasi-static case. Both mechanical loading and pressure driven fractures are considered because their behaviours differ in the direction of the pressure jumps. Then we explore stepwise crack tip advancement and pressure fluctuations in dynamic fracturing with a hydro-mechanical model of porous media based on the Hybrid Mixture Theory. Full dynamic analyses of examples dealing with both hydraulic fracturing and mechanical loading are presented. The stepwise fracture advancement is confirmed in the dynamic setting as well as in the pressure fluctuations, but there are substantial differences in the frequency contents of the pressure waves in the two loading cases. Comparison between the quasi-static and fully dynamic solutions reveals that the dynamic response gives much more information such as the type of pressure oscillations and related frequencies and should be applied whenever there is a doubt about inertia forces playing a role - the case in most fracturing events. In the absence of direct relevant dynamic tests on saturated media some experimental results on dynamic fracture in dry materials, a fast hydraulic fracturing test and observations from geophysics confirm qualitatively the obtained results such as the type of pressure oscillations and the substantial difference in the behaviour under the two loading cases.

  10. Hierarchical multiscale modeling for flows in fractured media using generalized multiscale finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale finite element method for solving flows in fractured media. Our approach is based on generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM), where we represent the fracture effects on a coarse grid via multiscale basis functions. These multiscale basis functions are constructed in the offline stage via local spectral problems following GMsFEM. To represent the fractures on the fine grid, we consider two approaches (1) discrete fracture model (DFM) (2) embedded fracture model (EFM) and their combination. In DFM, the fractures are resolved via the fine grid, while in EFM the fracture and the fine grid block interaction is represented as a source term. In the proposed multiscale method, additional multiscale basis functions are used to represent the long fractures, while short-size fractures are collectively represented by a single basis functions. The procedure is automatically done via local spectral problems. In this regard, our approach shares common concepts with several approaches proposed in the literature as we discuss. We would like to emphasize that our goal is not to compare DFM with EFM, but rather to develop GMsFEM framework which uses these (DFM or EFM) fine-grid discretization techniques. Numerical results are presented, where we demonstrate how one can adaptively add basis functions in the regions of interest based on error indicators. We also discuss the use of randomized snapshots (Calo et al. Randomized oversampling for generalized multiscale finite element methods, 2014), which reduces the offline computational cost.

  11. An Efficient Boundary Integral Formulation for Flow Through Fractured Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, M. F.; Lee, S. H.; Kamath, J.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper we present a new model for flow in fractured porous media. We formulate our model in terms of a coupled system of boundary integral equations and present an efficient procedure for solving the equations using the boundary element method. In the new model, the flow in the matrix is governed by the usual Darcy law for porous media, with the fractures being treated as planar sources embedded in the matrix. The flow in an individual fracture is governed by a two-dimensional Darcy law (as in a Hele-Shaw cell), with an associated planar sink distribution. The essential feature of this approach is that the fractures are treated as special planes rather than narrow-gap voids. The error in the resulting system of equations is on the order of an intrinsic dimensionless parameter (the ratio of the fracture gap size to the scale of the volume under consideration). We also describe how we adapt the new model to compute effective grid block permeabilities. This was the principal motivation behind the development of the new model. Using effective grid block permeabilities to model flow in fractured oil and gas reservoirs is a much more efficient process than modeling the flow when every fracture is precisely represented. We present some numerical examples that illustrate the new flow model and how it is used to model flow in a reservoir.

  12. Multiscale model reduction for shale gas transport in poroelastic fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkutlu, I. Yucel; Efendiev, Yalchin; Vasilyeva, Maria; Wang, Yuhe

    2018-01-01

    Inherently coupled flow and geomechanics processes in fractured shale media have implications for shale gas production. The system involves highly complex geo-textures comprised of a heterogeneous anisotropic fracture network spatially embedded in an ultra-tight matrix. In addition, nonlinearities due to viscous flow, diffusion, and desorption in the matrix and high velocity gas flow in the fractures complicates the transport. In this paper, we develop a multiscale model reduction approach to couple gas flow and geomechanics in fractured shale media. A Discrete Fracture Model (DFM) is used to treat the complex network of fractures on a fine grid. The coupled flow and geomechanics equations are solved using a fixed stress-splitting scheme by solving the pressure equation using a continuous Galerkin method and the displacement equation using an interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. We develop a coarse grid approximation and coupling using the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM). GMsFEM constructs the multiscale basis functions in a systematic way to capture the fracture networks and their interactions with the shale matrix. Numerical results and an error analysis is provided showing that the proposed approach accurately captures the coupled process using a few multiscale basis functions, i.e. a small fraction of the degrees of freedom of the fine-scale problem.

  13. A study of steam injection in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dindoruk, M.D.S.; Aziz, K.; Brigham, W.; Castanier, L.

    1996-02-01

    Steam injection is the most widely used thermal recovery technique for unfractured reservoirs containing heavy oil. There have been numerous studies on theoretical and experimental aspects of steam injection for such systems. Fractured reservoirs contain a large fraction of the world supply of oil, and field tests indicate that steam injection is feasible for such reservoirs. Unfortunately there has been little laboratory work done on steam injection in such systems. The experimental system in this work was designed to understand the mechanisms involved in the transfer of fluids and heat between matrix rocks and fractures under steam injection.

  14. Seismic wave propagation in fractured media: A discontinuous Galerkin approach

    KAUST Repository

    De Basabe, Jonás D.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate and implement a discontinuous Galekin method for elastic wave propagation that allows for discontinuities in the displacement field to simulate fractures or faults using the linear- slip model. We show numerical results using a 2D model with one linear- slip discontinuity and different frequencies. The results show a good agreement with analytic solutions. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for their flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. They model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, they develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account the fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  16. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1984-10-01

    We have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for our flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. We model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, we develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account for fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  17. Enhanced oil displacement by nanofluid's structural disjoining pressure in model fractured porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ramakrishnan, T S; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2018-02-01

    Nanofluids for improved oil recovery has been demonstrated through laboratory corefloods. Despite numerous experimental studies, little is known about the efficacy of nanofluids in fractured systems. Here, we present studies of nanofluid injection in fractured porous media (both water-wet and oil-wet) formed by sintering borosilicate glass-beads around a dissolvable substrate. The fracture inside the porous medium is characterized and visualized using a high resolution X-ray microtomography. Based on a simple displacement theory, the nanofluid injection is conducted at a rate where structural disjoining pressure driven oil recovery is operational. An additional 23.8% oil was displaced using nanofluid after brine injection with an overall recovery efficiency of 90.4% provided the matrix was in its native wettability state. But only 6% additional oil was displaced by nanofluid following brine injection when the bead-pack was rendered oil-wet. Nanofluids appear to be a good candidate for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in fractured water-wet to weakly water-wet media but not necessarily for strongly oil-wet systems. Our laboratory studies enable us to understand limitations of nanofluids for improving oil recovery in fractured media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of a microscale fracture on dynamic capillary pressure of two-phase flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingming; Lu, Shuangfang; Zhan, Hongbin; Wenqjie, Guo; Ma, Huifang

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic capillary pressure (DCP) effects, which is vital for predicting multiphase flow behavior in porous media, refers to the injection rate dependence capillary pressure observed during non-equilibrium displacement experiments. However, a clear picture of the effects of microscale fractures on DCP remains elusive. This study quantified the effects of microscale fractures on DCP and simulated pore-scale force and saturation change in fractured porous media using the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Eighteen simulation cases were carried out to calculate DCP as a function of wetting phase saturation. The effects of viscosity ratio and fracture orientation, aperture and length on DCP and DCP coefficient τ were investigated, where τ refers to the ratio of the difference of DCP and static capillary pressure (SCP) over the rate of wetting-phase saturation change versus time. Significant differences in τ values were observed between unfractured and fractured porous media. The τ values of fractured porous media were 1.1  × 104 Pa ms to 5.68 × 105 Pa ms, which were one or two orders of magnitude lower than those of unfractured porous media with a value of 4 × 106 Pa. ms. A horizontal fracture had greater effects on DCP and τ than a vertical fracture, given the same fracture aperture and length. This study suggested that a microscale fracture might result in large magnitude changes in DCP for two-phase flow.

  19. Simulation of contaminant transport in fractured porous media on triangular meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen

    2010-12-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume (FV) methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The FV method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. Numerical examples in a medium containing fracture network illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model. © 2010 IEEE.

  20. Fracturing in granular media: the role of capillarity, wetting, and disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, R.; Trojer, M.; de Anna, P.; Szulczewski, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of shale oil and shale gas into the energy landscape has relied on achieving vigorous stimulation of the rock by means of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Traditionally, hydraulic fracturing is understood as a single-fluid-phase, pressure-driven process, in which the fluid (typically water with additives) is injected at a high-enough rate that the pressure builds up faster than it can dissipate by permeating into the rock, thereby fracturing it. However, the prevalent conditions for shale (ultra fine pore size, moderate overburden stress, and poor cementation) suggest that capillary forces could play an important role in the fracturing process. Here, we show the results of our recent experimental and theoretical studies on fracturing of granular media by means of injection of an immiscible fluid. We conduct carefully controlled injection experiments in a quasi-2D granular medium (a circular Hele-Shaw cell filled with glass beads), in an experimental set-up that allows us to systematically study the impact of capillarity (by varying injection rate, bead size, and fluid-fluid surface tension), wetting properties (by treating the beads and the cell plates by chemical vapor deposition of silane-based substances) and confinement (by varying the load on the cell). Our choice of defending and invading liquids and granular medium allows us to investigate a wide range of contact angles, from drainage to imbibition. We demonstrate that wettability exerts a powerful influence on the invasion/fracturing morphology of unfavorable mobility displacements. High time resolution imaging techniques and particle image velocimetry (PIV) allow us to quantify matrix displacement and fracture opening dynamics. Our results provide insights on fracture propagation, fracture length distribution and the fracture drainage area, parameters which are critically important to better understand long-term hydrocarbon production from shale.

  1. A residual-based a posteriori error estimator for single-phase Darcy flow in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-12-09

    In this paper we develop an a posteriori error estimator for a mixed finite element method for single-phase Darcy flow in a two-dimensional fractured porous media. The discrete fracture model is applied to model the fractures by one-dimensional fractures in a two-dimensional domain. We consider Raviart–Thomas mixed finite element method for the approximation of the coupled Darcy flows in the fractures and the surrounding porous media. We derive a robust residual-based a posteriori error estimator for the problem with non-intersecting fractures. The reliability and efficiency of the a posteriori error estimator are established for the error measured in an energy norm. Numerical results verifying the robustness of the proposed a posteriori error estimator are given. Moreover, our numerical results indicate that the a posteriori error estimator also works well for the problem with intersecting fractures.

  2. Impact of flow correlation and heterogeneity on transport in fractured media: field evidence and theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.; Bour, O.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative modeling of flow and transport through fractured geological media is challenging due to the inaccessibility of the underlying medium properties and the complex interplay between heterogeneity and small scale transport processes such as heterogeneous advection, matrix diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion and adsorption. This complex interplay leads to anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior, the origin of which remains a matter of debate: whether it arises from variability in fracture permeability (velocity heterogeneity), connectedness in the fracture network (velocity correlation), or interaction between fractures and matrix. Here we show that this uncertainty of heterogeneity- vs. correlation-controlled transport can be resolved by combining convergent and push-pull tracer tests because flow reversibility is strongly dependent on correlation, whereas late-time scaling of breakthrough curves is mainly controlled by heterogeneity. We build on this insight, and propose a Lagrangian statistical model that takes the form of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) with correlated particle velocities. In this framework, flow heterogeneity and flow correlation are quantified by a Markov process of particle transition times that is characterized by a distribution function and a transition probability. Our transport model captures the anomalous behavior in the breakthrough curves for both push-pull and convergent flow geometries, with the same set of parameters. We validate our model in the Ploemeur observatory in France. Thus, the proposed correlated CTRW modeling approach provides a simple yet powerful framework for characterizing the impact of flow correlation and heterogeneity on transport in fractured media.

  3. Impact of velocity correlation and distribution on transport in fractured media: Field evidence and theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Bour, Olivier; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    Flow and transport through fractured geologic media often leads to anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior, the origin of which remains a matter of debate: whether it arises from variability in fracture permeability (velocity distribution), connectedness in the flow paths through fractures (velocity correlation), or interaction between fractures and matrix. Here we show that this uncertainty of distribution- versus correlation-controlled transport can be resolved by combining convergent and push-pull tracer tests because flow reversibility is strongly dependent on velocity correlation, whereas late-time scaling of breakthrough curves is mainly controlled by velocity distribution. We build on this insight, and propose a Lagrangian statistical model that takes the form of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) with correlated particle velocities. In this framework, velocity distribution and velocity correlation are quantified by a Markov process of particle transition times that is characterized by a distribution function and a transition probability. Our transport model accurately captures the anomalous behavior in the breakthrough curves for both push-pull and convergent flow geometries, with the same set of parameters. Thus, the proposed correlated CTRW modeling approach provides a simple yet powerful framework for characterizing the impact of velocity distribution and correlation on transport in fractured media.

  4. Modelling of fluid flow in fractured porous media by the singular integral equations method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to develop a method for numerical modelling of fluid flow through fractured porous media and for determination of their effective permeability by taking advantage of recent results based on formulation of the problem by Singular Integral Equations. In parallel, it was also an occasion to continue on the theoretical development and to obtain new results in this area. The governing equations for flow in such materials are reviewed first and mass conservation at the fracture intersections is expressed explicitly. Using the theory of potential, the general potential solutions are proposed in the form of a singular integral equation that describes the steady-state flow in and around several fractures embedded in an infinite porous matrix under a far-field pressure condition. These solutions represent the pressure field in the whole body as functions of the infiltration in the fractures, which fully take into account the fracture interaction and intersections. Closed-form solutions for the fundamental problem of fluid flow around a single fracture are derived, which are considered as the benchmark problems to validate the numerical solutions. In particular, the solution obtained for the case of an elliptical disc-shaped crack obeying to the Poiseuille law has been compared to that obtained for ellipsoidal inclusions with Darcy law.The numerical programs have been developed based on the singular integral equations method to resolve the general potential equations. These allow modeling the fluid flow through a porous medium containing a great number of fractures. Besides, this formulation of the problem also allows obtaining a semi-analytical infiltration solution over a single fracture depending on the matrice permeability, the fracture conductivity and the fracture geometry. This result is the important key to up-scaling the effective permeability of a fractured porous medium by using different homogenisation schemes. The results obtained by the self

  5. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  6. An XFEM-based model for fluid flow in fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenck, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Many fields of applications for porous media flow include geometrically anisotropic inclusions and strongly discontinuous material coefficients which differ in orders of magnitude. If the extension of those heterogeneities is small in normal direction compared to the tangential directions, e.g., long and thin, those features are called fractures. Examples which include such fractured porous-media systems in earth sciences include reservoir engineering, groundwater-resource management, carbon capture and storage (CCS), radioactive-waste reposition, coal bed methane migration in mines, geothermal engineering and hydraulic fracturing. The analysis and prediction of flow in fractured porous-media systems is important for all the aforementioned applications. Experiments are usually too expensive and time consuming to satisfy the demand for fast but accurate decision making information. Many different conceptual and numerical models to treat fractured porous-media systems can be found in the literature. However, even in the time of large supercomputers with massive parallel computing power, the computational efficiency, and therefore the economic efficiency, plays a dominating role in the evaluation of simulation software. In this thesis an efficient method to simulate flow in fractured porous media systems is presented. Darcy flow in fractures and matrix is assumed. The presented method is suited best for flow regimes depending on both, the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix and is able to account for highly conductive but also almost impermeable fractures with respect to the surrounding matrix. The newly developed method is based on a co-dimension one conceptual model for the fracture network which is embedded in the surrounding matrix. The basis for this model reduction is given in Martin et al. (2005). Numerically the fracture network is resolved by its own grid and coupled to the independent matrix grid. The discretization on this matrix grid allows jumps in

  7. A study on the single continuum modeling of radionuclide migration in fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Tae

    1992-02-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is described by the single continuum model, i.e., equivalent porous medium(EPM) model. For this purpose, one-dimensional solute transport in the fracture and two-dimensional solute transport in the porous rock matrix is considered. The network of fractures embedded in the porous rock matrix is idealized as two orthogonally intersecting families of equally spaced, parallel fractures directed at 45 .deg. to the regional groundwater flow direction. Physical processes considered are advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, molecular diffusion, sorption onto the fracture surfaces, sorption in the rock matrix, and radioactive decay. Governing equations are solved by the finite element method, and upstream weighting technique is used in order to prevent the oscillation of solution in case of highly advection dominated transport. The domain is discretized into a network of triangular and quadrilateral elements by intersecting a number of mesh lines between each pair of fractures. The one-dimensional fracture elements are superimposed onto the boundaries of the porous rock matrix, and equal concentrations are applied as a boundary condition between fractures and porous rock matrix. Validity of the numerical scheme is established by comparison with an analytic solution for the three cases independently, i.e., one- and two-dimensional problems in the porous rock matrix and one-dimensional transport problem in the fracture. An overall numerical scheme is verified by comparison with the analytic solution of one-dimensional solute transport in ordinary porous media. In all cases the numerical scheme is found to be capable of producing reliable results, and more accurate solutions can be obtained by reducing both the mesh size and time step in the case of highly obtained by reducing both the mesh size and time step in the case of highly advection dominated problems. The breakthrough curves are obtained as a function of time according to

  8. A modeling and numerical algorithm for thermoporomechanics in multiple porosity media for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous modeling of coupling between fluid, heat, and geomechanics (thermo-poro-mechanics), in fractured porous media is one of the important and difficult topics in geothermal reservoir simulation, because the physics are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled. Coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics are investigated using the multiple interacting continua (MINC) method as applied to naturally fractured media. In this study, we generalize constitutive relations for the isothermal elastic dual porosity model proposed by Berryman (2002) to those for the non-isothermal elastic/elastoplastic multiple porosity model, and derive the coupling coefficients of coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics and constraints of the coefficients. When the off-diagonal terms of the total compressibility matrix for the flow problem are zero, the upscaled drained bulk modulus for geomechanics becomes the harmonic average of drained bulk moduli of the multiple continua. In this case, the drained elastic/elastoplastic moduli for mechanics are determined by a combination of the drained moduli and volume fractions in multiple porosity materials. We also determine a relation between local strains of all multiple porosity materials in a gridblock and the global strain of the gridblock, from which we can track local and global elastic/plastic variables. For elastoplasticity, the return mapping is performed for all multiple porosity materials in the gridblock. For numerical implementation, we employ and extend the fixed-stress sequential method of the single porosity model to coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics in multiple porosity systems, because it provides numerical stability and high accuracy. This sequential scheme can be easily implemented by using a porosity function and its corresponding porosity correction, making use of the existing robust flow and geomechanics simulators. We implemented the proposed modeling and numerical algorithm to the reaction transport simulator

  9. Analysis of 2D flow and heat transfer modeling in fracture of porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunsheng; Nian, Xianbo; Liu, Yong; Qi, Chao; Song, Jinsheng; Yu, Wenhe

    2017-08-01

    Heat and mass transfer between porous media and fluid is a complex coupling process, which is widely used in various fields of engineering applications, especially for natural and artificial fractures in oil and gas extraction. In this study, a new method is proposed to deal with the flow and heat transfer problem of steady flow in a fracture. The fluid flow in a fracture was described using the same method as Mohais, who considered a fracture as a channel with porous wall, and the perturbation method was used to solve the mathematical model. Unlike previous studies, the shear jump boundary condition proposed by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker was used at the interface between the fluid and porous media. The main methods were perturbation analysis and the application of shear jump boundary conditions. The influence of permeability, channel width, shear jump degree and effective dynamic viscosity on the flow and heat transfer in the channel was studied by analysing the analytical solution. The distribution of axial velocity in the channel with the change of the typical parameters and the sensitivity of the heat transfer was obtained.

  10. Study of phenomena of tracer transport and dispersion in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ippolito, Irene

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to present some transport phenomena according to two different approaches: firstly, the study of flows and tracing in a natural crack within a granitic site, and secondly, the study of flows of different geometries in model cracks, mainly by using techniques of tracer dispersion. The author first presents some properties of fractured media and elements of the theory of the phenomenon of dispersion. She notably discusses the reversibility of the Taylor dispersion which is the prevailing mechanism for simply connected geometries such as in the case of a flow between two continuous solid surfaces limiting a fracture. In the next chapters, the author reports the analysis of characteristics of local structures (mouths, roughnesses) of a single fracture by using echo dispersion. She reports experiments as well as Monte Carlo simulations performed on well defined geometries. In a parallel way, some characteristics measurements (rate-pressure, distribution of flows and tracing in transmission) and mechanical measurements of fracture deformation have been performed on a natural fracture in a granitic site [fr

  11. Microstructural characterization, petrophysics and upscaling - from porous media to fractural media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Liu, K.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2017-12-01

    We present an integrated study for the characterization of complex geometry, fluid transport features and mechanical deformation at micro-scale and the upscaling of properties using microtomographic data: We show how to integrate microstructural characterization by the volume fraction, specific surface area, connectivity (percolation), shape and orientation of microstructures with identification of individual fractures from a 3D fractural network. In a first step we use stochastic analyses of microstructures to determine the geometric RVE (representative volume element) of samples. We proceed by determining the size of a thermodynamic RVE by computing upper/lower bounds of entropy production through Finite Element (FE) analyses on a series of models with increasing sizes. The minimum size for thermodynamic RVE's is identified on the basis of the convergence criteria of the FE simulations. Petrophysical properties (permeability and mechanical parameters, including plastic strength) are then computed numerically if thermodynamic convergence criteria are fulfilled. Upscaling of properties is performed by means of percolation theory. The percolation threshold is detected by using a shrinking/expanding algorithm on static micro-CT images of rocks. Parameters of the scaling laws can be extracted from quantitative analyses and/or numerical simulations on a series of models with similar structures but different porosities close to the percolation threshold. Different rock samples are analyzed. Characterizing parameters of porous/fractural rocks are obtained. Synthetic derivative models of the microstructure are used to estimate the relationships between porosity and mechanical properties. Results obtained from synthetic sandstones show that yield stress, cohesion and the angle of friction are linearly proportional to porosity. Our integrated study shows that digital rock technology can provide meaningful parameters for effective upscaling if thermodynamic volume averaging

  12. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Accurate simulation of matrix diffusion in regional-scale dual-porosity and dual-permeability media is a critical issue for the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, given the prevalence of fractured geologic media on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Contaminant transport through regional-scale fractured media is typically quantified by particle-tracking based Lagrangian solvers through the inclusion of dual-domain mass transfer algorithms that probabilistically determine particle transfer between fractures and unfractured matrix blocks. UGTA applications include a wide variety of fracture aperture and spacing, effective diffusion coefficients ranging four orders of magnitude, and extreme end member retardation values. This report incorporates the current dual-domain mass transfer algorithms into the well-known particle tracking code RWHet [LaBolle, 2006], and then tests and evaluates the updated code. We also develop and test a direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach to replace the classical transfer probability method in characterizing particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface. The final goal of this work is to implement the algorithm identified as most efficient and effective into RWHet, so that an accurate and computationally efficient software suite can be built for dual-porosity/dual-permeability applications. RWHet is a mature Lagrangian transport simulator with a substantial user-base that has undergone significant development and model validation. In this report, we also substantially tested the capability of RWHet in simulating passive and reactive tracer transport through regional-scale, heterogeneous media. Four dual-domain mass transfer methodologies were considered in this work. We first developed the empirical transfer probability approach proposed by Liu et al. [2000], and coded it into RWHet. The particle transfer probability from one continuum to the other is proportional to the ratio of the mass entering the other

  13. Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ababou, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs

  14. Combined fracture/porous media model for contaminant transport of radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.; Ray, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    A model, with an analytical solution, was developed to study the effects of combined fracture and porous media flow on the migration rate of radioactive nuclides. The objective is to determine the degree of enhanced migration due to a thin fracture within the otherwise homogeneous porous medium. The geological waste disposal zone is treated as an infinite two-dimensional medium consisting of a narrow channel surrounded by a flowing aquifer. The top and bottom of the zone are assumed to be bounded by impermeable clays. The two-dimensional convective-dispersion equations, with a line source have been solved giving analytical expressions for the contaminant concentration, flux and total discharge rate downstream of the source. The total discharge rate of nuclides downstream of the pulse source has been calculated and compared with the results for ion migration in a homogeneous porous medium

  15. Discrete-fracture-model of multi–scale time-splitting two–phase flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2017-11-23

    In this article, we consider a two-phase immiscible incompressible flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured heterogeneous porous media. The system of the governing equations consists of water saturation, Darcy’s law, nanoparticles concentration in water, deposited nanoparticles concentration on the pore-wall, and entrapped nanoparticles concentration in the pore-throat, as well as, porosity and permeability variation due to the nanoparticles deposition/entrapment on/in the pores. The discrete-fracture model (DFM) is used to describe the flow and transport in fractured porous media. Moreover, multiscale time-splitting strategy has been employed to manage different time-step sizes for different physics, such as saturation, concentration, etc. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed multi-scale time splitting approach.

  16. Development of a new semi-analytical model for cross-borehole flow experiments in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Delphine; Irving, James; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of borehole flow logs is a valuable technique for identifying the presence of fractures in the subsurface and estimating properties such as fracture connectivity, transmissivity and storativity. However, such estimation requires the development of analytical and/or numerical modeling tools that are well adapted to the complexity of the problem. In this paper, we present a new semi-analytical formulation for cross-borehole flow in fractured media that links transient vertical-flow velocities measured in one or a series of observation wells during hydraulic forcing to the transmissivity and storativity of the fractures intersected by these wells. In comparison with existing models, our approach presents major improvements in terms of computational expense and potential adaptation to a variety of fracture and experimental configurations. After derivation of the formulation, we demonstrate its application in the context of sensitivity analysis for a relatively simple two-fracture synthetic problem, as well as for field-data analysis to investigate fracture connectivity and estimate fracture hydraulic properties. These applications provide important insights regarding (i) the strong sensitivity of fracture property estimates to the overall connectivity of the system; and (ii) the non-uniqueness of the corresponding inverse problem for realistic fracture configurations.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics in flow through unsaturated fractured-porous media: Status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    2002-11-27

    The need has long been recognized to improve predictions of flow and transport in partially saturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock of the vadose zone for many practical applications, such as remediation of contaminated sites, nuclear waste disposal in geological formations, and climate predictions. Until recently, flow and transport processes in heterogeneous subsurface media with oscillating irregularities were assumed to be random and were not analyzed using methods of nonlinear dynamics. The goals of this paper are to review the theoretical concepts, present the results, and provide perspectives on investigations of flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, using the methods of nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos. The results of laboratory and field investigations indicate that the nonlinear dynamics of flow and transport processes in unsaturated soils and fractured rocks arise from the dynamic feedback and competition between various nonlinear physical processes along with complex geometry of flow paths. Although direct measurements of variables characterizing the individual flow processes are not technically feasible, their cumulative effect can be characterized by analyzing time series data using the models and methods of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Identifying flow through soil or rock as a nonlinear dynamical system is important for developing appropriate short- and long-time predictive models, evaluating prediction uncertainty, assessing the spatial distribution of flow characteristics from time series data, and improving chemical transport simulations. Inferring the nature of flow processes through the methods of nonlinear dynamics could become widely used in different areas of the earth sciences.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics in flow through unsaturated fractured porous media: Status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    2002-01-01

    The need has long been recognized to improve predictions of flow and transport in partially saturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock of the vadose zone for many practical applications, such as remediation of contaminated sites, nuclear waste disposal in geological formations, and climate predictions. Until recently, flow and transport processes in heterogeneous subsurface media with oscillating irregularities were assumed to be random and were not analyzed using methods of nonlinear dynamics. The goals of this paper are to review the theoretical concepts, present the results, and provide perspectives on investigations of flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, using the methods of nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos. The results of laboratory and field investigations indicate that the nonlinear dynamics of flow and transport processes in unsaturated soils and fractured rocks arise from the dynamic feedback and competition between various nonlinear physical processes along with complex geometry of flow paths. Although direct measurements of variables characterizing the individual flow processes are not technically feasible, their cumulative effect can be characterized by analyzing time series data using the models and methods of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Identifying flow through soil or rock as a nonlinear dynamical system is important for developing appropriate short- and long-time predictive models, evaluating prediction uncertainty, assessing the spatial distribution of flow characteristics from time series data, and improving chemical transport simulations. Inferring the nature of flow processes through the methods of nonlinear dynamics could become widely used in different areas of the earth sciences

  19. Magnitude-recurrence statistics for stratabound fracture networks in layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, David; Davidsen, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Variants of the Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) relation, which express scale-independent behavior of earthquakes over a range of values, are almost universally used to describe magnitude-recurrence statistics for microseismic observations. The b value, which is the slope derived from classic G-R plots, is a particularly important parameter that effectively measures the abundance of large-magnitude events relative to small events. Hydraulic fracture monitoring programs often yield apparent b values of 2.0 or greater. These values are exceptionally high compared to earthquake fault sysems, which typically exhibit b values close to 1.0. In some reports, a sudden reduction in b value during treatment has been attributed to unintended activation of a pre-existing fault. An alternative model is developed here to describe magnitude statistics of microseismic events that occur on steeply dipping to vertical fracture surfaces in horizontally layered media. Termination of fractures at mechanical layer boundaries imposes a size-dependent scaling relationship and results in a stratabound fracture networks, which are well described in a number of field studies. In the case of constant stress drop, microseismic magnitude distributions will mimic bed-thickness distributions under these circumstances. A lognormal distribution of mechanical bed thickness, which provides a good fit for three examples considered here from various parts of North America, leads asymptotically to a Gaussian distribution of microseismic magnitudes that readily explains apparent observed b values of close to 2.0. This model is consistent with a sudden reduction in b value arising from uninended triggering of a pre-existing fault, and also implies that subtle changes in b value during a treatment program may be indicative of spatial variations in reservoir facies.

  20. Numerical modeling of contaminant transport in fractured porous media using mixed finite-element and finitevolume methods

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods; i.e., the mixed finite-element (MFE) method and the finite-volume method. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocity fields for both the fractures and matrix, which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite-volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms, respectively. The temporary evolution for the pressure distributions, streamline fields, and concentration profiles are obtained for six different arrangements of fractures. The results clearly show the distorted concentration effects caused by the ordered and disordered (random) patterns of the fractures and illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model. © 2011 by Begell House Inc.

  1. Single well thermal tracer test, a new experimental set up for characterizing thermal transport in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Floriant; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-04-01

    Thermal transport in fractured media depends on the hydrological properties of fractures and thermal characteristics of rock. Tracer tests using heat as tracer can thus be a good alternative to characterize fractured media for shallow geothermal needs. This study investigates the possibility of implementing a new thermal tracer test set up, the single well thermal tracer test, to characterize hydraulic and thermal transport properties of fractured crystalline rock. The experimental setup is based on injecting hot water in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer in the borehole while pumping and monitoring the temperature in a fracture crossing the same borehole at greater elevation. One difficulty comes from the fact that injection and withdrawal are achieved in the same borehole involving thermal losses along the injection tube that may disturb the heat recovery signal. To be able to well localize the heat influx, we implemented a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS) which allows the temperature monitoring with high spatial and temporal resolution (29 centimeters and 30 seconds respectively). Several tests, at different pumping and injection rates, were performed in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). We show through signal processing how the thermal breakthrough may be extracted thanks to Fiber-Optic distributed temperature measurements. In particular, we demonstrate how detailed distributed temperature measurements were useful to identify different inflows and to estimate how much heat was transported and stored within the fractures network. Thermal breakthrough curves of single well thermal tracer tests were then interpreted with a simple analytical model to characterize hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the fractured media. We finally discuss the advantages of these tests compared to cross-borehole thermal tracer tests.

  2. Parsimonious nonstationary flood frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serago, Jake M.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2018-02-01

    There is now widespread awareness of the impact of anthropogenic influences on extreme floods (and droughts) and thus an increasing need for methods to account for such influences when estimating a frequency distribution. We introduce a parsimonious approach to nonstationary flood frequency analysis (NFFA) based on a bivariate regression equation which describes the relationship between annual maximum floods, x, and an exogenous variable which may explain the nonstationary behavior of x. The conditional mean, variance and skewness of both x and y = ln (x) are derived, and combined with numerous common probability distributions including the lognormal, generalized extreme value and log Pearson type III models, resulting in a very simple and general approach to NFFA. Our approach offers several advantages over existing approaches including: parsimony, ease of use, graphical display, prediction intervals, and opportunities for uncertainty analysis. We introduce nonstationary probability plots and document how such plots can be used to assess the improved goodness of fit associated with a NFFA.

  3. Multiscale time-splitting strategy for multiscale multiphysics processes of two-phase flow in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, S.

    2011-01-01

    The temporal discretization scheme is one important ingredient of efficient simulator for two-phase flow in the fractured porous media. The application of single-scale temporal scheme is restricted by the rapid changes of the pressure and saturation in the fractured system with capillarity. In this paper, we propose a multi-scale time splitting strategy to simulate multi-scale multi-physics processes of two-phase flow in fractured porous media. We use the multi-scale time schemes for both the pressure and saturation equations; that is, a large time-step size is employed for the matrix domain, along with a small time-step size being applied in the fractures. The total time interval is partitioned into four temporal levels: the first level is used for the pressure in the entire domain, the second level matching rapid changes of the pressure in the fractures, the third level treating the response gap between the pressure and the saturation, and the fourth level applied for the saturation in the fractures. This method can reduce the computational cost arisen from the implicit solution of the pressure equation. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  4. Groundwater protection in fractured media: a vulnerability-based approach for delineating protection zones in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Alain; Tripet, Jean-Pierre; Kozel, Ronald; Meylan, Benjamin; Sinreich, Michael; Zwahlen, François

    2008-11-01

    A vulnerability-based approach for delineating groundwater protection zones around springs in fractured media has been developed to implement Swiss water-protection regulations. It takes into consideration the diversity of hydrogeological conditions observed in fractured aquifers and provides individual solutions for each type of setting. A decision process allows for selecting one of three methods, depending on the spring vulnerability and the heterogeneity of the aquifer. At the first stage, an evaluation of spring vulnerability is required, which is essentially based on spring hydrographs and groundwater quality monitoring. In case of a low vulnerability of the spring, a simplified method using a fixed radius approach (“distance method”) is applied. For vulnerable springs, additional investigations must be completed during a second stage to better characterize the aquifer properties, especially in terms of heterogeneity. This second stage includes a detailed hydrogeological survey and tracer testing. If the aquifer is assessed as slightly heterogeneous, the delineation of protection zones is performed using a calculated radius approach based on tracer test results (“isochrone method”). If the heterogeneity is high, a groundwater vulnerability mapping method is applied (“DISCO method”), based on evaluating discontinuities, protective cover and runoff parameters. Each method is illustrated by a case study.

  5. Numerical research of two-phase flow in fractured-porous media based on discrete fracture fetwork model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatkov, A. A.; Kosyakov, V. P.; Rodionov, S. P.; Botalov, A. Y.

    2018-03-01

    In this work was the study of the processes of isothermal and non-isothermal flow of high viscosity oil in a fractured-porous reservoir. The numerical experiment was done using our own reservoir simulator with the possibility of modeling of fluid motion in conditions of non-isothermal processes and long fractures in the formation.

  6. Wavelet analysis for nonstationary signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penha, Rosani Maria Libardi da

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical vibration signals play an important role in anomalies identification resulting of equipment malfunctioning. Traditionally, Fourier spectral analysis is used where the signals are assumed to be stationary. However, occasional transient impulses and start-up process are examples of nonstationary signals that can be found in mechanical vibrations. These signals can provide important information about the equipment condition, as early fault detection. The Fourier analysis can not adequately be applied to nonstationary signals because the results provide data about the frequency composition averaged over the duration of the signal. In this work, two methods for nonstationary signal analysis are used: Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and wavelet transform. The STFT is a method of adapting Fourier spectral analysis for nonstationary application to time-frequency domain. To have a unique resolution throughout the entire time-frequency domain is its main limitation. The wavelet transform is a new analysis technique suitable to nonstationary signals, which handles the STFT drawbacks, providing multi-resolution frequency analysis and time localization in a unique time-scale graphic. The multiple frequency resolutions are obtained by scaling (dilatation/compression) the wavelet function. A comparison of the conventional Fourier transform, STFT and wavelet transform is made applying these techniques to: simulated signals, arrangement rotor rig vibration signal and rotate machine vibration signal Hanning window was used to STFT analysis. Daubechies and harmonic wavelets were used to continuos, discrete and multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The results show the Fourier analysis was not able to detect changes in the signal frequencies or discontinuities. The STFT analysis detected the changes in the signal frequencies, but with time-frequency resolution problems. The wavelet continuos and discrete transform demonstrated to be a high efficient tool to detect

  7. Contaminant transport in fractured porous media: analytical solution for a two-member decay chain in a single fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudicky, E.A.; Frind, E.O.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the problem of radionuclide chain decay during transport through a discrete fracture situated in a porous rock matrix. The solution takes into account advection along the fracture, molecular diffusion from the fracture to the porous matrix, adsorption on the fracture face, adsorption in the rock matrix, and radioactive decay. The solution for the daughter product is in the form of a double integral which is evaluated by Gauss-Legendre quadrature. Results show that the daughter product tends to advance ahead of the parent nuclide even when the half-life of the parent is larger. This is attributed to the effect of chain decay in the matrix, which tends to reduce the diffusive loss of the daughter along the fracture. The examples also demonstrate that neglecting the parent nuclide and modeling its daughter as a single species can result in significant overestimation of arrival times at some point along the fracture. Although the analytical solution is restricted to a two-member chain for practical reasons, it represents a more realistic description of nuclide transport along a fracture than available single-species models. The solution may be of use for application to other contaminants undergoing different types of first-order transformation reactions

  8. Modeling of Multicomponent Diffusions and Natural Convection in Unfractured and Fractured Media by Discontinuous Galerkin and Mixed Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Hussein

    2017-12-29

    Computation of the distribution of species in hydrocarbon reservoirs from diffusions (thermal, molecular, and pressure) and natural convection is an important step in reservoir initialization. Current methods, which are mainly based on the conventional finite difference approach, may not be numerically efficient in fractured and other media with complex heterogeneities. In this work, the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method combined with the mixed finite element (MFE) method is used for the calculation of compositional variation in fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The use of unstructured gridding allows efficient computations for fractured media when the crossflow equilibrium concept is invoked. The DG method has less numerical dispersion than the upwind finite difference (FD) methods. The MFE method ensures continuity of fluxes at the interface of the grid elements. We also use the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method instead of the MFE calculate the diffusion fluxes. Results from several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness, and accuracy of the model. Various features of convection and diffusion in homogeneous, layered, and fractured media are also discussed.

  9. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. The wrist is made up of eight ...

  10. Hybrid-dimensional modelling of two-phase flow through fractured porous media with enhanced matrix fracture transmission conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Konstantin; Hennicker, Julian; Masson, Roland; Samier, Pierre

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we extend, to two-phase flow, the single-phase Darcy flow model proposed in [26], [12] in which the (d - 1)-dimensional flow in the fractures is coupled with the d-dimensional flow in the matrix. Three types of so called hybrid-dimensional two-phase Darcy flow models are proposed. They all account for fractures acting either as drains or as barriers, since they allow pressure jumps at the matrix-fracture interfaces. The models also permit to treat gravity dominated flow as well as discontinuous capillary pressure at the material interfaces. The three models differ by their transmission conditions at matrix fracture interfaces: while the first model accounts for the nonlinear two-phase Darcy flux conservations, the second and third ones are based on the linear single phase Darcy flux conservations combined with different approximations of the mobilities. We adapt the Vertex Approximate Gradient (VAG) scheme to this problem, in order to account for anisotropy and heterogeneity aspects as well as for applicability on general meshes. Several test cases are presented to compare our hybrid-dimensional models to the generic equi-dimensional model, in which fractures have the same dimension as the matrix, leading to deep insight about the quality of the proposed reduced models.

  11. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Improving estimates of subsurface gas transport in unsaturated fractured media using experimental Xe diffusion data and numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J. P.; Ortega, A. D.; Harp, D. R.; Boukhalfa, H.; Stauffer, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    Gas transport in unsaturated fractured media plays an important role in a variety of applications, including detection of underground nuclear explosions, transport from volatile contaminant plumes, shallow CO2 leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and methane leaks from hydraulic fracturing operations. Gas breakthrough times are highly sensitive to uncertainties associated with a variety of hydrogeologic parameters, including: rock type, fracture aperture, matrix permeability, porosity, and saturation. Furthermore, a couple simplifying assumptions are typically employed when representing fracture flow and transport. Aqueous phase transport is typically considered insignificant compared to gas phase transport in unsaturated fracture flow regimes, and an assumption of instantaneous dissolution/volatilization of radionuclide gas is commonly used to reduce computational expense. We conduct this research using a twofold approach that combines laboratory gas experimentation and numerical modeling to verify and refine these simplifying assumptions in our current models of gas transport. Using a gas diffusion cell, we are able to measure air pressure transmission through fractured tuff core samples while also measuring Xe gas breakthrough measured using a mass spectrometer. We can thus create synthetic barometric fluctuations akin to those observed in field tests and measure the associated gas flow through the fracture and matrix pore space for varying degrees of fluid saturation. We then attempt to reproduce the experimental results using numerical models in PLFOTRAN and FEHM codes to better understand the importance of different parameters and assumptions on gas transport. Our numerical approaches represent both single-phase gas flow with immobile water, as well as full multi-phase transport in order to test the validity of assuming immobile pore water. Our approaches also include the ability to simulate the reaction equilibrium kinetics of dissolution

  13. ogs6 - a new concept for porous-fractured media simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Dmitri; Bilke, Lars; Fischer, Thomas; Rink, Karsten; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THMC) processes in porous and fractured media, continuously developed since the mid-eighties. The basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework for solving coupled multi-field problems. OGS is targeting mainly on applications in environmental geoscience, e.g. in the fields of contaminant hydrology, water resources management, waste deposits, or geothermal energy systems, but it has also been successfully applied to new topics in energy storage recently. OGS is actively participating several international benchmarking initiatives, e.g. DECOVALEX (waste management), CO2BENCH (CO2 storage and sequestration), SeSBENCH (reactive transport processes) and HM-Intercomp (coupled hydrosystems). Despite the broad applicability of OGS in geo-, hydro- and energy-sciences, several shortcomings became obvious concerning the computational efficiency as well as the code structure became too sophisticated for further efficient development. OGS-5 was designed for object-oriented FEM applications. However, in many multi-field problems a certain flexibility of tailored numerical schemes is essential. Therefore, a new concept was designed to overcome existing bottlenecks. The paradigms for ogs6 are: - Flexibility of numerical schemes (FEM#FVM#FDM), - Computational efficiency (PetaScale ready), - Developer- and user-friendly. ogs6 has a module-oriented architecture based on thematic libraries (e.g. MeshLib, NumLib) on the large scale and uses object-oriented approach for the small scale interfaces. Usage of a linear algebra library (Eigen3) for the mathematical operations together with the ISO C++11 standard increases the expressiveness of the code and makes it more developer-friendly. The new C++ standard also makes the template meta-programming technique code used for compile-time optimizations more compact. We have transitioned the main code development to

  14. Learning for Nonstationary Dirichlet Processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quinn, A.; Kárný, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 10 (2007), s. 827-855 ISSN 0890-6327 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100750401 Grant - others:MŠk ČR(CZ) 2C06001 Program:2C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Nestacionární procesy * učení * Dirichletovy procesy * zapomínání Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2007 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2007/as/karny-learning for nonstationary dirichlet processes .pdf

  15. Pore-level influence of micro-fracture parameters on visco-capillary behavior of two-phase displacements in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhforouz, M. R.; Akhlaghi Amiri, H. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, coupled Cahn-Hilliard phase field and Navier-Stokes equations were solved using finite element method to address the effects of micro-fracture and its characterizations on water-oil displacements in a heterogeneous porous medium. Sensitivity studies at a wide range of viscosity ratios (M) and capillary numbers (Ca), and the resultant log Ca-log M stability phase diagram, revealed that in both media, with/without fracture, the three regimes of viscous fingering, capillary fingering and stable displacement similarly occur. However, presence of the fracture caused water channeling phenomenon which resulted in reduction of the number of active fingers and hence the final oil recovery factor. At high Ca (especially in the stable regime, with log Ca ≥ -2.5 and log M ≥ 0), recovery factor for the fractured medium was relatively identical with the non-fractured one. At log M ≥ 0, the fracture was fully swept, but flow instabilities were observed inside the fracture at lower M values, especially for log Ca > -4.6. In the case of the fractured medium at log Ca = -4.6 and log M = 0 (capillary dominant flow), it is observed that the primary breakthrough took place by a finger progressed through the matrix, not those channeled through the fracture. Geometrical properties of the fracture, including length, aperture and orientation, highly affected both displacement profile and efficiency. The fracture length inversely influenced the oil recovery factor. It was observed that there is a critical fracture width (almost half of the medium average pore diameter) at which the recovery factor of the medium during displacement is minimum, compared to the media having thinner and thicker fractures. Minor channeling effect in the media with thinner fracture and larger fracture swept volume as well as high fracture/matrix cross flow in the media with thicker fracture were detected as the main cause of this non-monotonic behavior. In the models with thick fractures (with

  16. Fractal analysis of fracture increasing spontaneous imbibition in porous media with gas-saturated

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Jianchao

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous imbibition (SI) of wetting liquid into matrix blocks due to capillary pressure is regarded as an important recovery mechanism in low permeability fractured reservoir. In this paper, an analytical model is proposed for characterizing SI horizontally from a single plane fracture into gas-saturated matrix blocks. The presented model is based on the fractal character of pores in porous matrix, with gravity force included in the entire imbibition process. The accumulated mass of wetting liquid imbibed into matrix blocks is related to a number of factors such as contact area, pore fractal dimension, tortuosity, maximum pore size, porosity, liquid density and viscosity, surface tension, contact angle, as well as height and tilt angle of the fracture. The mechanism of fracture-enhanced SI is analyzed accordingly. Because of the effect of fracture, the gravity force is positive to imbibition process. Additionally, the farther away from the fracture top of the pore, the more influential the hydrostatic pressure is upon the imbibition action. The presented fractal analysis of horizontal spontaneous imbibition from a single fracture could also shed light on the scaling study of the mass transfer function between matrix and fracture system of fractured reservoirs. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  17. Coupling of Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics in Fractured Porous Media: Application to CO2 Leakages from Natural and Stimulated Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Leakage to the atmosphere of a significant fraction of injected CO2 would constitute a failure of a geological CO2 storage project from a greenhouse gas mitigation perspective. We present a numerical model that simulates flow and transport of CO2 into heterogeneous subsurface systems. The model, StoTran, is a flexible numerical environment that uses state-of-the-art finite element and finite volume methods and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement scheme implemented using MPI and OpenMP protocols. Multiphase flow equations and the geomechanical equations are implicitly solved and either fully or sequentially coupled. StoTran can address inverse and forward problems under deterministic or stochastic conditions. For the current study, StoTran has been used to simulate several scenarios spanning from a homogeneous single layered reservoir to heterogeneous multi-layered systems, which including cap-rock with embedded fractures, have been simulated under different operations of CO2 injection and CO2 leakages conditions. Results show the impact of the injection and leakage rates on the time evolution of the spread of the CO2 plume, its interception of the fractured cap-rock and the risk associated with the contamination of the overlaying aquifer. Spatial and temporal moments have been calculated for different, deterministic of stochastic, subsurface physical and chemical properties. Spatial moments enable assessing the extent of the region of investigation under conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, several leakage scenarios show the intermittence behavior and development of the CO2 plume in the subsurface; its first interception with the fractures located further far from the injection well then, at a second stage, its interception with the fracture within the immediate vicinity of the injection well. We will present a remedy to CO2 leakages from the reservoir in order to enhance a long term containment of the injected CO2. This work performed under the auspices of

  18. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomat, L.

    2008-04-01

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH≥11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  19. An Efficient XFEM Approximation of Darcy Flows in Arbitrarily Fractured Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumagalli Alessio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface flows are influenced by the presence of faults and large fractures which act as preferential paths or barriers for the flow. In literature models were proposed to handle fractures in a porous medium as objects of codimension 1. In this work we consider the case of a network of intersecting fractures, with the aim of deriving physically consistent and effective interface conditions to impose at the intersection between fractures. This new model accounts for the angle between fractures at the intersections and allows for jumps of pressure across the intersection. This latter property permits to describe more accurately the flow when fractures are characterised by different properties, than other models that impose pressure continuity. The main mathematical properties of the model, derived in the two-dimensional setting, are analysed. As concerns the numerical discretization we allow the grids of the fractures to be independent, thus in general non-matching at the intersection, by means of the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM, to increase the flexibility of the method in the case of complex geometries characterized by a high number of fractures.

  20. Assessing the P-wave attenuation and phase velocity characteristics of fractured media based on creep and relaxation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marco; Germán Rubino, J.; Müller, Tobias M.; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    , the corresponding results obtained from creep and relaxation tests must be equivalent. For most analyses of media characterized by patchy saturation or double-porosity-type structures these two definitions are equivalent. It is, however, not clear whether this equivalence remains true in the presence of strong material contrasts as those prevailing in fractured rocks. In this work, we explore this question for periodically fractured media. To this end, we build a medium composed of infinite replicas of a unit volume containing one fracture. This unit volume coincides with the smallest possible volume that is statistically representative of the whole. Then, we perform several creep and relaxation tests on samples composed of an increasing number of these unit volumes. We find that the wave field signatures determined from relaxation tests are independent from the number of unit volumes. Conversely, the P-wave attenuation and phase velocity characteristics inferred from creep tests are different and vary with the number of unit volumes considered. Quite interestingly, the creep test results converge with those of the relaxation tests as the number of unit volumes increases. These findings are expected to have direct implications for corresponding laboratory measurements as well as for our understanding of seismic wave propagation in fractured media.

  1. Modelling of fractured reservoirs. Case of multi-scale media; Modelisation des reservoirs fractures. Cas des milieux multi-echelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, N.

    2000-12-13

    Some of the most productive oil and gas reservoirs are found in formations crossed by multi-scale fractures/faults. Among them, conductive faults may closely control reservoir performance. However, their modelling encounters numerical and physical difficulties linked with (a) the necessity to keep an explicit representation of faults through small-size grid blocks, (b) the modelling of multiphase flow exchanges between the fault and the neighbouring medium. In this thesis, we propose a physically-representative and numerically efficient modelling approach in order to incorporate sub-vertical conductive faults in single and dual-porosity simulators. To validate our approach and demonstrate its efficiency, simulation results of multiphase displacements in representative field sector models are presented. (author)

  2. On the development and benchmarking of an approach to model gas transport in fractured media with immobile water storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, D. R.; Ortiz, J. P.; Pandey, S.; Karra, S.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Stauffer, P. H.; Anderson, D. N.; Bradley, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    In unsaturated fractured media, the rate of gas transport is much greater than liquid transport in many applications (e.g., soil vapor extraction operations, methane leaks from hydraulic fracking, shallow CO2 transport from geologic sequestration operations, and later-time radionuclide gas transport from underground nuclear explosions). However, the relatively immobile pore water can inhibit or promote gas transport for soluble constituents by providing storage. In scenarios with constant pressure gradients, the gas transport will be retarded. In scenarios with reversing pressure gradients (i.e. barometric pressure variations) pore water storage can enhance gas transport by providing a ratcheting mechanism. Recognizing the computational efficiency that can be gained using a single-phase model and the necessity of considering pore water storage, we develop a Richard's solution approach that includes kinetic dissolution/volatilization of constituents. Henry's Law governs the equilibrium gaseous/aqueous phase partitioning in the approach. The approach is implemented in a development branch of the PFLOTRAN simulator. We verify the approach with analytical solutions of: (1) 1D gas diffusion, (2) 1D gas advection, (3) sinusoidal barometric pumping of a fracture, and (4) gas transport along a fracture with uniform flow and diffusive walls. We demonstrate the retardation of gas transport in cases with constant pressure gradients and the enhancement of gas transport with reversing pressure gradients. The figure presents the verification of our approach to the analytical solution of barometric pumping of a fracture from Nilson et al (1991) where the x-axis "Horizontal axis" is the distance into the matrix block from the fracture.

  3. Nonstationary envelope process and first excursion probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    The definition of stationary random envelope proposed by Cramer and Leadbetter, is extended to the envelope of nonstationary random process possessing evolutionary power spectral densities. The density function, the joint density function, the moment function, and the crossing rate of a level of the nonstationary envelope process are derived. Based on the envelope statistics, approximate solutions to the first excursion probability of nonstationary random processes are obtained. In particular, applications of the first excursion probability to the earthquake engineering problems are demonstrated in detail.

  4. A characterization of sparse nonstationary Gabor expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Emil Solsbæk; Nielsen, Morten

    and prove that the nonstationary Gabor frame forms a Banach frame for the decomposition space. Furthermore, we show that the decomposition space norm can be completely characterized by a sparseness condition on the frame coefficients and we prove an upper bound on the approximation error that occurs when......We investigate the problem of constructing sparse time-frequency representations with flexible frequency resolution, studying the theory of nonstationary Gabor frames in the framework of decomposition spaces. Given a painless nonstationary Gabor frame, we construct a compatible decomposition space...... thresholding the frame coefficients for signals belonging to the decomposition space....

  5. What does hydraulic tomography tell us about fractured geological media? A field study and synthetic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yuanyuan; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Illman, Walter A.; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Bruines, Patrick; Onoe, Hironori; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2015-12-01

    Between 2005 and 2010, Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted four long-term, independent pumping tests in a fractured granite formation at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) site in Mizunami city, central Japan. During these tests, drawdowns were monitored at different depths along several deep boreholes. These tests become one of the few, if not the only, hydraulic tomographic survey conducted in the world over thousands of meters in a fractured geologic medium with several fault zones. We analyzed the drawdown-time data set associated with each pumping test independently, and then the data sets from all pumping tests jointly to derive the spatial distributions of hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) of the medium. These estimated distributions revealed some large-scale high K and low K zones. While the low K zones corroborated well with known low permeable layers and fault based on geological investigations, there were no clear geological features that can be related to the large-scale high K zones. In order to understand and substantiate these high and low K zones, we simulated a hydraulic tomographic survey in a synthetic fractured aquifer, which bears similar geologic features (i.e., formations, fractures, and faults) at the MIU site, with exception that the hydraulic properties, fracture and fault distributions were known exactly. Results of the simulation show that not only are the identified high K zones related to fracture networks connected with pumping and observation locations of each pumping test but also their values reflect the degree of connectivity of the network. Afterward, we investigated the extent of the improvement of characterization of the fault and fractures through the use of deploying dense monitoring intervals and late-time flux measurements.

  6. Parametric modelling of nonstationary platform deck motions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    Univariate system identification models are, in general, developed based on teh assumption that offshore dynamic systems are stationary random processes. For nonstationary processes, a method is adopted to transform the time series into wide...

  7. A new approach to tracer transport analysis: From fracture systems to strongly heterogeneous porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu.

    1989-02-01

    Many current development and utilization of groundwater resources include a study of their flow and transport properties. These properties are needed in evaluating possible changes in groundwater quality and potential transport of hazardous solutes through the groundwater system. Investigation of transport properties of fractured rocks is an active area of research. Most of the current approaches to the study of flow and transport in fractured rocks cannot be easily used for analysis of tracer transport field data. A new approach is proposed based on a detailed study of transport through a fracture of variable aperture. This is a two-dimensional strongly heterogeneous permeable system. It is suggested that tracer breakthrough curves can be analyzed based on an aperture or permeability probability distribution function that characterizes the tracer flow through the fracture. The results are extended to a multi-fracture system and can be equally applied to a strongly heterogeneous porous medium. Finally, the need for multi-point or line and areal tracer injection and observation tests is indicated as a way to avoid the sensitive dependence of point measurements on local permeability variability. 30 refs., 15 figs

  8. Failure of heterogeneous materials: Scaling properties of fracture surfaces and implications on models of cracks in disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    While there exists a unified theoretical framework - Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) - to describe the failure of homogeneous materials, understanding and modelling the mechanical properties of heterogeneous media continue to raise significant fundamental challenges. These mechanical properties, observed at the macroscopic scale, result from microscopic processes occurring at the scale of the material. To include these local processes into a statistical description constitutes then a crucial step toward the setup of predictive macroscopic models. Crack surface roughness is a consequence of these local processes. Consequently, many fractography experiments have focussed on their analysis. In this context, it was recently evidenced that, in many materials, fracture surfaces exhibit anisotropic scaling properties reminiscent to interface growth problems, fully characterized by two couples of parameters: The roughness exponents and the characteristic length-scales measured along and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth respectively. While the characteristic length-scales do depend on the considered material, the exponents are surprisingly universal: Two distinct sets of critical exponents are observed whether the surfaces are examined at scales below or above the size of the damaged zone at the crack front. Models of crack growth in disordered media are discussed at the light of these experimental observations. In particular, one can derive a model from LEFM which describe the development of crack roughness as an ``elastic'' manifold creeping in a random media. This approach captures quantitatively the experimental observations performed at length-scales above the size of the process zone. In this approach, the onset of crack propagation can be interpreted as a dynamic phase transition while sub-critical crack growth can be assimilated to thermally-assisted depinning.

  9. Self-healing of Fractures in Argillaceous Media from the Geomechanical Point of View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horseman, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Presently, there is no established theory describing fracture self-healing and self-sealing processes in mud-rocks (clays, mud-stones and shales) and no methodology to assess the conditions under which these processes might be important. The author suggests that the modified Cam-Clay approach provides a useful conceptual and theoretical framework for the analysis of the largely hydro-mechanical process of self-sealing. Three basic hypotheses are proposed and applied to the problem of fracture self-sealing in the repository EDZ and to the more general question of fault sealing. (author)

  10. Acoustics on a Real Scale Model: Application to Fractured Media Diagraphies acoustiques sur modèle physique à l'échelle 1 : application aux milieux fracturés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari J. L.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluid migration depends on the properties of the geological medium. It increases in fractured media. A better understanding of fractured media can be obtained by the full waveform acoustic technique only if the accuracy and the efficiency of the acoustic method can be correctly calibrated on a known medium. For this purpose, a real scale model made of concrete was built. The first part of the paper describes the real scale model, with its advantages and pitfalls. It illustrates the benefit of using data obtained on the model for tool development. The second part shows acoustic data recorded in the real scale model which represents a fractured medium. The open fracture is perpendicular to the borehole axis. The acoustic know-how acquired from the model has been used to develop an acoustic dipmeter method. This method is briefly described. Two field examples of full waveform acoustic data recorded in fractured media are shown in the third part. The first example shows open and cemented fractures observed on a constant offset section recorded in a vertical well. The second example shows both dipping reflectors and fractures observed in a highly deviated well. In both examples, the fractures and reflectors are confirmed by a core analysis. La migration de fluide après injection dépend du taux de fracturation du milieu géologique. La diagraphie acoustique en champ total est un outil d'investigation du milieu fracturé. Cet outil est d'autant plus performant qu'il est bien maîtrisé. Un modèle physique à l'échelle 1 permet l'utilisation d'outils acoustiques standards. Il permet d'acquérir des données sur milieu à géométrie connue et aux paramètres mécaniques connus. Il permet de juger de la complexité de la réponse acoustique à une hétérogénéité (fractures ouvertes, fractures cimentées. La première partie de l'article est consacrée à la description du modèle physique avec ses avantages et ses inconvénients. Elle montre

  11. Monitoring thermal processes in low-permeability fractured media using fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Loew, Simon; Amann, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) systems constitute arguably one of the main significant advances in the development of modern monitoring techniques in field hydrogeology, both for shallow (e.g. quantification of surface water-groundwater interactions) and deeper applications (borehole temperature monitoring). Deployment of FO-DTS monitoring systems in boreholes has notably allowed further promoting the use of temperature as a tracer to improve the characterization of heterogeneous media, with a strong focus on permeable environments such as shallow unconsolidated aquifers and/or highly-fractured rocks, generally found close to ground surface. However, applying this technology to low-permeability media, as in the case of intact rock mass intersected by isolated, discrete fractures still remains a challenge, perhaps explaining the limited number of field results reported in the scientific literature to date. Yet, understanding the transport, storage and exchange of heat in deep, low-permeability crystalline rocks is critical to many scientific and engineering research topics and applications, including for example deep geothermal energy (DGE). In the present contribution, we describe the use and application of FO-DTS monitoring to a broad range of processes, varying from the propagation and persistence of thermal anomalies (both natural and induced) to the monitoring of the curing of epoxy resin and cement grouts along the annular space of boreholes designed for monitoring discrete, packed-off zones. All data provided herein has been collected as part of a multi-disciplinary research program on hydraulic stimulation and deep geothermal energy carried out at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), an underground rock laboratory located in the Aar massif, in the Swiss Alps. Through these examples, we illustrate the importance of understanding the spatial and temporal variations of local thermal regimes when planning to monitoring boreholes temperatures

  12. Comparison of three FE-FV numerical schemes for single-and two-phase flow simulation of fractured porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nick, H.M.; Matthäi, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    We benchmark a family of hybrid finite element–node-centered finite volume discretization methods (FEFV) for single- and two-phase flow/transport through porous media with discrete fracture representations. Special emphasis is placed on a new method we call DFEFVM in which the mesh is split along

  13. Modeling multiphase heat and mass transfer in consolidated, fractured, porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixler, N.E.; Eaton, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A number of potential transport mechanisms are considered in this paper: Darcy flow due to pressure and density gradients in the liquid and gas phases; Knudsen diffusion in the gas phase; binary diffusion in the gas phase; heat conduction; energy convection; and evaporation/condensation and its associated latent heat effects. Most of these mechanisms are highly nonlinear, especially Darcy flow, where relative permeabilities often vary by orders of magnitude depending on local saturation, and evaporation/condensation, which depends strongly on local temperature, gas pressure, and saturation. As a consequence of the nonlinearities, it is essential to employ numerical methods if realistic modeling is to be performed. Here, the numerical model is of the standard Galerkin/finite element variety, which is convenient for handling irregular domains and a wide variety of boundary conditions. This numerical model is used to examine the relative effectiveness of each of the transport mechanisms in several one-dimensional and simple two-dimensional multiphase flows in fractured and unfractured porous materials. The importance of fracture orientation is also studied. Predictions are compared with experimental measurements for imbibition and drying of fractured volcanic tuff

  14. Higher-order compositional modeling of three-phase flow in 3D fractured porous media based on cross-flow equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase compositional flow in fractured porous media, when all the species can transfer between the phases, is a real challenge. Despite the broad applications in hydrocarbon reservoir engineering and hydrology, a compositional numerical simulator for three-phase flow in fractured media has not appeared in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we present a three-phase fully compositional simulator for fractured media, based on higher-order finite element methods. To achieve computational efficiency, we invoke the cross-flow equilibrium (CFE) concept between discrete fractures and a small neighborhood in the matrix blocks. We adopt the mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to approximate convective Darcy fluxes and the pressure equation. This approach is the most natural choice for flow in fractured media. The mass balance equations are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, which is perhaps the most efficient approach to capture physical discontinuities in phase properties at the matrix-fracture interfaces and at phase boundaries. In this work, we account for gravity and Fickian diffusion. The modeling of capillary effects is discussed in a separate paper. We present the mathematical framework, using the implicit-pressure-explicit-composition (IMPEC) scheme, which facilitates rigorous thermodynamic stability analyses and the computation of phase behavior effects to account for transfer of species between the phases. A deceptively simple CFL condition is implemented to improve numerical stability and accuracy. We provide six numerical examples at both small and larger scales and in two and three dimensions, to demonstrate powerful features of the formulation.

  15. Analysis and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in 3D fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canamon Valera, I.

    2006-11-01

    This doctoral research was conducted as part of a joint France-Spain co-tutelage PhD thesis in the framework of a bilateral agreement between two universities, the Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse (INPT) and the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM). It concerns a problem of common interest at the national and international levels, namely, the disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories. The present work is devoted, more precisely, to near-field hydrogeological aspects involving mass and heat transport phenomena. The first part of the work is devoted to a specific data interpretation problem (pressures, relative humidities, temperatures) in a multi-barrier experimental system at the scale of a few meters - the 'Mock-Up Test' of the FEBEX project, conducted in Spain. Over 500 time series are characterized in terms of spatial, temporal, and/or frequency/scale-based statistical analysis techniques. The time evolution and coupling of physical phenomena during the experiment are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn concerning the behavior and reliability of the sensors. The second part of the thesis develops in more detail the 3-Dimensional (3D) modeling of coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical phenomena in a fractured porous rock, this time at the scale of a hundred meters, based on the data of the 'In-Situ Test' of the FEBEX project conducted at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. As a first step, a reconstruction of the 3D fracture network is obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, taking into account through optimization the geomorphological data collected around the FEBEX gallery. The heterogeneous distribution of traces observed on the cylindrical wall of the tunnel is fairly well reproduced in the simulated network. In a second step, we develop a method to estimate the equivalent permeability of a many-fractured block by extending the superposition method of Ababou et al. [1994] to the case where the permeability of the rock matrix is not

  16. Characterization of thermal tracer tests and heat exchanges in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Florian; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Lavenant, Nicolas; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, several heat tracer tests have been achieved along a borehole between two connected fractures. The heat tracer tests have been achieved at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). The tracer tests consist in monitoring the temperature in the upper fracture while injecting hot water in the deeper one thanks to a field boiler. For such an experimental setup, the main difficulty to interpret the data comes from the requirement for separating the temperature advective signal of the tracer test (temperature recovery) from the heat increase due to injection of hot water through the borehole which induces heat losses all along the injection tube in the water column. For doing so, in addition to a double straddle packer used for isolating the injection chamber, the particularity of the experimental set up is the use of fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS); an innovative technology which allows spatial and temporal monitoring of the temperature all along the well. Thanks to this tool, we were able to estimate heat increases coming from diffusion along the injection tube which is found much lower than localized temperature increases resulting from tracer test recovery. With local temperatures probes, separating both effects would not have been feasible. We also show through signal processing how diffusive and advective effects may be differentiated. This allowed us to estimate temperature recovery for different heat tracer durations and setups. In particular we show that temperature recovery is highly dependent on hydraulic configuration such as perfect dipole or fully

  17. On the theory of transport of fluids in fractured media for the safety analysis of a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic theory is developed of the role of fractures in the transport of radionuclides by groundwater through fractured rocks from the nuclear waste repository to be built in deep geologic formations to the biosphere. Fractures are grouped into four ''irreducible'' types: joints, nodes, shear zones, and fracture zones, and their geometrical and sorption characteristics, having bearings on radionuclide transport, are expressed in mathematical terms. The question of radioactivity retention in various fracture types is then carefully studied using idealized geometries to mimic natural forms. Fundamental transport equations are derived for the fracture-pore complex, taking into consideration the special physical characteristics of fractures and the effects of sorption therein

  18. On the theory of transport in fractured media for the safety analysis of a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1982-10-01

    This report aims at developing a systematic theory of the role of fractures in the transport of radionuclides by groundwater, through fractured rocks from a deep-lying nuclear waste repository to the biosphere. Fractures are grouped into four 'irreducible' types: joints, nodes, shear zones and fracture zones, and the physical characteristics which influence radionuclide transport are expressed in mathematical terms. The question of radioactivity retention is then studied for various fracture types, using idealized geometries to model natural forms. Fundamental transport equations are derived for the fracture-pore complex, taking into consideration the special physical characteristics of fractures and the effects of sorption therein. (author)

  19. Results of nonlinear and nonstationary image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, S.M.; Correla, J.A.; Chesler, D.A.; Metz, C.E.

    1973-01-01

    A nonstationary method, multiple z-divided filtering, and a nonlinear method, biased smearing have been applied to scintigrams. Biased smearing does not appear to hold much promise. Multiple z-divided filtering, on the other hand, appears to be justified, and initial results at minimum encourage further research into the possibility that this technique may become a method of choice

  20. Risk assessment in fractured porous media with particular reference to water catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Helmig, R.; Nowak, W.; Binning, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    . As a consequence, the four vulnerability criteria are assessed stochastically. The stochastic approach increases computational costs. As a counter-measure, we approximate the transient contaminant transport process by a higher-order expansion in the temporal moments of breakthrough, which we simulate directly from steady-state moment-generating equations [Harvey and Gorelick, 1995]. The computational time saved by the approximation in transient behaviour is then available for stochastic modelling. For further computational savings, we adopt the reverse formulation of well contamination. With the help of a geostatistical fracture-matrix generator [here: Silberhorn-Hemminger, 2002] we generate artificial fractured-matrix systems, representing the mean characteristic karst properties (e.g. fracture density, etc.) within the study area or any artificial aquifer domain. In a Monte Carlo approach, an ensemble of 1000 fracture-matrix systems are randomly generated, and the flow and transport processes are calculated in DuMuX as a one phase two component model. With an inverse formulation of the steady-state transport problem, the capture zone of the well can be calculated for each realization. The mean arrival time at the well may be calculated directly from the first temporal moment equation. Peak contamination level, peak arrival time, threshold arrival time and exposure time require more information than merely the first temporal moment. In order to reconstruct dispersive contaminant dilution and the shape of the breakthrough curve, the second central temporal moment equation (and higher order moment equations) are applied. Then, by statistical analysis of the ensemble results, all four intrinsic well vulnerability measures can be calculated. The final protection area outlines are given by the maximum acceptable risk level for a water manager towards its water supply from the catchment perspective. To validate our approach for a real case scenario, the whole risk concept

  1. Modeling Transport in Fractured Porous Media with the Random-Walk Particle Method: The Transient Activity Range and the Particle-Transfer Probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehua Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2001-01-01

    Multiscale features of transport processes in fractured porous media make numerical modeling a difficult task, both in conceptualization and computation. Modeling the mass transfer through the fracture-matrix interface is one of the critical issues in the simulation of transport in a fractured porous medium. Because conventional dual-continuum-based numerical methods are unable to capture the transient features of the diffusion depth into the matrix (unless they assume a passive matrix medium), such methods will overestimate the transport of tracers through the fractures, especially for the cases with large fracture spacing, resulting in artificial early breakthroughs. We have developed a new method for calculating the particle-transfer probability that can capture the transient features of diffusion depth into the matrix within the framework of the dual-continuum random-walk particle method (RWPM) by introducing a new concept of activity range of a particle within the matrix. Unlike the multiple-continuum approach, the new dual-continuum RWPM does not require using additional grid blocks to represent the matrix. It does not assume a passive matrix medium and can be applied to the cases where global water flow exists in both continua. The new method has been verified against analytical solutions for transport in the fracture-matrix systems with various fracture spacing. The calculations of the breakthrough curves of radionuclides from a potential repository to the water table in Yucca Mountain demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method for simulating 3-D, mountain-scale transport in a heterogeneous, fractured porous medium under variably saturated conditions

  2. Pressure evolution and deformation of confined granular media during pneumatic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Toussaint, Renaud; Turquet, Antoine Léo; Mâløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2018-01-01

    By means of digital image correlation, we experimentally characterize the deformation of a dry granular medium confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell due to air injection at a constant overpressure high enough to deform it (from 50 to 250 kPa). Air injection at these overpressures leads to the formation of so-called pneumatic fractures, i.e., channels empty of beads, and we discuss the typical deformations of the medium surrounding these structures. In addition we simulate the diffusion of the fluid overpressure into the medium, comparing it with the Laplacian solution over time and relating pressure gradients with corresponding granular displacements. In the compacting medium we show that the diffusing pressure field becomes similar to the Laplace solution on the order of a characteristic time given by the properties of the pore fluid, the granular medium, and the system size. However, before the diffusing pressure approaches the Laplace solution on the system scale, we find that it resembles the Laplacian field near the channels, with the highest pressure gradients on the most advanced channel tips and a screened pressure gradient behind them. We show that the granular displacements more or less always move in the direction against the local pressure gradients, and when comparing granular velocities with pressure gradients in the zone ahead of channels, we observe a Bingham type of rheology for the granular paste (the mix of air and beads), with an effective viscosity μB and displacement thresholds ∇ ⃗Pc evolving during mobilization and compaction of the medium. Such a rheology, with disorder in the displacement thresholds, could be responsible for placing the pattern growth at moderate injection pressures in a universality class like the dielectric breakdown model with η =2 , where fractal dimensions are found between 1.5 and 1.6 for the patterns.

  3. Nonlinear approximation with nonstationary Gabor frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Emil Solsbæk; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    We consider sparseness properties of adaptive time-frequency representations obtained using nonstationary Gabor frames (NSGFs). NSGFs generalize classical Gabor frames by allowing for adaptivity in either time or frequency. It is known that the concept of painless nonorthogonal expansions...... resolution. Based on this characterization we prove an upper bound on the approximation error occurring when thresholding the coefficients of the corresponding frame expansions. We complement the theoretical results with numerical experiments, estimating the rate of approximation obtained from thresholding...

  4. Interaction between neutrinos and nonstationary plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, J.T. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal). Centro de Electrodinamica; Bingham, R. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Shukla, P.K. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Dawson, J.M. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Tsytovich, V.N. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Obshchej Fiziki

    1995-12-11

    The collective interaction of electron neutrinos with a dense non-stationary plasma is described here. This effect can eventually lead to a significant loss of energy of the neutrinos emitted by a collapsing supernova. The present effect is an exact analogue of the photon acceleration in an ionization front. We present here a classical estimate of the neutrino energy losses and also give the corresponding quantum description. (orig.).

  5. On the theory of transport in fractured media for the safety analysis of a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1982-10-01

    This paper aims at developing a systematic theory of the role of fractures in the transport of radionuclides in the fractured rocks by groundwater, from the nuclear waste repository to be built in the deep geological formations, to the biosphere. Fractures are grouped into four 'irreducible' types: joints, nodes, shear zones and fracture zones, and their physical characteristics, having bearings on radionuclide transport, are expressed in mathematical terms. The question of radioactivity retention is then carefully studied for various fracture types, using idealized geometries to mimic natural forms. Fundamental transport equations are derived for the fracture-pore complex, taking into consideration the special physical characteristics of fractures and the effects of sorption therein

  6. Recovery of SIMS depth profiles with account for nonstationary effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunin, Pavel Andreevich; Drozdov, Yurii Nikolaevich; Drozdov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Yurasov, Dmitry Vladimirovich

    2014-01-01

    In this work we consider a method of accounting for the nonstationary effects in recovery of SIMS depth profiles. The depth resolution function (DRF) is described by Hofmann's nonstationary MRI (mixing-roughness-information depth) model using the depth-dependent parameters. The effects in question include the nonstationary atomic mixing and development of surface roughness. A mathematical description of the nonstationary depth profiling process by the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is proposed. The inverse problem is solved using an algorithm based on the Tikhonov regularization method. The proposed nonstationary recovery method is tested on both model and real structures. The development of surface roughness in SIMS depth profiling of the real structure was observed. Grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (XRR) technique was used to verify the results of SIMS profiles restoration for periodic structure containing thin Ge layers in the Si matrix. The advantages of the proposed recovery algorithm to allow for the nonstationary effects are shown.

  7. Regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction algorithm for weak signal detection in micro-seismic monitoring: Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weilin; Wang, Runqiu; Chen, Yangkang

    2018-02-01

    Micro-seismic signal is typically weak compared with the strong background noise. In order to effectively detect the weak signal in micro-seismic data, we propose a mathematical morphology based approach. We decompose the initial data into several morphological multi-scale components. For detection of weak signal, a non-stationary weighting operator is proposed and introduced into the process of reconstruction of data by morphological multi-scale components. The non-stationary weighting operator can be obtained by solving an inversion problem. The regularized non-stationary method can be understood as a non-stationary matching filtering method, where the matching filter has the same size as the data to be filtered. In this paper, we provide detailed algorithmic descriptions and analysis. The detailed algorithm framework, parameter selection and computational issue for the regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction (RNMR) method are presented. We validate the presented method through a comprehensive analysis through different data examples. We first test the proposed technique using a synthetic data set. Then the proposed technique is applied to a field project, where the signals induced from hydraulic fracturing are recorded by twelve three-component (3-C) geophones in a monitoring well. The result demonstrates that the regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction can improve the detectability of the weak micro-seismic signals. Using the processed data, the short-term-average over long-term average (STA/LTA) picking algorithm and Geiger's method are applied to obtain new locations of micro-seismic events. In addition, we show that the proposed RNMR method can be used not only in micro-seismic data but also in reflection seismic data to detect the weak signal. We also discussed the extension of RNMR from 1D to 2D or a higher dimensional version.

  8. Upscaling on Fracture Flow Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dugstad, Martin Sandanger

    2017-01-01

    Fractures have a great impact on the quality of a porous media. The understanding of the fractures is important to describe the challenges linked to flow of geothermal heat, the transport of groundwater or transport of hydrocarbons in a porous media. The understanding of fracture can help to increase the energy production, or the extraction of clean drinkable groundwater. In this study we will investigate the effects of fractures in a porous medium by incorporate fractures as a...

  9. Computational and Experimental Investigation of Contaminant Plume Response to DNAPL Source Zone Architecture and Depletion in Porous and Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    tomography, fractured rocks, heterogeneity, plume mass flux, compound specific isotope analysis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...flow and transport parameters of highly fractured porous rock samples, J. Hydrol., 278 (1-4), 51-63. McDermott C, Kolditz O. Geomechanical model for

  10. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Laura K.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2016-04-01

    Impact from natural hazards is a shared global problem that causes tremendous loss of life and property, economic cost, and damage to the environment. Increasingly, many natural processes show evidence of nonstationary behavior including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow, sea levels, and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on peaks over threshold (POT) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e., that the probability of exceedance of some critical event is constant through time. Given increasing evidence of trends in natural hazards, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The well-developed field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (X) with its failure time series (T), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods, risk, and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose POT magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied generalized Pareto model. We derive the hazard function for this case and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard random variable X with corresponding failure time series T should have application to a wide class of natural hazards with opportunities for future extensions.

  11. Multiaxis Rainflow Fatigue Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, T.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical structures and components may be subjected to cyclical loading conditions, including sine and random vibration. Such systems must be designed and tested accordingly. Rainflow cycle counting is the standard method for reducing a stress time history to a table of amplitude-cycle pairings prior to the Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage calculation. The damage calculation is straightforward for sinusoidal stress but very complicated for random stress, particularly for nonstationary vibration. This paper evaluates candidate methods and makes a recommendation for further study of a hybrid technique.

  12. Nonstationary temperature field in the fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehauc, A.; Spasojevic, D.

    1970-03-01

    Nonstationary temperature field in the fuel element was examined for spatial and time distribution of the specific power generated in the fuel element. Analytical method was developed for calculating the temperature variation in the fuel element of a nuclear reactor for a typical shape of the heat generation function. The method is based on series expansion of the temperature field by self functions and application of Laplace transformation in time coordinate. For numerical calculation of the temperature distribution a computer code was developed based on the proposed method and applied on the ZUSE-Z-23 computer [sr

  13. Analysis of stress and deformation in non-stationary creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feijoo, R.A.; Taroco, E.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.

    1980-12-01

    A variational method and its algorithm are presented; they permit the analysis of stress and deformation in non-stationary creep. This algorithm is applied to an infinite cylinder submitted to an internal pressure. The solution obtained is compared with the solution of non-stationary creep problems [pt

  14. A simple nonstationary-volatility robust panel unit root test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demetrescu, Matei; Hanck, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    We propose an IV panel unit root test robust to nonstationary error volatility. Its finite-sample performance is convincing even for many units and strong cross-correlation. An application to GDP prices illustrates the inferential impact of nonstationary volatility. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Modelling and reflexions coefficient inversion of fractured media by using genetic algorithm; Modelagem e inversao de coeficientes de reflexao em meios fraturados usando algoritmo genetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinen, Julio Setsuo

    1998-12-01

    A method for the exact modeling and inversion of multi-azimuthal qP-wave reflection coefficients at an interface separating two anisotropic media with at least one of its planes of symmetry parallel to the interface, i.e., monoclinic or higher symmetries is presented. To illustrate the procedure, we compute qP-wave reflection coefficients at an interface separating an isotropic medium (representing a seal rock) from an anisotropic medium (representing a reservoir rock with vertical aligned fractures). Forward modeling of the qP reflection coefficients for all possible azimuths and angles of incidence suggests that amplitude versus offset (AVO) effects, combined with amplitude versus azimuth (AVA) effects, can be indicate of fracture density orientation. Particularly, the difference in the offset of the critical angles arrivals for different azimuths is proportional to the fracture density: the higher the fracture density, the larger the difference. A global optimization technique (genetic algorithm) to the invert wide angle (up to 45 degrees of incidence) AVO synthetic data, for three azimuths of the plane of the data acquisition was used. It was found that configuration is the minimum number of acquisition planes and the minimum distance of the far offset needed to invert AVO/AVA data is forty-five degrees. The model space consists of the mass density and five elastic parameters of a transversely isotropic medium with a horizontal symmetry axis, which represents the fractured reservoir rock. The parameter of the fractured rock are computed using real data from a oil reservoir. There are no prior information on the values of the model space parameters, except for reasonable value of wave velocities in crustal rocks and constraints of elastic stability of solid media. Mild anisotropy is also assumed, i.e, shear waves are slower than compressional waves for any direction or propagation and neither anomalous polarizations nor triplications occur. After inversion of

  16. Direct numerical simulation of reactive flow and modeling of pore-scale transport phenomena in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeli, M. A.; Alizadehnomeli, M.

    2017-12-01

    A long-term geochemical modeling of CO2 sequestration is carried out in a single fracture to investigate its impact on CO2 transport and storage capacity. We model the fracture by considering flow of CO2 between finite plates. We study the physics and the critical time of blockage for a fracture to interpret the results. To this end, we employ direct numerical simulation tools and algorithms to simulate incompressible flow along with necessary transport equations that capture the kinetics of relevant chemical reactions. The numerical model is based on a finite volume method using a sequential non-iterative approach. It is found that mineral precipitation has an important effect on reservoir porosity and permeability. According to the simulations, the flow of injected CO2 in the fracture is controlled by changes in the pore-scale permeability close to the fracture inlet. The fracture ceases to be a fluid channel because of the precipitation of minerals. In addition, using parameter analysis we also determine the effect of various mineral precipitates on porosity of fractures.

  17. Semi-stochastic generator (FRAGMA) of 2D fractured media by mechanistic analogy - Application to reactive transport in a fractured package of vitrified nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevoisier, D.; Bouyer, F.; Gin, St.

    2011-01-01

    In a geological storage context, the durability of nuclear glass is first and foremost determined by its alteration rate and by the surface being leached. This surface is comprised of a network of three-dimensional cracks due to the stress relief generated by the cooling of glass packages. In order to improve the methods employed so far for quantifying the impact of a fissure network on the life time of glass packages in geological disposal, we have developed a software, referred to as FRAGMA, which can be used to generate a realistic 2D geometry of the fissure network inside the glass based on mechanistic analogies. This type of tool is required for providing a mesh adapted to the calculation codes simulating water flow and glass alteration in such a medium. The main principles of this tool have been developed and its parameters have been defined based on the analysis of theoretical fracture processes and observations of real fissure networks. The 2D networks developed using FRAGMA are compared with cross-sections of real networks. It is outlined that the general structure of the fracture maps is correctly reproduced, compared to the observations; consequently, it is relevant to apply the tool for further studies in order to generate more complex crack networks, and to study the channeling in such structures, as expected by the strong organized pattern of the experimental fracture maps. (authors)

  18. Numerical simulation of counter-current spontaneous imbibition in water-wet fractured porous media: Influences of water injection velocity, fracture aperture, and grains geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Iman; Masihi, Mohsen; Nasiri Zarandi, Masoud

    2017-11-01

    Counter-current spontaneous imbibition (SI), in which water and oil flow through the same face in opposite directions, is known as one of the most significant oil recovery mechanisms in naturally fractured reservoirs; however, this mechanism has not received much attention. Understanding the dynamic of water-oil displacement during counter-current SI is very challenging because of simultaneous impacts of multiple factors including geometry complexity and heterogeneity of naturally fractured reservoir materials, e.g., high permeability contrast between the rock matrix and fracture, wettability, and porosity. This study investigates the effects of water injection velocity, fracture aperture, and grain shape during counter-current SI at pore-scale. A robust finite element solver is used to solve the governing equations of multiphase flow, which are the coupled Navier-Stokes and Cahn-Hilliard phase-field equations. The results showed that the case with the highest injection velocity (uinj = 5 mm/s) recovered more than 15% of the matrix oil at the early times and then reached its ultimate recovery factor. However, in the case of the lowest injection velocity, i.e., uinj = 0.05 mm/s, the lowest imbibition rate was observed at the early times, but ultimately 23% of the matrix oil was recovered. The model with uinj = 5 mm/s was able to capture some pore-level mechanisms such as snap-off, oil film thinning, interface coalescence, and water film bridging. The obtained results revealed that changing the fracture aperture has a slight effect on the imbibition rate at the earlier times and ultimate recoveries would be almost equal. To assess the influences of grain shape on the imbibition process, the simulated domain was reconstructed with cubic grains. It was noticed that because of higher permeability and porosity, relatively larger oil drops were formed and resulted in higher oil recovery compared with the model with spherical grains. The developed model can be used as a

  19. U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics and conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997 - July 27, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided

  20. U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics; and Conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997--July 27, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided.

  1. Minimization principles for the coupled problem of Darcy-Biot-type fluid transport in porous media linked to phase field modeling of fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Christian; Mauthe, Steffen; Teichtmeister, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    This work develops new minimization and saddle point principles for the coupled problem of Darcy-Biot-type fluid transport in porous media at fracture. It shows that the quasi-static problem of elastically deforming, fluid-saturated porous media is related to a minimization principle for the evolution problem. This two-field principle determines the rate of deformation and the fluid mass flux vector. It provides a canonically compact model structure, where the stress equilibrium and the inverse Darcy's law appear as the Euler equations of a variational statement. A Legendre transformation of the dissipation potential relates the minimization principle to a characteristic three field saddle point principle, whose Euler equations determine the evolutions of deformation and fluid content as well as Darcy's law. A further geometric assumption results in modified variational principles for a simplified theory, where the fluid content is linked to the volumetric deformation. The existence of these variational principles underlines inherent symmetries of Darcy-Biot theories of porous media. This can be exploited in the numerical implementation by the construction of time- and space-discrete variational principles, which fully determine the update problems of typical time stepping schemes. Here, the proposed minimization principle for the coupled problem is advantageous with regard to a new unconstrained stable finite element design, while space discretizations of the saddle point principles are constrained by the LBB condition. The variational principles developed provide the most fundamental approach to the discretization of nonlinear fluid-structure interactions, showing symmetric systems in algebraic update procedures. They also provide an excellent starting point for extensions towards more complex problems. This is demonstrated by developing a minimization principle for a phase field description of fracture in fluid-saturated porous media. It is designed for an

  2. Complex Kerr geometry and nonstationary Kerr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the Kerr-Schild approach, we consider the complex structure of Kerr geometry which is determined by a complex world line of a complex source. The real Kerr geometry is represented as a real slice of this complex structure. The Kerr geometry is generalized to the nonstationary case when the current geometry is determined by a retarded time and is defined by a retarded-time construction via a given complex world line of source. A general exact solution corresponding to arbitrary motion of a spinning source is obtained. The acceleration of the source is accompanied by a lightlike radiation along the principal null congruence. It generalizes to the rotating case, the known Kinnersley class of 'photon rocket' solutions

  3. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Environmental Science and Engineering Div.; Lowe, K.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Murdoch, L.D. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Slack, W.W. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  4. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It most ... occurs with other fractures of the face. Nose injuries and neck ...

  5. Analytical Modeling of the Pseudo-Colloid Migration with the Band release Boundary Condition in the Fractured Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Miseon; Kang, Chulhyung; Hwang, Yongsoo

    2011-01-01

    Many papers have already dealt with the problem of the radionuclide transport in various fractured porous systems, but without discussing daughter products. However, natural radionuclides may decay to radioactive daughter muscled, which may travel farther than the the parent nuclides. It is considered the multi-member decay chain of the actinide nuclide with the band release inlet boundary condition in a fractured porous rock. In this paper, it is developed the pseudo-colloid migration with the band release inlet boundary conditions with multi-member decay chains in a fractured porous matrix. It is obtained a semi-analytical solution for the multi-member decay chains as a canonical form. As one can expected, the colloid has significantly important influence to the radionuclide transport in the geologic system and the decay chain also isn't neglecting. The concept of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been widely accepted at many countries. The repositories aim mainly to prevent the radionuclides form migrating to the biosphere through any one of many pathways. Fractures can act as main pathways for radionuclide transport because of their relatively high permeabilities

  6. A Comparison of PSD Enveloping Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to derive a power spectral density (PSD) envelope for nonstationary acceleration time histories, including launch vehicle data, so that components can be designed and tested accordingly. This paper presents the results of the three methods for an actual flight accelerometer record. Guidelines are given for the application of each method to nonstationary data. The method can be extended to other scenarios, including transportation vibration.

  7. Comparison of four nonstationary hydrologic design methods for changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Xiong, Lihua; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Xia, Jun; Du, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The hydrologic design of nonstationary flood extremes is an emerging field that is essential for water resources management and hydrologic engineering design to cope with changing environment. This paper aims to investigate and compare the capability of four nonstationary hydrologic design strategies, including the expected number of exceedances (ENE), design life level (DLL), equivalent reliability (ER), and average design life level (ADLL), with the last three methods taking into consideration the design life of the project. The confidence intervals of the calculated design floods were also estimated using the nonstationary bootstrap approach. A comparison of these four methods was performed using the annual maximum flood series (AMFS) of the Weihe River basin, Jinghe River basin, and Assunpink Creek basin. The results indicated that ENE, ER and ADLL yielded the same or very similar design values and confidence intervals for both increasing and decreasing trends of AMFS considered. DLL also yields similar design values if the relationship between DLL and ER/ADLL return periods is considered. Both ER and ADLL are recommended for practical use as they have associated design floods with the design life period of projects and yield reasonable design quantiles and confidence intervals. Furthermore, by assuming that the design results using either a stationary or nonstationary hydrologic design strategy should have the same reliability, the ER method enables us to solve the nonstationary hydrologic design problems by adopting the stationary design reliability, thus bridging the gap between stationary and nonstationary design criteria.

  8. Estimating Poromechanical and Hydraulic Properties of Fractured Media Aquifers Using a Model of the Aquifer at Ploemeur France: Broad Applications and Future Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. W.; Burbey, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Aquifers in fractured crystalline bedrock are located over half of the earth's surface and are vital civil and economic resources particularly in places where ample, safe surface water is not available. With fractured media aquifers providing large percentages of water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural use in many regions of the world. Distinguishing sustainable quantities of extraction is of paramount importance to the continuing viability of these important resources and the communities they serve. The fractured and faulted crystalline-rock aquifer system supporting the community of Ploemeur France has been providing one million cubic meters of water annually, resulting in a modest long-term drawdown of about 15m. To understand the sources and mechanisms of recharge that support this aquifer system, a three-dimensional ABAQUS model was developed using known geologic, water-level and geodetic (tiltmeters and GPS) data to simulate the natural aquifer system that is dominated by a permeable sub-vertical fault and an intersecting semi-horizontal contact zone. The model is used to constrain the poromechanical properties of the fault and contact zones relative to the host crystalline rocks and overlying saprolite by taking advantage of the tilt and seasonal GPS responses caused by municipal pumping along with water-level data for the area. A chief goal in this modeling effort is to assess the sources of recharge to this aquifer system that is atypically productive for a crystalline-rock setting. Preliminary results suggest that the source of water supplying this community is a combination of rapid localized recharge through the saprolite and fault zone and recharge along the contact zone, both from the north (older water) and where it is exposed to the south (younger water). The modeling effort also shows the importance of combining GPS and surface tiltmeter data with water-level measurements for constraining the properties of this complex aquifer system and

  9. Discrete Fracture Network Characterization of Fractured Shale Reservoirs with Implications to Hydraulic Fracturing Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, G.

    2016-12-01

    Shales are important petroleum source rocks and reservoir seals. Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have facilitated high gas production rates from shale and have had a strong impact on the U.S. gas supply and markets. Modeling of effective permeability for fractured shale reservoirs has been challenging because the presence of a fracture network significantly alters the reservoir hydrologic properties. Due to the frequent occurrence of fracture networks, it is of vital importance to characterize fracture networks and to investigate how these networks can be used to optimize the hydraulic fracturing. We have conducted basic research on 3-D fracture permeability characterization and compartmentization analyses for fractured shale formations, which takes the advantages of the discrete fracture networks (DFN). The DFN modeling is a stochastic modeling approach using the probabilistic density functions of fractures. Three common scenarios of DFN models have been studied for fracture permeability mapping using our previously proposed techniques. In DFN models with moderately to highly concentrated fractures, there exists a representative element volume (REV) for fracture permeability characterization, which indicates that the fractured reservoirs can be treated as anisotropic homogeneous media. Hydraulic fracturing will be most effective if the orientation of the hydraulic fracture is perpendicular to the mean direction of the fractures. A DFN model with randomized fracture orientations, on the other hand, lacks an REV for fracture characterization. Therefore, a fracture permeability tensor has to be computed from each element. Modeling of fracture interconnectivity indicates that there exists no preferred direction for hydraulic fracturing to be most effective oweing to the interconnected pathways of the fracture network. 3-D fracture permeability mapping has been applied to the Devonian Chattanooga Shale in Alabama and the results suggest that an

  10. Evidence of non-Darcy flow and non-Fickian transport in fractured media at laboratory scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cherubini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During a risk assessment procedure as well as when dealing with cleanup and monitoring strategies, accurate predictions of solute propagation in fractured rocks are of particular importance when assessing exposure pathways through which contaminants reach receptors. Experimental data obtained under controlled conditions such as in a laboratory allow to increase the understanding of the fundamental physics of fluid flow and solute transport in fractures. In this study, laboratory hydraulic and tracer tests have been carried out on an artificially created fractured rock sample. The tests regard the analysis of the hydraulic loss and the measurement of breakthrough curves for saline tracer pulse inside a rock sample of parallelepiped shape (0.60 × 0.40 × 0.08 m. The convolution theory has been applied in order to remove the effect of the acquisition apparatus on tracer experiments. The experimental results have shown evidence of a non-Darcy relationship between flow rate and hydraulic loss that is best described by Forchheimer's law. Furthermore, in the flow experiments both inertial and viscous flow terms are not negligible. The observed experimental breakthrough curves of solute transport have been modeled by the classical one-dimensional analytical solution for the advection–dispersion equation (ADE and the single rate mobile–immobile model (MIM. The former model does not properly fit the first arrival and the tail while the latter, which recognizes the existence of mobile and immobile domains for transport, provides a very decent fit. The carried out experiments show that there exists a pronounced mobile–immobile zone interaction that cannot be neglected and that leads to a non-equilibrium behavior of solute transport. The existence of a non-Darcian flow regime has showed to influence the velocity field in that it gives rise to a delay in solute migration with respect to the predicted value assuming linear flow. Furthermore, the

  11. Fracture-mechanical investigations on the propagation of heat-tension-cracks, in boittle multi-component media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.

    1983-01-01

    The quasistatic dissipation of thermically induced cracks in brittle multi-components material with plane boundary areas is studied. The distribution of Eigentension, which is causing the dissipation of cracks, is produced by cooling the composite material from the production temperature to room temperature. Tension distributions, respectively of the fracture-mechanical coefficients were determined by solving of the boundary value problems of the theory of plane thermoelasticity, a based on existence of a plane distortion state, respectively of a plane state of tension. Because of the complicated shape of the free surface one adopted a numerical solution, the finite-element method, to solve the corresponding mixed boundary value problems. (orig.) [de

  12. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  13. Geophysical Exploration of Fractured-Media Aquifers at the Mexican Mesa Central: Satellite City, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Loera, Héctor; Ramos Leal, José Alfredo; Dávila Harris, Pablo; Torres Gaytan, David Ernesto; Martinez Ruiz, Victor Julian; Gogichaishvili, Avto

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater is scarce in arid and semi-arid zones in the Mexican Mesa Central. It is found at depths over 200 m, and its movement is primarily through fractures. This work aims to present a geophysical methodology, which shows the potential of combining natural and induced methods to locate confined aquifers in fault zones. The studies begin by interpreting the aeromagnetic survey, mainly by seeking lineaments associated with low magnetic anomalies, which are correlated with fault zones, and/or fractures and/or geological contacts where ferromagnetic minerals have undergone oxidation due to their association with recharge zones. These aeromagnetic lineaments are confirmed on land by a ground magnetic survey. After locating these areas, interpreted as permeability zones, their possible association with moist zones is confirmed by applying the vertical electrical sounding (VES) technique. H-type curve is associated with the presence of saturated zones. This study used the proposed methodology to interpret four main aeromagnetic lineaments and 12 main ground magnetic lineaments in a 36 km2 (6 km × 6 km) area. Twenty-six SEV were performed over these magnetic lineaments, of which about 50 % were associated with H-type resistivity curves, interpreted as being associated with moisture. Of the 12 VES with inferred groundwater potential, two wells have been drilled to date, one having an extraction flow of 70 lps.

  14. An efficient fully-implicit multislope MUSCL method for multiphase flow with gravity in discrete fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiamin; Younis, Rami M.

    2017-06-01

    The first-order methods commonly employed in reservoir simulation for computing the convective fluxes introduce excessive numerical diffusion leading to severe smoothing of displacement fronts. We present a fully-implicit cell-centered finite-volume (CCFV) framework that can achieve second-order spatial accuracy on smooth solutions, while at the same time maintain robustness and nonlinear convergence performance. A novel multislope MUSCL method is proposed to construct the required values at edge centroids in a straightforward and effective way by taking advantage of the triangular mesh geometry. In contrast to the monoslope methods in which a unique limited gradient is used, the multislope concept constructs specific scalar slopes for the interpolations on each edge of a given element. Through the edge centroids, the numerical diffusion caused by mesh skewness is reduced, and optimal second order accuracy can be achieved. Moreover, an improved smooth flux-limiter is introduced to ensure monotonicity on non-uniform meshes. The flux-limiter provides high accuracy without degrading nonlinear convergence performance. The CCFV framework is adapted to accommodate a lower-dimensional discrete fracture-matrix (DFM) model. Several numerical tests with discrete fractured system are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the numerical model.

  15. Nonstationary source separation using sequential and variational Bayesian learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jen-Tzung; Hsieh, Hsin-Lung

    2013-05-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a popular approach for blind source separation where the mixing process is assumed to be unchanged with a fixed set of stationary source signals. However, the mixing system and source signals are nonstationary in real-world applications, e.g., the source signals may abruptly appear or disappear, the sources may be replaced by new ones or even moving by time. This paper presents an online learning algorithm for the Gaussian process (GP) and establishes a separation procedure in the presence of nonstationary and temporally correlated mixing coefficients and source signals. In this procedure, we capture the evolved statistics from sequential signals according to online Bayesian learning. The activity of nonstationary sources is reflected by an automatic relevance determination, which is incrementally estimated at each frame and continuously propagated to the next frame. We employ the GP to characterize the temporal structures of time-varying mixing coefficients and source signals. A variational Bayesian inference is developed to approximate the true posterior for estimating the nonstationary ICA parameters and for characterizing the activity of latent sources. The differences between this ICA method and the sequential Monte Carlo ICA are illustrated. In the experiments, the proposed algorithm outperforms the other ICA methods for the separation of audio signals in the presence of different nonstationary scenarios.

  16. Matched Weyl-Heisenberg expansions of nonstationary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozek, W.

    1996-09-01

    This thesis is about various aspects of linear time-varying systems and nonstationary processes (together nonstationary environments). Such nonstationary environments play an important role in modern communication engineering, particularly as models for natural signals or time-varying communication channels. Emphasis is on time-frequency-parametrized representations of nonstationary environments, i.e., time-varying power spectra and time varying transfer functions. Introduction of the generalized Weyl correspondence enables a unified formulation of classical, so far seemingly disparate definitions like Priestley's evolutionary spectrum, the Wigner-Ville spectrum, Zadeh's time-varying transfer function (Kohn-Nirenberg symbol) and the Weyl symbol. Nonstationary Wiener filtering provides an illustrative example for the limited applicability of these time-frequency concepts to a straight forward generalization of frequency domain solutions. We introduce a fundamental classification into underspread/overspread environments based on characterizing the underlying linear operator by the essential support of its spreading function. For underspread environments it is shown that the time-frequency-parametrized representations get essentially definition-independent and can be used in the same manner as the frequency-parametrized representations of stationary environments. Combining the practical efficiency of time-frequency-parametrized representations with the theoretical optimality of a diagonalizing transform leads to window matching criteria for the short-time Fourier transform/ Gabor expansion (discrete/continuous Weyl-Heisenberg expansion) of signals and linear systems. (author)

  17. Pressure Transient Analysis and Flux Distribution for Multistage Fractured Horizontal Wells in Triple-Porosity Reservoir Media with Consideration of Stress-Sensitivity Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-porosity model is usually adopted to describe reservoirs with multiscaled pore spaces, including matrix pores, natural fractures, and vugs. Multiple fractures created by hydraulic fracturing can effectively improve the connectivity between existing natural fractures and thus increase well deliverability. However, little work has been done on pressure transient behavior of multistage fractured horizontal wells in triple-porosity reservoirs. Based on source/sink function method, this paper presents a triple-porosity model to investigate the transient pressure dynamics and flux distribution for multistage fractured horizontal wells in fractured-vuggy reservoirs with consideration of stress-dependent natural fracture permeability. The model is semianalytically solved by discretizing hydraulic fractures and Pedrosa’s transformation, perturbation theory, and integration transformation method. Type curves of transient pressure dynamics are generated, and flux distribution among hydraulic fractures for a fractured horizontal well with constant production rate is also discussed. Parametric study shows that major influential parameters on transient pressure responses are parameters pertinent to reservoir properties, interporosity mass transfer, and hydraulic fractures. Analysis of flux distribution indicates that flux density gradually increases from the horizontal wellbore to fracture tips, and the flux contribution of outermost fractures is higher than that of inner fractures. The model can also be extended to optimize hydraulic fracture parameters.

  18. Some Results on the Wavelet Packet Decomposition of Nonstationary Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Touati

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet/wavelet packet decomposition has become a very useful tool in describing nonstationary processes. Important examples of nonstationary processes encountered in practice are cyclostationary processes or almost-cyclostationary processes. In this paper, we study the statistical properties of the wavelet packet decomposition of a large class of nonstationary processes, including in particular cyclostationary and almost-cyclostationary processes. We first investigate in a general framework, the existence and some properties of the cumulants of wavelet packet coefficients. We then study more precisely the almost-cyclostationary case, and determine the asymptotic distributions of wavelet packet coefficients. Finally, we particularize some of our results in the cyclostationary case before providing some illustrative simulations.

  19. Non-Stationary Internal Tides Observed with Satellite Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal variability of the internal tide is inferred from a 17-year combined record of Topex/Poseidon and Jason satellite altimeters. A global sampling of along-track sea-surface height wavenumber spectra finds that non-stationary variance is generally 25% or less of the average variance at wavenumbers characteristic of mode-l tidal internal waves. With some exceptions the non-stationary variance does not exceed 0.25 sq cm. The mode-2 signal, where detectable, contains a larger fraction of non-stationary variance, typically 50% or more. Temporal subsetting of the data reveals interannual variability barely significant compared with tidal estimation error from 3-year records. Comparison of summer vs. winter conditions shows only one region of noteworthy seasonal changes, the northern South China Sea. Implications for the anticipated SWOT altimeter mission are briefly discussed.

  20. Non-stationary condition monitoring through event alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik; Larsen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    We present an event alignment framework which enables change detection in non-stationary signals. change detection. Classical condition monitoring frameworks have been restrained to laboratory settings with stationary operating conditions, which are not resembling real world operation. In this pa......We present an event alignment framework which enables change detection in non-stationary signals. change detection. Classical condition monitoring frameworks have been restrained to laboratory settings with stationary operating conditions, which are not resembling real world operation....... In this paper we apply the technique for non-stationary condition monitoring of large diesel engines based on acoustical emission sensor signals. The performance of the event alignment is analyzed in an unsupervised probabilistic detection framework based on outlier detection with either Principal Component...

  1. Stochastic modelling of non-stationary financial assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevens, Joana; Rocha, Paulo; Boto, João P.; Lind, Pedro G.

    2017-11-01

    We model non-stationary volume-price distributions with a log-normal distribution and collect the time series of its two parameters. The time series of the two parameters are shown to be stationary and Markov-like and consequently can be modelled with Langevin equations, which are derived directly from their series of values. Having the evolution equations of the log-normal parameters, we reconstruct the statistics of the first moments of volume-price distributions which fit well the empirical data. Finally, the proposed framework is general enough to study other non-stationary stochastic variables in other research fields, namely, biology, medicine, and geology.

  2. Nonstationary Narrow-Band Response and First-Passage Probability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The notion of a nonstationary narrow-band stochastic process is introduced without reference to a frequency spectrum, and the joint distribution function of two consecutive maxima is approximated by use of an envelope. Based on these definitions the first passage problem is treated as a Markov...... point process. The theory is applied to the response of a linear oscillator excited by a stationary process from t equals 0, and a simple algebraic relation between the nonstationary and stationary correlation functions of the response is derived....

  3. Local polynomial Whittle estimation covering non-stationary fractional processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Frank

    This paper extends the local polynomial Whittle estimator of Andrews & Sun (2004) to fractionally integrated processes covering stationary and non-stationary regions. We utilize the notion of the extended discrete Fourier transform and periodogram to extend the local polynomial Whittle estimator...... to the non-stationary region. By approximating the short-run component of the spectrum by a polynomial, instead of a constant, in a shrinking neighborhood of zero we alleviate some of the bias that the classical local Whittle estimators is prone to. This bias reduction comes at a cost as the variance is in...

  4. Physics-preserving averaging scheme based on Grunwald-Letnikov formula for gas flow in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2018-01-02

    The heterogeneous natures of rock fabrics, due to the existence of multi-scale fractures and geological formations, led to the deviations from unity in the flux-equations fractional-exponent magnitudes. In this paper, the resulting non-Newtonian non-Darcy fractional-derivatives flux equations are solved using physics-preserving averaging schemes that incorporates both, original and shifted, Grunwald-Letnikov (GL) approximation formulas preserving the physics, by reducing the shifting effects, while maintaining the stability of the system, by keeping one shifted expansion. The proposed way of using the GL expansions also generate symmetrical coefficient matrices that significantly reduces the discretization complexities appearing with all shifted cases from literature, and help considerably in 2D and 3D systems. Systems equations derivations and discretization details are discussed. Then, the physics-preserving averaging scheme is explained and illustrated. Finally, results are presented and reviewed. Edge-based original GL expansions are unstable as also illustrated in literatures. Shifted GL expansions are stable but add a lot of additional weights to both discretization sides affecting the physical accuracy. In comparison, the physics-preserving averaging scheme balances the physical accuracy and stability requirements leading to a more physically conservative scheme that is more stable than the original GL approximation but might be slightly less stable than the shifted GL approximations. It is a locally conservative Single-Continuum averaging scheme that applies a finite-volume viewpoint.

  5. Methods and Tools to allow molecular flow simulations to be coupled to higher level continuum descriptions of flows in porous/fractured media and aerosol/dust dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-09

    The purpose of this project was to develop methods and tools that will aid in safety evaluation of nuclear fuels and licensing of nuclear reactors relating to accidents.The objectives were to develop more detailed and faster computations of fission product transport and aerosol evolution as they generally relate to nuclear fuel and/or nuclear reactor accidents. The two tasks in the project related to molecular transport in nuclear fuel and aerosol transport in reactor vessel and containment. For both the tasks, explorations of coupling of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo with Navier-Stokes solvers or the Sectional method were not successful. However, Mesh free methods for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method were successfully explored.These explorations permit applications to porous and fractured media, and arbitrary geometries.The computations were carried out in Mathematica and are fully parallelized. The project has resulted in new computational tools (algorithms and programs) that will improve the fidelity of computations to actual physics, chemistry and transport of fission products in the nuclear fuel and aerosol in reactor primary and secondary containments.

  6. Characterizing and modelling cyclic behaviour in non-stationary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A method based on wavelet transform is developed to characterize variations at multiple scales in non-stationary time series. We consider two different financial time series, S&P CNX Nifty closing index of the National Stock Exchange (India) and Dow. Jones industrial average closing values. These time series are ...

  7. Cointegration and Econometric Analysis of Non-Stationary Data in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is in conformity with the philosophy underlying the cointegration theory. Therefore, ignoring cointegration in non-stationary time series variables could lead to misspecification of the underlying process in the determination of corporate income tax in Nigeria. Thus, the study conclude that cointegration is greatly enhanced ...

  8. On complete moment convergence for nonstationary negatively associated random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Hwa Ko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this paper is to establish the complete moment convergence for nonstationary negatively associated random variables satisfying the weak mean domination condition. The result is an improvement of complete convergence in Marcinkiewicz-Zygmund-type SLLN for negatively associated random variables in Kuczmaszewska (Acta Math. Hung. 128:116-130, 2010.

  9. Dynamic Memory Model for Non-Stationary Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus Nørgaard; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    Real-world problems are often nonstationary and can cause cyclic, repetitive patterns in the search landscape. For this class of problems, we introduce a new GA with dynamic explicit memory, which showed superior performance compared to a classic GA and a previously introduced memory-based GA for...

  10. Turbulence Driven by Common Non-stationary Weak Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, L.

    2015-12-01

    Complications with analysis of turbulence in common non-stationary weak-wind conditions are briefly surveyed. The behavior of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is then examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field using measurements from three field programs with towers ranging from 12 to 20 m and an extensive horizontal network of sonic anemometers. The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions are studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso motions. Cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The relationship between the heat flux, wind speed and stratification is investigated. Weak wind conditions include frequent vertical convergence of the heat flux and implied temperature advection.

  11. Numerical Clifford Analysis for the Non-stationary Schroedinger Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faustino, N.; Vieira, N.

    2007-01-01

    We construct a discrete fundamental solution for the parabolic Dirac operator which factorizes the non-stationary Schroedinger operator. With such fundamental solution we construct a discrete counterpart for the Teodorescu and Cauchy-Bitsadze operators and the Bergman projectors. We finalize this paper with convergence results regarding the operators and a concrete numerical example

  12. A Phase Vocoder Based on Nonstationary Gabor Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Emil Solsbæk; Dörfler, Monika

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm for time stretching music signals based on the theory of nonstationary Gabor frames (NSGFs). The algorithm extends the techniques of the classical phase vocoder (PV) by incorporating adaptive timefrequency (TF) representations and adaptive phase locking. The adaptive TF...

  13. Dynamic Memory Model for Non-Stationary Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus Nørgaard; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    Real-world problems are often nonstationary and can cause cyclic, repetitive patterns in the search landscape. For this class of problems, we introduce a new GA with dynamic explicit memory, which showed superior performance compared to a classic GA and a previously introduced memory-based GA...

  14. Nonstationary Hydrological Frequency Analysis: Theoretical Methods and Application Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L.

    2014-12-01

    Because of its great implications in the design and operation of hydraulic structures under changing environments (either climate change or anthropogenic changes), nonstationary hydrological frequency analysis has become so important and essential. Two important achievements have been made in methods. Without adhering to the consistency assumption in the traditional hydrological frequency analysis, the time-varying probability distribution of any hydrological variable can be established by linking the distribution parameters to some covariates such as time or physical variables with the help of some powerful tools like the Generalized Additive Model of Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). With the help of copulas, the multivariate nonstationary hydrological frequency analysis has also become feasible. However, applications of the nonstationary hydrological frequency formula to the design and operation of hydraulic structures for coping with the impacts of changing environments in practice is still faced with many challenges. First, the nonstationary hydrological frequency formulae with time as covariate could only be extrapolated for a very short time period beyond the latest observation time, because such kind of formulae is not physically constrained and the extrapolated outcomes could be unrealistic. There are two physically reasonable methods that can be used for changing environments, one is to directly link the quantiles or the distribution parameters to some measureable physical factors, and the other is to use the derived probability distributions based on hydrological processes. However, both methods are with a certain degree of uncertainty. For the design and operation of hydraulic structures under changing environments, it is recommended that design results of both stationary and nonstationary methods be presented together and compared with each other, to help us understand the potential risks of each method.

  15. Fracture characteristics in Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial for the performance assessment of geosphere to evaluate the characteristics of fractures that can be dominant radionuclide migration pathways from a repository to biosphere. This report summarizes the characteristics of fractures obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields surveys at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at outcrops and galleries throughout the country. The characteristics of fractures described in this report are fracture orientation, fracture shape, fracture frequency, fracture distribution in space, transmissivity of fracture, fracture aperture, fracture fillings, alteration halo along fracture, flow-wetted surface area in fracture, and the correlation among these characteristics. Since granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media, a large amount of fracture data is available in literature. In addition, granitic rock has been treated as a potential host rock in many overseas programs, and has JNC performed a number of field observations and experiments in granodiorite at the Kamaishi mine. Therefore, the characteristics of fractures in granitic rock are qualitatively and quantitatively clarified to some extent in this report, while the characteristics of fractures in another rock types are not clarified. (author)

  16. Modeling mixed retention and early arrivals in multidimensional heterogeneous media using an explicit Lagrangian scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Baeumer, Boris; LaBolle, Eric M.

    2015-08-01

    This study develops an explicit two-step Lagrangian scheme based on the renewal-reward process to capture transient anomalous diffusion with mixed retention and early arrivals in multidimensional media. The resulting 3-D anomalous transport simulator provides a flexible platform for modeling transport. The first step explicitly models retention due to mass exchange between one mobile zone and any number of parallel immobile zones. The mobile component of the renewal process can be calculated as either an exponential random variable or a preassigned time step, and the subsequent random immobile time follows a Hyper-exponential distribution for finite immobile zones or a tempered stable distribution for infinite immobile zones with an exponentially tempered power-law memory function. The second step describes well-documented early arrivals which can follow streamlines due to mechanical dispersion using the method of subordination to regional flow. Applicability and implementation of the Lagrangian solver are further checked against transport observed in various media. Results show that, although the time-nonlocal model parameters are predictable for transport with retention in alluvial settings, the standard time-nonlocal model cannot capture early arrivals. Retention and early arrivals observed in porous and fractured media can be efficiently modeled by our Lagrangian solver, allowing anomalous transport to be incorporated into 2-D/3-D models with irregular flow fields. Extensions of the particle-tracking approach are also discussed for transport with parameters conditioned on local aquifer properties, as required by transient flow and nonstationary media.

  17. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    Although time-dependent quantum systems have been studied since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, they continue to attract the attention of many researchers, and almost every decade new important discoveries or new fields of application are made. Among the impressive results or by-products of these studies, one should note the discovery of the path integral method in the 1940s, coherent and squeezed states in the 1960-70s, quantum tunneling in Josephson contacts and SQUIDs in the 1960s, the theory of time-dependent quantum invariants in the 1960-70s, different forms of quantum master equations in the 1960-70s, the Zeno effect in the 1970s, the concept of geometric phase in the 1980s, decoherence of macroscopic superpositions in the 1980s, quantum non-demolition measurements in the 1980s, dynamics of particles in quantum traps and cavity QED in the 1980-90s, and time-dependent processes in mesoscopic quantum devices in the 1990s. All these topics continue to be the subject of many publications. Now we are witnessing a new wave of interest in quantum non-stationary systems in different areas, from cosmology (the very first moments of the Universe) and quantum field theory (particle pair creation in ultra-strong fields) to elementary particle physics (neutrino oscillations). A rapid increase in the number of theoretical and experimental works on time-dependent phenomena is also observed in quantum optics, quantum information theory and condensed matter physics. Time-dependent tunneling and time-dependent transport in nano-structures are examples of such phenomena. Another emerging direction of study, stimulated by impressive progress in experimental techniques, is related to attempts to observe the quantum behavior of macroscopic objects, such as mirrors interacting with quantum fields in nano-resonators. Quantum effects manifest themselves in the dynamics of nano-electromechanical systems; they are dominant in the quite new and very promising field of circuit

  18. Partitioning dynamics of unsaturated flows in fractured porous media: Laboratory studies and three-dimensional multi-scale smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gravity-driven flow in fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Bresinsky, L. T.; Shigorina, E.; Noffz, T.; Dentz, M.; Sauter, M.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Preferential flow dynamics in unsaturated fractures remain a challenging topic on various scales. On pore- and fracture-scales the highly erratic gravity-driven flow dynamics often provoke a strong deviation from classical volume-effective approaches. Against the common notion that flow in fractures (or macropores) can only occur under equilibrium conditions, i.e., if the surrounding porous matrix is fully saturated and capillary pressures are high enough to allow filling of the fracture void space, arrival times suggest the existence of rapid preferential flow along fractures, fracture networks, and fault zones, even if the matrix is not fully saturated. Modeling such flows requires efficient numerical techniques to cover various flow-relevant physics, such as surface tension, static and dynamic contact angles, free-surface (multi-phase) interface dynamics, and formation of singularities. Here we demonstrate the importance of such flow modes on the partitioning dynamics at simple fracture intersections, with a combination of laboratory experiments, analytical solutions and numerical simulations using our newly developed massively parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. Flow modes heavily influence the "bypass" behavior of water flowing along a fracture junction. Flows favoring the formation of droplets exhibit a much stronger bypass capacity compared to rivulet flows, where nearly the whole fluid mass is initially stored within the horizontal fracture. This behavior is demonstrated for a multi-inlet laboratory setup where the inlet-specific flow rate is chosen so that either a droplet or rivulet flow persists. The effect of fluid buffering within the horizontal fracture is presented in terms of dimensionless fracture inflow so that characteristic scaling regimes can be recovered. For both cases (rivulets and droplets), flow within the horizontal fracture transitions into a Washburn regime until a critical threshold is reached and the bypass efficiency

  19. Simulation of counter-current imbibition in water-wet fractured reservoirs based on discrete-fracture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yueying

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Isolated fractures usually exist in fractured media systems, where the capillary pressure in the fracture is lower than that of the matrix, causing the discrepancy in oil recoveries between fractured and non-fractured porous media. Experiments, analytical solutions and conventional simulation methods based on the continuum model approach are incompetent or insufficient in describing media containing isolated fractures. In this paper, the simulation of the counter-current imbibition in fractured media is based on the discrete-fracture model (DFM. The interlocking or arrangement of matrix and fracture system within the model resembles the traditional discrete fracture network model and the hybrid-mixed-finite-element method is employed to solve the associated equations. The Behbahani experimental data validates our simulation solution for consistency. The simulation results of the fractured media show that the isolated-fractures affect the imbibition in the matrix block. Moreover, the isolated fracture parameters such as fracture length and fracture location influence the trend of the recovery curves. Thus, the counter-current imbibition behavior of media with isolated fractures can be predicted using this method based on the discrete-fracture model.

  20. Hydrologic behavior of fracture networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.C.S.; Endo, H.K.; Karasaki, K.; Pyrak, L.; MacLean, P.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the nature of flow and transport in discontinuous fracture networks. The hydrologic behavior of these networks has been examined using two- and three-dimensional numerical models. The numerical models represent random realizations of fracture networks based on statistical field measurements of fracture geometry and equivalent hydraulic aperture. We have compared the flux and mechanical transport behavior of these networks to the behavior of equivalent continua. In this way we are able to determine whether a given fracture network can be modeled as an equivalent porous media in both flux and advective transport studies. We have examined departures from porous media behavior both as a function of interconnectivity and heterogeneity. Parameter studies have revealed behavior patterns such as: given a fracture frequency that can be measured in the field, porous media like behavior and the magnitude of permeability are both enhanced if the fractures are longer and the standard deviation of fracture permeabilities is smaller. Transport studies have shown that the ratio between flux and velocity is not necessarily constant when the direction of flow is changed in systems which do behave like a porous media for flux. Thus the conditions under which porous media analysis can be used in transport studies are more restrictive than the condition for flux studies. We have examined systems which do not behave like porous media and have shown how the in situ behavior varies as a function of scale of observation. The behavior of well tests in fractured networks has been modeled and compared to a new analytical well test solution which accounts for the early time dominance of the fractures intersecting the well. Finally, a three-dimensional fracture flow model has been constructed which assumes fractures are randomly located discs. 13 references, 12 figures

  1. Competitiveness of nonstationary states in linear kinetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, Victor I.; Kapitanchuk, Oleksiy L.

    2018-01-01

    The master equation formalism is used to describe the possibility for peak population amplitudes of two nonstationary states in a 3-stage linear kinetic system to be endowed with an untraditional physical quantity — competitiveness — established in regard to the differences for the degree of the peak responses to a change in the input rate constants. Calculated coefficients of competitiveness are found to agree with observations of performance for the three optical materials with respect to their reliability in different operating windows. It is concluded that, for a non-equilibrium linear kinetic system, the competitiveness constitutes a common dynamic property of its nonstationary states and, in the case of their directed irreversible evolution, comprises the property of a system’s anti-cooperativity.

  2. Compounding approach for univariate time series with nonstationary variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Rudi; Barkhofen, Sonja; Guhr, Thomas; Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen; Kuhl, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of nonstationary systems is the time dependence of their statistical parameters. Measured time series may exhibit Gaussian statistics on short time horizons, due to the central limit theorem. The sample statistics for long time horizons, however, averages over the time-dependent variances. To model the long-term statistical behavior, we compound the local distribution with the distribution of its parameters. Here, we consider two concrete, but diverse, examples of such nonstationary systems: the turbulent air flow of a fan and a time series of foreign exchange rates. Our main focus is to empirically determine the appropriate parameter distribution for the compounding approach. To this end, we extract the relevant time scales by decomposing the time signals into windows and determine the distribution function of the thus obtained local variances.

  3. Nonstationary ARCH and GARCH with t-distributed Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Søndergaard; Rahbek, Anders

    Consistency and asymptotic normality are established for the maximum likelihood estimators in the nonstationary ARCH and GARCH models with general t-distributed innovations. The results hold for joint estimation of (G)ARCH effects and the degrees of freedom parameter parametrizing the t-distribut......Consistency and asymptotic normality are established for the maximum likelihood estimators in the nonstationary ARCH and GARCH models with general t-distributed innovations. The results hold for joint estimation of (G)ARCH effects and the degrees of freedom parameter parametrizing the t......-distribution. With T denoting sample size, classic square-root T-convergence is shown to hold with closed form expressions for the multivariate covariances....

  4. Non-Stationary Dependence Structures for Spatial Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Huser, Raphaël

    2016-03-03

    Max-stable processes are natural models for spatial extremes because they provide suitable asymptotic approximations to the distribution of maxima of random fields. In the recent past, several parametric families of stationary max-stable models have been developed, and fitted to various types of data. However, a recurrent problem is the modeling of non-stationarity. In this paper, we develop non-stationary max-stable dependence structures in which covariates can be easily incorporated. Inference is performed using pairwise likelihoods, and its performance is assessed by an extensive simulation study based on a non-stationary locally isotropic extremal t model. Evidence that unknown parameters are well estimated is provided, and estimation of spatial return level curves is discussed. The methodology is demonstrated with temperature maxima recorded over a complex topography. Models are shown to satisfactorily capture extremal dependence.

  5. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  6. ADSL Transceivers Applying DSM and Their Nonstationary Noise Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bostoen Tom

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic spectrum management (DSM comprises a new set of techniques for multiuser power allocation and/or detection in digital subscriber line (DSL networks. At the Alcatel Research and Innovation Labs, we have recently developed a DSM test bed, which allows the performance of DSM algorithms to be evaluated in practice. With this test bed, we have evaluated the performance of a DSM level-1 algorithm known as iterative water-filling in an ADSL scenario. This paper describes the results of, on the one hand, the performance gains achieved with iterative water-filling, and, on the other hand, the nonstationary noise robustness of DSM-enabled ADSL modems. It will be shown that DSM trades off nonstationary noise robustness for performance improvements. A new bit swap procedure is then introduced to increase the noise robustness when applying DSM.

  7. ADSL Transceivers Applying DSM and Their Nonstationary Noise Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bogaert, Etienne Van; Bostoen, Tom; Verlinden, Jan; Cendrillon, Raphael; Moonen, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Dynamic spectrum management (DSM) comprises a new set of techniques for multiuser power allocation and/or detection in digital subscriber line (DSL) networks. At the Alcatel Research and Innovation Labs, we have recently developed a DSM test bed, which allows the performance of DSM algorithms to be evaluated in practice. With this test bed, we have evaluated the performance of a DSM level-1 algorithm known as iterative water-filling in an ADSL scenario. This paper describes the results of, on the one hand, the performance gains achieved with iterative water-filling, and, on the other hand, the nonstationary noise robustness of DSM-enabled ADSL modems. It will be shown that DSM trades off nonstationary noise robustness for performance improvements. A new bit swap procedure is then introduced to increase the noise robustness when applying DSM.

  8. Thin viscoelastic disc subjected to radial non-stationary loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adámek V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of non-stationary wave phenomena in isotropic viscoelastic solids using analytical approaches is the aim of this paper. Concretely, the problem of a thin homogeneous disc subjected to radial pressure load nonzero on the part of its rim is solved. The external excitation is described by the Heaviside function in time, so the nonstationary state of stress is induced in the disc. Dissipative material behaviour of solid studied is represented by the discrete material model of standard linear viscoelastic solid in the Zener configuration. After the derivation of motion equations final form, the method of integral transforms in combination with the Fourier method is used for finding the problem solution. The solving process results in the derivation of integral transforms of radial and circumferential displacement components. Finally, the type of derived functions singularities and possible methods for their inverse Laplace transform are mentioned.

  9. Learning in Non-Stationary Environments Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lughofer, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Recent decades have seen rapid advances in automatization processes, supported by modern machines and computers. The result is significant increases in system complexity and state changes, information sources, the need for faster data handling and the integration of environmental influences. Intelligent systems, equipped with a taxonomy of data-driven system identification and machine learning algorithms, can handle these problems partially. Conventional learning algorithms in a batch off-line setting fail whenever dynamic changes of the process appear due to non-stationary environments and external influences.   Learning in Non-Stationary Environments: Methods and Applications offers a wide-ranging, comprehensive review of recent developments and important methodologies in the field. The coverage focuses on dynamic learning in unsupervised problems, dynamic learning in supervised classification and dynamic learning in supervised regression problems. A later section is dedicated to applications in which dyna...

  10. Portfolio return distributions: Sample statistics with non-stationary correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Chetalova, Desislava; Schmitt, Thilo A.; Schäfer, Rudi; Guhr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider random vectors drawn from a multivariate normal distribution and compute the sample statistics in the presence of non-stationary correlations. For this purpose, we construct an ensemble of random correlation matrices and average the normal distribution over this ensemble. The resulting distribution contains a modified Bessel function of the second kind whose behavior differs significantly from the multivariate normal distribution, in the central part as well as in the tails. This ...

  11. Nonstationary heat flow in the piston of the turbocharged engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr GUSTOF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the numeric computations of nonstationary heat flow in form of temperature distribution on characteristic surfaces of the piston of the turbocharged engine at the beginning phase its work was presented. The computations were performed for fragmentary load engine by means of the two-zone combustion model, the boundary conditions of III kind and the finite elements method (FEM by using of COSMOS/M program.

  12. A Generalized Framework for Non-Stationary Extreme Value Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragno, E.; Cheng, L.; Sadegh, M.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Empirical trends in climate variables including precipitation, temperature, snow-water equivalent at regional to continental scales are evidence of changes in climate over time. The evolving climate conditions and human activity-related factors such as urbanization and population growth can exert further changes in weather and climate extremes. As a result, the scientific community faces an increasing demand for updated appraisal of the time-varying climate extremes. The purpose of this study is to offer a robust and flexible statistical tool for non-stationary extreme value analysis which can better characterize the severity and likelihood of extreme climatic variables. This is critical to ensure a more resilient environment in a changing climate. Following the positive feedback on the first version of Non-Stationary Extreme Value Analysis (NEVA) Toolbox by Cheng at al. 2014, we present an improved version, i.e. NEVA2.0. The upgraded version herein builds upon a newly-developed hybrid evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach for numerical parameters estimation and uncertainty assessment. This addition leads to a more robust uncertainty estimates of return levels, return periods, and risks of climatic extremes under both stationary and non-stationary assumptions. Moreover, NEVA2.0 is flexible in incorporating any user-specified covariate other than the default time-covariate (e.g., CO2 emissions, large scale climatic oscillation patterns). The new feature will allow users to examine non-stationarity of extremes induced by physical conditions that underlie the extreme events (e.g. antecedent soil moisture deficit, large-scale climatic teleconnections, urbanization). In addition, the new version offers an option to generate stationary and/or non-stationary rainfall Intensity - Duration - Frequency (IDF) curves that are widely used for risk assessment and infrastructure design. Finally, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) of the package is provided, making NEVA

  13. Stochastic and fractal analysis of fracture trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessendorf, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    Analyses of fracture trajectories are used to investigate structures that fall between 'micro' and 'macro' scales. It was shown that fracture trajectories belong to the class of nonstationary processes. It was also found that correlation distance, which may be related to a characteristic size of a fracture process, increases with crack length. An assemblage of crack trajectory processes may be considered as a diffusive process. Chudnovsky (1981-1985) introduced a 'crack diffusion coefficient' d which reflects the ability of the material to deviate the crack trajectory from the most energetically efficient path and thus links the material toughness to its structure. For the set of fracture trajectories in AISI 304 steel, d was found to be equal to 1.04 microns. The fractal dimension D for the same set of trajectories was found to be 1.133.

  14. Stationary and nonstationary properties of evolving networks with preferential linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezewski, W.

    2002-01-01

    Networks evolving by preferential attachment of both external and internal links are investigated. The rate of adding an external link is assumed to depend linearly on the degree of a preexisting node to which a new node is connected. The process of creating an internal link, between a pair of existing vertices, is assumed to be controlled entirely by the vertex that has more links than the other vertex in the pair, and the rate of creation of such a link is assumed to be, in general, nonlinear in the degree of the more strongly connected vertex. It is shown that degree distributions of networks evolving only by creating internal links display for large degrees a nonstationary power-law decay with a time-dependent scaling exponent. Nonstationary power-law behaviors are numerically shown to persist even when the number of nodes is not fixed and both external and internal connections are introduced, provided that the rate of preferential attachment of internal connections is nonlinear. It is argued that nonstationary effects are not unlikely in real networks, although these effects may not be apparent, especially in networks with a slowly varying mean degree

  15. Optimizing a Military Supply Chain in the Presence of Random, Non-Stationary Demands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yew

    2003-01-01

    ... logistics supply chain that satisfies uncertain, non-stationary demands, while taking into account the volatility and singularity of military operations This research focuses on the development...

  16. RESEARCH PROGRAM ON FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2002-04-12

    Numerical simulation of water injection in discrete fractured media with capillary pressure is a challenge. Dual-porosity models in view of their strength and simplicity can be mainly used for sugar-cube representation of fractured media. In such a representation, the transfer function between the fracture and the matrix block can be readily calculated for water-wet media. For a mixed-wet system, the evaluation of the transfer function becomes complicated due to the effect of gravity. In this work, they use a discrete-fracture model in which the fractures are discretized as one dimensional entities to account for fracture thickness by an integral form of the flow equations. This simple step greatly improves the numerical solution. Then the discrete-fracture model is implemented using a Galerkin finite element method. The robustness and the accuracy of the approach are shown through several examples. First they consider a single fracture in a rock matrix and compare the results of the discrete-fracture model with a single-porosity model. Then, they use the discrete-fracture model in more complex configurations. Numerical simulations are carried out in water-wet media as well as in mixed-wet media to study the effect of matrix and fracture capillary pressures.

  17. Coupling of a two phase gas liquid 3D Darcy flow in fractured porous media with a 1D free gas flow

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Konstantin; Masson, Roland; Trenty, Laurent; Zhang, Yumeng

    2015-01-01

    A model coupling a three dimensional gas liquid compositional Darcy flow in a frac-tured porous medium, and a one dimensional compositional free gas flow is presented. The coupling conditions at the interface between the gallery and the porous medium account for the molar normal fluxes continuity for each component, the gas liquid thermody-namical equilibrium, the gas pressure continuity and the gas and liquid molar fractions continuity. The fractures are represented as interfaces of codimens...

  18. Testing for long memory in potentially nonstationary perturbed fractional processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Frank; Frederiksen, Per S.

    In this paper, we propose new tests for long memory in stationary and nonstationary time series possibly perturbed by short-run noise which may be serially correlated. The tests are all based on semiparametric estimators and exploit the self-similarity property of long memory processes. We o......¤er simulation results that show good size properties of the tests, with power against spurious long memory. An empirical study of daily log-squared returns series of exchange rates and DJIA30 stocks shows that indeed there is long memory in exchange rate volatility and stock return volatility....

  19. Detrending of non-stationary noise data by spline techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.

    1989-11-01

    An off-line method for detrending non-stationary noise data has been investigated. It uses a least squares spline approximation of the noise data with equally spaced breakpoints. Subtraction of the spline approximation from the noise signal at each data point gives a residual noise signal. The method acts as a high-pass filter with very sharp frequency cutoff. The cutoff frequency is determined by the breakpoint distance. The steepness of the cutoff is controlled by the spline order. (author) 12 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs

  20. Parametric amplification of waves in non-stationary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivitskij, V.S.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    Using plasma as a nonlinear medium which can provide an amplification of electromagnetic radiation is of a sufficiently great interest now. Parametric amplification of oscillations connected with a nonstationary of the medium parameters is one of such mechanisms which may result in waves growing. To find a growth rate of such a 'parametric' wave amplification (resulting from the dependence ε ωk (vector) (t) it is necessary to clarify how does the dielectric permittivity depend upon time. Namely, the general form of the (linear) connection between an induction D(t) and an intensity Ε(vector) (t) of the electric field is given. (Author)

  1. A Phase Vocoder Based on Nonstationary Gabor Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Emil Solsbæk; Dörfler, Monika

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm for time stretching music signals based on the theory of nonstationary Gabor frames (NSGFs). The algorithm extends the techniques of the classical phase vocoder (PV) by incorporating adaptive timefrequency (TF) representations and adaptive phase locking. The adaptive TF...... that with just three times as many TF coefficients as signal samples, artifacts such as phasiness and transient smearing can be greatly reduced compared to the classical PV. The proposed algorithm is tested on both synthetic and real world signals and compared with state of the art algorithms in a reproducible...

  2. Bayesian Inference of Nonstationary Precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Infrastructure Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    comparison of these Bayesian- inferred IDF curves under stationary and nonstationary conditions. BACKGROUND: Probability concepts and related relevant...second edition, texts in statistical science. United Kingdom: Chapman & Hall/CRC. Gelman, A., and D. B. Rubin. 1992. Inference from iterative...ERDC/CHL CHETN-X-2 March 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Bayesian Inference of Nonstationary Precipitation Intensity

  3. Wavelet-Based Methodology for Evolutionary Spectra Estimation of Nonstationary Typhoon Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Closed-form expressions are proposed to estimate the evolutionary power spectral density (EPSD of nonstationary typhoon processes by employing the wavelet transform. Relying on the definition of the EPSD and the concept of the wavelet transform, wavelet coefficients of a nonstationary typhoon process at a certain time instant are interpreted as the Fourier transform of a new nonstationary oscillatory process, whose modulating function is equal to the modulating function of the nonstationary typhoon process multiplied by the wavelet function in time domain. Then, the EPSD of nonstationary typhoon processes is deduced in a closed form and is formulated as a weighted sum of the squared moduli of time-dependent wavelet functions. The weighted coefficients are frequency-dependent functions defined by the wavelet coefficients of the nonstationary typhoon process and the overlapping area of two shifted wavelets. Compared with the EPSD, defined by a sum of the squared moduli of the wavelets in frequency domain in literature, this paper provides an EPSD estimation method in time domain. The theoretical results are verified by uniformly modulated nonstationary typhoon processes and non-uniformly modulated nonstationary typhoon processes.

  4. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface - Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    Although the biogeochemical processes underlying in situ bioremediation technologies are increasingly well understood, field-scale heterogeneity (both physical and biogeochemical) remains a major obstacle to successful field-scale implementation. In particular, slow release of contamination from low-permeability regions (primarily by diffusive/dispersive mass transfer) can hinder the effectiveness of remediation. The research described in this report was conducted in conjunction with a project entitled ''In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface'', which was funded through the Field Research element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Timothy Scheibe (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Scott Brooks (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The overall goal of the project was to evaluate strategies that target bioremediation at interfaces between high- and low-permeability regions of an aquifer in order to minimize the rate of contaminant transfer into high-permeability/high fluid flow zones. The research was conducted at the Area 2 site of the Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Area 2 is a shallow pathway for migration of contaminated groundwater to seeps in the upper reach of Bear Creek at ORNL, mainly through a ca. 1 m thick layer of gravel located 4-5 m below the ground surface. Hydrological tracer studies indicate that the gravel layer receives input of uranium from both upstream sources and from diffusive mass transfer out of highly contaminated fill and saprolite materials above and below the gravel layer. We sought to test the hypothesis that injection of electron donor into this

  5. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface – Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric E. Roden

    2007-11-02

    Although the biogeochemical processes underlying in situ bioremediation technologies are increasingly well understood, field-scale heterogeneity (both physical and biogeochemical) remains a major obstacle to successful field-scale implementation. In particular, slow release of contamination from low-permeability regions (primarily by diffusive/dispersive mass transfer) can hinder the effectiveness of remediation. The research described in this report was conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface”, which was funded through the Field Research element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Timothy Scheibe (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Scott Brooks (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The overall goal of the project was to evaluate strategies that target bioremediation at interfaces between high- and low-permeability regions of an aquifer in order to minimize the rate of contaminant transfer into high-permeability/high fluid flow zones. The research was conducted at the Area 2 site of the Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Area 2 is a shallow pathway for migration of contaminated groundwater to seeps in the upper reach of Bear Creek at ORNL, mainly through a ca. 1 m thick layer of gravel located 4-5 m below the ground surface. Hydrological tracer studies indicate that the gravel layer receives input of uranium from both upstream sources and from diffusive mass transfer out of highly contaminated fill and saprolite materials above and below the gravel layer. We sought to test the hypothesis that injection of electron donor into

  6. Detection of hidden structures in nonstationary spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken; Okada, Masato

    2011-05-01

    We propose an algorithm for simultaneously estimating state transitions among neural states and nonstationary firing rates using a switching state-space model (SSSM). This algorithm enables us to detect state transitions on the basis of not only discontinuous changes in mean firing rates but also discontinuous changes in the temporal profiles of firing rates (e.g., temporal correlation). We construct estimation and learning algorithms for a nongaussian SSSM, whose nongaussian property is caused by binary spike events. Local variational methods can transform the binary observation process into a quadratic form. The transformed observation process enables us to construct a variational Bayes algorithm that can determine the number of neural states based on automatic relevance determination. Additionally, our algorithm can estimate model parameters from single-trial data using a priori knowledge about state transitions and firing rates. Synthetic data analysis reveals that our algorithm has higher performance for estimating nonstationary firing rates than previous methods. The analysis also confirms that our algorithm can detect state transitions on the basis of discontinuous changes in temporal correlation, which are transitions that previous hidden Markov models could not detect. We also analyze neural data recorded from the medial temporal area. The statistically detected neural states probably coincide with transient and sustained states that have been detected heuristically. Estimated parameters suggest that our algorithm detects the state transitions on the basis of discontinuous changes in the temporal correlation of firing rates. These results suggest that our algorithm is advantageous in real-data analysis.

  7. Adaptive nonstationary DPCM image coding with variable block size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Chyi; Daut, David G.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the design and performance of a spatial domain image encoding scheme that adapts to the localized statistical structure of an image. An adaptive differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) image coding system operates on an image that has been preprocessed into segments of variable size, square blocks. Each block is separately encoded by a DPCM system whose parameters have been obtained based upon an underlying nonstationary image model fitted to the block. The source coding performance of the adaptive DPCM algorithm proposed in this study has ben found to result in an improvement of 2.5 dB, or greater, compared to that obtained using a non-adaptive, conventionally designed DPCM encoder/decoder pair when operating at low bit rates. Reconstructed images obtained in this study are of perceptually higher-quality due to the adaptive encoding system design being based on the more realistic assumption of nonstationary statistics. Specifically, experiments have revealed that reconstructed edges within local regions of the image are sharper providing an overall improvement in a viewers subjective assessment of global image quality.

  8. Incremental learning of concept drift in nonstationary environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Ryan; Polikar, Robi

    2011-10-01

    We introduce an ensemble of classifiers-based approach for incremental learning of concept drift, characterized by nonstationary environments (NSEs), where the underlying data distributions change over time. The proposed algorithm, named Learn(++). NSE, learns from consecutive batches of data without making any assumptions on the nature or rate of drift; it can learn from such environments that experience constant or variable rate of drift, addition or deletion of concept classes, as well as cyclical drift. The algorithm learns incrementally, as other members of the Learn(++) family of algorithms, that is, without requiring access to previously seen data. Learn(++). NSE trains one new classifier for each batch of data it receives, and combines these classifiers using a dynamically weighted majority voting. The novelty of the approach is in determining the voting weights, based on each classifier's time-adjusted accuracy on current and past environments. This approach allows the algorithm to recognize, and act accordingly, to the changes in underlying data distributions, as well as to a possible reoccurrence of an earlier distribution. We evaluate the algorithm on several synthetic datasets designed to simulate a variety of nonstationary environments, as well as a real-world weather prediction dataset. Comparisons with several other approaches are also included. Results indicate that Learn(++). NSE can track the changing environments very closely, regardless of the type of concept drift. To allow future use, comparison and benchmarking by interested researchers, we also release our data used in this paper. © 2011 IEEE

  9. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  10. Characterization and modelling of fluid flows in fissured and fractured media. relation with hydrothermal alterations and paleo-stress quantification; Caracterisation et modelisation des ecoulements fluides en milieu fissure. relation avec les alterations hydrothermales et quantification des paleocontraintes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausse, J.

    1998-10-15

    In all materials (rocks, concretes, ceramics,...), the presence of fractures at different scales implies high permeability and often oriented fluid flows. These fluid circulations in fractures induce more or less intense fluid-rock interactions with mineral crystallisation and/or dissolution. These phenomena directly depend on the nature of the fluids and the rocks, the physical and chemical properties of the media and the rate of fluid renewal (permeabilities). Usually, the development of such alterations leads to a massive sealing of the fractures (vein alterations) and of the fissures (fluid inclusion planes and microcracks, pervasive alteration). Therefore, their study brings us precious indications for the understanding of the mechanisms of fluid migrations in fossil systems. A geometrical study of the fracture systems at micro or macroscopic scales, based on the spatial distribution of sealing minerals, is applied to two different granites: the Soultz-sous-Foret granite (Bas-Rhin, France) and the Brezouard granite (Vosges, France). At the macroscopic scale, a new graphical method is proposed in order to study drilling data (Soultz granite). It allows to identify the presence of three independent mineral associations (quartz - illite, calcite-chlorite and hematite) in independent fracture systems characterised by a specific 3D geometry and hydraulic properties. These three types of vein alteration correspond to distinct and non contemporaneous fluid percolations. At the microscopic scale, the reconstitution of crack opening - fluid percolation - crack sealing stages is delicate. However, the study of their geometrical characteristics (orientations, radius, volume densities) and thereby the quantification of their porosities, exchange surfaces and permeabilities, allow to identify their respective roles in the fluid propagation. These microstructures, which are very numerous in granites, imply high but variable matrix permeabilities. This has been confirmed by

  11. Speeding up the antidynamical Casimir effect with nonstationary qutrits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Díaz-Guevara, J. J.; Napoli, A.; Militello, B.

    2017-09-01

    The antidynamical Casimir effect (ADCE) is a term coined to designate the coherent annihilation of excitations due to resonant external perturbation of system parameters, allowing for extraction of quantum work from nonvacuum states of some field. Originally proposed for a two-level atom (qubit) coupled to a single-cavity mode in the context of the nonstationary quantum Rabi model, it suffered from a very low transition rate and correspondingly narrow resonance linewidth. In this paper we show analytically and numerically that the ADCE rate can be increased by at least one order of magnitude by replacing the qubit by an artificial three-level atom (qutrit) in a properly chosen configuration. For the cavity thermal state we demonstrate that the dynamics of the average photon number and atomic excitation is completely different from the qubit's case, while the behavior of the total number of excitations is qualitatively similar yet significantly faster.

  12. Analysis of Nonstationary Time Series for Biological Rhythms Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leise, Tanya L

    2017-06-01

    This article is part of a Journal of Biological Rhythms series exploring analysis and statistics topics relevant to researchers in biological rhythms and sleep research. The goal is to provide an overview of the most common issues that arise in the analysis and interpretation of data in these fields. In this article on time series analysis for biological rhythms, we describe some methods for assessing the rhythmic properties of time series, including tests of whether a time series is indeed rhythmic. Because biological rhythms can exhibit significant fluctuations in their period, phase, and amplitude, their analysis may require methods appropriate for nonstationary time series, such as wavelet transforms, which can measure how these rhythmic parameters change over time. We illustrate these methods using simulated and real time series.

  13. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas’yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  14. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  15. Non-stationary magnetoencephalography by Bayesian filtering of dipole models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somersalo, E.; Voutilainen, A.; Kaipio, J. P.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we consider the biomagnetic inverse problem of estimating a time-varying source current from magnetic field measurements. It is assumed that the data are severely corrupted by measurement noise. This setting is a model for magnetoencephalography (MEG) when the dynamic nature of the source prevents us from effecting noise reduction by averaging over consecutive measurements. Thus, the potential applications of this approach include the single trial estimation of the brain activity, in particular from the spontaneous MEG data. Our approach is based on non-stationary Bayesian estimation, and we propose the use of particle filters. The source model in this work is either a single dipole or multiple dipole model. Part of the problem consists of the model determination. Numerical simulations are presented.

  16. Nonstationary temporal Wiener filtering of gated blood pool studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Miller, T.R.; Doherty, P.W.; Bianco, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Temporal filtering of dynamic images can significantly improve the image quality of gated blood pool (GBP) studies and serves as a necessary preprocessing step in the formation of cardiac functional images based on derivatives of pixel time activity curves. Generally, either linear combination of the frames, or a simple frequency domain low pass filter have been employed. The work described in this paper introduces the Wiener temporal filter which adjusts to match the temporal characteristic of the image at each pixel. For temporal data degraded by signal-dependent Poisson noise, the frequency domain form of the filter is presented. Use of nonstationary temporal Wiener filtering was found to improve the quality of cines formed from GBP studies and yielded better separation of cardiac from non-cardiac regions in functional images the peak ejection and filling rates

  17. Generalized Predictive Control for Non-Stationary Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palsson, Olafur Petur; Madsen, Henrik; Søgaard, Henning Tangen

    1994-01-01

    This paper shows how the generalized predictive control (GPC) can be extended to non-stationary (time-varying) systems. If the time-variation is slow, then the classical GPC can be used in context with an adaptive estimation procedure of a time-invariant ARIMAX model. However, in this paper prior...... knowledge concerning the nature of the parameter variations is assumed available. The GPC is based on the assumption that the prediction of the system output can be expressed as a linear combination of present and future controls. Since the Diophantine equation cannot be used due to the time......-variation of the parameters, the optimal prediction is found as the general conditional expectation of the system output. The underlying model is of an ARMAX-type instead of an ARIMAX-type as in the original version of the GPC (Clarke, D. W., C. Mohtadi and P. S. Tuffs (1987). Automatica, 23, 137-148) and almost all later...

  18. Non-stationary vibrations of a thin viscoelastic orthotropic beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, V.; Valeš, František; Tikal, B.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 12 (2009), e2569-e2576 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/07/0946 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : thin beam * non-stationary vibration * analytical solution Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V0Y-4WB3N8S-4&_user=640952&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1156243286&_rerunOrigin= google &_acct=C000034318&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=640952&md5=ce096901a3382058455e822a20645820

  19. Likelihood inference for a nonstationary fractional autoregressive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Ørregård Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses model-based inference in an autoregressive model for fractional processes which allows the process to be fractional of order d or d-b. Fractional differencing involves infinitely many past values and because we are interested in nonstationary processes we model the data X1......,...,X_{T} given the initial values X_{-n}, n=0,1,..., as is usually done. The initial values are not modeled but assumed to be bounded. This represents a considerable generalization relative to all previous work where it is assumed that initial values are zero. For the statistical analysis we assume...... the conditional Gaussian likelihood and for the probability analysis we also condition on initial values but assume that the errors in the autoregressive model are i.i.d. with suitable moment conditions. We analyze the conditional likelihood and its derivatives as stochastic processes in the parameters, including...

  20. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  1. A Nonstationary Markov Model Detects Directional Evolution in Hymenopteran Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2015-11-01

    Directional evolution has played an important role in shaping the morphological, ecological, and molecular diversity of life. However, standard substitution models assume stationarity of the evolutionary process over the time scale examined, thus impeding the study of directionality. Here we explore a simple, nonstationary model of evolution for discrete data, which assumes that the state frequencies at the root differ from the equilibrium frequencies of the homogeneous evolutionary process along the rest of the tree (i.e., the process is nonstationary, nonreversible, but homogeneous). Within this framework, we develop a Bayesian approach for testing directional versus stationary evolution using a reversible-jump algorithm. Simulations show that when only data from extant taxa are available, the success in inferring directionality is strongly dependent on the evolutionary rate, the shape of the tree, the relative branch lengths, and the number of taxa. Given suitable evolutionary rates (0.1-0.5 expected substitutions between root and tips), accounting for directionality improves tree inference and often allows correct rooting of the tree without the use of an outgroup. As an empirical test, we apply our method to study directional evolution in hymenopteran morphology. We focus on three character systems: wing veins, muscles, and sclerites. We find strong support for a trend toward loss of wing veins and muscles, while stationarity cannot be ruled out for sclerites. Adding fossil and time information in a total-evidence dating approach, we show that accounting for directionality results in more precise estimates not only of the ancestral state at the root of the tree, but also of the divergence times. Our model relaxes the assumption of stationarity and reversibility by adding a minimum of additional parameters, and is thus well suited to studying the nature of the evolutionary process in data sets of limited size, such as morphology and ecology. © The Author

  2. Partitioning uncertainty in streamflow projections under nonstationary model conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Ila; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2018-02-01

    Assessing the impacts of Land Use (LU) and climate change on future streamflow projections is necessary for efficient management of water resources. However, model projections are burdened with significant uncertainty arising from various sources. Most of the previous studies have considered climate models and scenarios as major sources of uncertainty, but uncertainties introduced by land use change and hydrologic model assumptions are rarely investigated. In this paper an attempt is made to segregate the contribution from (i) general circulation models (GCMs), (ii) emission scenarios, (iii) land use scenarios, (iv) stationarity assumption of the hydrologic model, and (v) internal variability of the processes, to overall uncertainty in streamflow projections using analysis of variance (ANOVA) approach. Generally, most of the impact assessment studies are carried out with unchanging hydrologic model parameters in future. It is, however, necessary to address the nonstationarity in model parameters with changing land use and climate. In this paper, a regression based methodology is presented to obtain the hydrologic model parameters with changing land use and climate scenarios in future. The Upper Ganga Basin (UGB) in India is used as a case study to demonstrate the methodology. The semi-distributed Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is set-up over the basin, under nonstationary conditions. Results indicate that model parameters vary with time, thereby invalidating the often-used assumption of model stationarity. The streamflow in UGB under the nonstationary model condition is found to reduce in future. The flows are also found to be sensitive to changes in land use. Segregation results suggest that model stationarity assumption and GCMs along with their interactions with emission scenarios, act as dominant sources of uncertainty. This paper provides a generalized framework for hydrologists to examine stationarity assumption of models before considering them

  3. Analysis and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in 3D fractured media; Analyse et modelisation des phenomenes couples thermo-hydromecaniques en milieux fractures 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canamon Valera, I

    2006-11-15

    This doctoral research was conducted as part of a joint France-Spain co-tutelage PhD thesis in the framework of a bilateral agreement between two universities, the Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse (INPT) and the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM). It concerns a problem of common interest at the national and international levels, namely, the disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories. The present work is devoted, more precisely, to near-field hydrogeological aspects involving mass and heat transport phenomena. The first part of the work is devoted to a specific data interpretation problem (pressures, relative humidities, temperatures) in a multi-barrier experimental system at the scale of a few meters - the 'Mock-Up Test' of the FEBEX project, conducted in Spain. Over 500 time series are characterized in terms of spatial, temporal, and/or frequency/scale-based statistical analysis techniques. The time evolution and coupling of physical phenomena during the experiment are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn concerning the behavior and reliability of the sensors. The second part of the thesis develops in more detail the 3-Dimensional (3D) modeling of coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical phenomena in a fractured porous rock, this time at the scale of a hundred meters, based on the data of the 'In-Situ Test' of the FEBEX project conducted at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. As a first step, a reconstruction of the 3D fracture network is obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, taking into account through optimization the geomorphological data collected around the FEBEX gallery. The heterogeneous distribution of traces observed on the cylindrical wall of the tunnel is fairly well reproduced in the simulated network. In a second step, we develop a method to estimate the equivalent permeability of a many-fractured block by extending the superposition method of Ababou et al. [1994] to the case where the permeability of

  4. Onset of density-driven instabilities in fractured aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Raad, Seyed Mostafa; Hassanzadeh, Hassan

    2018-04-01

    Linear stability analysis is conducted to study the onset of density-driven convection involved in solubility trapping of C O2 in fractured aquifers. The effect of physical properties of a fracture network on the stability of a diffusive boundary layer in a saturated fractured porous media is investigated using the dual porosity concept. Linear stability analysis results show that both fracture interporosity flow and fracture storativity play an important role in the stability behavior of the system. It is shown that a diffusive boundary layer under the gravity field in fractured porous media with lower fracture storativity and/or higher fracture interporosity flow coefficient is more stable. We present scaling relations for the onset of convective instability in fractured aquifers with single and variable matrix block size distribution. These findings improve our understanding of density-driven flow in fractured aquifers and are important in the estimation of potential storage capacity, risk assessment, and storage site characterization and screening.

  5. fracture criterion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fracture in metallic glasses. What are the connections between nano- and micro- mechanisms and toughness? Metallic glasses are schizophrenic in the fracture sense. PDF Create! 5 Trial www.nuance.com ...

  6. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thumb Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Thumb Arthritis Trigger Finger Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  7. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  8. Comparison of nonstationary generalized logistic models based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the evidences of climate change have been observed in hydrologic data such as rainfall and flow data. The time-dependent characteristics of statistics in hydrologic data are widely defined as nonstationarity. Therefore, various nonstationary GEV and generalized Pareto models have been suggested for frequency analysis of nonstationary annual maximum and POT (peak-over-threshold data, respectively. However, the alternative models are required for nonstatinoary frequency analysis because of analyzing the complex characteristics of nonstationary data based on climate change. This study proposed the nonstationary generalized logistic model including time-dependent parameters. The parameters of proposed model are estimated using the method of maximum likelihood based on the Newton-Raphson method. In addition, the proposed model is compared by Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the characteristics of models and applicability.

  9. Detection of Partial Demagnetization Fault in PMSMs Operating under Nonstationary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chao; Delgado Prieto, Miguel; Romeral, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Demagnetization fault detection of in-service Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines (PMSMs) is a challenging task because most PMSMs operate under nonstationary circumstances in industrial applications. A novel approach based on tracking characteristic orders of stator current using Vold...

  10. Non-stationary transformation of neutron energy by a moving grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A. I.; Kulin, G. V.; Bushuev, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The report gives a short review of the studies dedicated to the investigation and applications of non-stationary quantum effects in neutron diffraction from moving periodic structures. The studies were performed in 1994-2015.

  11. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as shown on an x-ray. Selection of treatment depends upon the patient’s activity level, the location of the fracture and the severity of the fracture. Recovery Shoulder fractures may leave a patient with permanent shoulder stiffness, regardless of ...

  12. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  13. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow bicycle safety recommendations. Do not drink and drive. Do not allow yourself to be driven by someone who may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull ...

  14. Analyzing nonstationary financial time series via hilbert-huang transform (HHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus, computer program product and method of analyzing non-stationary time varying phenomena. A representation of a non-stationary time varying phenomenon is recursively sifted using Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) to extract intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The representation is filtered to extract intrinsic trends by combining a number of IMFs. The intrinsic trend is inherent in the data and identifies an IMF indicating the variability of the phenomena. The trend also may be used to detrend the data.

  15. Simulation of inhomogeneous, non-stationary and non-Gaussian turbulent winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M; Larsen, G C; Hansen, K S

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence time series are needed for wind turbine load simulation. The multivariate Fourier simulation method often used for this purpose is extended for inhomogeneous and non-stationary processes of general probability distribution. This includes optional conditional simulation matching simulated series to field measurements at selected points. A probability model for the application of turbine wind loads is discussed, and finally the technique for non-stationary processes is illustrated by turbulence simulation during a front passage

  16. Trend analysis using non-stationary time series clustering based on the finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Gorji Sefidmazgi, M.; Sayemuzzaman, M.; Homaifar, A.; Jha, M. K.; Liess, S.

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze low-frequency variability of climate, it is useful to model the climatic time series with multiple linear trends and locate the times of significant changes. In this paper, we have used non-stationary time series clustering to find change points in the trends. Clustering in a multi-dimensional non-stationary time series is challenging, since the problem is mathematically ill-posed. Clustering based on the finite element method (FEM) is one of the methods ...

  17. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  18. Hydraulic properties of fracture networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreuzy, J.R. de

    1999-12-01

    Fractured medium are studied in the general framework of oil and water supply and more recently for the underground storage of high level nuclear wastes. As fractures are generally far more permeable than the embedding medium, flow is highly channeled in a complex network of fractures. The complexity of the network comes from the broad distributions of fracture length and permeability at the fracture scale and appears through the increase of the equivalent permeability at the network scale. The goal of this thesis is to develop models of fracture networks consistent with both local-scale and global-scale observations. Bidimensional models of fracture networks display a wide variety of flow structures ranging from the sole permeable fracture to the equivalent homogeneous medium. The type of the relevant structure depends not only on the density and the length and aperture distributions but also on the observation scale. In several models, a crossover scale separates complex structures highly channeled from more distributed and homogeneous-like flow patterns at larger scales. These models, built on local characteristics and validated by global properties, have been settled in steady state. They have also been compared to natural well test data obtained in Ploemeur (Morbihan) in transient state. The good agreement between models and data reinforces the relevance of the models. Once validated and calibrated, the models are used to estimate the global tendencies of the main flow properties and the risk associated with the relative lack of data on natural fractures media. (author)

  19. [Hip fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisová, Drahomíra; Salášek, Martin; Pavelka, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Hip fractures are ranked among the frequent injuries. These fractures have been often coupled with high energy trauma in children and in patients with normal bone structure, low energy trauma and osteoporotic fracture (fragility fracture) is typical in elder patients. Hip fractures are divided into five groups: femoral head fracture, femoral neck fracture, pertrochanteric, intertrochateric and subtrochanteric fracture. Surgical treatment is indicated in all patients unless contraindications are present. Long bed rest has been accompanied by a high risk of development of thromboembolic disease, pneumonia and bed sore. Healing in the wrong position and nonunions are often the result of conservative treatment. Screw osteosynthesis is performed in isolated femoral head factures. Three cannulated screws or a DHS plate (dynamic hip screw) are used in fractures of the femoral neck with normal femoral head perfusion, total hip replacement is recommended in elder patients and in case of loss of blood supply of the femoral head. Pertrochanteric and intertrochanteric fractures can be stabilized by the femoral nails (PFN, PFN A, PFH - proximal femoral nail), nails are suitable for minimally invasive insertion and provide higher stability in the shaft, or plates (DHS) designed for stable pertronchanteric and intertrochanteric fractures. Subtrochanteric fractures can be fixed also intramedullary (nails - PFN long, PFN A long) and extramedullary (plates - DCS dynamic condylar screw, proximal femoral LCP - locking compression plate). Open reduction with internal plate fixation is advantageous for pathological fractures, as biopsy sampling can be performed. Hip fracture rehabilitation is integral part of the treatment, including walking on crutches or with a walker with partial weight bearing for at least six weeks.

  20. Tracer transport in fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Tsang, Y.W.; Hale, F.V.

    1988-07-01

    Recent interest in the safety of toxic waste underground disposal and nuclear waste geologic repositories has motivated many studies of tracer transport in fractured media. Fractures occur in most geologic formations and introduce a high degree of heterogeneity. Within each fracture, the aperture is not constant in value but strongly varying. Thus for such media, tracer tends to flow through preferred flowpaths or channels within the fractures. Along each of these channels, the aperture is also strongly varying. A detailed analysis is carried out on a 2D single fracture with variable apertures and the flow through channels is demonstrated. The channels defined this way are not rigidly set pathways for tracer transport, but are the preferred flow paths in the sense of stream-tubes in the potential theory. It is shown that such variable-aperture channels can be characterized by an aperture probability distribution function, and not by the exact deterministic geometric locations. We also demonstrate that the 2D tracer transport in a fracture can be calculated by a model of a system of 1D channels characterized by this distribution function only. Due to the channeling character of tracer transport in fractured rock, random point measurements of tracer breakthrough curves may give results with a wide spread in value due to statistical fluctuations. The present paper suggests that such a wide spread can probably be greatly reduced by making line/areal (or multiple) measurements covering a few spatial correlation lengths. 13 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  1. Nonstationary dynamics of the Alessandro-Beatrice-Bertotti-Montorsi model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrinevski, Alexander; Le Doussal, Pierre; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-03-01

    We obtain an exact solution for the motion of a particle driven by a spring in a Brownian random-force landscape, the Alessandro-Beatrice-Bertotti-Montorsi (ABBM) model. Many experiments on quasistatic driving of elastic interfaces (Barkhausen noise in magnets, earthquake statistics, shear dynamics of granular matter) exhibit the same universal behavior as this model. It also appears as a limit in the field theory of elastic manifolds. Here we discuss predictions of the ABBM model for monotonous, but otherwise arbitrary, time-dependent driving. Our main result is an explicit formula for the generating functional of particle velocities and positions. We apply this to derive the particle-velocity distribution following a quench in the driving velocity. We also obtain the joint avalanche size and duration distribution and the mean avalanche shape following a jump in the position of the confining spring. Such nonstationary driving is easy to realize in experiments, and provides a way to test the ABBM model beyond the stationary, quasistatic regime. We study extensions to two elastically coupled layers, and to an elastic interface of internal dimension d, in the Brownian force landscape. The effective action of the field theory is equal to the action, up to one-loop corrections obtained exactly from a functional determinant. This provides a connection to renormalization-group methods.

  2. On the non-stationary generalized Langevin equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hugues; Voigtmann, Thomas; Schilling, Tanja

    2017-12-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations and single molecule experiments, observables are usually measured along dynamic trajectories and then averaged over an ensemble ("bundle") of trajectories. Under stationary conditions, the time-evolution of such averages is described by the generalized Langevin equation. By contrast, if the dynamics is not stationary, it is not a priori clear which form the equation of motion for an averaged observable has. We employ the formalism of time-dependent projection operator techniques to derive the equation of motion for a non-equilibrium trajectory-averaged observable as well as for its non-stationary auto-correlation function. The equation is similar in structure to the generalized Langevin equation but exhibits a time-dependent memory kernel as well as a fluctuating force that implicitly depends on the initial conditions of the process. We also derive a relation between this memory kernel and the autocorrelation function of the fluctuating force that has a structure similar to a fluctuation-dissipation relation. In addition, we show how the choice of the projection operator allows us to relate the Taylor expansion of the memory kernel to data that are accessible in MD simulations and experiments, thus allowing us to construct the equation of motion. As a numerical example, the procedure is applied to Brownian motion initialized in non-equilibrium conditions and is shown to be consistent with direct measurements from simulations.

  3. Decoupled tracking and thermal monitoring of non-stationary targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok Kiong; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Sunan; Wong, Yoke San; Lee, Tong Heng

    2009-10-01

    Fault diagnosis and predictive maintenance address pertinent economic issues relating to production systems as an efficient technique can continuously monitor key health parameters and trigger alerts when critical changes in these variables are detected, before they lead to system failures and production shutdowns. In this paper, we present a decoupled tracking and thermal monitoring system which can be used on non-stationary targets of closed systems such as machine tools. There are three main contributions from the paper. First, a vision component is developed to track moving targets under a monitor. Image processing techniques are used to resolve the target location to be tracked. Thus, the system is decoupled and applicable to closed systems without the need for a physical integration. Second, an infrared temperature sensor with a built-in laser for locating the measurement spot is deployed for non-contact temperature measurement of the moving target. Third, a predictive motion control system holds the thermal sensor and follows the moving target efficiently to enable continuous temperature measurement and monitoring.

  4. Modelling nonstationary Doppler noise in exoplanetary radial velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We construct a new class of analytic nonstationary noise models for exoplanetary Doppler data. The observable correlated noise is represented as a convolution of a parent activity process with a given memory function. The model honours the casuality principle, meaning that only past values of the activity may affect the observable value. This model does not approximate detailedly any real stellar activity phenomena, but it becomes mathematically simple, simultaneously satisfying the basic natural principles of physical sensibility and self-consistency.Additionally, we develop a new type of periodograms that can be used to detect periodic modulations in the Doppler noise characteristics, rather than in the observed radial velocity curve itself. We present first results of applying this technique to public Doppler time series available for a set of planet-hosting stars.This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  5. Nonstationary magnetosonic wave dynamics in plasmas exhibiting collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Maity, Chandan; Schamel, Hans

    2013-08-01

    In a Lagrangian fluid approach, an explicit method has been presented previously to obtain an exact nonstationary magnetosonic-type wave solution in compressible magnetized plasmas of arbitrary resistivity showing competition among hydrodynamic convection, magnetic field diffusion, and dispersion [Chakrabarti , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.145003 106, 145003 (2011)]. The purpose of the present work is twofold: it serves (i) to describe the physical and mathematical background of the involved magnetosonic wave dynamics in more detail, as proposed by our original Letter, and (ii) to present an alternative approach, which utilizes the Lagrangian mass variable as a new spatial coordinate [Schamel, Phys. Rep.PRPLCM0370-157310.1016/j.physrep.2003.12.002 392, 279 (2004)]. The obtained exact nonlinear wave solutions confirm the correctness of our previous results, indicating a collapse of the magnetic field irrespective of the presence of dispersion and resistivity. The mean plasma density, on the other hand, is less singular, showing collapse only when dispersive effects are negligible. These results may contribute to our understanding of the generation of strongly localized magnetic fields (and currents) in plasmas, and they are expected to be of special importance in the astrophysical context of magnetic star formation.

  6. Acetabular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows, so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT scan was ordered. Significant findings: The non-contrast CT images show a minimally displaced comminuted fracture of the right acetabulum involving the acetabular roof, medial and anterior walls (red arrows, with associated obturator muscle hematoma (blue oval. Discussion: Acetabular fractures are quite rare. There are 37 pelvic fractures per 100,000 people in the United States annually, and only 10% of these involve the acetabulum. They occur more frequently in the elderly totaling an estimated 4,000 per year. High-energy trauma is the primary cause of acetabular fractures in younger individuals and these fractures are commonly associated with other fractures and pelvic ring disruptions. Fractures secondary to moderate or minimal trauma are increasingly of concern in patients of advanced age.1 Classification of acetabular fractures can be challenging. However, the approach can be simplified by remembering the three basic types of acetabular fractures (column, transverse, and wall and their corresponding radiologic views. First, column fractures should be evaluated with coronally oriented CT images. This type of fracture demonstrates a coronal fracture line running caudad to craniad, essentially breaking the acetabulum into two halves: a front half and a back half. Secondly, transverse fractures should be evaluated by sagittally oriented CT images. By definition, a transverse fracture separates the acetabulum into superior and inferior halves with the fracture line extending from anterior to posterior

  7. Colles Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez León, Belisario

    2014-01-01

    Our expertise is the study of more than 2,000 cases of Colles' fractures. Colles name should in this case to synthesize the type of fractures of the lower end of the radius. There have been various proposed classifications according to the different fracture lines can be demonstrated radiologically in the region of the wrist. We believe that these ratings should only be retained if the concept of the articular fracture or not in the classical sense, since it has great value in the functional ...

  8. [Calcaneus fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, M P; Sanders, R W

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the calcaneus generally occur in the setting of high-energy trauma, resulting in complex, three-dimensionally oriented fracture patterns. Surgical treatment is typically indicated for displaced intra-articular fractures, permitting restoration of calcaneal height, width and overall morphology, in addition to the posterior facet articular surface where possible, and enabling late in situ arthrodesis as a means of salvage in the event of post-traumatic arthritis. The present article briefly discusses our preferred methods for the management of calcaneal fractures. An English full text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  9. H2 emission from non-stationary magnetized bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tram, L. N.; Lesaffre, P.; Cabrit, S.; Gusdorf, A.; Nhung, P. T.

    2018-01-01

    When a fast moving star or a protostellar jet hits an interstellar cloud, the surrounding gas gets heated and illuminated: a bow shock is born that delineates the wake of the impact. In such a process, the new molecules that are formed and excited in the gas phase become accessible to observations. In this paper, we revisit models of H2 emission in these bow shocks. We approximate the bow shock by a statistical distribution of planar shocks computed with a magnetized shock model. We improve on previous works by considering arbitrary bow shapes, a finite irradiation field and by including the age effect of non-stationary C-type shocks on the excitation diagram and line profiles of H2. We also examine the dependence of the line profiles on the shock velocity and on the viewing angle: we suggest that spectrally resolved observations may greatly help to probe the dynamics inside the bow shock. For reasonable bow shapes, our analysis shows that low-velocity shocks largely contribute to H2 excitation diagram. This can result in an observational bias towards low velocities when planar shocks are used to interpret H2 emission from an unresolved bow. We also report a large magnetization bias when the velocity of the planar model is set independently. Our 3D models reproduce excitation diagrams in BHR 71 and Orion bow shocks better than previous 1D models. Our 3D model is also able to reproduce the shape and width of the broad H2 1-0S(1) line profile in an Orion bow shock (Brand et al. 1989).

  10. Assessing the extent of non-stationary biases in GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Jannatun; Johnson, Fiona; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are the main tools for estimating changes in the climate for the future. The imperfect representation of climate models introduces biases in the simulations that need to be corrected prior to their use for impact assessments. Bias correction methods generally assume that the bias calculated over the historical period does not change and can be applied to the future. This study investigates this assumption by considering the extent and nature of bias non-stationarity using 20th century precipitation and temperature simulations from six CMIP5 GCMs across Australia. Four statistics (mean, standard deviation, 10th and 90th quantiles) in monthly and seasonal biases are obtained for three different time window lengths (10, 25 and 33 years) to examine the properties of bias over time. This approach is repeated for two different phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which is known to have strong influences on the Australian climate. It is found that bias non-stationarity at decadal timescales is indeed an issue over some of Australia for some GCMs. When considering interdecadal variability there are significant difference in the bias between positive and negative phases of the IPO. Regional analyses confirmed these findings with the largest differences seen on the east coast of Australia, where IPO impacts tend to be the strongest. The nature of the bias non-stationarity found in this study suggests that it will be difficult to modify existing bias correction approaches to account for non-stationary biases. A more practical approach for impact assessments that use bias correction maybe to use a selection of GCMs where the assumption of bias non-stationarity holds.

  11. Designing and operating infrastructure for nonstationary flood risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss-Gollin, J.; Farnham, D. J.; Lall, U.

    2017-12-01

    Climate exhibits organized low-frequency and regime-like variability at multiple time scales, causing the risk associated with climate extremes such as floods and droughts to vary in time. Despite broad recognition of this nonstationarity, there has been little theoretical development of ideas for the design and operation of infrastructure considering the regime structure of such changes and their potential predictability. We use paleo streamflow reconstructions to illustrate an approach to the design and operation of infrastructure to address nonstationary flood and drought risk. Specifically, we consider the tradeoff between flood control and conservation storage, and develop design and operation principles for allocating these storage volumes considering both a m-year project planning period and a n-year historical sampling record. As n increases, the potential uncertainty in probabilistic estimates of the return periods associated with the T-year extreme event decreases. As the duration m of the future operation period decreases, the uncertainty associated with the occurrence of the T-year event also increases. Finally, given the quasi-periodic nature of the system it may be possible to offer probabilistic predictions of the conditions in the m-year future period, especially if m is small. In the context of such predictions, one can consider that a m-year prediction may have lower bias, but higher variance, than would be associated with using a stationary estimate from the preceding n years. This bias-variance trade-off, and the potential for considering risk management for multiple values of m, provides an interesting system design challenge. We use wavelet-based simulation models in a Bayesian framework to estimate these biases and uncertainty distributions and devise a risk-optimized decision rule for the allocation of flood and conservation storage. The associated theoretical development also provides a methodology for the sizing of storage for new

  12. Contribution de l'homogénéisation à l'étude de la filtration d'un fluide en milieu poreux fracturé Contribution of the Homogenization Process to the Seepage Through Fractured Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutin C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article est consacré à la modélisation de l'écoulement d'un fluide dans un massif poreux fracturé. Contrairement aux approches phénoménologiques, nous traitons le problème au moyen de la méthode d'homogénéisation par développements asymptotiques en milieux périodiques. Les comportements macroscopiques sont ainsi déduits de la physique à l'échelle microscopique, sans autre prérequis. Deux cas ont été examinés : l'écoulement d'un gaz dans un massif rigide et l'écoulement d'un fluide incompressible dans une matrice déformable. Dans ces deux situations, on met en évidence le rôle fondamental du rapport entre les deux séparations d'échelles (échelle macroscopique-échelle des fissures et échelle des fissures-échelle des pores. Les descriptions macroscopiques sont conditionnées par la relation entre les séparations d'échelles, le couplage interéchelle étant maximum lorsque les rapports d'échelles sont identiques. This paper deals with the seepage of a fluid through a fissured porous medium. Conversely to the phenomenological approaches we treat this problem by using the homogenization method of asymptotic developments for periodic structures. Thus the macroscopic behaviours are directly deduced from the physics at the microscopic scale, without any prerequisite. Two cases have been investigated : the flow of a gas through a rigid medium and the flow of an incompressible fluid through a deformable matrix. In both situations, it appears that the ratio between the two scale separations (macroscopic scale-fissure scale and fissure scale-pore scale plays an essential role. The macroscopic description depends on the scale separations, the interscale coupling being maximum when the scales are equally separated.

  13. Identification of modal parameters from nonstationary ambient vibration data using the channel-expansion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Dar Yun; Lin, Chang Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The identification of modal parameters from the response data only is studied for structural systems under nonstationary ambient vibration. In a previous paper by the authors, the modal parameters of a system were identified using the correlation method in conjunction with the curve-fitting technique. This was done by working within the assumption that the ambient excitation is a nonstationary white noise in the form of a product model. In the present paper, the Ibrahim time-domain method (ITD) is extended for modal-parameter identification from the nonstationary ambient response data without any additional treatment of converting the original data into the form of free vibration. The ambient responses corresponding to various nonstationary inputs can be approximately expressed as a sum of exponential functions. In effect, the ITD method can be used in conjunction with the channel-expansion technique to identify the major modes of a structural system. To distinguish the structural modes from the non-structural modes, the concept of mode -shape coherence and confidence factor is employed. Numerical simulations, including one example of using the practical excitation data, confirm the validity and robustness of the proposed method for identification of modal parameters from the nonstationary ambient response

  14. Integrating nonstationary behaviors of typhoon and non-typhoon extreme rainfall events in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chanyoung; Lee, Taesam; Kwon, Hyun-Han

    2017-07-11

    Extreme rainfall events in East Asia can be derived from the two subcomponents of tropical cyclones (TC) and non-TC based rainfall (mostly summer monsoons). Critical natural hazards including floods and landslides occur repeatedly due to the heavy rainfall associated with the two subcomponents, and disaster losses are increasing because global warming has caused changes in the extreme rainfall characteristics of two subcomponents. Subsequently, the frequency and intensity of extreme rainfall have reportedly become nonstationary. The majority of literature on nonstationary frequency analyses do not account for the different behaviors (stationarity or nonstationarity) of annual maximum rainfall (AMR) from the two subcomponents (PM TC and PM NTC ). To carry out a nonstationary frequency analysis considering the different behaviors of the PM TC and PM NTC series, this study proposes a novel approach of integrating the fitted PM TC and PM NTC series after modeling the nonstationarity of the PM TC and PM NTC series individually. The presented results conclude that the proposed approach provides more reliable estimates than existing nonstationary approaches by reflecting the different features of the PM TC and PM NTC series. We suggest that the proposed approach provides a reasonable design rainfall in constructing hydraulics to mitigate the different nonstationary effects of two TC and non-TC rainfall extremes.

  15. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-01-29

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  16. XFEM modeling of hydraulic fracture in porous rocks with natural fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, ZhanLi; Zeng, QingLei; Gao, Yue; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2017-08-01

    Hydraulic fracture (HF) in porous rocks is a complex multi-physics coupling process which involves fluid flow, diffusion and solid deformation. In this paper, the extended finite element method (XFEM) coupling with Biot theory is developed to study the HF in permeable rocks with natural fractures (NFs). In the recent XFEM based computational HF models, the fluid flow in fractures and interstitials of the porous media are mostly solved separately, which brings difficulties in dealing with complex fracture morphology. In our new model the fluid flow is solved in a unified framework by considering the fractures as a kind of special porous media and introducing Poiseuille-type flow inside them instead of Darcy-type flow. The most advantage is that it is very convenient to deal with fluid flow inside the complex fracture network, which is important in shale gas extraction. The weak formulation for the new coupled model is derived based on virtual work principle, which includes the XFEM formulation for multiple fractures and fractures intersection in porous media and finite element formulation for the unified fluid flow. Then the plane strain Kristianovic-Geertsma-de Klerk (KGD) model and the fluid flow inside the fracture network are simulated to validate the accuracy and applicability of this method. The numerical results show that large injection rate, low rock permeability and isotropic in-situ stresses tend to lead to a more uniform and productive fracture network.

  17. Fracture sacrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely rare case of combined transverse and vertical fracture of sacrum with neurological deficit is reported here with a six month follow-up. The patient also had an L1 compression fracture. The patient has recovered significantly with conservative management.

  18. Elbow Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occur commonly in children and in the elderly. Nerve and/or artery injuries can be associated with these types of fractures and must be carefully evaluated by your doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are ...

  19. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  20. Non-stationary ETAS to model earthquake occurrences affected by episodic aseismic transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattamanchi, Sasi; Tiwari, Ram Krishna; Ramesh, Durbha Sai

    2017-11-01

    We present a non-stationary epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model in which the usual assumption of stationary background rate is relaxed. Such a model could be used for modeling seismic sequences affected by aseismic transients such as fluid/magma intrusion, slow slip earthquakes (SSEs), etc. The non-stationary background rate is expressed as a linear combination of B-splines, and a method is proposed that allows for simultaneous estimation of background rate as well as other ETAS model parameters. We also present an extension to this non-stationary ETAS model where an adaptive roughness penalty function is used and consequently provides better estimates of rapidly varying background rate functions. The performance of the proposed methods is demonstrated on synthetic catalogs and an application to detect earthquake swarms (possibly associated with SSEs) in Hikurangi margin (North Island, New Zealand) is presented.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Surface Stress with Non-stationary Weak Winds and Stable Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, L.; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind, stably-stratified, boundary layer over land is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field using measurements from three field programs. These field programs include towers ranging from 12 to 20 m in height and an extensive horizontal network of sonic anemometers. The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and non-stationary submeso motions is investigated from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected partly due to enhancement of the turbulence by submeso motions. Cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases in the downward transport of momentum.

  2. A note on the almost sure central limit theorems for the maxima of strongly dependent nonstationary Gaussian vector sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zeng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We prove some almost sure central limit theorems for the maxima of strongly dependent nonstationary Gaussian vector sequences under some mild conditions. The results extend the ASCLT to nonstationary Gaussian vector sequences and give substantial improvements for the weight sequence obtained by Lin et al. (Comput. Math. Appl. 62(2:635-640, 2011.

  3. Mathematical modelling of nonstationary processes in a regenerator with dissociating coolant at supercritical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashchilova, Eh.M.; Sharovarov, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The mathematical model of nonstationary processes in heat exchangers with dissociating coolant at supercritical parameters is given. Its dimensionless criteria are deveped. The effect of NPP regenerator parameters on criteria variation is determined. The proceeding nonstationary processes are estimated qualitatively using the dimensionless parameters. Dynamics of the processes in heat exchangers is described by the energy, mass and moment-of-momentum equations for heating and heated medium taking into account heat accumulation in the heat-transfer wall and distribution of parameters along the length of a heat exchanger

  4. Analysis of non-stationary temperature field in reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehauc, A.; Spasojevic, D.

    1970-01-01

    Starting from time and space distribution of power generation determined previously stationary analysis of fuel element, a method was developed for non-stationary conditions. It is based on development of temperature field by eigenfunctions and application of Laplace transformation for calculating transfer function of power variation in time and space distribution of temperature field in the fuel element. Dynamic behaviour of fuel element in non-stationary regime and frequency analysis of the transfer function was done. Transfer function of temperature field is given in the form of amplitude and frequency characteristics

  5. A review on hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Quanshu Li; Huilin Xing; Jianjun Liu; Xiangchon Liu

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is widely accepted and applied to improve the gas recovery in unconventional reservoirs. Unconventional reservoirs to be addressed here are with very low permeability, complicated geological settings and in-situ stress field etc. All of these make the hydraulic fracturing process a challenging task. In order to effectively and economically recover gas from such reservoirs, the initiation and propagation of hydraulic fracturing in the heterogeneous fractured/porous media u...

  6. Discrete fracture modeling of multiphase flow and hydrocarbon production in fractured shale or low permeability reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y.; Settgast, R. R.; Fu, P.; Tompson, A. F. B.; Morris, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been recognized that multiphase flow and transport in fractured porous media is very important for various subsurface applications. Hydrocarbon fluid flow and production from hydraulically fractured shale reservoirs is an important and complicated example of multiphase flow in fractured formations. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing is able to create extensive fracture networks in low permeability shale rocks, leading to increased formation permeability and enhanced hydrocarbon production. However, unconventional wells experience a much faster production decline than conventional hydrocarbon recovery. Maintaining sustainable and economically viable shale gas/oil production requires additional wells and re-fracturing. Excessive fracturing fluid loss during hydraulic fracturing operations may also drive up operation costs and raise potential environmental concerns. Understanding and modeling processes that contribute to decreasing productivity and fracturing fluid loss represent a critical component for unconventional hydrocarbon recovery analysis. Towards this effort we develop a discrete fracture model (DFM) in GEOS (LLNL multi-physics computational code) to simulate multiphase flow and transfer in hydraulically fractured reservoirs. The DFM model is able to explicitly account for both individual fractures and their surrounding rocks, therefore allowing for an accurate prediction of impacts of fracture-matrix interactions on hydrocarbon production. We apply the DFM model to simulate three-phase (water, oil, and gas) flow behaviors in fractured shale rocks as a result of different hydraulic stimulation scenarios. Numerical results show that multiphase flow behaviors at the fracture-matrix interface play a major role in controlling both hydrocarbon production and fracturing fluid recovery rates. The DFM model developed in this study will be coupled with the existing hydro-fracture model to provide a fully integrated

  7. A geometrically based method for predicting stress-induced fracture aperture and flow in discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is often done through modeling and upscaling of discrete fracture networks (DFNs). The two-dimensional fracture geometry required for DFNs is obtained from subsurface and outcropping analog data. However, these data provide little information...... networks, digitized from outcropping pavements. These networks cover a wide range of possible geometries and spatial distributions. The geometrically based method predicts the average hydraulic aperture and equivalent permeability of fractured porous media with error margins of less than 5%....

  8. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  9. Supracondylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 15-year-old male presented to the emergency department with right elbow pain after falling off a skateboard. The patient denied a decrease in strength or sensation but did endorse paresthesias to his hand. On exam, the patient had an obvious deformity of his right elbow with tenderness to palpation and decreased range of motion at the elbow. Sensation, motor function, and pulses were intact. Radiographic imaging was obtained. Significant findings: The pre-reduction films show a type III supracondylar fracture. There is complete displacement of the distal humerus anteriorly. Specific findings for supracondylar fracture include: a posterior fat pad (red arrow and a displaced anterior humeral line (yellow line.1 When no fracture is present, the anterior humeral line should intersect the middle third of the capitellum; in this X-ray, it does not intersect the capitellum at all. This X-ray demonstrates a normal radiocapitellar line (blue line that intersects the capitellum. The presence of a narrow anterior fat pad aka “sail sign” can be normal. Discussion: Supracondylar fractures of the humerus occur at the distal portion of the humerus without involving the growth plate.2 This is the second most common fracture in children overall. In children, it is the most common fracture of the elbow.3 This injury has a high risk of neurovascular compromise, such as compartment syndrome or ischemic contracture, and thus the clinician must perform immediate and frequent neurovascular assessments focusing on the distributions of the brachial artery in addition to the median, ulnar, and radial nerves.4 Hyperextension injuries that typically occur following a fall onto an outstretched arm are responsible for 95% of supracondylar fractures.1 A type I supracondylar fracture is non-displaced and can be treated with immobilization through a posterior splint and sling5 with close follow-up, type II is angulated but with an intact

  10. A simple heuristic for perishable inventory control under non-stationary stochastic demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alcoba, A.G.; Rossi, R.; Martin-Barragan, B.; Hendrix, E.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the single-item single-stocking location non-stationary stochastic lot sizing problem for a perishable product. We consider fixed and proportional ordering cost, holding cost and penalty cost. The item features a limited shelf life, therefore we also take into account a

  11. Non-stationary dynamics of climate variability in synchronous influenza epidemics in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal variation in the incidence of influenza is widely assumed. However, few studies have examined non-stationary relationships between global climate factors and influenza epidemics. We examined the monthly incidence of influenza in Fukuoka, Japan, from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the patterns of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The monthly incidence of influenza showed cycles of 1 year with the IOD and 2 years with ENSO indices (Multivariate, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4). These associations were non-stationary and appeared to have major influences on the synchrony of influenza epidemics. Our study provides quantitative evidence that non-stationary associations have major influences on synchrony between the monthly incidence of influenza and the dynamics of the IOD and ENSO. Our results call for the consideration of non-stationary patterns of association between influenza cases and climatic factors in early warning systems.

  12. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-03

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  13. Suppression of anomalous synchronization and nonstationary behavior of neural network under small-world topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaretto, B. R. R.; Budzinski, R. C.; Prado, T. L.; Kurths, J.; Lopes, S. R.

    2018-05-01

    It is known that neural networks under small-world topology can present anomalous synchronization and nonstationary behavior for weak coupling regimes. Here, we propose methods to suppress the anomalous synchronization and also to diminish the nonstationary behavior occurring in weakly coupled neural network under small-world topology. We consider a network of 2000 thermally sensitive identical neurons, based on the model of Hodgkin-Huxley in a small-world topology, with the probability of adding non local connection equal to p = 0 . 001. Based on experimental protocols to suppress anomalous synchronization, as well as nonstationary behavior of the neural network dynamics, we make use of (i) external stimulus (pulsed current); (ii) biologic parameters changing (neuron membrane conductance changes); and (iii) body temperature changes. Quantification analysis to evaluate phase synchronization makes use of the Kuramoto's order parameter, while recurrence quantification analysis, particularly the determinism, computed over the easily accessible mean field of network, the local field potential (LFP), is used to evaluate nonstationary states. We show that the methods proposed can control the anomalous synchronization and nonstationarity occurring for weak coupling parameter without any effect on the individual neuron dynamics, neither in the expected asymptotic synchronized states occurring for large values of the coupling parameter.

  14. The role of initial values in nonstationary fractional time series models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We consider the nonstationary fractional model $\\Delta^{d}X_{t}=\\varepsilon _{t}$ with $\\varepsilon_{t}$ i.i.d.$(0,\\sigma^{2})$ and $d>1/2$. We derive an analytical expression for the main term of the asymptotic bias of the maximum likelihood estimator of $d$ conditional on initial values, and we...

  15. A flag-up algorithm and test for nonstationary customer-specific product graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten H. J.; Scholderer, Joachim

    period. The results show that the test is clearly able to identify customers with evolving behavior, and that it can easily be deployed as part of a CRM system. It enables companies with loyalty programs to focus on nonstationary customers, i.e. customers who may represent opportunities for cross-selling...

  16. Time-varying output performances of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting under nonstationary random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Kim, Miso; Park, Choon-Su; Youn, Byeng D.

    2018-01-01

    Piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting (PVEH) has received much attention as a potential solution that could ultimately realize self-powered wireless sensor networks. Since most ambient vibrations in nature are inherently random and nonstationary, the output performances of PVEH devices also randomly change with time. However, little attention has been paid to investigating the randomly time-varying electroelastic behaviors of PVEH systems both analytically and experimentally. The objective of this study is thus to make a step forward towards a deep understanding of the time-varying performances of PVEH devices under nonstationary random vibrations. Two typical cases of nonstationary random vibration signals are considered: (1) randomly-varying amplitude (amplitude modulation; AM) and (2) randomly-varying amplitude with randomly-varying instantaneous frequency (amplitude and frequency modulation; AM-FM). In both cases, this study pursues well-balanced correlations of analytical predictions and experimental observations to deduce the relationships between the time-varying output performances of the PVEH device and two primary input parameters, such as a central frequency and an external electrical resistance. We introduce three correlation metrics to quantitatively compare analytical prediction and experimental observation, including the normalized root mean square error, the correlation coefficient, and the weighted integrated factor. Analytical predictions are in an excellent agreement with experimental observations both mechanically and electrically. This study provides insightful guidelines for designing PVEH devices to reliably generate electric power under nonstationary random vibrations.

  17. $\\beta$-mixing and moments properties of a non-stationary copula-based Markov process

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbi, Fabio; Mulinacci, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides conditions under which a non-stationary copula-based Markov process is $\\beta$-mixing. We introduce, as a particular case, a convolution-based gaussian Markov process which generalizes the standard random walk allowing the increments to be dependent.

  18. Double-Wavelet Approach to Studying the Modulation Properties of Nonstationary Multimode Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Mosekilde, Erik; Pavlov, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of double-wavelet analysis, the paper proposes a method to study interactions in the form of frequency and amplitude modulation in nonstationary multimode data series. Special emphasis is given to the problem of quantifying the strength of modulation for a fast signal by a coexisting...

  19. Fermions Tunneling from Non-Stationary Dilaton-Maxwell Black Hole via General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Fermions tunneling of the non-stationary Dilaton-Maxwell black hole is investigated with general tortoise coordinate transformation. The Dirac equation is simplified by semiclassical approximation so that the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is generated. Finally the tunneling rate and the Hawking temperature is calculated.

  20. Non-stationary covariance function modelling in 2D least-squares collocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbeheshti, N.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2009-06-01

    Standard least-squares collocation (LSC) assumes 2D stationarity and 3D isotropy, and relies on a covariance function to account for spatial dependence in the observed data. However, the assumption that the spatial dependence is constant throughout the region of interest may sometimes be violated. Assuming a stationary covariance structure can result in over-smoothing of, e.g., the gravity field in mountains and under-smoothing in great plains. We introduce the kernel convolution method from spatial statistics for non-stationary covariance structures, and demonstrate its advantage for dealing with non-stationarity in geodetic data. We then compared stationary and non- stationary covariance functions in 2D LSC to the empirical example of gravity anomaly interpolation near the Darling Fault, Western Australia, where the field is anisotropic and non-stationary. The results with non-stationary covariance functions are better than standard LSC in terms of formal errors and cross-validation against data not used in the interpolation, demonstrating that the use of non-stationary covariance functions can improve upon standard (stationary) LSC.

  1. Isotopically nonstationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA) of photosynthesis and photorespiration in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photorespiration is a central component of photosynthesis; however to better understand its role it should be viewed in the context of an integrated metabolic network rather than a series of individual reactions that operate independently. Isotopically nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST...

  2. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  3. Tracking of Nonstationary Noise Based on Data-Driven Recursive Noise Power Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, J.S.; Heusdens, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers estimation of the noise spectral variance from speech signals contaminated by highly nonstationary noise sources. The method can accurately track fast changes in noise power level (up to about 10 dB/s). In each time frame, for each frequency bin, the noise variance estimate is

  4. Production planning of a perishable product with lead time and non-stationary demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauls-Worm, K.G.J.; Haijema, R.; Hendrix, E.M.T.; Rossi, R.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We study a production planning problem for a perishable product with a fixed lifetime, under a service-level constraint. The product has a non-stationary stochastic demand. Food supply chains of fresh products like cheese and several crop products, are characterised by long lead times due to

  5. Comparison of different modeling approaches to simulate contaminant transport in a fractured limestone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Rosenberg, L.; Balbarini, Nicola

    approaches have been developed to describe contaminant transport in fractured media, such as the discrete fracture (with various fracture geometries), equivalent porous media (with and without anisotropy), and dual porosity models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for limestone geologies...... of field data is the determination of relevant hydraulic properties and interpretation of aqueous and solid phase contaminant concentration sampling data. Traditional water sampling has a bias towards fracture sampling, however concentrations in the limestone matrix are needed for assessing contaminant...

  6. Nonstationary color tracking for vision-based human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Huang, T S

    2002-01-01

    Skin color offers a strong cue for efficient localization and tracking of human body parts in video sequences for vision-based human-computer interaction. Color-based target localization could be achieved by analyzing segmented skin color regions. However, one of the challenges of color-based target tracking is that color distributions would change in different lighting conditions such that fixed color models would be inadequate to capture nonstationary color distributions over time. Meanwhile, using a fixed skin color model trained by the data of a specific person would probably not work well for other people. Although some work has been done on adaptive color models, this problem still needs further studies. We present our investigation of color-based image segmentation and nonstationary color-based target tracking, by studying two different representations for color distributions. We propose the structure adaptive self-organizing map (SASOM) neural network that serves as a new color model. Our experiments show that such a representation is powerful for efficient image segmentation. Then, we formulate the nonstationary color tracking problem as a model transduction problem, the solution of which offers a way to adapt and transduce color classifiers in nonstationary color distributions. To fulfill model transduction, we propose two algorithms, the SASOM transduction and the discriminant expectation-maximization (EM), based on the SASOM color model and the Gaussian mixture color model, respectively. Our extensive experiments on the task of real-time face/hand localization show that these two algorithms can successfully handle some difficulties in nonstationary color tracking. We also implemented a real-time face/hand localization system based on such algorithms for vision-based human-computer interaction.

  7. Power-density spectrum of non-stationary short-lived light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidorzi, Cristiano

    2011-08-01

    The power-density spectrum of a light curve is often calculated as the average of a number of spectra derived on individual time intervals the light curve is divided into. This procedure implicitly assumes that each time interval is a different sample function of the same stochastic ergodic process. While this assumption can be applied to many astrophysical sources, there remains a class of transient, highly non-stationary and short-lived events, such as gamma-ray bursts, for which this approach is often inadequate. The power spectrum statistics of a constant signal affected by statistical (Poisson) noise are known to be a χ22 in the Leahy normalization. However, this is no more the case when a non-stationary signal is also present. As a consequence, the uncertainties on the power spectrum cannot be calculated on the basis of the χ22 properties, as assumed by tools such as XRONOS POWSPEC. We generalize the result in the case of a non-stationary signal affected by uncorrelated white noise and show that the new distribution is a non-central χ22(λ), whose non-central value λ is the power spectrum of the deterministic function describing the non-stationary signal. Finally, we test these results in the case of synthetic curves of gamma-ray bursts. We end up with a new formula for calculating the power spectrum uncertainties. This is crucial in the case of non-stationary short-lived processes affected by uncorrelated statistical noise, for which ensemble averaging does not make any physical sense.

  8. Wavelet analysis for nonstationary signals; Analise de sinais em regime transiente aplicando a tecnica de wavelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penha, Rosani Maria Libardi da

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical vibration signals play an important role in anomalies identification resulting of equipment malfunctioning. Traditionally, Fourier spectral analysis is used where the signals are assumed to be stationary. However, occasional transient impulses and start-up process are examples of nonstationary signals that can be found in mechanical vibrations. These signals can provide important information about the equipment condition, as early fault detection. The Fourier analysis can not adequately be applied to nonstationary signals because the results provide data about the frequency composition averaged over the duration of the signal. In this work, two methods for nonstationary signal analysis are used: Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and wavelet transform. The STFT is a method of adapting Fourier spectral analysis for nonstationary application to time-frequency domain. To have a unique resolution throughout the entire time-frequency domain is its main limitation. The wavelet transform is a new analysis technique suitable to nonstationary signals, which handles the STFT drawbacks, providing multi-resolution frequency analysis and time localization in a unique time-scale graphic. The multiple frequency resolutions are obtained by scaling (dilatation/compression) the wavelet function. A comparison of the conventional Fourier transform, STFT and wavelet transform is made applying these techniques to: simulated signals, arrangement rotor rig vibration signal and rotate machine vibration signal Hanning window was used to STFT analysis. Daubechies and harmonic wavelets were used to continuos, discrete and multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The results show the Fourier analysis was not able to detect changes in the signal frequencies or discontinuities. The STFT analysis detected the changes in the signal frequencies, but with time-frequency resolution problems. The wavelet continuos and discrete transform demonstrated to be a high efficient tool to detect

  9. Galeazzi fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  10. Trochanteric fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrlin, K.; Stroemberg, T.; Lidgren, L.; Walloee, A.; Pettersson, H.; Lund Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty trochanteric factures operated upon with McLaughlin, Ender or Richard's osteosynthesis were divided into 6 different types based on their radiographic appearance before and immediately after reposition with special reference to the medial cortical support. A significant correlation was found between the fracture type and subsequent mechanical complications where types 1 and 2 gave less, and types 4 and 5 more complications. A comparison of the various osteosyntheses showed that Richard's had significantly fewer complications than either the Ender or McLaughlin types. For Richard's osteosynthesis alone no correlation to fracture type could be made because of the small number of complications in this group. (orig.)

  11. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media; Comprehension de l'alteration a long terme des colis de verre R7T7: etude du couplage chimie transport dans un milieu fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomat, L

    2008-04-15

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH{>=}11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  12. A comparison between two global optimization algorithms (genetic and differential evolution) to calculate the reflection coefficients in fractured media; Uma comparacao entre dois algoritmos de otimizacao global (algoritmo genetico e evolucao diferencial) para inversao de coeficientes de reflexao em meios fraturados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanzeler, Francisco Joclean Alves

    1999-06-01

    In this work, we extract the elastic stiffness and mass density from an multi azimuthal qP-wave reflection coefficients at an interface separating two anisotropic media with monoclinic symmetry with at least one of its planes of symmetry parallel to the interface. This objective was reach by forward and inverse modeling. We calculate the q-P-wave reflection for three models (I, II, III) of anisotropic equivalent medium: isotropic medium above a TIH medium; TIV medium above a TIH medium; and orthorhombic medium above a TIH medium. The TIH medium is equivalent an isotropic fractured medium with equivalent elastic stiffness and mass density calculated by the Hudson formulation. The reflection coefficients used was on its exact form and was generated for models I, II and III in multi-azimuthal/incidence angles and contaminated by gaussian noise. In the inverse modeling we work with GA and with DE algorithms to calculate the inversion parameter (5 elastic stiffness and mass density for bottom media and Vs of upper isotropic media) by minimization of 12 norm of difference between the true and synthetic reflection coefficient. We assume that we know the parameter of the upper media of the three models, except Vs for model one in especial case of inversion of upper media.The parameter to be determined by inverse modeling are parametrized in model space for values that is in according with the value of the observed velocity of propagation of elastic waves in the earth crust, and the resolution of measure, and constraints of elastic stability of the solid media. The GA and DE algorithms reached good inversion to the models with at least three azimuthal angles, (0 deg C, 45 deg C and 90 deg C) and incidence angles of 34 deg C for model I, and 50 deg C inverted only by GA for models II and III; and the especial case take by DE that need at least 44 deg C to invert the model I with the Vs of the upper media. From this results we can see the potential to determine from q

  13. Multi-scale Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Nonlinear and Nonstationary Teleconnection Signals and Artificial Neural Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies can affect terrestrial precipitation via ocean-atmosphere interaction known as climate teleconnection. Non-stationary and non-linear characteristics of the ocean-atmosphere system make the identification of the teleconnection signals...

  14. Hydraulic tomography for detecting fracture zone connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yonghong; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J; Xiang, Jianwei; Illman, Walter A; Ando, Kenichi; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Cheng-Haw

    2008-01-01

    Fracture zones and their connectivity in geologic media are of great importance to ground water resources management as well as ground water contamination prevention and remediation. In this paper, we applied a recently developed hydraulic tomography (HT) technique and an analysis algorithm (sequential successive linear estimator) to synthetic fractured media. The application aims to explore the potential utility of the technique and the algorithm for characterizing fracture zone distribution and their connectivity. Results of this investigation showed that using HT with a limited number of wells, the fracture zone distribution and its connectivity (general pattern) can be mapped satisfactorily although estimated hydraulic property fields are smooth. As the number of wells and monitoring ports increases, the fracture zone distribution and connectivity become vivid and the estimated hydraulic properties approach true values. We hope that the success of this application may promote the development and application of the new generations of technology (i.e., hydraulic, tracer, pneumatic tomographic surveys) for mapping fractures and other features in geologic media.

  15. A voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D cluster-size test based on random field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanjie; Nickerson, Lisa D; Zhao, Xuna; Nichols, Thomas E; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Cluster-size tests (CSTs) based on random field theory (RFT) are commonly adopted to identify significant differences in brain images. However, the use of RFT in CSTs rests on the assumption of uniform smoothness (stationarity). When images are non-stationary, CSTs based on RFT will likely lead to increased false positives in smooth regions and reduced power in rough regions. An adjustment to the cluster size according to the local smoothness at each voxel has been proposed for the standard test based on RFT to address non-stationarity, however, this technique requires images with a large degree of spatial smoothing, large degrees of freedom and high intensity thresholding. Recently, we proposed a voxelation-corrected 3D CST based on Gaussian random field theory that does not place constraints on the degree of spatial smoothness. However, this approach is only applicable to stationary images, requiring further modification to enable use for non-stationary images. In this study, we present modifications of this method to develop a voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D CST based on RFT. Both simulated and real data were used to compare the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST to the standard cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT and the voxelation-corrected stationary CST. We found that voxelation-corrected stationary CST is liberal for non-stationary images and the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST performs better than cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT under low smoothness, low intensity threshold and low degrees of freedom. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The approximate thermal-model-testing method for non-stationary temperature fields in central zones of fast reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhin, V.I.; Matukhin, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The approach to generalization of the non-stationary heat exchange data for the central zones of the nuclear reactor fuel assemblies and the approximate thermal-model-testing criteria are proposed. The fuel assemblies of fast and water-cooled reactors with different fuel compositions have been investigated. The reason of the non-stationary heat exchange is the fuel-energy-release time dependence. (author)

  17. Relativistic electrodynamics of dissipative elastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranys, M.

    1980-01-01

    A phenomenological general relativistic electrodynamics is proposed for a dissipative elastic solid which is polarizable and magnetizable and whose governing equations form a hyperbolic system. Non-stationary transport equations are proposed for dissipative fluxes (and constitutive equations of electrodynamics) containing new cross-effect terms, as required for compatibility with an entropy principle expressed by a new balance equation (including a new Gibbs equation). The dynamic equations are deduced from the unified Minkowski-Abraham-Eckart energy-momentum tensor. The theory, formed by a set of 29 (reducible to 23) partial differential equations (in special relativity) governing the material behaviour of the system characterized by generalizing the constitutive equations of quasineutral media, together with Maxwell's equations, may be referred to as the electrodynamics of dissipative elastic media (or fluid). The proposed transport laws for polarization and magnetization generalize the well-known Debye law for relaxation and show the influence of shear and bulk viscosity on polarization and magentization. Besides the form of the entropy function, the free energy function in the non-stationary regime is also formulated. (auth)

  18. Efficient Simulation and Downscaling of Large Non-Stationary Fields with Varying Local Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodov, B.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of locally anisotropic, non-stationary random fields is a relatively new topic in geostatistics with applications currently restricted to the construction of an admissible covariance matrix. In this paper, we introduce an efficient algorithm for constructing large non-stationary random fields with arbitrary local covariance structure and anisotropy. At the heart of our approach is a newly developed robust directional multiresolution framework combined with a local tensor anisotropy model. The use of our algorithm is illustrated with local anisotropy analysis, simulation and downscaling of complex pseudo-precipitation (PP) fields* related to tropical and extra-tropical cyclones. The efficiency of the algorithm allows obtaining realistic downscaled global GCM precipitation fields down to a few kilometers resolution in seconds.* Reference: Unpublished work by Huiling Yuan and Zoltan Toth. PP fields are constructed by taking the precipitation as the positive component of the field and the water vapor saturation deficit as its negative complement.

  19. Causal Discovery from Nonstationary/Heterogeneous Data: Skeleton Estimation and Orientation Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Huang, Biwei; Zhang, Jiji; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    It is commonplace to encounter nonstationary or heterogeneous data, of which the underlying generating process changes over time or across data sets (the data sets may have different experimental conditions or data collection conditions). Such a distribution shift feature presents both challenges and opportunities for causal discovery. In this paper we develop a principled framework for causal discovery from such data, called Constraint-based causal Discovery from Nonstationary/heterogeneous Data (CD-NOD), which addresses two important questions. First, we propose an enhanced constraint-based procedure to detect variables whose local mechanisms change and recover the skeleton of the causal structure over observed variables. Second, we present a way to determine causal orientations by making use of independence changes in the data distribution implied by the underlying causal model, benefiting from information carried by changing distributions. Experimental results on various synthetic and real-world data sets are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of our methods.

  20. Non-stationary hydrological frequency analysis based on the reconstruction of extreme hydrological series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y. M.; Liang, Z. M.; Jiang, X. L.; Bu, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for non-stationary hydrological frequency analysis is proposed. The approach is due to the following consideration that, at present the data series used to detect mutation characteristic is very short, which may only reflect the partial characteristic of the population. That is to say, the mutation characteristic of short series may not fully represent the mutation characteristic of population, such as the difference of mutation degree between short sample and population. In this proposed method, an assumption is done that the variation hydrological series in a big time window owns an expected vibration center (EVC), which is a linear combination of the two mean values of the two subsample series obtained through separating the original hydrological series by a novel optimal segmentation technique (change rate of slope method). Then using the EVC to reconstruct non-stationary series to meet the requirement of stationary, and further ensure the conventional frequency analysis methods is valid.

  1. A Study of the Allan Variance for Constant-Mean Nonstationary Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haotian; Guerrier, Stephane; Molinari, Roberto; Zhang, Yuming

    2017-08-01

    The Allan Variance (AV) is a widely used quantity in areas focusing on error measurement as well as in the general analysis of variance for autocorrelated processes in domains such as engineering and, more specifically, metrology. The form of this quantity is widely used to detect noise patterns and indications of stability within signals. However, the properties of this quantity are not known for commonly occurring processes whose covariance structure is non-stationary and, in these cases, an erroneous interpretation of the AV could lead to misleading conclusions. This paper generalizes the theoretical form of the AV to some non-stationary processes while at the same time being valid also for weakly stationary processes. Some simulation examples show how this new form can help to understand the processes for which the AV is able to distinguish these from the stationary cases and hence allow for a better interpretation of this quantity in applied cases.

  2. Detection of Unusual Events and Trends in Complex Non-Stationary Data Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Rafael B.; Protopopescu, Vladimir A.; Worley, Brian Addison; Perez, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The search for unusual events and trends hidden in multi-component, nonlinear, non-stationary, noisy signals is extremely important for a host of different applications, ranging from nuclear power plant and electric grid operation to internet traffic and implementation of non-proliferation protocols. In the context of this work, we define an unusual event as a local signal disturbance and a trend as a continuous carrier of information added to and different from the underlying baseline dynamics. The goal of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of detecting hidden intermittent events inside non-stationary signal data sets corrupted by high levels of noise, by using the Hilbert-Huang empirical mode decomposition method

  3. Modeling nonstationary extreme value distributions with nonlinear functions: An application using multiple precipitation projections for U.S. cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Myoung-Jin; Kim, Yeonjoo; Markus, Momcilo; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    2017-09-01

    Climate extremes, such as heavy precipitation events, have become more common in recent decades, and nonstationarity concepts have increasingly been adopted to model hydrologic extremes. Various issues are associated with applying nonstationary modeling to extremes, and in this study, we focus on assessing the need for different forms of nonlinear functions in a nonstationary generalized extreme value (GEV) model of different annual maximum precipitation (AMP) time series. Moreover, we suggest an efficient approach for selecting the nonlinear functions of a nonstationary GEV model. Based on observed and multiple projected AMP data for eight cities across the U.S., three separate tasks are proposed. First, we conduct trend and stationarity tests for the observed and projected data. Second, AMP series are fit with thirty different nonlinear functions, and the best functions among these are selected. Finally, the selected nonlinear functions are used to model the location parameter of a nonstationary GEV model and stationary and nonstationary GEV models with a linear function. Our results suggest that the simple use of nonlinear functions might prove useful with nonstationary GEV models of AMP for different locations with different types of model results.

  4. Advantages of the non-stationary approach: test on eddy current signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, P.

    1993-12-01

    Conventional signal processing is often unsuitable for the interpretation of intrinsically non-stationary signals, such as surveillance or non destructive testing signals. In these cases, ''advanced'' methods are required. This report presents two applications of non-stationary signal processing methods to the complex signals obtained in eddy current non destructive testing of steam generator tubes. The first application consists in segmenting the absolute channel, which can be likened to a piecewise constant signal. The Page-Hinkley cumulative sum algorithm is used, enabling detection of unknown mean amplitude jumps in a piecewise constant signal disturbed by a white noise. Results are comparable to those obtained with the empirical method currently in use. As easy to implement as the latter, the Page-Hinkley algorithm has the added advantage of being well formalized and of identifying whether the jumps in mean are positive or negative. The second application concerns assistance in detecting characteristic fault transients in the differential channels, using the continuous wavelet transform. The useful signal and noise spectra are fairly close, but not strictly identical. With the continuous wavelet transform, these frequency differences can be turned to account. The method was tested on synthetic signals obtained by summing noise and real defect signals. Using the continuous wavelet transform reduces the minimum signal-to-noise ratio by 5 dB for detection of a transient as compared with direct detection on the original signal. Finally, a summary of non-stationary methods using our data is presented. The two investigations described confirm that non-stationary methods may be considered as interesting signal and image analysis tools, as an efficient complement to conventional methods. (author). 24 figs., 13 refs

  5. Nonstationary Movement of a Generalized Newtonian Liquid About a Solid Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perminov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Nonstationary flows of dilatant and pseudoplastic liquids, classified among the Newtonian liquids, about a solid body were investigated. A pulsating flow of a dilatant liquid and the averaged flow of this liquid arising on the basis of its pulsating flow in the boundary layer near an infinite solid cylinder were numerically calculated for the case of high-frequency transverse vibrations of the cylinder. A numerical simulation of a flow of a pseudoplastic liquid about the indicated cylinder has been performed.

  6. Nonstationary behavior in a delayed feedback traveling wave tube folded waveguide oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskin, N.M.; Titov, V.N.; Han, S.T.; So, J.K.; Jang, K.H.; Kang, Y.B.; Park, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    Folded waveguide traveling-wave tubes (FW TWT) are among the most promising candidates for powerful compact amplifiers and oscillators in millimeter and submillimeter wave bands. In this paper, the nonstationary behavior of a FW TWT oscillator with delayed feedback is investigated. Starting conditions of the oscillations are derived analytically. Results of numerical simulation of single-frequency, self-modulation (multifrequency) and chaotic generation regimes are presented. Mode competition phenomena, multistability and hysteresis are discussed

  7. Determination of non-stationary stochastic processes compatible with seismic response/design spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Giaralis, A.; Spanos, P. D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the problem of deriving non-stationary stochastic processes defined by a parametric evolutionary power spectrum (EPS) compatible with a given (target) design spectrum is addressed. An inverse stochastic dynamics problem is formulated and solved in a least-square sense to determine the requisite EPS. This involves the incorporation of a “peak factor” which is used to relate statistically the target spectrum to the EPS. Special attention is focused on deriving design spectrum comp...

  8. Consistent and Conservative Model Selection with the Adaptive LASSO in Stationary and Nonstationary Autoregressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders Bredahl

    2016-01-01

    as if only these had been included in the model from the outset. In particular, this implies that it is able to discriminate between stationary and nonstationary autoregressions and it thereby constitutes an addition to the set of unit root tests. Next, and important in practice, we show that choosing...... to perform conservative model selection it has power even against shrinking alternatives of this form and compare it to the plain Lasso....

  9. Self-organising mixture autoregressive model for non-stationary time series modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, He; Yin, Hujun

    2008-12-01

    Modelling non-stationary time series has been a difficult task for both parametric and nonparametric methods. One promising solution is to combine the flexibility of nonparametric models with the simplicity of parametric models. In this paper, the self-organising mixture autoregressive (SOMAR) network is adopted as a such mixture model. It breaks time series into underlying segments and at the same time fits local linear regressive models to the clusters of segments. In such a way, a global non-stationary time series is represented by a dynamic set of local linear regressive models. Neural gas is used for a more flexible structure of the mixture model. Furthermore, a new similarity measure has been introduced in the self-organising network to better quantify the similarity of time series segments. The network can be used naturally in modelling and forecasting non-stationary time series. Experiments on artificial, benchmark time series (e.g. Mackey-Glass) and real-world data (e.g. numbers of sunspots and Forex rates) are presented and the results show that the proposed SOMAR network is effective and superior to other similar approaches.

  10. A location-based multiple point statistics method: modelling the reservoir with non-stationary characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanshu; Feng, Wenjie

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a location-based multiple point statistics method is developed to model a non-stationary reservoir. The proposed method characterizes the relationship between the sedimentary pattern and the deposit location using the relative central position distance function, which alleviates the requirement that the training image and the simulated grids have the same dimension. The weights in every direction of the distance function can be changed to characterize the reservoir heterogeneity in various directions. The local integral replacements of data events, structured random path, distance tolerance and multi-grid strategy are applied to reproduce the sedimentary patterns and obtain a more realistic result. This method is compared with the traditional Snesim method using a synthesized 3-D training image of Poyang Lake and a reservoir model of Shengli Oilfield in China. The results indicate that the new method can reproduce the non-stationary characteristics better than the traditional method and is more suitable for simulation of delta-front deposits. These results show that the new method is a powerful tool for modelling a reservoir with non-stationary characteristics.

  11. A comparison of three approaches to non-stationary flood frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, S. E.; Strupczewski, W. G.; Bogdanowicz, E.

    2017-08-01

    Non-stationary flood frequency analysis (FFA) is applied to statistical analysis of seasonal flow maxima from Polish and Norwegian catchments. Three non-stationary estimation methods, namely, maximum likelihood (ML), two stage (WLS/TS) and GAMLSS (generalized additive model for location, scale and shape parameters), are compared in the context of capturing the effect of non-stationarity on the estimation of time-dependent moments and design quantiles. The use of a multimodel approach is recommended, to reduce the errors due to the model misspecification in the magnitude of quantiles. The results of calculations based on observed seasonal daily flow maxima and computer simulation experiments showed that GAMLSS gave the best results with respect to the relative bias and root mean square error in the estimates of trend in the standard deviation and the constant shape parameter, while WLS/TS provided better accuracy in the estimates of trend in the mean value. Within three compared methods the WLS/TS method is recommended to deal with non-stationarity in short time series. Some practical aspects of the GAMLSS package application are also presented. The detailed discussion of general issues related to consequences of climate change in the FFA is presented in the second part of the article entitled "Around and about an application of the GAMLSS package in non-stationary flood frequency analysis".

  12. Matérn-based nonstationary cross-covariance models for global processes

    KAUST Repository

    Jun, Mikyoung

    2014-07-01

    Many spatial processes in environmental applications, such as climate variables and climate model errors on a global scale, exhibit complex nonstationary dependence structure, in not only their marginal covariance but also their cross-covariance. Flexible cross-covariance models for processes on a global scale are critical for an accurate description of each spatial process as well as the cross-dependences between them and also for improved predictions. We propose various ways to produce cross-covariance models, based on the Matérn covariance model class, that are suitable for describing prominent nonstationary characteristics of the global processes. In particular, we seek nonstationary versions of Matérn covariance models whose smoothness parameters vary over space, coupled with a differential operators approach for modeling large-scale nonstationarity. We compare their performance to the performance of some existing models in terms of the aic and spatial predictions in two applications: joint modeling of surface temperature and precipitation, and joint modeling of errors in climate model ensembles. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  13. The Fourier decomposition method for nonlinear and non-stationary time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pushpendra; Joshi, Shiv Dutt; Patney, Rakesh Kumar; Saha, Kaushik

    2017-03-01

    for many decades, there has been a general perception in the literature that Fourier methods are not suitable for the analysis of nonlinear and non-stationary data. In this paper, we propose a novel and adaptive Fourier decomposition method (FDM), based on the Fourier theory, and demonstrate its efficacy for the analysis of nonlinear and non-stationary time series. The proposed FDM decomposes any data into a small number of 'Fourier intrinsic band functions' (FIBFs). The FDM presents a generalized Fourier expansion with variable amplitudes and variable frequencies of a time series by the Fourier method itself. We propose an idea of zero-phase filter bank-based multivariate FDM (MFDM), for the analysis of multivariate nonlinear and non-stationary time series, using the FDM. We also present an algorithm to obtain cut-off frequencies for MFDM. The proposed MFDM generates a finite number of band-limited multivariate FIBFs (MFIBFs). The MFDM preserves some intrinsic physical properties of the multivariate data, such as scale alignment, trend and instantaneous frequency. The proposed methods provide a time-frequency-energy (TFE) distribution that reveals the intrinsic structure of a data. Numerical computations and simulations have been carried out and comparison is made with the empirical mode decomposition algorithms.

  14. A New Method for Nonlinear and Nonstationary Time Series Analysis: The Empirical Mode Decomposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Norden E.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part of the method is the Empirical Mode Decomposition method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF). An IMF is defined as any function having the same numbers of zero-crossing and extrema, and also having symmetric envelopes defined by the local maxima and minima respectively. The IMF also admits well-behaved Hilbert transform. This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. Since the decomposition is based on the local characteristic time scale of the data, it is applicable to nonlinear and nonstationary processes. With the Hilbert transform, the Intrinsic Mode Functions yield instantaneous frequencies as functions of time that give sharp identifications of imbedded structures. The final presentation of the results is an energy-frequency-time distribution, designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. Classical nonlinear system models are used to illustrate the roles played by the nonlinear and nonstationary effects in the energy-frequency-time distribution.

  15. Does nonstationarity in rainfall require nonstationary intensity-duration-frequency curves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Poulomi; Coulibaly, Paulin

    2017-12-01

    In Canada, risk of flooding due to heavy rainfall has risen in recent decades; the most notable recent examples include the July 2013 storm in the Greater Toronto region and the May 2017 flood of the Toronto Islands. We investigate nonstationarity and trends in the short-duration precipitation extremes in selected urbanized locations in Southern Ontario, Canada, and evaluate the potential of nonstationary intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves, which form an input to civil infrastructural design. Despite apparent signals of nonstationarity in precipitation extremes in all locations, the stationary vs. nonstationary models do not exhibit any significant differences in the design storm intensity, especially for short recurrence intervals (up to 10 years). The signatures of nonstationarity in rainfall extremes do not necessarily imply the use of nonstationary IDFs for design considerations. When comparing the proposed IDFs with current design standards, for return periods (10 years or less) typical for urban drainage design, current design standards require an update of up to 7 %, whereas for longer recurrence intervals (50-100 years), ideal for critical civil infrastructural design, updates ranging between ˜ 2 and 44 % are suggested. We further emphasize that the above findings need re-evaluation in the light of climate change projections since the intensity and frequency of extreme precipitation are expected to intensify due to global warming.

  16. Research on Polarization Cancellation of Nonstationary Ionosphere Clutter in HF Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingpeng Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oblique projection polarization filter (OPPF can be applied as an effective approach for interference cancellation in high-frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR and other systems. In order to suppress the nonstationary ionosphere clutter further, a novel OPPF based clutter suppressing scheme is proposed in this paper. The polarization and nonstationary characteristic of the clutter are taken into account in the algorithms referred to as range-Doppler domain polarization suppression (RDDPS and the range-time domain polarization suppression (RTDPS method, respectively. The RDDPS is designed for weak ionosphere clutter and implemented in the range-Doppler domain directly, whereas the RTDPS algorithm is designed to suppress the powerful ionosphere clutter with a multisegment estimation and suppression scheme. About 15–23 dB signal to interference ratio (SIR improvement can be excepted when using the proposed method, whereas the targets can be more easily detected in the range-Doppler map. Experimental results demonstrate that the scheme proposed is effective for nonstationary ionosphere clutter and is proven to be a practical interference cancellation technique for HFSWR.

  17. Poisson pre-processing of nonstationary photonic signals: Signals with equality between mean and variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplová, Michaela; Sovka, Pavel; Cifra, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Photonic signals are broadly exploited in communication and sensing and they typically exhibit Poisson-like statistics. In a common scenario where the intensity of the photonic signals is low and one needs to remove a nonstationary trend of the signals for any further analysis, one faces an obstacle: due to the dependence between the mean and variance typical for a Poisson-like process, information about the trend remains in the variance even after the trend has been subtracted, possibly yielding artifactual results in further analyses. Commonly available detrending or normalizing methods cannot cope with this issue. To alleviate this issue we developed a suitable pre-processing method for the signals that originate from a Poisson-like process. In this paper, a Poisson pre-processing method for nonstationary time series with Poisson distribution is developed and tested on computer-generated model data and experimental data of chemiluminescence from human neutrophils and mung seeds. The presented method transforms a nonstationary Poisson signal into a stationary signal with a Poisson distribution while preserving the type of photocount distribution and phase-space structure of the signal. The importance of the suggested pre-processing method is shown in Fano factor and Hurst exponent analysis of both computer-generated model signals and experimental photonic signals. It is demonstrated that our pre-processing method is superior to standard detrending-based methods whenever further signal analysis is sensitive to variance of the signal.

  18. Media Pedagogy: Media Education, Media Socialisation and Educational Media

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Qvortrup

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between education and media. These two concepts can be combined in three ways: one can think of media education, i.e. education in the subject of mass media. One can think of media socialisation, i.e. education within the context of a media society in which pupils and students are experienced media users. Finally, one can think of educational media, i.e. media used for educational purposes. After having specified these three subject areas,...

  19. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2017-06-09

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  20. Gas transport in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Clifford K

    2006-01-01

    This book presents a compilation of state-of-the art studies on gas and vapor transport processes in porous and fractured media. A broad set of models and processes are presented, including advection/diffusion, the Dusty Gas Model, enhanced vapor diffusion, phase change, coupled processes, solid/vapor sorption, and vapor-pressure lowering. Numerous applications are also presented that illustrate these processes and models in current problems facing the scientific community. This book fills a gap in the general area of transport in porous and fractured media; an area that has historically been dominated by studies of liquid-phase flow and transport. This book identifies gas and vapor transport processes that may be important or dominant in various applications, and it exploits recent advances in computational modeling and experimental methods to present studies that distinguish the relative importance of various mechanisms of transport in complex media.

  1. Homogenization and two scales convergence of some stationary and non-stationary heat transfer problems, application to gas cooled nuclear rectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibi, Z.

    2011-01-01

    We are interested in the homogenization of heat transfer in periodic porous media modelling the geometry of a gas cooled nuclear reactor. This geometry is made of a solid media perforated by several long thin parallel cylinders, the diameter of which is of the same order than the period. The heat is transported by conduction in the solid part of the domain and by conduction, convection and radiative transfer in the fluid part (the cylinders). A non-local boundary condition models the radiative heat transfer on the cylinder walls. It is a stationary analysis corresponding to a nominal performance of the reactor core, and also non-stationary corresponding to a normal shut-down of the core. To obtain the homogenized problem we first use a formal two-scale asymptotic expansion method. The mathematical justification of our results is based on the notion of two-scale convergence. One feature of this work in dimension 3 is that it combines homogenization with a 3D to 2D asymptotic analysis since the radiative transfer in the limit cell problem is purely two-dimensional. A second feature of this work is the study of this heat transfer when it contains an oscillating thermal source at the microscopic level and a thermal exchange with the perforations. In this context, our numerical analysis shows a non-negligible contribution of the second order corrector which helps us to model the gradients appearing between the source area and the perforations. (author) [fr

  2. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  3. Media education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  4. An XFEM Model for Hydraulic Fracturing in Partially Saturated Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimzadeh Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a complex multi-physics phenomenon. Numerous analytical and numerical models of hydraulic fracturing processes have been proposed. Analytical solutions commonly are able to model the growth of a single hydraulic fracture into an initially intact, homogeneous rock mass. Numerical models are able to analyse complex problems such as multiple hydraulic fractures and fracturing in heterogeneous media. However, majority of available models are restricted to single-phase flow through fracture and permeable porous rock. This is not compatible with actual field conditions where the injected fluid does not have similar properties as the host fluid. In this study we present a fully coupled hydro-poroelastic model which incorporates two fluids i.e. fracturing fluid and host fluid. Flow through fracture is defined based on lubrication assumption, while flow through matrix is defined as Darcy flow. The fracture discontinuity in the mechanical model is captured using eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM while the fracture propagation criterion is defined through cohesive fracture model. The discontinuous matrix fluid velocity across fracture is modelled using leak-off loading which couples fracture flow and matrix flow. The proposed model has been discretised using standard Galerkin method, implemented in Matlab and verified against several published solutions. Multiple hydraulic fracturing simulations are performed to show the model robustness and to illustrate how problem parameters such as injection rate and rock permeability affect the hydraulic fracturing variables i.e. injection pressure, fracture aperture and fracture length. The results show the impact of partial saturation on leak-off and the fact that single-phase models may underestimate the leak-off.

  5. Evaluation of modeling approaches to simulate contaminant transport in a fractured limestone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Broholm, Mette Martina

    contaminant transport in fractured media, such as discrete fracture, equivalent porous media, and dual continuum models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for real limestone geologies. Our goal is therefore to develop, evaluate and compare approaches for modeling transport of contaminants...... data is the determination of relevant hydraulic properties and interpretation of aqueous and solid phase contaminant concentration sampling data. Traditional water sampling has a bias towards fracture sampling; however, concentrations in the limestone matrix are needed for assessing contaminant rebound...

  6. Risk Assessment in Fractured Clayey Tills - Which Modeling Tools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Binning, Philip John

    2012-01-01

    The article presents different tools available for risk assessment in fractured clayey tills and their advantages and limitations are discussed. Because of the complex processes occurring during contaminant transport through fractured media, the development of simple practical tools for risk...... assessment is challenging and the inclusion of the relevant processes is difficult. Furthermore the lack of long-term monitoring data prevents from verifying the accuracy of the different conceptual models. Further investigations based on long-term data and numerical modeling are needed to accurately...... describe contaminant transport in fractured media and develop practical tools with the relevant processes and level of complexity....

  7. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharam, S.C.; Perko, J.; Jacques, D.; Mallants, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry. • Time of peak radionuclide fluxes is sensitive to the fracture networks. • Uniform flow model mimics a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures. • Effect of fracture width on radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity. • Effect of increased dispersivity in fractured media does not always result in a lower peak flux for specific fracture networks due to higher concentrations adjacent to the fracture plane. - Abstract: Analysis of the effect of fractures in porous media on fluid flow and mass transport is of great interest in many fields including geotechnical, petroleum, hydrogeology and waste management. This paper presents sensitivity analyses examining the effect of various hypothetical fracture networks on the performance of a planned near surface disposal facility in terms of radionuclide transport behaviour. As it is impossible to predict the initiation and evolution of fracture networks and their characteristics in concrete structures over time scales of interest, several fracture networks have been postulated to test the sensitivity of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Fluid flow through concrete matrix and fracture networks are modelled via Darcy's law. A single species radionuclide transport equation is employed for both matrix and fracture networks, which include the processes advection, diffusion, dispersion, sorption/desorption and radioactive decay. The sensitivity study evaluates variations in fracture network configuration and fracture width together with different sorption/desorption characteristics of radionuclides in a cement matrix, radioactive decay constants and matrix dispersivity. The effect of the fractures is illustrated via radionuclide breakthrough curves, magnitude and time of peak mass flux, cumulative mass flux and concentration profiles. For the

  8. Barometric Pumping of a Fractured Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J. F.; Pili, E.; Guillon, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluctuations in the ambient atmospheric pressure result in motion of air in porous fractured media. This mechanism, known as barometric pumping, efficiently transports gaseous species through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. This is of interest in fields, such as transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, remediation of contaminated sites, radon in buildings, leakage from carbon sequestration sites and detection of nuclear explosions. The fractures are modeled as polygonal plane surfaces with a given transmissivity embedded in a permeable matrix. The slightly compressible fluid obeys Darcy's law in these two media with exchanges between them. The solute obeys convection-diffusion equations in both media again with exchanges. The fractures and the porous medium are meshed by triangles and tetrahedra, respectively. The equations are discretized by the finite volume method. A Flux Limiting Scheme diminishes numerical dispersion ; the solute transfer between the fractures and the porous medium is precisely evaluated. The resulting equations are solved by conjugate gradient algorithms. This model is applied to the Roselend Natural Laboratory. At a 55 m depth, a sealed cavity allows for gas release experiments across fractured porous rocks in the unsaturated zone. The fractures are hexagons with a radius of 5m; their density is larger than 2.4 10-3 m-3; the aperture is about 0.5 mm. The pressure fluctuations are sinusoidal, of amplitude 0.01 bar and period 1 week. The solute concentration is equal to 1 at the bottom. Systematic results will be presented. First, the precision of the calculations is assessed. Second, the pressure and solute concentration fields are displayed and discussed. Third, the influence of the major parameters (fracture density, aperture, porosity, diffusion coefficient,…) is illustrated and discussed. These results are discussed in terms of the amplification of solute transfer to the ground surface by the pressure fluctuations.

  9. A simple analytical description of the non-stationary dynamics in Ising spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Vázquez, Eduardo; Del Ferraro, Gino; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2017-03-01

    The analytical description of the dynamics in models with discrete variables (e.g. Ising spins) is a notoriously difficult problem, which can only be tackled under some approximation. Recently a novel variational approach to solve the stationary dynamical regime has been introduced by Pelizzola (2013 Eur. Phys. J. B 86 120), where simple closed equations are derived under mean-field approximations based on the cluster variational method. Here we propose to use the same approximation based on the cluster variational method also for the non-stationary regime, which has not been considered up to now within this framework. We check the validity of this approximation in describing the non-stationary dynamical regime of several Ising models defined on Erdős-Rényi random graphs: we study ferromagnetic models with symmetric and partially asymmetric couplings, models with random fields and also spin glass models. A comparison with the actual Glauber dynamics, solved numerically, shows that one of the two studied approximations (the so-called ‘diamond’ approximation) provides very accurate results in all the systems studied. Only for the spin glass models do we find some small discrepancies in the very low temperature phase, probably due to the existence of a large number of metastable states. Given the simplicity of the equations to be solved, we believe the diamond approximation should be considered as the ‘minimal standard’ in the description of the non-stationary regime of Ising-like models: any new method pretending to provide a better approximate description to the dynamics of Ising-like models should perform at least as good as the diamond approximation.

  10. Non-stationary Discharge Patterns in Motor Cortex under Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabato eSantaniello

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN directly modulates the basal ganglia, but how such stimulation impacts the cortex upstream is largely unknown. There is evidence of cortical activation in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats and facilitation of motor evoked potentials in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients, but the impact of the DBS settings on the cortical activity in normal vs. Parkinsonian conditions is still debated.In recent studies, we used point process models to analyze non-stationary activation patterns and inter-neuronal dependencies in the motor and sensory cortices of awake non-human primates during STN DBS. We reported that these features are enhanced after treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, which causes a consistent PD-like motor impairment, and that high-frequency DBS (i.e., >100 pulses-per-second [pps] strongly reduces the short-term patterns (3-7ms period both before and after MPTP treatment, while it elicits a consistent short-latency post-stimulus activation. Low-frequency DBS (≤50pps, instead, had negligible effects on the non-stationary features while decreased the burstiness of the spike trains.We evaluate here the impact of the DBS settings on the cortical discharge patterns by using tools from the information theory (receiver operating characteristic curve, information rate, etc. and report that the probability of spiking of the cortical neurons is significantly conditioned on the DBS settings, with such dependency being significantly larger for high- vs. low-frequency DBS. Overall, the selective suppression of non-stationary features and the increased modulation of the spike probability suggest that high-frequency STN DBS enhances the neuronal activation in motor and sensory cortices, presumably because of reinforcement mechanisms, which perhaps involve the overlap between feedback antidromic and feed-forward orthodromic responses along the basal ganglia

  11. A flag-up algorithm and test for nonstationary customer-specific product graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten H. J.; Scholderer, Joachim

    period. The results show that the test is clearly able to identify customers with evolving behavior, and that it can easily be deployed as part of a CRM system. It enables companies with loyalty programs to focus on nonstationary customers, i.e. customers who may represent opportunities for cross...... values are above five. The resulting statistic is Chi-square distributed, with degrees of freedom equal to the number of edges that are present, with a penalty based on shopping basket size. The test is demonstrated using panel scanner data from 4,921 supermarket loyalty card holders over a 19-month...

  12. Non-Stationary Modelling and Simulation of Near-Source Earthquake Ground Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fouskitakis, G. N.

    This paper is concerned with modelling and simulation of near-source earthquake ground motion. Recent studies have revealed that these motions show heavy non-stationary behaviour with very low frequencies dominating parts of the earthquake sequence. Modelling and simulation of this behaviour...... by an epicentral distance of 16 km and measured during the 1979 Imperial valley earthquake in California (USA). The results of the study indicate that while all three approaches can succesfully predict near-source ground motions, the Neural Network based one gives somewhat poorer simulation results....

  13. Non-Stationary Modelling and Simulation of Near-Source Earthquake Ground Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fouskitakis, G. N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with modelling and simulation of near-source earthquake ground motion. Recent studies have revealed that these motions show heavy non-stationary behaviour with very low frequencies dominating parts of the earthquake sequence. Modeling and simulation of this behaviour...... by an epicentral distance of 16 km and measured during the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California (U .S .A.). The results of the study indicate that while all three approaches can successfully predict near-source ground motions, the Neural Network based one gives somewhat poorer simulation results....

  14. ARE THE REAL GDP SERIES IN ASIAN COUNTRIES NONSTATIONARY OR NONLINEAR STATIONARY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurun Nahar Jannati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper checks whether per capita real gross domestic product (GDP series in 16 Asian countries are nonstationary or nonlinear and globally stationary during the period from 1970 to 2009, by applying the nonlinear unit root tests developed by Kapitanios, Shin and Snell (2003. In five out of the sixteen countries that is approximately one-third of the countries, the series are found to be stationary with asymmetric or nonlinear mean reversion. Analyses depict that nonlinear unit root test are suitable for some cases compare to the commonly used unit root test, Augmented Dickey-Fuller (ADF and Dickey-Fuller Generalized Least Square (DF-GLS tests.

  15. Non-stationary Condition Monitoring of large diesel engines with the AEWATT toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik; Larsen, Jan; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a specialized toolbox for non-stationary condition monitoring of large 2-stroke diesel engines based on acoustic emission measurements. The main contribution of this toolbox has so far been the utilization of adaptive linear models such as Principal and Independent Component...... Analysis, as combined modeling and feature reduction methods. These models describe the, say 1024 or 2048, acoustic emission samples per engine revolution, i.e. data are in the crank angle domain. In this framework we have applied unsupervised learning using only one feature – the log...

  16. Detection of unusual events and trends in complex non-stationary data streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton-Perez, C.; Perez, R.B.; Protopopescu, V.; Worley, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    The search for unusual events and trends hidden in multi-component, nonlinear, non-stationary, noisy signals is extremely important for diverse applications, ranging from power plant operation to homeland security. In the context of this work, we define an unusual event as a local signal disturbance and a trend as a continuous carrier of information added to and different from the underlying baseline dynamics. The goal of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of detecting hidden events inside intermittent signal data sets corrupted by high levels of noise, by using the Hilbert-Huang empirical mode decomposition method.

  17. Hawking radiation temperatures in non-stationary Kerr black holes with different tortoise coordinate transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, X.G. [Southwest Jiaotong University, Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Chengdu (China); China West Normal University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanchong (China); Jiang, Q.Q. [China West Normal University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanchong (China); Wei, L.F. [Southwest Jiaotong University, Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Chengdu (China); Sun Yat-Sen University, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-04-15

    We apply the Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method to study the Hawking radiations of scalar and Dirac particles in non-stationary Kerr black holes under different tortoise coordinate transformations. We found that all the relevant Hawking radiation spectra show still the blackbody ones, while the Hawking temperatures are strongly related to the used tortoise coordinate transformations. The properties of these dependences are discussed analytically and numerically. Our results imply that proper selections of tortoise coordinate transformations should be important in the studies of Hawking radiations and the correct selection would be given by the experimental observations in the future. (orig.)

  18. A regional and nonstationary model for partial duration series of extreme rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Ida Bülow; Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2017-01-01

    of extreme rainfall. The framework is built on a partial duration series approach with a nonstationary, regional threshold value. The model is based on generalized linear regression solved by generalized estimation equations. It allows a spatial correlation between the stations in the network and accounts...... furthermore for variable observation periods at each station and in each year. Marginal regional and temporal regression models solved by generalized least squares are used to validate and discuss the results of the full spatiotemporal model. The model is applied on data from a large Danish rain gauge network...

  19. Hawking radiation temperatures in non-stationary Kerr black holes with different tortoise coordinate transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, X. G.; Jiang, Q. Q.; Wei, L. F.

    2012-04-01

    We apply the Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method to study the Hawking radiations of scalar and Dirac particles in non-stationary Kerr black holes under different tortoise coordinate transformations. We found that all the relevant Hawking radiation spectra show still the blackbody ones, while the Hawking temperatures are strongly related to the used tortoise coordinate transformations. The properties of these dependences are discussed analytically and numerically. Our results imply that proper selections of tortoise coordinate transformations should be important in the studies of Hawking radiations and the correct selection would be given by the experimental observations in the future.

  20. Nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization for ill-posed problems in Banach spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Qinian; Stals, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization is an efficient method for solving ill-posed problems in Hilbert spaces. However, this method may not produce good results in some situations since it tends to oversmooth solutions and hence destroy special features such as sparsity and discontinuity. By making use of duality mappings and Bregman distance, we propose an extension of this method to the Banach space setting and establish its convergence. We also present numerical simulations which indicate that the method in Banach space setting can produce better results. (paper)

  1. Nonstationary heat and mass transfer in the multilayer building construction with ventilation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkov, N. S.

    2017-11-01

    Results of numerical modeling of the coupled nonstationary heat and mass transfer problem under conditions of a convective flow in facade system of a three-layer concrete panel for two different constructions (with ventilation channels and without) are presented. The positive effect of ventilation channels on the energy and humidity regime over a period of 12 months is shown. Used new method of replacement a solid zone (requiring specification of porosity and material structure, what complicates process of convergence of the solution) on quasi-solid in form of a multicomponent mixture (with restrictions on convection and mass fractions).

  2. Faster Simulation Methods for the Non-Stationary Random Vibrations of Non-Linear MDOF Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askar, A.; Köylüoglu, H. U.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    subject to nonstationary Gaussian white noise excitation, as an alternative to conventional direct simulation methods. These alternative simulation procedures rely on an assumption of local Gaussianity during each time step. This assumption is tantamount to various linearizations of the equations....... Such a treatment offers higher rates of convergence, faster speed and higher accuracy. These procedures are compared to the direct Monte Carlo simulation procedure, which uses a fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme with the white noise process approximated by a broad band Ruiz-Penzien broken line process...

  3. Faster Simulation Methods for the Nonstationary Random Vibrations of Non-linear MDOF Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askar, A.; Köylüo, U.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    1996-01-01

    subject to nonstationary Gaussian white noise excitation, as an alternative to conventional direct simulation methods. These alternative simulation procedures rely on an assumption of local Gaussianity during each time step. This assumption is tantamount to various linearizations of the equations....... Such a treatment offers higher rates of convergence, faster speed and higher accuracy. These procedures are compared to the direct Monte Carlo simulation procedure, which uses a fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme with the white noise process approximated by a broad band Ruiz-Penzien broken line process...

  4. Calibration of a mass spectrometer by means of the nonstationary flow method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, L.V.; Volobuev, P.V.; Suetin, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A linear dependence between the gas flow and signal of a mass spectrometer existing in a wide range of flux variation permits to calibrate the mass spectrometer with respect to the flow. The non-stationary flow method consists in the simultaneous recording of a mass spectrometer signal and the gas flow coming into it. A system for mass spectrometer calibration has been elaborated. The system comprises a capacity-type micromanometer, a graduating volume, a potentiometer and a frequency meter. The method described makes it possible to calibrate the mass spectrometer rather easily and quickly

  5. Numerical Solution of Problem for Non-Stationary Heat Conduction in Multi-Layer Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Еsman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for non-stationary heat conduction of multi-layer bodies has been developed. Dirac’s δ-function is used to take into account phase and chemical transformations in one of the wall layers. While formulating a problem non-linear heat conduction equations have been used with due account of dependence of thermal and physical characteristics on temperature. Solution of the problem is realized with the help of methods of a numerical experiment and computer modeling.

  6. Optimal Fitting of Non-linear Detector Pulses with Nonstationary Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Cabera, B.; Figueroa-Felicianco, E.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Optimal extraction of pulses of constant known shape from a time series with stationary noise is well understood and widely used in detection applications. Applications where high resolution is required over a wide range of input signal amplitudes use much of the dynamic range of the sensor. The noise will in general vary over this signal range, and the response may be a nonlinear function of the energy input. We present an optimal least squares procedure for inferring input energy in such a detector with nonstationary noise and nonlinear energy response.

  7. Numerical methods for realizing nonstationary Poisson processes with piecewise-constant instantaneous-rate functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrod, Steven; Kelton, W. David

    2006-01-01

    with piecewise-constant instantaneous rate functions, a capability that has been implemented in commercial simulation software. They test these algorithms in C programs and make comparisons of accuracy, speed, and variability across disparate rate functions and microprocessor architectures. Choice of optimal......Nonstationary Poisson processes are appropriate in many applications, including disease studies, transportation, finance, and social policy. The authors review the risks of ignoring nonstationarity in Poisson processes and demonstrate three algorithms for generation of Poisson processes...... algorithm could not be predicted without knowledge of microprocessor architecture....

  8. Media Komunitas dan Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawito .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This essay deals with community media in relation to media literacy. After a short discussion on a number of community media characters is made the essay goes further with somewhat detail theoretical presumptions of the roles of media community with respect primarily to the development as Amartya Sen mentioned about. The author suggests that community media may play some significant roles in the development including (a disseminating information (from varieties of perspective, (b facilitating public discussion, (c helping to reach solutions of problems, (d encouraging participations, and (e encouraging the development of media literacy. Regarding the last point the author remarks that media community may have a dual-roles i.e facilitating community’s member in media participation and facilitating community’s member in media education.

  9. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  10. Water infiltration into exposed fractured rock surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Fractured rock media are present at many existing and potential waste disposal sites, yet characterization data and physical relationships are not well developed for such media. This study focused on water infiltration characteristics of an exposed fractured rock as an approach for defining the upper boundary condition for unsaturated-zone water percolation and contaminant transport modeling. Two adjacent watersheds of 0.24 and 1.73 ha with slopes up to 45% were instrumented for measuring rainfall and runoff. Fracture density was measured from readily observable fracture traces on the surface. Three methods were employed to evaluate the rainfall-runoff relationship. The first method used the annual totals and indicated that only 22.5% of rainfall occurred as runoff for the 1990-1991 water year, which demonstrates a high water intake rate by the exposed fracture system. The second method employed total rainfall and runoff for individual storms in conjunction with the commonly used USDA Soil Conservation Service curve number method developed for wide ranges of soils and vegetation. Curve numbers between 75 and 85 were observed for summer and winter storms with dry antecedent runoff conditions, while values exceeded 90 for wet conditions. The third method used a mass-balance approach for four major storms, which indicated that water intake rates ranged from 2.0 to 7.3 mm h -1 , yielding fracture intake velocities ranging from 122 to 293 m h -1 . The three analyses show the complexity of the infiltration process for fractured rock. However, they contribute to a better understanding of the upper boundary condition for predicting contaminant transport through an unsaturated fractured rock medium. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Fractures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 299 MS patients 22 have had fractures and of these 17 after onset of MS. The fractures most frequently involved the femoral neck and trochanter (41%). Three patients had had more than one fracture. Only 1 patient had osteoporosis. The percentage of fractures increase...

  12. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Perfect, E.; Donnelly, B.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Tremsin, A. S.; McKay, L. D.; DiStefano, V. H.; Cai, J. C.; Santodonato, L. J.

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative data on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. Further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon in other natural and engineered porous media.

  13. Assessment of fracture risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanis, John A.; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V.

    2009-01-01

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  14. Assessment of fracture risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanis, John A. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); McCloskey, Eugene V. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); Osteoporosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. Modelling nonstationary thermohydrodynamic processes in heat-exchange circuits with a two-phase coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model and a open-quotes fastclose quotes computer program for analyzing nonstationary thermohydrodynamic processes in distributed multi-element circuits containing a two-phase coolant. The author's approach is based on representing the distributed multi-element circuits with the two-phase coolant (such as cooling circuits of the reactor of an atomic power station) in the form of equivalent thermohydrodynamic chains composed of idealized elements with the intrinsic properties of the structure elements of real systems. The author has developed the nomenclature of such conceptual elements for objects which can be modelled; the nomenclature encompasses the control volumes (with a single-phase or two-phase coolant or a moving boundary of boiling/condensation) and the branch lines (type of tube and connections in dependence on the inertia of the coolant being taken into account) for a hydrodynamic submodel and the thermal components and lines for a thermal submodel. The mathematical models which have been developed and the program using them are designated for various forms of calculating slow thermohydrodynamic processes in multi-element coolant circuits in reactors and modeling test stands. The program facilitates calculation of the range of stable operation, detailed studies of stationary and nonstationary modes of operation, and forecasts of effective engineering measures to obtain stability with the aid of microcomputers

  16. Self-adaptive change detection in streaming data with non-stationary distribution

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-01-01

    Non-stationary distribution, in which the data distribution evolves over time, is a common issue in many application fields, e.g., intrusion detection and grid computing. Detecting the changes in massive streaming data with a non-stationary distribution helps to alarm the anomalies, to clean the noises, and to report the new patterns. In this paper, we employ a novel approach for detecting changes in streaming data with the purpose of improving the quality of modeling the data streams. Through observing the outliers, this approach of change detection uses a weighted standard deviation to monitor the evolution of the distribution of data streams. A cumulative statistical test, Page-Hinkley, is employed to collect the evidence of changes in distribution. The parameter used for reporting the changes is self-adaptively adjusted according to the distribution of data streams, rather than set by a fixed empirical value. The self-adaptability of the novel approach enhances the effectiveness of modeling data streams by timely catching the changes of distributions. We validated the approach on an online clustering framework with a benchmark KDDcup 1999 intrusion detection data set as well as with a real-world grid data set. The validation results demonstrate its better performance on achieving higher accuracy and lower percentage of outliers comparing to the other change detection approaches. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Responses of discretized systems under narrow band nonstationary random excitations. Part 1: linear problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; To, C. W. S.

    2005-10-01

    The extended stochastic central difference (ESCD) method is proposed as a viable alternative for computing linear responses of discretized multi-degrees-of-freedom (mdof) systems under narrow band stationary and nonstationary random disturbances. The method provides a means of controlling the center frequencies and bandwidths of narrow band stationary and nonstationary random excitation processes. It is suitable for larger-scale random response analysis of complicated structures idealized by the finite element method. Its additional important feature is that application of normal mode or complex normal mode analysis or direct numerical integration algorithms such as the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is not required. Examples, including one of flow-induced vibration of a pipe containing a moving fluid are included to demonstrate: (1) the capability of the proposed method and difference between responses of discretized systems under narrow band and wide band random excitations, and (2) its accuracy and efficiency by way of comparison to the Monte Carlo simulation data. Generalization of the ESCD method for computation of responses of nonlinear mdof systems is presented in a companion paper.

  18. Identification of Non-Stationary Magnetic Field Sources Using the Matching Pursuit Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Palczynska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The measurements of electromagnetic field emissions, performed on board a vessel have showed that, in this specific environment, a high level of non-stationary magnetic fields (MFs is observed. The adaptive time-frequency method can be used successfully to analyze this type of measured signal. It allows one to specify the time interval in which the individual frequency components of the signal occur. In this paper, the method of identification of non-stationary MF sources based on the matching pursuit (MP algorithm is presented. It consists of the decomposition of an examined time-waveform into the linear expansion of chirplet atoms and the analysis of the matrix of their parameters. The main feature of the proposed method is the modification of the chirplet’s matrix in a way that atoms, whose normalized energies are lower than a certain threshold, will be rejected. On the time-frequency planes of the spectrograms, obtained separately for each remaining chirlpet, it can clearly identify the time-frequency structures appearing in the examined signal. The choice of a threshold defines the computing speed and precision of the performed analysis. The method was implemented in the virtual application and used for processing real data, obtained from measurements of time-vary MF emissions onboard a ship.

  19. A non-stationary cost-benefit based bivariate extreme flood estimation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Junguo

    2018-02-01

    Cost-benefit analysis and flood frequency analysis have been integrated into a comprehensive framework to estimate cost effective design values. However, previous cost-benefit based extreme flood estimation is based on stationary assumptions and analyze dependent flood variables separately. A Non-Stationary Cost-Benefit based bivariate design flood estimation (NSCOBE) approach is developed in this study to investigate influence of non-stationarities in both the dependence of flood variables and the marginal distributions on extreme flood estimation. The dependence is modeled utilizing copula functions. Previous design flood selection criteria are not suitable for NSCOBE since they ignore time changing dependence of flood variables. Therefore, a risk calculation approach is proposed based on non-stationarities in both marginal probability distributions and copula functions. A case study with 54-year observed data is utilized to illustrate the application of NSCOBE. Results show NSCOBE can effectively integrate non-stationarities in both copula functions and marginal distributions into cost-benefit based design flood estimation. It is also found that there is a trade-off between maximum probability of exceedance calculated from copula functions and marginal distributions. This study for the first time provides a new approach towards a better understanding of influence of non-stationarities in both copula functions and marginal distributions on extreme flood estimation, and could be beneficial to cost-benefit based non-stationary bivariate design flood estimation across the world.

  20. Exact nonstationary responses of rectangular thin plate on Pasternak foundation excited by stochastic moving loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guohai; Meng, Zeng; Yang, Dixiong

    2018-01-01

    This paper develops an efficient method termed as PE-PIM to address the exact nonstationary responses of pavement structure, which is modeled as a rectangular thin plate resting on bi-parametric Pasternak elastic foundation subjected to stochastic moving loads with constant acceleration. Firstly, analytical power spectral density (PSD) functions of random responses for thin plate are derived by integrating pseudo excitation method (PEM) with Duhamel's integral. Based on PEM, the new equivalent von Mises stress (NEVMS) is proposed, whose PSD function contains all cross-PSD functions between stress components. Then, the PE-PIM that combines the PEM with precise integration method (PIM) is presented to achieve efficiently stochastic responses of the plate by replacing Duhamel's integral with the PIM. Moreover, the semi-analytical Monte Carlo simulation is employed to verify the computational results of the developed PE-PIM. Finally, numerical examples demonstrate the high accuracy and efficiency of PE-PIM for nonstationary random vibration analysis. The effects of velocity and acceleration of moving load, boundary conditions of the plate and foundation stiffness on the deflection and NEVMS responses are scrutinized.

  1. Around and about an application of the GAMLSS package to non-stationary flood frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, S. E.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Strupczewski, W. G.

    2017-08-01

    The non-stationarity of hydrologic processes due to climate change or human activities is challenging for the researchers and practitioners. However, the practical requirements for taking into account non-stationarity as a support in decision-making procedures exceed the up-to-date development of the theory and the of software. Currently, the most popular and freely available software package that allows for non-stationary statistical analysis is the GAMLSS (generalized additive models for location, scale and shape) package. GAMLSS has been used in a variety of fields. There are also several papers recommending GAMLSS in hydrological problems; however, there are still important issues which have not previously been discussed concerning mainly GAMLSS applicability not only for research and academic purposes, but also in a design practice. In this paper, we present a summary of our experiences in the implementation of GAMLSS to non-stationary flood frequency analysis, highlighting its advantages and pointing out weaknesses with regard to methodological and practical topics.

  2. Climate variability and nonstationary dynamics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A stationary association between climate factors and epidemics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia has been widely assumed. However, it is unclear whether elements of the local climate that are relevant to M. pneumoniae pneumonia transmission have stationary signatures of climate factors on their dynamics over different time scales. We performed a cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the patterns of association between monthly M. pneumoniae cases in Fukuoka, Japan, from 2000 to 2012 and indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Monthly M. pneumoniae cases were strongly associated with the dynamics of both the IOD and ENSO for the 1-2-year periodic mode in 2005-2007 and 2010-2011. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of M. pneumoniae epidemics. Our results call for the consideration of non-stationary, possibly non-linear, patterns of association between M. pneumoniae cases and climatic factors in early warning systems.

  3. Nonstationary Frequency Analysis of Extreme Floods Using the Time-varying Two-component Mixture Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L.; Xiong, L.; Liu, D.; Hu, T.; Xu, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The basic IID assumption of the traditional flood frequency analysis has been challenged by nonstationarity. The most popular practice for analyzing nonstationarity of flood series is to use a fixed single-type probability distribution incorporated with the time-varying moments. However, the type of probability distribution could be both complex because of distinct flood populations and time-varying under changing environments. To allow the investigation of this complex nature, the time-varying two-component mixture distributions (TTMD) method is proposed in this study by considering the time variations of not only the moments of its component distributions but also the weighting coefficients. Having identified the existence of mixed flood populations based on circular statistics, the proposed TTMD was applied to model the annual maximum flood series (AMFS) of two stations in the Weihe River basin (WRB), with the model parameters calibrated by the meta-heuristic maximum likelihood (MHML) method. The performance of TTMD was evaluated by different diagnostic plots and indexes and compared with stationary single-type distributions, stationary mixture distributions and time-varying single-type distributions. The results highlighted the advantages of using TTMD models and physically-based covariates in nonstationary flood frequency analysis. Besides, the optimal TTMD models were considered to be capable of settling the issue of nonstationarity and capturing the mixed flood populations satisfactorily. It is concluded that the TTMD model is a good alternative in the nonstationary frequency analysis and can be applied to other regions with mixed flood populations.

  4. Quantum Radiation Properties of Dirac Particles in General Nonstationary Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Chen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum radiation properties of Dirac particles in general nonstationary black holes in the general case are investigated by both using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation and considering simultaneously the asymptotic behaviors of the first-order and second-order forms of Dirac equation near the event horizon. It is generally shown that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on both the time and different angles. Further, we give a general expression of the new extra coupling effect in thermal radiation spectrum of Dirac particles which is absent from the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particles. Also, we reveal a relationship that is ignored before between thermal radiation and nonthermal radiation in the case of scalar particles, which is that the chemical potential in thermal radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of scalar particles in nonthermal radiation for general nonstationary black holes.

  5. Non-stationary random vibration analysis of structures under multiple correlated normal random excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbin; Mulani, Sameer B.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Fei, Qingguo; Wu, Shaoqing

    2017-07-01

    An algorithm that integrates Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) and the finite element method (FEM) is proposed to perform non-stationary random vibration analysis of structures under excitations, represented by multiple random processes that are correlated in both time and spatial domains. In KLE, the auto-covariance functions of random excitations are discretized using orthogonal basis functions. The KLE for multiple correlated random excitations relies on expansions in terms of correlated sets of random variables reflecting the cross-covariance of the random processes. During the response calculations, the eigenfunctions of KLE used to represent excitations are applied as forcing functions to the structure. The proposed algorithm is applied to a 2DOF system, a 2D cantilever beam and a 3D aircraft wing under both stationary and non-stationary correlated random excitations. Two methods are adopted to obtain the structural responses: a) the modal method and b) the direct method. Both the methods provide the statistics of the dynamic response with sufficient accuracy. The structural responses under the same type of correlated random excitations are bounded by the response obtained by perfectly correlated and uncorrelated random excitations. The structural response increases with a decrease in the correlation length and with an increase in the correlation magnitude. The proposed methodology can be applied for the analysis of any complex structure under any type of random excitation.

  6. Speech Waveform Compression Using Robust Adaptive Voice Activity Detection for Nonstationary Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Chun Wu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The voice activity detection (VAD is crucial in all kinds of speech applications. However, almost all existing VAD algorithms suffer from the nonstationarity of both speech and noise. To combat this difficulty, we propose a new voice activity detector, which is based on the Mel-energy features and an adaptive threshold related to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR estimates. In this paper, we first justify the robustness of the Bayes classifier using the Mel-energy features over that using the Fourier spectral features in various noise environments. Then, we design an algorithm using the dynamic Mel-energy estimator and the adaptive threshold, which depends on the SNR estimates. In addition, a realignment scheme is incorporated to correct the sparse-and-spurious noise estimates. Numerous simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of our proposed VAD method and the comparisons are made with a couple of existing representative schemes, namely, the VAD using the likelihood ratio test with Fourier spectral energy features and that based on the enhanced time-frequency parameters. Three types of noises, namely, white noise (stationary, babble noise (nonstationary, and vehicular noise (nonstationary were artificially added by the computer for our experiments. As a result, our proposed VAD algorithm significantly outperforms other existing methods as illustrated by the corresponding receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves. Finally, we demonstrate one of the major applications, namely, speech waveform compression associated with our new robust VAD scheme and quantify the effectiveness in terms of compression efficiency.

  7. Speech Waveform Compression Using Robust Adaptive Voice Activity Detection for Nonstationary Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed WaheeduddinQ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The voice activity detection (VAD is crucial in all kinds of speech applications. However, almost all existing VAD algorithms suffer from the nonstationarity of both speech and noise. To combat this difficulty, we propose a new voice activity detector, which is based on the Mel-energy features and an adaptive threshold related to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR estimates. In this paper, we first justify the robustness of the Bayes classifier using the Mel-energy features over that using the Fourier spectral features in various noise environments. Then, we design an algorithm using the dynamic Mel-energy estimator and the adaptive threshold, which depends on the SNR estimates. In addition, a realignment scheme is incorporated to correct the sparse-and-spurious noise estimates. Numerous simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of our proposed VAD method and the comparisons are made with a couple of existing representative schemes, namely, the VAD using the likelihood ratio test with Fourier spectral energy features and that based on the enhanced time-frequency parameters. Three types of noises, namely, white noise (stationary, babble noise (nonstationary, and vehicular noise (nonstationary were artificially added by the computer for our experiments. As a result, our proposed VAD algorithm significantly outperforms other existing methods as illustrated by the corresponding receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves. Finally, we demonstrate one of the major applications, namely, speech waveform compression associated with our new robust VAD scheme and quantify the effectiveness in terms of compression efficiency.

  8. Non-stationary hydrological frequency analysis based on the reconstruction of extreme hydrological series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach for non-stationary hydrological frequency analysis is proposed. The approach is due to the following consideration that, at present the data series used to detect mutation characteristic is very short, which may only reflect the partial characteristic of the population. That is to say, the mutation characteristic of short series may not fully represent the mutation characteristic of population, such as the difference of mutation degree between short sample and population. In this proposed method, an assumption is done that the variation hydrological series in a big time window owns an expected vibration center (EVC, which is a linear combination of the two mean values of the two subsample series obtained through separating the original hydrological series by a novel optimal segmentation technique (change rate of slope method. Then using the EVC to reconstruct non-stationary series to meet the requirement of stationary, and further ensure the conventional frequency analysis methods is valid.

  9. Estimating return levels from maxima of non-stationary random sequences using the Generalized PWM method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ribereau

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering work of Landwehr et al. (1979, Hosking et al. (1985 and their collaborators, the Probability Weighted Moments (PWM method has been very popular, simple and efficient to estimate the parameters of the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV distribution when modeling the distribution of maxima (e.g., annual maxima of precipitations in the Identically and Independently Distributed (IID context. When the IID assumption is not satisfied, a flexible alternative, the Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE approach offers an elegant way to handle non-stationarities by letting the GEV parameters to be time dependent. Despite its qualities, the MLE applied to the GEV distribution does not always provide accurate return level estimates, especially for small sample sizes or heavy tails. These drawbacks are particularly true in some non-stationary situations. To reduce these negative effects, we propose to extend the PWM method to a more general framework that enables us to model temporal covariates and provide accurate GEV-based return levels. Theoretical properties of our estimators are discussed. Small and moderate sample sizes simulations in a non-stationary context are analyzed and two brief applications to annual maxima of CO2 and seasonal maxima of cumulated daily precipitations are presented.

  10. Non-stationary and relaxation phenomena in cavity-assisted quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselkova, N. G.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the non-stationary and relaxation phenomena in cavity-assisted quantum memories for light. As a storage medium we consider an ensemble of cold atoms with standard Lambda-scheme of working levels. Some theoretical aspects of the problem were treated previously by many authors, and recent experiments stimulate more deep insight into the ultimate ability and limitations of the device. Since quantum memories can be used not only for the storage of quantum information, but also for a substantial manipulation of ensembles of quantum states, the speed of such manipulation and hence the ability to write and retrieve the signals of relatively short duration becomes important. In our research we do not apply the so-called bad cavity limit, and consider the memory operation of the signals whose duration is not much larger than the cavity field lifetime, accounting also for the finite lifetime of atomic coherence. In our paper we present an effective approach that makes it possible to find the non-stationary amplitude and phase behavior of strong classical control field, that matches the desirable time profile of both the envelope and the phase of the retrieved quantized signal. The phase properties of the retrieved quantized signals are of importance for the detection and manipulation of squeezing, entanglement, etc by means of optical mixing and homodyning.

  11. Non-Stationary Hydrologic Frequency Analysis using B-Splines Quantile Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, B.; St-Hilaire, A.; Bouezmarni, T.; Ouarda, T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrologic frequency analysis is commonly used by engineers and hydrologists to provide the basic information on planning, design and management of hydraulic structures and water resources system under the assumption of stationarity. However, with increasing evidence of changing climate, it is possible that the assumption of stationarity would no longer be valid and the results of conventional analysis would become questionable. In this study, we consider a framework for frequency analysis of extreme flows based on B-Splines quantile regression, which allows to model non-stationary data that have a dependence on covariates. Such covariates may have linear or nonlinear dependence. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used to estimate quantiles and their posterior distributions. A coefficient of determination for quantiles regression is proposed to evaluate the estimation of the proposed model for each quantile level. The method is applied on annual maximum and minimum streamflow records in Ontario, Canada. Climate indices are considered to describe the non-stationarity in these variables and to estimate the quantiles in this case. The results show large differences between the non-stationary quantiles and their stationary equivalents for annual maximum and minimum discharge with high annual non-exceedance probabilities. Keywords: Quantile regression, B-Splines functions, MCMC, Streamflow, Climate indices, non-stationarity.

  12. Trend analysis using non-stationary time series clustering based on the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji Sefidmazgi, M.; Sayemuzzaman, M.; Homaifar, A.; Jha, M. K.; Liess, S.

    2014-05-01

    In order to analyze low-frequency variability of climate, it is useful to model the climatic time series with multiple linear trends and locate the times of significant changes. In this paper, we have used non-stationary time series clustering to find change points in the trends. Clustering in a multi-dimensional non-stationary time series is challenging, since the problem is mathematically ill-posed. Clustering based on the finite element method (FEM) is one of the methods that can analyze multidimensional time series. One important attribute of this method is that it is not dependent on any statistical assumption and does not need local stationarity in the time series. In this paper, it is shown how the FEM-clustering method can be used to locate change points in the trend of temperature time series from in situ observations. This method is applied to the temperature time series of North Carolina (NC) and the results represent region-specific climate variability despite higher frequency harmonics in climatic time series. Next, we investigated the relationship between the climatic indices with the clusters/trends detected based on this clustering method. It appears that the natural variability of climate change in NC during 1950-2009 can be explained mostly by AMO and solar activity.

  13. An Integrated Real-Time Beamforming and Postfiltering System for Nonstationary Noise Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gannot Sharon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for real-time multichannel speech enhancement in environments of nonstationary noise and time-varying acoustical transfer functions (ATFs. The proposed system integrates adaptive beamforming, ATF identification, soft signal detection, and multichannel postfiltering. The noise canceller branch of the beamformer and the ATF identification are adaptively updated online, based on hypothesis test results. The noise canceller is updated only during stationary noise frames, and the ATF identification is carried out only when desired source components have been detected. The hypothesis testing is based on the nonstationarity of the signals and the transient power ratio between the beamformer primary output and its reference noise signals. Following the beamforming and the hypothesis testing, estimates for the signal presence probability and for the noise power spectral density are derived. Subsequently, an optimal spectral gain function that minimizes the mean square error of the log-spectral amplitude (LSA is applied. Experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed system in nonstationary noise environments.

  14. Dynamics of Inhomogeneous Shell Systems Under Non-Stationary Loading (Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovoi, P. Z.; Meish, V. F.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental works on the determination of dynamics of smooth and stiffened cylindrical shells contacting with a soil medium under various non-stationary loading are reviewed. The results of studying three-layer shells of revolution whose motion equations are obtained within the framework of the hypotheses of the Timoshenko geometrically nonlinear theory are stated. The numerical results for shells with a piecewise or discrete filler enable the analysis of estimation of the influence of geometrical and physical-mechanical parameters of structures on their dynamics and reveal new mechanical effects. Basing on the classical theory of shells and rods, the effect of the discrete arrangement of ribs and coefficients of the Winkler or Pasternak elastic foundation on the normal frequencies and modes of rectangular planar cylindrical and spherical shells is studied. The number and shape of dispersion curves for longitudinal harmonic waves in a stiffened cylindrical shell are determined. The equations of vibrations of ribbed shells of revolution on Winkler or Pasternak elastic foundation are obtained using the geometrically nonlinear theory and the Timoshenko hypotheses. On applying the integral-interpolational method, numerical algorithms are developed and the corresponding non-stationary problems are solved. The special attention is paid to the statement and solution of coupled problems on the dynamical interaction of cylindrical or spherical shells with the soil water-saturated medium of different structure.

  15. Media Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis

    2017-01-01

    Media Entrepreneurship has been an ambiguous, unclear and controversial concept and despite of growing academic efforts in the last decade, it is still a poorly defined subject. This paper is an effort to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive definition of media entrepreneurship. Firstly......, a literature review conducted and entrepreneurship, media, opportunity and innovation as building blocks of media entrepreneurship explained. Then by using of a mixed of bibliographic method and a Delphi method with multi-stage analysis process, a consensual definition of media entrepreneurship proposed...... entrepreneurship....

  16. Media Framing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus T.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of media framing refers to the way in which the news media organize and provide meaning to a news story by emphasizing some parts of reality and disregarding other parts. These patterns of emphasis and exclusion in news coverage create frames that can have considerable effects on news...... consumers’ perceptions and attitudes regarding the given issue or event. This entry briefly elaborates on the concept of media framing, presents key types of media frames, and introduces the research on media framing effects....

  17. Identifying osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis per se is not a harmful disease. It is the sequela of osteoporosis and most particularly the occurrence of osteoporotic fracture that makes osteoporosis a serious medical condition. All of the preventative measures, investigations, treatment and research into osteoporosis have one primary goal and that is to prevent the occurrence of osteoporotic fracture. Vertebral fracture is by far and away the most prevalent osteoporotic fracture. The significance and diagnosis of vertebral fracture are discussed in this article. PMID:26435923

  18. A review on hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanshu Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is widely accepted and applied to improve the gas recovery in unconventional reservoirs. Unconventional reservoirs to be addressed here are with very low permeability, complicated geological settings and in-situ stress field etc. All of these make the hydraulic fracturing process a challenging task. In order to effectively and economically recover gas from such reservoirs, the initiation and propagation of hydraulic fracturing in the heterogeneous fractured/porous media under such complicated conditions should be mastered. In this paper, some issues related to hydraulic fracturing have been reviewed, including the experimental study, field study and numerical simulation. Finally the existing problems that need to be solved on the subject of hydraulic fracturing have been proposed.

  19. Imaging of vertebral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral fracture is a common clinical problem. Osteoporosis is the leading cause of non-traumatic vertebral fracture. Often, vertebral fractures are not clinically suspected due to nonspecific presentation and are overlooked during routine interpretation of radiologic investigations. Moreover, once detected, many a times the radiologist fails to convey to the clinician in a meaningful way. Hence, vertebral fractures are a constant cause of morbidity and mortality. Presence of vertebral fracture increases the chance of fracture in another vertebra and also increases the risk of subsequent hip fracture. Early detection can lead to immediate therapeutic intervention improving further the quality of life. So, in this review, we wish to present a comprehensive overview of vertebral fracture imaging along with an algorithm of evaluation of vertebral fractures.

  20. On The Ubiquity of Nonstationary Fluvial Suspended Sediment Dynamics: A Call for Long Term Monitoring and Dynamical Sediment Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    Watersheds with sufficient monitoring data have been predominantly found to display nonstationary suspended sediment dynamics, whereby the relationship between suspended sediment concentration and discharge changes over time. Despite the importance of suspended sediment as a keystone of geophysical and biochemical processes, and as a primary mediator of water quality, stationary behavior remains largely assumed in the context of these applications. This study presents an investigation into the time dependent behavior of small mountainous rivers draining the coastal ranges of the western continental US over interannual to interdecadal time scales. Of the 250+ small coastal (drainage area systems. Temporal patterns of non-stationary behavior provided some evidence for spatial coherence, which may be related to synoptic hydro-metrological patterns and regional scale changes in land use patterns. However, the results also highlight the complex, integrative nature of watershed scale fluvial suspended sediment dynamics. This underscores the need for in-depth, forensic approaches for initial processes identification, which require long term, high resolution monitoring efforts in order to adequately inform management. The societal implications of nonstationary sediment dynamics and their controls were further explored through the case of California, USA, where over 150 impairment listings have resulted in more than 50 sediment TMDLs, only 3 of which are flux based - none of which account for non-stationary behavior.

  1. Nonstationarity RC Workshop Report: Nonstationary Weather Patterns and Extreme Events Informing Design and Planning for Long-Lived Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    WORKSHOP REPORT Nonstationary Weather Patterns and Extreme Events Informing Design and Planning for Long-Lived Infrastructure ESTCP Project RC...information about extreme events . There is a gap between climate science and planning /design practice that needs to be bridged. To explore...potential research opportunities stemming from the workshop on Nonstationarity Weather Patterns and Extreme Events : Informing Design/ Planning

  2. Project Lifespan-based Nonstationary Hydrologic Design Methods for Changing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L.

    2017-12-01

    Under changing environment, we must associate design floods with the design life period of projects to ensure the hydrologic design is really relevant to the operation of the hydrologic projects, because the design value for a given exceedance probability over the project life period would be significantly different from that over other time periods of the same length due to the nonstationarity of probability distributions. Several hydrologic design methods that take the design life period of projects into account have been proposed in recent years, i.e. the expected number of exceedances (ENE), design life level (DLL), equivalent reliability (ER), and average design life level (ADLL). Among the four methods to be compared, both the ENE and ER methods are return period-based methods, while DLL and ADLL are risk/reliability- based methods which estimate design values for given probability values of risk or reliability. However, the four methods can be unified together under a general framework through a relationship transforming the so-called representative reliability (RRE) into the return period, i.e. m=1/1(1-RRE), in which we compute the return period m using the representative reliability RRE.The results of nonstationary design quantiles and associated confidence intervals calculated by ENE, ER and ADLL were very similar, since ENE or ER was a special case or had a similar expression form with respect to ADLL. In particular, the design quantiles calculated by ENE and ADLL were the same when return period was equal to the length of the design life. In addition, DLL can yield similar design values if the relationship between DLL and ER/ADLL return periods is considered. Furthermore, ENE, ER and ADLL had good adaptability to either an increasing or decreasing situation, yielding not too large or too small design quantiles. This is important for applications of nonstationary hydrologic design methods in actual practice because of the concern of choosing the emerging

  3. Flood frequency analysis of historical flood data under stationary and non-stationary modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. J.; Botero, B. A.; López, J.; Francés, F.; Díez-Herrero, A.; Benito, G.

    2015-06-01

    Historical records are an important source of information on extreme and rare floods and fundamental to establish a reliable flood return frequency. The use of long historical records for flood frequency analysis brings in the question of flood stationarity, since climatic and land-use conditions can affect the relevance of past flooding as a predictor of future flooding. In this paper, a detailed 400 yr flood record from the Tagus River in Aranjuez (central Spain) was analysed under stationary and non-stationary flood frequency approaches, to assess their contribution within hazard studies. Historical flood records in Aranjuez were obtained from documents (Proceedings of the City Council, diaries, chronicles, memoirs, etc.), epigraphic marks, and indirect historical sources and reports. The water levels associated with different floods (derived from descriptions or epigraphic marks) were computed into discharge values using a one-dimensional hydraulic model. Secular variations in flood magnitude and frequency, found to respond to climate and environmental drivers, showed a good correlation between high values of historical flood discharges and a negative mode of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. Over the systematic gauge record (1913-2008), an abrupt change on flood magnitude was produced in 1957 due to constructions of three major reservoirs in the Tagus headwaters (Bolarque, Entrepeñas and Buendia) controlling 80% of the watershed surface draining to Aranjuez. Two different models were used for the flood frequency analysis: (a) a stationary model estimating statistical distributions incorporating imprecise and categorical data based on maximum likelihood estimators, and (b) a time-varying model based on "generalized additive models for location, scale and shape" (GAMLSS) modelling, which incorporates external covariates related to climate variability (NAO index) and catchment hydrology factors (in this paper a reservoir index; RI). Flood frequency

  4. Parameters effective on estimating a nonstationary mixed-phase wavelet using cumulant matching approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughi, Ehsan; Javaherian, Abdolrahim

    2018-01-01

    Seismic inversion is a process performed to remove the effects of propagated wavelets in order to recover the acoustic impedance. To obtain valid velocity and density values related to subsurface layers through the inversion process, it is highly essential to perform reliable wavelet estimation such as cumulant matching approach. For this purpose, the seismic data were windowed in this work in such a way that two consecutive windows were only one sample apart. Also, we did not consider any fixed wavelet for any window and let the phase of each wavelet rotate in each sample in the window. Comparing the fourth order cumulant of the whitened trace and fourth-order moment of the all-pass operator in each window generated a cost function that should be minimized with a non-linear optimization method. In this regard, parameters effective on the estimation of the nonstationary mixed-phase wavelets were tested over the created nonstationary seismic trace at 0.82 s and 1.6 s. Besides, we compared the consequences of each parameter on estimated wavelets at two mentioned times. The parameters studied in this work are window length, taper type, the number of iteration, signal-to-noise ratio, bandwidth to central frequency ratio, and Q factor. The results show that applying the optimum values of the effective parameters, the average correlation of the estimated mixed-phase wavelets with the original ones is about 87%. Moreover, the effectiveness of the proposed approach was examined on a synthetic nonstationary seismic section with variable Q factor values alongside the time and offset axis. Eventually, the cumulant matching method was applied on a cross line of the migrated data from a 3D data set of an oilfield in the Persian Gulf. Also, the effect of the wrong Q estimation on the estimated mixed-phase wavelet was considered on the real data set. It is concluded that the accuracy of the estimated wavelet relied on the estimated Q and more than 10% error in the estimated value

  5. Emergence of Anomalous Transport in Stressed Rough Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Brown, S.; Alves da Silva, J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and tracer transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the geosciences, and therefore has been extensively studied. Geologic fractures, however, are always under significant overburden stress. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through rough-walled fractures in a fundamental way, studies of anomalous tracer transport at the scale of individual fractures have so far ignored the potential role of confining stress.Here, we report the emergence of anomalous (non-Fickian) transport through a rough-walled fracture as a result of increasing the normal stress on the fracture. We generate fracture surfaces with fractal roughness, and solve the elastic contact problem between the two surfaces to obtain the 3D fracture geometry for increasing levels of normal stress. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed rough fracture. We observe a transition from Fickian to anomalous transport as the normal stress on the fracture increases.We show that the origin of this anomalous transport behavior can be traced to the self-organization of the flow field into a heterogeneous structure dominated by preferential channels and stagnation zones, as a result of the larger number of contacts in a highly stressed fracture. We also propose a spatial Markov model that reproduces the transport behavior at the scale of the entire fracture with only three physical parameters. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous particle transport in fractured media. Finally, we show preliminary laboratory experiment results that confirm our findings. (a) Magnitude of the volumetric flux at each discretization grid block at low stress. (b) Magnitude of the volumetric flux for a highly stressed fracture. Values are normalized with the mean volumetric flux.

  6. Media Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    News and other kinds of journalistic stories, 16-17 hours a day, all year round, on all platforms, also the moderated social media. The key research thesis behind this article is that the continuous and speedy stream of news stories and media content now is becoming the centre of the production...... processes and the value creation in converged multimedia newsrooms. The article identify new methods and discuss editorial challenges in handling media flow....

  7. Quantifying Representative Hydraulic Conductivity for Three-Dimensional Fractured Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.; Ni, C.

    2013-12-01

    The fractures and pores in rock formations are the fundamental units for flow and contaminant transport simulations. Due to technical and logical limitations it is difficult in reality to account for such small units to model flow and transport in large-scale problems. The concept of continuum representations of fractured rocks is then used as an alternative to solve for flow and transport in complex fractured formations. For these types of approaches the determinations of the representative parameters such as hydraulic conductivity and dispersion coefficient play important roles in controlling the accuracy of simulation results for large-scale problems. The objective of this study is to develop a discrete fracture network (DFN) model and the associated unstructured mesh generation system to characterize the continuum hydraulic conductivity for fractured rocks on different scales. In this study a coupled three-dimensional model of water flow, thermal transport, solute transport, and geochemical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated porous media (HYDROGEOCHEM) is employed to be the flow simulator to analyze the flow behaviors in fracture formations. The fracture network model and the corresponding continuum model are simulated for same scale problems. Based on the concept of mass conservation in flow, the correlations between statistics of fracture structure and the representative continuum parameters are quantified for a variety of fracture distribution scenarios and scales. The results of this study are expected to provide general insight into the procedures and the associated techniques for analyzing flow in complex large-scale fractured rock systems.

  8. Micro-CT image calibration to improve fracture aperture measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Lamei Ramandi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel technique for the accurate measurement and adjustment of fracture apertures in digital images of fractured media is presented. We utilize X-ray micro-computed tomography to image a highly fractured coal sample and collect high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM images from the samples surface to facilitate segmentation of coal fractures. The gray-scale micro-CT values at the mid-point of fractures are obtained and correlated to aperture sizes measured with the higher resolution SEM data. Afterwards, the micro-CT images are upsampled to enable assignment of aperture sizes smaller than the image resolution. We initially segment the coal image, upsample the segmented image, and then re-calibrate the fracture aperture sizes. The final calibrated segmented image contains the fracture network acquired from the micro-CT data with precise aperture sizes assigned based on the high-resolution SEM data. To illustrate the importance of accurate aperture measurement, two coal subsets are tested. The permeabilities before and after applying the calibration method are measured. The results show a significant change in numerical permeabilities after applying the calibration method. This indicates that a large amount of information is potentially omitted when utilizing standard image segmentation tools to segment fractured media.

  9. Fractures (Broken Bones): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Fractures (broken bones) Fractures (broken bones): First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A fracture is a ... 10, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-fractures/basics/ART-20056641 . Mayo Clinic ...

  10. Evaluating the Impact of Advertising Media Plans: A Model of Consumer Purchase Dynamics Using Single-Source Data

    OpenAIRE

    James H. Pedrick; Fred S. Zufryden

    1991-01-01

    We propose a model to analyze the impact of advertising media plans and point-of-purchase marketing variables on a brand's market performance. Our model integrates brand choice, purchase incidence, and exposure behavior within a nonstationary stochastic framework. Moreover, it considers various aspects of consumer heterogeneity including individual differences in loyalty levels, purchase rates, and exposure probabilities for a population of consumers. The integrated model provides a relations...

  11. Mathematical modeling of non-stationary gas flow in gas pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisov, V. G.; Nikolaev, A. K.; Lykov, Y. V.; Duchnevich, L. N.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of the operation of the gas transportation system shows that for a considerable part of time pipelines operate in an unsettled regime of gas movement. Its pressure and flow rate vary along the length of pipeline and over time as a result of uneven consumption and selection, switching on and off compressor units, shutting off stop valves, emergence of emergency leaks. The operational management of such regimes is associated with difficulty of reconciling the operating modes of individual sections of gas pipeline with each other, as well as with compressor stations. Determining the grounds that cause change in the operating mode of the pipeline system and revealing patterns of these changes determine the choice of its parameters. Therefore, knowledge of the laws of changing the main technological parameters of gas pumping through pipelines in conditions of non-stationary motion is of great importance for practice.

  12. Nonstationary modeling of a long record of rainfall and temperature over Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, Gabriele; Smith, James A.; Napolitano, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    A long record (1862-2004) of seasonal rainfall and temperature from the Rome observatory of Collegio Romano are modeled in a nonstationary framework by means of the Generalized Additive Models in Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). Modeling analyses are used to characterize nonstationarities in rainfall and related climate variables. It is shown that the GAMLSS models are able to represent the magnitude and spread in the seasonal time series with parameters which are a smooth function of time. Covariate analyses highlight the role of seasonal and interannual variability of large-scale climate forcing, as reflected in three teleconnection indexes (Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Mediterranean Index), for modeling seasonal rainfall and temperature over Rome. In particular, the North Atlantic Oscillation is a significant predictor during the winter, while the Mediterranean Index is a significant predictor for almost all seasons.

  13. 3rd International Conference on Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Rubini, Riccardo; D'Elia, Gianluca; Cocconcelli, Marco; Chaari, Fakher; Zimroz, Radoslaw; Bartelmus, Walter; Haddar, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the processings of the third edition of the Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations (CMMNO13) which was held in Ferrara, Italy. This yearly event merges an international community of researchers who met – in 2011 in Wroclaw (Poland) and in 2012 in Hammamet (Tunisia) – to discuss issues of diagnostics of rotating machines operating in complex motion and/or load conditions. The growing interest of the industrial world on the topics covered by the CMMNO13 involves the fields of packaging, automotive, agricultural, mining, processing and wind machines in addition to that of the systems for data acquisition.The participation of speakers and visitors from industry makes the event an opportunity for immediate assessment of the potential applications of advanced methodologies for the signal analysis. Signals acquired from machines often contain contributions from several different components as well as noise. Therefore, the major challenge of condition monitoring is to po...

  14. Enhancement and Noise Statistics Estimation for Non-Stationary Voiced Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Sidsel Marie; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, single channel speech enhancement in the time domain is considered. We address the problem of modelling non-stationary speech by describing the voiced speech parts by a harmonic linear chirp model instead of using the traditional harmonic model. This means that the speech signal...... covariance matrix estimate is obtained. We suggest using this estimate in combination with other filters such as the Wiener filter. The performance of the Wiener filter and LCMV filter are compared using the APES noise covariance matrix estimate and a power spectral density (PSD) based noise covariance...... matrix estimate. It is shown that the APES covariance matrix works well in combination with the Wiener filter, and the PSD based covariance matrix works well in combination with the LCMV filter....

  15. Non-stationary time series modeling on caterpillars pest of palm oil for early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiyowati, Susi; Nugraha, Rida F.; Mukhaiyar, Utriweni

    2015-12-01

    The oil palm production has an important role for the plantation and economic sector in Indonesia. One of the important problems in the cultivation of oil palm plantation is pests which causes damage to the quality of fruits. The caterpillar pest which feed palm tree's leaves will cause decline in quality of palm oil production. Early warning system is needed to minimize losses due to this pest. Here, we applied non-stationary time series modeling, especially the family of autoregressive models to predict the number of pests based on its historical data. We realized that there is some uniqueness of these pests data, i.e. the spike value that occur almost periodically. Through some simulations and case study, we obtain that the selection of constant factor has a significance influence to the model so that it can shoot the spikes value precisely.

  16. Instantaneous Purified Orbit: A New Tool for Analysis of Nonstationary Vibration of Rotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Dongfeng

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In some circumstances, vibration signals of large rotating machinery possess time-varying characteristics to some extent. Traditional diagnosis methods, such as FFT spectrum and orbit diagram, are confronted with a huge challenge to deal with this problem. This work aims at studying the four intrinsic drawbacks of conventional vibration signal processing method and instantaneous purified orbit (IPO on the basis of improved Fourier spectrum (IFS to analyze nonstationary vibration. On account of integration, the benefits of short period Fourier transform (SPFT and regular holospectrum, this method can intuitively reflect vibration characteristics of’a rotor system by means of parameter analysis for corresponding frequency ellipses. Practical examples, such as transient vibration in run-up stages and bistable condition of rotor show that IPO is a powerful tool for diagnosis and analysis of the vibration behavior of rotor systems.

  17. Inhomogeneous and nonstationary Hall states of the CDW with quantized normal carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazovskii, S.

    2015-03-01

    We suggest a theory for a deformable and sliding charge density wave (CDW) in the Hall bar geometry for the quantum limit when the carriers in remnant small pockets are concentrated at lowest Landau levels (LL) forming a fractionally (ν central region via sharp domain walls. Resulting picture is that of compensated collective and normal pulsing counter-currents driven by the Hall voltage. This scenario is illustrated by numerical modeling for nonstationary distributions of the current and the electric field. This picture can interpret experiments in mesa-junctions showing depinning by the Hall voltage and the generation of voltage-controlled high frequency oscillations (Yu.I. Latyshev, P. Monceau, A.A. Sinchenko, et al., Presented at ECRYS-2011, unpublished [1]).

  18. Quantum radiation of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field in nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibungochouba Singh, T.; Ablu Meitei, I.; Yugindro Singh, K.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum radiation properties of nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter (KdS) black hole is investigated using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The locations of horizons and the temperature of the thermal radiation as well as the maximum energy of the nonthermal radiation are derived. It is found that the surface gravity and the Hawking temperature depend on both time and different angles. An extra coupling effect is obtained in the thermal radiation spectrum of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field equations which is absent in the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particles. Further, the chemical potential derived from the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particle has been found to be equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of the scalar particle in the nonthermal radiation for KdS black hole. It is also shown that the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation produces a constant term in the expression of the surface gravity and Hawking temperature.

  19. Is the Labour Force Participation Rate Non-Stationary in Romania?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Aviral Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to test hysteresis of the Romanian labour force participation rate, by using time series data, with quarterly frequency, covering the period 1999Q1-2013Q4. The main results reveal that the Romanian labour force participation rate is a nonlinear process and has a partial unit root (i.e. it is stationary in the first regime and non-stationary in the second one, the main breaking point being registered around year 2005. In this context, the value of using unemployment rate as an indicator for capturing joblessness in this country is debatable. Starting from 2005, the participation rate has not followed long-term changes in unemployment rate, the disturbances having permanent effects on labour force participation rate.

  20. EM algorithm applied for estimating non-stationary region boundaries using electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambampati, A. K.; Rashid, A.; Kim, B. S.; Liu, Dong; Kim, S.; Kim, K. Y.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been used for the dynamic estimation of organ boundaries. One specific application in this context is the estimation of lung boundaries during pulmonary circulation. This would help track the size and shape of lungs of the patients suffering from diseases like pulmonary edema and acute respiratory failure (ARF). The dynamic boundary estimation of the lungs can also be utilized to set and control the air volume and pressure delivered to the patients during artificial ventilation. In this paper, the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is used as an inverse algorithm to estimate the non-stationary lung boundary. The uncertainties caused in Kalman-type filters due to inaccurate selection of model parameters are overcome using EM algorithm. Numerical experiments using chest shaped geometry are carried out with proposed method and the performance is compared with extended Kalman filter (EKF). Results show superior performance of EM in estimation of the lung boundary.

  1. 4th International Conference on Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Zimroz, Radoslaw; Bartelmus, Walter; Haddar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The book provides readers with a snapshot of recent research and technological trends in the field of condition monitoring of machinery working under a broad range of operating conditions. Each chapter, accepted after a rigorous peer-review process, reports on an original piece of work presented and discussed at the 4th International Conference on Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-stationary Operations, CMMNO 2014, held on December 15-16, 2014, in Lyon, France. The contributions have been grouped into three different sections according to the main subfield (signal processing, data mining, or condition monitoring techniques) they are related to. The book includes both theoretical developments as well as a number of industrial case studies, in different areas including, but not limited to: noise and vibration; vibro-acoustic diagnosis; signal processing techniques; diagnostic data analysis; instantaneous speed identification; monitoring and diagnostic systems; and dynamic and fault modeling. This book no...

  2. Unveiling non-stationary coupling between Amazon and ocean during recent extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Antônio M. de T.; Zou, Yong; de Oliveira, Gilvan Sampaio; Kurths, Jürgen; Macau, Elbert E. N.

    2018-02-01

    The interplay between extreme events in the Amazon's precipitation and the anomaly in the temperature of the surrounding oceans is not fully understood, especially its causal relations. In this paper, we investigate the climatic interaction between these regions from 1999 until 2012 using modern tools of complex system science. We identify the time scale of the coupling quantitatively and unveil the non-stationary influence of the ocean's temperature. The findings show consistently the distinctions between the coupling in the recent major extreme events in Amazonia, such as the two droughts that happened in 2005 and 2010 and the three floods during 1999, 2009 and 2012. Interestingly, the results also reveal the influence over the anomalous precipitation of Southwest Amazon has become increasingly lagged. The analysis can shed light on the underlying dynamics of the climate network system and consequently can improve predictions of extreme rainfall events.

  3. A New Family of Interpolatory Non-Stationary Subdivision Schemes for Curve Design in Geometric Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Costanza; Romani, Lucia

    2010-09-01

    Univariate subdivision schemes are efficient iterative methods to generate smooth limit curves starting from a sequence of arbitrary points. Aim of this paper is to present and investigate a new family of 6-point interpolatory non-stationary subdivision schemes capable of reproducing important curves of great interest in geometric modeling and engineering applications, if starting from uniformly spaced initial samples. This new family can reproduce conic sections since it is obtained by a parameter depending affine combination of the cubic exponential B-spline symbol generating functions in the space V4,γ = {1,x,etx,e-tx} with t∈{0,s,is|s>0}. Moreover, the free parameter can be chosen to reproduce also other interesting analytic curves by imposing the algebraic conditions for the reproduction of an additional pair of exponential polynomials giving rise to different extensions of the space V4,γ.

  4. A non-stationary panel data investigation of the unemployment-crime relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, Johan; Westerlund, Joakim

    2014-03-01

    Many empirical studies of the economics of crime focus solely on the determinants thereof, and do not consider the dynamic and cross-sectional properties of their data. As a response to this, the current paper offers an in-depth analysis of this issue using data covering 21 Swedish counties from 1975 to 2010. The results suggest that the crimes considered are non-stationary, and that this cannot be attributed to county-specific disparities alone, but that there are also a small number of common stochastic trends to which groups of counties tend to revert. In an attempt to explain these common stochastic trends, we look for a long-run cointegrated relationship between unemployment and crime. Overall, the results do not support cointegration, and suggest that previous findings of a significant unemployment-crime relationship might be spurious. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000548.htm Ankle fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An ankle fracture is a break in 1 or more ...

  6. Discrete Fracture Networks Groundwater Modelling at Bedding Control Fractured Sedimentary Rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Yeh; Yuan-Chieh, Wu

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater flow modelling in fractured rock mass is an important challenging work in predicting the transport of contamination. So far as we know about the numerical analysis method was consider for crystalline rock, which means discontinuous are treated as stochastic distribution in homogeneous rock mass. Based on the understanding of geology in Taiwan in past few decades, we know that the hydraulic conductivities of Quaternary and Tertiary system rock mass are strongly controlled by development of sedimentary structures (bedding plane). The main purpose of this study is to understand how Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) affects numerical results in terms of hydraulic behavior using different DFN generation methods. Base on surface geology investigation and core drilling work (3 boreholes with a total length of 120m), small scale fracture properties with in Cho-lan formation (muddy sandstone) are defined, including gently dip of bedding and 2 sub-vertical joint sets. Two FracMan/MAFIC numerical modellings are conducted, using ECPM approach (Equivalent Continuum Porous Media); case A considered all fracture were Power law distribution with Poisson fracture center; case B considered all bedding plans penetrate into modelling region, and remove the bedding count to recalculate joint fracture parameters. Modelling results show that Case B gives stronger groundwater pathways than Case A and have impact on flow field. This preliminary modelling result implicates the groundwater flow modelling work in some fractured sedimentary rock mass, might be considerate to rock sedimentary structure development itself, discontinuous maybe not follow the same stochastic DFN parameter.

  7. Flood frequency analysis for nonstationary annual peak records in an urban drainage basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, Gabriele; Smith, James A.; Serinaldi, Francesco; Bales, Jerad; Bates, Paul D.; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2009-08-01

    Flood frequency analysis in urban watersheds is complicated by nonstationarities of annual peak records associated with land use change and evolving urban stormwater infrastructure. In this study, a framework for flood frequency analysis is developed based on the Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape parameters (GAMLSS), a tool for modeling time series under nonstationary conditions. GAMLSS is applied to annual maximum peak discharge records for Little Sugar Creek, a highly urbanized watershed which drains the urban core of Charlotte, North Carolina. It is shown that GAMLSS is able to describe the variability in the mean and variance of the annual maximum peak discharge by modeling the parameters of the selected parametric distribution as a smooth function of time via cubic splines. Flood frequency analyses for Little Sugar Creek (at a drainage area of 110km) show that the maximum flow with a 0.01-annual probability (corresponding to 100-year flood peak under stationary conditions) over the 83-year record has ranged from a minimum unit discharge of 2.1mskm to a maximum of 5.1mskm. An alternative characterization can be made by examining the estimated return interval of the peak discharge that would have an annual exceedance probability of 0.01 under the assumption of stationarity (3.2mskm). Under nonstationary conditions, alternative definitions of return period should be adapted. Under the GAMLSS model, the return interval of an annual peak discharge of 3.2mskm ranges from a maximum value of more than 5000 years in 1957 to a minimum value of almost 8 years for the present time (2007). The GAMLSS framework is also used to examine the links between population trends and flood frequency, as well as trends in annual maximum rainfall. These analyses are used to examine evolving flood frequency over future decades.

  8. Flood frequency analysis for nonstationary annual peak records in an urban drainage basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, G.; Smith, J.A.; Serinaldi, F.; Bales, J.; Bates, P.D.; Krajewski, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood frequency analysis in urban watersheds is complicated by nonstationarities of annual peak records associated with land use change and evolving urban stormwater infrastructure. In this study, a framework for flood frequency analysis is developed based on the Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape parameters (GAMLSS), a tool for modeling time series under nonstationary conditions. GAMLSS is applied to annual maximum peak discharge records for Little Sugar Creek, a highly urbanized watershed which drains the urban core of Charlotte, North Carolina. It is shown that GAMLSS is able to describe the variability in the mean and variance of the annual maximum peak discharge by modeling the parameters of the selected parametric distribution as a smooth function of time via cubic splines. Flood frequency analyses for Little Sugar Creek (at a drainage area of 110 km2) show that the maximum flow with a 0.01-annual probability (corresponding to 100-year flood peak under stationary conditions) over the 83-year record has ranged from a minimum unit discharge of 2.1 m3 s- 1 km- 2 to a maximum of 5.1 m3 s- 1 km- 2. An alternative characterization can be made by examining the estimated return interval of the peak discharge that would have an annual exceedance probability of 0.01 under the assumption of stationarity (3.2 m3 s- 1 km- 2). Under nonstationary conditions, alternative definitions of return period should be adapted. Under the GAMLSS model, the return interval of an annual peak discharge of 3.2 m3 s- 1 km- 2 ranges from a maximum value of more than 5000 years in 1957 to a minimum value of almost 8 years for the present time (2007). The GAMLSS framework is also used to examine the links between population trends and flood frequency, as well as trends in annual maximum rainfall. These analyses are used to examine evolving flood frequency over future decades. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Changes in floodplain inundation under nonstationary hydrology for an adjustable, alluvial river channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, B. C.; Belmont, P.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wilcock, P. R.

    2017-05-01

    Predicting the frequency and aerial extent of flooding in river valleys is essential for infrastructure design, environmental management, and risk assessment. Conventional flood prediction relies on assumptions of stationary flood distributions and static channel geometries. However, nonstationary flow regimes are increasingly observed and changes in flow and/or sediment supply are known to alter the geometry and flood conveyance of alluvial channels. Systematic changes in flows and/or channel geometry may amplify or attenuate the frequency and/or extent of flood inundation in unexpected ways. We present a stochastic, reduced complexity model to investigate such dynamics. The model routes a series of annual peak discharges through a simplified reach-averaged channel-floodplain cross section. Channel width, depth, and slope are permitted to adjust annually by a user-specified fraction toward equilibrium geometries predicted based on each year's peak discharge and sediment supply. Modeled channel adjustments are compared with empirical observations for two rivers in Minnesota, USA that have experienced multiple large floods over the past 6 years. The model is then run using six hypothetical scenarios simulating nonstationary flow regimes with temporal adjustments in the mean and/or variance of the governing peak-flow distributions. Each scenario is run repeatedly while varying parameters that control the amount of fractional adjustment that channel geometries can make annually. Results indicate that the intra-annual mean horizontal width of floodplain inundation primarily depends on the governing peak-flow distribution's coefficient of variation, but the intra-annual frequency of floodplain inundation (i.e., the fraction of modeled years with inundation) primarily depends on the amount of channel adjustment permitted annually.

  10. A Flexible Nonlinear Modelling Framework for Nonstationary Generalized Extreme Value Analysis in Hydrology and Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    Parameters in a Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution are specified as a function of covariates using a conditional density network (CDN), which is a probabilistic extension of the multilayer perceptron neural network. If the covariate is time, or is dependent on time, then the GEV-CDN model can be used to perform nonlinear, nonstationary GEV analysis of hydrological or climatological time series. Due to the flexibility of the neural network architecture, the model is capable of representing a wide range of nonstationary relationships. Model parameters are estimated by generalized maximum likelihood, an approach that is tailored to the estimation of GEV parameters from geophysical time series. Model complexity is identified using the Bayesian information criterion and the Akaike information criterion with small sample size correction. Monte Carlo simulations are used to validate GEV-CDN performance on four simple synthetic problems. The model is then demonstrated on precipitation data from southern California, a series that exhibits nonstationarity due to interannual/interdecadal climatic variability. A hierarchy of models can be defined by adjusting three aspects of the GEV-CDN model architecture: (i) by specifying either a linear or a nonlinear hidden-layer activation function; (ii) by adjusting the number of hidden-layer nodes; or (iii) by disconnecting weights leading to output-layer nodes. To illustrate, five GEV-CDN models are shown here in order of increasing complexity for the case of a single covariate, which, in this case, is assumed to be time. The shape parameter is assumed to be constant in all models, although this is not a requirement of the GEV-CDN framework.

  11. Genetic distance for a general non-stationary markov substitution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, Benjamin D; Yap, Von Bing; Zhang, Rongli; Huttley, Gavin A

    2015-03-01

    The genetic distance between biological sequences is a fundamental quantity in molecular evolution. It pertains to questions of rates of evolution, existence of a molecular clock, and phylogenetic inference. Under the class of continuous-time substitution models, the distance is commonly defined as the expected number of substitutions at any site in the sequence. We eschew the almost ubiquitous assumptions of evolution under stationarity and time-reversible conditions and extend the concept of the expected number of substitutions to nonstationary Markov models where the only remaining constraint is of time homogeneity between nodes in the tree. Our measure of genetic distance reduces to the standard formulation if the data in question are consistent with the stationarity assumption. We apply this general model to samples from across the tree of life to compare distances so obtained with those from the general time-reversible model, with and without rate heterogeneity across sites, and the paralinear distance, an empirical pairwise method explicitly designed to address nonstationarity. We discover that estimates from both variants of the general time-reversible model and the paralinear distance systematically overestimate genetic distance and departure from the molecular clock. The magnitude of the distance bias is proportional to departure from stationarity, which we demonstrate to be associated with longer edge lengths. The marked improvement in consistency between the general nonstationary Markov model and sequence alignments leads us to conclude that analyses of evolutionary rates and phylogenies will be substantively improved by application of this model. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  12. Non-stationary rainfall and natural flows modeling at the watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egüen, M.; Aguilar, C.; Solari, S.; Losada, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    In areas in which natural water resources are variable over time, tools that determine the probability distribution of hydrological variables are required to evaluate various management alternatives. In this article, a stochastic simulation framework of hydrological variables through atmospheric pressure modeling is proposed. This methodology employs the mean value of the atmospheric pressure in the winter to differentiate the wet, medium and dry years in terms of rainfall and flow at different temporal scales. Monthly mean and daily maximum rainfall and flow data series are stochastically replicated. To achieve this replication, a non-stationary parametric mixture distribution model that combines a Weibull and a Normal distribution is fitted to the univariate distribution of the atmospheric pressure. This model includes interannual variability through two covariables: extraterrestrial solar radiation and the NAO index. This model is applied to the Guadalete River Basin in southern Spain, in which the river flow regime is influenced by the highly seasonal precipitation regime typically found in the Mediterranean area. The non-stationary parametric mixture distribution model with the two covariables showed a good fit to the observed sea level pressure, displaying an important reduction on the BIC. A good correlation was obtained between the average sea level pressure in winter and the accumulated precipitation and flow (r = -0.8 for monthly values and -0.6 for maximum daily values). The statistical similarity indicated that the synthetic series of precipitation and flow preserved the distribution trends in the observed data. The identical methodology can be applied in other watersheds once the direct relationship between the mean atmospheric pressure and the hydrology of the area is known.

  13. Statistical modelling of the backscattered field in a one-dimensional non-stationary stochastic problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, O. E.; Yaroshchuk, I. O.

    2001-10-01

    Within the framework of an exact wave approach in the spatial-time domain, the one-dimensional stochastic problem of sound pulse scattering by a layered random medium is considered. On the basis of a unification of methods which has been developed by the authors, previously applied to the investigation of non-stationary deterministic wave problems and stochastic stationary wave problems, an analytical-numerical simulation of the behaviour of the backscattered field stochastic characteristics was carried out. Several forms of incident pulses and signals are analysed. We assume that random fluctuations of a medium are described by virtue of the Gaussian Markov process with an exponential correlation function. The most important parameters appearing in the problem are discussed; namely, the time scales of diffusion, pulse durations, the medium layer thickness or the largest observation time scale in comparison with the time scale of one correlation length for the case of a half-space. An exact pattern of the pulse backscattering processes is obtained. It is illustrated by the behaviour of the backscattered field statistical moments for all observation times which are of interest. It is shown that during the time interval when the main part of the pulse energy leaves the medium, the backscattered field is a substantially non-stationary process, having a non-zero mean value and an average intensity that decays according to a power law. There are various power indices for the different duration incident pulses, however, they are not the same as those of previous papers, which were obtained on the basis of an approximate and asymptotic analysis. We have also verified that the Gaussian law is valid for the probability density function of the backscattered field in the case of any incident pulse duration.

  14. Influence nonstationary ionospheric signal of a signal on accuracy of measurements of angles of arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V.; Petrova, I.; Teplov, V.

    In the report we consider accuracy of angular measurements connected with nonstationary ionospheric signal. The estimation is made for the array antenna with small base. At measurements of angle of arrival in system with small base the mode separation is achieved due to Doppler shift. Therefore influence nonstationary ionospheric signal on the achievable spectral resolution, on mistakes of definition of frequencies and phases of close spectral components has the high profile. For numerical estimations the measurements of angles and phases executed in September - December 2001 on a measuring ionospheric complex of the Kazan State University are used. In the most part (92 %) received spectra are observed two and more components, frequently there are measurements with close spectral components. At definition of phases for close spectral lines with the help of window Fast Fourier Transformation there are distortions, which depend on differences of frequencies and phases of these spectral lines. The beams which have come from different directions, on different antennas will have a various phase difference. It will result in various extent of error in a phase definition, so and to a error in angle definition. The extent of error in angle definition is increased by reduction of a difference of frequencies of spectral components and increase of distinction in arrival directions of beams. We execute accounts for frequency 10 MHz and array antenna consisting of two independent perpendicular bases, crossed in a horizontal plane. Array antenna consists of 4 vertical dipole antennas (height of 10.7 m.), located on a circle by a diameter 15.6. Having compared the received dependence with results of processing of the experimentally received signals, it is possible to make a conclusion, that the accuracy of definition of corners about 1degree is for the system, described by the aerial, a limit at use of classical methods of spectral processing. For achievement of accuracy is

  15. Modelling non-stationary annual maximum flood heights in the lower Limpopo River basin of Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maposa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we fit a time-dependent generalised extreme value (GEV distribution to annual maximum flood heights at three sites: Chokwe, Sicacate and Combomune in the lower Limpopo River basin of Mozambique. A GEV distribution is fitted to six annual maximum time series models at each site, namely: annual daily maximum (AM1, annual 2-day maximum (AM2, annual 5-day maximum (AM5, annual 7-day maximum (AM7, annual 10-day maximum (AM10 and annual 30-day maximum (AM30. Non-stationary time-dependent GEV models with a linear trend in location and scale parameters are considered in this study. The results show lack of sufficient evidence to indicate a linear trend in the location parameter at all three sites. On the other hand, the findings in this study reveal strong evidence of the existence of a linear trend in the scale parameter at Combomune and Sicacate, whilst the scale parameter had no significant linear trend at Chokwe. Further investigation in this study also reveals that the location parameter at Sicacate can be modelled by a nonlinear quadratic trend; however, the complexity of the overall model is not worthwhile in fit over a time-homogeneous model. This study shows the importance of extending the time-homogeneous GEV model to incorporate climate change factors such as trend in the lower Limpopo River basin, particularly in this era of global warming and a changing climate. Keywords: nonstationary extremes; annual maxima; lower Limpopo River; generalised extreme value

  16. Media darling

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    He is the media-friendly face of particle physics, appearing on countless TV and radio shows in the run-up to the opening of CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Matthew Chalmers discovers how Brian Cox finds the time to be both a physicist and a media personality. (2 pages)

  17. Instructional Media

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This can be summed up in a few words: Students can learn a great deal from any of the media. Under most of the conditions tested, they could learn as much as from ... Beyond physical conditions (deafness) there is little reason to expect a differential media. Scientia Militaria, South African Journal of Military Studies, Vol 13 ...

  18. Role of geomechanically grown fractures on dispersive transport in heterogeneous geological formations

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H. M.

    2011-11-04

    A second order in space accurate implicit scheme for time-dependent advection-dispersion equations and a discrete fracture propagation model are employed to model solute transport in porous media. We study the impact of the fractures on mass transport and dispersion. To model flow and transport, pressure and transport equations are integrated using a finite-element, node-centered finite-volume approach. Fracture geometries are incrementally developed from a random distributions of material flaws using an adoptive geomechanical finite-element model that also produces fracture aperture distributions. This quasistatic propagation assumes a linear elastic rock matrix, and crack propagation is governed by a subcritical crack growth failure criterion. Fracture propagation, intersection, and closure are handled geometrically. The flow and transport simulations are separately conducted for a range of fracture densities that are generated by the geomechanical finite-element model. These computations show that the most influential parameters for solute transport in fractured porous media are as follows: fracture density and fracture-matrix flux ratio that is influenced by matrix permeability. Using an equivalent fracture aperture size, computed on the basis of equivalent permeability of the system, we also obtain an acceptable prediction of the macrodispersion of poorly interconnected fracture networks. The results hold for fractures at relatively low density. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  19. Fracture prevention in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusens, PP; Sambrook, P.N.; Lems, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    The lifetime risk of experiencing a fracture in 50-year-old men is lower (20%) than the risk in women (50%). Consequently, much less research has been carried out on osteoporosis and fracture risk in men. Differences in the risk and incidence of fractures between men and women are related to

  20. Imaging of insufficiency fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: christian.krestan@meduniwien.ac.at; Hojreh, Azadeh [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-09-15

    This review focuses on the occurrence, imaging and differential diagnosis of insufficiency fractures. Prevalence, the most common sites of insufficiency fractures and their clinical implications are discussed. Insufficiency fractures occur with normal stress exerted on weakened bone. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common cause of insufficiency fractures. Other conditions which affect bone turnover include osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, chronic renal failure and high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. It is a challenge for the radiologist to detect and diagnose insufficiency fractures, and to differentiate them from other bone lesions. Radiographs are still the most widely used imaging method for identification of insufficiency fractures, but sensitivity is limited, depending on the location of the fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very sensitive tool to visualize bone marrow abnormalities associated with insufficiency fractures. Thin section, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) depicts subtle fracture lines allowing direct visualization of cortical and trabecular bone. Bone scintigraphy still plays a role in detecting fractures, with good sensitivity but limited specificity. The most important differential diagnosis is underlying malignant disease leading to pathologic fractures. Bone densitometry and clinical history may also be helpful in confirming the diagnosis of insufficiency fractures.

  1. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables

  2. Anomalous Transport in Natural Fracture Networks Induced by Tectonic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Lei, Q.; Lee, S.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the subsurface. However, characterizing flow and transport through fractured media is challenging due to the high uncertainty and large heterogeneity associated with fractured rock properties. In addition to these "static" challenges, geologic fractures are always under significant overburden stress, and changes in the stress state can lead to changes in the fracture's ability to conduct fluids. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through fractures in a fundamental way, the impact of confining stress on transportthrough fractured rock remains poorly understood. The link between anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and confining stress has been shown, only recently, at the level of a single rough fracture [1]. Here, we investigate the impact of geologic (tectonic) stress on flow and tracer transport through natural fracture networks. We model geomechanical effects in 2D fractured rock by means of a finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM) [2], which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, reactivation of pre-existing fractures, and propagation of new cracks, upon changes in the stress field. We apply the model to a fracture network extracted from the geological map of an actual rock outcrop to obtain the aperture field at different stress conditions. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed fracture networks. We observe that anomalous transport emerges in response to confining stress on the fracture network, and show that the stress state is a powerful determinant of transport behavior: (1) An anisotropic stress state induces preferential flow paths through shear dilation; (2) An increase in geologic stress increases aperture heterogeneity that induces late-time tailing of particle breakthrough curves. Finally, we develop an effective transport model that captures the anomalous transport through the stressed fracture

  3. Characterization of fracture patterns and hygric properties for moisture flow modelling in cracked concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouchier, Simon; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    , but their distribution is difficult to predict due to the variety of environmental factors which cause them. This paper aims at applying experimental non-destructive techniques for the observation of fracture patterns and of fluid flow in fractures, in order to provide this data to models for fluid transfer in fractured...... porous media. Digital Image Correlation was performed during the fracturing of concrete samples, in which moisture uptake was then monitored using X-ray radiography. Finite-element simulations were then performed based on the measurements of the fracture patterns, in order to recreate the measured...

  4. Effect of Random Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Geometry in Fractured Carbonate Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Shijie; Zhao, Haiyang; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Geng, Yudi; Tao, Shan; Zhang, Guangqing; Chen, Mian

    2018-02-01

    Natural fractures have a significant influence on the propagation geometry of hydraulic fractures in fractured reservoirs. True triaxial volumetric fracturing experiments, in which random natural fractures are created by placing cement blocks of different dimensions in a cuboid mold and filling the mold with additional cement to create the final test specimen, were used to study the factors that influence the hydraulic fracture propagation geometry. These factors include the presence of natural fractures around the wellbore, the dimension and volumetric density of random natural fractures and the horizontal differential stress. The results show that volumetric fractures preferentially formed when natural fractures occurred around the wellbore, the natural fractures are medium to long and have a volumetric density of 6-9%, and the stress difference is less than 11 MPa. The volumetric fracture geometries are mainly major multi-branch fractures with fracture networks or major multi-branch fractures (2-4 fractures). The angles between the major fractures and the maximum horizontal in situ stress are 30°-45°, and fracture networks are located at the intersections of major multi-branch fractures. Short natural fractures rarely led to the formation of fracture networks. Thus, the interaction between hydraulic fractures and short natural fractures has little engineering significance. The conclusions are important for field applications and for gaining a deeper understanding of the formation process of volumetric fractures.

  5. Pore-fluid effects on seismic waves in vertically fractured earth with orthotropic symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-15

    For elastically noninteracting vertical-fracture sets at arbitrary orientation angles to each other, a detailed model is presented in which the resulting anisotropic fractured medium generally has orthorhombic symmetry overall. Some of the analysis methods and ideas of Schoenberg are emphasized, together with their connections to other similarly motivated and conceptually related methods by Sayers and Kachanov, among others. Examples show how parallel vertical-fracture sets having HTI (horizontal transversely isotropic) symmetry transform into orthotropic fractured media if some subsets of the vertical fractures are misaligned with the others, and then the fractured system can have VTI (vertical transversely isotropic) symmetry if all of the fractures are aligned randomly or half parallel and half perpendicular to a given vertical plane. An orthotropic example having vertical fractures in an otherwise VTI earth system (studied previously by Schoenberg and Helbig) is compared with the other examples treated and it is finally shown how fluids in the fractures affect the orthotropic poroelastic system response to seismic waves. The key result is that fracture-influence parameters are multiplied by a factor of (1-B), where 0 {le} B < 1 is Skempton's second coefficient for poroelastic media. Skempton's B coefficient is itself a measurable characteristic of fluid-saturated porous rocks, depending on porosity, solid moduli, and the pore-fluid bulk modulus. For heterogeneous porous media, connections between the present work and earlier related results of Brown and Korringa are also established.

  6. Role of MRI in hip fractures, including stress fractures, occult fractures, avulsion fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, O.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Lalam, R.; Tins, B.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Singh, J.

    2012-01-01

    MR imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of hip fractures in all age groups, in a large spectrum of patient groups spanning the elderly and sporting population. It allows a confident exclusion of fracture, differentiation of bony from soft tissue injury and an early confident detection of fractures. There is a spectrum of MR findings which in part is dictated by the type and cause of the fracture which the radiologist needs to be familiar with. Judicious but prompt utilisation of MR in patients with suspected hip fractures has a positive therapeutic impact with healthcare cost benefits as well as social care benefits.

  7. Fractures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 299 MS patients 22 have had fractures and of these 17 after onset of MS. The fractures most frequently involved the femoral neck and trochanter (41%). Three patients had had more than one fracture. Only 1 patient had osteoporosis. The percentage of fractures increased...... with increasing age and disease duration. Among 34 deceased MS patients 4 had had fractures. These findings are discussed in relation to physical and cognitive impairment in MS. A case-control study is recommended....

  8. Medial fracture line significance in calcaneus fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogut, Tahir; Ayhan, Egemen; Kantarci, Fatih; Unlu, Mehmet C; Salih, Muhammet

    2011-01-01

    In Sanders' classification of calcaneus fractures, the medial fracture line (subtype C) is close to the tarsal canal, which contains an artery for the talus and calcaneus. We hypothesized that because of this brittle vascular localization, patients with C line fracture patterns might describe radiologic subtalar arthritis more often and have more complaints. The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of C line fracture patterns with other types of calcaneus fractures. A total of 25 surgically treated feet were involved. Regarding Sanders' classification, group 1 included fractures involving the C line (11 feet), and group 2 included fractures not involving the C line (14 feet). Patient age at admission, trauma date, and interval until surgery were obtained from the patients' medical records. The Bohler angles were determined from the radiographs. At the last follow-up visit, the radiologist graded subtalar arthritis using computed tomography. For clinical follow-up, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Maryland scores were assessed. No significant differences were found in mean age, follow-up period, delay to surgery, or postoperative Bohler angle between the 2 groups. The mean preoperative Bohler angle was significantly low for group 1. Although not significantly different, the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Maryland scores were lower for group 1 (81.9 and 84.3) than group 2 (87.8 and 92.0), and the median subtalar arthritis grade was greater for group 1 (score 2) than for group 2 (score 1.5). The worse results with C line fracture patterns despite satisfactory reduction might result from sinus tarsi artery damage. Angiographic investigations could clarify this theory in the future. Consequently, surgeons must inform and should hesitate to operate on patients with these highly comminuted C line calcaneus fractures. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Fracture in Soft Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole

    Fracture is a phenomenon that is generally associated with solids. A key element in fracture theory is the so-called weakest link idea that fracture initiates from the largest pre-existing material imperfection. However, recent work has demonstrated that fracture can also happen in liquids, where...... surface tension will act to suppress such imperfections. Therefore, the weakest link idea does not seem immediately applicable to fracture in liquids. This presentation will review fracture in liquids and argue that fracture in soft liquids is a material property independent of pre-existing imperfections....... The following questions then emerge: What is the material description needed to predict crack initiation, crack speed and crack shape in soft materials and liquids....

  10. Media violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials.

  11. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  12. Investigation of fracture-matrix interaction: Preliminary experiments in a simple system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz, S.D.; Tidwell, V.C.; Glass, R.J.; Sobolik, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    Paramount to the modeling of unsaturated flow and transport through fractured porous media is a clear understanding of the processes controlling fracture-matrix interaction. As a first step toward such an understanding, two preliminary experiments have been performed to investigate the influence of matrix imbibition on water percolation through unsaturated fractures in the plane normal to the fracture. Test systems consisted of thin slabs of either tuff or an analog material cut by a single vertical fracture into which a constant fluid flux was introduced. Transient moisture content and solute concentration fields were imaged by means of x-ray absorption. Flow fields associated with the two different media were significantly different owing to differences in material properties relative to the imposed flux. Richards' equation was found to be a valid means of modeling the imbibition of water into the tuff matrix from a saturated fracture for the current experiment

  13. Community Media: Muting the Democratic Media Discourse?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpentier, N.; Lie, R.; Servaes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the concept of community media. Components that construct the identity of community media; Multi-theoretical approaches for analysis of community media; Definition of community media based on the concept of alternative media; Link between community media and civil society; Problems faced

  14. A phase angle based diagnostic scheme to planetary gear faults diagnostics under non-stationary operational conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ke; Wang, Kesheng; Ni, Qing; Zuo, Ming J.; Wei, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Planetary gearbox is a critical component for rotating machinery. It is widely used in wind turbines, aerospace and transmission systems in heavy industry. Thus, it is important to monitor planetary gearboxes, especially for fault diagnostics, during its operational conditions. However, in practice, operational conditions of planetary gearbox are often characterized by variations of rotational speeds and loads, which may bring difficulties for fault diagnosis through the measured vibrations. In this paper, phase angle data extracted from measured planetary gearbox vibrations is used for fault detection under non-stationary operational conditions. Together with sample entropy, fault diagnosis on planetary gearbox is implemented. The proposed scheme is explained and demonstrated in both simulation and experimental studies. The scheme proves to be effective and features advantages on fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes under non-stationary operational conditions.

  15. Asymptotic Theory for the QMLE in GARCH-X Models with Stationary and Non-Stationary Covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Heejoon; Kristensen, Dennis

    as captured by its long-memory parameter dx; in particular, we allow for both stationary and non-stationary covariates. We show that the QMLE'’s of the regression coefficients entering the volatility equation are consistent and normally distributed in large samples independently of the degree of persistence....... This implies that standard inferential tools, such as t-statistics, do not have to be adjusted to the level of persistence. On the other hand, the intercept in the volatility equation is not identifi…ed when the covariate is non-stationary which is akin to the results of Jensen and Rahbek (2004, Econometric...... Theory 20) who develop similar results for the pure GARCH model with explosive volatility....

  16. A biorthogonal decomposition for the identification and simulation of non-stationary and non-Gaussian random fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, I. [IMSIA, UMR EDF-ENSTA-CNRS-CEA 9219, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Ferré, G., E-mail: gregoire.ferre@ponts.org [CERMICS – Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, 6 et 8 avenue Blaise Pascal, Cité Descartes, Champs sur Marne, 77455 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2 (France); Poirion, F. [Department of Structural Dynamics and Aeroelasticity, ONERA, BP 72, 29 avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); Benoit, M. [Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes Hors Equilibre (IRPHE), UMR 7342 (CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Ecole Centrale Marseille), 49 rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, BP 146, 13384 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new method for the identification and simulation of non-Gaussian and non-stationary stochastic fields given a database is proposed. It is based on two successive biorthogonal decompositions aiming at representing spatio–temporal stochastic fields. The proposed double expansion allows to build the model even in the case of large-size problems by separating the time, space and random parts of the field. A Gaussian kernel estimator is used to simulate the high dimensional set of random variables appearing in the decomposition. The capability of the method to reproduce the non-stationary and non-Gaussian features of random phenomena is illustrated by applications to earthquakes (seismic ground motion) and sea states (wave heights).

  17. Odontoid Fracture: Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Peña

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 84-year-old male presented with left-sided posterior head, neck, and back pain after a ground level fall. Exam was notable for left parietal scalp laceration and midline cervical spine tenderness with no obvious deformities. He was neurovascularly intact, and placed in an Aspen Collar with strict spine precautions. Significant findings: Computed Tomography (CT of the cervical spine showed a stable, acute, non-displaced fracture of the odontoid process extending into the body of C2, consistent with a Type III Odontoid Fracture. He was evaluated by orthopedic spine service who recommended conservative, non-operative management. Discussion: The cervical spine is composed of seven vertebrae, with C1 and C2 commonly referred to as the Atlas and Axis, respectively. Unique to C2 is a bony prominence, the Odontoid Process (Dens. Hyperextension or hyperflexion injuries can induce significant stress causing fractures. Odontoid fractures comprise approximately 10% of vertebral fractures, and there are three types with varying stability.1 Type 1 is the rarest and is a fracture involving the superior segment of the Dens. It is considered a stable fracture. Type 2 is the most common and is a fracture involving the base of the odontoid process, below the transverse component of the cruciform ligament. This fracture is unstable and requires operative stabilization. 2 Type 3 odontoid fractures are classified by a fracture of the Odontoid process, as well as the lateral masses of the C2. Determining the stability of a Type III Odontoid fracture requires radiographic evaluation. Strict cervical spine precautions must be adhered to until adequate imaging and surgical consultation is obtained. CT of the of cervical spine fractures poses several advantages to plain film radiography due to the ability to view the anatomy in three planes. 3 However, if there is concern for ligamentous injury, MRI is the preferred modality.3

  18. Solving a Local Boundary Value Problem for a Nonlinear Nonstationary System in the Class of Feedback Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitko, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    An algorithm convenient for numerical implementation is proposed for constructing differentiable control functions that transfer a wide class of nonlinear nonstationary systems of ordinary differential equations from an initial state to a given point of the phase space. Constructive sufficient conditions imposed on the right-hand side of the controlled system are obtained under which this transfer is possible. The control of a robotic manipulator is considered, and its numerical simulation is performed.

  19. Non-stationary flood frequency analysis in continental Spanish rivers, using climate and reservoir indices as external covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J.; Francés, F.

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidences of the impact of persistent modes of regional climate variability, coupled with the intensification of human activities, have led hydrologists to study flood regime without applying the hypothesis of stationarity. In this study, a framework for flood frequency analysis is developed on the basis of a tool that enables us to address the modelling of non-stationary time series, namely, the "generalized additive models for location, scale and shape" (GAMLSS). Two approaches to non-stationary modelling in GAMLSS were applied to the annual maximum flood records of 20 continental Spanish rivers. The results of the first approach, in which the parameters of the selected distributions were modelled as a function of time only, show the presence of clear non-stationarities in the flood regime. In a second approach, the parameters of the flood distributions are modelled as functions of climate indices (Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, Mediterranean Oscillation and the Western Mediterranean Oscillation) and a reservoir index that is proposed in this paper. The results when incorporating external covariates in the study highlight the important role of interannual variability in low-frequency climate forcings when modelling the flood regime in continental Spanish rivers. Also, with this approach it is possible to properly introduce the impact on the flood regime of intensified reservoir regulation strategies. The inclusion of external covariates permits the use of these models as predictive tools. Finally, the application of non-stationary analysis shows that the differences between the non-stationary quantiles and their stationary equivalents may be important over long periods of time.

  20. Non-stationary flood frequency analysis in continental Spanish rivers, using climate and reservoir indices as external covariates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. López

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidences of the impact of persistent modes of regional climate variability, coupled with the intensification of human activities, have led hydrologists to study flood regime without applying the hypothesis of stationarity. In this study, a framework for flood frequency analysis is developed on the basis of a tool that enables us to address the modelling of non-stationary time series, namely, the "generalized additive models for location, scale and shape" (GAMLSS. Two approaches to non-stationary modelling in GAMLSS were applied to the annual maximum flood records of 20 continental Spanish rivers. The results of the first approach, in which the parameters of the selected distributions were modelled as a function of time only, show the presence of clear non-stationarities in the flood regime. In a second approach, the parameters of the flood distributions are modelled as functions of climate indices (Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, Mediterranean Oscillation and the Western Mediterranean Oscillation and a reservoir index that is proposed in this paper. The results when incorporating external covariates in the study highlight the important role of interannual variability in low-frequency climate forcings when modelling the flood regime in continental Spanish rivers. Also, with this approach it is possible to properly introduce the impact on the flood regime of intensified reservoir regulation strategies. The inclusion of external covariates permits the use of these models as predictive tools. Finally, the application of non-stationary analysis shows that the differences between the non-stationary quantiles and their stationary equivalents may be important over long periods of time.

  1. Three-dimensional simulation of nonstationary flow phenomena in last stage. Exhaust hood compartment and its elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodov, V.G. [Kharkov State Automobile and Highway Technical University, Theoretical Mechanics and Hydraulics Department, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The article describes numerical models and some results of numerical simulation of self-excited oscillatory flow regimes through exhaust diffusers of large steam turbines, operating as a part of compartment (jointly with last stage). The modelling is based on a model of ideal gas flow and full nonstationary 3D formulation and 2nd time and space order explicit Godunov`s scheme. (author) 11 refs.

  2. Approximate analysis of non-stationary loss queues and networks of loss queues with general service time distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Izady, N; Worthington, D J

    2011-01-01

    A Fixed Point Approximation (FPA) method has recently been suggested for non-stationary analysis of loss queues and networks of loss queues with Exponential service times. Deriving exact equations relating time-dependent mean numbers of busy servers to blocking probabilities, we generalize the FPA method to loss systems with general service time distributions. These equations are combined with associated formulae for stationary analysis of loss systems in steady state through a carried load t...

  3. New Tortoise Coordinate and Hawking Radiation of Dirac Particles in a Non-stationary Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiao-Gang

    2012-04-01

    The Hawking effect of Dirac particles in a non-stationary Kerr-Newman black hole is investigated using an improved Damour-Ruffini method with a new tortoise coordinate transformation. In contrast with the old tortoise coordinate, the new one satisfies the dimensional requirement. It is interesting to note that the Hawking emission spectrum remains a blackbody one with a correction term ξ existing in the Hawking temperature. Compared with the old tortoise coordinate transformation, our results appears more accurate and reliable.

  4. Can we identify non-stationary dynamics of trial-to-trial variability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emili Balaguer-Ballester

    Full Text Available Identifying sources of the apparent variability in non-stationary scenarios is a fundamental problem in many biological data analysis settings. For instance, neurophysiological responses to the same task often vary from each repetition of the same experiment (trial to the next. The origin and functional role of this observed variability is one of the fundamental questions in neuroscience. The nature of such trial-to-trial dynamics however remains largely elusive to current data analysis approaches. A range of strategies have been proposed in modalities such as electro-encephalography but gaining a fundamental insight into latent sources of trial-to-trial variability in neural recordings is still a major challenge. In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept study to the analysis of trial-to-trial variability dynamics founded on non-autonomous dynamical systems. At this initial stage, we evaluate the capacity of a simple statistic based on the behaviour of trajectories in classification settings, the trajectory coherence, in order to identify trial-to-trial dynamics. First, we derive the conditions leading to observable changes in datasets generated by a compact dynamical system (the Duffing equation. This canonical system plays the role of a ubiquitous model of non-stationary supervised classification problems. Second, we estimate the coherence of class-trajectories in empirically reconstructed space of system states. We show how this analysis can discern variations attributable to non-autonomous deterministic processes from stochastic fluctuations. The analyses are benchmarked using simulated and two different real datasets which have been shown to exhibit attractor dynamics. As an illustrative example, we focused on the analysis of the rat's frontal cortex ensemble dynamics during a decision-making task. Results suggest that, in line with recent hypotheses, rather than internal noise, it is the deterministic trend which most likely underlies

  5. Modeling fire spatial non-stationary in Portugal using GWR and GAMLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Ana C. L.; Amaral Turkman, Maria A.; Bistinas, Ioannis; Pereira, José M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Portuguese wildfires are responsible for large environmental, ecological and socio-economic impacts and, in the last decade, vegetation fires consumed on average 140.000ha/year. Portugal has a unique fires-atlas of burnt scar perimeters covering the 1975-2009 period, which allows the assessment of the fire most affected areas. It's crucial to understand the influence of the main drivers of forest fires and its spatial distribution in order to set new management strategies to reduce its impacts. Thus, this study aims at evaluating the spatial stationarity of the fire-environment relationship using two statistical approaches: Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) and Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). Analysis was performed using a regular 2kmx2km cell size grid, a total of 21293 observations overlaying the mainland of Portugal. Fire incidence was determined as the number of times each grid cell burned in the 35 years period. For the GWR analysis the group of environmental variables selected as predictors are: ignition source (population density (PD)); vegetation (proportion of forest and shrubland (FORSHR)); and weather (total precipitation of the coldest quarter (PCQ). Results showed that the fire-environment relationship is non-stationary, thus the coefficient estimates of all the predictors vary spatially, both in magnitude and sign. The most statistically significant predictor is FORSHR, followed by the PCQ. Despite the relationship between fire incidence and PD is non-stationary, only 9% of the observations are statistically significant at a 95% level of confidence. When compared with the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) global model, 53% of the R2 statistic is above the 26% global estimated value, meaning a better explanation of the fire incidence variance with the local model approach. Using the same environmental variables, fire incidence was also modeled using GAMLSS to characterize nonstationarities in fire incidence. It is

  6. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTILAYER METAL-CERAMIC COATINGS UNDER NONSTATIONARY THERMAL EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy M. Samoilenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the aircraft engine construction is determined by the increase of operation parameters of gas turbine engines, which is inevitably accompanied by an increase of operating temperatures and load for the vital elements of the turbine hot ducts. Furthermore, the requirements for reliability of the engine in general are also increasing. Achievement of these requirements is determined by the performance of the materials turbine blades are made of and is made possible by the application of high-heat Nickel alloys in combination with combined heat-shielding coatings.This article dwells on the problem of assessing the impact of non-stationary thermal effects on the temperature distribution in a multilayer heatproof coating. With the aim of assessing the working capacity of heatproof coatings we propose a method of calculating the temperature field for the blade profile and the coatingdepth, based on the solution of the basic one-dimensional differential equation of heat conduction.This method allows us to assess the performance of heatproof coating and also gives us an opportunity to choose a combination of heatproof coating layers for the specific operating conditions of a gas turbine engine’s blades.In addition, using the proposed method it is possible to evaluate the effect of non-stationary heat flux on the structure of high-temperature alloy of the engine’s turbine blades and, therefore, to evaluate the capacity with the given coating. At temperatures of 1150–1200 °C and higher in heat-resistant Nickel alloys there starts a coagulation process of the main reinforcing coherent particle phase on the basis of the intermetallic compound, long plates with wavy shapes are formed instead of the cuboids, a formation of topologically close-packed phases which are needle-like compositions happens. These processes lead to a significant deterioration of the strength characteristics of heat-resistant alloys. Making calculations according to

  7. Nonstationary frequency analysis of extreme daily precipitation amounts in Southeastern Canada using a peaks-over-threshold approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiombiano, Alida N.; El Adlouni, Salaheddine; St-Hilaire, André; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; El-Jabi, Nassir

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a statistical inference of Southeastern Canada extreme daily precipitation amounts is proposed using a classical nonstationary peaks-over-threshold model. Indeed, the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) is fitted to excess time series derived from annual averages of independent precipitation amount events above a fixed threshold, the 99th percentile. Only the scale parameter of the fitted distribution is allowed to vary as a function of a covariate. This variability is modeled using B-spline function. Nonlinear correlation and cross-wavelet analysis allowed identifying two dominant climate indices as covariates in the study area, Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Pacific North American (PNA). The nonstationary frequency analysis showed that there is an east-west behavior of the AO index effects on extreme daily precipitation amounts in the study area. Indeed, the higher quantiles of these events are conditional to the AO positive phase in Atlantic Canada, while those in the more southeastern part of Canada, especially in Southern Quebec and Ontario, are negatively related to AO. The negative phase of PNA also gives the best significant correlation in these regions. Moreover, a regression analysis between AO (PNA) index and conditional quantiles provided slope values for the positive phase of the index on the one hand and the negative phase and on the other hand. This statistic allows computing a slope ratio which permits to sustain the nonlinear relation assumption between climate indices and precipitation and the development of the nonstationary GPD model for Southeastern Canada extremes precipitation modeling.

  8. Non-Stationary Rician Noise Estimation in Parallel MRI Using a Single Image: A Variance-Stabilizing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieciak, Tomasz; Aja-Fernandez, Santiago; Vegas-Sanchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo

    2017-10-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) techniques have gained a great importance both in research and clinical communities recently since they considerably accelerate the image acquisition process. However, the image reconstruction algorithms needed to correct the subsampling artifacts affect the nature of noise, i.e., it becomes non-stationary. Some methods have been proposed in the literature dealing with the non-stationary noise in pMRI. However, their performance depends on information not usually available such as multiple acquisitions, receiver noise matrices, sensitivity coil profiles, reconstruction coefficients, or even biophysical models of the data. Besides, some methods show an undesirable granular pattern on the estimates as a side effect of local estimation. Finally, some methods make strong assumptions that just hold in the case of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which limits their usability in real scenarios. We propose a new automatic noise estimation technique for non-stationary Rician noise that overcomes the aforementioned drawbacks. Its effectiveness is due to the derivation of a variance-stabilizing transformation designed to deal with any SNR. The method was compared to the main state-of-the-art methods in synthetic and real scenarios. Numerical results confirm the robustness of the method and its better performance for the whole range of SNRs.

  9. A simplified fracture network model for studying the efficiency of a single well semi open loop heat exchanger in fractured crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Bour, Olivier; Thierion, Charlotte; Ausseur, Jean-Yves; Lesuer, Hervé; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (energy storage at these shallow depths is still remaining very challenging because of the complexity of fractured media. The purpose of this study is to test the possibility of efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, a simplified numerical model of fractured media is considered with few fractures. Here we present the different steps for building the model and for achieving the sensitivity analysis. First, an analytical and dimensional study on the equations has been achieved to highlight the main parameters that control the optimization of the system. In a second step, multiphysics software COMSOL was used to achieve numerical simulations in a very simplified model of fractured media. The objective was to test the efficiency of such a system to store and recover thermal energy depending on i) the few parameters controlling fracture network geometry (size and number of fractures) and ii) the frequency of cycles used to store and recover thermal energy. The results have then been compared to reference shallow geothermal systems already set up for porous media. Through this study, relationships between structure, heat exchanges and storage may be highlighted.

  10. -Lesser known stress fractures-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Stress fractures of the tibia may disclose a longitudinal orientation which is obvious at bone scanning; a mild periostosis may appear on plain films; CT demonstrates a radially-oriented fracture in one aspect of the diaphyseal cortex. A cortical dissection-like vertically oriented insufficiency fracture may involve the medial aspect of the femoral shaft underlying the lesser trochanter; the fracture is concentric to the femoral cortex at CT. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum may be misdiagnosed on plain films; bone scanning displays a typical H-shaped increased uptake which is a specific pattern. Insufficiency fractures of the pubis may appear as tumoral bone destruction; however no soft tissue mass is present at CT which in addition demonstrates normal fat tissue abutting the osseous lesion.

  11. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical...

  12. Estimating Consumption to Biomass Ratio in Non-Stationary Harvested Fish Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Wiff

    Full Text Available The food consumption to biomass ratio (C is one of the most important population parameters in ecosystem modelling because its quantifies the interactions between predator and prey. Existing models for estimating C in fish populations are per-recruit cohort models or empirical models, valid only for stationary populations. Moreover, empirical models lack theoretical support. Here we develop a theory and derive a general modelling framework to estimate C in fish populations, based on length frequency data and the generalised von Bertalanffy growth function, in which models for stationary populations with a stable-age distributions are special cases. Estimates using our method are compared with estimates from per-recruit cohort models for C using simulated harvested fish populations of different lifespans. The models proposed here are also applied to three fish populations that are targets of commercial fisheries in southern Chile. Uncertainty in the estimation of C was evaluated using a resampling approach. Simulations showed that stationary and non-stationary population models produce different estimates for C and those differences depend on the lifespan, fishing mortality and recruitment variations. Estimates of C using the new model exhibited smoother inter-annual variation in comparison with a per-recruit model estimates and they were also smaller than C predicted by the empirical equations in all population assessed.

  13. A fast nonstationary iterative method with convex penalty for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qinian; Lu, Xiliang

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we consider the computation of approximate solutions for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces. In order to capture the special feature of solutions, non-smooth convex functions are introduced as penalty terms. By exploiting the Hilbert space structure of the underlying problems, we propose a fast iterative regularization method which reduces to the classical nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization when the penalty term is chosen to be the square of norm. Each iteration of the method consists of two steps: the first step involves only the operator from the problem while the second step involves only the penalty term. This splitting character has the advantage of making the computation efficient. In case the data is corrupted by noise, a stopping rule is proposed to terminate the method and the corresponding regularization property is established. Finally, we test the performance of the method by reporting various numerical simulations, including the image deblurring, the determination of source term in Poisson equation, and the de-autoconvolution problem.

  14. A fast nonstationary iterative method with convex penalty for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Qinian; Lu, Xiliang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the computation of approximate solutions for inverse problems in Hilbert spaces. In order to capture the special feature of solutions, non-smooth convex functions are introduced as penalty terms. By exploiting the Hilbert space structure of the underlying problems, we propose a fast iterative regularization method which reduces to the classical nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization when the penalty term is chosen to be the square of norm. Each iteration of the method consists of two steps: the first step involves only the operator from the problem while the second step involves only the penalty term. This splitting character has the advantage of making the computation efficient. In case the data is corrupted by noise, a stopping rule is proposed to terminate the method and the corresponding regularization property is established. Finally, we test the performance of the method by reporting various numerical simulations, including the image deblurring, the determination of source term in Poisson equation, and the de-autoconvolution problem. (paper)

  15. On the role of heat flux in the non-stationary thermal problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanovskiy, A. V.; Kostanovskaya, M. E.

    2018-01-01

    The paper reports on the analysis of experimental thermogram obtained in the process of instant cooling of a spherical solid-phase molybdenum sample by the method of electrostatic levitation. We show that the temperature gradient along the radius of the sample is absent during the cooling of the sample from the melting temperature of T melt = 2889 K. Further, we describe a method for determining functional dependencies of local entropy rate of production, force and heat flux on time. It has appeared, that during cooling of the molybdenum solid sphere the local entropy rate of production and heat flux have identical dependence from time-aspire to a minimum with zero value at approach to ambient temperature (thermodynamic extremum principle). It has allowed draw a conclusion, that in the considered non-stationary problem the heat flux plays defining role unlike the stationary one-dimensional problem in which force is an original cause, and the heat flux results from action of force.

  16. Development of the Nonstationary Incremental Analysis Update Algorithm for Sequential Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Song, Hyo-Jong; Jung, Jaehee; Lim, Gyu-Ho

    2017-04-01

    This study introduces a altered version of the incremental analysis updates (IAU), called the nonstationary IAU (NIAU) method, to enhance the assimilation accuracy of the IAU while retaining the continuity of the analysis. Analogous to the IAU, the NIAU is designed to add analysis increments at every model time step to improve the continuity in the intermittent data assimilation. Still, unlike the IAU, the NIAU method applies time-evolved forcing employing the forward operator as rectifications to the model. The solution of the NIAU is better than that of the IAU, of which analysis is performed at the start of the time window for adding the IAU forcing, in terms of the accuracy of the analysis field. It is because, in the linear systems, the NIAU solution equals that in an intermittent data assimilation method at the end of the assimilation interval. To have the filtering property in the NIAU, a forward operator to propagate the increment is reconstructed with only dominant singular vectors. An illustration of those advantages of the NIAU is given using the simple 40-variable Lorenz model.

  17. Non-stationary hydrologic frequency analysis using B-spline quantile regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, B.; Bouezmarni, T.; St-Hilaire, A.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2017-11-01

    Hydrologic frequency analysis is commonly used by engineers and hydrologists to provide the basic information on planning, design and management of hydraulic and water resources systems under the assumption of stationarity. However, with increasing evidence of climate change, it is possible that the assumption of stationarity, which is prerequisite for traditional frequency analysis and hence, the results of conventional analysis would become questionable. In this study, we consider a framework for frequency analysis of extremes based on B-Spline quantile regression which allows to model data in the presence of non-stationarity and/or dependence on covariates with linear and non-linear dependence. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm was used to estimate quantiles and their posterior distributions. A coefficient of determination and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) for quantile regression are used in order to select the best model, i.e. for each quantile, we choose the degree and number of knots of the adequate B-spline quantile regression model. The method is applied to annual maximum and minimum streamflow records in Ontario, Canada. Climate indices are considered to describe the non-stationarity in the variable of interest and to estimate the quantiles in this case. The results show large differences between the non-stationary quantiles and their stationary equivalents for an annual maximum and minimum discharge with high annual non-exceedance probabilities.

  18. A Review of ENSO Influence on the North Atlantic. A Non-Stationary Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Rodríguez-Fonseca

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric seasonal cycle of the North Atlantic region is dominated by meridional movements of the circulation systems: from the tropics, where the West African Monsoon and extreme tropical weather events take place, to the extratropics, where the circulation is dominated by seasonal changes in the jetstream and extratropical cyclones. Climate variability over the North Atlantic is controlled by various mechanisms. Atmospheric internal variability plays a crucial role in the mid-latitudes. However, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO is still the main source of predictability in this region situated far away from the Pacific. Although the ENSO influence over tropical and extra-tropical areas is related to different physical mechanisms, in both regions this teleconnection seems to be non-stationary in time and modulated by multidecadal changes of the mean flow. Nowadays, long observational records (greater than 100 years and modeling projects (e.g., CMIP permit detecting non-stationarities in the influence of ENSO over the Atlantic basin, and further analyzing its potential mechanisms. The present article reviews the ENSO influence over the Atlantic region, paying special attention to the stability of this teleconnection over time and the possible modulators. Evidence is given that the ENSO–Atlantic teleconnection is weak over the North Atlantic. In this regard, the multidecadal ocean variability seems to modulate the presence of teleconnections, which can lead to important impacts of ENSO and to open windows of opportunity for seasonal predictability.

  19. Analysis of Nonstationary Change of Annual Maximum Level Records in the Yangtze River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the impact of climate change and human activities, the stationarity of hydrometeorological extreme value series has been losing in many regions, which makes occurrence rules of hydrometeorological extreme events more complicated. In this study, the efficiencies of trend test methods such as Spearman rank correlation test and Mann-Kendall test, as well as the efficiencies of change-point test methods such as moving T test, moving rank sum test, Pettitt test, and sequential Mann-Kendall test were analyzed quantitatively through Monte Carlo simulation. Five representative level stations in the Yangtze River estuary were selected, and the methods listed above were used in the trend and change-point detection of the annual maximum tidal level records in the period of 1950–2008. It was found that obvious rising tendency existed in the annual maximum tidal level series for all these 5 stations, and year 1980 (for 3 stations and year 1979 (for 2 stations were statistically significant change-points. Two subseries were divided with the change-point as the dividing point for all these actual series in the stations. Frequency analyses were carried out, respectively, for all of the subseries, and the impact of nonstationary changes in annual maximum tidal levels on probability distribution was evaluated quantitatively.

  20. Multipactor threshold calculation of coaxial transmission lines in microwave applications with nonstationary statistical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Wang, H.; Zhang, N.; Cui, W.; Neuber, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical theory for the initial onset of multipactor breakdown in coaxial transmission lines, taking both the nonuniform electric field and random electron emission velocity into account. A general numerical method is first developed to construct the joint probability density function based on the approximate equation of the electron trajectory. The nonstationary dynamics of the multipactor process on both surfaces of coaxial lines are modelled based on the probability of various impacts and their corresponding secondary emission. The resonant assumption of the classical theory on the independent double-sided and single-sided impacts is replaced by the consideration of their interaction. As a result, the time evolutions of the electron population for exponential growth and absorption on both inner and outer conductor, in response to the applied voltage above and below the multipactor breakdown level, are obtained to investigate the exact mechanism of multipactor discharge in coaxial lines. Furthermore, the multipactor threshold predictions of the presented model are compared with experimental results using measured secondary emission yield of the tested samples which shows reasonable agreement. Finally, the detailed impact scenario reveals that single-surface multipactor is more likely to occur with a higher outer to inner conductor radius ratio

  1. Development of the Nonstationary Incremental Analysis Update Algorithm for Sequential Data Assimilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Geun Ham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces a modified version of the incremental analysis updates (IAU, called the nonstationary IAU (NIAU method, to improve the assimilation accuracy of the IAU while keeping the continuity of the analysis. Similar to the IAU, the NIAU is designed to add analysis increments at every model time step to improve the continuity in the intermittent data assimilation. However, unlike the IAU, the NIAU procedure uses time-evolved forcing using the forward operator as corrections to the model. The solution of the NIAU is superior to that of the forward IAU, of which analysis is performed at the beginning of the time window for adding the IAU forcing, in terms of the accuracy of the analysis field. It is because, in the linear systems, the NIAU solution equals that in an intermittent data assimilation method at the end of the assimilation interval. To have the filtering property in the NIAU, a forward operator to propagate the increment is reconstructed with only dominant singular vectors. An illustration of those advantages of the NIAU is given using the simple 40-variable Lorenz model.

  2. Kinetic features and non-stationary electron trapping in paraxial magnetic nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Zhou, J.; Ahedo, E.; Martínez-Sánchez, M.; Ramos, J. J.

    2018-03-01

    The paraxial expansion of a collisionless plasma jet into vacuum, guided by a magnetic nozzle, is studied with an Eulerian and non-stationary Vlasov-Poisson solver. Parametric analyzes varying the magnetic field expansion rate, the size of the simulation box, and the electrostatic potential fall are presented. After choosing the potential fall leading to a zero net current beam, the steady states of the simulations exhibit a quasi-neutral region followed by a downstream sheath. The latter, an unavoidable consequence of the finite size of the computational domain, does not affect the quasi-neutral region if the box size is chosen appropriately. The steady state presents a strong decay of the perpendicular temperature of the electrons, whose profile versus the inverse of the magnetic field does not depend on the expansion rate within the quasi-neutral region. As a consequence, the electron distribution function is highly anisotropic downstream. The simulations revealed that the ions reach a higher velocity during the transient than in the steady state and their distribution functions are not far from mono-energetic. The density percentage of the population of electrons trapped during the transient, which is computed self-consistently by the code, is up to 25% of the total electron density in the quasi-neutral region. It is demonstrated that the exact amount depends on the history of the system and the steady state is not unique. Nevertheless, the amount of trapped electrons is smaller than the one assumed heuristically by kinetic stationary theories.

  3. Nonstationary heat conduction in one-dimensional models with substrate potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelman, O. V.; Shvartsman, R.; Madar, B.; Savin, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates nonstationary heat conduction in one-dimensional models with substrate potential. To establish universal characteristic properties of the process, we explore three different models: Frenkel-Kontorova (FK), phi4+ (φ4+), and phi4- (φ4-). Direct numeric simulations reveal in all these models a crossover from oscillatory decay of short-wave perturbations of the temperature field to smooth diffusive decay of the long-wave perturbations. Such behavior is inconsistent with the parabolic Fourier equation of heat conduction and clearly demonstrates the necessity for hyperbolic corrections in the phenomenological description of the heat conduction process. The crossover wavelength decreases with an increase in the average temperature. The decay patterns of the temperature field almost do not depend on the amplitude of the perturbations, so the use of linear evolution equations for the temperature field is justified. In all models investigated, the relaxation of thermal perturbations is exponential, contrary to a linear chain, where it follows a power law. The most popular lowest-order hyperbolic generalization of the Fourier law, known as the Cattaneo-Vernotte or telegraph equation, is also not valid for the description of the observed behavior of the models with the substrate potential, since the characteristic relaxation time in an oscillatory regime strongly depends on the excitation wavelength. For some of the models, this dependence seems to obey a simple scaling law.

  4. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, A.A. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shapiro, D.S., E-mail: shapiro.dima@gmail.com [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Remizov, S.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pogosov, W.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lozovik, Yu.E. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Moscow Region, Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-12

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation. - Highlights: • Coupled qubit-resonator system under the modulation of a resonator frequency is considered. • Counterrotating terms of the Hamiltonian are of importance even in the resonance. • Qubit excited state population is highest if driving frequency matches dressed-state energy.

  5. New generation non-stationary portable neutron generators for biophysical applications of Neutron Activation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, N; Cannuli, A; Caccamo, M T; Pace, C

    2017-01-01

    Neutron sources are increasingly employed in a wide range of research fields. For some specific purposes an alternative to existing large-scale neutron scattering facilities, can be offered by the new generation of portable neutron devices. This review reports an overview for such recently available neutron generators mainly addressed to biophysics applications with specific reference to portable non-stationary neutron generators applied in Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The review reports a description of a typical portable neutron generator set-up addressed to biophysics applications. New generation portable neutron devices, for some specific applications, can constitute an alternative to existing large-scale neutron scattering facilities. Deuterium-Deuterium pulsed neutron sources able to generate 2.5MeV neutrons, with a neutron yield of 1.0×10 6 n/s, a pulse rate of 250Hz to 20kHz and a duty factor varying from 5% to 100%, when combined with solid-state photon detectors, show that this kind of compact devices allow rapid and user-friendly elemental analysis. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of ionospheric TEC disturbances as non-stationary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Abdu Mohammed; Berhane, Tesfahun; Roininen, Lassi; Nigussie, Melessew

    2018-03-01

    We model regular and irregular variation of ionospheric total electron content as stationary and non-stationary processes, respectively. We apply the method developed to SCINDA GPS data set observed at Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (11.6 °N, 37.4 °E) . We use hierarchical Bayesian inversion with Gaussian Markov random process priors, and we model the prior parameters in the hyperprior. We use Matérn priors via stochastic partial differential equations, and use scaled Inv -χ2 hyperpriors for the hyperparameters. For drawing posterior estimates, we use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods: Gibbs sampling and Metropolis-within-Gibbs for parameter and hyperparameter estimations, respectively. This allows us to quantify model parameter estimation uncertainties as well. We demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed using a synthetic test case. Finally, we apply the method to real GPS data set, which we decompose to regular and irregular variation components. The result shows that the approach can be used as an accurate ionospheric disturbance characterization technique that quantifies the total electron content variability with corresponding error uncertainties.

  7. Morphology of silver deposits produced by non-stationary steady regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovski, Orce

    2002-01-01

    Morphology of silver electro deposits produced by periodical reversing of d.c. pulses was studied. Employing usual electrorefining conditions it is not possible to deposit compact silver layers from Ag non-complexing salts. This is due, mainly, to the high value of silver exchange current density and to the silver crystallographic peculiarity. In order to counteract this phenomenon, instead of usual, (stationer) potential-current regimes, non-stationary one was applied in this study. The effect of phosphate ions in the electrolyte was further clarified. A set of experimental conditions was applied so that silver was electrodeposited under mixed electrochemical and diffusion control. The primar cathodic pulse causes silver to nucleate with high density and nuclei to start to grow. The subsequent anodic pulse (current reversal) lowers the gradient of silver ion concentration and dissolves the most active growth centers as well. The combination of cathodic and anodic pulses diminishes the dendritic growth and helps smoothing of deposit surface to occur. Fine-grained and more compact deposits are produced, as compared to the ones grown in purely potentiostatic conditions. It was found that the addition of phosphate ions as well as the application of intensive electrolyte stirring change the Ag- grain morphology in favor of poli crystal whisker structure. (Author)

  8. Embracing heterothermic diversity: non-stationary waveform analysis of temperature variation in endotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Danielle L; Menzies, Allyson K; Landry-Cuerrier, Manuelle; Larocque, Guillaume; Humphries, Murray M

    2017-07-01

    Recent research is revealing incredible diversity in the thermoregulatory patterns of wild and captive endotherms. As a result of these findings, classic thermoregulatory categories of 'homeothermy', 'daily heterothermy', and 'hibernation' are becoming harder to delineate, impeding our understanding of the physiological and evolutionary significance of variation within and around these categories. However, we lack a generalized analytical approach for evaluating and comparing the complex and diversified nature of the full breadth of heterothermy expressed by individuals, populations, and species. Here we propose a new approach that decomposes body temperature time series into three inherent properties-waveform, amplitude, and period-using a non-stationary technique that accommodates the temporal variability of body temperature patterns. This approach quantifies circadian and seasonal variation in thermoregulatory patterns, and uses the distribution of observed thermoregulatory patterns as a basis for intra- and inter-specific comparisons. We analyse body temperature time series from multiple species, including classical hibernators, tropical heterotherms, and homeotherms, to highlight the approach's general usefulness and the major axes of thermoregulatory variation that it reveals.

  9. Pediatric pelvic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Candice P; Holman, Joel; Herman, Martin J

    2007-03-01

    Pediatric pelvic fractures account for only 1% to 2% of fractures seen by orthopaedic surgeons who treat children. They are typically associated with high-energy trauma, requiring a comprehensive workup for concomitant life-threatening injuries. Anteroposterior radiographs and rapid-sequence computed tomography are the standards of diagnostic testing to identify the fracture and recognize associated injuries. Treatment is individualized based on patient age, fracture classification, stability of the pelvic ring, extent of concomitant injuries, and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most pelvic injuries in children are treated nonsurgically, with protected weight bearing and gradual return to activity. Open reduction and internal fixation is required for acetabular fractures with >2 mm of fracture displacement and for any intra-articular or triradiate cartilage fracture displacement >2 mm. To prevent limb-length discrepancies, external fixation is necessary for pelvic ring displacement >2 cm. Fractures involving immature triradiate cartilage may lead to growth disturbance of the acetabulum, resulting in acetabular dysplasia, hip subluxation, or hip joint incongruity. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head may develop after acetabular fractures associated with hip dislocation. Other complications include myositis ossificans and neurologic deficits secondary to sciatic, femoral, and/or lumbosacral plexus nerve injuries.

  10. Scaphoid fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Scaphoid fractures are rare in childhood. Diagnosis is very difficult to establish because carpal bones are not fully ossified. In suspected cases comparative or delayed radiography is used, as well as computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and bone scintigraphy. Majority of scaphoid fractures are treated conservatively with good results. In case of delayed fracture healing various types of treatment are available. Objective. To determine the mechanism of injury, clinical healing process, types and outcome of treatment of scaphoid fractures in children. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed patients with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone over a ten-year period (2002-2011. The outcome of the treatment of “acute” scaphoid fracture was evaluated using the Mayo Wrist Score. Results. There were in total 34 patients, of mean age 13.8 years, with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone, whose bone growth was not finished yet. Most common injury mechanism was fall on outstretched arm - 76% of patients. During the examined period 31 children with “acute” fracture underwent conservative treatment, with average immobilization period of 51 days. Six patients were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 25 patients, after completed rehabilitation, functional results determined by the Mayo Wrist Score were excellent. Conclusion. Conservative therapy of “acute” scaphoid fractures is an acceptable treatment option for pediatric patients with excellent functional results.

  11. Fracture of the styloid process associated with the mandible fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the styloid process (SP of temporal bone is an uncommon injuries. Fracture of the SP can be associated with the facial injuries including mandible fracture. However, injury to the SP may be concealed and missed diagnosis may lead to the improper or various unnecessary treatments. A rare case of SP fracture associated with the ipsilateral mandibular fracture and also the diagnostic and management considerations of the SP fracture are discussed.

  12. Approche probabiliste des milieux poreux hétérogènes ou fracturés en relation avec les écoulements diphasiques Probabilistic Approach to Heterogeneous Or Fractured Porous Media in Relation to Two-Phase Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquin C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La prise en compte des particularités structurales des gisements pétroliers fracturés ou hétérogènes est nécessaire à l'amélioration des prévisions de production. La description de ce type de gisements relève d'une approche probabiliste, qui conduit à une estimation des caractéristiques de la roche réservoir : distribution des dimensions des blocs d'un réservoir fissuré, échelles d'hétérogénéité. Ces caractéristiques sont introduites dans les modèles déterministes qui décrivent l'écoulement des fluides. On présente en particulier les problèmes que pose la transposition au gisement des résultats obtenus au laboratoire sur petits échantillons : changement d'échelle géométrique, estimation de la récupération finale et de l'évolution de la production en fonction du temps. The structural features of fractured or heterogenous oil fields must be taken into consideration to improve production forecasting. The description of such fields is based on a probabilistic approach leading to an estimate of the characteristics of the reservoir rock, i. e. distribution of the block sizes of a fissured reservoir, scales of heterogeneity. These characteristics are fed into deterministic models that describe fluid flows. Special attention is paid to problems raised by the transposition of laboratory results obtained on small samples to a field. Such problems include the change in geometric scale, the estimating of ultimate recovery and how production will evolve in time.

  13. Media Training

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  14. Fracture flow due to hydrothermally induced quartz growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Tobias; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wendler, Frank; Enzmann, Frieder; Blum, Philipp

    2017-09-01

    Mineral precipitations are a common feature and limitation of initially open, permeable rock fractures by forming sealing structures or secondary roughness in open voids. Hence, the objective of this numerical study is the evaluation of hydraulic properties of fractures sealed by hydrothermally induced needle and compact quartz growth. Phase-field models of progressive syntaxial and idiomorphic quartz growth are implemented into a fluid flow simulation solving the Navier-Stokes equation. Flow simulations for both quartz types indicate an obvious correlation between changes in permeability, fracture properties (e.g. aperture, relative roughness and porosity) and crystal growth behavior, which also forms distinct flow paths. Thus, at lower sealing stages initial fracture permeability significantly drops down for the 'needle fracture' forming highly tortuous flow paths, while the 'compact fracture' records a considerably smaller loss. Fluid flow in both sealing fractures most widely is governed by a ;parallel plate;-like cubic law behavior. However, the 'needle fracture' also reveals flow characteristics of a porous media. A semi-theoretical equation is introduced that links geometrical (am) with hydraulically effective apertures (ah) and the relative fracture roughness. For this purpose, a geometry factor α is introduced being α = 2.5 for needle quartz and α = 1.0 for compact quartz growth. In contrast to most common ah-am-relationships this novel formulation not only reveals more precise predictions for the needle (RMSE = 1.5) and the compact fractures (RMSE = 3.2), but also exhibit a larger range of validity concerning the roughness of the 'needle' (σ/am = 0-2.4) and the 'compact fractures' (σ/am = 0-1.8).

  15. The Process of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing, know as fracking or hydrofracking, produces fractures in a rock formation by pumping fluids (water, proppant, and chemical additives) at high pressure down a wellbore. These fractures stimulate the flow of natural gas or oil.

  16. Fracturing Writing Spaces: Multimodal Storytelling Ignites Process Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenters, Kimberly; Winters, Kari-Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the affordances of literature-based, arts-infused and digital media processes for students, as multimodal practices take centre stage in an English Language Arts unit on fractured fairy tales. The study takes up the challenge of addressing multimodal literacy instruction and research in ways that utilize a range of…

  17. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    At the present time proximal femoral fractures account for 30% of all fractures referred to hospitals for treatment. Our population is ageing, the proportion of patients with post-menopausal or senile osteoporosis is increasing and therefore the number of proximal femoral fractures requiring urgent treatment is growing too. In the age category of 50 years and older, the incidence of these fractures has increased exponentially. Our department serves as a trauma centre for half of Prague and part of the Central Bohemia Region with a population of 1 150 000. Prague in particular has a high number of elderly citizens. Our experience is based on extensive clinical data obtained from the Register of Proximal Femoral Fractures established in 1997. During 14 years, 4280 patients, 3112 women and 1168 men, were admitted to our department for treatment of proximal femoral fractures. All patients were followed up until healing or development of complications. In the group under study, 82% were patients older than 70 years; 72% of those requiring surgery were in their seventies and eighties. Men were significantly younger than women (pfractures were 2.3-times more frequent in women than in men. In the category under 60 years, men significantly outnumbered women (pfractures were, on the average, eight years older than the patients with intertrochanteric fractures, which is a significant difference (pTrochanteric fractures accounted for 54.7% and femoral neck fractures for 45.3% of all fractures. The inter-annual increase was 5.9%, with more trochanteric than femoral neck fractures. There was a non-significant decrease in intertrochanteric (AO 31-A3) fractures. On the other hand, the number of pertrochanteric (AO 31-A1+2) fractures increased significantly (pfractures were treated with a proximal femoral nail; a short nail was used in 1260 and a long nail in 134 of them. A dynamic hip screw (DHS) was employed to treat 947 fractures. Distinguishing between pertrochanteric (21-A1

  18. Streaming Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  19. Otitis media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovers, MM; Schilder, AGM; Zielhuis, GA; Rosenfeld, RM

    2004-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) continues to be one of the most common childhood infections and is a major cause of morbidity in children. The pathogenesis of OM is multifactorial, involving the adaptive and native immune system, Eustachian-tube dysfunction, viral and bacterial load, and genetic and environmental

  20. Otitis media

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infectious diseases pose quite different challenges to those who seek to apply evidence~based guidelines, as they do ... because AOM is a disease that remits ..... Schwartz B. Otitis media — principles of judicious use of antimicrobial agents. Pediatrics 1998;. 101: 165-171. Gross PA, Puj at D. Implementing practice.

  1. Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Professionals. 29 January 2010. 20 May 2010. <http://econsultancy.com/blog/5324-20+-mind-blowing-social- media...Statistics Revisited.” Econsultancy | Community of Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Professionals. 29 Jan. 2010. 20 May 2010. <http://econsultancy.com/blog

  2. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  3. Vertebral Fracture Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Vertebral Fracture Prediction A method of processing data derived from an image of at least part of a spine is provided for estimating the risk of a future fracture in vertebraeof the spine. Position data relating to at least four neighbouring vertebrae of the spine is processed. The curvature...

  4. Dislocation model of fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kull', L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Papers dealing with study on mechanisms of submicricrack formation and propagation using dislocation representations are analyzed. Cases of brittle and ductile fracture of materials as well as models of dislocationless (amorphous) zone at the growing crack tip are considered. Dislocation models of fracture may be used when studying the processes of deformation and accumulation of damages in elements of nuclear facilities

  5. Physeal Fractures in Foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David G; Aitken, Maia R

    2017-08-01

    Physeal fractures are common musculoskeletal injuries in foals and should be included as a differential diagnosis for the lame or nonweightbearing foal. Careful evaluation of the patient, including precise radiographic assessment, is paramount in determining the options for treatment. Prognosis mostly depends on the patient's age, weight, and fracture location and configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    This special issue of S¯adhan¯a is rightly dedicated to the fracture mechanics of concrete. In particular, the size effect is highlighted. As appropriately pointed out in the first inter- national conference on fracture mechanics of concrete structures, FraMCos-I, organized by Z P Ba˘zant, at Breckenridge, Colorado in 1992, ...

  7. Displaced patella fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Displaced patella fractures often result in disruption of the extensor mechanism of the knee. An intact extensor mechanism is a requirement for unassisted gait. Therefore, operative treatment of the displaced patella fracture is generally recommended. The evaluation of the patella fracture patient includes examination of extensor mechanism integrity. Operative management of patella fractures normally includes open reduction with internal fixation, although partial patellectomy is occasionally performed, with advancement of quadriceps tendon or patellar ligament to the fracture bed. Open reduction with internal fixation has historically been performed utilizing anterior tension band wiring, although comminution of the fracture occasionally makes this fixation construct inadequate. Supplementation or replacement of the tension band wire construct with interfragmentary screws, cerclage wire or suture, and/or plate-and-screw constructs may add to the stability of the fixation construct. Arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint is very common after healing of patella fractures, and substantial functional deficits may persist long after fracture healing has occurred. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Hand fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an orthopedic surgeon if: Your metacarpal bones are broken and shifted out of place Your fingers do not line up correctly Your fracture nearly went through the skin Your fracture went through the skin Your pain is severe or becoming worse Self-care at Home You may have pain and swelling for 1 ...

  9. A new equi-dimensional fracture model using polyhedral cells for microseismic data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2017-04-09

    We present a method for modeling flow in porous media in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach utilizes the Mimetic Finite Difference (MFD) method. We employ a novel equi-dimensional approach for meshing fractures. By using polyhedral cells we avoid the common challenge in equi-dimensional fracture modeling of creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how polyhedra can mesh complex fractures without introducing a large number of cells. We use polyhedra and the MFD method a second time for embedding fracture boundaries in the matrix domain using a “cut-cell” paradigm. The embedding approach has the advantage of being simple and localizes irregular cells to the area around the fractures. It also circumvents the need for conventional mesh generation, which can be challenging when applied to complex fracture geometries. We present numerical results confirming the validity of our approach for complex fracture networks and for different flow models. In our first example, we compare our method to the popular dual-porosity technique. Our second example compares our method with directly meshed fractures (single-porosity) for two-phase flow. The third example demonstrates two-phase flow for the case of intersecting ellipsoid fractures in three-dimensions, which are typical in microseismic analysis of fractures. Finally, we demonstrate our method on a two-dimensional fracture network produced from microseismic field data.

  10. Management of Open Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Blease

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The large spectrum of open fractures is an amalgamation of injuries with the single variable in common of communication of the fractured bone with the outside environment, and thus an increased risk for infection. Contributing to the presence of bacteria within the fracture site is devascularized soft tissue, the degree of which can be directly attributed to the amount of energy imparted to the tissues. The currently used classification system aids in defining the degree of severity of these injuries and their subsequent risk for infection. The basic management principal for all of these injury patterns remains essentially the same, however: prevention of infection through debridement, wound management, antibiotic usage, and fracture stabilization. Frequently multiple surgical procedures will be required in order to obtain an infection free, united fracture with adequate soft tissue coverage (1.

  11. Formation fracturing with foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauer, R.E.; Kohlhaas, C.A.

    1974-01-01

    Over 60 wells have been treated with hydraulic fracturing techniques, with foam as the fracturing fluid. These foams contained as much as 95% gaseous phase; most treatments used foams with gas contents in the 65% to 85% range. Foam has several desirable properties for use as a fracturing fluid: high sand-carrying and sand-suspending capability, low fluid loss, low hydrostatic head, low pressure drops due to friction, quick fluid recovery, low formation damage, and no reduction of fracture conductivity due to fluid ingredients. Most applications of foam as a fracturing fluid have been in low permeability gas reservoirs. However, several oil reservoirs also have been successfully treated. Cost of the treatment is approx. the same or slightly less than a treatment with conventional fluids of comparable volume and rate. (25 refs.)

  12. Dating fractures in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, K.E., E-mail: kath.halliday@nuh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N.J.; Somers, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, R. [Department of Radiology, Paul O' Gorman Building, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  13. Proximal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Teixidor, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In hip fracture surgery, the exact choice of implant often remains somewhat unclear for the individual surgeon, but the growing literature consensus has enabled publication of evidence-based surgical treatment pathways. The aim of this article was to review author pathways and national...... guidelines for hip fracture surgery and discuss a method for future pathway/guideline implementation and evaluation. METHODS: By a PubMed search in March 2015 six studies of surgical treatment pathways covering all types of proximal femoral fractures with publication after 1995 were identified. Also we......-displaced femoral neck fractures and prosthesis for displaced among the elderly; and sliding hip screw for stabile- and intramedullary nails for unstable- and sub-trochanteric fractures) but they are based on a variety of criteria and definitions - and often leave wide space for the individual surgeons' subjective...

  14. Non-stationary hydropower generation projection over the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T.; Voisin, N.; Fu, T.

    2017-12-01

    Over the western U.S, 27% of the electricity demand is met with hydropower on an average year. Water resources availability in the western U.S. are projected to undergo changes in seasonality in the future due to the decline in snowpack. Future projection of hydropower generation which are based on regression relationship between observed monthly flow and hydropower generation combining with simulated flow have the advantage of reflecting the complexity in hydropower operations. However they do not capture the non-stationary generation due to the shift in natural flow seasonality and associated changes in reservoir storage which affect the generation. Physically - based hydropower models based on large scale regulated flow simulations can capture the change in hydropower generation however they would need to be calibrated in order to provide further insight onto power system resource adequacy studies and understand the impact on overall power system operations. In this study we simulate historical and future monthly hydropower generation using a process-based model. We use an integrated water modeling framework consisting of hydrologic simulations based on the Variable Infiltration Capacity Model (VIC), CMIP5, and large-scale river routing - water management model (MOSART-WM) over the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region. Reservoir operations characteristics, in addition to generation, are calibrated to reproduce historical observations. Estimates are provided for run of the river reservoirs and storage reservoirs over the Western U.S. We provide a new projection of potential hydropower generation and evaluate the effect of non-stationarity with respect to previous regression-based estimates.

  15. A Non-Stationary 1981-2012 AVHRR NDVI(sub 3g) Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Jorge E.; Tucker, Compton J.

    2014-01-01

    The NDVI(sub 3g) time series is an improved 8-km normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data set produced from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments that extends from 1981 to the present. The AVHRR instruments have flown or are flying on fourteen polar-orbiting meteorological satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and are currently flying on two European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, MetOp-A and MetOp-B. This long AVHRR record is comprised of data from two different sensors: the AVHRR/2 instrument that spans July 1981 to November 2000 and the AVHRR/3 instrument that continues these measurements from November 2000 to the present. The main difficulty in processing AVHRR NDVI data is to properly deal with limitations of the AVHRR instruments. Complicating among-instrument AVHRR inter-calibration of channels one and two is the dual gain introduced in late 2000 on the AVHRR/3 instruments for both these channels. We have processed NDVI data derived from the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) from 1997 to 2010 to overcome among-instrument AVHRR calibration difficulties. We use Bayesian methods with high quality well-calibrated SeaWiFS NDVI data for deriving AVHRR NDVI calibration parameters. Evaluation of the uncertainties of our resulting NDVI values gives an error of plus or minus 0.005 NDVI units for our 1981 to present data set that is independent of time within our AVHRR NDVI continuum and has resulted in a non-stationary climate data set.

  16. Nonstationary porosity evolution in mixing zone in coastal carbonate aquifer using an alternative modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabidi, Ezzeddine; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2015-07-01

    In the last few decades, hydrogeochemical problems have benefited from the strong interest in numerical modeling. One of the most recognized hydrogeochemical problems is the dissolution of the calcite in the mixing zone below limestone coastal aquifer. In many works, this problem has been modeled using a coupling algorithm between a density-dependent flow model and a geochemical model. A related difficulty is that, because of the high nonlinearity of the coupled set of equations, high computational effort is needed. During calcite dissolution, an increase in permeability can be identified, which can induce an increase in the penetration of the seawater into the aquifer. The majority of the previous studies used a fully coupled reactive transport model in order to model such problem. Romanov and Dreybrodt (J Hydrol 329:661-673, 2006) have used an alternative approach to quantify the porosity evolution in mixing zone below coastal carbonate aquifer at steady state. This approach is based on the analytic solution presented by Phillips (1991) in his book Flow and Reactions in Permeable Rock, which shows that it is possible to decouple the complex set of equation. This equation is proportional to the square of the salinity gradient, which can be calculated using a density driven flow code and to the reaction rate that can be calculated using a geochemical code. In this work, this equation is used in nonstationary step-by-step regime. At each time step, the quantity of the dissolved calcite is quantified, the change of porosity is calculated, and the permeability is updated. The reaction rate, which is the second derivate of the calcium equilibrium concentration in the equation, is calculated using the PHREEQC code (Parkhurst and Apello 1999). This result is used in GEODENS (Bouhlila 1999; Bouhlila and Laabidi 2008) to calculate change of the porosity after calculating the salinity gradient. For the next time step, the same protocol is used but using the updated porosity

  17. Statistical downscaling of rainfall: a non-stationary and multi-resolution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Md. Mamunur; Beecham, Simon; Chowdhury, Rezaul Kabir

    2016-05-01

    A novel downscaling technique is proposed in this study whereby the original rainfall and reanalysis variables are first decomposed by wavelet transforms and rainfall is modelled using the semi-parametric additive model formulation of Generalized Additive Model in Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). The flexibility of the GAMLSS model makes it feasible as a framework for non-stationary modelling. Decomposition of a rainfall series into different components is useful to separate the scale-dependent properties of the rainfall as this varies both temporally and spatially. The study was conducted at the Onkaparinga river catchment in South Australia. The model was calibrated over the period 1960 to 1990 and validated over the period 1991 to 2010. The model reproduced the monthly variability and statistics of the observed rainfall well with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) values of 0.66 and 0.65 for the calibration and validation periods, respectively. It also reproduced well the seasonal rainfall over the calibration (NSE = 0.37) and validation (NSE = 0.69) periods for all seasons. The proposed model was better than the tradition modelling approach (application of GAMLSS to the original rainfall series without decomposition) at reproducing the time-frequency properties of the observed rainfall, and yet it still preserved the statistics produced by the traditional modelling approach. When downscaling models were developed with general circulation model (GCM) historical output datasets, the proposed wavelet-based downscaling model outperformed the traditional downscaling model in terms of reproducing monthly rainfall for both the calibration and validation periods.

  18. A non-stationary relationship between global climate phenomena and human plague incidence in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreppel, Katharina S; Caminade, Cyril; Telfer, Sandra; Rajerison, Minoarison; Rahalison, Lila; Morse, Andy; Baylis, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is found in Asia and the Americas, but predominantly in Africa, with the island of Madagascar reporting almost one third of human cases worldwide. Plague's occurrence is affected by local climate factors which in turn are influenced by large-scale climate phenomena such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The effects of ENSO on regional climate are often enhanced or reduced by a second large-scale climate phenomenon, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). It is known that ENSO and the IOD interact as drivers of disease. Yet the impacts of these phenomena in driving plague dynamics via their effect on regional climate, and specifically contributing to the foci of transmission on Madagascar, are unknown. Here we present the first analysis of the effects of ENSO and IOD on plague in Madagascar. We use a forty-eight year monthly time-series of reported human plague cases from 1960 to 2008. Using wavelet analysis, we show that over the last fifty years there have been complex non-stationary associations between ENSO/IOD and the dynamics of plague in Madagascar. We demonstrate that ENSO and IOD influence temperature in Madagascar and that temperature and plague cycles are associated. The effects on plague appear to be mediated more by temperature, but precipitation also undoubtedly influences plague in Madagascar. Our results confirm a relationship between plague anomalies and an increase in the intensity of ENSO events and precipitation. This work widens the understanding of how climate factors acting over different temporal scales can combine to drive local disease dynamics. Given the association of increasing ENSO strength and plague anomalies in Madagascar it may in future be possible to forecast plague outbreaks in Madagascar. The study gives insight into the complex and changing relationship between climate factors and plague in Madagascar.

  19. A Non-Stationary 1981–2012 AVHRR NDVI3g Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Pinzon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The NDVI3g time series is an improved 8-km normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI data set produced from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR instruments that extends from 1981 to the present. The AVHRR instruments have flown or are flying on fourteen polar-orbiting meteorological satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA and are currently flying on two European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, MetOp-A and MetOp-B. This long AVHRR record is comprised of data from two different sensors: the AVHRR/2 instrument that spans July 1981 to November 2000 and the AVHRR/3 instrument that continues these measurements from November 2000 to the present. The main difficulty in processing AVHRR NDVI data is to properly deal with limitations of the AVHRR instruments. Complicating among-instrument AVHRR inter-calibration of channels one and two is the dual gain introduced in late 2000 on the AVHRR/3 instruments for both these channels. We have processed NDVI data derived from the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS from 1997 to 2010 to overcome among-instrument AVHRR calibration difficulties. We use Bayesian methods with high quality well-calibrated SeaWiFS NDVI data for deriving AVHRR NDVI calibration parameters. Evaluation of the uncertainties of our resulting NDVI values gives an error of ± 0.005 NDVI units for our 1981 to present data set that is independent of time within our AVHRR NDVI continuum and has resulted in a non-stationary climate data set.

  20. The Identification of Seismo and Volcanomagnetic Events Using Non-stationary Analysis of Geomagnetic Field Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Johnston, M.; La Manna, M.

    Many studies have shown a clear correlation between volcanic and/or seismic activ- ity and time variations of local geomagnetic fields, called seismomagnetic (SM) and /or volcanomagnetic (VM) effects. SM and VM can be generated from various phys- ical process, such as piezomagnetism, tectonomagnetism and electrokinetism. Rele- vant parameters are the event duration, the event magnitude and the magnetometer sample rate. Here, we present some results obtained from a non-stationary analysis of geomagnetic time series that focuses on automatic detection of possible SM and VM events. Several approaches are considered. The first one, based on the continuous wavelet transform, provides us with a multiresolution lecture of the signal, expanded in time-scale space. The second uses a time-variant adaptive algorithm (RLS) that al- lows the detection of some time intervals where important statistical variations of the signal occur. Finally, we investigate a third technique relying on multifractal analy- sis. This latter allows estimation of local regularity of a time series path, in order to detect unusual singularities. Different multifractal models were used for testing the methodology, such as multifractional Brownian Motions (mbmSs), before applying it to synthetic simulations of geomagnetic signals. In our simulations, we took into account theoretical SM and/or VM effects deriving from fault rupture and overpres- sured magma chambers. We applied these methodologies to two different real world data sets, recorded on Mt Etna (volcanic area) during the volcanic activity occurred in 1981, and in North Palm Springs (seismic area) during the seism of July 8th 1986, respectively. In both cases, all techniques were effective in automatically identifying the geomagnetic time-variations likely inferred by volcanic and/or seismic activity and the results are in good agreement with the indices provided by real volcanic and seismic measurements.