WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonsensory cochlear duct

  1. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-c-MET Signaling Mediates the Development of Nonsensory Structures of the Mammalian Cochlea and Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shumei; Miwa, Toru; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Levitt, Pat; Ohyama, Takahiro

    2016-08-03

    The stria vascularis is a nonsensory structure that is essential for auditory hair cell function by maintaining potassium concentration of the scala media. During mouse embryonic development, a subpopulation of neural crest cell-derived melanocytes migrates and incorporates into a subregion of the cochlear epithelium, forming the intermediate cell layer of the stria vascularis. The relation of this developmental process to stria vascularis function is currently unknown. In characterizing the molecular differentiation of developing peripheral auditory structures, we discovered that hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) is expressed in the future stria vascularis of the cochlear epithelium. Its receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Met, is expressed in the cochlear epithelium and melanocyte-derived intermediate cells in the stria vascularis. Genetic dissection of HGF signaling via c-MET reveals that the incorporation of the melanocytes into the future stria vascularis of the cochlear duct requires c-MET signaling. In addition, inactivation of either the ligand or receptor developmentally resulted in a profound hearing loss at young adult stages. These results suggest a novel connection between HGF signaling and deafness via melanocyte deficiencies. We found the roles of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling in stria vascularis development for the first time and that lack of HGF signaling in the inner ear leads to profound hearing loss in the mouse. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism that may underlie human deafness DFNB39 and DFNB97. Our findings reveal an additional example of context-dependent c-MET signaling diversity, required here for proper cellular invasion developmentally that is essential for specific aspects of auditory-related organogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/368200-10$15.00/0.

  2. Hepatocyte Growth Factor–c-MET Signaling Mediates the Development of Nonsensory Structures of the Mammalian Cochlea and Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shumei; Miwa, Toru; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    The stria vascularis is a nonsensory structure that is essential for auditory hair cell function by maintaining potassium concentration of the scala media. During mouse embryonic development, a subpopulation of neural crest cell-derived melanocytes migrates and incorporates into a subregion of the cochlear epithelium, forming the intermediate cell layer of the stria vascularis. The relation of this developmental process to stria vascularis function is currently unknown. In characterizing the molecular differentiation of developing peripheral auditory structures, we discovered that hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) is expressed in the future stria vascularis of the cochlear epithelium. Its receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Met, is expressed in the cochlear epithelium and melanocyte-derived intermediate cells in the stria vascularis. Genetic dissection of HGF signaling via c-MET reveals that the incorporation of the melanocytes into the future stria vascularis of the cochlear duct requires c-MET signaling. In addition, inactivation of either the ligand or receptor developmentally resulted in a profound hearing loss at young adult stages. These results suggest a novel connection between HGF signaling and deafness via melanocyte deficiencies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found the roles of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling in stria vascularis development for the first time and that lack of HGF signaling in the inner ear leads to profound hearing loss in the mouse. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism that may underlie human deafness DFNB39 and DFNB97. Our findings reveal an additional example of context-dependent c-MET signaling diversity, required here for proper cellular invasion developmentally that is essential for specific aspects of auditory-related organogenesis. PMID:27488639

  3. An automated A-value measurement tool for accurate cochlear duct length estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyaniwura, John E; Elfarnawany, Mai; Ladak, Hanif M; Agrawal, Sumit K

    2018-01-22

    There has been renewed interest in the cochlear duct length (CDL) for preoperative cochlear implant electrode selection and postoperative generation of patient-specific frequency maps. The CDL can be estimated by measuring the A-value, which is defined as the length between the round window and the furthest point on the basal turn. Unfortunately, there is significant intra- and inter-observer variability when these measurements are made clinically. The objective of this study was to develop an automated A-value measurement algorithm to improve accuracy and eliminate observer variability. Clinical and micro-CT images of 20 cadaveric cochleae specimens were acquired. The micro-CT of one sample was chosen as the atlas, and A-value fiducials were placed onto that image. Image registration (rigid affine and non-rigid B-spline) was applied between the atlas and the 19 remaining clinical CT images. The registration transform was applied to the A-value fiducials, and the A-value was then automatically calculated for each specimen. High resolution micro-CT images of the same 19 specimens were used to measure the gold standard A-values for comparison against the manual and automated methods. The registration algorithm had excellent qualitative overlap between the atlas and target images. The automated method eliminated the observer variability and the systematic underestimation by experts. Manual measurement of the A-value on clinical CT had a mean error of 9.5 ± 4.3% compared to micro-CT, and this improved to an error of 2.7 ± 2.1% using the automated algorithm. Both the automated and manual methods correlated significantly with the gold standard micro-CT A-values (r = 0.70, p value measurement tool using atlas-based registration methods was successfully developed and validated. The automated method eliminated the observer variability and improved accuracy as compared to manual measurements by experts. This open-source tool has the potential to benefit

  4. A simple method for purification of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells, and application for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, Meike; Scheibinger, Mirko; Guo, Zhaohua; Jan, Taha A; Adams, Christopher M; Cheng, Alan G; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive hair cells and supporting cells comprise the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The paucity of both cell types has hampered molecular and cell biological studies, which often require large quantities of purified cells. Here, we report a strategy allowing the enrichment of relatively pure populations of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells including supporting cells. We utilized specific uptake of fluorescent styryl dyes for labeling of hair cells. Enzymatic isolation and flow cytometry was used to generate pure populations of sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells. We applied mass spectrometry to perform a qualitative high-resolution analysis of the proteomic makeup of both the hair cell and non-sensory cell populations. Our conservative analysis identified more than 600 proteins with a false discovery rate of Analysis of proteins exclusively detected in either population revealed 64 proteins that were specific to hair cells and 103 proteins that were only detectable in non-sensory cells. Statistical analyses extended these groups by 53 proteins that are strongly upregulated in hair cells versus non-sensory cells and vice versa by 68 proteins. Our results demonstrate that enzymatic dissociation of styryl dye-labeled sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells is a valid method to generate pure enough cell populations for flow cytometry and subsequent molecular analyses.

  5. Hair cell regeneration or the expression of related factors that regulate the fate specification of supporting cells in the cochlear ducts of embryonic and posthatch chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingling; Jin, Ran; Xu, Jincao; Ji, Yubin; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhang, Xuebo; Zhang, Xinwen; Han, Zhongming; Zeng, Shaoju

    2016-02-01

    Hair cells in posthatch chickens regenerate spontaneously through mitosis or the transdifferentiation of supporting cells in response to antibiotic injury. However, how embryonic chicken cochleae respond to antibiotic treatment remains unknown. This study is the first to indicate that unlike hair cells in posthatch chickens, the auditory epithelium was free from antibiotic injury (25-250 mg gentamicin/kg) in embryonic chickens, although FITC-conjugated gentamicin actually reached embryonic hair cells. Next, we examined and counted the cells and performed labeling for BrdU, Sox2, Atoh1/Math1, PV or p27(kip1) (triple or double labeling) in the injured cochlea ducts after gentamicin treatment at 2 h (h), 15 h, 24 h, 2 days (d), 3 d and 7 d after BrdU treatment in posthatch chickens. Our results indicated that following gentamicin administration, proliferating cells (BrdU+) were labeled for Atoh1/Math1 in the damaged areas 3d after gentamicin administration, whereas hair cells (PV+) renewed through mitosis (BrdU+) or direct transdifferentiation (BrdU-) were evident only after 5 d of gentamicin administration. In addition, Sox2 expression was up-regulated in triggered supporting cells at an early stage of regeneration, but stopped at the advent of mature hair cells. Our study also indicated that p27(kip1) was expressed in both hair cells and supporting cells but was down-regulated in a subgroup of the supporting cells that gave rise to hair cells. These data and the obtained dynamic changes of the cells labeled for BrdU, Sox2, Atoh1/Math1, PV or p27(kip1) are useful for understanding supporting cell behaviors and their fate specification during hair cell regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... Hearing Aids Retinitis Pigmentosa - National Eye Institute Telecommunications Relay Services Usher Syndrome Your Baby's Hearing Screening News ...

  7. Variations in U.S. Consumers' Acceptability of Korean Rice Cake, Seolgitteok, with respect to Sensory Attributes and Nonsensory Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungeun; Yoon, Suk Hoo; Min, Jieun; Lee, Suji; Tokar, Tonya; Lee, Sun-Ok; Seo, Han-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Because the Korean rice cake, Seolgitteok, is mainly prepared with rice flour containing no gluten-protein associated with celiac disease, it can be considered for inclusion in a gluten-free diet. However, Western consumers may be unlikely to enjoy the plain flavor and chewy texture of Seolgitteok. This study aimed to determine both sensory and nonsensory factors that might affect U.S. consumers' acceptability of Seolgitteok. A total of 119 U.S. consumers rated 5 Seolgitteok samples, differentiated by descriptive sensory analysis, with respect to hedonic impression and just-about-right aspects of sensory attributes. Nonsensory factors such as demographic profile, innovativeness, social representation, sensation-seeking, and personality traits were also assessed. Addition levels of brown rice flour (0% to 100%) and sugar (5% to 20%) not only enriched flavor, but also lessened chewiness of Seolgitteok, thereby increasing an overall hedonic impression. Moreover, consumer acceptability of Seolgitteok varied with respect to nonsensory factors. Seolgitteok was more appreciated by males, sensation seekers, and individuals constrained by social desirability than by other groups. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that U.S. consumers' acceptability of Seolgitteok varies not only by sensory attributes such as rice flavor, sweetness, and chewiness, but also by nonsensory factors such as gender, sensation-seeking characteristics, and personality traits. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Hearing loss in fibromyalgia? Somatic sensory and non-sensory symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia and other rheumatic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Rasker, Johannes J.; Häuser, W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It has been proposed that fibromyalgia can be understood as a disorder of central sensitisation and dysregulation (CD) and that characteristic somatic symptoms are the result of `central augmentation`. We examined this hypothesis by analysing sensory and non-sensory variables in the

  9. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Natalia Delage; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition. (author)

  10. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Delage Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition.

  11. Bile Duct Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Health Library / Diagnostics & Testing / Bile Duct Exploration Bile Duct Exploration Common bile duct exploration is a ... Test Details Results and Follow-Up What is bile, and what is bile duct exploration? Bile is ...

  12. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  13. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma). Use the menu below to ...

  14. Trends in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management.

  15. The mental representation of living and nonliving things: differential weighting and interactivity of sensorial and non-sensorial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Paulo; Morais, José; Brito-Mendes, Carlos; Kolinsky, Régine

    2005-02-01

    Warrington and colleagues (Warrington & McCarthy, 1983, 1987; Warrington & Shallice, 1984) claimed that sensorial and functional-associative (FA) features are differentially important in determining the meaning of living things (LT) and nonliving things (NLT). The first aim of the present study was to evaluate this hypothesis through two different access tasks: feature generation (Experiment 1) and cued recall (Experiment 2). The results of both experiments provided consistent empirical support for Warrington and colleagues' assumption. The second aim of the present study was to test a new differential interactivity hypothesis that combines Warrington and colleagueS' assumption with the notion of a higher number of intercorrelations and hence of a stronger connectivity between sensorial and non-sensorial features for LTs than for NLTs. This hypothesis was motivated by previoUs reports of an uncrossed interaction between domain (LTs vs NLTs) and attribute type (sensorial vs FA) in, for example, a feature verification task (Laws, Humber, Ramsey, & McCarthy, 1995): while FA attributes are verified faster than sensorial attributes for NLTs, no difference is observed for LTs. We replicated and generalised this finding using several feature verification tasks on both written words and pictures (Experiment 3), including in conditions aimed at minimising the intervention of priming biases and strategic or mnemonic processes (Experiment 4). The whole set of results suggests that both privileged relations between features and categories, and the differential importance of intercorrelations between features as a function of category, modulate access to semantic features.

  16. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin ... the Use of Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ...

  17. Bile duct stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... duct, the tube that moves bile from the liver to the small intestine. Bile is a substance that helps with digestion. ... causes of this condition include: Cancer of the bile duct, liver or pancreas Damage and scarring due to a ...

  18. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic as...

  19. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know; Implante coclear: o que o radiologista precisa saber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Natalia Delage; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: nataliadelagegomes@gmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-05-15

    Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition. (author)

  20. Blocked Tear Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the nose (lacrimal sac). From there tears travel down a duct (the nasolacrimal duct) draining into your nose. Once in the nose, tears are reabsorbed. A blockage can occur at any point in the tear drainage system, from the puncta ...

  1. Effect of cochlear nerve electrocautery on the adult cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, Claire E; Merwin, William H; Klatt-Cromwell, Cristine; Hutson, Kendall A; Ewend, Matthew G; Adunka, Oliver F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Buchman, Craig A

    2015-04-01

    Electrocauterization and subsequent transection of the cochlear nerve induce greater injury to the cochlear nucleus than sharp transection alone. Some studies show that neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients fit with auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) fail to achieve speech perception abilities similar to ABI recipients without NF2. Reasons for these differences remain speculative. One hypothesis posits poorer performance to surgically induced trauma to the cochlear nucleus from electrocautery. Sustained electrosurgical depolarization of the cochlear nerve may cause excitotoxic-induced postsynaptic nuclear injury. Equally plausible is that cautery in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus induces necrosis. The cochlear nerve was transected in anesthetized adult gerbils sharply with or without bipolar electrocautery at varying intensities. Gerbils were perfused at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days postoperatively; their brainstem and cochleas were embedded in paraffin and sectioned at 10 μm. Alternate sections were stained with flourescent markers for neuronal injury or Nissl substance. In additional experiments, anterograde tracers were applied directly to a sectioned eighth nerve to verify that fluorescent-labeled profiles seen were terminating auditory nerve fibers. Cochlear nerve injury was observed from 72 hours postoperatively and was identical across cases regardless of surgical technique. Postsynaptic cochlear nucleus injury was not seen after distal transection of the nerve. By contrast, proximal transection was associated with trauma to the cochlear nucleus. Distal application of bipolar electrocautery seems safe for the cochlear nucleus. Application near the root entry zone must be used cautiously because this may compromise nuclear viability needed to support ABI stimulation.

  2. Modified nasolacrimal duct stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Min; Jin Mei; Chen Huanjun; Li Yi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Traditional nasolacrimal duct stenting possesses some shortcoming including difficulty of pulling ball head guide wire from the nasal cavity with turbinate hypertrophy and nasal septal deviation. The new method of nose-oral tube track establishment can overcome the forementioned and increase the successful rate. Methods: 5 F catheter and arterial sheath were modified to be nasolacrimal duct stent delivery device respectively. Antegrade dacryocystography was taken firstly to display the obstructed site and followed by the modified protocol of inserting the guide wire through nasolacrimal duct and nasal cavity, and establishing the stent delivery track for retrograde stent placement. Results: 5 epiphora patients with failure implantation by traditional method were all succeeded through the modified stenting (100%). During 6-mouth follow-up, no serious complications and reocclusion occurred. Conclusion: The establishment of eye-nose-mouth-nose of external nasal guide wire track can improve the successful rate of nasolacrimal duct stenting. (authors)

  3. Bile duct obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors that have spread to the biliary system Liver and bile duct worms (flukes) The risk factors include: History of ... Increased bilirubin level Increased alkaline phosphatase level Increased liver enzymes The ... CT scan Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography ( ...

  4. Ducted fuel injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Charles J.

    2018-03-06

    Various technologies presented herein relate to enhancing mixing inside a combustion chamber to form one or more locally premixed mixtures comprising fuel and charge-gas with low peak fuel to charge-gas ratios to enable minimal, or no, generation of soot and other undesired emissions during ignition and subsequent combustion of the locally premixed mixtures. To enable sufficient mixing of the fuel and charge-gas, a jet of fuel can be directed to pass through a bore of a duct causing charge-gas to be drawn into the bore creating turbulence to mix the fuel and the drawn charge-gas. The duct can be located proximate to an opening in a tip of a fuel injector. The duct can comprise of one or more holes along its length to enable charge-gas to be drawn into the bore, and further, the duct can cool the fuel and/or charge-gas prior to combustion.

  5. Cochlear implantation in Mondini dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshi, Ahmad; Hassanzadeh, Saeid; Abasalipour, Parvaneh; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaddin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    The use of cochlear implantation to treat patients with inner ear malformations such as Mondini dysplasia has been increasingly successful. Until now, conventional hearing aids in these patients have not performed well. Consequently, the hearing problem for patients with this condition has been somewhat improved with the use of cochlear implants. Various results of cochlear implantation have been reported in these patients so far. This is a report of 5 patients with Mondini malformation who have undergone cochlear implant surgery. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  7. Modelling Cochlear Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea plays a crucial role in mammal hearing. The basic function of the cochlea is to map sounds of different frequencies onto corresponding characteristic positions on the basilar membrane (BM. Sounds enter the fluid-filled cochlea and cause deflection of the BM due to pressure differences between the cochlear fluid chambers. These deflections travel along the cochlea, increasing in amplitude, until a frequency-dependent characteristic position and then decay away rapidly. The hair cells can detect these deflections and encode them as neural signals. Modelling the mechanics of the cochlea is of help in interpreting experimental observations and also can provide predictions of the results of experiments that cannot currently be performed due to technical limitations. This paper focuses on reviewing the numerical modelling of the mechanical and electrical processes in the cochlea, which include fluid coupling, micromechanics, the cochlear amplifier, nonlinearity, and electrical coupling.

  8. Cochlear implantation in patients with bilateral cochlear trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serin, Gediz Murat; Derinsu, Ufuk; Sari, Murat; Gergin, Ozgül; Ciprut, Ayça; Akdaş, Ferda; Batman, Cağlar

    2010-01-01

    Temporal bone fracture, which involves the otic capsule, can lead to complete loss of auditory and vestibular functions, whereas the patients without fractures may experience profound sensorineural hearing loss due to cochlear concussion. Cochlear implant is indicated in profound sensorineural hearing loss due to cochlear trauma but who still have an intact auditory nerve. This is a retrospective review study. We report 5 cases of postlingually deafened patients caused by cochlear trauma, who underwent cochlear implantation. Preoperative and postoperative hearing performance will be presented. These patients are cochlear implanted after the cochlear trauma in our department between 2001 and 2006. All patients performed very well with their implants, obtained open-set speech understanding. They all became good telephone users after implantation. Their performance in speech understanding was comparable to standard postlingual adult patients implanted. Cochlear implantation is an effective aural rehabilitation in profound sensorineural hearing loss caused by temporal bone trauma. Preoperative temporal bone computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and promontorium stimulation testing are necessary to make decision for the surgery and to determine the side to be implanted. Surgery could be challenging and complicated because of anatomical irregularity. Moreover, fibrosis and partial or total ossification within the cochlea must be expected. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Curved-Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Hyun Baekt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study is conducted on the fully-developed laminar flow of an incompressible viscous fluid in a square duct rotating about a perpendicular axis to the axial direction of the duct. At the straight duct, the rotation produces vortices due to the Coriolis force. Generally two vortex cells are formed and the axial velocity distribution is distorted by the effect of this Coriolis force. When a convective force is weak, two counter-rotating vortices are shown with a quasi-parabolic axial velocity profile for weak rotation rates. As the rotation rate increases, the axial velocity on the vertical centreline of the duct begins to flatten and the location of vorticity center is moved near to wall by the effect of the Coriolis force. When the convective inertia force is strong, a double-vortex secondary flow appears in the transverse planes of the duct for weak rotation rates but as the speed of rotation increases the secondary flow is shown to split into an asymmetric configuration of four counter-rotating vortices. If the rotation rates are increased further, the secondary flow restabilizes to a slightly asymmetric double-vortex configuration. Also, a numerical study is conducted on the laminar flow of an incompressible viscous fluid in a 90°-bend square duct that rotates about axis parallel to the axial direction of the inlet. At a 90°-bend square duct, the feature of flow by the effect of a Coriolis force and a centrifugal force, namely a secondary flow by the centrifugal force in the curved region and the Coriolis force in the downstream region, is shown since the centrifugal force in curved region and the Coriolis force in downstream region are dominant respectively.

  10. Patent arterial duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Robin P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patent arterial duct (PAD is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes. Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of

  11. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  12. Cochlear implant magnet retrofit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N L; Breda, S D; Hoffman, R A

    1988-06-01

    An implantable magnet is now available for patients who have received the standard Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant and who are not able to wear the headband satisfactorily. This magnet is attached in piggy-back fashion to the previously implanted receiver/stimulator by means of a brief operation under local anesthesia. Two patients have received this magnet retrofit, and are now wearing the headset with greater comfort and satisfaction. It is felt that the availability of this magnet will increase patient compliance in regard to hours of implant usage.

  13. Vitellointestinal Duct Anomalies in Infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kadian, Yogender Singh; Verma, Anjali; Rattan, Kamal Nain; Kajal, Pardeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitellointestinal duct (VID) or omphalomesenteric duct anomalies are secondary to the persistence of the embryonic vitelline duct, which normally obliterates by weeks 5–9 of intrauterine life. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of a total of 16 patients of symptomatic remnants of vitellointestinal duct from period of Jan 2009 to May 2013. Results: Male to female ratio (M:F) was 4.3:1 and mean age of presentation was 2 months and their mode of presentation was: paten...

  14. Cochlear implants in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Robert D; Zdanski, Carlton; Roush, Patricia; Brown, Carolyn; Teagle, Holly; Pillsbury, Harold C; Buchman, Craig

    2006-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by dystopia canthorum, hyperplasia of the eyebrows, heterochromia irides, a white forelock, and sensorineural hearing loss in 20% to 55% of patients. This patient population accounts for approximately 2% of congenitally deaf children. The purpose of this retrospective case review was to describe the outcomes for those children with Waardenburg syndrome who have undergone cochlear implantation. Pediatric cochlear implant recipients with documented evidence of Waardenburg syndrome underwent retrospective case review. All patients received their cochlear implants at the study institution followed by outpatient auditory habilitation. Charts were reviewed for etiology and duration of deafness, age at time of cochlear implantation, perioperative complications, duration of use, and performance outcomes. Results of standard tests batteries for speech perception and production administered as a part of the patients' auditory habilitation were reviewed. Seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome and cochlear implants were identified. The average age at implantation was 37 months (range, 18-64 months) and the average duration of use was 69 months (range, 12-143 months). All of these patients are active users of their devices and perform very well after implantation. There were no major complications in this small group of patients. Children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss without other comorbidities (e.g., developmental delay, inner ear malformations) perform well when they receive cochlear implantation and auditory habilitation. Patients with Waardenburg syndrome can be expected to have above-average performance after cochlear implantation.

  15. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION PREVALENCE IN ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starokha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper describes an experience of cochlear implantation in elderly. Cochlear implantation has become a widely accepted intervention in the treatment of individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants are now accepted as a standard of care to optimize hearing and subsequent speech development in children and adults with deafness. But cochlear implantation affects not only hearing abilities, speech perception and speech production; it also has an outstanding impact on the social life, activities and self-esteem of each patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cochlear implantation efficacy in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. There were 5 patients under our observation. Surgery was performed according to traditional posterior tympanotomy and cochleostomy for cochlear implant electrode insertion for all observed patients. The study was conducted in two stages: before speech processor’s activation and 3 months later. Pure tone free field audiometry was performed to each patient to assess the efficiency of cochlear implantation in dynamics. The aim of the study was also to evaluate quality of life in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss after unilateral cochlear implantation. Each patient underwent questioning with 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. SF-36 is a set of generic, coherent, and easily administered quality-of-life measures. The SF-36 consists of eight scaled scores, which are the weighted sums of the questions in their section. Each scale is directly transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. The eight sections are: physical functioning; physical role functioning; emotional role functioning; vitality; emotional well-being; social role functioning; bodily pain; general health perceptions. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in elderly consistently improved quality of life

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics in rectangular ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhart, L.

    1994-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flow in straight ducts or bends is a key issue, which has to be investigated for developing self-cooled liquid metal blankets of fusion reactors. The code presented solves the full set of governing equations and simulates all phenomena of such flows, including inertial effects. The range of application is limited by computer storage only. (orig./WL)

  17. Labyrinthectomy with cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolan, T A; Shepard, N T; Niparko, J K

    1993-05-01

    Numerous reports indicate that the cochlea remains responsive to electrical stimulation following labyrinthectomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with a severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss from birth, who developed episodic vertigo with symptoms suggestive of delayed onset endolymphatic hydrops. Following 8 months of failed medical and vestibular rehabilitation management, a right-sided labyrinthectomy combined with cochlear implantation was performed without complication. Postoperatively the patient was free of vertigo. Attempts to activate the patient's device between 4 to 12 weeks after surgery were unsuccessful as stimulation of the electrodes resulted in discomfort. However, all 20 electrodes elicited comfortable hearing sensations 16 weeks postsurgery. One year after the successful activation, the patient demonstrated improved sound awareness and speech recognition with the implant when compared with preoperative performance with a hearing aid. This case study suggests that electrical detection thresholds with prosthetic stimulation may be unstable in the recently labyrinthectomized ear but supports and extends prior observations of preserved cochlear responsiveness after labyrinthectomy.

  18. Reciprocity principle in duct acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1979-01-01

    Various reciprocity relations in duct acoustics have been derived on the basis of the spatial reciprocity principle implied in Green's functions for linear waves. The derivation includes the reciprocity relations between mode conversion coefficients for reflection and transmission in nonuniform ducts, and the relation between the radiation of a mode from an arbitrarily terminated duct and the absorption of an externally incident plane wave by the duct. Such relations are well defined as long as the systems remain linear, regardless of acoustic properties of duct nonuniformities which cause the mode conversions.

  19. Cochlear implants and medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Brian J; Bhatt, Nishant

    2010-09-01

    To compare the costs of medical tourism in cochlear implant surgery performed in India as compared to the United States. In addition, the cost savings of obtaining cochlear implant surgery in India were compare d to those of other surgical interventions obtained as a medical tourist. Searches were conducted on Medline and Google using the search terms: 'medical tourism', 'medical offshoring', 'medical outsourcing', 'cochlear implants' and 'cochlear implantation'. The information regarding cost of medical treatment was obtained from personal communication with individuals familiar with India's cochlear implantation medical tourism industry. The range of cost depended on length of stay as well as the device chosen. Generally the cost, inclusive of travel, surgery and device, was in the range of $21,000-30,000, as compared to a cost range of $40,000-$60,000 in the US. With the escalating cost of healthcare in the United States, it is not surprising that some patients would seek to obtain surgical care overseas at a fraction of the cost. Participants in medical tourism often have financial resources, but lack health insurance coverage. While cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery performed outside the United States in India at centers that cater to medical tourists are often performed at one-quarter to one-third of the cost that would have been paid in the United States, the cost differential for cochlear implants is not nearly as favorable.

  20. EKSTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCT CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Aleš Tomažič; Dragan Stanisavljevič; Valentin Sojar; Blaž Trotovšek

    2003-01-01

    Background. Malignant strictures involving the bile ducts remain a major challenge in biliary surgery. It is an uncommon cancer. The etiology is unknown, most cases are sporadic, but several conditions confer an incrised risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma.Clinical presentation and preoperative evaluation. The early simptoms are nonspecific. In the past computed tomography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and angiography were considered standard investigations, but currently magne...

  1. Noise suppression in duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Barfeh, M.A.G.

    2001-01-01

    In air-conditioning system the noise generated by supply fan is carried by conditioned air through the ductwork. The noise created in ductwork run may be transmission, regenerative and ductborne. Transmission noise is fan noise, regenerative noise is due to turbulence in flow and ductborne noise is the noise radiating from duct to surroundings. Some noise is attenuated in ducts also but if noise level is high then it needs to be attenuated. A simple mitre bend can attenuate-noise. This principle is extended to V and M-shape ducts with inside lining of fibreglass, which gave maximum attenuation of 77 dB and 62 dB respectively corresponding to 8 kHz frequency as compared to mitre, bend giving maximum 18 dB attenuation. Sound level meter measured sound levels with octave band filter and tests were conducted in anechoic room. A V-shape attenuator can be used at fan outlet and high frequency noise can be minimized greatly. (author)

  2. Rare bile duct anomaly: B3 duct draining to gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old girl presented with recurrent right upper abdominal pain and dyspepsia. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed a dilated common channel of intrahepatic bile duct of segment 3 (B3 and segment 4 (B4 drained into the gallbladder directly. The patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and Roux-en Y hepaticojejunostomy (B3-jejunostomy. Among the anatomical variability of the biliary system, the cholecystohepatic ducts are controversial in existence and incidence. We report a very rare variant of a cholecystohepatic duct in which the B3 duct drained into gallbladder directly and to the best of our knowledge this is the first report.

  3. Cochlear implantation in a bilateral Mondini dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, M; Orzan, E; Gabana, M; Genovese, E; Arslan, E; Fisch, U

    1997-01-01

    We report the speech perception progress and programming procedures of a case of congenital profound deafness and bilateral Mondini dysplasia implanted with a Nucleus 20 + 2 cochlear implant at the age of six. Unclear relations between electrodes array and cochlear partition made implant programming difficult and non-standard procedures were set. Cochlear implantation may give excellent rehabilitative results also in cochleae with malformation.

  4. Radiation resistant ducted superconductive coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, A.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation-resistant ducted superconductive coil consists of a helically wound electrical conductor constituted by an electrically conductive core of superconductive material provided with a longitudinally extending cooling duct. The core is covered with a layer of inorganic insulating material and the duct is covered by an electrically conductive metallic gas-tight sheath. The metallic sheaths on adjacent turns of the coil are secured together. 2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures

  5. Duct having oscillatory side wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2018-04-03

    A pump system includes a particulate consolidator pump that has a pump outlet. A duct is coupled to the pump outlet. The duct has a wall that is coupled with an oscillator. The oscillator is operable to oscillate the wall at a controlled frequency. The controlled frequency is selected with respect to breaking static bridging of particulate in the duct due, at least in part, to consolidation of the particulate from a downstream check valve.

  6. Continued expression of GATA3 is necessary for cochlear neurosensory development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S Duncan

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the developing mammalian inner ear are progressively defined through cell fate restriction. This process culminates in the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1, which is necessary for differentiation of hair cells, but not for their specification. Loss of several genes will disrupt ear morphogenesis or arrest of neurosensory epithelia development. We previously showed in null mutants that the loss of the transcription factor, Gata3, results specifically in the loss of all cochlear neurosensory development. Temporal expression of Gata3 is broad from the otic placode stage through the postnatal ear. It therefore remains unclear at which stage in development Gata3 exerts its effect. To better understand the stage specific effects of Gata3, we investigated the role of Gata3 in cochlear neurosensory specification and differentiation utilizing a LoxP targeted Gata3 line and two Cre lines. Foxg1(Cre∶Gata3(f/f mice show recombination of Gata3 around E8.5 but continue to develop a cochlear duct without differentiated hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. qRT-PCR data show that Atoh1 was down-regulated but not absent in the duct whereas other hair cell specific genes such as Pou4f3 were completely absent. In addition, while Sox2 levels were lower in the Foxg1(Cre:Gata3(f/f cochlea, Eya1 levels remained normal. We conclude that Eya1 is unable to fully upregulate Atoh1 or Pou4f3, and drive differentiation of hair cells without Gata3. Pax2-Cre∶Gata3(f/f mice show a delayed recombination of Gata3 in the ear relative to Foxg1(Cre:Gata3(f/f . These mice exhibited a cochlear duct containing patches of partially differentiated hair cells and developed only few and incorrectly projecting spiral ganglion neurons. Our conditional deletion studies reveal a major role of Gata3 in the signaling of prosensory genes and in the differentiation of cochlear neurosenory cells. We suggest that Gata3 may act in combination with Eya1, Six1, and

  7. Transcystic duct treatment of common bile duct stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberg, J.R.; Chun, G.

    1981-01-01

    Successful removal of 2 retained common bile duct stones following cholecystostomy is described. With the use of the steerable catheter and the wire basket, one stone was crushed and the second was extracted in retrograde fashion through the cystic duct and gallbladder. (orig.)

  8. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on cochlear implantation in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of 5 congenitally...... deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2 years of age.  Ratings of video observations were used to measure the children's early communication development with and without the use of their cochlear implants. In addition, parental interviews were used to assess the benefits...... parents perceived regarding their children's cochlear implants. Two examples are included in this article to illustrate the parents' perspectives about cochlear implantation in their deafblind children. Benefits of cochlear implantation in this cohort of children included improved attention and emotional...

  9. [Bilateral cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J

    2017-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are standard for the hearing rehabilitation of severe to profound deafness. Nowadays, if bilaterally indicated, bilateral implantation is usually recommended (in accordance with German guidelines). Bilateral implantation enables better speech discrimination in quiet and in noise, and restores directional and spatial hearing. Children with bilateral CI are able to undergo hearing-based hearing and speech development. Within the scope of their individual possibilities, bilaterally implanted children develop faster than children with unilateral CI and attain, e.g., a larger vocabulary within a certain time interval. Only bilateral implantation allows "binaural hearing," with all the benefits that people with normal hearing profit from, namely: better speech discrimination in quiet and in noise, as well as directional and spatial hearing. Naturally, the developments take time. Binaural CI users benefit from the same effects as normal hearing persons: head shadow effect, squelch effect, and summation and redundancy effects. Sequential CI fitting is not necessarily disadvantageous-both simultaneously and sequentially fitted patients benefit in a similar way. For children, earliest possible fitting and shortest possible interval between the two surgeries seems to positively influence the outcome if bilateral CI are indicated.

  10. Bioinformatic Integration of Molecular Networks and Major Pathways Involved in Mice Cochlear and Vestibular Supporting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Teresa; Gallego-Martinez, Alvaro; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2018-01-01

    Background : Cochlear and vestibular epithelial non-hair cells (ENHCs) are the supporting elements of the cellular architecture in the organ of Corti and the vestibular neuroepithelium in the inner ear. Intercellular and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are essential to prevent an abnormal ion redistribution leading to hearing and vestibular loss. The aim of this study is to define the main pathways and molecular networks in the mouse ENHCs. Methods : We retrieved microarray and RNA-seq datasets from mouse epithelial sensory and non-sensory cells from gEAR portal (http://umgear.org/index.html) and obtained gene expression fold-change between ENHCs and non-epithelial cells (NECs) against HCs for each gene. Differentially expressed genes (DEG) with a log2 fold change between 1 and -1 were discarded. The remaining genes were selected to search for interactions using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and STRING platform. Specific molecular networks for ENHCs in the cochlea and the vestibular organs were generated and significant pathways were identified. Results : Between 1723 and 1559 DEG were found in the mouse cochlear and vestibular tissues, respectively. Six main pathways showed enrichment in the supporting cells in both tissues: (1) "Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteases"; (2) "Calcium Transport I"; (3) "Calcium Signaling"; (4) "Leukocyte Extravasation Signaling"; (5) "Signaling by Rho Family GTPases"; and (6) "Axonal Guidance Si". In the mouse cochlea, ENHCs showed a significant enrichment in 18 pathways highlighting "axonal guidance signaling (AGS)" ( p = 4.37 × 10 -8 ) and "RhoGDI Signaling" ( p = 3.31 × 10 -8 ). In the vestibular dataset, there were 20 enriched pathways in ENHCs, the most significant being "Leukocyte Extravasation Signaling" ( p = 8.71 × 10 -6 ), "Signaling by Rho Family GTPases" ( p = 1.20 × 10 -5 ) and "Calcium Signaling" ( p = 1.20 × 10 -5 ). Among the top ranked networks, the most biologically significant network contained the

  11. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  12. Fluid coupling in a discrete model of cochlear mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen J; Lineton, Ben; Ni, Guangjian

    2011-09-01

    A discrete model of cochlear mechanics is introduced that includes a full, three-dimensional, description of fluid coupling. This formulation allows the fluid coupling and basilar membrane dynamics to be analyzed separately and then coupled together with a simple piece of linear algebra. The fluid coupling is initially analyzed using a wavenumber formulation and is separated into one component due to one-dimensional fluid coupling and one comprising all the other contributions. Using the theory of acoustic waves in a duct, however, these two components of the pressure can also be associated with a far field, due to the plane wave, and a near field, due to the evanescent, higher order, modes. The near field components are then seen as one of a number of sources of additional longitudinal coupling in the cochlea. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the fluid chamber areas can also be taken into account, to predict both the pressure difference between the chambers and the mean pressure. This allows the calculation, for example, of the effect of a short cochlear implant on the coupled response of the cochlea. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  13. The impact of duct-to-duct interaction on the hex duct dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.; Chang, L.K.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Dilation of the hex duct is an important factor in the operational lifetime of fuel subassemblies in liquid metal fast reactors. It is caused primarily by the irradiation-enhanced creep and void swelling of the hex duct material. Excessive dilation may jeopardize subassembly removal from the core or cause a subassembly storage problem where the grid size of the storage basket is limited. Dilation of the hex duct in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) limits useful lifetime because of these storage basket limitations. It is, therefore, important to understand the hex duct dilation behavior to guide the design and in-core management of fuel subassemblies in a way that excessive duct deformation can be avoided. To investigate the dilation phenomena, finite-element models of the hex duct have been developed. The inelastic analyses were performed using the structural analysis code, ANSYS. Both Type 316 and D9 austenitic stainless steel ducts are considered. The calculated dilations are in good agreement with profilometry measurements made after irradiation. The analysis indicates that subassembly interaction is an important parameter in addition to neutron fluence and temperature in determining hex duct dilation. 5 refs

  14. Communication between cochlear perilymph and cerebrospinal fluid through the cochlear modiolus visualized after intratympanic administration of Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Satake, Hiroko; Iwano, Shingo; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    Intratympanic injection of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) has been reported as a procedure to visualize endolymphatic hydrops of Meniere's disease. We frequently noted that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the internal auditory canal (IAC) was also enhanced after this procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how frequently this occurs and to investigate the specific features of patients who lack this communication. A total of 25 patients with clinically suspected endolymphatic hydrops underwent the procedure. After 24 h, three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) and 3D constructive interference in steady state (3D-CISS) were performed. The presence of contrast enhancement in the CSF space of the fundus of the IAC was evaluated. The contrast ratio between CSF of the IAC fundus and cerebellar white matter on the injected side was 1.49±0.65, and that of the noninjected side was 0.32±0.16 (P<0.01). Enhancement of the CSF space in the IAC fundus was seen in all but two subjects: one had enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome (EEDS), and the other had cochlear nerve agenesis. In these two patients, the cochlear modiolus seemed to be normal. Intratympanic Gd-DTPA administration can reveal permeability of the modiolus and might facilitate evaluation of functional abnormalities of the modiolus not detected by conventional imaging tests. (author)

  15. Reading skills after cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    It has frequently been found that profoundly deaf children with conventional hearing aids have difficulties with the comprehension of written text. Cochlear Implants (CIs) were expected to enhance the reading comprehension of these profoundly deaf children because they provide auditory access to

  16. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Dietz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies.

  17. [Cochlear implant treatment in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, R; Stelzig, Y

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of impaired auditory function through cochlear implant is possible, with high reliably and great success. Nevertheless, there are regular disputes between patients and insurance companies due to high costs. In Germany, approx. 1.9 Mio. people are severely hearing impaired. It can be estimated that for adequate hearing rehabilitation about 30,000 cochlear implants/year are necessary. Currently, less than 10% of those affected are offered cochlear implant. A handicap is defined if there is deviation from normal hearing for more than 6 months. This sets a time frame for the supply with cochlear implant after sudden deafness. The professional code requires to advice all medical options to a person seeking help for hearing loss. This includes benefit-risk consideration. At this point, the economic aspect plays no role. The indication for medical treatment is only subject to the treating physician and should not be modified by non-physicians or organizations. It should be noted that a supply of hearing aids is qualitatively different to the help from a cochlear implant, which provides a restoration of lost function. In social law (SGB V and IX) doctors are requested to advise and recommend all measures which contribute to normal hearing (both sides). This indicates that doctors may be prosecuted for not offering help when medically possible, just because health insurance employees did not approve the cost balance. The current situation, with insufficient medical care for the hearing impaired, needs clarifying. To do this, patients, health insurance companies, the political institutions, legislation and professional societies need to accept their responsibilities.

  18. Diversity in cochlear morphology and its influence on cochlear implant electrode position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, K.S. van der; Briaire, J.J.; Wolterbeek, R..; Snel-Bongers, J.; Verbist, B.M.; Frijns, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    To define a minimal set of descriptive parameters for cochlear morphology and study its influence on the cochlear implant electrode position in relation to surgical insertion distance.Cochlear morphology and electrode position were analyzed using multiplanar reconstructions of the pre- and

  19. In Vivo Interplay between p27Kip1, GATA3, ATOH1, and POU4F3 Converts Non-sensory Cells to Hair Cells in Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Walters

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hearing loss is widespread and persistent because mature mammalian auditory hair cells (HCs are nonregenerative. In mice, the ability to regenerate HCs from surrounding supporting cells (SCs declines abruptly after postnatal maturation. We find that combining p27Kip1 deletion with ectopic ATOH1 expression surmounts this age-related decline, leading to conversion of SCs to HCs in mature mouse cochleae and after noise damage. p27Kip1 deletion, independent of canonical effects on Rb-family proteins, upregulated GATA3, a co-factor for ATOH1 that is lost from SCs with age. Co-activation of GATA3 or POU4F3 and ATOH1 promoted conversion of SCs to HCs in adult mice. Activation of POU4F3 alone also converted mature SCs to HCs in vivo. These data illuminate a genetic pathway that initiates auditory HC regeneration and suggest p27Kip1, GATA3, and POU4F3 as additional therapeutic targets for ATOH1-mediated HC regeneration. : Auditory hair cells are nonregenerative, resulting in persistent hearing loss upon damage. Walters et al. find that manipulating two genes, p27Kip1 and Atoh1, induces the conversion of nonsensory cells to hair cells in adult mice. This effect is mediated by GATA3 and POU4F3, where POU4F3 alone was found to convert nonsensory cells. Keywords: regeneration, aging, differentiation, proliferation, development, cancer, sensory, cochlea, hearing

  20. Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola B; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2018-02-16

    The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitellointestinal Duct Anomalies in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadian, Yogender Singh; Verma, Anjali; Rattan, Kamal Nain; Kajal, Pardeep

    2016-01-01

    Vitellointestinal duct (VID) or omphalomesenteric duct anomalies are secondary to the persistence of the embryonic vitelline duct, which normally obliterates by weeks 5-9 of intrauterine life. This is a retrospective analysis of a total of 16 patients of symptomatic remnants of vitellointestinal duct from period of Jan 2009 to May 2013. Male to female ratio (M:F) was 4.3:1 and mean age of presentation was 2 months and their mode of presentation was: patent VID in 9 (56.25%) patients, umbilical cyst in 2(12.25%), umbilical granuloma in 2 (12.25%), and Meckel diverticulum as content of hernia sac in obstructed umbilical hernia in 1 (6.25%) patient. Two patients with umbilical fistula had severe electrolyte disturbance and died without surgical intervention. Persistent VID may have varied presentations in infancy. High output umbilical fistula and excessive bowel prolapse demand urgent surgical intervention to avoid morbidity and mortality.

  2. CT evaluation of preoperative cochlear implantation cochlear implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Xiuzhong; Zhong Lansheng; Lan Bowen; Huang Yaosheng; Du Baowen; Zhu Jian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT scan as a preoperative evaluation for cochlear implantation candidates. Methods: Axial high-resolution temporal bone CT and three-dimensional reconstruction of inner ear were performed in 93 patients with sensorineural hearing loss. results: Among 81 patients with congenital sensorineural deafness, Mondini malformation was seen in 7 case (13 ears); large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) was revealed in 5 cases (8 ears); and inner ear ossification was found in 1 case (2 ears). In 1 case (2 ears) of inner ear fibrosis, reduced cochlear signal was noted on MRI but no unremarkable findings was shown on CT scan, however, in the operation, the device could not inserted into the basal circle of the cochlea, due to fibrous obliteration. In 12 patients with post-speech deafness, chronic suppurative tympanitis was seen in 2 cases (4 ears), and inner ear ossification was revealed in 1 case (2 ears). Conclusion: CT plays an indispensable role in the pre-operative evaluation of cochlear implantation. T 2 -weighted FSE-MRI of the inner ear is a useful complementary to CT scan. (authors)

  3. Microanatomy of the cochlear hook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Changyow Claire; Tan, Xiaodong; Stock, Stuart R.; Soriano, Carmen; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2017-09-01

    Communication among humans occurs through coding and decoding of acoustic information. The inner ear or cochlea acts as a frequency analyzer and divides the acoustic signal into small frequency bands, which are processed at different sites along the cochlea. The mechano-electrical conversion is accomplished by the soft tissue structures in the cochlea. While the anatomy for most of the cochlea has been well described, a detailed description of the very high frequency and vulnerable cochlear hook region is missing. To study the cochlear hook, mice cochleae were imaged with synchrotron radiation and high-resolution reconstructions have been made from the tomographic scans. This is the first detailed description of the bony and soft tissues of the hook region of the mammalian cochlea.

  4. Serotonin projection patterns to the cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A M; Thompson, G C

    2001-07-13

    The cochlear nucleus is well known as an obligatory relay center for primary auditory nerve fibers. Perhaps not so well known is the neural input to the cochlear nucleus from cells containing serotonin that reside near the midline in the midbrain raphe region. Although the specific locations of the main, if not sole, sources of serotonin within the dorsal cochlear nucleus subdivision are known to be the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, sources of serotonin located within other cochlear nucleus subdivisions are not currently known. Anterograde tract tracing was used to label fibers originating from the dorsal and median raphe nuclei while fluorescence immunohistochemistry was used to simultaneously label specific serotonin fibers in cat. Biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the dorsal and median raphe nuclei and was visualized with Texas Red, while serotonin was visualized with fluorescein. Thus, double-labeled fibers were unequivocally identified as serotoninergic and originating from one of the labeled neurons within the dorsal and median raphe nuclei. Double-labeled fiber segments, typically of fine caliber with oval varicosities, were observed in many areas of the cochlear nucleus. They were found in the molecular layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, in the small cell cap region, and in the granule cell and external regions of the cochlear nuclei, bilaterally, of all cats. However, the density of these double-labeled fiber segments varied considerably depending upon the exact region in which they were found. Fiber segments were most dense in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (especially in the molecular layer) and the large spherical cell area of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus; they were moderately dense in the small cell cap region; and fiber segments were least dense in the octopus and multipolar cell regions of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus. Because of the presence of labeled fiber segments in subdivisions of the cochlear nucleus other than the

  5. Relationship of the area measurement of the large endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome as well as the clinical symptoms with CT and MR imaging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Sang; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Jong Sea; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Kim, Shi Chan

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of the large endolymphatic duct or sac syndrome (LEDS) and its associated anomalies, with clinical features. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 52 ears obtained from 26 patients with LEDS. We reviewed the clinical findings, audiology testing, and treatment results. The degree of hearing loss was classified from normal to profound, based on pure tone audiometry. The largest areas were measured at each endolymphatic duct and analyzed to determine whether a correlation exists with the degree of hearing loss. We also analyzed the differences in measurements between CT and MRI findings. All 26 patients had some degree of sensorineural hearing loss, which resulted in 18 ears to undergo a cochlear implantation. One patient was diagnosed with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. Five patients had a sudden hearing loss onset. Ten ears had incomplete cochlear partitions, whereas 28 ears had enlarged vestibules. All patients had severe to profound hearing loss. We found no statistical correlation between the size of the largest area of the endolymphatic duct and the degree of hearing loss. The mean area of the endolymphatic ducts, as per an MRI examination, revealed slightly greater areas than the CT findings, although the differences were not significant. Enlarged vestibules and incomplete partitions of the cochlea were common anomalies associated with LEDS. We found no statistical correlation between the largest area of the endolymphatic duct or sac with the degree of hearing loss

  6. Deafblind People's Experiences of Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Janet

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear implants are electronic devices that create the sensation of hearing in those who cannot obtain any benefit from conventional hearing aids. This article examines the experience of cochlear implantation in a select group of individuals with acquired deafblindness, focusing on three key themes: access to communication, information and…

  7. Importance of cochlear health for implant function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingst, Bryan E; Zhou, Ning; Colesa, Deborah J; Watts, Melissa M; Strahl, Stefan B; Garadat, Soha N; Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C; Budenz, Cameron L; Raphael, Yehoash; Zwolan, Teresa A

    2015-04-01

    Amazing progress has been made in providing useful hearing to hearing-impaired individuals using cochlear implants, but challenges remain. One such challenge is understanding the effects of partial degeneration of the auditory nerve, the target of cochlear implant stimulation. Here we review studies from our human and animal laboratories aimed at characterizing the health of the implanted cochlea and the auditory nerve. We use the data on cochlear and neural health to guide rehabilitation strategies. The data also motivate the development of tissue-engineering procedures to preserve or build a healthy cochlea and improve performance obtained by cochlear implant recipients or eventually replace the need for a cochlear implant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Should you get your heating ducts cleaned?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation conducted research into duct cleaning during which time several houses were tested for hot air furnace duct performance before and after cleaning. Duct cleaning is a major industry which claims that cleaning of ducts will provide you with better indoor air quality, reduce household molds and allergens, get rid of house dust, result in more airflow and better delivery of warm air and reduce energy costs. This report does not substantiate those claims. Researchers found little or no discernible differences in the concentrations of house airborne particles or in duct airflows due to duct cleaning. This is because ducts are metal passages that cannot create dust. Most household dusts come from outdoors that has been tracked in or blows through windows and other openings. While duct cleaning may be justifiable personally, it does not change the quality of the air you breathe, nor will it significantly affect airflow or heating costs. Some filters effectively clean the air in the ducts but they do not create a dust-free environment because of the above-mentioned dust sources. The only time that duct cleaning may make sense is if you have water in your ducts that can result in mold growth, if you are moving into a newly constructed house to remove drywall dust, if your are having trouble with furnace airflow, or if you see an accumulation of debris in the return air ducts. It was emphasized that broadcast spraying of biocides within the duct system should not be performed.

  9. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  11. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  12. Direct measurement of cerebrospinal fluid pressure through the cochlea in a congenitally deaf child with Mondini dysplasia undergoing cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J M; Ashcroft, P

    1999-03-01

    Perilymph/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) "gushers" may occur at cochleostomy during cochlear implant surgery, particularly in patients with congenital cochlear duct malformation in which CSF in the internal auditory meatus is in direct communication with the perilymphatic space in the cochlea. The object of the study was to measure the pressure and flow of a CSF gusher at cochleostomy. The design was a preoperative pressure measurement. The setting was a multidisciplinary cochlear implant program. A 4-year-old girl with bilateral Mondini deformity undergoing cochlear implantation was studied. A size 23 FG intravenous cannula was inserted into the cochlea and connected to a pediatric drip set to form an improvised manometer. Intracochlear fluid pressure was measured at 14 cm H2O, equivalent to the normal CSF pressure that would be recorded in a child of this age at lumbar puncture. An indirect measurement of the likely size of the CSF/perilymph defect was made. This technique may allow better assessment of the risk of postoperative CSF leakage and meningitis. This simple technique of measuring the pressure in a perilymph gusher can be used to assess the need for careful sealing of the cochleostomy, to measure the reduction in pressure produced by head elevation or a spinal drain, and to assess the probable size of a defect in the lamina cribrosa.

  13. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Induction systems ducts and air duct systems. 29.1103 Section 29.1103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1103 Induction systems ducts and air duct...

  14. Audiovisual segregation in cochlear implant users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Landry

    Full Text Available It has traditionally been assumed that cochlear implant users de facto perform atypically in audiovisual tasks. However, a recent study that combined an auditory task with visual distractors suggests that only those cochlear implant users that are not proficient at recognizing speech sounds might show abnormal audiovisual interactions. The present study aims at reinforcing this notion by investigating the audiovisual segregation abilities of cochlear implant users in a visual task with auditory distractors. Speechreading was assessed in two groups of cochlear implant users (proficient and non-proficient at sound recognition, as well as in normal controls. A visual speech recognition task (i.e. speechreading was administered either in silence or in combination with three types of auditory distractors: i noise ii reverse speech sound and iii non-altered speech sound. Cochlear implant users proficient at speech recognition performed like normal controls in all conditions, whereas non-proficient users showed significantly different audiovisual segregation patterns in both speech conditions. These results confirm that normal-like audiovisual segregation is possible in highly skilled cochlear implant users and, consequently, that proficient and non-proficient CI users cannot be lumped into a single group. This important feature must be taken into account in further studies of audiovisual interactions in cochlear implant users.

  15. Assessment of Cochlear Function during Cochlear Implantation by Extra- and Intracochlear Electrocochleography

    OpenAIRE

    Dalbert, Adrian; Pfiffner, Flurin; Hoesli, Marco; Koka, Kanthaiah; Veraguth, Dorothe; Roosli, Christof; Huber, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were: (1) To investigate the correlation between electrophysiological changes during cochlear implantation and postoperative hearing loss, and (2) to detect the time points that electrophysiological changes occur during cochlear implantation. Material and Methods: Extra- and intracochlear electrocochleography (ECoG) were used to detect electrophysiological changes during cochlear implantation. Extracochlear ECoG recordings were conducted through a needle elec...

  16. Thoracic duct lymphography by subcutaneous contrast agent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A second lymphography revealed a collateral thoracic duct that was not detected during the first lymphography. The collateral duct was ligated and chylothorax was resolved after the second surgery. The lymphography applied in this study was minimally-invasive and easily provided images of the thoracic duct in a dog with ...

  17. Wind Turbine With Concentric Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Wind Turbine device is relatively compact and efficient. Converging inner and outer ducts increase pressure difference across blades of wind turbine. Turbine shaft drives alternator housed inside exit cone. Suitable for installation on such existing structures as water towers, barns, houses, and commercial buildings.

  18. Prevention and management of cochlear implant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Singh, Rajesh; Atlas, Marcus D

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the issues of infection related to an implantable medical device is crucial to all cochlear implant teams. Furthermore, given the risk of central nervous system complications and the relatively high quantity of underlying resource investment associated with cochlear implantation, the stakes of infection are high. The optimal strategies to prevent and manage such infections are still evolving as good-quality prospective data to guide such management decisions are not yet abundant within the medical literature and many recommendations are based on retrospective reviews or anecdotal evidence. We will outline a general strategy to deal with cochlear implant-related infection based on both the authors' experience and the published literature.

  19. Is All Human Hearing Cochlear?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Faranak Emami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the possibility that the saccule may contribute to human hearing. The forty participants included twenty healthy people and twenty other subjects selected from patients who presented with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo to Audiology Department of Hazrat Rasoul Akram hospital (Tehran, Iran. Assessments comprised of audiological evaluations, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs, recognition of spoken phonemes in white noise (Rsp in wn, and auditory brainstem response to 500 Hz tone burst (ABR500 HZ. Twenty affected ears with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by abnormal cVEMPs revealed decreased scores of Rsp in wn and abnormal findings of ABR500 HZ. Both unaffected and normal ears had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs and ABR500 HZ between three groups were significant (P<0.05, ANOVA. The correlation between RSP in wn and p13 latencies was significant. The peak-to-peak amplitudes showed significant correlation to RSP in wn. The correlation between RSP in wn and the latencies of n23 was significant. In high-level of noisy competing situations, healthy human saccular sensation can mediate the detection of low frequencies and possibly help in cochlear hearing for frequency and intensity discrimination. So, all human hearing is not cochlear.

  20. Cochlear implant: the family's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sheila de Souza; Dupas, Giselle; Chiari, Brasilia Maria

    2018-07-01

    To understand the family's experience of a child who uses a cochlear implant (CI). Specifically, to identify the difficulties, changes, and feelings entailed by deafness and the use of the CI; the coping strategies; and to understand the role of the family for the child with a CI. Qualitative research, using Symbolic Interactionism and Straussian Grounded Theory as the theoretical and methodological frameworks, respectively. Data collection instrument: semi-structured interview. A total of 9 families (32 individuals) participated in the study. The children's ages ranged from 6 to 11 years old (mean = 8.9 years old). Their experience is described in the following categories: Having to fight for results, Coping with difficult situations, Recognizing that you are not alone, Learning to overcome, and Having one's life restored by the implant. Cochlear implantation changes the direction of the child and the family's life by restoring the child's opportunity to hear and to obtain good results in her personal, social, and academic development. Even after implantation, the child continues to experience difficulties and requires the family's mobilization in order to be successful. The family is the principal actor in the process of the child's rehabilitation.

  1. Cochlear anatomy: CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Manuel; Bruno, Claudio; Martin, Eduardo; Canale, Nancy; De Luca, Laura; Spina, Juan C. h

    2002-01-01

    The authors present a brief overview of the normal cochlear anatomy with CT and MR images in order to allow a more complete identification of the pathological findings in patients with perceptive hipoacusia. (author)

  2. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  3. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  4. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Gjedde, Albert; Wallentin, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners...... with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca's area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss...... occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca's area in restoration of speech perception, but only...

  5. Music enjoyment with cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Charlotte; Chen, Stephanie Y; Lalwani, Anil K

    2018-10-01

    Since the advent of cochlear implant (CI) surgery in the 1960s, there have been remarkable technological and surgical advances enabling excellent speech perception in quiet with many CI users able to use the telephone. However, many CI users struggle with music perception, particularly with the pitch-based and melodic elements of music. Yet remarkably, despite poor music perception, many CI users enjoy listening to music based on self-report questionnaires, and prospective studies have suggested a disassociation between music perception and enjoyment. Music enjoyment is arguably a more functional measure of one's listening experience, and thus enhancing one's listening experience is a worthy goal. Recent studies have shown that re-engineering music to reduce its complexity may enhance enjoyment in CI users and also delineate differences in musical preferences from normal hearing listeners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Human Cochlear Mechanical Nonlinearity Inferred via Psychometric Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizami Lance

    2013-12-01

    Extension of the model of Schairer and colleagues results in credible cochlear nonlinearities in man, suggesting that forward-masking provides a non-invasive way to infer the human mechanical cochlear nonlinearity.

  7. Quadcopter thrust optimization with ducted-propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuantama Endrowednes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In relation to quadcopter body frame model, propeller can be categorized into propeller with ducted and without ducted. This study present differences between those two using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics method. Both categories utilize two blade-propeller with diameter of 406 (mm. Propeller rotation generates acceleration per time unit on the volume of air. Based on the behavior of generated air velocity, ducted propeller can be modeled into three versions. The generated thrust and performance on each model were calculated to determine the best model. The use of ducted propeller increases the total weight of quadcopter and also total thrust. The influence of this modeling were analyzed in detail with variation of angular velocity propeller from 1000 (rpm to 9000 (rpm. Besides the distance between propeller tip and ducted barrier, the size of ducted is also an important part in thrust optimization and total weight minimization of quadcopter.

  8. Thermal neutrons streaming in straight duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehouani, A.; Boulkheir, M.; Ichaoui, R.

    2000-01-01

    The neutron streaming in duct is due to two phenomena: a) direct propagation and b) reflection on duct wall. We have used the Monte Carlo method to evaluate the ratio of the reflected neutrons flux by the duct wall to the total flux at the exit of the duct for iron and aluminium. Ten neutrons energy groups are considered between 10 -5 eV and 10 eV. A Fortran program is developed to evaluate the neutron double differential albedo. It is shown that the two following approximations are largely justified: i) Three collisions in the duct wall are sufficient to attain the asymptotic limit of the multiscattered neutron double differential albedo ii) The points of entry and exit of the neutron in the duct wall may be considered the same for the multiscattered neutrons. For a punctual source at the mouth of the duct, we have determined the direct and the reflected part of the total thermal neutron flux at the exit of the duct for different lengths and different radius of the duct. For a punctual source, we have found that the major contribution to the total flux of neutrons at the exit is due to the neutron reflection by walls and the reflection contribution decreases when the neutron energy decreases. For a constant length of the duct, the reflected part decreases when the duct radius increases while for the disk shaped source we have found the opposite phenomena. The transmitted neutron flux distribution at the exit of the duct are determined for disk shaped source for different neutron energy and for different distance from the exit center. (author)

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Bile Duct Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Yiwei; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian biliary system, consisting of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts, is responsible for transporting bile from the liver to the intestine. Bile duct dysfunction, as is seen in some congenital biliary diseases such as Alagille syndrome and biliary atresia, can lead to the accumulation of bile in the liver, preventing the excretion of detoxification products and ultimately leading to liver damage. Bile duct formation requires coordinated cell-cell interactions, resulting in...

  10. Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome with Transverse Testicular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastham JA, McEvoy K, Sullivan R, Chandrasoma P. A case of simultaneous bilateral nonseminomatous testicular tumors in persistent müllerian duct syndrome. J Urol 1992;148:407-8. 8. Shinmura Y, Yokoi T, Tsutsui Y. A case of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the müllerian duct in persistent müllerian duct syndrome: The first ...

  11. Parotid salivary duct stenosis following caudal maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrinho, Lisa A; Faísca, Pedro B; Niza, Maria M R E

    2014-01-01

    Parotid salivary duct dilation was diagnosed in a 9-year-old male dog. The dog had undergone caudal maxillectomy on the ipsilateral side 2-years prior to presentation. Treatment consisted of parotid salivary duct excision and superficial parotidectomy that lead to the resolution of clinical signs. Transient facial neuropraxia was observed immediately after surgery and resolved spontaneously after 2-weeks. Parotid salivary duct dilation should be considered as a chronic postoperative complication following caudal maxillectomy.

  12. Nasopalatine duct cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikrishna Pasupuleti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasopalatine duct cyst (NPDC is the most common non-odontogenic cyst of oral cavity. Clinically, Nasopalatine duct cyst manifests as an asymptomatic swelling of the palate or the upper lip. Radiographically, it is seen as a heart-shaped radiolucency and can be confused with periapical pathology. The aim of this article is to report a case of a nasopalatine duct cyst in a 36-year-old patient which was misinterpreted for a periapical cyst. Diagnosis of a Nasopalatine duct cyst can be given through clinical, radiographical, and histopathological examination.

  13. Retrolabyrinthine approach for cochlear nerve preservation in neurofibromatosis type 2 and simultaneous cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few cases of cochlear implantation (CI in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 patients had been reported in the literature. The approaches described were translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid or middle cranial fossa. Objectives: To describe a case of a NF2- deafened-patient who underwent to vestibular schwannoma resection via RLA with cochlear nerve preservation and CI through the round window, at the same surgical time. Resumed Report: A 36-year-old woman with severe bilateral hearing loss due to NF2 was submitted to vestibular schwannoma resection and simultaneous CI. Functional assessment of cochlear nerve was performed by electrical promontory stimulation. Complete tumor removal was accomplishment via RLA with anatomic and functional cochlear and facial nerve preservation. Cochlear electrode array was partially inserted via round window. Sound field hearing threshold improvement was achieved. Mean tonal threshold was 46.2 dB HL. The patient could only detect environmental sounds and human voice but cannot discriminate vowels, words nor do sentences at 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Cochlear implantation is a feasible auditory restoration option in NF2 when cochlear anatomic and functional nerve preservation is achieved. The RLA is adequate for this purpose and features as an option for hearing preservation in NF2 patients.

  14. The cochlear implant as a tinnitus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés-Varela, Héctor; Royo-López, Juan; Carmen-Sampériz, Luis; Sebastián-Cortés, José M; Alfonso-Collado, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is a symptom of high prevalence in patients with cochlear pathology. We studied the evolution of tinnitus in patients undergoing unilateral cochlear implantation for treatment of profound hearing loss. This was a longitudinal, retrospective study of patients that underwent unilateral cochlear implantation and who had bilateral tinnitus. Tinnitus was assessed quantitatively and qualitatively before surgery and at 6 and 12 months after surgery. We evaluated 20 patients that underwent unilateral cochlear implantation with a Nucleus(®) CI24RE Contour Advance™ electrode device. During the periods in which the device was in operation, improvement or disappearance of tinnitus was evidenced in the ipsilateral ear in 65% of patients, and in the contralateral ear, in 50%. In periods in which the device was disconnected, improvement or disappearance of tinnitus was found in the ipsilateral ear in 50% of patients, and in the ear contralateral to the implant in 45% of the patients. In 10% of the patients, a new tinnitus appeared in the ipsilateral ear. The patients with profound hearing loss and bilateral tinnitus treated with unilateral cochlear implantation improved in a high percentage of cases, in the ipsilateral ear and in the contralateral ear. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Usher syndrome and cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loundon, Natalie; Marlin, Sandrine; Busquet, Denise; Denoyelle, Françoise; Roger, Gilles; Renaud, Francis; Garabedian, Erea Noel

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the symptoms leading to diagnosis and the quality of rehabilitation after cochlear implantation in Usher syndrome. Retrospective cohort study. ENT department of a tertiary referral hospital. Among 210 patients given an implantation in the Ear, Nose, and Throat department, 185 were congenitally deaf and 13 had Usher syndrome (7.0%). Five had a family history of Usher, and eight were sporadic cases. Eleven cases were Usher type I, one was Usher type III, and one was not classified. The age at implantation ranged from 18 months to 44 years (mean, 6 years 1 month). The mean follow-up was 52 months (range, 9 months to 9 years). All patients had audiophonological and clinical examination, computed tomography scan of the temporal bones, ophthalmologic examination with fundoscopy, and an electroretinogram. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and vestibular examination were performed in 9 of 13 and 10 of 13 cases, respectively. Logopedic outcome measured preimplant and postimplant closed- and open-set word recognition and oral expression at follow-up. The most frequent initial sign of Usher syndrome was delayed walking, with a mean age of 20 months. Among the 172 other congenitally deaf children with implants, when deafness was not associated with other neurologic disorders, the mean age at walking was 14 months (p < 0.001). The fundoscopy was always abnormal after the age of 5 years, and the electroretinogram was abnormal in all cases. Vestibular function was abnormal in all but one case (nonclassified). The computed tomography scan and the magnetic resonance imaging were always normal. Logopedic results with cochlear implants showed good perception skills in all but one case. The best perceptive results were obtained in children implanted before the age of 9 years. Oral language had significantly progressed in 9 of 13 at follow-up. There was no relation between the visual acuity and the logopedic results. The earliest clinical sign associated with deafness

  16. Parental expectations and outcomes of pediatric cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Elizabeth; Kandathil, Cherian; Carron, Jeffrey D

    2009-10-01

    Cochlear implants have been used with increasing frequency over the past twenty years, including very young patients. To determine if parents are satisfied with their children's performance after cochlear implantation. Survey mailed to parents of children receiving cochlear implants. 31 questionnaires were returned out of 69 mailed (45 %). The vast majority of responding parents felt that their children benefited substantially from cochlear implant surgery. Cochlear implantation is effective in helping children develop auditory-oral communication skills. Access to auditory/oral communication programs in this state remains an obstacle in postoperative habilitation.

  17. Measure Guideline: Sealing and Insulating of Ducts in Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

    2011-12-01

    This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

  18. Measure Guideline. Sealing and Insulating Ducts in Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Puttagunta, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

  19. Cochlear implant after bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, Jesper; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective case study at a tertiary referral center was to investigate the outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss due to meningitis compared to CI in children with deafness due to other reasons. This post-meningial group (PMG) consisted of 22 children undergoing CI due to deafness induced by meningitis, between December 1996 and January 2012. Five children had bilateral simultaneous implantation. None was excluded and the children were followed for at least 3 years. Operations were carried out by one of two surgeons using similar techniques in all cases. Each patient from the PMG was matched 2:1 with children having implantation for other reasons according to age and follow up (control group). Overall, the median category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) score were not statistically significantly different between the two groups. The presence of additional central nervous system (CNS) disorders (post-meningeal sequelae), however, correlated significantly with poorer outcome CI was a safe procedure without surgical complications in the present study. It is possible to restore auditory capacity and speech performance to a degree comparable to children undergoing implantation for other reasons. A statistically important variable is secondary CNS involvement. The rehabilitation program after CI should be adjusted according to these additional handicaps. It is recommended to screen meningitis patients as fast as possible to identify those with hearing loss and initiate treatment with hearing aids or CI. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Tinnitus and Sleep Difficulties After Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzycki, Robert H; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Dawes, Piers; Munro, Kevin J; Moore, David R; Kitterick, Pádraig T

    To estimate and compare the prevalence of and associations between tinnitus and sleep difficulties in a sample of UK adult cochlear implant users and those identified as potential candidates for cochlear implantation. The study was conducted using the UK Biobank resource, a population-based cohort of 40- to 69-year olds. Self-report data on hearing, tinnitus, sleep difficulties, and demographic variables were collected from cochlear implant users (n = 194) and individuals identified as potential candidates for cochlear implantation (n = 211). These "candidates" were selected based on (i) impaired hearing sensitivity, inferred from self-reported hearing aid use and (ii) impaired hearing function, inferred from an inability to report words accurately at negative signal to noise ratios on an unaided closed-set test of speech perception. Data on tinnitus (presence, persistence, and related distress) and on sleep difficulties were analyzed using logistic regression models controlling for gender, age, deprivation, and neuroticism. The prevalence of tinnitus was similar among implant users (50%) and candidates (52%; p = 0.39). However, implant users were less likely to report that their tinnitus was distressing at its worst (41%) compared with candidates (63%; p = 0.02). The logistic regression model suggested that this difference between the two groups could be explained by the fact that tinnitus was less persistent in implant users (46%) compared with candidates (72%; p reported difficulties with sleep were similar among implant users (75%) and candidates (82%; p = 0.28), but participants with tinnitus were more likely to report sleep difficulties than those without (p explanation is supported by the similar prevalence of sleep problems among implant users and potential candidates for cochlear implantation, despite differences between the groups in tinnitus persistence and related emotional distress. Cochlear implantation may therefore not be an appropriate intervention

  1. Ducted wind turbine optimization : A numerical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dighe, V.V.; De Oliveira Andrade, G.L.; van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2017-01-01

    The practice of ducting wind turbines has shown a beneficial effect on the overall performance, when compared to an open turbine of the same rotor diameter1. However, an optimization study specifically for ducted wind turbines (DWT’s) is missing or incomplete. This work focuses on a numerical

  2. Visualization of the thoracic duct by lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.L.; Itti, R.; Tours Univ., 37

    1987-01-01

    Imaging of the thoracic duct is usually performed by radiological lymphography. However, this procedure, which uses an oil based dye injected directly into the lymph channels, has some adverse effects. In this paper we note that lymphoscintigraphy, a physiological and non invasive method, may visualize thoracic duct abnormalities, and might be particularly usefull when radiological lymphography is contraindicated. (orig.)

  3. Vacuum exhaust duct used for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Nobuo; Kondo, Mitsuaki; Honda, Tsutomu.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a vacuum exhaust duct used for a thermonuclear device. A cylindrical metal liners is lined with a gap to the inside of a vacuum exhaust duct main body. Bellows are connected to both ends of the metal liners and the end of the bellows is welded to the vacuum exhaust duct main body. Futher, a heater is mounted to the metal liner on the side of the vacuum exhaust duct main body, and the metal liner is heated by the heater to conduct baking for the vacuum exhaust duct main body. Accordingly, since there is no requirement for elevating the temperature of the vacuum exhaust duct upon conducting baking, the vacuum exhaust duct scarcely suffers substantial deformation due to heat expansion. Further, there is also no substantial deformation for the bellows disposed between the outer circumference of the vacuum vessel and a portion of a vacuum exhaust duct, so that the durability of the bellows is greatly improved. (I.S.)

  4. Music Therapy for Preschool Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Kenworthy, Maura; Van Voorst, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides research and clinical information relevant to music therapy for preschool children who use cochlear implants (CI). It consolidates information from various disciplinary sources regarding (a) cochlear implantation of young prelingually-deaf children (~age 2-5), (b) patterns of auditory and speech-language development, and (c) research regarding music perception of children with CIs. This information serves as a foundation for the final portion of the article, which describes typical music therapy goals and examples of interventions suitable for preschool children. PMID:23904691

  5. Cholangiographic evaluation of bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.A.; MacCarty, R.L.; Gaffey, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Cholangiograms and clinical histories of 82 patients with biopsy-proved bile duct carcinoma were reviewed. The carcinomas were classified according to morphologic findings and clinical outcome. Ulcerative colitis and antecedent inflammatory disease of the biliary tree, particularly primary sclerosing cholangitis, seem to predispose to the development of bile duct carcinoma. Focal stenotic lesions were the most common morphologic type (62/82). Polypoid carcinomas and diffuse sclerosing carcinomas were less common and of about equal frequency. Prognosis was best for patients with polypoid carcinomas and worst for those with diffuse sclerosing carcinomas. In 69 cases (84%), the tumors involved the intrahepatic or proximal extrahepatic ducts, makin curative resection difficult or impossible. Patients with carcinomas limited to the more distal extrahepatic bile ducts had a longer average survival and a higher probability of surgical cure. Proper management of patients with bile duct carcinoma requires a complete and accurate cholangiographic evaluation of the morphology, location, and extent of the disease

  6. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, D; Murri, A; Succo, G

    2013-04-01

    We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on the left side. Surgical exploration confirmed magnet twisting; the magnet was effectively repositioned. Left CI performance was restored to pre-migration level. The wound healed without complications. Thus, focused dressing does not prevent magnet migration in CI recipients undergoing 1.5 Tesla MRI. All patients should be counselled on this potential complication. A minor surgical procedure is required to reposition the magnet. Nevertheless, timely diagnosis is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and subsequent device contamination. Plain skull radiograph is very effective in identifying magnet twisting; it should be performed systematically after MRI or minimally on all suspected cases.

  7. Follow-up of cochlear implant use in patients who developed bacterial meningitis following cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Patrizia; D'Elia, Chiara; Bosco, Ersilia; De Seta, Elio; Panebianco, Valeria; Vergari, Valeria; Filipo, Roberto

    2008-08-01

    The present study is a long-term follow-up of speech perception outcomes and cochlear implant use in three cases of meningitis that occurred after cochlear implantation. Case series study. Study was performed on three children implanted with different models of Clarion devices, two of them with positioner. Recognition and comprehension were assessed via the Italian adaptation of GASP (TAP) test, and phonetically balanced bi-syllabic words in open-set. High resolution computed tomography scan acquisition was performed to obtain axial coronal and oblique multiplanar reconstructions of the cochlea. Two patients were affected by enlarged cochlear acqueduct and Mondini malformation the first carrying positioner. One patient had a normal cochlea, and the positioner could have been the main cause of bacterial spread. As a consequence of meningitis the child with normal cochlea and the other with enlarged vestibular acqueduct developed cochlear ossification, increased M-level and worsening of hearing outcomes. The child with Mondini malformation developed facial nerve stimulation. Contralateral implantation was performed in the first two patients. Bacterial meningitis occurring after cochlear implantation may induce cochlear ossification, facial nerve stimulation, and permanent or temporary loss of implant use. Planned follow-up with high resolution computed tomography and evaluation of M-levels could be useful prognostic tools in the management of these patients.

  8. Cochlear Implantation in Siblings With Refsum's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähr, Kerstin; Kuechler, Alma; Gencik, Martin; Arnolds, Judith; Dendy, Meaghan; Lang, Stephan; Arweiler-Harbeck, Diana

    2017-08-01

    Whether the origin of severe hearing loss in Refsum's syndrome is caused by cochlear impairment or retrocochlear degeneration remains unclear. This case report aims to investigate hearing performance before and after cochlear implantation to shed light on this question. Also, identification of new mutations causing Refsum's syndrome would be helpful in generating additional means of diagnosis. A family of 4 individuals was subjected to genetic testing. Two siblings (56 and 61 years old) suffered from severe hearing and vision loss and received bilateral cochlear implants. Genetic analysis, audiological outcome, and clinical examinations were performed. One new mutation in the PHYH gene (c.768del63bp) causing Refsum's disease was found. Preoperative distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPAOEs) were absent. Postoperative speech perception in Freiburger speech test was 100% for bisyllabic words and 85% (patient No. 1) and 65% (patient No. 2), respectively, for monosyllabic words. Five years after implantation, speech perception remained stable for bisyllabic words but showed decreasing capabilities for monosyllabic words. A new mutation causing Refsum's disease is presented. Cochlear implantation in case of severe hearing loss leads to an improvement in speech perception and should be recommended for patients with Refsum's disease, especially when the hearing loss is combined with a severe loss of vision. Decrease of speech perception in the long-term follow-up could indicate an additional retrocochlear degeneration.

  9. Libyan cochlear implant programme: achievements, difficulties, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data relating to the patients who received cochlear implantation at Tripoli Medical Centre between October 2007 and February 2010 were analysed. Implant operations were performed on 37 patients. All patients received Med-El SONATATI100 devices. Thirty-four (91.9%) of these patients were children, whilst three (8.1%) ...

  10. Environmental Sound Training in Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Sheft, Stanley; Kuvadia, Sejal; Gygi, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study investigated the effect of a short computer-based environmental sound training regimen on the perception of environmental sounds and speech in experienced cochlear implant (CI) patients. Method: Fourteen CI patients with the average of 5 years of CI experience participated. The protocol consisted of 2 pretests, 1 week apart,…

  11. Multichannel cochlear implantation in the scala vestibuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Karen; Marrinan, Michelle S; Waltzman, Susan B; Roland, J Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss resulting from otosclerosis, meningitis, chronic otitis media, autoimmune ear disease, and trauma can be associated with partial or total obstruction of the cochlear scalae. Multichannel cochlear implantation may be difficult in a cochlea with an obstructed scala tympani. The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of scala tympani electrode insertion. Retrospective chart review. Academic medical center. Eight children and adults with profound sensorineural hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation with known scala vestibuli electrode array insertion were subjects for this study. Eight study subjects underwent implantation: five with the Nucleus 24RCS (Contour) device and three with the Nucleus 24M device. Imaging findings, operative findings, and age-appropriate speech perception testing. All patients had full electrode insertion. Various obstructive patterns on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were found, and there was a range of speech perception results. All but one patient improved based on age-appropriate monosyllabic word and sentence tests. Scala vestibuli multielectrode insertion is a viable alternative when scala tympani insertion is not possible because of abnormal anatomy or anatomical changes secondary to disease or previous implantation. We will also present an algorithm of options for decision making for implantation when encountering cochlear obstruction and difficult electrode insertion.

  12. Gender Categorization in Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massida, Zoe; Marx, Mathieu; Belin, Pascal; James, Christopher; Fraysse, Bernard; Barone, Pascal; Deguine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined the ability of subjects with cochlear implants (CIs) to discriminate voice gender and how this ability evolved as a function of CI experience. Method: The authors presented a continuum of voice samples created by voice morphing, with 9 intermediate acoustic parameter steps between a typical male and a…

  13. Simplifying cochlear implant speech processor fitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willeboer, C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional fittings of the speech processor of a cochlear implant (CI) rely to a large extent on the implant recipient's subjective responses. For each of the 22 intracochlear electrodes the recipient has to indicate the threshold level (T-level) and comfortable loudness level (C-level) while

  14. The preoperative imaging evaluation for cochlear implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhonglin; Wang Zhenchang; Fu Lin; Li Yong; Xian Junfang; Yang Bentao; Lan Baosen; Li Yongxin; Zheng Jun; Song Yan; Liu Bo; Chen Xueqing; He Haili

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI findings of temporal bone and to evaluate preoperative diagnostic value for cochlear implantation. Methods: One hundred and sixty candidates for cochlear implantation were examined with axial CT scan, 64 of them also with coronal CT scan, and 119 patients with MRI. Results: All of 320 ears were well-aerated, and 206 ears had mastoid cavities extended posteriorly to the sigmoid sinus. The length from posterior-lateral tympanic wall to the outer cortex was (2.34±0.42) mm (left side) and (2.25±0.40) mm (right side) (U=1.887, P 1 and T 2 signal on MRI. The congenital malformations of inner ear occurred in 67 ears, including complete dysplasia in 1 ear, cochlear hypodysplasia in 6 ears, Mondini deformation in 5 ears, enlarged vestibular aqueduct in 40 ears, dysplastic semicircular canal and the vestibulae in 10 ears, and narrowing of internal auditory canal in 5 ears. Conclusion: Preoperative imaging examinations can provide critical information to ensure successful cochlear' implantation. (authors)

  15. Listening Effort With Cochlear Implant Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Başkent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing

  16. Bile Duct Adenoma with Oncocytic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Johannesen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct adenomas are benign bile duct proliferations usually encountered as an incidental finding. Oncocytic bile duct neoplasms are rare and the majority are malignant. A 61-year-old male with a diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma was undergoing surgery when a small white nodule was discovered on the surface of the right lobe of his liver. This lesion was composed of cytologically bland cells arranged in tightly packed glands. These cells were immunopositive for cytokeratin 7, negative for Hep Par 1, contained mucin, and had a Ki67 proliferation index of 8%. The morphology, immunophenotype, presence of mucin, and normal appearing bile ducts, as well as the increased Ki67 proliferation rate, were consistent with a bile duct adenoma with oxyphilic (oncocytic change. Oncocytic tumors in the liver are rare; the first described in 1992. Only two bile duct adenomas with oncocytic change have been reported and neither of them had reported mucin production or the presence of normal appearing bile ducts within the lesion.

  17. Financial Aspects of Bile Duct Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaz Alı, Ozgkıour; Ibis, Abdil Cem; Gurtekin, Basak

    2017-11-04

    BACKGROUND Major bile duct injury is the most worrisome complication of cholecystectomy. There is no detailed data about the incidence or treatment-related costs of bile duct injuries in Turkey. We aimed to determine prevalence and therapeutic costs of patients with major biliary duct injuries managed in our department, and further estimate a projection of these parameters at the national level. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients admitted due to bile duct injury during cholecystectomy from 2011 to 2014 were included. Healthcare costs were calculated by summing of their all treatment-related costs in Istanbul Medical Faculty. We collected 2014-2015 data on number of patients diagnosed with cholecystitis in Turkey, the number of cholecystectomies, and the number of the interventions performed following these initial surgeries, which were obtained from the Turkish Social Security Institution. RESULTS Forty-nine patients were enrolled and bilioenteric diversion was performed in 39 patients: 20.4% of patients had Bismuth II, 38.8% had Bismuth III, and 40.8% had Bismuth IV biliary stricture. Comparison of stricture types with total costs, days of hospitalization, and outpatient clinic costs revealed significant differences. Mean total cost of corrective surgeries was 9199 TRY. We estimated that 1.5% to 2.4% of patients who underwent cholecystectomy in Turkey have bile duct injury (including 0.3% with major bile duct injury). CONCLUSIONS New preventive strategies should be used to avoid bile duct injuries, which have a huge financial impact on the national economy.

  18. Anomalous facial nerve canal with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, L V; Curtin, H D

    2001-05-01

    Anteromedial "migration" of the first segment of the facial nerve canal has been previously identified in a patient with a non-Mondini-type cochlear malformation. In this study, several patients with the same facial nerve canal anomaly were reviewed to assess for the association and type of cochlear malformation. CT scans of the temporal bone of 15 patients with anteromedial migration of the first segment of the facial nerve canal were collected from routine departmental examinations. In seven patients, the anomalous course was bilateral, for a total of 22 cases. The migration was graded relative to normal as either mild/moderate or pronounced. The cochlea in each of these cases was examined for the presence and size of the basilar, second, and apical turns. The turns were either absent, small, normal, or enlarged. The CT scans of five patients with eight Mondini malformations were examined for comparison. The degree of the facial nerve migration was pronounced in nine cases and mild/moderate in 13. All 22 of these cases had associated cochlear abnormalities of the non-Mondini variety. These included common cavity anomalies with lack of definition between the cochlea and vestibule (five cases), cochleae with enlarged basilar turns and absent second or third turns (five cases), and cochleae with small or normal basilar turns with small or absent second or third turns (12 cases). None of the patients with Mondini-type cochlear malformations had anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal. Anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal occurs in association with some cochlear malformations. It did not occur in association with the Mondini malformations. A cochlea with a Mondini malformation, being similar in size to a normal cochlea, may physically prohibit such a deviation in course.

  19. [Salivary gland drainage into the thyroglossal duct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siem, G; Natvig, K; Kolbenstvedt, A; Lømo, J

    2001-01-20

    Failure in regression of the thyroglossal duct is one of the most common reasons for midline swellings in the neck. Several authors have described recurrent thyroglossal duct remnants with persisting draining sinuses. However, few have described accessory salivary glands that drain into the thyroglossal duct. In this article we report two such cases with midline salivary glands in the floor of the mouth. These two patients were subsequently successfully treated with radical tissue resection in the area between the hyoid bone and foramen cecum. Preoperative fistulography or sinography was useful to demonstrate the ductal ramification of the salivary glands, and use of methylene blue during surgery proved of significant value for the result.

  20. [Morphologic feature and cochlear implant surgical approach for cochlear modiolus deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoxing

    2014-09-01

    To review the classification of cochlear modiolus deficiency and decision on surgical approach for above case,in order to provide mastery for cochlear implant (CI) indication. Basing on temporal bone HRCT pre-operation, CI subjects with modiolus deficiency were defined as following groups: (1) deficiency caused by cochlear dysplasia (Mondini malformation); (2) deficiency caused by dysplasia of cochlear and vestibule (Common cavity malformation); (3) deficiency caused by absence of internal acoustic meatus fundus (IP-III malformation). Three types of surgical approach were utilized: type I, electrode array was introduced through facial recess, enlarged the round window, type II, opened the surface of chchlea, electrode array was introduced through facial recess, fenestration on posterior promontory and then inserted around lateral wall of inner-cochlear cavity. type III, electrode array was introduce through fenestration of lateral semicircular canal and then placed close to the bony wall of common cavity. One hundred and sixty-six cochlear modiolus deficiency cases were identified into 3 groups as following: 135 Mondini malformation cases into group a, 18 common cavity malformation cases into group b, and 13 IP-III malformation cases into group c. Surgical approach: type I were used in 136 cases (123 Mondini cases and 13 IP-III cases), while approach type II in 12 cases (12 Mondini cases), and approach type III in 18 cases (18 common cavity cases). Income post-operation of CI: For group a (Mondini malformation), post-activation mean hearing threshold in sound field was 65 dB, speech recognition score is 95% (single finals test) and 25% (signal initials test), while it was 80 dB, 60% and 0 for group b (Conmon cavity malformation), and it was 55 dB, 100% and 45% for group c (IP-III malformation). The income of speech recognition score for cochlear modiolus deficiency was relatively poor, group b was worst and group c was best, while group a moderate.

  1. What Does Music Sound Like for a Cochlear Implant User?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiam, Nicole T; Caldwell, Meredith T; Limb, Charles J

    2017-09-01

    Cochlear implant research and product development over the past 40 years have been heavily focused on speech comprehension with little emphasis on music listening and enjoyment. The relatively little understanding of how music sounds in a cochlear implant user stands in stark contrast to the overall degree of importance the public places on music and quality of life. The purpose of this article is to describe what music sounds like to cochlear implant users, using a combination of existing research studies and listener descriptions. We examined the published literature on music perception in cochlear implant users, particularly postlingual cochlear implant users, with an emphasis on the primary elements of music and recorded music. Additionally, we administered an informal survey to cochlear implant users to gather first-hand descriptions of music listening experience and satisfaction from the cochlear implant population. Limitations in cochlear implant technology lead to a music listening experience that is significantly distorted compared with that of normal hearing listeners. On the basis of many studies and sources, we describe how music is frequently perceived as out-of-tune, dissonant, indistinct, emotionless, and weak in bass frequencies, especially for postlingual cochlear implant users-which may in part explain why music enjoyment and participation levels are lower after implantation. Additionally, cochlear implant users report difficulty in specific musical contexts based on factors including but not limited to genre, presence of lyrics, timbres (woodwinds, brass, instrument families), and complexity of the perceived music. Future research and cochlear implant development should target these areas as parameters for improvement in cochlear implant-mediated music perception.

  2. Reference values of MRI measurements of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwal, Kriti; Bedoya, Maria A.; Patel, Neal; Darge, Kassa; Anupindi, Sudha A. [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rambhatla, Siri J. [Beth Israel Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Newark, NJ (United States); Sreedharan, Ram R. [University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging/cholangiopancreatography (MRI/MRCP) is now an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of biliary and pancreatic pathology in children, but there are no data depicting the normal diameters of the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct. Recognition of abnormal duct size is important and the increasing use of MRCP necessitates normal MRI measurements. To present normal MRI measurements for the common bile duct and pancreatic duct in children. In this retrospective study we searched all children ages birth to 10 years in our MR urography (MRU) database from 2006 until 2013. We excluded children with a history of hepatobiliary or pancreatic surgery. We stratified 204 children into five age groups and retrospectively measured the CBD and the pancreatic duct on 2-D axial and 3-D coronal T2-weighted sequences. We performed statistical analysis, using logistic and linear regressions to detect the age association of the visibility and size of the duct measurements. We used non-parametric tests to detect gender and imaging plane differences. Our study included 204 children, 106 (52%) boys and 98 (48%) girls, with a median age of 33 months (range 0-119 months). The children were distributed into five age groups. The common bile duct was visible in all children in all age groups. The pancreatic duct was significantly less visible in the youngest children, group 1 (54/67, 80.5%; P = 0.003) than in the oldest children, group 5 (22/22, 100%). In group 2 the pancreatic duct was seen in 19/21 (90.4%), in group 3 52/55 (94.5%), and in group 4 39/39 (100%). All duct measurements increased with age (P < 0.001; r-value > 0.423), and the incremental differences between ages were significant. The measurement variations between the axial and coronal planes were statistically significant (P < 0.001); however these differences were fractions of millimeters. For example, in group 1 the mean coronal measurement of the CBD was 2.1 mm and the axial

  3. Reference values of MRI measurements of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwal, Kriti; Bedoya, Maria A.; Patel, Neal; Darge, Kassa; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Rambhatla, Siri J.; Sreedharan, Ram R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging/cholangiopancreatography (MRI/MRCP) is now an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of biliary and pancreatic pathology in children, but there are no data depicting the normal diameters of the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct. Recognition of abnormal duct size is important and the increasing use of MRCP necessitates normal MRI measurements. To present normal MRI measurements for the common bile duct and pancreatic duct in children. In this retrospective study we searched all children ages birth to 10 years in our MR urography (MRU) database from 2006 until 2013. We excluded children with a history of hepatobiliary or pancreatic surgery. We stratified 204 children into five age groups and retrospectively measured the CBD and the pancreatic duct on 2-D axial and 3-D coronal T2-weighted sequences. We performed statistical analysis, using logistic and linear regressions to detect the age association of the visibility and size of the duct measurements. We used non-parametric tests to detect gender and imaging plane differences. Our study included 204 children, 106 (52%) boys and 98 (48%) girls, with a median age of 33 months (range 0-119 months). The children were distributed into five age groups. The common bile duct was visible in all children in all age groups. The pancreatic duct was significantly less visible in the youngest children, group 1 (54/67, 80.5%; P = 0.003) than in the oldest children, group 5 (22/22, 100%). In group 2 the pancreatic duct was seen in 19/21 (90.4%), in group 3 52/55 (94.5%), and in group 4 39/39 (100%). All duct measurements increased with age (P < 0.001; r-value > 0.423), and the incremental differences between ages were significant. The measurement variations between the axial and coronal planes were statistically significant (P < 0.001); however these differences were fractions of millimeters. For example, in group 1 the mean coronal measurement of the CBD was 2.1 mm and the axial

  4. Transmission of wave energy in curved ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1973-01-01

    A formation of wave energy flow was developed for motion in curved ducts. A parametric study over a range of frequencies determined the ability of circular bends to transmit energy for the case of perfectly rigid walls.

  5. Submandibular duct sialolithiasis an unusual presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, M.; Jafferi, S.; Jafferi, S.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple calculi in a submandibular gland duct is an uncommon occurrence. One such case occurring in a young boy of 25 years is reported here where thirteen very small stones of 1-3 mm of maximum diameter were lined up in the Wharton's duct in such a way that they were difficult to appreciate on inspection and palpation. Successful exploration was done in two steps. (author)

  6. Hollow-duct radiation delivery system investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of hollow-duct structure for high-power laser-diode-array radiation delivery into the end-pumped large-aperture gain media is reported. A ray tracing method has been used to evaluate the performance of the structure designed for maximum transmission efficiency and output beam profile homogeneity. Variable hollow-duct lengths as well as emanating angles of laser-diode-array have been taken into account.

  7. [The development of musicality in children after cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Liu, Bo; Dong, Ruijuan; Xu, Tianqiu; Chen, Jing; Chen, Xuejing; Zhong, Yan; Meng, Chao; Wang, Hong; Chen, Xueqing

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the development of musicality in children after cochlear implantation, and provide a clinical database for the evaluation of their musicality. Twenty-six children with cochlear implants (CI group) participated in this research. They received cochlear implants at the age of 11 to 68 months with a mean of 35.6 months. Seventy-six infants as a control group aged from 1 to 24 months with a mean of 6.1 months participated in this study, whose hearing were considered normal by passing the case history collection, high-risk registers for hearing loss and hearing screening using DPOAE. The music and young children with CIs: Musicality Rating Scale was used to evaluate their musicality. The evaluation was performed before cochlear implantation and 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 months after cochlear implantation for children with cochlear implants. The evaluation was also performed at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 months for children with normal hearing. The mean scores of musicality showed significant improvements with time of CI use for CI group (Pmusicality also showed significant improvements with time for control group (P0.05). Significant difference was noted between the two groups at 24 months (Pmusicality of children with cochlear implants improved significantly with time after cochlear implantation. The most rapid growth was found in the first year after cochlear implantation.

  8. [Multi-channel cochlear implants in patients with Mondini malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-xin; Han, De-min; Zhao, Xiao-tian; Chen, Xue-qing; Kong, Ying; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Bo; Liu, Sha; Mo, Ling-yan; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Shuo

    2004-02-01

    To describe clinical experiences with multi-channel cochlear implantation in patients with Mondini malformation. Among 300 patients who received multi-channel cochlear implants from 1996 to 2002 in Beijing Tongren Hospital, 15 patients were diagnosed with Mondini malformation. A retrospective analysis was performed dealing with the surgical techniques, mapping and rehabilitations characteristics after surgery. 15 patients with normal cochlear structure are consider as control group. Gusher is found more common than the normal cochlear implantation, most of them are serious. The electrodes are inserted in the "cochleostomy" in full length of 13 Patients, 2 pairs of electrodes remains outside of "cochleostomy" in 2 patients. No serious complications occurred after implantation. All patients have auditory sensations. The impedance of the electrodes, the T level, C level and the hearing threshold are similar with the normal cochlear implantation group. The results have no significant difference in compare with normal cochlear group(P > 0.05). Multi-channel cochlear implantation could be performed safely in patients with Mondini malformation. The primary outcome for patients with Mondini malformation are similar to those with normal cochlear structure following the multi-channel cochlear implantation.

  9. A Comparison of Simulation Capabilities for Ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Smith, Matt K [ORNL; Gu, Lixing [Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    Typically, the cheapest way to install a central air conditioning system in residential buildings is to place the ductwork in the attic. Energy losses due to duct-attic interactions can be great, but current whole-house models are unable to capture the dynamic multi-mode physics of the interactions. The building industry is notoriously fragmented and unable to devote adequate research resources to solve this problem. Builders are going to continue to put ducts in the attic because floor space is too expensive to closet them within living space, and there are both construction and aesthetic issues with other approaches such as dropped ceilings. Thus, there is a substantial need to publicly document duct losses and the cost of energy used by ducts in attics so that practitioners, builders, homeowners and state and federal code officials can make informed decisions leading to changes in new construction and additional retrofit actions. Thus, the goal of this study is to conduct a comparison of AtticSim and EnergyPlus simulation algorithms to identify specific features for potential inclusion in EnergyPlus that would allow higher-fidelity modeling of HVAC operation and duct transport of conditioned air. It is anticipated that the resulting analysis from these simulation tools will inform energy decisions relating to the role of ducts in future building energy codes and standards.

  10. Cochlear pathology: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Manuel; Bruno, Claudio; Martin, Eduardo; Canale, Nancy; De Luca, Laura; Spina, Juan C. h

    2002-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective analysis of 50 patients with perceptive hearing loss. The neuro physiological work-up (evoked potentials, audiometric tests and otoemissions) identified the cochlea as the site of origin of the hearing loss. The imaging studies (high resolution CT and MR, including 3D volumes) showed petrous bone trauma (n=5) infections (bacterial or viral origin) (n=12) otosclerosis (n=8), Paget disease (n=3), and labyrinthine neurinomas (n=2). The other 20 cases showed development-linked disorders (Mitchel's, Mondini, Scheibe, Alexander, and hypoplasia of the cochlear canal). Imaging with CT and MR can identify in detail the structural abnormality affecting the cochlea and occasionally the immediate peri-cochlear region (otic capsule); the affected portion of the cochlea may thus be determined. (author)

  11. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth.

  12. Prevention of Noise Damage to Cochlear Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Assessment of synapse regeneration : Twelve week old CBA/CaJ mice are exposed to a moderate noise that destroys synapses on inner hair cells (IHCs) but spares...result of excitotoxic trauma to cochlear synapses due to glutamate released from the hair cells . Excitotoxic trauma damages the postsynaptic cell by...components ............................................. 12 d) Quantitative analysis of effects of neurotrophic factors on synapse regeneration in vitro

  13. Ultrasound appearance of chronic mammary duct ectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne, N. [Ottawa Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: nathalie_duchesne_22@yahoo.ca; Skolnik, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Family Medicine, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bilmer, S. [Ottawa Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-12-15

    Mammary duct ectasia (MDE), also called periductal mastitis, mammary dysplasia, or plasma cell mastitis, is a benign condition of the mammary gland first described by Haagensen in 1951. The etiology of MDE is unknown and its pathogenesis still controversial; the periductal inflammation could be either the cause or the result of dilated damaged ducts. The process is usually bilateral and asymptomatic, with only a small percentage of patients presenting with symptoms that may include long course of tumour formation, usually subareolar breast lumps, nipple discharge, nipple retraction, mastalgia, and mammary abscess or fistulas. Mammographic presentation of MDE is well known; its features include periductal calcification, benign intraductal calcification, and retroareolar duct dilatation. The periductal calcification results from dystrophic calcification and forms calcified rings or very dense, oval, elongated calcifications, each with a central lucency representing the dilated duct. Intraductal calcifications of duct ectasia represent inspissated intraductal material and are typically of uniform high density, often needle-like, and occasionally branching. Occasionally, there are no mammographic findings, and the diagnosis must rely on sonographic features. Appearance of MDE on ultrasonography (US) depends on the stage of the disease and the contents of the dilated ducts. The acute presentation has been demonstrated in the literature more often than has its chronic counterpart. In the former, duct content can vary from anechoic to isoechoic with surrounding fatty tissue. In chronic MDE, episodes of inflammation are longer. This tends to result in secretions that have a more solid, cheesy texture, partly due to cholesterol crystals, foam cells, and inflammatory cells. For both types of MDE, the appearance can mimic high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on US. In this essay, 2 chronic MDE cases are presented and their US appearance discussed. Our goal is to explore

  14. Ultrasound appearance of chronic mammary duct ectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, N.; Skolnik, S.; Bilmer, S.

    2005-01-01

    Mammary duct ectasia (MDE), also called periductal mastitis, mammary dysplasia, or plasma cell mastitis, is a benign condition of the mammary gland first described by Haagensen in 1951. The etiology of MDE is unknown and its pathogenesis still controversial; the periductal inflammation could be either the cause or the result of dilated damaged ducts. The process is usually bilateral and asymptomatic, with only a small percentage of patients presenting with symptoms that may include long course of tumour formation, usually subareolar breast lumps, nipple discharge, nipple retraction, mastalgia, and mammary abscess or fistulas. Mammographic presentation of MDE is well known; its features include periductal calcification, benign intraductal calcification, and retroareolar duct dilatation. The periductal calcification results from dystrophic calcification and forms calcified rings or very dense, oval, elongated calcifications, each with a central lucency representing the dilated duct. Intraductal calcifications of duct ectasia represent inspissated intraductal material and are typically of uniform high density, often needle-like, and occasionally branching. Occasionally, there are no mammographic findings, and the diagnosis must rely on sonographic features. Appearance of MDE on ultrasonography (US) depends on the stage of the disease and the contents of the dilated ducts. The acute presentation has been demonstrated in the literature more often than has its chronic counterpart. In the former, duct content can vary from anechoic to isoechoic with surrounding fatty tissue. In chronic MDE, episodes of inflammation are longer. This tends to result in secretions that have a more solid, cheesy texture, partly due to cholesterol crystals, foam cells, and inflammatory cells. For both types of MDE, the appearance can mimic high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on US. In this essay, 2 chronic MDE cases are presented and their US appearance discussed. Our goal is to explore

  15. A radiographic study of nasopalatine duct cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Chan Duck; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic features of 35 cases of nasopalatine duct cyst by means of the analysis of periapical and/or occlusal radiograms in 35 persons visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University and Chonbuk National University. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The incidence of nasopalatine duct cysts was higher in males (74.3%) than in females (25.7%). 2. The nasopalatine duct cysts were the most frequently occurred in the 4th decades (34.3%). The 6th and 7th decades (17.1%, 17.1%) were next in order to frequency followed by the 5th decades (14.3%), the 3rd decades (8.6%), the 2nd decades (5.7%), and 8th decades (2.9%). 3. In the signs and symptoms of nasopalatine duct cysts, 25.7% were swelling, 17.1% were swelling and tenderness, 20.0% were swelling and pain, and 37.2% were a symptom. 4. In the shape of nasopalatine duct cysts, 40.0% were round type, 48.6% 11.8% were heart type. 5. In symmetry of the nasopalatine duct cysts, 11.4% were 6-10 mm, 48.6% were 11-20 mm, 25.7% were 21-30 mm, and 14.3% were 31-40 mm. 6. In the periphery of nasopalatine duct cysts, 82.9% were distinct, 17.1% were relatively distinct. 7. In the change of root, 51.5% were intact, 17.1% were root divergence, 20.0% were root resorption, and 11.4% were root divergence and resorption.

  16. A radiographic study of nasopalatine duct cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Chan Duck; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic features of 35 cases of nasopalatine duct cyst by means of the analysis of periapical and/or occlusal radiograms in 35 persons visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University and Chonbuk National University. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The incidence of nasopalatine duct cysts was higher in males (74.3%) than in females (25.7%). 2. The nasopalatine duct cysts were the most frequently occurred in the 4th decades (34.3%). The 6th and 7th decades (17.1%, 17.1%) were next in order to frequency followed by the 5th decades (14.3%), the 3rd decades (8.6%), the 2nd decades (5.7%), and 8th decades (2.9%). 3. In the signs and symptoms of nasopalatine duct cysts, 25.7% were swelling, 17.1% were swelling and tenderness, 20.0% were swelling and pain, and 37.2% were a symptom. 4. In the shape of nasopalatine duct cysts, 40.0% were round type, 48.6% 11.8% were heart type. 5. In symmetry of the nasopalatine duct cysts, 11.4% were 6-10 mm, 48.6% were 11-20 mm, 25.7% were 21-30 mm, and 14.3% were 31-40 mm. 6. In the periphery of nasopalatine duct cysts, 82.9% were distinct, 17.1% were relatively distinct. 7. In the change of root, 51.5% were intact, 17.1% were root divergence, 20.0% were root resorption, and 11.4% were root divergence and resorption.

  17. Rehabilitation of deaf persons with cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gstoettner, W.; Hamzavi, J.; Czerny, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the last decade, the rehabilitation of postlingually deaf adults and prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants has been established as a treatment of deafness. The technological development of the implant devices and improvement of the surgical technique have led to a considerable increase of hearing performance during the last years. The postlingually deaf adults are able to use the telephone and may be integrated in their original job. Prelingually deaf children can even visit normal schools after cochlear implantation and hearing rehabilitation training. In order to preoperatively establish the state of the cochlear, radiological diagnosis of the temporal bone is necessary. High resolution computerized tomography imaging of the temporal bone with coronar and axial 1 mm slices and MRI with thin slice technique (three dimensional, T2 weighted turbo-spinecho sequence with 0.7 mm slices) have proved to be valuable according to our experience. Furthermore a postoperative synoptical X-ray, in a modified Chausse III projection, offers good information about the position of the implant and insertion of the stimulating electrode into the cochlea. (orig.) [de

  18. Hearing Preservation in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Carvalho Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a “soft surgery” cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients.

  19. Cochlear pathology in chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walby, A P; Barrera, A; Schuknecht, H F

    1983-01-01

    Chronic suppurative otitis media (COM) is reported to cause elevation of bone-conduction thresholds either by damage to cochlear sensorineural structures or by alteration in the mechanics of sound transmission in the ear. A retrospective study was made of the medical records of 87 patients with unilateral uncomplicated COM to document that abnormality in bone conduction does exist. In a separate study the cochlear pathology in 12 pairs of temporal bones with unilateral COM was studied by light microscopy. Infected ears showed higher than normal mean bone-conduction thresholds by amounts ranging from 1 dB at 500 Hz to 9.5 dB at 4,000 Hz. The temporal bones showed no greater loss of specialized sensorineural structures in infected ears than in normal control ears. Because there is no evidence that COM caused destruction of hair cells or cochlear neurons, alteration in the mechanics of sound transmission becomes a more plausible explanation for the hearing losses.

  20. The "flying" bile duct: avulsion of the common bile duct in a plane crash survivor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Blunt trauma is an unusual cause of extrahepatic bile duct injury. This is a case of a 51-year-old gentleman who sustained a significant seatbelt injury in a plane crash. Laparotomy, performed due to persistent abdominal pain, revealed that the common bile duct (CBD) was completely avulsed from the duodenum. Following insertion of drains and transfer to a hepatobiliary centre, the devascularised CBD was excised and replaced with a roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy. Necrotic tissue was debrided from the pancreatic head. A persistent bile leak developed from the sub-hepatic drain. Repeat laparotomy revealed a bile leak from small ducts on the liver surface. Ligation of the ducts and bioglue sealing of the area were successfully performed. Subsequent to this a pancreatic fistula developed from the main pancreatic duct, which has since resolved. This unusual case illustrates the need for prompt recognition and early repair to optimise outcomes in traumatic CBD injury.

  1. ITER L 6 equatorial maintenance duct remote handling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, J.

    1996-09-01

    The status and conclusions of a preliminary study of equatorial maintenance duct remote handling is reported. Due to issues with the original duct design a significant portion of the study had to be refocused on equatorial duct layout studies. The study gives an overview of some of the options for design of these ducts and the impact of the design on the equipment to work in the duct. To develop a remote handling concept for creating access through the ducts the following design tasks should be performed: define the operations sequences for equatorial maintenance duct opening and closing; review the remote handling requirements for equatorial maintenance duct opening and closing; design concept for door and pipe handling equipment and to propose preliminary procedures for material handling outsides the duct. 35 figs

  2. The long-term concerns post cochlear implantation as experienced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cochlear implantation aims to provide an effective means of spoken communication for prelingually deaf children. However, studies in this field are mostly clinically orientated, with little focus on the experiences and long-term concerns of families post cochlear implantation (CI). Objective. To describe the ...

  3. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  4. Remote programming of cochlear implants: a telecommunications model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElveen, John T; Blackburn, Erin L; Green, J Douglas; McLear, Patrick W; Thimsen, Donald J; Wilson, Blake S

    2010-09-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of remote programming for cochlear implants. Retrospective review of the cochlear implant performance for patients who had undergone mapping and programming of their cochlear implant via remote connection through the Internet. Postoperative Hearing in Noise Test and Consonant/Nucleus/Consonant word scores for 7 patients who had undergone remote mapping and programming of their cochlear implant were compared with the mean scores of 7 patients who had been programmed by the same audiologist over a 12-month period. Times required for remote and direct programming were also compared. The quality of the Internet connection was assessed using standardized measures. Remote programming was performed via a virtual private network with a separate software program used for video and audio linkage. All 7 patients were programmed successfully via remote connectivity. No untoward patient experiences were encountered. No statistically significant differences could be found in comparing postoperative Hearing in Noise Test and Consonant/Nucleus/Consonant word scores for patients who had undergone remote programming versus a similar group of patients who had their cochlear implant programmed directly. Remote programming did not require a significantly longer programming time for the audiologist with these 7 patients. Remote programming of a cochlear implant can be performed safely without any deterioration in the quality of the programming. This ability to remotely program cochlear implant patients gives the potential to extend cochlear implantation to underserved areas in the United States and elsewhere.

  5. A case report: the first successful cochlear implant in Uganda.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report: the first successful cochlear implant in Uganda. Richard Byaruhanga1, J. ... The patient was a 23 year old male whose presenting com- plaint was inability to .... Custom Sound by Cochlear (the company that manu- factures the ...

  6. Verbal Working Memory in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Susan; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Low, Keri E.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Verbal working memory in children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing was examined. Participants: Ninety-three fourth graders (47 with normal hearing, 46 with cochlear implants) participated, all of whom were in a longitudinal study and had working memory assessed 2 years earlier. Method: A dual-component model of…

  7. Are parents of children with cochlear implants coping?: research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many variables must be considered during the evaluation and rehabilitation of children for cochlear implantation, one of which is parental influence (for the duration of this report the parents, caregivers and guardians of children with cochlear implants and / or hearing impairments will be referred to as 'parents'). The aim of ...

  8. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants: Effects on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on CI in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of five congenitally deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2…

  9. Characterization of flow in a scroll duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, E. K.; Bennett, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative, flow visualization study was made of a partially elliptic cross section, inward curving duct (scroll duct), with an axial outflow through a vaneless annular cutlet. The working fluid was water, with a Re(d) of 40,000 at the inlet to the scroll duct, this Reynolds number being representative of the conditions in an actual gas turbine scroll. Both still and high speed moving pictures of fluorescein dye injected into the flow and illuminated by an argon ion laser were used to document the flow. Strong secondary flow, similar to the secondary flow in a pipe bend, was found in the bottom half of the scroll within the first 180 degs of turning. The pressure field set up by the turning duct was strong enough to affect the inlet flow condition. At 90 degs downstream, the large scale secondary flow was found to be oscillatory in nature. The exit flow was nonuniform in the annular exit. By 270 degs downstream, the flow appeared unorganized with no distinctive secondary flow pattern. Large scale structures from the upstream core region appeared by 90 degs and continued through the duct to reenter at the inlet section.

  10. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Gao, Simon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Hee Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Groves, Andrew K. [Department of Neuroscience, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, and Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Zuo, Jian [Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  11. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months). Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome.

  12. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Koyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months. Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome.

  13. Scala vestibuli cochlear implantation in patients with partially ossified cochleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrettini, Stefano; Forli, Francesca; Neri, Emanuele; Segnini, Giovanni; Franceschini, Stefano Sellari

    2002-11-01

    Partial cochlear obstruction is a relatively common finding in candidates for cochlear implants and frequently involves the inferior segment of the scala tympani in the basal turn of the cochlea. In such patients, the scala vestibuli is often patent and offers an alternative site for implantation. The current report describes two patients with such partial obstruction of the inferior segment of the basal cochlear turn, caused in one case by systemic vasculitis (Takayasu's disease) and in the other by obliterative otosclerosis. A scala vestibuli implantation allowed for complete insertion of the electrode array. No problems were encountered during the surgical procedures and the good post-operative hearing and communicative outcomes achieved were similar to those reported in patients without cochlear ossification. The importance of accurate pre-operative radiological study of the inner ear is underscored, to disclose the presence and define the features of the cochlear ossification and ultimately to properly plan the surgical approach.

  14. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering

  15. Squamous metaplasia of lactiferous ducts (SMOLD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, G.; Dessauvagie, B.; Sterrett, G.; Bourke, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to illustrate the mammographic and sonographic appearances of squamous metaplasia of the lactiferous ducts (SMOLD) and to discuss the disease processes of this uncommon breast disease, which shows a strong correlation with smoking. The most common mammographic appearance is of a retro-areolar asymmetrical density. Ultrasonography of the symptomatic breast typically shows a retro-areolar, predominately medial, ill-defined, hypoechoic lesion with either abscess or sinus/fistula formation. Duct dilatation and continuity with lactiferous ducts is commonly seen. Increased vascularity is occasionally seen on colour Doppler ultrasound. Pathology tissue confirmation is always required and this can be by histology of a core biopsy or excision specimen, or fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology. Occasionally smears of an associated abundant nipple or sinus discharge may be of value.

  16. Salivary duct carcinoma: a Danish national study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Helle; Elhakim, Mohammad Talal; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To present the first national series of salivary duct carcinoma patients, including survival rates and an analysis of prognostic factors. METHODS: By merging three Danish nationwide registries that encompass an entire population, 34 patients diagnosed with salivary duct carcinoma from......-rank test. RESULTS: Salivary duct carcinoma showed an incidence of 0.04/100.000 inhabitants/year. Distant recurrence was seen in 52% of patients. Five-year overall survival, disease-specific survival and recurrence-free survival were 32%, 42% and 35%, respectively. Univariate analyses suggested that overall...... carcinoma incidence averages to two episodes per year in the entire Kingdom of Denmark. With half of patients in this study experiencing distant recurrences and only a third surviving at 5 years, prognosis is dismal. Advanced overall stage, vascular invasion and involved resection margins all seem...

  17. Facial nerve stimulation outcomes after cochlear implantation with cochlear-facial dehiscence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina H. Fang, MD

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Cochlear-facial dehiscence can predispose patients to post-implant FNS. Prior temporal bone irradiation may carry a higher risk of FNS. We recommend scrutiny for CFD in CTs of CI candidates and appropriate risk counseling for FNS if CFD is discovered and more frequent monitoring for FNS by audiology.

  18. Evaluation of PEGIT duct connection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain S.; Brenner, Douglas E.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2003-08-01

    Most air duct system components are assembled in the field and are mechanically fastened by sheet metal screws (for sheet metal-to-sheet metal) or by drawbands (for flex duct-to-sheet metal). Air sealing is separate from this mechanical fastening and is usually achieved using tape or mastic products after mechanical fastening. Field observations have shown that mechanical fastening rarely meets code or manufacturers requirements and that sealing procedures are similarly inconsistent. To address these problems, Proctor Engineering Group (PEG) is developing a system of joining ducts (called PEGIT) that combines the mechanical fastening and sealing into a single self-contained procedure. The PEGIT system uses a shaped flexible seal between specially designed sheet metal duct fittings to both seal and fasten duct sections together. Figure 1 shows the inner duct fitting complete with rubber seal. This seal provides the air seal for the completed fitting and is shaped to allow the inner and outer fittings to slide together, and then to lock the fittings in place. The illustration in Figure 2 shows the approximate cross section of the rubber seal that shows how the seal has a lip that is angled backwards. This angled lip allows the joint to be pushed together by folding flat but then its long axis makes it stiff in the pulling apart direction. This study was undertaken to assist PEG in some of the design aspects of this system and to test the performance of the PEGIT system. This study was carried out in three phases. The initial phase evaluated the performance of a preliminary seal design for the PEGIT system. After the first phase, the seal was redesigned and this new seal was evaluated in the second phase of testing. The third phase performed more detailed testing of the second seal design to optimize the production tolerances of the sheet metal fittings. This report summarizes our findings from the first two phases and provides details about the third phase of testing.

  19. Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koecher, Martin [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Cerna, Marie [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Havlik, Roman [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kral, Vladimir [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Gryga, Adolf [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Duda, Miloslav [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures. Materials and methods: From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery. Results: Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%. Conclusion: Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective.

  20. Fluid flow in a spiral microfluidic duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Brendan; Stokes, Yvonne

    2018-04-01

    We consider the steady, pressure driven flow of a viscous fluid through a microfluidic device having the geometry of a planar spiral duct with a slowly varying curvature and height smaller than width. For this problem, it is convenient to express the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of a non-orthogonal coordinate system. Then, after applying appropriate scalings, the leading order equations admit a relatively simple solution in the central region of the duct cross section. First-order corrections with respect to the duct curvature and aspect ratio parameters are also obtained for this region. Additional correction terms are needed to ensure that no slip and no penetration conditions are satisfied on the side walls. Our solutions allow for a top wall shape that varies with respect to the radial coordinate which allows us to study the flow in a variety of cross-sectional shapes, including trapezoidal-shaped ducts that have been studied experimentally. At leading order, the flow is found to depend on the local height and slope of the top wall within the central region. The solutions are compared with numerical approximations of a classical Dean flow and are found to be in good agreement for a small duct aspect ratio and a slowly varying and small curvature. We conclude that the slowly varying curvature typical of spiral microfluidic devices has a negligible impact on the flow in the sense that locally the flow does not differ significantly from the classical Dean flow through a duct having the same curvature.

  1. The Canadian residential duct and chimney survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fugler, D.

    2003-12-01

    A study was conducted in 1989 to better understand the thermal performance of ducts and chimneys in houses. The objective was to address the problems associated with insufficient airflow and backdrafting of combustion gases resulting from malfunctioning fans, furnaces and fireplaces. The Duct Test Rig was used to measure and recorded airflows and heat losses in a variety of ducts and chimneys in a representative mix of houses in Vancouver, Kelowna, Winnipeg, Calgary, Toronto, London, Montreal, Quebec City, Halifax, Fredericton and Ottawa. Bath, kitchen, clothes dryer and central vacuum exhaust fans were tested to determine how performance is affected by fan age, accumulations of dust, grease, bugs and installation methods. Results indicate that there is no statistical difference between axial or centrifugal fans. The greatest problem appeared to be with low flows, high leakage rates, and poor conditions of bathroom fans. Many kitchen fans were found to be blocked at the inlet by cooking grease. The exhaust flows depended greatly on the condition of the backdraft damper. Dryer exhaust airflow was typically less than the 75 L/s specified by manufacturers, but even old dryers performed relatively well. All types of chimneys were tested for different positive hood pressures, airflow lost through leakage, and thermal characteristics. Airflow was found to vary depending on the type and area of the flue and the presence of a cap. For heating systems, the low duct efficiency was due mostly to duct leakage, radiation losses and restrictive ducts and registers. The findings of this testing program are still valid today. 3 tabs.

  2. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant

  3. Acoustic power balance in lined ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the two common definitions of acoustic energy density and intensity in uniform unlined ducts carrying uniform flow are compatible to the extent that both energy densities can be used in an appropriate variational principle to derive the convected wave equation. When the duct walls are lined both energy densities must be modified to account for the wall energy density. This results in a new energy conservation equation which utilizes a modified definition of axial power and accounts for wall dissipation. Computations in specific cases demonstrate the validity of the modified acoustic energy relation.

  4. Limits on normal cochlear 'third' windows provided by previous investigations of additional sound paths into and out of the cat inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosowski, John J; Bowers, Peter; Nakajima, Hideko H

    2018-03-01

    While most models of cochlear function assume the presence of only two windows into the mammalian cochlea (the oval and round windows), a position that is generally supported by several lines of data, there is evidence for additional sound paths into and out of the inner ear in normal mammals. In this report we review the existing evidence for and against the 'two-window' hypothesis. We then determine how existing data and inner-ear anatomy restrict transmission of sound through these additional sound pathways in cat by utilizing a well-tested model of the cat inner ear, together with anatomical descriptions of the cat cochlear and vestibular aqueducts (potential additional windows to the cochlea). We conclude: (1) The existing data place limits on the size of the cochlear and vestibular aqueducts in cat and are consistent with small volume-velocities through these ducts during ossicular stimulation of the cochlea, (2) the predicted volume velocities produced by aqueducts with diameters half the size of the bony diameters match the functional data within ±10 dB, and (3) these additional volume velocity paths contribute to the inner ear's response to non-acoustic stimulation and conductive pathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CASE REPORTS Thyroglossal duct cyst in adult Nigerians: a report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MacBook

    Thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC) is the most common paediatric midline neck lesion. It is rare ... modified Sistrunk's operation and histology confirmed the diagnosis of thyroglossal cyst. ... surgical procedure for the treatment of thyroglossal duct ...

  6. Liver and Bile Duct Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver cancer includes two major types: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic bile duct cancer, also known as cholangiocarcinoma. Find evidence-based information on liver and bile duct cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, genomics and statistics.

  7. New concept of the buildup factor in bent ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faik Ouahab, Z.; Jehouani, A.; Groetz, J.-E.

    2011-01-01

    A major problem confronting the radiation shielding designer is the accurate determination of neutron streaming through various penetrations in walls, ducts and mazes. The previous studies on neutron transmission were performed through empty ducts. The aim of this work is to evaluate the neutron transmission probability through a filled bent duct and the proposition of a new concept of the buildup factor for neutrons in multilegged ducts. An angular biaising technique is used in the Monte Carlo simulations to accelerate the calculation convergence. Results are first compared with those obtained by the MCNPX code. For an empty bent duct, the neutron transmission is only due to the neutron reflection on the duct wall. For a filled duct, the major contribution is due to the scattering on the atoms filling the duct.

  8. Evaluation of the usefulness of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Cho, Jin-ho; Kim, Jeehyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced significantly over the past two decades and is currently used extensively to monitor the internal structures of organs, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. We used ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to decalcify the bony walls of the cochlea and investigated the inner structures by deep penetration of light into the cochlear tissue using OCT on a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops (EH), induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct. The structural and functional changes associated with EH were identified using OCT and auditory brainstem response tests, respectively. We also evaluated structural alterations in the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction of the OCT images, which clearly showed physical changes in the cochlear structures. Furthermore, we found significant anatomical variations in the EH model and conducted graphical analysis by strial atrophy for comparison. The physical changes included damage to and flattening of the organ of Corti-evidence of Reissner's membrane distention-and thinning of the lateral wall. These results indicate that observation of EDTA-decalcified cochlea using OCT is significant in examination of gradual changes in the cochlear structures that are otherwise not depicted by hematoxylin and eosin staining.

  9. Solitary intrahepatic bile-duct cyst presenting with Jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Chun, Ki Sung; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Jun Gi

    1989-01-01

    Caroli's disease is an uncommon condition, and characterized by congenital segmental saccular dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. A case of Caroli's disease, manifested by only a large communicating cystic dilatation of left intrahepatic bile duct and causing extrinsic pressure over the extrahepatic bile duct, is presented. The patient was 43-year-old housewife, hospitalized because of abdominal distension and severe jaundice. To relieve jaundice and alleviate surgical intervention, percutaneous drainage of the bile-duct cyst preceded surgery

  10. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  11. Racemic alkaloids from the fungus Ganoderma cochlear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Long; Dou, Man; Luo, Qi; Cheng, Li-Zhi; Yan, Yong-Ming; Li, Rong-Tao; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Seven pairs of new alkaloid enantiomers, ganocochlearines C-I (1, 3-8), and three pairs of known alkaloids were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma cochlear. The chemical structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR data. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 3-10 were assigned by ECD calculations. Biological activities of these isolates against renal fibrosis were accessed in rat normal or diseased renal interstitial fibroblast cells. Importantly, the plausible biosynthetic pathway for this class of alkaloids was originally proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Conductive Hearing Loss Leads to Cochlear Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, M Charles; Liberman, Leslie D; Maison, Stéphane F

    2015-01-01

    Synapses between cochlear nerve terminals and hair cells are the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear in both noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, and this neuropathy is exacerbated in the absence of efferent feedback from the olivocochlear bundle. If age-related loss is dominated by a lifetime of exposure to environmental sounds, reduction of acoustic drive to the inner ear might improve cochlear preservation throughout life. To test this, we removed the tympanic membrane unilaterally in one group of young adult mice, removed the olivocochlear bundle in another group and compared their cochlear function and innervation to age-matched controls one year later. Results showed that tympanic membrane removal, and the associated threshold elevation, was counterproductive: cochlear efferent innervation was dramatically reduced, especially the lateral olivocochlear terminals to the inner hair cell area, and there was a corresponding reduction in the number of cochlear nerve synapses. This loss led to a decrease in the amplitude of the suprathreshold cochlear neural responses. Similar results were seen in two cases with conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. Outer hair cell death was increased only in ears lacking medial olivocochlear innervation following olivocochlear bundle cuts. Results suggest the novel ideas that 1) the olivocochlear efferent pathway has a dramatic use-dependent plasticity even in the adult ear and 2) a component of the lingering auditory processing disorder seen in humans after persistent middle-ear infections is cochlear in origin.

  13. Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS With Large Intraabdominal Seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Della Harigovind

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome, a form of male pseudohermaphroditism is characterized by the presence of the Mullerian duct derivatives in an otherwise phenotypically as well as genotypically normal male. We report a case of large intra abdominal seminoma in a male patient with cryptorchidism, along with persistence of Mullerian duct derivatives (uterus.

  14. Common Bile Duct Perforation Due to Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Jarmin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A young man with HIV presented with biliary peritonitis secondary to spontaneous common bile duct perforation. Investigation revealed that the perforation was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the bile duct is uncommon and usually presents with obstructive jaundice due to stricture. Bile duct perforation due to tuberculosis is extremely rare. Its management is discussed.

  15. Common Bile Duct Perforation Due to Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Razman Jarmin; Shaharin Shaharuddin

    2004-01-01

    A young man with HIV presented with biliary peritonitis secondary to spontaneous common bile duct perforation. Investigation revealed that the perforation was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the bile duct is uncommon and usually presents with obstructive jaundice due to stricture. Bile duct perforation due to tuberculosis is extremely rare. Its management is discussed.

  16. Iatrogenic injury of an aberrant right posterior sectoral bile duct

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Figs 1 and 2). A week later, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. (ERCP) examination was performed. This showed no filling of the right posterior sectoral ducts but normal opacification of the other ducts. (Figs 3a and b). These findings led to the diagnosis of an aberrant right posterior sectoral bile duct that ...

  17. A case of fascioliasis in common bile duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung; Lee, Chang Hong; Park, Seung Chul; Choi, Sang Yong; Lim, Han Jong [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    A case of Fascioliasis of common bile duct is confirmed by visualization of adult fluke. Fascioliasis caused by Fasciola hepatica, is common parasitic disease in cattle and sheep. Human is an accidental host. ERCP demonstrated irregular linear conglomerated filling defects in common bile duct. Through surgical intervention, we found adult flukes of F. hepatica and adenomatous hyperplasia of common bile duct.

  18. A case of fascioliasis in common bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung; Lee, Chang Hong; Park, Seung Chul; Choi, Sang Yong; Lim, Han Jong

    1989-01-01

    A case of Fascioliasis of common bile duct is confirmed by visualization of adult fluke. Fascioliasis caused by Fasciola hepatica, is common parasitic disease in cattle and sheep. Human is an accidental host. ERCP demonstrated irregular linear conglomerated filling defects in common bile duct. Through surgical intervention, we found adult flukes of F. hepatica and adenomatous hyperplasia of common bile duct

  19. Internal radiotherapy for hilar bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Munemasa; Ogino, Takashi; Konishi, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    By December 1998, 24 patients with non-resected hilar bile duct cancer (mean age of 74) had received bile duct intracavitary irradiation and 13 patients with residual cancer after resection of hilar bile duct cancer had received postoperative intracavitary irradiation. After they were externally irradiated 30 Gy in total by 15 fractions (2 Gy/time, 5 times in a week), intracavitary irradiation using 192-Ir was given 5 times in total (2 times in a week) from 3 weeks after external irradiation under the condition which dose became 8 Gy in depth of 10 mm from radiation source. The cases of postoperative irradiation had 3 times in total. As for 20 patients of non-resected hilar bile duct cancer without metastasis, 50% survival time was 265 days and there was no 5 year survivor. Fifty percents survival time of 4 patients with metastasis was 113 days. The effect of local control was recognized in 20 patients (83.3%). In 13 patients of postoperative irradiation, 50% survival time was 554 days, and survival rate of 3 years was 28%. (K.H.)

  20. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... incidental to its installation, must be made of noncombustible material. (c) Combustibles and other foreign materials are not allowed within ventilation ducts. However, metal piping and electrical wiring installed in... the wiring does not interfere with the operation of fire dampers. Electrical wiring and piping may not...

  1. Calcium influx pathways in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hug, M J; Pahl, C; Novak, I

    1996-01-01

    A number of agonists increase intracellular Ca2+ activity, [Ca2+]i, in pancreatic ducts, but the influx/efflux pathways and intracellular Ca2+ stores in this epithelium are unknown. The aim of the present study was to characterise the Ca2+ influx pathways, especially their pH sensitivity, in nati...

  2. MR findings in thyroglossal duct cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandino, A.; Salvi, L.; Chirico, G.; Scribano, E.; Longo, M.; Pandolfo, I.

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thyroglossal duct cysts have been studied with CT and MR. The typical CT feature of these cystic upper-neck lesions are depicted in literature, conversely MR findings are not well known. The homogeneous high intensity on T1-weighted images, higher than simple cyst or fluid, is the most typical feature of the thyroglossal cyst. (author). 12 refs.; 5 figs

  3. [Bile duct lesions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, J R; Ungeheuer, A; Feussner, H

    1994-09-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is both resulting in a slightly higher incidence of biliary lesions and a change of prevalence of the type of lesions. Damage to the biliary system occurs in 4 different types: The most severe case is the lesion with a structural defect of the hepatic or common bile duct with (IVa) or without (IVb) vascular injury. Tangential lesions without structural loss of the duct should be denominated as type III (IIIa with additional lesion to the vessels, type IIIb without). Type II comprehends late strictures without obvious intraoperative trauma to the duct. Type I includes immediate biliary fistulae of usually good prognosis. The increasing prevalence of structural defects of the bile ducts appears to be a peculiarity of laparoscopic cholecystectomy necessitating highly demanding operative repair. In the majority of cases, hepatico-jejunostomy or even intraparenchymatous anastomoses are required. Adaptation of well proven principles of open surgery is the best prevention of biliary lesions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy as well as the readiness to convert early to the open procedure.

  4. Depressurization test on hot gas duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihira, Masanori; Kunitomi; Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Sato, Yutaka.

    1989-05-01

    To study the integrity of internal structures and the characteristics in a hot gas duct under the rapid depressurization accident, depressurization tests have been carried out using a test apparatus installed the hot gas duct with the same size and the same structures as that of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The tests have been performed with three parameters: depressurization rate (0.14-3.08 MPa/s) determined by orifice diameter, area of the open space at the slide joint (11.9-2036 mm 2 ), and initial pressure (1.0-4.0 MPa) filled up in a pressure vessel, by using nitrogen gas and helium gas. The maximum pressure difference applied on the internal structures of the hot gas duct was 2.69 MPa on the liner tube and 0.45 MPa on the separating plate. After all tests were completed, the hot gas duct which was used in the tests was disassembled. Inspection revealed that there were no failure and no deformation on the internal structures such as separating plates, insulation layers, a liner tube and a pressure tube. (author)

  5. Whistler instability in a magnetospheric duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukdar, I.; Tripathi, V.K.; Jain, V.K.

    1989-01-01

    A whistler wave propagating through a preformed magnetospheric duct is susceptible to growth/amplification by an electron beam. The interaction is non-local and could be of Cerenkov or slow-cyclotron type. First-order perturbation theory is employed to obtain the growth rate for flat and Gaussian beam densities. (author)

  6. Cochlear implants in children implanted in Jordan: A parental overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamra, Rana A

    2015-07-01

    Exploring the perspective of parents on the cochlear implant process in Jordan. Sixty parents of deaf children were surveyed on the information gathering process prior to cochlear implant surgery, and their implant outcome expectations post-surgery. Whether child or parent characteristics may impact parents' post-surgical expectations was explored. Although parents used a variety of information sources when considering a cochlear implant, the ear, nose and throat doctor comprised their major source of information (60%). Parents received a range of information prior to cochlear implant but agreed (93.3%) on the need for a multidisciplinary team approach. Post-surgically, parents' expected major developments in the areas of spoken language (97%), and auditory skills (100%). Receiving education in mainstream schools (92%) was expected too. Parents perceived the cochlear implant decision as the best decision they can make for their child (98.3%). A significant correlation was found between parents contentment with the cochlear implant decision and expecting developments in the area of reading and writing (r=0.7). Child's age at implantation and age at hearing loss diagnosis significantly affected parents' post-implant outcome expectations (pparents agree on the need for a comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Parents' education about cochlear implants prior to the surgery can affect their post-surgical outcome expectations. The parental perspective presented in this study can help professionals develop better understanding of parents' needs and expectations and henceforth improve their services and support during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Tolerance of bile duct to intraoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of intraoperative radiation therapy of the bile duct and surrounding tissues, seven adult dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative irradiation with 11 MeV electrons. Two animals were treated at each dose level of 2000, 3000, and 4500 rads. A single dog which received a laparotomy and sham irradiation served as a control. The irradiation field consisted of a 5 cm diameter circle encompassing the extrahepatic bile duct, portal vein, hepatic artery, and lateral duodenal wall. The animals were followed clinically for mor than 18 months after treatment, and autopsies were performed on dogs that died to assess radiation-induced complications or tissue damage. All dogs developed fibrosis and mural thickening of the common duct, which appeared by 6 weeks following irradiation and which was dose-related, being mild at low doses and more severe at high doses. Hepatic changes were seen as early as 6 weeks after irradiation, consisting of periportal inflammation and fibrosis. The hepatic changes appeared earliest at the highest doses. Frank biliary cirrhosis eventually developed at all dose levels. Duodenal fibrosis appeared in the irradiation portal, being most severe at the highest doses and in some animals resulting in duodenal obstruction. No changes were observed in irradiated portions of portal vein and hepatic artery at any dose level. It was concluded that intraoperative radiation therapy delivered to the region of the common duct leads to ductal fibrosis, partial biliary obstruction with secondary hepatic changes, and duodenal fibrosis if bowel wall is included in the field. Clinical use of intraoperative radiation therapy to the bile duct in humans may require routine use of biliary and duodenal bypass to prevent obstructive complications

  8. Are Ducted Mini-Splits Worth It?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Jonathan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maguire, Jeffrey B [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Metzger, Cheryn E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Zhang, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2018-02-01

    Ducted mini-split heat pumps are gaining popularity in some regions of the country due to their energy-efficient specifications and their ability to be hidden from sight. Although product and install costs are typically higher than the ductless mini-split heat pumps, this technology is well worth the premium for some homeowners who do not like to see an indoor unit in their living area. Due to the interest in this technology by local utilities and homeowners, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has funded the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop capabilities within the Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) tool to model ducted mini-split heat pumps. After the fundamental capabilities were added, energy-use results could be compared to other technologies that were already in BEopt, such as zonal electric resistance heat, central air source heat pumps, and ductless mini-split heat pumps. Each of these technologies was then compared using five prototype configurations in three different BPA heating zones to determine how the ducted mini-split technology would perform under different scenarios. The result of this project was a set of EnergyPlus models representing the various prototype configurations in each climate zone. Overall, the ducted mini-split heat pumps saved about 33-60% compared to zonal electric resistance heat (with window AC systems modeled in the summer). The results also showed that the ducted mini-split systems used about 4% more energy than the ductless mini-split systems, which saved about 37-64% compared to electric zonal heat (depending on the prototype and climate).

  9. CT findings of thyroglossal duct cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Oh; Kim, Hong Soo; So, Hyun Soon; Nam, Mee Young; Choi, Jae Ho; Rhee, Hak Song

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of thyroglossal duct cysts. Sixteen patients with pathologically proved thyroglossal duct cysts were included in the study. CT scans were assessed retrospectively for shape, size, location, density of the central portions, septations, rim enhancement, changes in the adjacent fascial planes and investment within the strap muscles in the infrahyoid cysts. Thirteen cases of thyroglossal duct cysts were seen as round or oval cystic masses, two cases of them were seen as irregular-shaped lobulated cystic masses, and one case was seen as ovoid soft tissue mass. The cysts were from 1.4 to 5.7 cm in diameter (mean, 2.6 cm). The cyst was infrahyoid in 15 cases and suprahyoid in one case. The cyst was located in midline in eight cases, off midline in four cases, and both midline and off midline in four cases. The density of the central portions ranged from 15 to 82HU (mean, 32HU). Septations were noted in four cases. Rim enhancement was seen in 14 cases (93%), and heterogeneously enhancing soft tissue mass was seen in one case. In four cases, abnormal fascial planes were observed. All but one of the infrahyoid cysts (14/15) were embedded within the strap muscles, and one case of them was located anteriorly to strap muscles. CT permits one to make the diagnosis a thyroglossal duct cyst with a high degree of accuracy, as it can differentiate thyroglossal duct cysts from the other anterior neck masses by their typical location, characteristic morphology, and investment within the strap muscles

  10. Duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction after radical resection of Bismuth IIIa hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Guang; Gu, Jun; Dong, Ping; Lu, Jian-Hua; Li, Mao-Lan; Wu, Xiang-Song; Yang, Jia-Hua; Zhang, Lin; Ding, Qi-Chen; Weng, Hao; Ding, Qian; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2013-04-21

    At present, radical resection remains the only effective treatment for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The surgical approach for R0 resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is complex and diverse, but for the biliary reconstruction after resection, almost all surgeons use Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. A viable alternative to Roux-en-Y reconstruction after radical resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma has not yet been proposed. We report a case of performing duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction after radical resection of Bismuth IIIa hilar cholangiocarcinoma. End-to-end anastomosis between the left hepatic duct and the distal common bile duct was used for the biliary reconstruction, and a single-layer continuous suture was performed along the bile duct using 5-0 prolene. The patient was discharged favorably without biliary fistula 2 wk later. Evidence for tumor recurrence was not found after an 18 mo follow-up. Performing bile duct end-to-end anastomosis in hilar cholangiocarcinoma can simplify the complex digestive tract reconstruction process.

  11. Developing flow in S-shaped ducts. 2: Circular cross-section duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-Doppler velocimetry measured the laminar and turbulent streamwise flow in a S-duct. The wall pressure distribution and one component of cross-stream velocity were also obtained for the turbulent flow case. Boundary layers near the duct inlet were about 25 percent of the hydraulic diameter in the laminar flow and varied around the periphery of the pipe between 10 percent and 20 percent in turbulent flow. Pressure-driven secondary flows develop in the first half of the S-duct and are attenuated and reversed in the second half. For both Reynolds numbers there is a region near the outer wall of the second half of the duct where the sign of the radial vorticity results in an enforcement of the secondary flow which was established in the first half of the S-duct. The core flow migrates, for both Reynolds numbers, to the outside wall of the first half and lies towards the inside wall of the second half of the S-duct at the outlet. The thinner inlet boundary layers in the turbulent flow give rise to weaker secondary motion.

  12. Long-term follow-up after choledochojejunostomy for bile duct stones with complex clearance of the bile duct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouma, D. J.; Konsten, J.; Soeters, P. B.; Von Meyenfeldt, M.; Obertop, H.

    1989-01-01

    In this retrospective study, the long-term follow-up of patients undergoing choledochojejunostomy (Roux-en-Y) for bile duct stones with complex clearance of the bile duct is evaluated. Bile duct exploration and subsequent choledochojejunostomy (Roux-en-Y) was performed in 43 patients (median age 67

  13. Trends in Intraoperative Testing During Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Joshua Cody; Cox, Matthew D; Hollowoa, Blake; Bonilla-Velez, Juliana; Trinidade, Aaron; Dornhoffer, John L

    2018-03-01

    No consensus guidelines exist regarding intraoperative testing during cochlear implantation and wide variation in practice habits exists. The objective of this observational study was to survey otologists/neurotologists to understand practice habits and overall opinion of usefulness of intraoperative testing. Cross-sectional survey. A web-based survey was sent to 194 practicing Otologists/Neurotologists. Questions included practice setting and experience, habits with respect to electrodes used, intraoperative testing modalities used, overall opinion of intraoperative testing, and practice habits in various scenarios. Thirty-nine of 194 (20%) completed the survey. For routine patients, ECAPs and EIs were most commonly used together (38%) while 33% do not perform testing at all. Eighty-nine percent note that testing "rarely" or "never" changes management. Fifty-one percent marked the most important reason for testing is the reassurance provided to the family and/or the surgeon. Intraoperative testing habits and opinions regarding testing during cochlear implantation vary widely among otologic surgeons. The majority of surgeons use testing but many think there is minimal benefit and that surgical decision-making is rarely impacted. The importance of testing may change as electrodes continue to evolve.

  14. Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation: UNICAMP Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America.

  15. Parotid Duct Repair with Intubation Tube: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Muhammed Beşir; Barutca, Seda Asrufoğlu; Keskin, Elif Seda; Atik, Bekir

    2017-01-01

    The parotid duct can be damaged in traumatic injuries and surgical interventions. Early diagnosis and treatment of a duct injury is of great importance because complications such as sialocele and salivary gland fistula may develop if the duct is not surgically repaired. We think the cuff of an intubation tube is an ideal material in parotid duct repair, because of its technical characteristics, easiness of availability, and low-cost. In this paper, we described the use of the cuff cannula of an intubation tube for the diagnosis and treatment of parotid duct laceration, as a low-cost and easy to access material readily available in every operating room. PMID:28713751

  16. A study on CT features of intrahepatic bile duct abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Pengqiu; Li Peng; He Zhiyan; Chen Weixia; Liu Yan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT features of intrahepatic bile duct abscess (IBDA) and its pathologic basis. Methods: The CT imaging data of 31 consecutive cases of intrahepatic bile duct abscess proved by surgery or clinical treatments from October 1989 to February 1999 were retrospectively studied. The causes included acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis and retrograde infection due to different etiologies. For all the cases, the CT manifestations of liver abscess, bile duct abnormalities, and their relationship were observed respectively. Results: Manifestations of liver abscess were revealed in all cases (31/31, 100%). The CT manifestations of bile duct abnormalities included signs of etiologies caused bile duct obstruction and other signs including cholangiectasis (29/31, 93.5%), the dilated bile ducts communicated with (5/31, 16.1%) or abut on (8/31, 25.8%) the abscesses, and gas collection in bile ducts (10/31, 32.2%). The signs showing the relationship between liver abscess and bile duct abnormalities were that the abscesses complied with the obstructive site and the dilated bile ducts (15/31, 48.4%), and the liver abscesses located in different (7/31, 22.6%) or same (4/31, 12.9%) liver lobes or segments with gas collection in the dilated bile ducts. Conclusion: The CT manifestations of IBDA included signs of liver abscess, abnormalities of bile ducts, and signs showing their relationship. CT scanning was helpful in making comprehensive and accurate diagnosis of IBDA

  17. Radiologic imaging of bile duct changes by clonorchiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Jung, Soon Hee

    1988-01-01

    The changes of the bile ducts were reviewed retrospectively in 38 patients of clonorchiasis by ultrasonography and/or CT. Diagnosis was made in 13 patients by cholecystectomy and exploration of the common bile duct, another 2 patients by segmentectomy and wedge resection of the liver, and 23 patients by stool examination. 14 of 36 cases done ultrasonography showed the parallel channel sign, and small nodular echoes around the dilated bile ducts. And 3 cases showed the echoes of worm of clonorchis sinensis in the common bile duct. 22 of 36 cases showed the parallel channel signs only. All cases (11) done CT showed diffuse dilatation of the peripheral bile ducts. 5 of 11 cases showed ring or tubular contrast enhancement around the dilated bile ducts. In 2 cases of liver resection, the bile ducts showed adenomatous hyperplasia and severe periductal fibrosis. Proliferation of blood vessels and infiltration of inflammatory cells were also seen. So we consider that the increased echoes of the bile duct wall, small nodular echoes around the bile ducts were attributed to the bile duct dilatation, severe adenomatous hyperplasia and periductal fibrosis. The ring or tubular contrast enhancement of the dilated bile ducts seems to be caused by the marked periductal inflammation resulting in capillary proliferation and the periductal fibrosis.

  18. Radiologic imaging of bile duct changes by clonorchiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Jung, Soon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    The changes of the bile ducts were reviewed retrospectively in 38 patients of clonorchiasis by ultrasonography and/or CT. Diagnosis was made in 13 patients by cholecystectomy and exploration of the common bile duct, another 2 patients by segmentectomy and wedge resection of the liver, and 23 patients by stool examination. 14 of 36 cases done ultrasonography showed the parallel channel sign, and small nodular echoes around the dilated bile ducts. And 3 cases showed the echoes of worm of clonorchis sinensis in the common bile duct. 22 of 36 cases showed the parallel channel signs only. All cases (11) done CT showed diffuse dilatation of the peripheral bile ducts. 5 of 11 cases showed ring or tubular contrast enhancement around the dilated bile ducts. In 2 cases of liver resection, the bile ducts showed adenomatous hyperplasia and severe periductal fibrosis. Proliferation of blood vessels and infiltration of inflammatory cells were also seen. So we consider that the increased echoes of the bile duct wall, small nodular echoes around the bile ducts were attributed to the bile duct dilatation, severe adenomatous hyperplasia and periductal fibrosis. The ring or tubular contrast enhancement of the dilated bile ducts seems to be caused by the marked periductal inflammation resulting in capillary proliferation and the periductal fibrosis.

  19. A Case of Adenomyomatous Hyperplasia of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakatsu Numata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenomyomatous hyperplasia is rarely found in the extrahepatic bile duct. A 54-year-old man was referred to our center with a diagnosis of extrahepatic bile duct stenosis which had been detected by endoscopic retrograde choloangiopancreatography. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the wall of the middle extrahepatic bile duct, however no malignant cells were detected by cytology. Since bile duct carcinoma could not be ruled out, we performed resection of the extrahepatic duct accompanied by lymph node dissection. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as adenomyomatous hyperplasia of the extrahepatic bile duct. Present and previously reported cases showed the difficulty of making a diagnosis of adenomyomatous hyperplasia of the extrahepatic bile duct preoperatively or intraoperatively. Therefore, when adenomyomatous hyperplasia is suspected, a radical surgical procedure according to malignant disease may be necessary for definitive diagnosis.

  20. Dispersion properties of ducted whistlers, generated by lightning discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Pasmanik

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Whistler-mode wave propagation in magnetospheric ducts of enhanced cold plasma density is studied. The case of the arbitrary ratio of the duct radius to the whistler wavelength is considered, where the ray-tracing method is not applicable. The set of duct eigenmodes and their spatial structure are analysed and dependencies of eigenmode propagation properties on the duct characteristics are studied. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the group delay time of one-hop propagation of the whistler wave packet along the duct. We found that, in contrast to the case of a wide duct, the group delay time in a rather narrow duct decreases as the eigenmode number increases. The results obtained are suggested for an explanation of some types of multi-component whistler signals.

  1. Spectral measurements of gamma radiation streaming through ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakshisundaram, P.K.; Bhatnagar, V.M.; Raghunath, V.M.; Gopinath, D.V.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the spectral measurements of gamma radiation streaming through multi-legged rectangular concrete ducts for cesium-137 and cobald-60 sources. Effect of lead lining the inner surface of the duct on the streaming radiation spectrum and optimization of liner thickness for minimum streaming radiation dose have been studied. For three-legged ducts, a comparative analysis of lead lining the entire duct as against lining any one or both the corners of the duct is reported. It is seen that lead lining any one of the corners would reduce the streaming radiation dose by a factor of 5 to 12. Lining both the corners which is nearly as effective as lining the entire duct reduces the dose by a factor of 16 to 60 depending on the soruce energy and duct dimensions. (orig.)

  2. Reduction in spread of excitation from current focusing at multiple cochlear locations in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Monica; Landsberger, David M

    2016-03-01

    Channel interaction from a broad spread of excitation is likely to be a limiting factor in performance by cochlear implant users. Although partial tripolar stimulation has been shown to reduce spread of excitation, the magnitude of the reduction is highly variable across subjects. Because the reduction in spread of excitation is typically only measured at one electrode for a given subject, the degree of variability across cochlear locations is unknown. The first goal of the present study was to determine if the reduction in spread of excitation observed from partial tripolar current focusing systematically varies across the cochlea. The second goal was to measure the variability in reduction of spread of excitation relative to monopolar stimulation across the cochlea. The third goal was to expand upon previous results that suggest that scaling of verbal descriptors can be used to predict the reduction in spread of excitation, by increasing the limited number of sites previously evaluated and verify the relationships remain with the larger dataset. The spread of excitation for monopolar and partial tripolar stimulation was measured at 5 cochlear locations using a psychophysical forward masking task. Results of the present study suggest that although partial tripolar stimulation typically reduces spread of excitation, the degree of reduction in spread of excitation was found to be highly variable and no effect of cochlear location was found. Additionally, subjective scaling of certain verbal descriptors (Clean/Dirty, Pure/Noisy) correlated with the reduction in spread of excitation suggesting sound quality scaling might be used as a quick clinical estimate of channels providing a reduction in spread of excitation. This quick scaling technique might help clinicians determine which patients would be most likely to benefit from a focused strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The long-term concerns post cochlear implantation as experienced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality of life of families with children who have a hearing loss or who are fitted with cochlear implants. .... term going into the work force with a severe disability will he be .... balance between professional caution and urgency of treatment.

  4. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Cochlear Implants Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... in noisy environments—a critical ability in a classroom. Before the second implant, Mia was pulling back ...

  5. Auditory Mechanics of the Tectorial Membrane and the Cochlear Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review is timely and relevant since new experimental and theoretical findings suggest that cochlear mechanics from the nanoscale to the macroscale are affected by mechanical properties of the tectorial membrane and the spiral shape. Recent findings Main tectorial membrane themes covered are i) composition and morphology, ii) nanoscale mechanical interactions with the outer hair cell bundle, iii) macroscale longitudinal coupling, iv) fluid interaction with inner hair cell bundles, v) macroscale dynamics and waves. Main cochlear spiral themes are macroscale low-frequency energy focusing and microscale organ of Corti shear gain. Implications Findings from new experimental and theoretical models reveal exquisite sensitivity of cochlear mechanical performance to tectorial membrane structural organization, mechanics, and its positioning with respect to hair bundles. The cochlear spiral geometry is a major determinant of low frequency hearing. Suggestions are made for future research directions. PMID:21785353

  6. SNM holdup assessment of Los Alamos exhaust ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    Fissile material holdup in glovebox and fume hood exhaust ducting has been quantified for all Los Alamos duct systems. Gamma-based, nondestructive measurements were used to quantify holdup. The measurements were performed during three measurement campaigns. The first campaign, Phase I, provided foot-by-foot, semiquantitative measurement data on all ducting. These data were used to identify ducting that required more accurate (quantitative) measurement. Of the 280 duct systems receiving Phase I measurements, 262 indicated less than 50 g of fissile holdup and 19 indicated fissile holdup of 50 or more grams. Seven duct systems were measured in a second campaign, called Series 1, Phase II. Holdup estimates on these ducts ranged from 421 g of 235 U in a duct servicing a shut-down uranium-machining facility to 39 g of 239 Pu in a duct servicing an active plutonium-processing facility. Measurements performed in the second campaign proved excessively laborious, so a third campaign was initiated that used more efficient instrumentation at some sacrifice in measurement quality. Holdup estimates for the 12 duct systems measured during this third campaign ranged from 70 g of 235 U in a duct servicing analytical laboratories to 1 g of 235 U and 1 g of 239 Pu in a duct carrying exhaust air to a remote filter building. These quantitative holdup estimates support the conclusion made at the completion of the Phase I measurements that only ducts servicing shut-down uranium operations contain about 400 g of fissile holdup. No ventilation ducts at Los Alamos contain sufficient fissile material holdup to present a criticality safety concern

  7. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN A PATIENT WITH USHER'S SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Derinsu, Ufuk; Ciprut, Ayca

    2016-01-01

    Usher's Syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Usher’s Syndrome patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss can be considered as candidates for cochlear implantation.This case study reports a deaf-blind with Usher's Syndrome who received a cochlear implant, the audiological evaluation is presented and the therapy sessions are discussed. The patient demonstrated good performance overtime after the...

  8. Language understanding and vocabulary of early cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, L; Busch, GW; Sandahl, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the level of language understanding, the level of receptive and active vocabulary, and to estimate effect-related odds ratios for cochlear implanted children's language level.......The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the level of language understanding, the level of receptive and active vocabulary, and to estimate effect-related odds ratios for cochlear implanted children's language level....

  9. Computational tool for postoperative evaluation of cochlear implant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Pavan, Ana Luiza M.; Pina, Diana R. de; Altemani, Joao M.C.; Castilho, Arthur M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to calculate the insertion depth angle of cochlear implants, from computed tomography exams. The tool uses different image processing techniques, such as thresholding and active contour. Then, we compared the average insertion depth angle of three different implant manufacturers. The developed tool can be used, in the future, to compare the insertion depth angle of the cochlear implant with postoperative response of patient's hearing. (author)

  10. Cochlear implantation in the Mondini inner ear malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, R T; Robbins, A J; Myres, W A; Pope, M L

    1986-07-01

    We report the case of a profoundly deaf 4-year-old boy with congenital deafness as a result of Mondini's dysplasia. The Mondini inner ear malformation is the result of arrested labyrinthine development during embryogenesis and is characterized by both bony and membranous anomalies of the inner ear. The dysplastic cochlear anatomy does not preclude successful cochlear implantation, and electrical threshold measurements are similar to those recorded in pediatric subjects deafened as a result of other causes.

  11. Psycholinguistic abilities in cochlear implant and hearing impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Hatem Ezzeldin; Eldin, Sally Taher Kheir; Al Kasaby, Rasha Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many congenitally sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) children and cochlear implant (CI) recipients develop near-normal language skills. However, there is a wide variation in individual outcomes following cochlear implantation, or using hearing aids. Some CI recipients or Hearing aids users never develop useable speech and oral language skills. The causes of this enormous variation in outcomes are only partly understood at the present time. So, the aim of this study was to assess th...

  12. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. F...

  13. Characterization of Cochlear, Vestibular and Cochlear-Vestibular Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Patients with a Vestibulo-Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. K. Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral vestibular system is critical for the execution of activities of daily life as it provides movement and orientation information to motor and sensory systems. Patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction experience a significant decrease in quality of life and have currently no viable treatment option. Vestibular implants could eventually restore vestibular function. Most vestibular implant prototypes to date are modified cochlear implants to fast-track development. These use various objective measurements, such as the electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP, to supplement behavioral information. We investigated whether eCAPs could be recorded in patients with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. Specifically, eCAPs were successfully recorded for cochlear and vestibular setups, as well as for mixed cochlear-vestibular setups. Similarities and slight differences were found for the recordings of the three setups. These findings demonstrated the feasibility of eCAP recording with a vestibulo-cochlear implant. They could be used in the short term to reduce current spread and avoid activation of non-targeted neurons. More research is warranted to better understand the neural origin of vestibular eCAPs and to utilize them for clinical applications.

  14. Acoustic Power Transmission Through a Ducted Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Ed

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed ducted fans, when the rotor flowfield is shock-free, the main contribution to the inlet radiated acoustic power comes from the portion of the rotor stator interaction sound field that is transmitted upstream through the rotor. As such, inclusion of the acoustic transmission is an essential ingredient in the prediction of the fan inlet noise when the fan tip relative speed is subsonic. This paper describes a linearized Euler based approach to computing the acoustic transmission of fan tones through the rotor. The approach is embodied in a code called LINFLUX was applied to a candidate subsonic fan called the Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP). The results from this study suggest that it is possible to make such prediction with sufficient fidelity to provide an indication of the acoustic transmission trends with the fan tip speed.

  15. Impact fracture behavior of HT9 duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Ferritic alloys are known to undergo a ductile-brittle transition as the test temperature is decreased. This inherent problem has limited their applications to reactor component materials subjected to low neutron exposures. However, the excellent resistance to void swelling exhibited by these alloys has led to choosing the materials as candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. Despite the ductile-brittle transition problem, results show that the materials exhibit superior resistance to fracture under very high neutron fluences at irradiation temperatures above 380 degrees C. Impact testing on FFTF duct sections of HT9 indicates that HT9 ducts have adequate fracture toughness at much higher temperatures for handling operations at room temperature and refueling operations

  16. Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Maximizing Expected Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Kate E; Blum, Nathan J; Waryasz, Stephanie A; Augustyn, Marilyn

    Sonia is a 4 years 1 month-year-old girl with Waardenburg syndrome and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who had bilateral cochlear implants at 2 years 7 months years of age. She is referred to Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics by her speech/language pathologist because of concerns that her language skills are not progressing as expected after the cochlear implant. At the time of the implant, she communicated using approximately 20 signs and 1 spoken word (mama). At the time of the evaluation (18 months after the implant) she had approximately 70 spoken words (English and Spanish) and innumerable signs that she used to communicate. She could follow 1-step directions in English but had more difficulty after 2-step directions.Sonia was born in Puerto Rico at 40 weeks gestation after an uncomplicated pregnancy. She failed her newborn hearing test and was given hearing aids that did not seem to help.At age 2 years, Sonia, her mother, and younger sister moved to the United States where she was diagnosed with bilateral severe-to-profound hearing loss. Genetic testing led to a diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (group of genetic conditions that can cause hearing loss and changes in coloring [pigmentation] of the hair, skin, and eyes). She received bilateral cochlear implants 6 months later.Sonia's mother is primarily Spanish-speaking and mostly communicates with her in Spanish or with gestures but has recently begun to learn American Sign Language (ASL). In a preschool program at a specialized school for the deaf, Sonia is learning both English and ASL. Sonia seems to prefer to use ASL to communicate.Sonia receives speech and language therapy (SLT) 3 times per week (90 minutes total) individually in school and once per week within a group. She is also receiving outpatient SLT once per week. Therapy sessions are completed in English, with the aid of an ASL interpreter. Sonia's language scores remain low, with her receptive skills in the first percentile, and her

  17. [Cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Liangcai; Guo, Menghe; Chen, Shuaijun; Liu, Shuangriu; Chen, Hao; Gong, Jian

    2010-05-01

    To describe the multi-channel cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome including surgeries, pre and postoperative hearing assessments as well as outcomes of speech recognition. Multi-channel cochlear implantation surgeries have been performed in 12 cases with Waardenburg syndrome type II in our department from 2000 to 2008. All the patients received multi-channel cochlear implantation through transmastoid facial recess approach. The postoperative outcomes of 12 cases were compared with 12 cases with no inner ear malformation as a control group. The electrodes were totally inserted into the cochlear successfully, there was no facial paralysis and cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred after operation. The hearing threshold in this series were similar to that of the normal cochlear implantation. After more than half a year of speech rehabilitation, the abilities of speech discrimination and spoken language of all the patients were improved compared with that of preoperation. Multi-channel cochlear implantation could be performed in the cases with Waardenburg syndrome, preoperative hearing and images assessments should be done.

  18. Production of verb tenses in children with cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolovac Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of verb tenses leads to better language development of children with cochlear implants. The aim of this study was to assess the acquisition of verb tenses in children with cochlear implants. The sample included 60 children, aged from 9 to 15, with average intellectual abilities. The study group consisted of 30 patients with cochlear implants, with no additional disabilities. The control group consisted of 30 subjects with typical speech - language development and preserved hearing. The acquisition of basic tenses was assessed by 'Corpus for the Assessment of the Use of Tenses' (Dimić, 2003. Significant statistical differences were found in the use of the present tense in children with cochlear implants and hearing children (t=-4.385; p<0.001 as well as in the use of the past tense (t=-4.650; p<0.001, and the future tense (t=-4.269; p<0.001. There was also a significant difference in the use of irregular verb 'go' (t=-3.958; p<0.001, as well as in the combination of the present and the past tense (t=-5.806; p<0.001. The present tense was used correctly by most children with cochlear implants (70%, followed by the past tense (53%, and finally the future tense (23%. Children with cochlear implants, even after several years of re/habilitation, do not reach the grammatical development of children with normal hearing.

  19. Evaluating cochlear implant trauma to the scala vestibuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adunka, O; Kiefer, J; Unkelbach, M H; Radeloff, A; Gstoettner, W

    2005-04-01

    Placement of cochlear implant electrodes into the scala vestibuli may be intentional, e.g. in case of blocked scala tympani or unintentional as a result of trauma to the basilar membrane or erroneous location of the cochieostomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological consequences and cochlear trauma after implantation of different cochlear implant electrode arrays in the scala vestibuli. Human temporal bone study with histological and radiological evaluation. Twelve human cadaver temporal bones were implanted with different cochlear implant electrodes. Implanted bones were processed using a special method to section undecalcified bone. Cochlear trauma and intracochlear positions. All implanted electrodes were implanted into the scala vestibuli using a special approach that allows direct scala vestibuli insertions. Fractures of the osseous spiral lamina were evaluated in some bones in the basal cochlear regions. In most electrodes, delicate structures of the organ of Corti were left intact, however, Reissner's membrane was destroyed in all specimens and the electrode lay upon the tectorial membrane. In some bones the organ of Corti was destroyed. Scala vestibuli insertions did not cause severe trauma to osseous or neural structures, thus preserving the basis for electrostimulation of the cochlea. However, destruction of Reissner's membrane and impact on the Organ of Corti can be assumed to destroy residual hearing.

  20. United Kingdom national paediatric bilateral cochlear implant audit: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullington, Helen; Bele, Devyanee; Brinton, Julie; Lutman, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Prior to 2009, United Kingdom (UK) public funding was mainly only available for children to receive unilateral cochlear implants. In 2009, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published guidance for cochlear implantation following their review. According to these guidelines, all suitable children are eligible to have simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants or a sequential bilateral cochlear implant if they had received the first before the guidelines were published. Fifteen UK cochlear implant centres formed a consortium to carry out a multi-centre audit. The audit involves collecting data from simultaneously and sequentially implanted children at four intervals: before bilateral cochlear implants or before the sequential implant, 1, 2, and 3 years after bilateral implants. The measures include localization, speech recognition in quiet and background noise, speech production, listening, vocabulary, parental perception, quality of life, and surgical data including complications. The audit has now passed the 2-year point, and data have been received on 850 children. This article provides a first view of some data received up until March 2012.

  1. Cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness and tinnitus suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Jourdan T; O'Connell, Brendan; Hedley-Williams, Andrea; Wanna, George

    To quantify the potential effectiveness of cochlear implantation for tinnitus suppression in patients with single-sided deafness using the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. The study included 12 patients with unilateral tinnitus who were undergoing cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory was administered at the patient's cochlear implant candidacy evaluation appointment prior to implantation and every cochlear implant follow-up appointment, except activation, following implantation. Patient demographics and speech recognition scores were also retrospectively recorded using the electronic medical record. A significant reduction was found when comparing Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score preoperatively (61.2±27.5) to the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score after three months of cochlear implant use (24.6±28.2, p=0.004) and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score beyond 6months of CI use (13.3±18.9, p=0.008). Further, 45% of patients reported total tinnitus suppression. Mean CNC word recognition score improved from 2.9% (SD 9.4) pre-operatively to 40.8% (SD 31.7) by 6months post-activation, which was significantly improved from pre-operative scores (p=0.008). The present data is in agreement with previously published studies that have shown an improvement in tinnitus following cochlear implantation for the large majority of patients with single-sided deafness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mullerian Ducts Anomalies: A Simple View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Diaz, Nelson Enrique; Riano Montanez, Yeyson Fabian; Baron Criollo, Jose alexander

    2008-01-01

    Mullerian ducts anomalies are a major cause of infertility in women of reproductive age. They have multifactorial etiology. The following article reviews the classification of the American Fertility Society, the most widely accepted at present to describe this set of pathologies. Also a schematic review of the embryology is done and are shown cases of MRI, modality of choice by image to characterize the findings in the majority of presentation forms of these entities

  3. T-method duct design. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsal, R.J.; Behls, H.F.; Mangel, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for simulating HVAC duct systems, called T-method. The desirability of simulation appears in many HVAC problems, such as determining system operating efficiency, system retrofitting, nuclear plant normal/emergency conditions, fire/smoke control systems, fans operating in parallel, pressure balancing after system modification, and noise generated by dampers. T-method is capable of simulating these problems. This paper includes problem definition, a theoretical approach, calculation procedures, and many examples

  4. Pressure drop in T's in concentric ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock, R.A.W.

    1983-02-01

    A set of experiments has been carried out to measure the pressure drop characteristics of single-phase flow in dividing and joining right-angled T's in a concentric ducting system. These have been compared with measured pressure drops in a simple round tube system. In most tests with the concentric system the number of velocity heads lost is either similar to, or more than, the value for the round tubes. (author)

  5. Hinkley Point A gas duct repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    In 1990, routine visual inspection of the Hinckley Point A Reactor 1 pressure vessel gas outlet ducts showed failures in the welded stud bolts retaining the insulation edging strips. Since the ducts are accessible only from within the pressure vessel, a remote repair technique that could be deployed via the vessel stand pipe had to be found. A drawn arc stud welding and work package formerly used at the Oldbury Power Station was modified for the purpose. The only manipulators with sufficient reach and adequate carrying capacity to deploy the package were the Sizewell SNAKES manipulators. One of these was modified to fit the Hinckley reactor and repairs have been successfully carried out. Similar studs on the gas ducts in Reactor 2, are shielded from visual inspection by a Z-clip feature. A technique using pulsed thermography was developed. The studs were heated for a short time at their exposed ends using a prefocused lamp and the heat decay patterns monitored by an infrared camera enabling attached and detached studs to be distinguished. The inspection package was deployed using the SNAKES manipulator again. In both operations, I-Grip computer modelling was used in the design of the package envelope and the deployment routes. (UK)

  6. Dynamic response of cracked hexagonal subassembly ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazik, J.L.; Petroski, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    The hexagonal subassembly ducts (hexcans) of current Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) designs are typically made of 20% coldworked Type 316 stainless steel. Prolonged exposure of this initially tough and ductile material to a fast neutron flux at high temperatures can result in severe embrittlement. Under these conditions, the unstable crack propagation of flaws, which may have been introduced during fabrication or transportation of the hexcans, is a problem of interest in LMFBR safety analysis. The abnormal overpressurization resulting from certain interactions within a subassembly, or the rupture of one or more fuel pins, may be sufficient to overload an otherwise subcritical crack in an embrittled hexcan. This paper examines the dynamic elastic response of flawed and unflawed fast reactor subassembly ducts. A plane-strain finite element analysis was performed for ducts containing internal corner cracks, as well as external midflat cracks. Two worst case loading situations were considered: rapid uniform internal pressurization and suddenly applied point loads at opposite midflats. The finite-element code CHILES, which can accomodate the stress singularities that occur at crack tips, was given dynamic capabilities through the inclusion of a consistent mass matrix and step-by-step time integration scheme. The SAP IV code was also employed for eigenvalue analysis and modal response. Although this code does not contain singular elements in its element library, dynamic stress intensity factors were calculated by a technique requiring only ordinary isoparametric quadrilaterals

  7. Effect of duct geometry on Wells turbine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, S.; Abdel Hafiz, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Wells turbine duct design in the form of venturi duct is proposed and investigated. ► Optimum duct geometry is identified. ► Up to 14% increase of the turbine power can be achieved using the optimized duct geometry. ► Up to 9% improve of the turbine efficiency is attained by optimizing the turbine duct geometry. ► The optimized duct geometry results in tangible delay of the turbine stalling point. - Abstract: Wells turbines can represent important source of renewable energy for many countries. An essential disadvantage of Wells turbines is their low aerodynamic efficiency and consequently low power produced. In order to enhance the Wells turbine performance, the present research work proposes the use of a symmetrical duct in the form of a venturi tube with turbine rotor located at throat. The effects of duct area ratio and duct angle are investigated in order to optimize Wells turbine performance. The turbine performance is numerically investigated by solving the steady 3D incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stocks equation (RANS). A substantial improve of the turbine performance is achieved by optimizing the duct geometry. Increasing both the duct area ratio and duct angle increase the acceleration and deceleration upstream and downstream the rotor respectively. The accelerating flow with thinner boundary layer thickness upstream the rotor reduces the flow separation on the rotor suction side. The downstream diffuser reduces the interaction between tip leakage flow and blade suction side. Up to 14% increase in turbine power and 9% increase in turbine efficiency are achieved by optimizing the duct geometry. On other hand, a tangible delay of the turbine stall point is also detected.

  8. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallay, Dave [Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2016-01-07

    "9A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval. The primary research question with buried ducts is potential condensation at the outer jacket of the duct insulation in humid climates during the cooling season. Current best practices for buried ducts rely on encapsulating the insulated ducts with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation to control condensation and improve air sealing. The encapsulated buried duct concept has been analyzed and shown to be effective in hot-humid climates. The purpose of this project is to develop an alternative buried duct system that performs effectively as ducts in conditioned space - durable, energy efficient, and cost-effective - in a hot-humid climate (IECC warm-humid climate zone 3A) with three goals that distinguish this project: 1) Evaluation of design criteria for buried ducts that use common materials and do not rely on encapsulation using spray foam or disrupt traditional work sequences; 2) Establishing design criteria for compact ducts and incorporate those with the buried duct criteria to further reduce energy losses and control installed costs; 3) Developing HVAC design guidance for performing accurate heating and cooling load calculations for compact buried ducts.

  9. Imaging manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct tumor thrombi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingyu; Chen Jianyu; Liang Biling; Hu Tao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the imaging features of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) with bile duct tumor thrombi. Methods: Thirteen patients with bile duct tumor thrombi proved pathologically underwent imaging examination. MR and CT were performed in 3 cases, and 2 cases had CT only and 8 cases had MRI only. Ultrasonography(US) was performed in all 13 patients. The accuracy of bile duct tumor thrombi detection was compared between US, CT and MRI with Fisher test. Results: Liver tumors and bile duct tumor thrombi were demonstrated in all patients on CT or MRI. Presence of intraluminal soft tissue mass was found in four of five cases on CT, and mild enhancement of the intraluminal mass in the arterial phase was noted, dilated bile duct distal to tumor thrombi was detected in all five patients. Eleven Tumor thrombi showed slight low signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight high signal intensity on T 2 WI, and mild to moderate contrast enhancement on the contrast-enhanced MR images. The MRCP findings of tumor thrombi were as follows: interruption, stricture of the bile ducts or irregular filling defect in the bile ducts with dilated intrahepatic ducts, bile duet was abruptly interrupted or showed a 'rat-tail' stricture (n=5); the common bile duct was filled with tumor thrombi, intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and missing common bile duct was noted on MRCP (n=2). Bile duct tumor thrombi were correctly diagnosed in 7 cases on US, and 12 cases on CT or MRI. Six cases were misdiagnosed or miss-diagnosed on US, and 4 cases were misdiagnosed on CT or MRI. There was no significant difference between US and CT/MRI in diagnosis of bile duct tumor thrombi (P=0.270). Conclusion: CT or MR imaging is useful for the diagnosis of HCC with biliary tumor thrombi and for evaluating the extension of thrombi. (authors)

  10. Unilateral Duplication Of Parotid Duct. A Rare Anatomical Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Ferreira Arquez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The paired parotid glands are the largest of the major salivary glands and produces mainly serous secretions. The secretion of this gland reaches the oral cavity through single parotid duct (Stensen’s duct. The parotid duct begins at the anterior border of the gland, crosses the masseter muscle, and then pierces the buccinator muscle to reach the mucosa lining the mouth at the level of the cheek. The purpose of this study is determine the morphologic features of the parotid duct and describe an anatomical variation until now unreported. Methods and Findings: A total of 17 cadavers were used for this study in the Morphology Laboratory at the University of Pamplona. In a cadaver were findings: The main parotid duct originated two conducts: Left superior parotid duct and Left inferior parotid duct, is observed the criss-cross of the ducts, and then perforated the buccinator muscle and entered the oral cavity at a double parotid papilla containing a double opening, separated from each other in 0,98 mm. In the remaining  33 parotid regions (97.06% the parotid duct is conformed to the classical descriptions given in anatomical textbooks. Conclusions: The parotid duct anatomy is important for duct endoscopy, lithotripsy, sialography and trans-ductal facial nerve stimulation in the early stage of facial palsy in some cases. The anatomical variations also has clinical importance for parotid gland surgery and facial cosmetic surgery. To keep in mind the parotid duct variation will reduce iatrogenic injury risks and improve diagnosis of parotid duct injury.

  11. Binaural enhancement for bilateral cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BCI) users receive limited binaural cues and, thus, show little improvement to speech intelligibility from spatial cues. The feasibility of a method for enhancing the binaural cues available to BCI users is investigated. This involved extending interaural differences of levels, which typically are restricted to high frequencies, into the low-frequency region. Speech intelligibility was measured in BCI users listening over headphones and with direct stimulation, with a target talker presented to one side of the head in the presence of a masker talker on the other side. Spatial separation was achieved by applying either naturally occurring binaural cues or enhanced cues. In this listening configuration, BCI patients showed greater speech intelligibility with the enhanced binaural cues than with naturally occurring binaural cues. In some situations, it is possible for BCI users to achieve greater speech intelligibility when binaural cues are enhanced by applying interaural differences of levels in the low-frequency region.

  12. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lu

    Full Text Available Modern cochlear implant (CI users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  13. Ultra-Wideband Transceivers for Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reisenzahn Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-wideband (UWB radio offers low power consumption, low power spectral density, high immunity against interference, and other benefits, not only for consumer electronics, but also for medical devices. A cochlear implant (CI is an electronic hearing apparatus, requiring a wireless link through human tissue. In this paper we propose an UWB link for a data rate of Mbps and a propagation distance up to 500 mm. Transmitters with step recovery diode and transistor pulse generators are proposed. Two types of antennas and their filter characteristics in the UWB spectrum will be discussed. An ultra-low-power back tunnel diode receiver prototype is described and compared with conventional detector receivers.

  14. Cochlear vertebral entrapment syndrome: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chinghsiung; Lin Shinnkuang E-mail: sk1943@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Chang Yeujhy

    2001-11-01

    The authors describe a patient with isolated involvement of vestibulocochlear nerve by a huge vascular loop from vertebral dolichoectasia. No other neurological deficit was found except for unilateral hearing loss. Abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potential study indicated a retrocochlear lesion. The brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies demonstrated an abnormally enhanced vascular lesion impinged on the left porus acusticus with a displacement of the brainstem to the right. There was no infarction in the brainstem. A cerebral angiography demonstrated a megadolichoectatic horizontal loop at the intracranial portion of the left vertebral artery. There was no thrombus or atherosclerosis in the vertebrobasilar system. A mechanical compression by a vascular loop is the only possible pathogenesis for hearing loss. The authors diagnose this condition as cochlear vertebral entrapment syndrome.

  15. The cochlear nerve canal and internal auditory canal in children with normal cochlea but cochlear nerve deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Fei; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Zhenchang [Dept. of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)], e-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com; Mo, Lingyan [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)

    2013-04-15

    Background: There is an increasing frequency of requests for cochlear implantation (CI) in deaf children and more detailed image information is necessary for selecting appropriate candidates. Cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) is a contraindication to CI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the integrity of the cochlear nerve. The abnormalities of the cochlear nerve canal (CNC) and internal auditory canal (IAC) have been reported to be associated with CND. Purpose: To correlate CNC manifestation, size, and IAC diameter on high-resolution CT (HRCT) with CND diagnosed by MRI in children. Material and Methods: HRCT images from 35 sensorineurally deaf children who had normal cochlea but bilateral or unilateral CND diagnosed by MRI were studied retrospectively. The CNC and IAC manifestation and size were assessed and correlated with CND. Results: CND was diagnosed by MRI in 54/70 ears (77.1%). Thirty-two ears had an absent cochlear nerve (59.3%), while 22 ears had a small cochlear nerve (40.7%). The CNC diameter was <1.5 mm in 36 ears (66.7%). The CNC diameter ranged between 1.5 and 2.0 mm in seven ears (13.0%) and was >2.0 mm in 11 ears (20.4%). The IAC diameter was <3.0 mm in 25 ears (46.3%) and >3.0 mm in 29 ears (53.7%). Conclusion: The hypoplastic CNC might be more highly indicative of CND than that of a narrow IAC.

  16. The cochlear nerve canal and internal auditory canal in children with normal cochlea but cochlear nerve deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Fei; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Zhenchang; Mo, Lingyan

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing frequency of requests for cochlear implantation (CI) in deaf children and more detailed image information is necessary for selecting appropriate candidates. Cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) is a contraindication to CI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the integrity of the cochlear nerve. The abnormalities of the cochlear nerve canal (CNC) and internal auditory canal (IAC) have been reported to be associated with CND. Purpose: To correlate CNC manifestation, size, and IAC diameter on high-resolution CT (HRCT) with CND diagnosed by MRI in children. Material and Methods: HRCT images from 35 sensorineurally deaf children who had normal cochlea but bilateral or unilateral CND diagnosed by MRI were studied retrospectively. The CNC and IAC manifestation and size were assessed and correlated with CND. Results: CND was diagnosed by MRI in 54/70 ears (77.1%). Thirty-two ears had an absent cochlear nerve (59.3%), while 22 ears had a small cochlear nerve (40.7%). The CNC diameter was 2.0 mm in 11 ears (20.4%). The IAC diameter was 3.0 mm in 29 ears (53.7%). Conclusion: The hypoplastic CNC might be more highly indicative of CND than that of a narrow IAC

  17. [Cochlear implants in the social courts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottner, A; Iro, H; Schützenberger, A; Hoppe, U

    2018-02-01

    Since the indication for receiving a cochlear implant (CI) has widened (single-sided deafness [SSD], electric acoustic stimulation [EAS], bilateral CI, CI for long-term deafness), more and more patients come into consideration for such a treatment. Hence, disputes increasingly arise between patients and their insurance companies concerning the question of whether surgery and follow-up treatment have to be paid for by statutory health insurance. This work provides an overview of judgments rendered by the German social courts. We investigated whether and in which cases it is advisable for a patient to go to court, and how long the proceedings may take. We looked for judgments in the two biggest commercial legal databases and in the database of the German social courts, using combinations of the search parameters "Cochlear," "Cochlea," "Implant," and "Implantat." Three verdicts were attained by directly contacting the court; another one was mentioned in an article. The reviewed judgements were issued between 2003 and 2017. A total of 12 judgments were found. The patients won in all but one of the main proceedings. The case that was lost concerned exceptional circumstances. One patient didn't get the desired interim measure, but won in the main proceedings. The proceedings took between 1 year and 8 months, and 9 years and 5 months. Despite the amount of time the patient has to invest, taking legal action is worthwhile. The proceedings at the social courts are generally exempt from charges. In most cases, the statutory health insurance is ordered to pay for a CI.

  18. Parental perspectives of children using cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanini, Marcela Roselin; Morettin, Marina; Zabeu, Julia Speranza; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the parents' perspective with regard to evolution of their child with cochlear implant (CI). This was a cross-sectional prospective study conducted at the Centro de Pesquisas Audiológicas of Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais of Universidade de São Paulo. The selection of the sample was performed from the spontaneous demand, among the months from July to December 2011. The final sample comprised 50 parents or guardians of children using CI, with minimum 1 year and maximum of 3 years of device use. The translated and adapted to Brazilian Portuguese version of the questionnaire "Perspectives of parents of children with cochlear implants" was applied. This instrument consists of 74 questions and allows quantification of the parents' perspective on subscales that illustrate the situation of the child and family. Each question has five options scored from one to five responses. The Spearman test for comparison of results between the subscales was applied. The social relationships, self-sufficiency, and communication subscales showed the highest mean score, whereas the worst score was for child support subscale, reflecting the independence and autonomy of the patients. The correlation between the child subscales was realized, and the results showed themselves significant and positive for communication subscale of communication with all others subscales. The family subscales also had a positive correlation with the communication, education, and self-sufficiency. These results demonstrate that parents have good expectations regarding communication, independence, and social participation of children after CI surgery, and this questionnaire is a useful tool for use in clinical practice.

  19. Effect of unilateral and simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus : A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, Alice; Smulders, Yvette E.; Ramakers, Geerte G. J.; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L.; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A.; Stokroos, Robert J.; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien H.; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Huinck, Wendy J.; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A.; Grolman, Wilko

    Objectives/HypothesisTo determine the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus perception in patients with severe bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss and to demonstrate possible differences between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation. Study DesignProspective study.

  20. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, 789 Howard Avenue, P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  1. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R.

    2015-01-01

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  2. Eversion Bile Duct Anastomosis: A Safe Alternative for Bile Duct Size Discrepancy in Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Leyte, Pilar; McKenna, Greg J; Ruiz, Richard M; Anthony, Tiffany L; Saracino, Giovanna; Giuliano, Testa; Klintmalm, Goran B; Kim, Peter Tw

    2018-04-10

    Introduction Bile duct size discrepancy in liver transplantation may increase the risk of biliary complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and outcomes of the eversion bile duct anastomosis technique in deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) with duct to duct anastomosis. Methods A total of 210 patients who received a DDLT with duct to duct anastomosis from 2012 to 2017 were divided into two groups: those who had eversion bile duct anastomosis (N=70) and standard bile duct anastomosis (N=140). Biliary complications rates were compared between the two groups. Results There was no difference in the cumulative incidence of biliary strictures (P=0.20) and leaks (P=0.17) between the two groups. The biliary complication rate in the eversion group was 14.3% and 11.4% in the standard anastomosis group. All the biliary complications in the eversion group were managed with endoscopic stenting. A severe size mismatch (≥3:1 ratio) was associated with a significantly higher incidence of biliary strictures (44.4%) compared to 2:1 ratio (8.2%), (P=0.002). Conclusion The use of the eversion technique is a safe alternative for bile duct discrepancy in deceased donor liver transplantation; however, severe bile duct size mismatch may be a risk factor for biliary strictures with such technique. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  3. Pressure analysis in ventilation ducts at bituminization facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Naoki; Iimura, Masato; Takahashi, Yuki; Omori, Eiichi; Yamanouchi, Takamichi

    1997-09-01

    Pressure analysis in cell ventilation ducts at bituminization facility where the fire and explosion accident occured was carried out. This report also describes the results of bench mark calculations for computer code EVENT84 which was used for the accident analysis. The bench mark calculations were performed by comparing the analytical results by EVENT84 code with the experimental data of safety demonstration tests of ventilation system which were carried out by JAERI. We confirmed the applicability of EVENT84 code with the conservative results. The pressure analysis in cell ventilation ducts at bituminization facility were performed by comparing the analytical results of duct pressure by EVENT84 code with the yield stress of destroyed ducts by explosion, in order to estimate the scale of explosion. As a result, we could not explain the damage of ducts quantitatively, but we found the local pressure peaks analytically in downstream ducts where the serious damages were observed. (author)

  4. Cochlear implantation in autistic children with profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowska, Magdalena; Pastuszka, Agnieszka; Łukaszewicz-Moszyńska, Zuzanna; Mikołajewska, Lidia; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2016-11-19

    Cochlear implants have become the method of choice for the treatment of severe-to-profound hearing loss in both children and adults. Its benefits are well documented in the pediatric and adult population. Also deaf children with additional needs, including autism, have been covered by this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits from cochlear implantation in deafened children with autism as the only additional disability. This study analyzes data of six children. The follow-up time was at least 43 months. The following data were analyzed: medical history, reaction to music and sound, Ling's six sounds test, onomatopoeic word test, reaction to spoken child's name, response to requests, questionnaire given to parents, sound processor fitting sessions and data. After cochlear implantation each child presented other communication skills. In some children, the symptoms of speech understanding were observed. No increased hyperactivity associated with daily use cochlear implant was observed. The study showed that in autistic children the perception is very important for a child's sense of security and makes contact with parents easier. Our study showed that oral communication is not likely to be a realistic goal in children with cochlear implants and autism. The implantation results showed benefits that varied among those children. The traditional methods of evaluating the results of cochlear implantation in children with autism are usually insufficient to fully assess the functional benefits. These benefits should be assessed in a more comprehensive manner taking into account the limitations of communication resulting from the essence of autism. It is important that we share knowledge about these complex children with cochlear implants. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Costs involved in using a cochlear implant in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Robyn Kerr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation is an expensive but effective lifelong intervention for individuals with a severe-to-profound hearing loss. The primary aim of this study was to survey the short- and long-term costs of cochlear implantation. Individuals (N=154 using cochlear implants obtained from the University of Stellenbosch-Tygerberg Hospital Cochlear Implant Unit in Cape Town, South Africa were surveyed using a questionnaire and patient record review. The questionnaire used a combination of closed and open-ended questions to gather both quantitative and qualitative information. Costs were categorised as short- and long-term costs. All costs were converted to constant rands (June 2010 using the Consumer Price Index to allow for comparison in real terms over time. In the first 10 years of implantation the average estimated costs incurred by adults totalled R379 626, and by children R455 225. The initial purchase of the implant system was the most substantial cost, followed by upgrading of the processor. Travel and accommodation costs peaked in the first 2 years. On average the participants spent R2 550 per year on batteries and spares. Rehabilitation for children cost an average of R7 200. Insurance costs averaged R4 040 per year, and processor repairs R3 000 each. In addition to the upfront expense of obtaining the cochlear implant system, individuals using a cochlear implant in South Africa should be prepared for the long-term costs of maintenance, accessing the unit, support services and additional costs associated with use. Knowledge of these costs is important to ensure that individuals are successful users of their cochlear implants in the long term.

  6. Image Registration of Cochlear µCT Data Using Heat Distribution Similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Fagertun, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of the anatomical variability of the human cochlear is important for the design and function of Cochlear Implants. Good non-rigid alignment of high-resolution cochlear μCT data is a challenging task. In this paper we study the use of heat distribution similarity between sampl...

  7. New Criteria of Indication and Selection of Patients to Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. L. Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous changes continue to occur in cochlear implant candidacy. In general, these have been accompanied by concomitant and satisfactory changes in surgical techniques. Together, this has advanced the utility and safety of cochlear implantation. Most devices are now approved for use in patients with severe to profound unilateral hearing loss rather then the prior requirement of a bilateral profound loss. Furthermore, studies have begun utilizing short electrode arrays for shallow insertion in patients with considerable low-frequency residual hearing. This technique will allow the recipient to continue to use acoustically amplified hearing for the low frequencies simultaneously with a cochlear implant for the high frequencies. The advances in design of, and indications for, cochlear implants have been matched by improvements in surgical techniques and decrease in complications. The resulting improvements in safety and efficacy have further encouraged the use of these devices. This paper will review the new concepts in the candidacy of cochlear implant. Medline data base was used to search articles dealing with the following topics: cochlear implant in younger children, cochlear implant and hearing preservation, cochlear implant for unilateral deafness and tinnitus, genetic hearing loss and cochlear implant, bilateral cochlear implant, neuropathy and cochlear implant and neural plasticity, and the selection of patients for cochlear implant.

  8. HVAC; Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning - Aerosol Duct Sealant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    material was applied. Annual energy and cost savings were predicted based on a typical weather year for each site. The installation of the duct...Balance reports; Visible dust streaks on duct work, ceilings near supply diffusers, or electrical boxes; Comfort complaints Specific Leakage...energy consumption , depending on the HVAC system type and the location of the ducts that were sealed. The cost effectiveness of the technology is

  9. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct involvement : computed Tomographic (CT) findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; And others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the radiologic features of computed tomography (CT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with bile duct involvement. We retrospectively analyzed the two phase spiral CT findings of 31 patients in whom HCC with bile duct invasion (n=3D28) or compression (n=3D3), was diagnosed. Eight of these underwent follow up CT after transarterial chemoembolization. We analyzed the size, type, location, enhancement pattern, and lipiodol retention of parenchymal and intraductal masses, as well as their lymphadenopathy. In all patients with bile duct invasion, single or multiple masses were demonstrated in the bile ducts. Intraductal masses showed the same enhancement characteristics as the parenchymal mass (kappa 0.550, p less than 0.001), and were contiguous to this mass. In 14 of 28 patients, intraductal masses filled the peripheral intrahepatic bile ducts and extended to the common bile ducts. In the other 14, the parenchymal mass extended to the area of the porta hepatis and then directly invaded the large ducts. In nine of the 28 patients, there was a hypoattenuated cleft between the intraductal mass and ductal wall. In six, a parenchymal mass was not apparent (n=3D2), or was smaller than 2cm (n=3D4). In five of eight patients (62.5%), follow-up CT after transarterial chemoembolization showed compact or partial lipiodol retention within the intraductal mass. In patients with bile duct compression, perihilar lymph nodes were noted along with the dilated intrahepatic duct but no intra ductal mass was demonstrated in the duct. Hepatocellular carcinomas cause bile duct dilatation either by direct invasion or by extrinsic compression of the bile duct with surrounding enlarged nodes. For the diagnosis of this condition, CT is helpful. (author)

  11. Risk factors for central bile duct injury complicating partial liver resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E. A.; de Boer, M. T.; Sieders, E.; Peeters, P. M. J. G.; de Jong, K. P.; Slooff, M. J. H.; Porte, R. J.

    Background: Bile duct injury is a serious complication following liver resection. Few studies have differentiated between leakage from small peripheral bile ducts and central bile duct injury (CBDI), defined as an injury leading to leakage or stenosis of the common bile duct, common hepatic duct,

  12. Computed tomography of hepatocellular carcinoma. Dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soomi; Nakamura, Hitonobu; Tanaka, Ken; Hori, Shinichi; Tokunaga, Kou [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-10-01

    Based on a series of CT of the liver in 125 patients with hepatoma and 45 patients with metastatic hepatic tumors, the mode of dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct was examined. In patients with hepatoma, partia dilatations of intrahepatic bile duct were more commonly seen than general dilatations. On the other hand, there was no case of partial dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct in patients with metastatic hepatic tumors. It could be concluded that partial dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct is an useful CT finding to make a diagnosis of hepatoma, particularly to differentiate hepatoma from metastatic hepatic tumor.

  13. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, ou...... may be important in pancreas physiology and potentially in pancreas pathophysiology....... aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan...

  14. Duct Remediation Program: Engineered access research and construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, T.D.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, Duct Remediation mission concentrated on removing Plutonium Oxide from the process ductwork in the primary Plutonium processing facility. When possible, remediation took place from existing process gloveboxes. Fifteen locations were identified, however, that required accessing duct runs where no process gloveboxes existed. The building's second floor utility areas had many locations where long, inaccessible duct runs were prevalent. Consequently, an extensive program for design, procurement and construction was initiated to contain and isolate ducts for penetration when existing glovebox sites were not present

  15. Occlusion of the cystic duct by electrocoagulation: A radiologic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.D.; Quenville, W.F.; Burhenne, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical dissolution and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy are promising new methods for the treatment of cholelithiasis without cholecystectomy. Nonsurgical defunctionalization of the gallbladder is now required to prevent recurrent stone formation. The authors consider cystic duct occlusion to be the first step. Ten domestic pigs underwent transcatheter electrocoagulation of the cystic duct via a cholecystostomy under fluoroscopic control. Stricture formation was followed by complete cystic duct occlusion in all ten cases. After a follow-up period ranging from 2 to 17 weeks (mean, 13 weeks), the animals were killed. Histologic studies demonstrated that complete obliteration of the cystic duct lumen was due to fibrous scar formation

  16. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  17. Fluorescent Method for Observing Intravascular Bonghan Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Cheon Lee

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Observation of intra-vascular threadlike structures in the blood vessels of rats is reported with the images by differential interference contrast microscope, and fluorescence inverted microscope of the acridine-orange stained samples. The confocal microscope image and the hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed the distinctive pattern of nuclei distribution that clearly discerned the threadlike structure from fibrin, capillary, small venule, arteriole, or lymph vessel. Physiological function of the intra-vascular thread in connection with acupuncture is discussed. Especially, this threadlike duct can be a circulation path for herb-liquid flow, which may provide the scientific mechanism for therapeutic effect of herbal acupuncture.

  18. Levitated Duct Fan (LDF) Aircraft Auxiliary Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Emerson, Dawn C.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2011-01-01

    This generator concept includes a novel stator and rotor architecture made from composite material with blades attached to the outer rotating shell of a ducted fan drum rotor, a non-contact support system between the stator and rotor using magnetic fields to provide levitation, and an integrated electromagnetic generation system. The magnetic suspension between the rotor and the stator suspends and supports the rotor within the stator housing using permanent magnets attached to the outer circumference of the drum rotor and passive levitation coils in the stator shell. The magnets are arranged in a Halbach array configuration.

  19. JET neutral beam duct Optical Interlock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ash, A.D.; Jones, T.T.C.; Surrey, E.; Ćirić, D.; Hall, S.I.; Young, D.; Afzal, M.; Hackett, L.; Day, I.E.; King, R.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Optical Interlocks were installed on the JET NBI system as part of the EP2 upgrade. • The system protects the JET tokamak and NBI systems from thermal load damage. • Balmer-α beam emission is used to monitor the neutral beam-line pressure. • We demonstrate an improved trip delay of 2 ms compared to 50 ms before EP2. - Abstract: The JET Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system is the most powerful neutral beam plasma heating system currently operating. Optical Interlocks were installed on the beam lines in 2011 for the JET Enhancement Project 2 (EP2), when the heating power was increased from 23 MW to 34 MW. JET NBI has two beam lines. Each has eight positive ion injectors operating in deuterium at 80 kV–125 kV (accelerator voltage) and up to 65 A (beam current). Heating power is delivered through two ducts where the central power density can be more than 100 MW/m{sup 2}. In order to deliver this safely, the beam line pressure should be below 2 × 10{sup −5} mbar otherwise the power load on the duct from the re-ionised fraction of the beam is excessive. The new Optical Interlock monitors the duct pressure by measuring the Balmer-α beam emission (656 nm). This is proportional to the instantaneous beam flux and the duct pressure. Light is collected from a diagnostic window and focused into 1-mm diameter fibres. The Doppler shifted signal is selected using an angle-tuned interference filter. The light is measured by a photo-multiplier module with a logarithmic amplifier. The interlock activation time of 2 ms is sufficient to protect the system from a fully re-ionised beam—a significant improvement on the previous interlock. The dynamic range is sufficient to see bremsstrahlung emission from JET plasma and not saturate during plasma disruptions. For high neutron flux operations the optical fibres within the biological shield can be annealed to 350 °C. A self-test is possible by illuminating the diagnostic window with a test lamp and measuring

  20. Transcanal labyrinthectomy for intractable vertigo after unilateral cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Basura, Gregory J; Zwolan, Teresa A; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Telian, Steven A

    2011-10-01

    Document the use of transcanal labyrinthectomy to treat disabling attacks of vertigo after unilateral cochlear implantation. A 46-year-old woman with severe-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss secondary to enlarged vestibular aqueducts underwent cochlear implantation for her right ear with a Nucleus Freedom device. The surgery was uneventful, and postoperative imaging confirmed that the electrode was positioned properly. She developed episodic vertigo 10 to 14 days after the implant surgery, which failed to improve with aggressive vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Plugging of the round window for possible perilymphatic fistula did not relieve her symptoms. Right transcanal labyrinthectomy supplemented by filling the vestibule with gentamicin-soaked Gelfoam and then a customized vestibular rehabilitation program. Comparison of vestibular symptoms and cochlear implant performance before and after transcanal labyrinthectomy. The patient had immediate relief of symptoms, and the function of the cochlear implant was not adversely affected. Transcanal labyrinthectomy may be an effective method to ablate the vestibular end organ after unilateral cochlear implantation. It can offer relief of disabling vertigo without adversely affecting the performance of the implant.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen upregulates cochlear constitutive nitric oxide synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Ming-Ching

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a known adjuvant for treating ischemia-related inner ear diseases. Controversies still exist in the role of HBOT in cochlear diseases. Few studies to date have investigated the cellular changes that occur in inner ears after HBOT. Nitric oxide, which is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, is an important signaling molecule in cochlear physiology and pathology. Here we investigated the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on eardrum morphology, cochlear function and expression of NOS isoforms in cochlear substructures after repetitive HBOT in guinea pigs. Results Minor changes in the eardrum were observed after repetitive HBOT, which did not result in a significant hearing threshold shift by tone burst auditory brainstem responses. A differential effect of HBOT on the expression of NOS isoforms was identified. Upregulation of constitutive NOS (nNOS and eNOS was found in the substructures of the cochlea after HBOT, but inducible NOS was not found in normal or HBOT animals, as shown by immunohistochemistry. There was no obvious DNA fragmentation present in this HBOT animal model. Conclusions The present evidence indicates that the customary HBOT protocol may increase constitutive NOS expression but such upregulation did not cause cell death in the treated cochlea. The cochlear morphology and auditory function are consequently not changed through the protocol.

  2. Verbal Working Memory in Children With Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Low, Keri E.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Verbal working memory in children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing was examined. Participants Ninety-three fourth graders (47 with normal hearing, 46 with cochlear implants) participated, all of whom were in a longitudinal study and had working memory assessed 2 years earlier. Method A dual-component model of working memory was adopted, and a serial recall task measured storage and processing. Potential predictor variables were phonological awareness, vocabulary knowledge, nonverbal IQ, and several treatment variables. Potential dependent functions were literacy, expressive language, and speech-in-noise recognition. Results Children with cochlear implants showed deficits in storage and processing, similar in size to those at second grade. Predictors of verbal working memory differed across groups: Phonological awareness explained the most variance in children with normal hearing; vocabulary explained the most variance in children with cochlear implants. Treatment variables explained little of the variance. Where potentially dependent functions were concerned, verbal working memory accounted for little variance once the variance explained by other predictors was removed. Conclusions The verbal working memory deficits of children with cochlear implants arise due to signal degradation, which limits their abilities to acquire phonological awareness. That hinders their abilities to store items using a phonological code. PMID:29075747

  3. Exploring the experiences of teenagers with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Victoria; Verschuur, Carl; Lathlean, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Teenage cochlear implant users' perceptions of deafness, surgery, fitting of the device and life as a cochlear implant wearer were explored in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of teenagers' experiences of living with the device. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were undertaken and analysed using thematic analysis. Ten teenagers aged 14-16 years with at least one cochlear implant were interviewed. Seven teenagers experienced great pre-operative anxiety and two reported significant post-operative pain. Four of the teenagers described a mismatch between their expectations and the disappointing reality of adjusting to the device. However, all the teenagers reported an enhanced sense of well-being as a result of being able to interact more easily with their world around them. The teenagers differed in the extent to which they identified with the hearing and deaf world. Despite the early challenges, over time the teenagers experienced many functional and psychosocial benefits. Most felt their lives were now easier as a result of the cochlear implant(s). They described complex, flexible identities. By giving prominence to the teenagers' voices this study has added new knowledge concerning their experience of surgery. The findings also more fully revealed the challenges of adjusting to the device and the impact of having a cochlear implant on the teenagers' identities. Clinical recommendations are made to address the gaps in service highlighted by these findings.

  4. Prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhafeeri, Ahmad M; Alsanosi, Abdulrahman A

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of inner ear anomalies and the frequency of different anomaly types among cochlear implant recipients. This study included a retrospective chart review of all patients who received cochlear implants between January 2009 and January 2013 in King Abdulaziz University Hospital cochlear implant program in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All subjects underwent thin-cut CT of the temporal bone and MRI. The collected data included age, gender, and CT and MRI findings regarding temporal bone anomalies. Patients with any identified congenital inner ear anomalies were included in the study.  In total, 316 patients' cases were reviewed. Inner ear malformations were identified in 24 patients, which represented a prevalence of 7.5%. Among these 24 patients, 8 (33.3%) presented with a large vestibular aqueduct (LVA), 8 (33.3%) semicircular canal (SCC) dysplasia, 7 (29.1%) classical Mondini deformity, and one (4.1%) cochlear hypoplasia. The prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant recipients was 7.5%. This result is consistent with findings worldwide. The most common anomalies were LVA and SCC hypoplasia; by contrast, in other regions, the most common anomaly is either the Mondini deformity, or LVA.

  5. Fourteen-years experience with cochlear implantation in Ramathibodi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemsuwan, Lalida; Cheewaruangroj, Wichit; Tungkeeratichai, Jumroon; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Thawin, Cheamchit; Lertsukprasert, Krisna; Tiravanitchakul, Rattinan; Dara, Rada; Laothamatas, Jiraporn

    2010-12-01

    To review the cochlear implant program in Ramathibodi Hospital and share experience of cochlear implantation emphasized on clinical and surgical outcomes. Retrospective review of 143 ears (140 patients) operated with cochlear implant between 1995 and 2009. The demographic data including etiology of deafness and findings from temporal bone CTscans were reviewed. The authors' experience with cochlear implant surgery in terms of patient selection, patient advisory clinic, necessary equipment, pre- and postoperative evaluations, surgical techniques and complications were discussed. Most congenital origin was unknown etiology and congenital rubella was the most common known cause. From the CT scans of congenital deafness, vestibular aqueduct dilatation was the most common and found in 29.31% while Mondini malformation was shown to be 16.37%. The authors' surgical technique of using the pocket method and designed bony ridge at cortical mastoid rim had helped stabilizing the implant and electrode fancoil. During the last two years, no complication or revision surgery was detected. Cochlear implant surgery in both children and adults can result in good surgical outcome and fewer complications under experienced surgeons and a good team.

  6. Cochlear injury and adaptive plasticity of the auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNA R. eFETONI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that cochlear stressors as noise exposure and aging can induce homeostatic/maladaptive changes in the central auditory system from the brainstem to the cortex. Studies centered on such changes have revealed several mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult (noise trauma, drug- or age-related injury. The oxidative stress is central to current theories of induced sensory neural hearing loss and aging, and interventions to attenuate the hearing loss are based on antioxidant agent. The present review addresses the recent literature on the alterations in hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons due to noise-induced oxidative stress in the cochlea, as well on the impact of cochlear damage on the auditory cortex neurons. The emerging image emphasizes that noise-induced deafferentation and upward spread of cochlear damage is associated with the altered dendritic architecture of auditory pyramidal neurons. The cortical modifications may be reversed by treatment with antioxidants counteracting the cochlear redox imbalance. These findings open new therapeutic approaches to treat the functional consequences of the cortical reorganization following cochlear damage.

  7. Cochlear Implants and Psychiatric Assessments: a Norrie Disease Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Denis; Dubois, Thomas; Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Gilain, Chantal; Garin, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    It is important to perform psychiatric assessments of adult patients who are candidates for cochlear implants both to screen them for psychiatric disorders and to assess their understanding and compliance with the procedure. Deafness is a factor of difficulty for conducting in-depth psychiatric interviews, but concomitant blindness may make it impossible. After a description of Norrie disease, a rare disease in which blindness and deafness may occur together, we propose a case report of a patient suffering from the disease and who consulted in view of a cochlear implant. Early information on cochlear implants appears to be necessary before total deafness occurs in patients suffering from Norrie disease. An inventory of digital communication tools that can be used by the patient is also highly valuable. Research should be supported for a more systematic use of psychiatric assessments prior to cochlear implants. In the special case of Norrie disease, we recommend early screening for mental retardation and related psychotic disorders and, depending on the patient's level of understanding, preventive information on the benefits and limits of cochlear implants before total deafness occurs.

  8. Influence of cochlear implantation on peripheral vestibular receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Eike; Louza, Julia P R; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Gürkov, Robert

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to assess the influence of a cochlear implantation on peripheral vestibular receptor function in the inner ear in the implant and in the nonimplant side, and 2) to analyze a possible correlation with resulting vertigo symptoms. Prospective clinical study. Cochlear implant center at tertiary referral hospital. A total of 32 patients, aged 15 to 83 years, undergoing cochlear implantation were assessed pre- and postoperatively for caloric horizontal semicircular canal response and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials of the sacculus, and postoperatively for subjective vertigo symptoms. Patients with vertigo were compared with patients without symptoms with regard to the findings of the vestibular function tests. Cochlear implantation represents a significant risk factor for horizontal semicircular canal impairment (P 0.05). Cochlear implantation is a relevant risk factor for damage of peripheral vestibular receptor function. Therefore, preservation not only of residual hearing function but also of vestibular function should be aimed for, by using minimally invasive surgical techniques. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcomes and special considerations of cochlear implantation in waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorinis, Georgios; Lenarz, Thomas; Giourgas, Alexandros; Durisin, Martin; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was a state-of-the-art analysis of cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Twenty-five patients with WS treated with cochlear implants in our department from 1990 to 2010. The 25 patients with WS underwent 35 cochlear implantations. Hearing outcome was evaluated using HSM sentence test in 65 dB in quiet, Freiburg Monosyllabic Test, and categories of auditory performance for children and compared with that of a control group. Anatomic abnormalities of the inner ear were examined using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporal bones. The mean follow-up time was 8.3 years (range, 0.3-18.3 yr). The majority achieved favorable postimplantation performance with mean HSM scores of 75.3% (range, 22.6%-99%) and Freiburg Monosyllabic Test scores of 67.8% (range, 14%-95%). However, in 4 cases, the results were less satisfactory. The comparison with the control group did not reveal any statistical significance (p = 0.56). In 6 patients (24%), behavioral disorders caused temporary difficulties during the rehabilitation procedure. Except of isolated large vestibule in 1 patient, the radiological assessment of the 50 temporal bones did not reveal any temporal bone abnormalities. Most patients with WS performed well with cochlear implants. However, WS is related to behavioral disorders that may cause temporary rehabilitation difficulties. Finally, temporal bone malformations that could affect cochlear implantation are notcharacteristic of WS.

  10. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  11. Effects of chronic furosemide on central neural hyperactivity and cochlear thresholds after cochlear trauma in guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina eMulders

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased neuronal spontaneous firing rates have been observed throughout the central auditory system after trauma to the cochlea and this hyperactivity is believed to be associated with the phantom perception of tinnitus. Previously we have shown in an animal model of hearing loss, that an acute injection with furosemide can significantly decrease hyperactivity after cochlear trauma and eliminate behavioural evidence of tinnitus of early onset. However, furosemide also has the potential to affect cochlear thresholds. In this paper we measured the effects of a chronic (daily injections for 7 days furosemide treatment on the spontaneous firing rate of inferior colliculus neurons and on cochlear thresholds in order to establish whether a beneficial effect on hyperactivity can be obtained without causing additional hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to a 10 kHz, 124dB, 2 hour acoustic trauma, and after 5 days of recovery, were given daily i.p. injections of 80mg/kg furosemide or an equivalent amount of saline. The activity of single IC neurons was recorded 24 hours following the last injection. The furosemide treatment had no effect on cochlear thresholds compared to saline injections but did result in significant reductions in spontaneous firing rates recorded in inferior colliculus. These results that suggest a long term beneficial effect of furosemide on hyperactivity after cochlear trauma may be achievable without detrimental effects on hearing, which is important when considering therapeutic potential.

  12. The scala vestibuli for cochlear implantation. An anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulya, A J; Steenerson, R L

    1996-02-01

    Traditionally, cochlear implantation has used the scala tympani (ST) for electrode insertion. When faced with ST ossification, the surgeon may elect to drill out the cochlea to accomplish partial electrode insertion. Theoretically, another option in this situation is to insert the electrode into the scala vestibuli (SV). To determine whether or not the dimensions of the SV are sufficient to accommodate an electrode array so as to assess the feasibility of SV cochlear implantation. The study of 20 normal human temporal bones, comparing the maximum diameter and surface area of the ST with those of the combined SV and scala media. The dimensions of the SV and scala media were comparable to those of the ST and appeared sufficient to accommodate a cochlear implant electrode array. It appears that the combination of SV and scala media is a viable alternative route for electrode insertion, at least on the basis of anatomic dimensions, in those cases in which the ST is obliterated.

  13. Pre-, intra- and post-operative imaging of cochlear implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Naguib, N.N.N.; Burck, I. [University Hospital Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tawfik, A. [Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Emam, A. [University Hospital Alexandria (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Nour-Eldin, A. [University Hospital Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Radiology; Stoever, T. [University Hospital of Frankfurt (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to present essential imaging aspects in patients who are candidates for a possible cochlear implant as well as in postsurgical follow-up. Imaging plays a major role in providing information on preinterventional topography, variations and possible infections. Preoperative imaging using DVT, CT, MRI or CT and MRI together is essential for candidate selection, planning of surgical approach and exclusion of contraindications like the complete absence of the cochlea or cochlear nerve, or infection. Relative contraindications are variations of the cochlea and vestibulum. Intraoperative imaging can be performed by fluoroscopy, mobile radiography or DVT. Postoperative imaging is regularly performed by conventional X-ray, DVT, or CT. In summary, radiological imaging has its essential role in the pre- and post-interventional period for patients who are candidates for cochlear implants.

  14. Cochlear changes in presbycusis with tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Kyoichi; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Schachern, Patricia A; Morita, Norimasa; Nomiya, Shigenobu; Deroee, Armin F; Doi, Katsumi; Mori, Kazunori; Murata, Kiyotaka; Paparella, Michael M

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of tinnitus is obscure and its treatment is therefore elusive. Significant progress in this field can only be achieved by determining the mechanisms of tinnitus generation, and thus, histopathologic findings of the cochlea in presbycusis with tinnitus become crucial. We revealed the histopathologic findings of the cochlea in subjects with presbycusis and tinnitus. The subjects were divided into 2 groups, presbycusis with tinnitus (tinnitus) group and presbycusis without tinnitus (control) group, with each group comprising 8 temporal bones from 8 subjects. We quantitatively analyzed the number of spiral ganglion cells, loss of cochlear inner and outer hair cells, and areas of the stria vascularis and spiral ligament. There was a significantly greater loss of outer hair cells in the tinnitus group compared with the control group in the basal and upper middle turns. The stria vascularis was more atrophic in the tinnitus group compared with the control group in the basal turn. Tinnitus is more common in patients with presbycusis who have more severe degeneration of outer hair cells and stria vascularis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Migration of cochlear lateral wall cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, George; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Armour, Gary; Whitworth, Craig; Rybak, Leonard

    2003-03-01

    The role of apoptosis and proliferation in maintenance of cochlear lateral wall cells was examined. The methods employed for detection of apoptosis were the Hoechst fluorescence stain and TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end-labeling) assay, and proliferations were 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and presence of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen. The incidence of apoptosis in the strial marginal cell was 50% greater (32.9+/-3.7%) than strial intermediate and basal cells but similar to spiral ligament cells. Although division of marginal strial cells was rarely detected, a significant number of proliferating cells in the remaining stria vascularis and spiral ligament were observed. These data implied that replacement of marginal cells arose elsewhere and could be followed by a BrdU-deoxythymidine pulse-chase study. At 2 h post injection, nuclear BrdU in marginal cells was not detected; however, by 24 h post injection, 20-25% of marginal cell nuclei were BrdU-positive. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that marginal cells were replaced by underlying cells. Cell migration appears to be an important mechanism for preserving the function and structure of the stria vascularis.

  16. Cochlear implant users' spectral ripple resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Kyung; Turner, Christopher W; Karsten, Sue A; Henry, Belinda A; Gantz, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    This study revisits the issue of the spectral ripple resolution abilities of cochlear implant (CI) users. The spectral ripple resolution of recently implanted CI recipients (implanted during the last 10 years) were compared to those of CI recipients implanted 15 to 20 years ago, as well as those of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners from previously published data from Henry, Turner, and Behrens [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 1111-1121 (2005)]. More recently, implanted CI recipients showed significantly better spectral ripple resolution. There is no significant difference in spectral ripple resolution for these recently implanted subjects compared to hearing-impaired (acoustic) listeners. The more recently implanted CI users had significantly better pre-operative speech perception than previously reported CI users. These better pre-operative speech perception scores in CI users from the current study may be related to better performance on the spectral ripple discrimination task; however, other possible factors such as improvements in internal and external devices cannot be excluded.

  17. Common bile duct cancer with massive necrosis mimicking choledochal dilatation on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, H.; Matsumoto, S.; Ueda, S.; Maeda, T.; Aikawa, H.; Mori, H.

    1991-01-01

    Carcinomas of the common bile duct are usually seen as dilatation of the bile duct proximal to a solid mass on CT. In the case reported here, the common bile duct cancer itself mimicked dilated common bile duct on CT because of massive necrosis. In a case of simulating dilated common bile duct on CT, and discrepancy between CT and ultrasonography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a common bile duct cancer with massive necrosis should be included in the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Morphological study of pancreatic duct in red jungle fowl | Kadhim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neither goblet cells nor ductal glands were found in the pancreatic ducts. Secretion of both neutral and sulfated materials by the epithelial lining the pancreatic ducts, suggesting that they are acting not only to facilitate the transport of the pancreatic juice, but also as a protective barrier to protect the gland from autodigestion.

  19. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of vanishing bile duct syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndromes (VBDS) are characterized by progressive loss of small intrahepatic ducts caused by a variety of different diseases leading to chronic cholestasis, cirrhosis, and premature death from liver failure. The majority of adult patients with VBDS suffer from primary biliary

  20. Bile duct anastomotic stricture after pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Kenneth S H; Chan, See Ching; Chan, Kwong Leung; Sharr, William W; Tam, Paul K H; Fan, Sheung Tat; Lo, Chung Mau

    2012-07-01

    Hepaticojejunostomy is a well-accepted method, whereas duct-to-duct anastomosis is gaining popularity for bile duct reconstruction in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Biliary complications, especially biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS), are not clearly defined. The aim of the present study is to determine the rate of BAS and its associated risk factors. The study included 78 pediatric patients (duct-to-duct anastomosis during LDLT. The median follow-up period for the BAS group and the non-BAS group was 57.8 and 79.5 months, respectively (P = .683). Ten of the patients with BAS required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with or without dilatation for treating the stricture. Multivariable analysis showed that hepatic artery thrombosis and duct-to-duct anastomosis were 2 risk factors associated with BAS. In pediatric LDLT, hepaticojejunostomy is the preferred method for bile duct reconstruction, but more large-scale research needs to be done to reconfirm this result. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Liver and Bile Duct Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver cancer includes hepatocellular carcinoma and bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma). Risk factors for HCC include chronic infection with hepatitis B or C and cirrhosis of the liver. Start here to find information on liver and bile duct cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  2. Cystic duct closure by sealing with bipolar electrocoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, S; Damgaard, B; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic duct leakage after cholecystectomy is not uncommon and is a potentially serious complication. The aim of this study was to assess a bipolar sealing system (LigaSure) for closure of the cystic duct. METHODS: The records from consecutive laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed i...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of Muellerian duct anomalies in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yi; Phelps, Andrew; Zapala, Matthew A.; MacKenzie, John D.; MacKenzie, Tippi C.; Courtier, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Muellerian duct anomalies encompass a wide variety of disorders resulting from abnormalities in the embryological development of the Muellerian ducts. In the prepubertal pediatric population, Muellerian duct anomalies are often incidental findings on studies obtained for other reasons. The onset of menses can prompt more clinical symptoms. Proper characterization of Muellerian duct anomalies is important because these anomalies can affect the development of gynecological disorders as well as fertility. Muellerian duct anomalies also carry a high association with other congenital anomalies, particularly renal abnormalities. MRI is widely considered the best modality for assessing Muellerian duct anomalies; it provides multiplanar capability, clear anatomical detail and tissue characterization without ionizing radiation. MRI allows for careful description of Muellerian duct anomalies, often leading to classification into the most widely accepted classification system for Muellerian duct anomalies. This system, developed by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, includes seven subtypes: uterine agenesis/hypoplasia, unicornuate, didelphys, bicornuate, septate, arcuate, and diethylstilbestrol (DES) drug-related uterus. In cases of complex anomalies that defy classification, MRI allows detailed depiction of all components of the anatomical abnormality, allowing for proper management and surgical planning. (orig.)

  4. Surgical management of Stenson's duct injury using epidural catheter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-05

    Jul 5, 2012 ... Successful management of parotid duct injury depends on early diagnosis and appropriate intervention, failing of ... to diagnose and manage the parotid duct injuries using an “epidural catheter” which is often used for inducing spinal anesthesia. .... Water-soluble contrast media have a definite advantage.

  5. Chloride and potassium conductances of cultured human sweat ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Pedersen, P S; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the ion conductances, in particular those for Cl- and K+, of human sweat duct cells grown in primary culture. Sweat duct cells from healthy individuals were grown to confluence on a dialysis membrane, which was then mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber an...

  6. Seismic assessment of the Pickering pressure relief duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghobarah, A.

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of the study are to examine the structural response of the Pickering pressure relief duct when subjected to earthquake ground motion and to estimate the seismic withstand capacity of various components of the structural system on the basis of performance criteria consistent with the safety function of the duct. (author). 24 refs., 16 tabs., 31 figs

  7. Transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defect with Occlutech Duct Occluder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik-Ugan, Sezen; Saltik, Irfan Levent

    2018-04-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus occluders are used for transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defects, as well as for closure of patent ductus arteriosus. The Occlutech Duct Occluder is a newly introduced device for transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus. Here, we present a case in which the Occlutech Duct Occluder was successfully used on a patient for the closure of a perimembraneous ventricular septal defect.

  8. [Applied anatomy of scala tympani inlet related to cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tuanming; Guo, Menghe; Zhang, Hongzheng; Shu, Fan; Xie, Nanping

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the related parameters of the temporal bone structure for determining the position of implanting electrode into the scala tympani in cochlear implantation surgery through the facial recess and epitympanum approach. In a surgical simulation experiment, 20 human temporal bones were studied and measured to determine the related parameters of the temporal bone structure. The distance 5.91∓0.29 mm between the short process of the incus and the round window niche, 2.11∓0.18 mm between the stapes and the round window niche, 6.70∓0.19 mm between the facial nerve in the perpendicular paragraph and the round window niche, 2.22∓0.21 mm from the pyramidal eminence to the round window, and 2.16∓0.14 mm between the stapes and the round window. The minimal distance between the implanting electrode and the vestibular window was 2.12∓0.19 mm. The distance between the cochleariform process and the round window niche was 3.79∓0.17 mm. The position of the cochlear electrode array insertion into the second cochlear turn was 2.25∓0.13 mm under the stapes. The location of the cochlear electrode array insertion into the second cochlear turn was 2.28∓0.20 mm inferior to the pyramidal eminence. These parameters provide a reference value to determine the different positions of cochlear electrode array insertion into the scale tympani in different patients.

  9. Cochlear nucleus neuron analysis in individuals with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Raul; Nelson, Erik G

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cochlear nucleus neuron population in individuals with normal hearing and presbycusis. Retrospective study of archival human temporal bone and brain stem tissues. Using strict inclusion criteria, the temporal bones and cochlear nuclei from six normal hearing individuals and four individuals with presbycusis were selected for analysis. The spiral ganglion cell population, the cochlear nucleus neuron population, and the cell body size of the neurons were quantified in these cases. A relationship was not observed between age and the spiral ganglion cell population in the normal hearing group. Presbycusis subjects exhibited a reduced spiral ganglion cell population. The mean cochlear nucleus neuron population was observed to be significantly higher in the presbycusis group (mean ± standard deviation: 114,170 ± 10,570) compared to the normal hearing group (91,470 ± 9,510) (P = .019). This difference was predominantly the result of greater multipolar and granule cell neuron populations. Only the fusiform neuron type exhibited a significantly different mean cell body cross-sectional area between the normal hearing group (242 ± 27) and the presbycusis group (300 ± 37) (P = .033). This investigation is the first time, to our knowledge, that the populations of the eight neuron types in the cochlear nucleus have been quantified in both normal hearing individuals and individuals with presbycusis. The data support the concept that presbycusis is not an effect of aging alone but instead may be a condition that predisposes one to hearing loss with advancing age and is characterized by a congenitally elevated cochlear nucleus neuron population. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Positive predictive value of cholescintigraphy in common bile duct obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Austin, A.R.; Benedetto, A.R.; Growcock, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99m DISIDA imaging was employed in 400 patients to differentiate obstruction of the common bile duct from medical and other surgical causes of hyperbilirubinemia. Sequential anterior images demonstrated variable degrees of liver uptake, yet there was no evidence of intrabiliary or extrabiliary radioactivity for at least 4 hr after injection in 25 patients. Twenty-three patients were surgically documented to have complete obstruction of the common bile duct. One patient had hepatitis, and another had sickle cell crisis without bile duct obstruction. The remaining patients had either partial or no obstruction of the common bile duct. We conclude that the presence of liver uptake without evident biliary excretion by 4 hr on cholescintigraphy is highly sensitive and predictive of total obstruction of the common bile duct

  11. A Review of Double Common Bile Duct and Its Sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Sindhura; Etienne, Denzil; Reddy, Madhavi; Shahzad, Ghulamullah

    2018-02-01

    A double or accessory common bile duct (ACBD) is a rare congenital anomaly. We report the case of a 60-year-old American Asian male, who was found to have a double or duplicated common bile duct after being admitted for evaluation of a pancreatic mass. A duplicated bile duct has the same mucosa histologically as a single bile duct. However, the opening of a duplicated bile duct lacks a sphincter allowing retrograde flow of gut contents which results in a higher probability of intraductal calculus formation. On rare occasions, it can predispose to liver abscesses, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, gastric cancer, and ampullary cancer depending on the location of the opening of the ACBD. We present an integrative review of the limited cases of ACBD with correlation to the current case and discussion regarding the aspects of diagnosis and management.

  12. Cystic duct remnant mucocele in a liver transplant recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Sushil K. [Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Fishbien, Thomas M. [Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); Haddad, Nadim G. [Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Division of Transplant Surgery, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Cystic duct remnant mucocele is an extremely rare complication of liver transplantation in children. Surgical correction is usually required for cystic duct remnant mucocele when it causes biliary obstruction. We describe a 14-month-old liver transplant recipient who presented with biliary obstruction 1 month after orthotopic liver transplantation with an end-to-end choledochocholedocal biliary anastomosis for hepatoblastoma. US, CT and cholangiography findings were consistent with mucocele of the allograft cystic duct remnant. Surgery was not needed in our patient because the mucocele and biliary obstruction had resolved on repeat imaging most likely due to guidewire manipulation during cholangiography, resulting in opening of the cystic duct remnant orifice and drainage into the common duct. (orig.)

  13. Cystic duct remnant mucocele in a liver transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlawat, Sushil K.; Fishbien, Thomas M.; Haddad, Nadim G.

    2008-01-01

    Cystic duct remnant mucocele is an extremely rare complication of liver transplantation in children. Surgical correction is usually required for cystic duct remnant mucocele when it causes biliary obstruction. We describe a 14-month-old liver transplant recipient who presented with biliary obstruction 1 month after orthotopic liver transplantation with an end-to-end choledochocholedocal biliary anastomosis for hepatoblastoma. US, CT and cholangiography findings were consistent with mucocele of the allograft cystic duct remnant. Surgery was not needed in our patient because the mucocele and biliary obstruction had resolved on repeat imaging most likely due to guidewire manipulation during cholangiography, resulting in opening of the cystic duct remnant orifice and drainage into the common duct. (orig.)

  14. Scintigraphy of cysts of the common bile duct in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, S.P.; Akopyan, V.G.; Murieva, Z.D.; Tumanyan, G.T.; Mironova, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Cyst of the common bile duct, the most frequent variant of cystic dilatation of the extrahepatic biliary tract, represents a serious diagnostic problem. 13 children with cysts of the common bile duct were studied by the method of dynamic scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-HIDA. The scintigraphic picture was characterized by the following signs: sacculated or spheroidal dilatation of the common bile duct, dilatation of the left or both lobular bile ducts, absence of the gall bladder visualization. Change of indicators of the hepatic function and the time of interstinal visualization reflects both the disorder of distal parts permeability and the degree of cyst drainage. An experience of radioisotropic cholegraphy application reveals, that the efficiency of preoperational diagnosis of cysts of the common bile duct increases as a result of the more accurate evaluation of the dynamic of improvement of absorptive-excretory hepatic function after different variants of operations

  15. Consistent approach to air-cleaning system duct design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Ornberg, S.C.; Rooney, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear power plant air-cleaning system effectiveness is dependent on the capability of a duct system to safely convey contaminated gas to a filtration unit and subsequently to a point of discharge. This paper presents a logical and consistent design approach for selecting sheet metal ductwork construction to meet applicable criteria. The differences in design engineers' duct construction specifications are acknowledged. Typical duct construction details and suggestions for their effective use are presented. Improvements in duct design sections of ANSI/ASME N509-80 are highlighted. A detailed leakage analysis of a control room HVAC system is undertaken to illustrate the effects of conceptual design variations on duct construction requirements. Shortcomings of previously published analyses and interpretations of a current standard are included

  16. Tinnitus after Simultaneous and Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakers, Geerte G J; Kraaijenga, Véronique J C; Smulders, Yvette E; van Zon, Alice; Stegeman, Inge; Stokroos, Robert J; Free, Rolien H; Frijns, Johan H M; Huinck, Wendy J; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-01-01

    There is an ongoing global discussion on whether or not bilateral cochlear implantation should be standard care for bilateral deafness. Contrary to unilateral cochlear implantation, however, little is known about the effect of bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus. To investigate tinnitus outcomes 1 year after bilateral cochlear implantation. Secondarily, to compare tinnitus outcomes between simultaneous and sequential bilateral cochlear implantation and to investigate long-term follow-up (3 years). This study is a secondary analysis as part of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Thirty-eight postlingually deafened adults were included in the original trial, in which the presence of tinnitus was not an inclusion criterion. All participants received cochlear implants (CIs) because of profound hearing loss. Nineteen participants received bilateral CIs simultaneously and 19 participants received bilateral CIs sequentially with an inter-implant interval of 2 years. The prevalence and severity of tinnitus before and after simultaneous and sequential bilateral cochlear implantation were measured preoperatively and each year after implantation with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ). The prevalence of preoperative tinnitus was 42% (16/38). One year after bilateral implantation, there was a median difference of -8 (inter-quartile range (IQR): -28 to 4) in THI score and -9 (IQR: -17 to -9) in TQ score in the participants with preoperative tinnitus. Induction of tinnitus occurred in five participants, all in the simultaneous group, in the year after bilateral implantation. Although the preoperative and also the postoperative median THI and TQ scores were higher in the simultaneous group, the median difference scores were equal in both groups. In the simultaneous group, tinnitus scores fluctuated in the 3 years after implantation. In the sequential group, four patients had an additional benefit of the second CI: a total

  17. Tinnitus after Simultaneous and Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geerte G. J. Ramakers

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ImportanceThere is an ongoing global discussion on whether or not bilateral cochlear implantation should be standard care for bilateral deafness. Contrary to unilateral cochlear implantation, however, little is known about the effect of bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus.ObjectiveTo investigate tinnitus outcomes 1 year after bilateral cochlear implantation. Secondarily, to compare tinnitus outcomes between simultaneous and sequential bilateral cochlear implantation and to investigate long-term follow-up (3 years.Study designThis study is a secondary analysis as part of a multicenter randomized controlled trial.MethodsThirty-eight postlingually deafened adults were included in the original trial, in which the presence of tinnitus was not an inclusion criterion. All participants received cochlear implants (CIs because of profound hearing loss. Nineteen participants received bilateral CIs simultaneously and 19 participants received bilateral CIs sequentially with an inter-implant interval of 2 years. The prevalence and severity of tinnitus before and after simultaneous and sequential bilateral cochlear implantation were measured preoperatively and each year after implantation with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI and Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ.ResultsThe prevalence of preoperative tinnitus was 42% (16/38. One year after bilateral implantation, there was a median difference of −8 (inter-quartile range (IQR: −28 to 4 in THI score and −9 (IQR: −17 to −9 in TQ score in the participants with preoperative tinnitus. Induction of tinnitus occurred in five participants, all in the simultaneous group, in the year after bilateral implantation. Although the preoperative and also the postoperative median THI and TQ scores were higher in the simultaneous group, the median difference scores were equal in both groups. In the simultaneous group, tinnitus scores fluctuated in the 3 years after implantation. In the sequential group

  18. Staphylococcus lugdunensis: novel organism causing cochlear implant infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Bhumbra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cochlear implant infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reported here is a pediatric patient with a cochlear implant infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that has only recently been determined to be clinically relevant (1988. Unlike other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, it is more aggressive, carrying a greater potential for tissue destruction. In pediatrics, the organism is uncommon, poorly described, and generally pan-susceptible. Described herein is the presentation and management of this unusual organism in a pediatric setting.

  19. Dislocation of cochlear implant magnet as a complication following MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtojärvi, Sarita; Salonen, Jaakko

    According to current best knowledge, an MRI scan can be performed for patients with cochlear implants. The warnings and recommendations of the implant manufacturers must be followed strictly to prevent complications, such as overheating, migration or demagnetization of the magnet in the implant. We report on a case of cochlear implant magnet dislocation as a complication for an MRI scan. The patient had a tight bandage around the head to hold the magnet in place as recommended by the manufacturer, but apparently the bandage was not in the correct place.

  20. A Plug-and-Play Duct System Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Dickson, B. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Grisolia, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poerschke, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes an air distribution system composed of a series of uniformly-sized ducts that terminate in rooms throughout the home and return to a central manifold, similar in fashion to a “home-run” cross-linked polyethylene plumbing system. With a well-designed manifold, each duct receives an equal static pressure potential for airflow from the air handling unit, and the number of needed ducts for each room are simply attached to fittings located on the manifold; in this sense, the system is plug-and-play (PnP). As indicated, all ducts in the PnP system are identical in size and small enough to fit in the ceiling and wall cavities of a house (i.e., less than 3.5-in. outer diameter). These ducts are also more appropriately sized for the lower airflow requirements of modern, energy-efficient homes; therefore, the velocity of the air moving through the duct is between that of conventional duct systems (approximately 700 ft/min) and high-velocity systems (more than 1,500 ft/min) on the market today. The PnP duct system uses semi-rigid plastic pipes, which have a smooth inner wall and are straightforward to install correctly, resulting in a system that has minimal air leakage. However, plastic ducts are currently not accepted by code for use in residential buildings; therefore, the project team considered other duct materials for the system that are currently accepted by code, such as small-diameter, wirehelix, flexible ductwork.

  1. A Plug-and-Play Duct System Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, Robert [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Dickson, Bruce [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Grisolia, Anthony [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poerschke, Andrew [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, Ari [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-07-10

    This report describes an air distribution system composed of a series of uniformly-sized ducts that terminate in rooms throughout the home and return to a central manifold, similar in fashion to a “home-run” cross-linked polyethylene plumbing system. With a well-designed manifold, each duct receives an equal static pressure potential for airflow from the air handling unit, and the number of needed ducts for each room are simply attached to fittings located on the manifold; in this sense, the system is plug-and-play (PnP). As indicated, all ducts in the PnP system are identical in size and small enough to fit in the ceiling and wall cavities of a house (i.e., less than 3.5-in. outer diameter). These ducts are also more appropriately sized for the lower airflow requirements of modern, energy-efficient homes; therefore, the velocity of the air moving through the duct is between that of conventional duct systems (approximately 700 ft/min) and high-velocity systems (more than 1,500 ft/min) on the market today. The PnP duct system uses semi-rigid plastic pipes, which have a smooth inner wall and are straightforward to install correctly, resulting in a system that has minimal air leakage. However, plastic ducts are currently not accepted by code for use in residential buildings; therefore, the project team considered other duct materials for the system that are currently accepted by code, such as small-diameter, wirehelix, flexible ductwork.

  2. Self-retaining small-looped catheter for narrow bile ducts in high common bile duct obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.W.; Daehnert, W.

    1985-01-01

    A new self-retaining catheter was devised for percutaneous drainage of small bile ducts. The device allows safe external drainage without the risk of catheter dislocation even in high bile duct obstruction. The catheter is also suitable for percutaneous nephrostomy in non-dilated pyelocaliceal system. (orig.)

  3. Intraoperative cochlear nerve mapping with the mobile cochlear nerve compound action potential tracer in vestibular schwannoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Takuya; Fujitsu, Kazuhiko; Kaku, Shogo; Ichikawa, Teruo; Miyahara, Kosuke; Okada, Tomu; Tanino, Shin; Uriu, Yasuhiro; Murayama, Yuichi

    2018-05-18

    OBJECTIVE The authors describe the usefulness and limitations of the cochlear nerve compound action potential (CNAP) mobile tracer (MCT) that they developed to aid in cochlear nerve mapping during vestibular schwannoma surgery (VSS) for hearing preservation. METHODS This MCT device requires no more than 2 seconds for stable placement on the nerve to obtain the CNAP and thus is able to trace the cochlear nerve instantaneously. Simultaneous bipolar and monopolar recording is possible. The authors present the outcomes of 18 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative useful hearing (defined as class I or II of the Gardner-Robertson classification system) and underwent hearing-preservation VSS with the use of the MCT. Mapping was considered successful when it was possible to detect and trace the cochlear nerve. RESULTS Mapping of the cochlear nerve was successful in 13 of 18 patients (72.2%), and useful hearing was preserved in 11 patients (61.1%). Among 8 patients with large tumors (Koos grade 3 or 4), the rate of successful mapping was 62.5% (5 patients). The rate of hearing preservation in patients with large tumors was 50% (4 patients). CONCLUSIONS In addition to microsurgical presumption of the arrangement of each nerve, frequent probing on and around an unidentified nerve and comparison of each waveform are advisable with the use of both more sensitive monopolar and more location-specific bipolar MCT. MCT proved to be useful in cochlear nerve mapping and may consequently be helpful in hearing preservation. The authors discuss some limitations and problems with this device.

  4. Benign bile duct stenosis: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Medina, J.; Casal, M.; Vieito, X.

    1997-01-01

    The bening injuries of the biliary ducts are relatively little frequent. Exist two groups of injuries: to due to them to a series for responsible pathologies for itself of the such injuries training, and that basically are the sclerosant cholangitis, the chronic pancreatitis and the stenosis of the sfinter of Oddi, and related them to previous surgery. On both groups eitological, the interventional radiology occupies a place in the diagnosis as well as in the treatment, complementing or substituting to the surgery. Due to the greater frequency of the postchirurgical injuries, we have centered us basically in them. We make a review of the current state of the topic and a bibliographical tracking, emphasizing the most relevant projects. We show some clinical cases of our subject-specific experience. (Author) 42 refs

  5. Multisensory Integration in Cochlear Implant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A; Sheffield, Sterling W; Butera, Iliza M; Gifford, René H; Wallace, Mark T

    Speech perception is inherently a multisensory process involving integration of auditory and visual cues. Multisensory integration in cochlear implant (CI) recipients is a unique circumstance in that the integration occurs after auditory deprivation and the provision of hearing via the CI. Despite the clear importance of multisensory cues for perception, in general, and for speech intelligibility, specifically, the topic of multisensory perceptual benefits in CI users has only recently begun to emerge as an area of inquiry. We review the research that has been conducted on multisensory integration in CI users to date and suggest a number of areas needing further research. The overall pattern of results indicates that many CI recipients show at least some perceptual gain that can be attributable to multisensory integration. The extent of this gain, however, varies based on a number of factors, including age of implantation and specific task being assessed (e.g., stimulus detection, phoneme perception, word recognition). Although both children and adults with CIs obtain audiovisual benefits for phoneme, word, and sentence stimuli, neither group shows demonstrable gain for suprasegmental feature perception. Additionally, only early-implanted children and the highest performing adults obtain audiovisual integration benefits similar to individuals with normal hearing. Increasing age of implantation in children is associated with poorer gains resultant from audiovisual integration, suggesting a sensitive period in development for the brain networks that subserve these integrative functions, as well as length of auditory experience. This finding highlights the need for early detection of and intervention for hearing loss, not only in terms of auditory perception, but also in terms of the behavioral and perceptual benefits of audiovisual processing. Importantly, patterns of auditory, visual, and audiovisual responses suggest that underlying integrative processes may be

  6. The Phonemic Awareness Skills of Cochlear Implant Children and Children with Normal Hearing in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dashtelei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Phonemic awareness skills have a significant impact on children speech and language. The purpose of this study was investigating the phonemic awareness skills of children with cochlear implant and normal hearing peers in primary school. Methods: phonemic awareness subscales of phonological awareness test were administered to 30 children with cochlear implantation at the first to sixth grades of primary school and 30 children with normal hearing who were matched in age with cochlear implant group. All of children were between 6 to 11 years old. Children with cochlear implant had at least 1 to 2 years of implant experience and they were over 5 years when they receive implantation. Children with cochlear implant were selected from Special education centers in Tehran and children with normal hearing were recruited from primary schools in Tehran. The phonemic awareness skills were assessed in both groups. Results: The results showed that the Mean scores of phonemic awareness skills in cochlear implant children were significantly lower than children with normal hearing (P<.0001. Discussion: children with cochlear implant, despite Cochlear implantation prosthesis, had lower performance in phonemic awareness when compared with normal hearing children. Therefore, due to importance of phonemic awareness skills in learning of literacy skills, and defects of these skills in children with cochlear implant, these skills should be assessed carefully in children with cochlear implant and rehabilitative interventions should be considered.

  7. Experiments and calculations on neutron streaming through bent ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloosterman, J.L.; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.); Zsolnay, E.M.

    1993-07-01

    Neutron spectra in a cylindrical straight duct and in bent ducts with angles of 30deg, 60deg and 90deg have been measured by the multiple foil activation and thermoluminescence dosimetry methods. Two-dimensional discrete ordinates and three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations are executed, and the results are compared with the measurements. The flow rate at the duct entrance calculated by the DOT3.5 code is underestimated by approximately 30 %, due to a conversion of the core and reflector geometry from XY to RZ geometry. The fast neutron flux in the ducts is underestimated by 20 % by the MORSE-SGC/S code due to a too coarse angular mesh of the source, which does not properly represent the actual angular distribution of the fast flux, which is highly peaked forwardly into the ducts. The thermal neutron flux was over-estimated by the Monte Carlo calculation. A method is proposed to calculate the angular distribution of the flow rate at the duct entrance and to calculate the source strength and the angular distribution of the flow rate at the entrance of the second leg of the duct. The results are compared with those of the transport calculations. Generally, the agreement is quite satisfactory. (author).

  8. Water condensation promotes fungal growth in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasanen, P.; Pasanen, A.-L. (University of Kupopio, Department of Environmental Sciences, Kuopio (Finland)); Jantunen, M. (National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland))

    1993-01-01

    In a subarctic climate the diurnal variation in temperature may cause water condensation in ducts placed in the unheated spaces of a building. In this study, germination time and sporulation of a fungus, Penicillium verrucosum, were studied on dusty, galvanized steel sheet under different moisture conditions at room temperature. The effect of condensed water in a supply air duct on spore amplification was studied in an experimental ventilation set-up. In the field, air temperatures and the dew point temperature of air in the duct were monitored continuously for a week. P. verrucosum germinated on steel surfaces during five-hour incubation of the surface under humid conditions, when the surface has been moist for half an hour, germ tubes appeared within 17 hours. During 24-hour incubation under moist conditions, P. verrucosum produced hyphae and spores. In the experimental set-up the airborne spore counts increased when the air passed through a water-condensing section of the duct. Penicillium was the most abundant fungus sporulated on the moist duct surface. In the field, during humid weather, the surface temperature on the air stream surface decreased to the dew point temperature of the air in the duct. thus water condensation in air ducts may promote fungal growth. (au)

  9. Anatomic relationship of intrahepatic bile ducts to portal veins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, P.M.; Stempel, J.; Atri, M.; Lough, J.O.; Illescas, F.F.

    1987-01-01

    It is well accepted that intrahepatic bile ducts lie in front of corresponding portal vein branches. Since the authors' clinical experience with US was different, they studied 18 normal necropsy cadaver livers. The common bile duct, main portal vein, and hepatic artery were cannulated and injected respectively with air, dilute contrast medium, and mineral oil. The livers were then examined in anatomic position with CT. In the left lobe of the liver, the bile ducts were anterior to the portal vein in seven cases, posterior in seven cases, and were tortuous both anterior and posterior in three cases. In the right lobe, the bile ducts were anterior in nine cases, posterior in five cases, tortuous in one case, and not seen in two cases. In the porta hepatis, the bile ducts were anterior in eight cases, posterior in one case, tortuous in five cases, and not seen in three cases. Histologic specimens confirmed the anterior and posterior location of the bile ducts relative to the portal veins. In conclusion, intrahepatic bile ducts can be either anterior or posterior to the corresponding portal vein branches

  10. Cystic Duct Closure by Sealing With Bipolar Electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, B.; Jorgensen, L. N.; Larsen, S. S.; Kristiansen, V. B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cystic duct leakage after cholecystectomy is not uncommon and is a potentially serious complication. The aim of this study was to assess a bipolar sealing system (LigaSure®) for closure of the cystic duct. Methods: The records from consecutive laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed in 2 hospitals with closure of the cystic duct with LigaSure after informed consent were recorded and complications and morbidity registered. The records were compared with those of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy with closure of the cystic duct with clips during the same period. Results: During the study period, 218 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed; 102 of these were performed with the LigaSure. One patient was excluded due to violation of the protocol. We experienced no cases of cystic duct leakage, but in one patient, bile leakage from the gallbladder bed was observed probably due to a small aberrant duct. Conclusion: The LigaSure system was safe and effective for closure and division of the cystic duct in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:20412641

  11. Strategies for Working with Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn; Prause-Weber, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 23,000 individuals in the United States, including 10,000 children, have a cochlear implant. This biomedical electronic device has been a breakthrough in the auditory rehabilitation of individuals diagnosed with severe or profound sensorineural hearing losses who…

  12. Cochlear implantation and change in quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grøntved, Ågot Møller

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in adults and to evaluate the average implant usage per day. Ten profoundly deaf adults were implanted during the period April 1994 to September 1997. The patients answered questionnaires 1 year or more after receiving...

  13. The influence of cochlear implant electrode position on performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, K.S. van der; Briaire, J.J.; Verbist, B.M.; Muurling, T.J.; Frijns, J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    To study the relation between variables related to cochlear implant electrode position and speech perception performance scores in a large patient population.The study sample consisted of 203 patients implanted with a CII or HiRes90K implant with a HiFocus 1 or 1J electrode of Advanced Bionics.

  14. Pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation: preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Both clinical data and laboratory studies demonstrated the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation. This review examines strategies to prevent post-implant meningitis. Medline/PubMed database; English articles after 1980. Search terms: cochlear implants, pneumococcus meningitis, streptococcus pneumonia, immunization, prevention. Narrative review. All articles relating to post-implant meningitis without any restriction in study designs were assessed and information extracted. The presence of inner ear trauma as a result of surgical technique or cochlear implant electrode array design was associated with a higher risk of post-implant meningitis. Laboratory data demonstrated the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing meningitis induced via the hematogenous route of infection. Fibrous sealing around the electrode array at the cochleostomy site, and the use of antibiotic-coated electrode array reduced the risk of meningitis induced via an otogenic route. The recent scientific data support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendation of pneumococcal vaccination for the prevention of meningitis in implant recipients. Nontraumatic cochlear implant design, surgical technique, and an adequate fibrous seal around the cochleostomy site further reduce the risk of meningitis. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and Multiplicity of Double Vowels in Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Bomjun J.; Perry, Trevor T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examined cochlear implant (CI) users' perception of vowels presented concurrently (i.e., "double vowels") to further our understanding of auditory grouping in electric hearing. Method: Identification of double vowels and single vowels was measured with 10 CI subjects. Fundamental frequencies (F0s) of…

  16. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangado, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas; Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Dejea Velardo, Hector; Mistrik, Pavel; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Fagertun, Jens; Noailly, Jérôme; Piella, Gemma; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging. To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient's CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns constitutive parameters to all components of the finite element model. This model can then be used to study in silico the effects of the electrical stimulation of the cochlear implant. Results are shown on a total of 25 models of patients. In all cases, a final mesh suitable for finite element simulations was obtained, in an average time of 94 s. The framework has proven to be fast and robust, and is promising for a detailed prognosis of the cochlear implantation surgery.

  17. Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Håkan; Johansson, Björn; Magnusson, Lennart; Lyxell, Björn; Ellis, Rachel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relation between speech recognition and cognitive skills in bimodal cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid users. Method: Seventeen bimodal CI users (28-74 years) were recruited to the study. Speech recognition tests were carried out in quiet and in noise. The cognitive tests employed included the Reading Span Test and the…

  18. Libyan cochlear implant programme: achievements, difficulties, and future goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samya El-Ogbi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation has become established worldwide as a safe and effective method of auditory rehabilitation of selected severely and profound deaf children and adults. Over 100,000 patients have received cochlear implants worldwide with the paediatric population proving to be the main beneficiaries. The Libyan cochlear implant programme was set up in 2004. Data relating to the patients who received cochlear implantation at Tripoli Medical Centre between October 2007 and February 2010 were analysed. Implant operations were performed on 37 patients. All patients received Med-El SONATATI 100 devices. Thirty-four (91.9% of these patients were children, whilst three (8.1% were adults. Combined, congenital hearing loss (56.8% and perinatal/neonatal (29.7% were the two main aetiological factors in children. Seventeen patients (45.9% had a positive family history of deafness. Sixteen patients (43.2% were born to blood-related parents. The overall rate of minor and major complications was 16.2%, which is comparable to previous studies.

  19. Libyan cochlear implant programme: achievements, difficulties, and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Ali; Esriti, Anwer; Ehtuish, Asia; El-Ogbi, Samya

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implantation has become established worldwide as a safe and effective method of auditory rehabilitation of selected severely and profound deaf children and adults. Over 100,000 patients have received cochlear implants worldwide with the paediatric population proving to be the main beneficiaries. The Libyan cochlear implant programme was set up in 2004. Data relating to the patients who received cochlear implantation at Tripoli Medical Centre between October 2007 and February 2010 were analysed. Implant operations were performed on 37 patients. All patients received Med-El SONATA(TI) (100) devices. Thirty-four (91.9%) of these patients were children, whilst three (8.1%) were adults. Combined, congenital hearing loss (56.8%) and perinatal/neonatal (29.7%) were the two main aetiological factors in children. Seventeen patients (45.9%) had a positive family history of deafness. Sixteen patients (43.2%) were born to blood-related parents. The overall rate of minor and major complications was 16.2%, which is comparable to previous studies.

  20. Modulation of cochlear tuning by low-frequency sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, J.F.L.; Prijs, V.F.; Latour, J.B.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    An intense, low-frequency tone (about 30 Hz) modulates the sensitivity of the inner ear to high-frequency stimulation. This modulation is correlated with the displacement of the basilar membrane. The findings suggest that the modulation may also affect cochlear tuning. We have investigated

  1. The Acceptance of Background Noise in Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyler, Patrick N.; Bahng, Junghwa; von Hapsburg, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine (a) if acceptable noise levels (ANLs) are different in cochlear implant (CI) users than in listeners with normal hearing, (b) if ANLs are related to sentence reception thresholds in noise in CI users, and (c) if ANLs and subjective outcome measures are related in CI users. Method: ANLs and the…

  2. A software tool for analyzing multichannel cochlear implant signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wai Kong; Bögli, Hans; Dillier, Norbert

    2003-10-01

    A useful and convenient means to analyze the radio frequency (RF) signals being sent by a speech processor to a cochlear implant would be to actually capture and display them with appropriate software. This is particularly useful for development or diagnostic purposes. sCILab (Swiss Cochlear Implant Laboratory) is such a PC-based software tool intended for the Nucleus family of Multichannel Cochlear Implants. Its graphical user interface provides a convenient and intuitive means for visualizing and analyzing the signals encoding speech information. Both numerical and graphic displays are available for detailed examination of the captured CI signals, as well as an acoustic simulation of these CI signals. sCILab has been used in the design and verification of new speech coding strategies, and has also been applied as an analytical tool in studies of how different parameter settings of existing speech coding strategies affect speech perception. As a diagnostic tool, it is also useful for troubleshooting problems with the external equipment of the cochlear implant systems.

  3. The acquisition of personal pronouns in cochlear-implanted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbist, Annemie Josee Jozef

    2010-01-01

    Today, many deaf children can be given access to oral language thanks to a cochlear implant, a surgically implanted electronic device that provides a sense of sound thanks to electric stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this study, the acquisition of personal pronouns is considered to be a measure

  4. Predictors of Spoken Language Development Following Pediatric Cochlear Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johan Frijns; prof. Dr. Louis Peeraer; van Wieringen; Ingeborg Dhooge; Vermeulen; Jan Brokx; Tinne Boons; Wouters

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Although deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) are able to develop good language skills, the large variability in outcomes remains a significant concern. The first aim of this study was to evaluate language skills in children with CIs to establish benchmarks. The second aim was to

  5. Imaging of acquired non-traumatic cochlear lesions: iconographic essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Gonzaga, Juliana Gontijo

    2006-01-01

    Different non-traumatic acquired cochlear lesions are shown in this article with imaging methods. They may be responsible for neuro sensorial hearing loss or vertigo. The method of choice is computed tomography when evaluating the osseous labyrinth whereas magnetic resonance imaging has superior resolution in the studies of the membranaceous labyrinth. (author)

  6. Challenges in Improving Cochlear Implant Performance and Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2017-08-01

    Here I identify two gaps in cochlear implants that have been limiting their performance and acceptance. First, cochlear implant performance has remained largely unchanged, despite the number of publications tripling per decade in the last 30 years. Little has been done so far to address a fundamental limitation in the electrode-to-neuron interface, with the electrode size being a thousand times larger than the neuron diameter while the number of electrodes being a thousand times less. Both the small number and the large size of electrodes produce broad spatial activation and poor frequency resolution that limit current cochlear implant performance. Second, a similarly rapid growth in cochlear implant volume has not produced an expected decrease in unit price in the same period. The high cost contributes to low market penetration rate, which is about 20% in developed countries and less than 1% in developing countries. I will discuss changes needed in both research strategy and business practice to close the gap between prosthetic and normal hearing as well as that between haves and have-nots.

  7. Theory of Mind and Language in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmel, Ethan; Peters, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Thirty children with cochlear implants (CI children), age range 3-12 years, and 30 children with normal hearing (NH children), age range 4-6 years, were tested on theory of mind and language measures. The CI children showed little to no delay on either theory of mind, relative to the NH children, or spoken language, relative to hearing norms. The…

  8. Reading comprehension of deaf children with cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.M.; Bon, W.H.J. van; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (0) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was

  9. The Relationship Between Cochlear Implants and Deaf Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Madeleine; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    from a Danish national survey of deaf adults, the authors examined the significance of having (or not having) a CI in regard to identity (categorized as deaf, hearing, bicultural, and marginal) and various related factors concerning social participation and experiences of being deaf. Cochlear...

  10. Motor Development of Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheysen, Freja; Loots, Gerrit; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a cochlear implant (CI) on the motor development of deaf children. The study involved 36 mainstreamed deaf children (15 boys, 21 girls; 4- to 12-years old) without any developmental problems. Of these children, 20 had been implanted. Forty-three hearing children constituted a comparison…

  11. [Cochlear implant in patients with congenital malformation of inner ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-yi; Wu, Wen-ming; Xi, Xin; Huang, De-liang; Yang, Wei-yan

    2004-02-01

    To study surgical difficulty and key of the cochlear implant in patients with congenital malformation of inner ear. The cochlear implantations were performed in our department from Jan. 2001 to Apr. 2003 for 18 patients with the malformation of inner ear. In this series, there were 11 cases of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS), 3 cases of Waardenberg syndrome, 3 cases of Mondini malformation, and 1 case of Usher syndrome. All 18 patients accepted the Nucleus 24-channel cochlear implantations, including Nucleus straight electrode in 13 cases but Contour implantation in 5 cases of LVAS. During operations, leakage of perilymph but not cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the open of scala tympani occurred in 11 cases of LVAS, however, the electrode was inserted successfully. The abnormalities of round window occurred in one of 3 cases of Waardenberg syndrome and 3 cases of Mondini malformation, respectively. The cochlear implant could be conducted successfully for the LVAS, and the postoperative effect was same as the ones for the deafness persons with normal development of inner ear. However, for the patients with Mondini syndrome and common cavity, it is important to accurately assess the extent of abnormalities in the inner ear and accompanied malformation before operation, and to evaluate the full extent of difficulties of the operation in order to minimize the risk of CSF leakage and meningitis.

  12. Mismatch Negativity Based Neurofeedback for Cochlear Implant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luckmann, Annika; Başkent, Deniz; Jolij, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users experience great difficulty when it comes to pitch discrimination. This leads to problems during daily interactions, due to poor speech perception, but also a very low pleasure ratings for music. Improving pitch perception and discrimination in CI users would improve

  13. Cochlear Damage Affects Neurotransmitter Chemistry in the Central Auditory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Albert Godfrey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the perception of a monotonous sound not actually present in the environment, affects nearly 20% of the population of the United States. Although there has been great progress in tinnitus research over the past 25 years, the neurochemical basis of tinnitus is still poorly understood. We review current research about the effects of various types of cochlear damage on the neurotransmitter chemistry in the central auditory system and document evidence that different changes in this chemistry can underlie similar behaviorally measured tinnitus symptoms. Most available data have been obtained from rodents following cochlear damage produced by cochlear ablation, loud sound, or ototoxic drugs. Effects on neurotransmitter systems have been measured as changes in neurotransmitter level, synthesis, release, uptake, and receptors. In this review, magnitudes of changes are presented for neurotransmitter-related amino acids, acetylcholine, and serotonin. A variety of effects have been found in these studies that may be related to animal model, survival time, type of cochlear damage, or methodology. The overall impression from the evidence presented is that any imbalance of neurotransmitter-related chemistry could disrupt auditory processing in such a way as to produce tinnitus.

  14. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  15. Classroom performance of children with cochlear implants in mainstream education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, G.W.J.A.; Oever-Goltstein, M.H. van den; Langereis, M.C.; Chute, P.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We compared classroom performance of children with a cochlear implant (CI) with that of their normal-hearing peers in mainstream education. METHODS: Thirty-two CI children in mainstream education, congenitally or prelingually deaf, participated in this study, as did 37 hearing

  16. Interaction of tinnitus suppression and hearing ability after cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Jia-Nan; Lei, Guan-Xiong; Chen, Dai-Shi; Wang, Wei-Ze; Chen, Ai-Ting; Mong, Meng-Di; Li, Sun; Jiao, Qing-Shan; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2017-10-01

    To study the postoperative impact of cochlear implants (CIs) on tinnitus, as well as the impact of tinnitus on speech recognition with CI switched on. Fifty-two postlingual deafened CI recipients (21 males and 31 females) were assessed using an established Tinnitus Characteristics Questionnaire and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) before and after cochlear implantation. The tinnitus loudness was investigated when CI was switched on and off in CI recipients with persistent tinnitus. The relation between tinnitus loudness and recipients' satisfaction of cochlear implantation was analyzed by the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. With CI 'OFF', 42 CI recipients experienced tinnitus postimplant ipsilaterally and 44 contralaterally. Tinnitus was totally suppressed ipsilateral to the CI with CI 'ON' in 42.9%, partially suppressed in 42.9%, unchanged in 11.9% and aggravated in 2.4%. Tinnitus was totally suppressed contralaterally with CI 'ON' in 31.8% of CI recipients, partially suppressed in 47.7%, unchanged in 20.5%. Pearson correlation analysis showed that tinnitus loudness and the results of cochlear implant patients satisfaction was negatively correlated (r = .674, p tinnitus. The tinnitus loudness may affect patients' satisfaction with the use of CI.

  17. Simultaneous Communication and Cochlear Implants in the Classroom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Marschark, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the potential of simultaneous communication (sign and speech together) to support classroom learning by college students who use cochlear implants (CIs). Metacognitive awareness of learning also was evaluated. A within-subjects design involving 40 implant users

  18. Simultaneous communication supports learning in noise by cochlear implant users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Marschark, M.; Machmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to evaluate the potential of using spoken language and signing together (simultaneous communication, SimCom, sign-supported speech) as a means of improving speech recognition, comprehension, and learning by cochlear implant (CI) users in noisy contexts.Methods: Forty

  19. Perception of Cantonese Lexical Tones by Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Colleen M.; Lee, Kathy Y. S.; Dowell, Richard C.; Vogel, Adam P.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess Cantonese word recognition and the discrimination of Cantonese tones with manipulated contours by child and adolescent cochlear implant (CI) users and a group of peers with normal hearing (NH). It was hypothesized that the CI users would perform more poorly than their counterparts with NH in both…

  20. Cochlear implantation in Waardenburg syndrome: The Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Ramesh Chandra; Sikka, Kapil; Chaturvedy, Gaurav; Singh, Chirom Amit; Venkat Karthikeyan, C; Kumar, Rakesh; Agarwal, Shivani

    2010-10-01

    Children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) exhibiting normal inner ear anatomy, like those included in our cohort, derive significant benefit from cochlear implantation and results are comparable to those reported for the general population of implanted children. The patient population of WS accounts for approximately 2% of congenitally deaf children. The purpose of this retrospective case review was to describe the outcomes for those children with WS who have undergone cochlear implantation. On retrospective chart review, there were four cases with WS who underwent cochlear implantation. These cases were assessed for age at implantation, clinical and radiological features, operative and perioperative course, and performance outcomes. Auditory perception and speech production ability were evaluated using categories of auditory performance (CAP), meaningful auditory integration scales (MAIS), and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) during the follow-up period. In this group of children with WS, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months, the CAP score ranged from 3 to 5, MAIS from 25 to 30, and SIR was 3. These scores are comparable with those of other cochlear implantees.

  1. The correlation between the dilated extent of bile duct and gallbladder and low bile duct obstructive jaundice diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongqiu; Lu Guangming; Li Jieshou; Li Weiqin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value about the dilated extent of bile duct and gallbladder in low biliary obstructive diseases. Methods: CT and ERCP findings of 105 patients with low biliary obstructive disease were retrospectively analyzed. The dilated extent of intrahepatic and extra- hepatic bile duct and gallbladder were classified into seven types: Type I: severe dilatation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder; Type II: severe dilatation of extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder and slight dilated intrahapetic bile duct; Type III: severe dilatation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct without or slight dilatation of gallbladder; Type IV: severe extrahepatic bile duct dilatation without or slight dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder; Type V: severe intrahepatic bile duct dilatation without or with slight dilatation of extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder; Type VI: severe gallbladder dilatation without or with slight intrahepatic and extra- hepatic bile duct dilatation; Type VII: without or with slight dilatation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder. The biliary system dilated extent of low biliary obstructive disease on CT and ERCP were compared with results of clinical, operation, and pathology. Results: Thirty-three cases of tumor and 72 cases of non-tumor were proved by clinical and operation in 105 patients with low biliary obstructive disease. In 33 tumor patients, 16 patients were identified as Type I, 10 patients Type II, 4 patients Type III, 1 patient Type IV, 2 patients Type VII. In 72 non-tumor patients, 4 patients were identified as Type I, 4 patients Type II, 9 patients Type III, 33 patients Type IV, 2 patients Type V, 11 patients Type VI, 19 patients Type VII. A large difference between I, II type and III-VII type biliary dilatation existed in tumor and non-tumor group (χ 2 =47.33, P<0.01). Conclusion:Low obstructive biliary diseases are closely correlated with the dilated

  2. Effects of explosion-generated shock waves in ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, M.R.; Kahn, J.E.; Belk, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    An explosion in a space causes an increase in temperature and pressure. To quantify the challenge that will be presented to essential components in a ventilation system, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics of a shock wave generated by an explosion, with attention directed to the propagation of such a wave in a duct. Using the equations of unsteady flow and shock tube theory, a theoretical model has been formulated to provide flow properties behind moving shock waves that have interacted with various changes in duct geometry. Empirical equations have been derived to calculate air pressure, temperature, Mach number, and velocity in a duct following an explosion

  3. Preoperative intraluminal irradiation of the extrahepatic bile duct tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Arimoto, Takuro; Irie, Goro.

    1991-01-01

    From 1984 through 1986, six patients with extrahepatic bile duct tumor were treated preoperatively with intraluminal irradiation of the bile duct. There were no unresectable cases and pathological examination of the surgical specimens showed moderate to remarkable tumor regression in all cases. Postoperative biliary tract hemorrhage occurred in 2 of 3 patients who received 60 Gy at a point 7.5 mm from the center of the source. With accurate preoperative diagnosis of the tumor extent and careful setting of the target area of intraluminal irradiation, improved local tumor control of extrahepatic bile duct tumor can be expected with this method. (author)

  4. BACTERIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION ON Fasciola hepatica AND CATTLE BILIARY DUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Panebianco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the occurrence of bacteria in Fasciola hepatica and into cattle biliary ducts containing the parasite. A total of 24 liver and 58 F. hepatica samples were analysed. In all biliary ducts and in 62,06% of parasite Enterobacteriaceae were isolated. The bacterial specie more frequently isolated from parasite were Citrobacter freundii (34%, Proteus mirabilis (18%, Providencia rettgeri (12%, Staphylococcus spp. (18%, Enterobacter spp. (12%. There doesn’t appear to be a correlation between bacterial specie from parasite and ducts. The Authors conclude with some related inspective consideration.

  5. A remote joint system for large vacuum ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, D.B.; Coughlan, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A large remote vacuum duct joining system has been developed for fusion machines that uses several two-jaw screwdriven clamps. The preferred location for clamp installation is inside the vacuum duct where access space is available for the actuating device. It also decreases space needed for handling operations exterior to the duct. The clamp system is unique in that it is low cost, applies force directly over the seal, permits leak testing to the seal annulus, is highly reliable, can be remotely replaced, and is usable on a variety of other applications

  6. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss. Aim: To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations. Method: This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July 2012 were included in the study. Intraoperative neural response telemetry, hearing evaluation, speech perception, and speech production data before and after surgery were assessed. Results: During this period, 806 patients received a cochlear implant and 10 of these (1.2% were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome. Eight of the children received a Nucleus 24® implant and 1 child and 1 adult received a DigiSonic SP implant. The mean age at implantation was 44 months among the children. The average duration of use of a cochlear implant at the time of the study was 43 months. Intraoperative neural responses were present in all cases. Patients who could use the speech processor effectively had a pure tone average of 31 dB in free-field conditions. In addition, the MUSS and MAIS questionnaires revealed improvements in speech perception and production. Four patients did not have a good outcome, which might have been associated with ineffective use of the speech processor. Conclusion: Despite the heterogeneity of the group, patients with Waardenburg syndrome who received cochlear implants were found to have hearing thresholds that allowed access to speech sounds. However, patients who received early intervention and rehabilitation showed better evolution of auditory perception.

  7. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos; Samuel, Paola Angélica; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schimdt; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-07-01

     The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss.  To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations.  This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July 2012 were included in the study. Intraoperative neural response telemetry, hearing evaluation, speech perception, and speech production data before and after surgery were assessed.  During this period, 806 patients received a cochlear implant and 10 of these (1.2%) were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome. Eight of the children received a Nucleus 24(®) implant and 1 child and 1 adult received a DigiSonic SP implant. The mean age at implantation was 44 months among the children. The average duration of use of a cochlear implant at the time of the study was 43 months. Intraoperative neural responses were present in all cases. Patients who could use the speech processor effectively had a pure tone average of 31 dB in free-field conditions. In addition, the MUSS and MAIS questionnaires revealed improvements in speech perception and production. Four patients did not have a good outcome, which might have been associated with ineffective use of the speech processor.  Despite the heterogeneity of the group, patients with Waardenburg syndrome who received cochlear implants were found to have hearing thresholds that allowed access to speech sounds. However, patients who received early intervention and rehabilitation showed better evolution of auditory perception.

  8. Electroacoustic verification of frequency modulation systems in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidêncio, Vanessa Luisa Destro; Jacob, Regina Tangerino de Souza; Tanamati, Liége Franzini; Bucuvic, Érika Cristina; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari

    2017-12-26

    The frequency modulation system is a device that helps to improve speech perception in noise and is considered the most beneficial approach to improve speech recognition in noise in cochlear implant users. According to guidelines, there is a need to perform a check before fitting the frequency modulation system. Although there are recommendations regarding the behavioral tests that should be performed at the fitting of the frequency modulation system to cochlear implant users, there are no published recommendations regarding the electroacoustic test that should be performed. Perform and determine the validity of an electroacoustic verification test for frequency modulation systems coupled to different cochlear implant speech processors. The sample included 40 participants between 5 and 18 year's users of four different models of speech processors. For the electroacoustic evaluation, we used the Audioscan Verifit device with the HA-1 coupler and the listening check devices corresponding to each speech processor model. In cases where the transparency was not achieved, a modification was made in the frequency modulation gain adjustment and we used the Brazilian version of the "Phrases in Noise Test" to evaluate the speech perception in competitive noise. It was observed that there was transparency between the frequency modulation system and the cochlear implant in 85% of the participants evaluated. After adjusting the gain of the frequency modulation receiver in the other participants, the devices showed transparency when the electroacoustic verification test was repeated. It was also observed that patients demonstrated better performance in speech perception in noise after a new adjustment, that is, in these cases; the electroacoustic transparency caused behavioral transparency. The electroacoustic evaluation protocol suggested was effective in evaluation of transparency between the frequency modulation system and the cochlear implant. Performing the adjustment of

  9. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Sanja; Djoković, Sanja; Radić-šestić, Marina; Nikolić, Mina; Mikić, Branka; Mirić, Danica

    2015-08-01

    Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP) of cochlear implanted (Cl) children. Special attention was focused on the influence of the duration and intensity of rehabilitation and hearing age on further development of communication skills. A group of 30 CI children (13 boys and 17 girls) aged 2 to 5 years was enrolled in the study. All of the children had average intelligence and no other developmental disorder. They lived in families and attended rehabilitative seances 3 to 5 times a week. Their parents/caregivers answered structured questionnaire about functioning after pediatric cochlear implantation (FAPCI) and the results were the subject of detailed statistical analysis. Analysis of variance did not show any difference between the boys and the girls regarding FAPCI achievements (F(1, 28) = 2.909; p = 0.099) and age aberration in CP score (F(1,28) = 0.114, p = 0.738). Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant difference in FAPCI scores related to hearing age and duration of rehabilitation. Regression analysis (enter method) showed that model consisting of indipendent variables significantly contributed to prediction of overall FAPCI scores and Adjusted R2 value could explain 32% difference in communication skills of participants in this study. Communication skills of CI children evaluated by FAPCI are falling behind normatives for normal hearing children 18.6 months on the average. Hearing age, duration and intensity of rehabilitation have positive predictive value for communication skills development. Later identification of hearing loss and later cochlear implantation lead to delayed development of communication

  10. Barriers to pediatric cochlear implantation: A parental survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charles Q; Reilly, Brian K; Preciado, Diego A

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to (1) determine barriers in the pediatric cochlear implantation process specific to publicly insured patients, wherein delayed implantation has been reported, and (2) compare the perceived barriers between publicly and privately insured patients. Tertiary care cochlear implantation center at academic pediatric hospital. Cross-sectional survey, retrospective chart review. The validated, 39 item Barriers to Care Questionnaire was administered to the parents of 80 recipients of cochlear implantation by two surgeons between 2013 and 2016. Survey results and diagnosis to implant interval were compared based on public or private insurance status. Two-tailed Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Of 110 cochlear implants, 27 of 80 (34%) English-speaking parents completed the survey. 15 were privately insured and 12 were publicly insured. 23 of 27 respondents received cochlear implantation for pre-lingual sensorineural hearing loss. Publicly insured patients had significantly longer median time from diagnosis to implant than privately insured (19 vs. 8 mo, p = 0.01). The three worst scoring barrier categories for privately insured families in order were Pragmatics, Expectations, and Marginalization, whereas for publicly insured families it was Pragmatics, Skills, and Expectations. The worst scoring question for privately insured patients was "Having to take time off work". For the publicly insured, it was "Lack of communication." Privately insured patients reported more barriers on the Barriers to Care Questionnaire than publicly insured patients did. Although pragmatics was the worst-scoring barrier category for both groups, difficulties found on the survey ranked differently for each group. This information can help providers address disparities and access barriers for vulnerable patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A prospective study evaluating cochlear implant management skills: development and validation of the Cochlear Implant Management Skills survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R J; Jayakody, D M P; Eikelboom, R H; Taljaard, D S; Atlas, M D

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the ability of cochlear implant (CI) recipients to physically handle and care for their hearing implant device(s) and to identify factors that may influence skills. To assess device management skills, a clinical survey was developed and validated on a clinical cohort of CI recipients. Survey development and validation. A prospective convenience cohort design study. Specialist hearing implant clinic. Forty-nine post-lingually deafened, adult CI recipients, at least 12 months postoperative. Survey test-retest reliability, interobserver reliability and responsiveness. Correlations between management skills and participant demographic, audiometric, clinical outcomes and device factors. The Cochlear Implant Management Skills survey was developed, demonstrating high test-retest reliability (0.878), interobserver reliability (0.972) and responsiveness to intervention (skills training) [t(20) = -3.913, P = 0.001]. Cochlear Implant Management Skills survey scores range from 54.69% to 100% (mean: 83.45%, sd: 12.47). No associations were found between handling skills and participant factors. This is the first study to demonstrate a range in cochlear implant device handling skills in CI recipients and offers clinicians and researchers a tool to systematically and objectively identify shortcomings in CI recipients' device handling skills. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile duct cancer (also called cholangiocarcinoma) can occur in the bile ducts in the liver (intrahepatic) or outside the liver (perihilar or distal extrahepatic). Learn about the types of bile duct cancer, risk factors, clinical features, staging, and treatment for bile duct cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  13. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Symptoms, Tests, Prognosis, and Stages (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile duct cancer, or cholangiocarcinoma, is rare. Bile ducts are tubes that carry bile between the liver, gallbladder, and small intestine. Bile duct cancer can occur in the intrahepatic, perihilar (Klatskin tumor), or distal extrahepatic area. Learn about tests to diagnose and the stages of bile duct cancer.

  14. Comparison of outcomes in a case of bilateral cochlear implantation using devices manufactured by two different implant companies (Cochlear Corporation and Med-El).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, S J; Gibson, W P; Greenberg, S L; Bray, M

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports a case of a patient who has had bilateral cochlear implants that have been manufactured by different cochlear implant companies (Cochlear Corporation and Med-El). Comparison of speech perception tests following single implant insertion and bilateral insertion (3 and 12 months). The patient was also interviewed to obtain a subjective opinion on their quality of hearing. The patient reported that their Med-El implant had better sound quality than their Cochlear Corporation implant. The speech perception tests however failed to show any difference. Despite no difference found with the objective tests hearing is very subjective and therefore the patient's opinion on the quality of sound is important. It is only a matter of time before other patients are fitted with bilateral cochlear implants from different companies and this information should be collated to allow comparison between manufacturers.

  15. Imaging and clinical findings in large endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, Sabrina; Rasinski, Christine; Amaya, Beatrice

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Large endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome (LEDS) is known as the most common kind of inner ear malformations, which is radiologically detectable. Nevertheless, nowadays many questions are not fully cleared and LEDS is relatively unknown among general radiologists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of LEDS in the own patient population and to present our experiences regarding imaging findings, clinical presentation and follow up. Materials and methods: Based on a complete recording of all patients, sent from ENT department to radiology, we identified all radiological diagnosed cases of inner ear malformations including LEDS and all patients in whom an inner ear malformation was clinically suspected. The retrospective study included clinical records, HR-CT and MRI performed between 1994 and 2002. Results: Among 169 patients (338 ear), 17 of patients (median age: 12 years) and 28 ears, respectively, had enlarged endolymphatic structures. In 10 patients - 6% - (15 ears), no other abnormalities were detected, called isolated LEDS, seven patients showed additional inner ear abnormalities. One patient showed a labyrinthine hemorrhage after sudden hearing loss. Audiometric data revealed sensorineural hearing loss in 22 ears, deafness in 5 ears and normal hearing in 1 case of 28 ears. In 10 (67%) of 15 ears with isolated LEDS, the hearing loss was downward-fluctuating progressive. Twelve patients (eight with isolated LEDS) had partly repeated sudden hearing losses. A trigger for worsening of hearing was found in five patients. A correlation between the severity of morphological changes on imaging and the degree of hearing disturbances could not be detected. Only four young patients underwent a radiological examination within the first or second year after onset of hearing loss. Three patients received a cochlear implant. Conclusions: LEDS might be the cause of progressive hearing loss and repeated acute hearing losses in children and young

  16. ß-adrenergic regulation of ion transport in pancreatic ducts: Patch-clamp study of isolated rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: In the intact pancreas, bicarbonate secretion is thought to be controlled by a number of regulators, including adrenergic agonists. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adrenergic agonists on pancreatic ducts, which are the site of bicarbonate secretion....... METHODS: Small intralobular ducts were isolated from rat pancreas and studied in vitro by the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cell membrane voltages and currents were indicators of cellular ion transport. In some ducts, intracellular Ca2+ activity was measured by fluorescence optical methods. RESULTS...

  17. Visualization of spiral ganglion neurites within the scala tympani with a cochlear implant in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikar, Jennifer A; Batts, Shelley A; Pfingst, Bryan E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-05-15

    Current cochlear histology methods do not allow in situ processing of cochlear implants. The metal components of the implant preclude standard embedding and mid-modiolar sectioning, and whole mounts do not have the spatial resolution needed to view the implant within the scala tympani. One focus of recent auditory research is the regeneration of structures within the cochlea, particularly the ganglion cells and their processes, and there are multiple potential benefits to cochlear implant users from this work. To facilitate experimental investigations of auditory nerve regeneration performed in conjunction with cochlear implantation, it is critical to visualize the cochlear tissue and the implant together to determine if the nerve has made contact with the implant. This paper presents a novel histological technique that enables simultaneous visualization of the in situ cochlear implant and neurofilament-labeled nerve processes within the scala tympani, and the spatial relationship between them.

  18. Reactive neurogenesis and down-regulation of the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 in the cochlear nuclei after cochlear deafferentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Tighilet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available While many studies have been devoted to investigating the homeostatic plasticity triggered by cochlear hearing loss, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these central changes remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of reactive neurogenesis after unilateral cochlear nerve section in the cochlear nucleus of cats. We found a strong cell proliferation in all the cochlear nucleus sub-divisions ipsilateral to the lesion. Most of the newly generated cells survive up to one month after cochlear deafferentation in all cochlear nuclei (except the dorsal cochlear nucleus and give rise to a variety of cell types, i.e. microglial cells, astrocytes and neurons. Interestingly, many of the newborn neurons had an inhibitory (GABAergic phenotype. This result is intriguing since sensory deafferentation is usually accompanied by enhanced excitation, consistent with a reduction in central inhibition. The membrane potential effect of GABA depends, however, on the intra-cellular chloride concentration, which is maintained at low levels in adults by the potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2. The KCC2 density on the plasma membrane of neurons was then assessed after cochlear deafferentation in the cochlear nuclei ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Cochlear deafferentation is accompanied by a strong down-regulation of KCC2 ipsilateral to the lesion at 3 and 30 days post-lesion. This study suggests that reactive neurogenesis and downregulation of KCC2 is part of the vast repertoire involved in homeostatic plasticity triggered by hearing loss. These central changes may also play a role in the generation of tinnitus and hyperacusis.

  19. Status of the development of hot gas ducts for HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, H.; Klas, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the PNP nuclear process heat system the heat generated in the helium cooled core is transferred to the steam reformer and to the successive steam generator or to the intermediate heat exchanger by the primary helium via suitable hot gas ducts. The heat is carried over to the steam gasifier by the intermediate heat exchanger and a secondary helium loop. In both the primary and the secondary loop, the hot gas ducts are internally insulated by a ceramic fibre insulation to protect the support tube and the pressure housing from the high helium temperatures. A graphite hot gas liner will be used for the coaxial primary duct with an annular gap between support tube and pressure shell for the cold gas counterflow. A metallic hot gas liner will be installed in the secondary duct

  20. Improvement in the management of bile duct injuries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, Y. C.; Bergman, J. J.; de Wit, L. T.; Rauws, E. A.; Huibregtse, K.; Tytgat, G. N.; Gouma, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that improvements in diagnostic workup and treatment of bile duct injuries (BDI) sustained during laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be expected as experience increases with the laparoscopic procedure. Many published articles reported that early diagnosis,

  1. Design requirement on KALIMER control rod assembly duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.; Kim, Y. J.

    1998-03-01

    This document establishes the design guidelines which are needs for designing the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER as design requirements. it describes control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER and its requirements that includes functional requirements, performance requirements, interfacing systems, design limits and strength requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The control rod system consists of three parts, which are drive mechanism, drive-line, and absorber bundle. This report deals with the absorber bundle and its outer duct only because the others are beyond the scope of fuel system design. The guidelines for design requirements intend to be used for an improved design of the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 19 refs

  2. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Karen; Delvaux, Peter; Huysentruyt, Frederik

    2017-08-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is a rare variant of bile duct tumors, characterized by papillary growth within the bile duct lumen and is regarded as a biliary counterpart of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. IPNBs are mainly found in patients from Far Eastern areas, where hepatolithiasis and clonorchiasis are endemic. The Western experience, however, remains limited. In this article, we report a 56-year-old man, referred to our hospital because of deranged liver function tests. Further imaging modalities showed a cystic lesion of 9 cm diameter, arising from the left hepatic duct. Inlying was a heterogeneous, lobulated mass. The patient underwent a left hemihepatectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advanced technologies, diagnosis of IPNB is still challenging, especially in western countries due to its rarity. Early identification and resection of lesions, even in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients, are however important prognostic factors.

  3. Design requirement on KALIMER control rod assembly duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, W.; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.; Kim, Y. J

    1998-03-01

    This document establishes the design guidelines which are needs for designing the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER as design requirements. it describes control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER and its requirements that includes functional requirements, performance requirements, interfacing systems, design limits and strength requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The control rod system consists of three parts, which are drive mechanism, drive-line, and absorber bundle. This report deals with the absorber bundle and its outer duct only because the others are beyond the scope of fuel system design. The guidelines for design requirements intend to be used for an improved design of the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 19 refs.

  4. Spontaneous common bile duct perforation—A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Amberger

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spontaneous common bile duct perforation is an uncommon clinical entity in both adults and children. Few case reports have been published since the first clinical description in 1882. Our work has been reported in line with SCARE criteria. Presentation of case: Herein, we describe the case of a 28 year-old female who suffered spontaneous common bile duct perforation while admitted for choledocholithiasis. Discussion: The perforation occurred while in-hospital, and extensive imaging and laboratory tests characterized the disease in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spontaneous common bile duct perforation witnessed from pre-perforation through definitive management. Conclusion: Physicians and Surgeons should seek out this uncommon diagnosis in the patient with suspected Choledocholithiasis who suddenly become peritoneal on physical exam so that definitive care can be expedited. Keywords: Common bile duct, Biliary peritonitis, Choledocholithiasis

  5. Heuristic approach to the passive optical network with fibre duct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integer programming, network flow optimisation, passive optical network, ... This paper uses concepts from network flow optimisation to incorporate fibre duct shar ... [4] studied the survivable constrained ConFL problem and solved a number of.

  6. STEREOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE COCHLEAR NUCLEI OF MONKEY (MACACA FASCICULARIS AFTER DEAFFERENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Insausti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear nuclei (CN in the brainstem receive the input signals from the inner ear through the cochlear nerve, and transmit these signals to higher auditory centres. A variety of lesions of the cochlear nerve cause deafness. As reported in the literature, artificial removal of auditive input, or 'deafferentation', induces structural alterations in the CN. The purpose of this study was to estimate a number of relevant stereological parameters of the CN in control and deafferented Macaca fascicularis monkeys.

  7. [Inspecting the cochlear scala tympanic with flexible and semi-flexible micro-endoscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoxcing; Zhang, Yankun

    2006-02-01

    Flexible and semi-flexible micro-endoscopes were used in cochlear scala tympani inspection , to explore their application in inner ear examination. Fifteen profound hearing loss patients preparing for cochlear implant were included in this study. During the operation, micro-endoscopy was performed after opening the cochlear scala tympani. And 1 mm diameter semi-flexible micro-endoscope could go as deep as 9 mm into the cochlear scala tympani, while 0. 5 mm diameter flexible micro-endoscope could go as deep as 25 mm. The inspecting results were compared with video recording. Using 0.5 mm flexible micro-endoscope, we canould check cochlear scala tympani with depth range of 15-25 mm, but the video imaging was not clear enough to examine the microstructure in the cochlear. With 1 mm diameter semi-flexible micro-endoscope, we could reach 9 mm deep into the cochlear. During the examination, we found 3 cases with calcification deposit in osseous spiral lamina, l case with granulation tissue in the lateral wall of scala tympani, no abnormal findings in the other 11 cases. Inspecting the cochlear scala tympani with 0.5 mm flexible micro-endoscope, even though we can reach the second circuit of the cochlear, it is difficult to find the pathology in the cochlear because of the poor video imaging. With 1 mm semi-flexible micro-endoscope, we can identify the microstructure of the cochlear clearly and find the pathologic changes, but the inserting depth was limited to 9 mm with limitation to examine the whole cochlear.

  8. Bile Duct Obstruction Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis in Seven Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Cribb, Alastair E.; Burgener, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.

    1988-01-01

    Seven icteric dogs were determined to have bile duct obstruction secondary to chronic pancreatitis. All dogs had histories of intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities and total bilirubin concentrations were markedly elevated. Diagnosis was based on exploratory laparotomy and histological examination. Each dog had a 3 to 10 cm mass in the body of the pancreas and obstruction of the common bile duct. Three dogs treated with pancreatectomy,...

  9. Studying the sampling representativeness in the NPP ventilation ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnovskij, R.I.; Fedchenko, T.K.; Minin, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of the gas and aerosol voluminous activity in the NPP ventilation ducts are an important source of information on the radiation contaminants ingress into the environmental medium. These measurements include sampling, samples transport and proper measurements. The work is devoted to calculation of metrological characteristics of the sampling systems for the NPP gas-aerosol releases by different parameters of these systems and ventilation ducts. The results obtained are intended for application by designing such systems and their metrological certification [ru

  10. Endoscopic stenting in bile duct cancer increases liver volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae Ghon; Yang, Jae Do; Yu, Hee Chul; Cho, Baik Hwan; Lee, Seung Ok

    2014-09-01

    Objective evaluation tools for assessing the effectiveness of stenting in palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction are not satisfactory. Effects of biliary stenting on liver volume change have never been studied. We aimed to use volumetry to analyze liver volume changes after endoscopic stenting in bile duct cancer according to the location and number of stents. Retrospective review. University hospital. Patients with a diagnosis of hilar or distal bile duct cancer and who underwent biliary metal stenting. ERCP with self-expandable metal stent placement. Liver volume change after biliary stenting and its comparison according to the location (hilar vs distal common bile duct) and number (hilar bilateral vs hilar unilateral). There were 60 patients; 31 were treated for hilar bile duct cancer (13 for bilateral stent and 18 for unilateral stent) and 29 for distal bile duct cancer. Overall mean follow-up duration was 11.7 ± 4.9 weeks. Liver volume increased 17.4 ± 24.1%. The rate of liver growth was rapid during the early period from 4 to 8 weeks. Stenting in hilar bile duct cancer tended to increase liver volume more than distal biliary stents (22.5% vs 11.9%, P = .091). In hilar bile duct cancer, unilateral and bilateral stents showed similar liver volume increases (20.1% and 25.8%, respectively; P = .512). Single center, retrospective. Biliary stenting markedly increased liver volume in both hilar and distal bile duct cancer. Our data suggest that liver volume assessment could be a useful tool for evaluating stent efficacy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical versus endoscopic treatment of bile duct stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, D J; Vernon, D R; Toouli, J

    2006-01-01

    10% to 18% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones have common bile duct (CBD) stones. Treatment options for these stones include pre- or post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or open or laparoscopic surgery.......10% to 18% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones have common bile duct (CBD) stones. Treatment options for these stones include pre- or post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or open or laparoscopic surgery....

  12. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallay, D. [Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval.

  13. BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDREWS,J.

    2001-01-01

    This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

  14. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  15. WAVE PROPAGATION in the HOT DUCT of VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Schultz; Jim C. P. Liou

    2013-07-01

    In VHTR, helium from the reactor vessel is conveyed to a power conversion unit through a hot duct. In a hypothesized Depressurized Conduction Cooldown event where a rupture of the hot duct occurs, pressure waves will be initiated and reverberate in the hot duct. A numerical model is developed to quantify the transients and the helium mass flux through the rupture for such events. The flow path of the helium forms a closed loop but only the hot duct is modeled in this study. The lower plum of the reactor vessel and the steam generator are treated as specified pressure and/or temperature boundary to the hot duct. The model is based on the conservation principles of mass, momentum and energy, and on the equations of state for helium. The numerical solution is based on the method of characteristics with specified time intervals with a predictor and corrector algorithm. The rupture sub-model gives reasonable results. Transients induced by ruptures with break area equaling 20%, 10%, and 5% of the duct cross-sectional area are described.

  16. A non-local computational boundary condition for duct acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, William E.; Watson, Willie R.; Hodge, Steve L.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local boundary condition is formulated for acoustic waves in ducts without flow. The ducts are two dimensional with constant area, but with variable impedance wall lining. Extension of the formulation to three dimensional and variable area ducts is straightforward in principle, but requires significantly more computation. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite duct. It is implemented by a constant matrix operator which is applied at the boundary of the computational domain. An efficient computational solution scheme is developed which allows calculations for high frequencies and long duct lengths. This computational solution utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space while preserving the radiation boundary condition. The boundary condition is tested for several sources. It is demonstrated that the boundary condition can be applied close to the sound sources, rendering the computational domain small. Computational solutions with the new non-local boundary condition are shown to be consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wavefields in an infinite uniform duct.

  17. Conservative Treatment for Cystic Duct Stenosis in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gasparetto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Few cases of common bile duct stenosis have been reported in the literature, and observations of strictures in the cystic duct are even more rare. Surgical cholecystectomy is the treatment needed in most cases of gallbladder hydrops. This paper describes the diagnosis and successful medical treatment of a rare pediatric case of cystic duct stenosis and gallbladder hydrops. Case Report. A formerly healthy one-year-old girl was admitted with colicky abdominal pain. Blood tests were normal, except for an increase in transaminases. Abdominal ultrasound excluded intestinal intussusception and identified a distended gallbladder with biliary sludge. MR cholangiography revealed a dilated gallbladder containing bile sediment and no detectable cystic duct, while the rest of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tree and hepatic parenchyma were normal. This evidence was consistent with gallbladder hydrops associated with cystic duct stenosis. The baby was treated with i.v. hydration, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and ursodeoxycholic acid. Her general condition rapidly improved, with no further episodes of abdominal pain and normalization of liver enzymes. This allowed to avoid cholecystectomy, and the child is well 1.5 years after diagnosis. Conclusions. Although cholecystectomy is usually necessary in case of gallbladder hydrops, our experience suggests that surgical procedures can be avoided when the distension is caused by a cystic duct stenosis.

  18. Parotid duct laceration repair in two horses : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olivier

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Repair of parotid duct lacerations in 2 horses is described using intraluminal silastic tubing as a stent. The duct was lacerated traumatically at the facial vessel notch (incisura vasorum facialium in the 1st horse, and iatrogenically after removal of an intraluminal sialolith after development of infection within the duct in the 2nd horse. In both cases, a silastic tube was passed retrograde into the duct via the salivary papilla, past the wound until the end lay rostroventral to the parotid salivary gland. The severed salivary ducts and the wounds were sutured. The external portion of the silastic tube was sutured to the skin and the tube left in place. Recovery in the 1st case was uneventful. In the 2nd case a salivary duct/cutaneous fistula formed at a wound distant from the sutured wound, which healed spontaneously. This technique differs from a similar described technique in that the stent tube exits the oral cavity and is attached to the outer skin surface.

  19. Thermal performance test of the hot gas ducts of HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, M.; Kunitomi, K.; Ioka, I.; Umenishi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Shimomura, H.; Sanokawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    A hot gas duct provided with internal thermal insulation is to be used for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). This type of hot gas duct has not been used so far in industrial facilities, and only a couple of tests on such a large-scale model of a hot gas duct have been conducted. The present report deals with the results of the thermal performance of the single tube type hot gas ducts which are installed as parts of a helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL). Uniform temperature and heat flux distribution at the surface of the duct were observed, the experimental correlations being obtained for the effective thermal conductivity of the internal thermal insulation layer. The measured temperature distribution of the pressure tube was in good agreement with the calculation by a TRUMP heat transfer computer code. The temperature distribution of the inner tube of the co-axial hot gas duct was evaluated and no hot spot was detected. These results would be very valuable for the design and development of HTGR. (orig.)

  20. Bilateral cochlear implantation in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Ho; Shin, Myung Chul; Min, Hyun Jung; Park, Chul Won; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2011-01-01

    With the emphasis on bilateral hearing nowadays, bilateral cochlear implantation has been tried out for bilateral aural rehabilitation. Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss caused by head trauma can get help from cochlear implantation. We present the case of a 44-year-old man with bilateral otic capsule violating temporal bone fractures due to head trauma. The patient demonstrated much improved audiometric and psychoacoustic performance after bilateral cochlear implantation. We believe bilateral cochlear implantation in such patient can be a very effective tool for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcomes of cochlear implantation in deaf children of deaf parents: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, S

    2012-10-01

    This retrospective study compared the cochlear implantation outcomes of first- and second-generation deaf children. The study group consisted of seven deaf, cochlear-implanted children with deaf parents. An equal number of deaf children with normal-hearing parents were selected by matched sampling as a reference group. Participants were matched based on onset and severity of deafness, duration of deafness, age at cochlear implantation, duration of cochlear implantation, gender, and cochlear implant model. We used the Persian Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired, the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale, and the Sentence Imitation Test, in order to measure participants' speech perception, speech production and language development, respectively. Both groups of children showed auditory and speech development. However, the second-generation deaf children (i.e. deaf children of deaf parents) exceeded the cochlear implantation performance of the deaf children with hearing parents. This study confirms that second-generation deaf children exceed deaf children of hearing parents in terms of cochlear implantation performance. Encouraging deaf children to communicate in sign language from a very early age, before cochlear implantation, appears to improve their ability to learn spoken language after cochlear implantation.

  2. Patient-specific estimation of detailed cochlear shape from clinical CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, H Martin; Fagertun, Jens; Wimmer, Wilhelm

    2018-01-01

    of the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape from CT images. From a collection of temporal bone [Formula: see text]CT images, we build a cochlear statistical deformation model (SDM), which is a description of how a human cochlea deforms to represent the observed anatomical variability. The model is used...... for regularization of a non-rigid image registration procedure between a patient CT scan and a [Formula: see text]CT image, allowing us to estimate the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape. We test the accuracy and precision of the predicted cochlear shape using both [Formula: see text]CT and CT images...

  3. Music perception and appraisal: cochlear implant users and simulated cochlear implant listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rose; Uchanski, Rosalie M

    2012-05-01

    The inability to hear music well may contribute to decreased quality of life for cochlear implant (CI) users. Researchers have reported recently on the generally poor ability of CI users to perceive music, and a few researchers have reported on the enjoyment of music by CI users. However, the relation between music perception skills and music enjoyment is much less explored. Only one study has attempted to predict CI users' enjoyment and perception of music from the users' demographic variables and other perceptual skills (Gfeller et al, 2008). Gfeller's results yielded different predictive relationships for music perception and music enjoyment, and the relationships were weak, at best. The first goal of this study is to clarify the nature and relationship between music perception skills and musical enjoyment for CI users, by employing a battery of music tests. The second goal is to determine whether normal hearing (NH) subjects, listening with a CI simulation, can be used as a model to represent actual CI users for either music enjoyment ratings or music perception tasks. A prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Original music stimuli (unprocessed) were presented to CI users, and music stimuli processed with CI-simulation software were presented to 20 NH listeners (CIsim). As a control, original music stimuli were also presented to five other NH listeners. All listeners appraised 24 musical excerpts, performed music perception tests, and filled out a musical background questionnaire. Music perception tests were the Appreciation of Music in Cochlear Implantees (AMICI), Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), Melodic Contour Identification (MCI), and University of Washington Clinical Assessment of Music Perception (UW-CAMP). Twenty-five NH adults (22-56 yr old), recruited from the local and research communities, participated in the study. Ten adult CI users (46-80 yr old), recruited from the patient population of the local adult cochlear implant

  4. Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, D. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States); McIlvaine, J. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States); Fonorow, K. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces.

  5. MRI ductography of contrast agent distribution and leakage in normal mouse mammary ducts and ducts with in situ cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Erica; Fan, Xiaobing; Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Conzen, Suzanne D; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2017-07-01

    High resolution 3D MRI was used to study contrast agent distribution and leakage in normal mouse mammary glands and glands containing in situ cancer after intra-ductal injection. Five female FVB/N mice (~19weeks old) with no detectable mammary cancer and eight C3(1) SV40 Tag virgin female mice (~15weeks old) with extensive in situ cancer were studied. A 34G, 45° tip Hamilton needle with a 25μL Hamilton syringe was inserted into the tip of the nipple and approximately 15μL of a Gadodiamide was injected slowly over 1min into the nipple and throughout the duct on one side of the inguinal gland. Following injection, the mouse was placed in a 9.4T MRI scanner, and a series of high resolution 3D T1-weighted images was acquired with a temporal resolution of 9.1min to follow contrast agent leakage from the ducts. The first image was acquired at about 12min after injection. Ductal enhancement regions detected in images acquired between 12 and 21min after contrast agent injection was five times smaller in SV40 mouse mammary ducts (pcontrast agent from the SV40 ducts. The contrast agent washout rate measured between 12min and 90min after injection was ~20% faster (p<0.004) in SV40 mammary ducts than in FVB/N mammary ducts. These results may be due to higher permeability of the SV40 ducts, likely due to the presence of in situ cancers. Therefore, increased permeability of ducts may indicate early stage breast cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging features of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yubao; Li Meng; Zhong Xiaomei; Liu Zaiyi; Liang Changhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT and MRI features of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB). Methods: Thirty eight patients with IPNB finally diagnosed by puncture biopsy or surgery were enrolled in this study. All the CT or MRI data were investigated retrospectively. Twenty one patients underwent CT examinations, 17 patients underwent MRI examinations. The features of IPNB including the distribution features of the nodules or masses, CT and MRI features of cholangiectasis, mucus were analyzed. The accuracy differences of CT and MRI for the preoperatively diagnosing mucus and tumor growing along mucous were compared by nonparametric test. Results: The lesions (including 5 patients with solitary lesions and 19 patients with multiple lesions) were located in intrahepatic bile duct in 24 patients, 3 patients occurred simultaneously in intrahepatic and portal bile duct, 2 lesions occurred in portal bile duct, 8 lesions occurred in common bile duct, the lesions of 1 patient occurred simultaneously in common bile duct, cystic duct and gallbladder. Seventeen and 11 patients appeared nodules locating in dilated bile duct on CT and MRI, respectively. Four and 5 patients appeared cystic lesions with multiple nodules of the liver on CT and MRI, respectively. Higher contrast enhancement on CT and MRI in arterial phase than that in portal vein and equilibrium phase were observed in 18 and 12 patients, respectively. Excluding the patients undergoing puncture, CT was better than MRI in evaluating whether the mucus was present, with the accuracies of 30.0% (6/20) and 6.3% (1/16) for CT and MRI, respectively (Z=2.58, P<0.05). CT was worse than MRI in preoperatively evaluating the features of tumor growing along mucous, with the accuracies of 77.8% (14/18) and 92.6% (13/14) for CT and MRI, respectively (Z=4.23, P<0.01). Conclusion: IPNB had the features of growing along mucous of the bile duct, nodule or mass in dilated bile duct and other features, CT and MRI are

  7. An incidence study on thyroglossal duct cysts in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurt, A.; Ortug, C.; Aydar, Y.; Ortug, G.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of the asymptomatic thyroglossal duct anomalies and to review the literature and make comments on the significance of this condition. A total of 80 cadavers were dissected in the present study. This study was carried out during 2005, where the cadavers were randomly included from the criminal laboratories of the Ministry of Justice, Republic of Turkey in Istanbul. None of the cadavers had laryngeal and cervical injuries resulting from a trauma or the cause of their death. The examined cadavers included 59 men and 21 females, and their ages were ranged from 35-80 years old. The larynges were removed and fixed in 10% formalin and then dissected. The sections were examined using surgical SMZ 10 Nikon stereomicroscope. We evaluated the presence, localization and diameter of the cysts with regard to age and sex of the cadavers. We observed a total of 12 different localization of thyroglossal ducts and cysts among the 80 dissected cadavers. Ten of these ducts cysts were found in males with an age range of 35-68 years and 2 female cadavers aged 45-65 years. In 6 cases, the thyroglossal ducts and cysts were located in the left of the midline of the neck, while 3 cases were from the right of the midline, and the remaining was located on the midline of the neck. In all cases, thryoglossal ducts and cysts were complete and restricted to the infrahyoid region: all of them had connection with the hyoid bone, but not with the perichondrium of the cartilage. In addition, the thyroglossal ducts have connection with the left lobe of the thyroid glands in 3 cases, one case in the right lobe, and 2 cases with the isthmus of the thyroid gland. Finally in 5 cases thyroglossal ducts were complete and had well developed cysts. Thyroglossal duct remnants are one of the most often seen congenital asymptomatic masses of the neck region (7%). The presence of these duct remnants may lead to abnormal phonation and epithelial carcinomas. Therefore, correlation of

  8. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangado Lopez, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    . To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient......'s CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns......Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging...

  9. Evidence of echoic memory with a multichannel cochlear prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, S; Watkins, M J

    1988-10-01

    Short-term memory was examined in a subject with a multichannel cochlear prosthesis. Serial recall for lists of digits revealed what are widely regarded as the principal hallmarks of echoic memory, namely the recency effect and the suffix effect. Thus, probability of recall increased for the last one or two digits, except when a nominally irrelevant but spoken item was appended to the to-be-remembered list. It appears, therefore, that a multichannel cochlear implant can give rise to not only the perception of, but also an echoic memory for, speech. As with normal subjects, the suffix effect did not occur with a nonspeech suffix, implying that the echoic memory from the prosthesis shows normal sensitivity to the distinction between speech and nonspeech.

  10. Piezoelectric materials mimic the function of the cochlear sensory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Takatoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kawano, Satoyuki; Ogita, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Hamanishi, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi; Ito, Juichi

    2011-11-08

    Cochlear hair cells convert sound vibration into electrical potential, and loss of these cells diminishes auditory function. In response to mechanical stimuli, piezoelectric materials generate electricity, suggesting that they could be used in place of hair cells to create an artificial cochlear epithelium. Here, we report that a piezoelectric membrane generated electrical potentials in response to sound stimuli that were able to induce auditory brainstem responses in deafened guinea pigs, indicating its capacity to mimic basilar membrane function. In addition, sound stimuli were transmitted through the external auditory canal to a piezoelectric membrane implanted in the cochlea, inducing it to vibrate. The application of sound to the middle ear ossicle induced voltage output from the implanted piezoelectric membrane. These findings establish the fundamental principles for the development of hearing devices using piezoelectric materials, although there are many problems to be overcome before practical application.

  11. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a partially implanted electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound and support speech to severely to profoundly hearing impaired patients. It is constituted by an external portion, that usually sits behind the ear and an internal portion surgically placed under the skin. The external components include a microphone connected to a speech processor that selects and arranges sounds pucked up by the microphone. This is connected to a transmitter coil, worn on the side of the head, which transmits data to an internal receiver coil placed under the skin. The received data are delivered to an array of electrodes that are surgically implanted within the cochlea. The primary neural targets of the electrodes are the spiral ganglion cells which innervate fibers of the auditory nerve. When the electrodes are activated by the signal, they send a current along the auditory nerve and auditory pathways to the auditory cortex. Children and adults who are profoundly or severely hearing impaired can be fitted with cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 188,000 people worldwide have received implants. In Italy it is extimated that there are about 6-7000 implanted patients, with an average of 700 CI surgeries per year. Cochlear implantation, followed by intensive postimplantation speech therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, and social skills. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of CI. With regard to the results after cochlear implantation in relation to early implantation, better linguistic results are reported in children implanted before 12 months of life, even if no sufficient data exist regarding the relation between this advantage and the duration of implant use and how long

  12. Molecular characterization of apocrine salivary duct carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiosea, Simion I; Williams, Lindsay; Griffith, Christopher C; Thompson, Lester D R; Weinreb, Ilan; Bauman, Julie E; Luvison, Alyssa; Roy, Somak; Seethala, Raja R; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary classification and treatment of salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) require its thorough molecular characterization. Thirty apocrine SDCs were analyzed by the Ion Ampliseq Cancer HotSpot panel v2 for mutations in 50 cancer-related genes. Mutational findings were corroborated by immunohistochemistry (eg, TP53, BRAF, β-catenin, estrogen, and androgen receptors) or Sanger sequencing/SNaPshot polymerase chain reaction. ERBB2 (HER2), PTEN, FGFR1, CDKN2A/P16, CMET, EGFR, MDM2, and PIK3CA copy number changes were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization. TP53 mutations (15/27, 56%), PTEN loss (11/29, 38%, including 2 cases with PTEN mutation), PIK3CA hotspot mutations (10/30, 33%), HRAS hotspot mutations (10/29; 34%), and ERBB2 amplification (9/29, 31%, including 1 case with mutation) represented the 5 most common abnormalities. There was no correlation between genetic changes and clinicopathologic parameters. There was substantial overlap between genetic changes: 8 of 9 cases with ERBB2 amplification also harbored a PIK3CA, HRAS, and TP53 mutation and/or PTEN loss. Six of 10 cases with PIK3CA mutation also had an HRAS mutation. These findings provide a molecular rationale for dual targeting of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways in SDC. FGFR1 amplification (3/29, 10%) represents a new potential target. On the basis of studies of breast carcinomas, the efficacy of anti-ERBB2 therapy will likely be decreased in SDC with ERBB2 amplification co-occurring with PIK3CA mutation or PTEN loss. Therefore, isolated ERBB2 testing is insufficient for theranostic stratification of apocrine SDC. On the basis of the prevalence and type of genetic changes, apocrine SDC appears to resemble one subtype of breast carcinoma-"luminal androgen receptor positive/molecular apocrine."

  13. Complications in cochlear implantation at the Clinical Center of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dankuc Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The first modern cochlear implantation in Serbia was performed on November 26, 2002 at the Center for Cochlear Implantation of the Clinic for Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Clinical Center of Vojvodina. Objective. The aim of the paper is the analysis of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Major complications include those resulting in the necessity for revision surgery, explantation, reimplantation, severe disease or even lethal outcomes. Minor complications resolve spontaneously or can be managed by conservative therapy and do not require any prolonged hospitalization of the patient. Methods. In the 2002-2013 period, 99 patients underwent surgical procedures and 100 cochlear implants were placed. Both intraoperative and postoperative complications were analyzed in the investigated patient population. Results. The analysis encompassed 99 patients, the youngest and the oldest ones being one year old and 61 years old, respectively. The complications were noticed in 11 patients, i.e. in 10.5% of 105 surgical procedures. The majority of procedures (89.5% were not accompanied by any post-surgical complications. Unsuccessful implantation in a single-step procedure (4.04% and transient facial nerve paralysis can be considered most frequent among our patients, whereas cochlear ossification (1.01% and transient ataxia (2.02% occurred rarely. Stimulation of the facial nerve (1.01%, intraoperative perilymph liquid gusher (1.01%, device failure and late infections (1.01% were recorded extremely rarely. Conclusion. Complications such as electrode extrusion, skin necrosis over the implant or meningitis, which is considered the most severe postoperative complication, have not been recorded at our Center since the very beginning. Absence of postoperative meningitis in patients treated at the Center can be attributed to timely pneumococcal vaccination of children.

  14. Noise-induced cochlear synaptopathy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, M D; Burton, J A; Hauser, S N; Hackett, T A; Ramachandran, R; Liberman, M C

    2017-09-01

    Cochlear synaptopathy can result from various insults, including acoustic trauma, aging, ototoxicity, or chronic conductive hearing loss. For example, moderate noise exposure in mice can destroy up to ∼50% of synapses between auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) and inner hair cells (IHCs) without affecting outer hair cells (OHCs) or thresholds, because the synaptopathy occurs first in high-threshold ANFs. However, the fiber loss likely impairs temporal processing and hearing-in-noise, a classic complaint of those with sensorineural hearing loss. Non-human primates appear to be less vulnerable to noise-induced hair-cell loss than rodents, but their susceptibility to synaptopathy has not been studied. Because establishing a non-human primate model may be important in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics, we examined cochlear innervation and the damaging effects of acoustic overexposure in young adult rhesus macaques. Anesthetized animals were exposed bilaterally to narrow-band noise centered at 2 kHz at various sound-pressure levels for 4 h. Cochlear function was assayed for up to 8 weeks following exposure via auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). A moderate loss of synaptic connections (mean of 12-27% in the basal half of the cochlea) followed temporary threshold shifts (TTS), despite minimal hair-cell loss. A dramatic loss of synapses (mean of 50-75% in the basal half of the cochlea) was seen on IHCs surviving noise exposures that produced permanent threshold shifts (PTS) and widespread hair-cell loss. Higher noise levels were required to produce PTS in macaques compared to rodents, suggesting that primates are less vulnerable to hair-cell loss. However, the phenomenon of noise-induced cochlear synaptopathy in primates is similar to that seen in rodents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Balance Performance of Deaf Children With and Without Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this study was to compare the static and dynamic balance performance of deaf children with and without cochlear implants. This is a cross-sectional study of 145 school children, aged between 7 and 12 years comprising 85 children with congenital or early acquired bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss (the hearing loss group and 60 normal hearing aged-matched control counterparts were assessed using the balance subtest of Bruininks-Oseretsky test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP. The hearing loss group, 50 without cochlear implants (the non-implant group and 35 of them with unilateral cochlear implants (the implant group were recruited from schools for the deaf and normal hearing children (the control group randomly selected from two randomly selected elementary schools of Tehran city. The scores were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The total score of deaf children especially the implant group were significantly lower than the control group P<0.001. The balance performance of the control group was better than the implant group in all of the items as well as the non-implant group except the fourth tested item (walking forward on a line (P<0.05. The balance score of the implant group was significantly lower than the non-implant group except for the third tested item (standing on the preferred leg on a balance beam with eyes closed. The findings suggested that deaf children, specifically those with cochlear implants are at risk for motor and balance deficits. Thus, vestibular and motor evaluations, as well as interventions to improve balance and motor skills, should be prioritized for this population.

  16. Challenging aspects of contemporary cochlear implant electrode array design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistrík, Pavel; Jolly, Claude; Sieber, Daniel; Hochmair, Ingeborg

    2017-12-01

    A design comparison of current perimodiolar and lateral wall electrode arrays of the cochlear implant (CI) is provided. The focus is on functional features such as acoustic frequency coverage and tonotopic mapping, battery consumption and dynamic range. A traumacity of their insertion is also evaluated. Review of up-to-date literature. Perimodiolar electrode arrays are positioned in the basal turn of the cochlea near the modiolus. They are designed to initiate the action potential in the proximity to the neural soma located in spiral ganglion. On the other hand, lateral wall electrode arrays can be inserted deeper inside the cochlea, as they are located along the lateral wall and such insertion trajectory is less traumatic. This class of arrays targets primarily surviving neural peripheral processes. Due to their larger insertion depth, lateral wall arrays can deliver lower acoustic frequencies in manner better corresponding to cochlear tonotopicity. In fact, spiral ganglion sections containing auditory nerve fibres tuned to low acoustic frequencies are located deeper than 1 and half turn inside the cochlea. For this reason, a significant frequency mismatch might be occurring for apical electrodes in perimodiolar arrays, detrimental to speech perception. Tonal languages such as Mandarin might be therefore better treated with lateral wall arrays. On the other hand, closer proximity to target tissue results in lower psychophysical threshold levels for perimodiolar arrays. However, the maximal comfort level is also lower, paradoxically resulting in narrower dynamic range than that of lateral wall arrays. Battery consumption is comparable for both types of arrays. Lateral wall arrays are less likely to cause trauma to cochlear structures. As the current trend in cochlear implantation is the maximal protection of residual acoustic hearing, the lateral wall arrays seem more suitable for hearing preservation CI surgeries. Future development could focus on combining the

  17. Cochlear implantation in children and adults in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Kompis, Martin; Dillier, Norbert; Allum, John H. J.

    2014-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) is one of the most successful neural prostheses developed to date. It offers artificial hearing to individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss and with insufficient benefit from conventional hearing aids. The first implants available some 30 years ago provided a limited sensation of sound. The benefit for users of these early systems was mostly a facilitation of lip-reading based communication rather than an understanding of speech. Considerable progress has...

  18. Concept Formation Skills in Long-Term Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William G.; Beer, Jessica; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Ditmars, Allison; Pisoni, David B.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated if a period of auditory sensory deprivation followed by degraded auditory input and related language delays affects visual concept formation skills in long-term prelingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users. We also examined if concept formation skills are mediated or moderated by other neurocognitive domains (i.e., language, working memory, and executive control). Relative to normally hearing (NH) peers, CI users displayed significantly poorer performance in several s...

  19. Free-form image registration of human cochlear μCT data using skeleton similarity as anatomical prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Fagertun, Jens; Vera, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of the anatomical variability of the human cochlear is important for the design and function of Cochlear Implants. Proper non-rigid alignment of high-resolution cochlear μCT data is a challenge for the typical cubic B-spline registration model. In this paper we study one way ...

  20. Cochlear function tests in estimation of speech dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Ju; Park, So Young; Park, Shi Nae; Na, Mi Sun; Lee, Philip; Han, Jae Sang

    2016-10-01

    The loss of active cochlear mechanics causes elevated thresholds, loudness recruitment, and reduced frequency selectivity. The problems faced by hearing-impaired listeners are largely related with reduced dynamic range (DR). The aim of this study was to determine which index of the cochlear function tests correlates best with the DR to speech stimuli. Audiological data on 516 ears with pure tone average (PTA) of ≤55 dB and word recognition score of ≥70% were analyzed. PTA, speech recognition threshold (SRT), uncomfortable loudness (UCL), and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were explored as the indices of cochlear function. Audiometric configurations were classified. Correlation between each index and the DR was assessed and multiple regression analysis was done. PTA and SRT demonstrated strong negative correlations with the DR (r = -0.788 and -0.860, respectively), while DPOAE sum was moderately correlated (r = 0.587). UCLs remained quite constant for the total range of the DR. The regression equation was Y (DR) = 75.238 - 0.719 × SRT (R(2 )=( )0.721, p equation.

  1. Paediatric Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nierop, Josephine W I; Snabel, Rebecca R; Langereis, Margreet; Pennings, Ronald J E; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Kunst, Henricus P M

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the benefit of cochlear implantation in young deaf children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) compared to a reference group of young deaf children without additional disabilities. A retrospective study was conducted on children with WS who underwent cochlear implantation at the age of 2 years or younger. The post-operative results for speech perception (phonetically balanced standard Dutch consonant-vocal-consonant word lists) and language comprehension (the Reynell Developmental Language Scales, RDLS), expressed as a language quotient (LQ), were compared between the WS group and the reference group by using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 14 children were diagnosed with WS, and 6 of them had additional disabilities. The WS children were implanted at a mean age of 1.6 years and the 48 children of the reference group at a mean age of 1.3 years. The WS children had a mean phoneme score of 80% and a mean LQ of 0.74 at 3 years post-implantation, and these results were comparable to those of the reference group. Only the factor additional disabilities had a significant negative influence on auditory perception and language comprehension. Children with WS performed similarly to the reference group in the present study, and these outcomes are in line with the previous literature. Although good counselling about additional disabilities concomitant to the syndrome is relevant, cochlear implantation is a good rehabilitation method for children with WS. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Design of a new electrode array for cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kha, H.; Chen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This study aims to design a new electrode array which can be precisely located beneath the basilar membrane within the cochlear scala tympani. This placement of the electrode array is beneficial for increasing the effectiveness of the electrical stimulation of the audi tory nerves and maximising the growth factors delivered into the cochlea for regenerating the progressively lost auditory neurons, thereby significantly improving performance of the cochlear implant systems. Methods The design process involved two steps. First, the biocom patible nitinol-based shape memory alloy, of which mechanical deformation can be controlled using electrical cUTents/fields act vated by body temperature, was selected. Second, five different designs of the electrode array with embedded nitinol actuators were studied (Table I). The finite element method was employed to predict final positions of these electrode arrays. Results The electrode array with three 6 mm actuators at 2-8, 8-J4 and 14-20 mm from the tip (Fig. I) was found to be located most closely to the basilar membrane, compared with those in the other four cases. Conclusions A new nitinol cochlear implant electrode array with three embedded nitinol actuators has been designed. This electrode array is expected to be located beneath the basilar membrane for maximising the delivery of growth factors. Future research will involve the manufacturing of a prototype of this electrode array for use in insertion experiments and neurotrophin release tests.

  3. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira [Faculty of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  4. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Venail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement, electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device. The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = −0.11 ± 0.02, P<0.01, the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = −8.50 ± 1.97, P<0.01, and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF. Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  5. Ethical considerations in resource allocation in a cochlear implant program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Brian D; Pijl, Sipke; McDonald, Michael

    2008-04-01

    To review processes of resource allocation and the ethical considerations relevant to the fair allocation of a limited number of cochlear implants to increasing numbers of potential recipients. Review of relevant considerations. Tertiary referral hospital. Editorial discussion of the ethical issues of resource allocation. Heterogeneity of audiometric thresholds, self-reported disability of hearing loss, age of the potential cochlear implant recipient, cost-effectiveness, access to resources, compliance with follow-up, social support available to the recipient, social consequences of hearing impairment, and other recipient-related factors. In a publicly funded health care system, there will always be a need for decision-making processes for allocation of finite fiscal resources. All candidates for cochlear implantation deserve fair consideration. However, they are a heterogeneous group in terms of needs and expected outcomes consisting of traditional and marginal candidates, with a wide range of benefit from acoustic amplification. We argue that implant programs should thoughtfully prioritize treatment on the basis of need and potential benefit. We reject queuing on the basis of "first-come, first-served" or on the basis of perceived social worth.

  6. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira

    2015-01-01

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane

  7. Cochlear implantation in patient with Dandy-walker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Adriana Kosma Pires; Hamerschmidt, Rogerio; Mocelin, Marcos; Rezende, Rodrigo K

    2012-07-01

     Dandy Walker Syndrome is a congenital abnormality in the central nervous system, characterized by a deficiency in the development of middle cerebelar structures, cystic dilatation of the posterior pit communicating with the fourth ventricle and upward shift of the transverse sinuses, tentorium and dyes. Among the clinical signs are occipital protuberances, a progressive increase of the skull, bowing before the fontanels, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual impairment.  To describe a case of female patient, 13 years old with a diagnosis of this syndrome and bilateral hearing loss underwent cochlear implant surgery under local anesthesia and sedation.  CGS, 13 years old female was referred to the Otolaryngological Department of Otolaryngology Institute of Parana with a diagnosis of "Dandy-Walker syndrome" for Otolaryngological evaluation for bilateral hearing loss with no response to the use of hearing aids. Final Comments: The field of cochlear implants is growing rapidly. We believe that the presence of Dandy-Walker syndrome cannot be considered a contraindication to the performance of cochlear implant surgery, and there were no surgical complications due to neurological disorders with very favorable results for the patient who exhibits excellent discrimination. It has less need for lip reading with improvement in speech quality.

  8. Cochlear implantation in patient with Dandy-walker syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Adriana Kosma Pires de

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dandy Walker Syndrome is a congenital abnormality in the central nervous system, characterized by a deficiency in the development of middle cerebelar structures, cystic dilatation of the posterior pit communicating with the fourth ventricle and upward shift of the transverse sinuses, tentorium and dyes. Among the clinical signs are occipital protuberances, a progressive increase of the skull, bowing before the fontanels, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual impairment. Objectives: To describe a case of female patient, 13 years old with a diagnosis of this syndrome and bilateral hearing loss underwent cochlear implant surgery under local anesthesia and sedation. Case Report: CGS, 13 years old female was referred to the Otolaryngological Department of Otolaryngology Institute of Parana with a diagnosis of "Dandy-Walker syndrome" for Otolaryngological evaluation for bilateral hearing loss with no response to the use of hearing aids. Final Comments: The field of cochlear implants is growing rapidly. We believe that the presence of Dandy-Walker syndrome cannot be considered a contraindication to the performance of cochlear implant surgery, and there were no surgical complications due to neurological disorders with very favorable results for the patient who exhibits excellent discrimination. It has less need for lip reading with improvement in speech quality.

  9. Parametric study of electromagnetic waves propagating in absorbing curved S ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study attenuation of transverse magnetic (TM) waves propagating in two-dimensional S-curved ducts with absorbing walls. In the frequency range where the duct diameter and electromagnetic wave length are nearly equal, the effect of duct length, curvature (duct offset), and absorber wall thickness was examined. For a given offset in the curved duct, the length of the S-duct was found to significantly affect both the absorptive and reflective characteristics of the duct. For a straight and a curved duct with perfect electric conductor terminations, power attenuation contours were examined to determine electromagnetic wall properties associated with maximum input signal absorption. Offset of the S-duct was found to significantly affect the value of the wall permittivity associated with the optimal attenuation of the incident electromagnetic wave.

  10. Technical Note: Thoracic duct embolization for treatment of chylothorax: A novel guidance technique for puncture using combined MRI and fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen, Alampath; Sreekumar, Karumathil Pullara; Nazar, Puthukudiyil Kader; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) is an established radiological interventional procedure for thoracic duct injuries. Traditionally, it is done under fluoroscopic guidance after opacifying the thoracic duct with bipedal lymphangiography. We describe our experience in usinga heavily T2W sequence for guiding thoracic duct puncture and direct injection of glue through the puncture needle without cannulating the duct

  11. Technical Note: Thoracic duct embolization for treatment of chylothorax: A novel guidance technique for puncture using combined MRI and fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Alampath; Sreekumar, Karumathil Pullara; Nazar, Puthukudiyil Kader; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2012-04-01

    Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) is an established radiological interventional procedure for thoracic duct injuries. Traditionally, it is done under fluoroscopic guidance after opacifying the thoracic duct with bipedal lymphangiography. We describe our experience in usinga heavily T2W sequence for guiding thoracic duct puncture and direct injection of glue through the puncture needle without cannulating the duct.

  12. Optimum design of the injection duct system of a stenter machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juraeva, Makhsuda; Song, Dong Joo [Yeungnam University, Geyongsan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Jin [Ajou Motor College, Boryeong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Stenter machines are used for drying fabrics in the textile industry and have a heater, injection duct system, and fans inside a chamber. The injection duct system has ducts and air-injecting holes. Plane-type injection duct systems were investigated to obtain uniform airflow at the air-injecting holes. The flow field of the injection duct systems was computed using ANSYS CFX with different heights of the duct end and different shapes for the air-injecting holes. There was a high mass flow rate at the air-injecting holes and high airflow circulation inside both plane-type and mountain-type ducts at the ends. The height of the duct end was varied between 40 mm and 160 mm. The injection duct systems were analyzed with four different shapes of air-injecting holes. The circular and elliptical holes had lower standard deviations of the mass flow rate than other shapes. Relatively uniform mass flow rates were obtained in the plane-type and mountain-type duct systems when the height of the duct end was 40 mm and the shape of the air-injecting holes was circular or elliptical. The developed injection duct systems were improved by obtaining a uniform mass flow rate at the air-injecting holes. A stenter prototype was fabricated with the developed injection duct system to confirm the numerical results. The developed injection duct system had better performance than the original system.

  13. Aspects of Music with Cochlear Implants – Music Listening Habits and Appreciation in Danish Cochlear Implant Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Hansen, Mads; Sørensen, Stine Derdau

    Cochlear implant users differ significantly from their normal hearing peers when it comes to perception of music. Several studies have shown that structural features – such as rhythm, timbre, and pitch – are transmitted less accurately through an implant. However, we cannot predict personal...... music less post-implantation than prior to their hearing loss. Nevertheless, a large majority of CI listeners either prefer music over not hearing music at all or find music as pleasant as they recall it before their hearing loss, or more so....... enjoyment of music solely as a function of accuracy of perception. But can music be pleasant with a cochlear implant at all? Our aim here was to gather information of both music enjoyment and listening habits before the onset of hearing loss and post-operation from a large, representative sample of Danish...

  14. Selective deletion of cochlear hair cells causes rapid age-dependent changes in spiral ganglion and cochlear nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Ling; Strong, Melissa K; Kaur, Tejbeer; Juiz, Jose M; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Hume, Clifford; Warchol, Mark E; Palmiter, Richard D; Rubel, Edwin W

    2015-05-20

    During nervous system development, critical periods are usually defined as early periods during which manipulations dramatically change neuronal structure or function, whereas the same manipulations in mature animals have little or no effect on the same property. Neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (CN) are dependent on excitatory afferent input for survival during a critical period of development. Cochlear removal in young mammals and birds results in rapid death of target neurons in the CN. Cochlear removal in older animals results in little or no neuron death. However, the extent to which hair-cell-specific afferent activity prevents neuronal death in the neonatal brain is unknown. We further explore this phenomenon using a new mouse model that allows temporal control of cochlear hair cell deletion. Hair cells express the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor behind the Pou4f3 promoter. Injections of DT resulted in nearly complete loss of organ of Corti hair cells within 1 week of injection regardless of the age of injection. Injection of DT did not influence surrounding supporting cells directly in the sensory epithelium or spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Loss of hair cells in neonates resulted in rapid and profound neuronal loss in the ventral CN, but not when hair cells were eliminated at a more mature age. In addition, normal survival of SGNs was dependent on hair cell integrity early in development and less so in mature animals. This defines a previously undocumented critical period for SGN survival. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357878-14$15.00/0.

  15. Abnormalities of intrahepatic bile ducts in extrahepatic biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raweily, E A; Gibson, A A; Burt, A D

    1990-12-01

    The infantile cholangiopathies are a group of conditions associated with neonatal jaundice, which include extrahepatic biliary atresia, paucity of intra-hepatic bile ducts and disorders associated with persistence of fetal biliary structures, the so-called ductal plate malformations. Although previously regarded as distinct entities, it has recently been suggested that they may represent parts of a disease spectrum in which the principal process is one of bile duct destruction, the morphological manifestations in individual cases being influenced by the stage of intra-uterine development at which such injury occurs and by the site within the biliary system at which there is maximum damage. To further examine this concept, we have studied liver biopsy specimens from 37 neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia, with particular reference to abnormalities of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Paucity of intrahepatic ducts, defined as a bile duct: portal tract ratio of less than 0.9, was identified in six cases (16.2%). In eight cases (21.6%) we found concentric tubular ductal structures similar to those observed in ductal plate malformations. In one case, both abnormalities could be demonstrated. Our findings support the concept that there is overlap between the various types of infantile cholangiopathy.

  16. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy of bile duct stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Moo Sang; Jo, Jang Hwan; Kim, Byung Ro

    1989-01-01

    During the past one and half year, we performed ESWL therapy in 13 patients with common bile duct and intrahepatic duct stones, applying Lithostar-R (Siemens co. West Germany) and analyzed their results. In 13 patients, 9 residual common bile duct stones and 7 intrahepatic duct stones were selected postoperatively. The size of stones were ranged from 0.7 cm to 3.5 cm in diameter. 2 stones were multiple and the remained 14 were single in number. The visualization of stones were done with fluoroscopy after the injection of contrast media via cholangiographic T-tube or ERCP. ESWL were applied continuously until stone disintegration was visible, or upto maximum number of 3500 discharge of shock wave. If not disintegrated upto 3500, patients were underwent second or third lithotripsy session with interval of one week. Our results showed that among 9 common bile duct stones, 4 were completely disintegrated and passed out spontaneously, but 3 partially fragmented and removed by the additional procedure. 2 were failed. Among 7 intrahepatic stones, 3 completely and 2 partially were succeeded. One stone partially fragmented were retained without removal and other one were failed. Skin petechia in all patients were revealed on the entry port of shock wave, but no serous complication was not occurred

  17. High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chitwood, Rick [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); German, Alea [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weitzel, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Duct thermal losses and air leakage have long been recognized as prime culprits in the degradation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system efficiency. Both the U.S. Department of Energy’s Zero Energy Ready Home program and California’s proposed 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards require that ducts be installed within conditioned space or that other measures be taken to provide similar improvements in delivery effectiveness (DE). Pacific Gas & Electric Company commissioned a study to evaluate ducts in conditioned space and high-performance attics (HPAs) in support of the proposed codes and standards enhancements included in California’s 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards. The goal was to work with a select group of builders to design and install high-performance duct (HPD) systems, such as ducts in conditioned space (DCS), in one or more of their homes and to obtain test data to verify the improvement in DE compared to standard practice. Davis Energy Group (DEG) helped select the builders and led a team that provided information about HPD strategies to them. DEG also observed the construction process, completed testing, and collected cost data.

  18. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy of bile duct stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Moo Sang; Jo, Jang Hwan; Kim, Byung Ro [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    During the past one and half year, we performed ESWL therapy in 13 patients with common bile duct and intrahepatic duct stones, applying Lithostar-R (Siemens co. West Germany) and analyzed their results. In 13 patients, 9 residual common bile duct stones and 7 intrahepatic duct stones were selected postoperatively. The size of stones were ranged from 0.7 cm to 3.5 cm in diameter. 2 stones were multiple and the remained 14 were single in number. The visualization of stones were done with fluoroscopy after the injection of contrast media via cholangiographic T-tube or ERCP. ESWL were applied continuously until stone disintegration was visible, or upto maximum number of 3500 discharge of shock wave. If not disintegrated upto 3500, patients were underwent second or third lithotripsy session with interval of one week. Our results showed that among 9 common bile duct stones, 4 were completely disintegrated and passed out spontaneously, but 3 partially fragmented and removed by the additional procedure. 2 were failed. Among 7 intrahepatic stones, 3 completely and 2 partially were succeeded. One stone partially fragmented were retained without removal and other one were failed. Skin petechia in all patients were revealed on the entry port of shock wave, but no serous complication was not occurred.

  19. Primary Follicular Lymphoma of the Common Bile Duct Mimicking Cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Youssef Elbanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma of the common bile duct is extremely rare. We present a case with history of inflammatory bowel disease and clinical manifestations of obstructive jaundice. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP was done and demonstrated tight stricture at the middle part of common bile duct, and radiological findings were supportive of extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Whipple′s procedure was performed and the case was histopathologically proven to be non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma of follicular subtype involving the common bile duct. Lymphoma of the hepatobiliary system is usually present as secondary manifestation of systemic malignant lymphoma. However, primary malignant lymphomas arising from the hepatobiliary tree are extremely rare. The radiological appearance of common bile duct lymphoma is very similar to cholangiocarcinoma, making preoperative diagnosis very difficult, as in our present case. We also compare the imaging findings of our case to those seen in reported cases of follicular lymphoma of the common bile duct.

  20. Can cochlear implantation improve neurocognition in the aging population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Völter C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Christiane Völter,1 Lisa Götze,1 Stefan Dazert,1 Michael Falkenstein,2,3 Jan Peter Thomas1 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ruhr University Bochum, St. Elisabeth-Hospital, Bochum, Germany; 2Institute for Work, Learning and Ageing (ALA, Bochum, Germany; 3Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund, Germany Introduction: The relationship between cognition and the ability to hear is well known. Due to changes in demographics, the number of people with sensorineural hearing loss and cognitive impairment is increasing. The aim of this study was to identify the impact of hearing rehabilitation via cochlear implantation on cognitive decline among the aging population. Patients and methods: This prospective study included 60 subjects aged between 50 and 84 years (mean 65.8 years, SD=8.9 with a severe to profound bilateral hearing impairment. A computer-based evaluation of short- and long-term memory, processing speed, attention, working memory and inhibition was performed prior to surgery as well as 6 and 12 months after cochlear implantation. Additionally, speech perception at 65 and 80 dB (Freiburger monosyllabic speech test as well as disease-related (Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire and general (WHOQOL-OLD quality of life were assessed. Results: Six months postimplantation, speech perception, quality of life and also neurocognitive abilities significantly increased. The most remarkable improvement after 6 months was detected in executive functions such as attention (p<0.001, inhibition (p=0.025 and working memory (n-back: p=0.002; operation span task: p=0.008, followed by delayed recall (p=0.03. In contrast, long-term memory showed a significant change of performance only after 12 months (p=0.021. After 6 months, most cognitive domains remained stable, except working memory assessed by the operation span task, which significantly improved between 6 and 12 months (p<0.001. No

  1. Parental mode of communication is essential for speech and language outcomes in cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Breinegaard, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a very strong effect of the parental communication mode on the auditory capabilities and speech/language outcome for cochlear implanted children. The children exposed to spoken language had higher odds of scoring high in all tests applied and the findings suggest...... a very clear benefit of spoken language communication with a cochlear implanted child....

  2. Cyborgization: Deaf Education for Young Children in the Cochlear Implantation Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Joseph Michael

    2011-01-01

    The author, who was raised oral deaf himself, recounts a visit to a school for young deaf children and discovers that young d/Deaf children and their rights are subverted by the cochlear implantation empire. The hypercapitalist, techno-manic times of cochlear implantation has wreaked havoc to the lives of not only young children with deafness but…

  3. Effects of residual hearing on cochlear implant outcomes in children: A systematic-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiossi, Julia Santos Costa; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2017-09-01

    to investigate if preoperative residual hearing in prelingually deafened children can interfere on cochlear implant indication and outcomes. a systematic-review was conducted in five international databases up to November-2016, to locate articles that evaluated cochlear implantation in children with some degree of preoperative residual hearing. Outcomes were auditory, language and cognition performances after cochlear implant. The quality of the studies was assessed and classified according to the Oxford Levels of Evidence table - 2011. Risk of biases were also described. From the 30 articles reviewed, two types of questions were identified: (a) what are the benefits of cochlear implantation in children with residual hearing? (b) is the preoperative residual hearing a predictor of cochlear implant outcome? Studies ranged from 04 to 188 subjects, evaluating populations between 1.8 and 10.3 years old. The definition of residual hearing varied between studies. The majority of articles (n = 22) evaluated speech perception as the outcome and 14 also assessed language and speech production. There is evidence that cochlear implant is beneficial to children with residual hearing. Preoperative residual hearing seems to be valuable to predict speech perception outcomes after cochlear implantation, even though the mechanism of how it happens is not clear. More extensive researches must be conducted in order to make recommendations and to set prognosis for cochlear implants based on children preoperative residual hearing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spelling in Written Stories by School-Age Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straley, Sara G.; Werfel, Krystal L.; Hendricks, Alison Eisel

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the spelling of 3rd to 6th grade children with cochlear implants in written stories. Spelling was analysed using traditional correct/incorrect scoring as well as the Spelling Sensitivity Score, which provides linguistic information about spelling attempts. Children with cochlear implants spelled 86 per cent of words in stories…

  5. Sequential bilateral cochlear implantation in children: parents' perspective and device use.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparreboom, M.; Leeuw, A.R.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was (1) to measure parental expectations before surgery of a sequentially placed second cochlear implant and compare these results with parental observations postoperatively and (2) to measure device use of the second cochlear implant and compare to unilateral

  6. Quality of life and cochlear implantation in Usher syndrome type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, G.W.J.A.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this descriptive, retrospective study were to evaluate quality of life, hearing, and vision in patients with Usher syndrome type I with and without cochlear implant. METHODS: Quality of life (QoL) of 14 patients with Usher type I (USH1) with a cochlear implant (CI)

  7. Advances in cochlear implant telemetry: evoked neural responses, electrical field imaging, and technical integrity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, L.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, cochlear implantation has evolved into a well-established treatment of deafness, predominantly because of many improvements in speech processing and the controlled excitation of the auditory nerve. Cochlear implants now also feature telemetry, which is highly useful to

  8. Protective role of hydrogen sulfide against noise-induced cochlear damage: a chronic intracochlear infusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A reduction in cochlear blood flow plays an essential role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. The timely regulation of cochlear perfusion determines the progression and prognosis of NIHL. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S has attracted increasing interest as a vasodilator in cardiovascular systems. This study identified the role of H(2S in cochlear blood flow regulation and noise protection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The gene and protein expression of the H(2S synthetase cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE in the rat cochlea was examined using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR. Cochlear CSE mRNA levels varied according to the duration of noise exposure. A chronic intracochlear infusion model was built and artificial perilymph (AP, NaHS or DL-propargylglycine (PPG were locally administered. Local sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS significantly increased cochlear perfusion post-noise exposure. Cochlear morphological damage and hearing loss were alleviated in the NaHS group as measured by conventional auditory brainstem response (ABR, cochlear scanning electron microscope (SEM and outer hair cell (OHC count. The highest percentage of OHC loss occurred in the PPG group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that H(2S plays an important role in the regulation of cochlear blood flow and the protection against noise. Further studies may identify a new preventive and therapeutic perspective on NIHL and other blood supply-related inner ear diseases.

  9. A new computed tomography method to identify meningitis-related cochlear ossification and fibrosis before cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kazunori; Kashio, Akinori; Mori, Harushi; Ochi, Atushi; Karino, Shotaro; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kakigi, Akinobu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2014-04-01

    To develop a new method to determine the presence of intracochlear ossification and/or fibrosis in cochlear implantation candidates with bilateral profound deafness following meningitis. Diagnostic test assessment. A university hospital. This study involved 15 ears from 13 patients with profound deafness following meningitis who underwent cochlear implantation. These ears showed normal structures, soft tissue, partial bony occlusion, and complete bony occlusion in 4, 3, 2, and 6 ears, respectively. We measured radiodensity in Hounsfield units (HU) using 0.5-mm-thick axial high-resolution computed tomography image slices at 3 different levels in the basal turn, the fenestration, and inferior and ascending segment sites, located along the electrode-insertion path. Pixel-level analysis on the DICOM viewer yielded actual computed tomography values of intracochlear soft tissues by eliminating the partial volume effect. The values were compared with the intraoperative findings. Values for ossification (n = 12) ranged from +547 HU to +1137 HU; for fibrosis (n = 11), from +154 HU to +574 HU; and for fluid (n = 22), from -49 HU to +255 HU. From these values, we developed 2 presets of window width (WW) and window level (WL): (1) WW: 1800, WL: 1100 (200 HU to 2000 HU) and (2) WW: 1500, WL: 1250 (500 HU to 2000 HU). The results using these 2 presets corresponded well to the intraoperative findings. Our new method is easy and feasible for preoperative determination of the presence of cochlear ossification and/or fibrosis that develops following meningitis.

  10. Cochlear implantation in the world's largest medical device market: utilization and awareness of cochlear implants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Donna L

    2013-03-01

    Provision of cochlear implants (CIs) for those within the criteria for implantation remains lower in the United States than in some other developed nations. When adults and children are grouped together, the rate of utilization/provision remains low at around 6%. For children, the provision rate is about 50% of those who could benefit from an implant, compared with figures of about 90% for the Flanders part of Belgium, the United Kingdom and other European countries. The probable reasons for this underprovision include: low awareness of the benefits of CIs among the population; low awareness among health-care professionals; the lack of specific referral pathways; some political issues relating to the Deaf Community; and financial issues related to health provision. Such financial issues result in situations which either fail to provide for access to implants or provide too low a level of the necessary funding, especially for low-income individuals covered by public health-care programs such as Medicaid. These issues might be mitigated by adoption and publication of standards for best clinical practices for CI provision, availability of current cost-effectiveness data, and the existence of an organization dedicated to cochlear implantation. Such an organization, the American Cochlear Implant Alliance (ACI Alliance), was recently organized and is described in the paper by Niparko et al. in this Supplement.

  11. Radiation therapy in extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, Marc; Romestaing, Pascale; Talon, Bernard; Ardiet, J.M.; Salerno, Nathalie; Sentenac, Irenee; Gerard, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts (EHBD) received radiation therapy between Jan 1980-Dec 1988. The location of the tumors was: proximal third, 20 patients; middle third, 23; distal third, 3; diffuse, 5 patients. Thirty-six patients underwent surgery with complete gross resection in 14 (10/14 with positive margins), incomplete gross resection in 12 and only biopsy in 10. Fifteen patients had only biliary drainage without laparotomy after cytologic diagnosis of malignancy in 11/15. Radiation therapy was done with curative intent after complete or incomplete resection (n=26) and it was palliative in patients who had no resection or only biliary drainage (n=25). Twenty-five patients received external radiation-therapy (ERT) alone to the tumor and lymph nodes (mean dose 45 Gy/2Gy per fraction for cure, 35 Gy/10 fractions for palliation), 8 patients had only iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) implant (50-60 Gy at a 1 cm radius for cure, 30 Gy for palliation), 17 patients had both ERT + 192 Ir(ERT 42.5 Gy + 192 Ir 10-15 Gy for cure; ERT 20 Gy/5 fractions + 192 Ir 20-30 Gy for palliation) and one intra-operative irradiation + ERT. The overall survival rate for the entire group was 55, 28.5 and 15 percent at 12, 24, 36 months and median survival 12 months. Median survival was 22 months in patients treated with curative intent and only 10 months after palliative treatment (p0.03). Among patients who had curative treatment, median survival was 27.5 months after complete gross resection and 13 months after incomplete gross resection (p0.045). After complete gross resection 5/14 patients were alive without evolutive disease at 11, 19, 20, 23 and 41 months, 2 were alive with metastases at 25 and 27 months and 7/14 died of cancer from 7 to 59 months. The rate of complications was low: 3 cholangitis responsive to antibiotics, 1 hemobilia and 2 gastric ulcers. These results are encouraging especially for patients with complete gross resection but they must be

  12. Standardization of reliability reporting for cochlear implants: an interim report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backous, Douglas D; Watson, Stacey D

    2007-04-01

    To propose a standard definition of "out of specification" for cochlear implants and a paradigm for inclusion of category C of the ISO standard 5841-2:2000 for reporting in cumulative survival statistics. A standard definition of "out of specification" and consistent reporting by manufacturers of cochlear implants will create a fair and consistent representation of cumulative survival. This will allow discernment of differences between manufacturers for reliability and for detection of trends in reliability between model types from the same manufacturer. Three separate meetings with representatives of the three manufacturers of cochlear implants marketed in the United States were staged over a 13-mo period. Standard questions, created by the authors, were addressed by each representative to determine the current state of device reliability reporting. Results were presented to clinicians at the William House Cochlear Implant study Group and the Implantable devices sub-committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (2004, 2005) and at the 8th International Cochlear Implant Conference (2004) for feedback. After assimilation of feedback by all parties, the standard was written and reviewed by representatives from each manufacturer for accuracy of data. A complaint-driven standard was developed. A "cochlear implant" as an internal device placed and skin closed in surgery. An internal device is "out of specification" when one or more technical characteristics is outside the limits of normal function and results in explantation or non-use by the patient." Children will be reported separately from adults, each model of device will be reported on annually, a minimum of 200 devices must be in each model group for Cumulative Survival Reporting (CSR). Confidence limits are set at 95%. Explants will be determined to be "biological" or "technical." Technical explants are included in CSR reports. Devices failing to meet specifications set by the manufacturer, not in use but

  13. Cardi-O-Fix duct occluder versus Amplatzer duct occluder for closure of patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Ahmet; Demir, Ibrahim Halil; Saritaş, Türkay; Dedeoğlu, Reyhan; Yucel, Ilker Kemal; Demir, Fadli; Erdem, Abdullah

    2013-11-15

    We sought to investigate the safety, efficacy, and follow-up results of percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure using the novel Cardi-O-Fix duct occluder (CDO), a device similar to but less expensive than the Amplatzer duct occluder (ADO). We also aimed to compare these two devices in terms of results. Between March 2005 and May 2012, 167 patients diagnosed with moderate-to-large PDA underwent transcatheter closure. ADO was used in 56 (33.5%) patients with a mean age of 8.1 ± 11.9 years (3.6 months-56 years), whereas CDO was used in 111 (66.5%) patients with a mean age of 12.6 ± 14.6 years (4.8 months-63 years). The narrowest PDA diameter, the used device diameter, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and residual shunt rates were similar between the two groups. Procedural success rate was 100% in both groups. Although the residual shunt rate was higher in the CDO group immediately after the procedure, the difference was not statistically significant (12.6 vs. 8.9%; P = 0.3). There was no statistically significant difference between groups at discharge and during follow-up. No deaths occurred in any of the groups, and there were no differences in complication rates during the short- and mid-term follow-up periods (CDO 7/111 vs. ADO 5/56; P = 0.5 π). The CDO can be used for PDA closure because of its safety, effectiveness, and simplicity in use. It is available in bigger sizes and can be used in patients with large defects. According to our short- and mid-term findings, the results it yields are similar to those of the ADO; thus, it may be the preferred choice owing to its low cost and large size variability. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prolapse of inverted ileal loops through a patent vitellointestinal duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Agarwal, Nitin; Singh, Poonam; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a prolapsed patent vitellointestinal duct (PVID) in a 2-month-old girl child who presented with sudden increase in size of a polypoidal lesion into a large, ‘Y’-shaped reddish, prolapsing lesion, discharging gaseous and faecal matter at her umbilicus. The lesion was diagnosed as a prolapse of inverted ileal loops through the PVID. The child had no associated congenital anomalies. A transumbilical exploration was performed, followed by wedge resection and anastomosis. The child tolerated the procedure well and the postoperative course was uneventful. If the omphalomesenteric duct fails to obliterate a range of congenital defects related to the umbilicus, it can become clinically apparent. Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest of these defects but is most often asymptomatic. PVID is the most common symptomatic anomaly of the patent omphalomesenteric duct and requires prompt surgical correction to avoid complications. PMID:26494719

  15. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hilar Bile Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippei Yamana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We herein report a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of the hilar bile duct. A 66-year-old Japanese male patient was admitted to our hospital because of appetite loss and jaundice. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an enhanced mass measuring 10 × 30 mm in the hilar bile duct region. After undergoing biliary drainage, the patient underwent extended right hepatic lobectomy with regional lymph nodes dissection. The tumor had invaded the right portal vein. Therefore, we also performed resection and reconstruction of the portal vein. Histopathologically, the carcinoma cells exhibited a solid structure with differentiation to squamous cell carcinoma with keratinization and intercellular bridges. Immunohistochemical staining of the tumor cells revealed positive cytokeratin staining and negative CAM 5.2 staining. Based on these findings, a definitive diagnosis of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the hilar bile duct was made.

  16. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  17. Diagnosis of functional nasolacrimal duct obstruction using dacryoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyun Wook; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Kim, Euy Neyng; Chung, Yong An; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the value of dacryoscintigraphy in the assessment of patients with a clinical diagnosis of functional nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Dacryoscintigraphy was performed in symptomatic 35 lacrimal drainage systems in 18 patients (age range: 37 ∼76,8 males, 10 females) that were patent on syringing. Abnormalities were detected with dacryoscintigraphy in 75.8% of systems. The positive scintigrams were subdivided into those demonstrating prelacrimal sac delay (31.8%), delay at the lacrimal sac/junction (40.9%), or delay within the duct (27%). Dacryoscintigraphy is noninvasive useful technique in the assessment of the functional nasolacrimal duct obstruction and very sensitive at detecting abnormalities in patients with lid laxity caused by senile change and facial nerve palsy

  18. Bile Duct Obstruction Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis in Seven Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Alastair E.; Burgener, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.

    1988-01-01

    Seven icteric dogs were determined to have bile duct obstruction secondary to chronic pancreatitis. All dogs had histories of intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities and total bilirubin concentrations were markedly elevated. Diagnosis was based on exploratory laparotomy and histological examination. Each dog had a 3 to 10 cm mass in the body of the pancreas and obstruction of the common bile duct. Three dogs treated with pancreatectomy, gastrojejunostomy, and cholecystojejunostomy died within five weeks. Three dogs treated with conservative surgical procedures were alive at 8, 16, and 26 months postoperatively. One dog was euthanized because of suspected neoplasia. Hepatic enzyme activity and bilirubin levels decreased markedly in the surviving dogs. Histological examination of the pancreatic masses indicated chronic pancreatitis. Hepatic biopsies revealed evidence of cholestasis. Chronic pancreatitis should be included in the differential diagnoses of icterus, bile duct obstruction, and masses in the pancreas. PMID:17423102

  19. [Qilin Pills for obstructive azoospermia after ejaculatory duct reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Gao, Ping; Ren, Fei-Qiang; Chang, De-Gui; Yu, Xu-Jun; Zhang, Pei-Hai

    2016-09-01

    To observe the clinical effect of Qilin Pills in the treatment of severe oligozoospermia after microsurgical ejaculatory duct reconstruction for obstructive azoospermia. We retrospectively analyzed 75 cases of obstructive azoospermia treated by ejaculatory duct reconstruction followed by administration of Qilin Pills. The patients were divided into a Qilin group (n=42) and a control group (n=33) postoperatively, treated with Qilin Pills and placebo, respectively. After 3 months of medication, we compared the sperm quality between the two groups of patients. After 3 months' treatment, all the patients experienced remarkable improvement in sperm quality (P0.05). The total effectiveness rate was higher in the Qilin group than in the controls (88.1% vs 72.7%), but with no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05). Qilin Pills are fairly effective in improving the quantity of sperm in obstructive azoospermia patients after ejaculatory duct reconstruction.

  20. Thermal behavior of the duct applied functionally graded material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Sun; Yoon, Dong Young; Im, Jong Bin [Hankuk Aviation Univ., Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), the high temperature results from friction among the air, combustion of fuel in engine and combustion gas of a nozzle. The high temperature may cause serious damages in UAV structure. The Functionally Graded Material(FGM) is chosen as a material of the engine duct structure. Thermal stress analysis of FGM is performed in this paper. FGM is composed of two constituent materials that are mixed up according to the specific volume fraction distribution in order to withstand high temperature. Therefore, hoop stress, axial stress and shear stress of duct with 2 layers, 4 layers and 8 layers FGM are compared and analyzed respectively. In addition, the creep behavior of FGM used in duct structure of an engine is analyzed for better understanding of FGM characteristics.

  1. Design of a Mobile Robot for Air Ducts Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses A. Koledoye

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the solutions adopted for the design and the implementation of an autonomous wheeled robot developed for the exploration and mapping of air ventilation ducts. The hardware is based on commercial off-the-shelf devices, including sensors, motors, processing devices and interfaces. The mechanical chassis was designed from scratch to meet a trade-off between small size and available volume to host the components. The software stack is based on the Robot Operating System (ROS. Special attention was dedicated to the design of the mobility strategy, which must take into account some constraints and issues that are specific to the considered application, such as the relatively small size of ducts, the need to detect and avoid possible holes on the floor of the duct and other unusual obstacles and the unavailability of external reference frameworks for localization. The main contribution of this paper lies in the design, implementation and experimentation of the overall system.

  2. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2017-01-01

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Working memory in Farsi-speaking children with normal development and cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani, Zahra; Amidfar, Meysam; Dadgar, Hooshang; Jalaie, Shohre

    2014-04-01

    Working memory has an important role in language acquisition and development of cognition skills. The ability of encoding, storage and retrieval of phonological codes, as activities of working memory, acquired by audition sense. Children with cochlear implant experience a period that they are not able to perceive sounds. In order to assess the effect of hearing on working memory, we investigated working memory as a cognition skill in children with normal development and cochlear implant. Fifty students with normal hearing and 50 students with cochlear implant aged 5-7 years participated in this study. Children educated in the preschool, the first and second grades. Children with normal development were matched based on age, gender, and grade of education with cochlear implant. Two components of working memory including phonological loop and central executive were compared between two groups. Phonological loop assessed by nonword repetition task and forward digit span. To assess central executive component backward digit span was used. The developmental trend was studied in children with normal development and cochlear implant as well. The effect of age at implantation in children with cochlear implants on components of working memory was investigated. There are significant differences between children with normal development and cochlear implant in all tasks that assess working memory (p memory between different grades showed significant differences both in children with normal development and in children with cochlear implant (p implied that children with cochlear implant may experience difficulties in working memory. Therefore, these children have problems in encoding, practicing, and repeating phonological units. The results also suggested working memory develops when the child grows up. In cochlear implant children, with decreasing age at implantation and increasing their experience in perceiving sound, working memory skills improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  4. Adenomas of the common bile duct in familial adenomatous polyposis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mao-Lin; Pan, Jun-Yong; Bai, Yan-Nan; Lai, Zhi-De; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Yao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Gardner’s syndrome is often accompanied by adenomas of the stomach and duodenum. We experienced a case of adenomas of the common bile duct in a 40-year-old woman with FAP presenting with acute cholangitis. Only 8 cases of adenomas or adenocarcinoma of the common bile duct have been reported in the literature in patients with FAP or Gardner’s syndrome. Those patients presented with acute cholangitis or pancreatitis. Local excision or Whipple procedure may be the reasonable surgical option. PMID:25780319

  5. Advanced Strategy Guideline: Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-12-01

    This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings. Principles discussed that will maximize occupant comfort include delivery of the proper amount of conditioned air for appropriate temperature mixing and uniformity without drafts, minimization of system noise, the impacts of pressure loss, efficient return air duct design, and supply air outlet placement, as well as duct layout, materials, and sizing.

  6. Parametric investigation of fracture of EBR-II ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Moustakakis, B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of preliminary static and dynamic finite element fracture mechanics analyses that were conducted to analytically simulate the dynamic fracture behavior of EBR-II ducts are presented. The loads considered are those that may arise because of rapid release of fission gases from a failed fuel element inside a duct, obtained from some previous tests and a recent analytical model. In spite of the motivation for the present work, the analytical procedures described may have a wider general application in the fail-safe design of structures

  7. Clinical implications of bile duct injury after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Tang Wenjie; Lin Hanying; Ye Huiyi; Dai Guanghai; Wang Zhiqiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence, risk factors , and clinical course of bile duct injury after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for treatment of hepatic malignancy. Methods: A total of 1240 consecutive patients with hepatic malignancies underwent 2680 TACE procedures. None of these patients were found to have any radiographic evidence of biliary abnormalities pre-TACE. Eighteen patients developed bile duct injuries at 3 weeks to 3 months after TACE. A retrospective review of medical records and imaging studies were carried out to evaluate the occurrence of TACE-induced bile duct injury, the clinical outcome, and the statistical significance of potential predisposing factors. Results: The TACE-induced bile duct injuries occurred in 13 of 148 patients with liver metastatic tumors (8.8%), 5 of 1092 patients with HCC (0.5%). Biliary injuries, including focal (n=4) and multiple intrahepatic bile duct dilatation (n=8), and cystic lesion or biloma (n=6), were identified on the follow-up imaging studies after TACE. Three patients with multiple bile duct injuries had mild jaundice at the presentation, two of them responded well to the conservative treatment, one died of irreversible deterioration of liver function at 2 weeks after the onset of jaundice. Four patients with a large biloma had associated serious bacterial infections; 3 of which were treated with percutaneous catheter drainage and antibiotics, 2 of them died of purulent peritonitis due to rupture of the cystic lesions and 1 cured with antibiotic. The remaining 11 patients were asymptomatic. The mortality related to the biliary injury occurred in 3 patients (16.7%). The incidences of bile duct injury were higher in patients with metastatic tumors in non-cirrhotic livers than in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhosis (P<0.01), higher in patient with hypovascular lesions (P<0.01), and higher in patients using an emulsion of lipiodol-platinum for selective embolization

  8. Simultaneous Papillary Carcinoma in Thyroglossal Duct Cyst and Thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cancela e Penna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglossal duct cyst (TDC is a cystic expansion of a remnant of the thyroglossal duct tract. Carcinomas in the TDC are extremely rare and are usually an incidental finding after the Sistrunk procedure. In this report, an unusual case of a 36-year-old woman with concurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma arising in the TDC and on the thyroid gland is presented, followed by a discussion of the controversies surrounding the possible origins of a papillary carcinoma in the TDC, as well as the current management options.

  9. Analysis of materials in ducts by Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouveia, M.A.G.; Lopes, R.T.; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Camerini, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the use of the Compton Scattering Technique as essay, for materials characterization in petroleum ducts. The essay have been accomplished in laboratory ambit, so that the presented results should be analyzed so that the system can come to be used in the field. The inspection was performed using Compton Scattering techniques, with two detectors aligned, in an angle of 90 degrees with a source of Cs-137 with energy of 662 keV. The results demonstrated the good capacity of the system to detect materials deposited in petroleum ducts during petroleum transportation. (author)

  10. Positioning of supporting-cable ducts in a prestressed concrete bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roetzer, H.

    1981-01-01

    Before inserting the supporting cables positioning of cable ducts in prestressed concrete bridges can be performed with the aid of radiation sources hauled through the ducts and localized by means of radiation monitors

  11. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cahen, Djuna L.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Nio, Yung; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Busch, Olivier R.; Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Johan S.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Huibregtse, Kees; Bruno, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pancreatitis and a dilated pancreatic duct, ductal decompression is recommended. We conducted a randomized trial to compare endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct. METHODS: All symptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis and a distal

  12. ASSESSMENT OF FUNGAL (PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM) GROWTH ON THREE HVAC DUCT MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The article discusses laboratory experiments to evaluate the susceptibility of three ventilation duct materials (fibrous glass ductboard, galvanized steel, and insulated flexible duct) to fungal (P. chrysogenum) growth. [NOTE: Many building investigators have documented fungal bi...

  13. Endoscopic Management of Perforation of Right Hepatic Duct Following Non-Surgical Abdominal Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, B. C.; Maini, A.; Saraswat, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Isolated bile duct injuries after blunt abdominal trauma are rare. Surgery is the usual mode of treatment. We report a patient with a right hepatic duct injury following blunt abdominal trauma who was managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy.

  14. Congenital double bile duct presenting as recurrent cholangitis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.D. Chakravarty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Double common bile duct (DCBD is a rare congenital anomaly. Most of these bile duct anomalies are associated with bile duct stones, anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction (APBJ, pancreatitis and bile duct or gastric cancers. Early detection and treatment is important to avoid long term complications. Surgical resection of the anomalous bile duct and reconstruction of the biliary enteric anastomosis is the treatment of choice. We report a rare case of DCBD anomaly in a girl, who presented with recurrent cholangitis. She had type Va DCBD anomaly. She underwent successful resection of the bile duct and reconstruction of the biliary enteric anastomosis. Preoperative imaging and diagnosis of the congenital biliary anomaly is very important to avoid intraoperative bile duct injury. Review of the literature shows very few cases of type Va DCBD, presenting with either bile duct stones or APBJ.

  15. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology in candidates for surgical resection of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: should the International Consensus Guidelines be revised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Maehara, Tadayuki

    2009-03-01

    The International Consensus Guidelines are helpful for the management of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), because they allow us to exclude malignancy. However, it is not possible to predict malignancy with certainty, and further preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs is required to avoid the false-positive results. To examine the usefulness of pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology by using an originally designed double-lumen catheter for discriminating benign and malignant IPMNs of the branch-duct type in candidates for surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology was investigated in 24 patients with branch-duct IPMNs who underwent surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines, namely, they either had intramural nodules or the ectatic branch duct was >30 mm in diameter. Single-center retrospective study. Academic medical center. The sensitivity and specificity of pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology for discriminating benign from malignant IPMNs. More than 30 mL of pancreatic-duct-lavage fluid was obtained from each patient, and there were no patients with noninformative results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the cytologic diagnosis were 78%, 93%, 88%, and 88%, respectively. Single-center and small number of patients. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology can improve differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs of the branch-duct type in candidates for surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines.

  16. Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, D.; McIlvaine , J.; Fonorow, K.; Martin, E.

    2011-11-01

    This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing. Interior ducts result from bringing the duct work inside a home's thermal and air barrier. Architects, designers, builders, and new home buyers should thoroughly investigate any opportunity for energy savings that is as easy to implement during construction, such as the opportunity to construct interior duct work. In addition to enhanced energy efficiency, interior ductwork results in other important advantages, such as improved indoor air quality, increased system durability and increased homeowner comfort. While the advantages of well-designed and constructed interior duct systems are recognized, the implementation of this approach has not gained a significant market acceptance. This guideline describes a variety of methods to create interior ducts including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. As communication of the intent of an interior duct system, and collaboration on its construction are paramount to success, this guideline details the critical design, planning, construction, inspection, and verification steps that must be taken. Involved in this process are individuals from the design team; sales/marketing team; and mechanical, insulation, plumbing, electrical, framing, drywall and solar contractors.

  17. Practical use of CFD for air conditioning duct and defroster designing; Kucho duct defroster no CFD sekkei katsuyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, K [Daihatsu Motor Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The automobile industry have made effort to shorten the development period. Recently CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) on initial design stage becomes use for improvement of development efficiency. Although the practical guidepost (computed examples) for air conditioning duct and defroster are a little reported. This report presents how to optimize and standardize the calculational methods, calculational grid, boundary conditions for air conditioning duct and defroster nozzle in the practical use. Also we tried the discontinuous interface grid and the solution adaptive method. 2 refs., 17 figs.

  18. A simple method to calculate the neutron flow through full ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faik Ouahab, Z.; Jehouani, A.; Ghassoun, J.; Senhou, N.; Groetz, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of a study of assessment of the probability for neutrons to be guided in a full duct with a square cross section and doubly bent. Two software have been developed, based on the Monte Carlo simulation, to compute the neutron transmission probability at the end of the duct. Results are in good agreement with that obtained with the MCNP-5 code. The neutron flow and probability at the duct end have been determined for different materials and different duct dimensions

  19. Chitin in the Silk Gland Ducts of the Spider Nephila edulis and the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gwilym J. G.; Knight, David P.; Vollrath, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori. Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems. We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts. PMID:24015298

  20. Ducting Conditions for Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Tropical Disturbances from GPS Dropsonde Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    depression, tropical storm , hurricane, extratropical cyclone, subtropical depression, subtropical storm , a low of no category, tropical wave, disturbance or...surface-based ducts, and elevated ducts. We further separate the duct occurrence based on the location relative to their respective storms . Based...on the number of soundings in different types of tropical disturbances, we chose to further analyze duct conditions in hurricanes and tropical storms

  1. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Shi, Jian-rong; Salvi, Richard; Roth, Jerome A.

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons

  2. Cochlear implant rehabilitation outcomes in Waardenburg syndrome children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Andrade, Susana Margarida; Monteiro, Ana Rita Tomé; Martins, Jorge Humberto Ferreira; Alves, Marisa Costa; Santos Silva, Luis Filipe; Quadros, Jorge Manuel Cardoso; Ribeiro, Carlos Alberto Reis

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of children with documented Waardenburg syndrome implanted in the ENT Department of Centro Hospitalar de Coimbra, concerning postoperative speech perception and production, in comparison to the rest of non-syndromic implanted children. A retrospective chart review was performed for children congenitally deaf who had undergone cochlear implantation with multichannel implants, diagnosed as having Waardenburg syndrome, between 1992 and 2011. Postoperative performance outcomes were assessed and confronted with results obtained by children with non-syndromic congenital deafness also implanted in our department. Open-set auditory perception skills were evaluated by using European Portuguese speech discrimination tests (vowels test, monosyllabic word test, number word test and words in sentence test). Meaningful auditory integration scales (MAIS) and categories of auditory performance (CAP) were also measured. Speech production was further assessed and included results on meaningful use of speech Scale (MUSS) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). To date, 6 implanted children were clinically identified as having WS type I, and one met the diagnosis of type II. All WS children received multichannel cochlear implants, with a mean age at implantation of 30.6±9.7months (ranging from 19 to 42months). Postoperative outcomes in WS children were similar to other nonsyndromic children. In addition, in number word and vowels discrimination test WS group showed slightly better performances, as well as in MUSS and MAIS assessment. Our study has shown that cochlear implantation should be considered a rehabilitative option for Waardenburg syndrome children with profound deafness, enabling the development and improvement of speech perception and production abilities in this group of patients, reinforcing their candidacy for this audio-oral rehabilitation method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cochlear Implant Spatial Selectivity with Monopolar, Bipolar and Tripolar Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziyan; Tang, Qing; Zeng, Fan-Gang; Guan, Tian; Ye, Datian

    2011-01-01

    Sharp spatial selectivity is critical to auditory performance, particularly in pitch related tasks. Most contemporary cochlear implants have employed monopolar stimulation that produces broad electric fields, which presumably contribute to poor pitch and pitch-related performance by implant users. Bipolar or tripolar stimulation can generate focused electric fields but requires higher current to reach threshold and, more interestingly, has not produced any apparent improvement in cochlear implant performance. The present study addressed this dilemma by measuring psychophysical and physiological spatial selectivity with both broad and focused stimulations in the same cohort of subjects. Different current levels were adjusted by systematically measuring loudness growth for each stimulus, each stimulation mode, and in each subject. Both psychophysical and physiological measures showed that, although focused stimulation produced significantly sharper spatial tuning than monopolar stimulation, it could shift the tuning position or even split the tuning tips. The altered tuning with focused stimulation is interpreted as a result of poor electrode-to-neuron interface in the cochlea, and is suggested to be mainly responsible for the lack of consistent improvement in implant performance. A linear model could satisfactorily quantify the psychophysical and physiological data and derive the tuning width. Significant correlation was found between the individual physiological and psychophysical tuning widths, and the correlation was improved by log-linearly transforming the physiological data to predict the psychophysical data. Because the physiological measure took only one-tenth of the time of the psychophysical measure, the present model is of high clinical significance in terms of predicting and improving cochlear implant performance. PMID:22138630

  4. Short-term risk of falling after cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Madelyn N; Baudhuin, Jacqueline E; Hullar, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is a highly effective intervention for hearing loss, but insertion of an implant into the cochlea is often accompanied by loss of residual hearing function. Sometimes, postoperative testing also shows loss of function in the semicircular canals or otolith organs. The effect of this loss on equilibrium, particularly in the short term following surgery, and the risk of falling due to this loss is unknown. We prospectively measured balance in 16 consecutive adult cochlear implant patients before and 2 weeks after surgery. Subjects stood on a foam pad with eyes closed, feet together and arms at the side. The length of time over which this posture could be maintained was recorded up to a maximum value of 30 s indicating normal performance. Ten of 16 subjects reached a maximal time on preoperative testing. Nine of 16 subjects lost balance function after surgery. Four of the 10 subjects with normal preoperative balance function lost function. Subjects older than the age of 60 were more likely to lose balance function than younger subjects. We used previously published values relating balance performance on foam to risk of falling to calculate the fall risk among our subjects. The relative risk of falling increased after surgery by more than threefold in some patients. Imbalance after cochlear implantation may be much more common, particularly in the short term, than previously appreciated. This imbalance is accompanied by an increased risk of falling in many patients. Careful preoperative counseling before implantation and postoperative therapeutic intervention to improve comfort and reduce the chance of falling may be warranted, particularly in patients at a risk for injuries from falls (level of evidence: 2b). © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yang [Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Shi, Jian-rong [Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Salvi, Richard [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Roth, Jerome A., E-mail: jaroth@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons.

  6. "COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH INNER EAR MALFORMATIONS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Borghei S. Abdi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Performing cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformation has always been a matter of dispute. This study was designed to analyze the operative findings,complications, and postoperative performance of patients with inner ear anomalies who underwent cochlear implantation. Six patients with inner ear malformations underwent implantation in our academic tertiary referral center from 1997 to 2002. The average follow-up period was 27 months. Malformations included one incomplete partition, one common cavity, one narrow internal acoustic canal (IAC in a patient with Riley-Day syndrome and 3 cases of large vestibular aqueduct. All received multi-channel implants either Nucleus 22 or Clarion device. Facial nerve was anomalous in 2 cases. CSF gusher occurred in 4 patients, which was controlled with packing the cochleostomy site. In all cases, the full length of electrode array was inserted, except one with Mondini's dysplasia where insertion failed in the first operation and was referred to another center for a successful surgery on the opposite ear. No other surgical complications were encountered. In 4 cases, all the 22 electrodes could be activated. All patients showed improved hearing performance after implantation. Four showed open-set speech recognition. The one with narrow IAC showed improved awareness to environmental sounds. In the other case (common cavity, the perception tests could not be performed because of very young age. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformations is a successful way of rehabilitation, although complications should be expected and auditory responses may be highly variable and relatively moderate.

  7. Safety of Monopolar Electrocautery in Patients With Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Duc A; Woodson, Erika A; Anne, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    The outcomes of 2 patients with cochlear implants (CIs) who underwent adenotonsillectomy (AT) with inadvertent use of monopolar cautery are presented. The safety data regarding monopolar cautery use in CI recipients is also reviewed. This is a retrospective case series of 2 CI recipients that underwent AT with monopolar cautery and literature review of electrocautery safety in the setting of CI. Two patients with CIs underwent AT with use of monopolar cautery inadvertently by surgeons that do not routinely perform cochlear implants as part of his or her clinical practice. Patient 1 was a 9-year-old female who had AT for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after undergoing unilateral CI for profound congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) 8 years ago. Patient 2 was a 7-year-old female who underwent AT for OSA 4 months after undergoing unilateral CI for congenital SNHL. Both patients had no immediate signs of complications with their CI use postoperatively. Both patients demonstrated unchanged postoperative neural response telemetry and behavioral audiometric testing. Patient 1 continues to have no CI-related complications 3.5 years after the procedure. Patient 2 has been followed for at least 3 months by audiometric testing and 10 months by otolaryngologist with no CI-related complications. Although animal and cadaveric studies suggest that monopolar cautery may be safely used in patients with cochlear implants, there have been no in vivo human studies that have evaluated the risk to the patient or implant. This is a report of a small, unintended experience with 2 patients, both of whom exhibit no complications or changes to CI function thus far. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred North American conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Elaine K. Sutherland; Kevin T. Smith; Donald A. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic resin ducts form in xylem and phloem tissue of conifers in response to abiotic wounding, fungal invasion, and insect attack. Little is known about resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred trees. The aim of this study is to quantify changes in traits of both axial and radial resin ducts, along with those of associated epithelial cells and...

  9. Effects of partial portal vein arterialization on the hilar bile duct in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shao-Hua; Li, Chong-Hui; Chen, Yong-Liang; Song, Jian-Ning; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Zhou, Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Liver revascularization is frequently required during the enlarged radical operation for hilar cholangiocarcinoma involving the hepatic artery. Researchers have carried out a number of experiments applying partial portal vein arterialization (PVA) in clinical practice. In this study we aimed to establish a theoretical basis for clinical application of partial PVA and to investigate the effects of partial PVA on rat hilar bile duct and hepatic functions. Thirty rats were randomly and equally assigned into 3 groups: control (group A), hepatic artery ligation+bile duct recanalization (group B), and partial PVA+bile duct recanalization (group C). Proliferation and apoptosis of rat hilar bile duct epithelial cells, arteriolar counts of the peribiliary plexus (PBP) of the bile duct wall, changes in serum biochemistry, and pathologic changes in the bile duct were assessed 1 month after operation. The proliferation of hilar bile duct epithelial cells in group B was greater than in groups A and C (Philar bile duct epithelial cells were detected in any of the groups. The PBP arteriolar counts of the hilar bile duct wall were similar in groups A and C (P>0.05), but the count was lower in group B than in group A (Philar bile duct walls were observed only in group B. Partial PVA can restore the arterial blood supply of the hilar bile duct and significantly extenuate the injury to hilar bile duct epithelial cells resulting from hepatic artery ligation.

  10. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. [Responses of bat cochlear nucleus neurons to ultrasonic stimuli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, A G; Grigor'eva, T I

    1977-01-01

    The responses of cochlear nuclei single units in Vespertilionidae and Rhinolophidae were studied by means of ultrasound stimuli of different frequencies. Most neurons were found to have one or two complementary response areas with best frequencies equal to 1/2 and 1/3 of the highest one (which we regard as the basic best frequency). In Vespertilionidae which emit frequency-modulated signals some neurons have complementary areas with upper thresholds. The latency of responses do not correlate with the stimulus frequency. This suggests that there is no correlative reception of echosignals at this level of auditory system in bats.

  12. Perceptual Interactions Between Electrodes Using Focused and Monopolar Cochlear Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McDermott, Hugh J.; Swanson, Brett A.

    2015-01-01

    -matched sequential and simultaneous stimuli composed of 2 spatially separated pulse trains was measured as function of the electrode separation. Results indicated a strong current-summation interaction for simultaneous stimuli in the MP mode for separations up to at least 4.8 mm. No significant interaction was found......In today’s cochlear implant (CI) systems, the monopolar (MP) electrode configuration is the most commonly used stimulation mode, requiring only a single current source. However, with an implant that will allow simultaneous activation of multiple independent current sources, it is possible...

  13. Cochlear implantation for severe sensorineural hearing loss caused by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Il-Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung; Kong, Soo-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Lightning strike can produce an array of clinical symptoms and injuries. It may damage multiple organs and cause auditory injuries ranging from transient hearing loss and vertigo to complete disruption of the auditory system. Tympanic-membrane rupture is relatively common in patients with lightning injury. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of auditory lesions in lightning survivors have not been fully elucidated. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss caused by a lightning strike, who was successfully rehabilitated after a cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of Mandarin spoken language after pediatric cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Soli, Sigfrid D; Zheng, Yun; Li, Gang; Meng, Zhaoli

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate early spoken language development in young Mandarin-speaking children during the first 24 months after cochlear implantation, as measured by receptive and expressive vocabulary growth rates. Growth rates were compared with those of normally hearing children and with growth rates for English-speaking children with cochlear implants. Receptive and expressive vocabularies were measured with the simplified short form (SSF) version of the Mandarin Communicative Development Inventory (MCDI) in a sample of 112 pediatric implant recipients at baseline, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after implantation. Implant ages ranged from 1 to 5 years. Scores were expressed in terms of normal equivalent ages, allowing normalized vocabulary growth rates to be determined. Scores for English-speaking children were re-expressed in these terms, allowing direct comparisons of Mandarin and English early spoken language development. Vocabulary growth rates during the first 12 months after implantation were similar to those for normally hearing children less than 16 months of age. Comparisons with growth rates for normally hearing children 16-30 months of age showed that the youngest implant age group (1-2 years) had an average growth rate of 0.68 that of normally hearing children; while the middle implant age group (2-3 years) had an average growth rate of 0.65; and the oldest implant age group (>3 years) had an average growth rate of 0.56, significantly less than the other two rates. Growth rates for English-speaking children with cochlear implants were 0.68 in the youngest group, 0.54 in the middle group, and 0.57 in the oldest group. Growth rates in the middle implant age groups for the two languages differed significantly. The SSF version of the MCDI is suitable for assessment of Mandarin language development during the first 24 months after cochlear implantation. Effects of implant age and duration of implantation can be compared directly across

  15. Dual Coding of Frequency Modulation in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraouty, Nihaad; Stasiak, Arkadiusz; Lorenzi, Christian; Varnet, Léo; Winter, Ian M

    2018-04-25

    Frequency modulation (FM) is a common acoustic feature of natural sounds and is known to play a role in robust sound source recognition. Auditory neurons show precise stimulus-synchronized discharge patterns that may be used for the representation of low-rate FM. However, it remains unclear whether this representation is based on synchronization to slow temporal envelope (ENV) cues resulting from cochlear filtering or phase locking to faster temporal fine structure (TFS) cues. To investigate the plausibility of those encoding schemes, single units of the ventral cochlear nucleus of guinea pigs of either sex were recorded in response to sine FM tones centered at the unit's best frequency (BF). The results show that, in contrast to high-BF units, for modulation depths within the receptive field, low-BF units (modulation depths extending beyond the receptive field, the discharge patterns follow the ENV and fluctuate at the modulation rate. The receptive field proved to be a good predictor of the ENV responses for most primary-like and chopper units. The current in vivo data also reveal a high level of diversity in responses across unit types. TFS cues are mainly conveyed by low-frequency and primary-like units and ENV cues by chopper and onset units. The diversity of responses exhibited by cochlear nucleus neurons provides a neural basis for a dual-coding scheme of FM in the brainstem based on both ENV and TFS cues. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Natural sounds, including speech, convey informative temporal modulations in frequency. Understanding how the auditory system represents those frequency modulations (FM) has important implications as robust sound source recognition depends crucially on the reception of low-rate FM cues. Here, we recorded 115 single-unit responses from the ventral cochlear nucleus in response to FM and provide the first physiological evidence of a dual-coding mechanism of FM via synchronization to temporal envelope cues and phase locking to temporal

  16. Use of CT in the evaluation of cochlear otosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Valvassori, G.E.; Deitch, R.L.; Norouzi, P.; Henrikson, G.C.; Capek, V.; Applebaum, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Otosclerosis (otospongiosis) occurs when the hard endochondral bone of the otic capsule is replaced by spongy vascular foci of haversian bone. Using computed tomography (CT), the authors studied the ears of 32 selected patients with mixed or sensorineural hearing loss; 24 were suspected of having otosclerosis. CT proved valuable in detecting cochlear otosclerosis, foci of demineralization, and changes in bony texture and enables the easy recognition of subtle radiographic findings. This paper also reports the CT findings of temporal bones in osteogenesis imperfecta and Paget disease

  17. [Strategy for minimally invasive cochlear implantation and residual hearing preservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y Y; Chen, J Y; Shen, M; Yang, J

    2018-01-07

    In the past few decades, considerable development was achieved in the cochlear implantation following the emergence of innovative electrode array and advances in minimally invasive surgery. Minimally invasive technique led to a better preservation of residual low-frequency hearing. The loss of residual hearing was caused by complicated factors. According to previous studies, a slower and stable speed of electrode insertion and the use of perioperative steroids were demonstrated to have a positive impact on hearing preservation. The selection of electrode array or its insertion approaches didn't show any distinctive benefits in hearing preservation.

  18. Spontaneous bile duct perforation in an infant, managed with simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous bile duct perforation is a very rare but important cause of surgical jaundice in pediatric patients and one of the most common causes of surgical jaundice during infancy after biliary atresia. Preoperative diagnosis may not be possible in most of the cases. The exact cause of the perforation remains unclear.

  19. Design requirement on KALIMER blanket fuel assembly duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.

    1998-03-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER as design guidance. The blanket fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER consists of fuel rods, mounting rail, nosepiece, duct with pad, handling socket with pad. Blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with solid ferritic-martensitic steel rod and key way blanket fuel slug, cladding, and wire wrap. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array, and the rod bundle is attached to the nosepiece with mounting rails. The bottom end of the assembly duct is formed by a long nosepiece which provides the lower restraint function and the paths for coolant inlet. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. (author). 20 refs., 4 figs

  20. Two phase flow combustion modelling of a ducted rocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowe, R.A.; Dubois, C.; Harris, P.G.; Mayer, A.E.H.J.; Champlain, A. de; Ringuette, S.

    2001-01-01

    Under a co-operative program, the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier and Université Laval in Canada and the TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory in the Netherlands have studied the use of a ducted rocket for missile propulsion. Hot-flow direct-connect combustion experiments using both simulated and

  1. Reconstruction of major bile duct injuries after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Bardram, Linda; Wettergren, André

    2010-01-01

    Bile duct injury (BDI) after cholecystectomy remains a serious complication with major implications for patient outcome. For most major BDIs, the recommended method of repair is a hepaticojejunostomy (HJ). We conducted a retrospective review aiming to examine the perioperative and the long...

  2. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  3. Laparoscopic managment of common bile duct stones: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroori, S; Bell, J C

    2002-05-01

    The management of choledocholithiasis has changed radically since the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, perceived technical difficulties have deterred many surgeons from treating common bile duct stones laparoscopically at the time of cholecystectomy. This has lead to reliance on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography followed by endoscopic sphincterotomy to deal with common bile duct stones. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients who had laparoscopic common bile duct exploration at Downe Hospital between December 1999 and August 2001. Among 149 laparoscopic cholecystectomies done by our group in this period, 10 patients (6.7%) underwent laparoscopic CBD exploration, three by the transcystic technique and seven by choledochotomy. Three patients (2%) had unsuspected stones found on routine per- operative cholangiogram. The mean operative time was 2.34hrs (range 1.50-3.30hrs). The mean hospital post- operative stay was 3 days (range 1-6 days). Post-operative morbidity was zero. Stone clearance was achieved in all cases. We conclude, laparoscopic exploration of the common bile duct is relatively safe and straightforward method. The key skill required is the ability to perform laparoscopic suturing with confidence.

  4. Cladding and Duct Materials for Advanced Nuclear Recycle Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Todd R.; Busby, J. T.; Klueh, R. L.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2008-01-01

    This is a review article that provides an overview of the reactor core structural materials and clad and duct needs for the GNEP advanced burner reactor design. A short history of previous research on structural materials for irradiation environments is provided. There is also a section describing some advanced materials that may be candidate materials for various reactor core structures

  5. Flow in curved ducts of varying cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Patel, V. C.

    1992-07-01

    Two numerical methods for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared with each other by applying them to calculate laminar and turbulent flows through curved ducts of regular cross-section. Detailed comparisons, between the computed solutions and experimental data, are carried out in order to validate the two methods and to identify their relative merits and disadvantages. Based on the conclusions of this comparative study a numerical method is developed for simulating viscous flows through curved ducts of varying cross-sections. The proposed method is capable of simulating the near-wall turbulence using fine computational meshes across the sublayer in conjunction with a two-layer k-epsilon model. Numerical solutions are obtained for: (1) a straight transition duct geometry, and (2) a hydroturbine draft-tube configuration at model scale Reynolds number for various inlet swirl intensities. The report also provides a detailed literature survey that summarizes all the experimental and computational work in the area of duct flows.

  6. Discontinuous finite element treatment of duct problems in transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, A. M.; Qamar, S.

    1998-01-01

    A discontinuous finite element approach is presented to solve the even-parity Boltzmann transport equation for duct problems. Presence of ducts in a system results in the streaming of particles and hence requires the employment of higher order angular approximations to model the angular flux. Conventional schemes based on the use of continuous trial functions require the same order of angular approximations to be used everywhere in the system, resulting in wastage of computational resources. Numerical investigations for the test problems presented in this paper indicate that the discontinuous finite elements eliminate the above problems and leads to computationally efficient and economical methods. They are also found to be more suitable for treating the sharp changes in the angular flux at duct-observer interfaces. The new approach provides a single-pass alternate to extrapolation and interactive schemes which need multiple passes of the solution strategy to acquire convergence. The method has been tested with the help of two case studies, namely straight and dog-leg duct problems. All results have been verified against those obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and K/sup +/ continuous finite element method. (author)

  7. Thyroglossal Duct Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Synchronous Lingual Thyroid Atypia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglossal duct and lingual thyroid ectopic lesions are exceedingly rare synchronous findings. Papillary thyroid carcinoma of these ectopic thyroid sites is well understood but still a rare finding. This case points to some management nuances in regard to ectopic thyroid screening with imaging and also shows the effectiveness of minimally invasive transoral robotic surgery for lingual thyroid.

  8. Percutaneous management of bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islim, F.; Ors, S.; Salik, A.; Guven, K.; Yanar, F.; Alis, H.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The risk of bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is higher than open cholecystectomy. Objective: To discuss the importance of minimally invasive treatment options in the management of bile duct injuries after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and to present our approach in the management. Materials and methods: Management of 25 patients with symptomatic bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy was retrospectively evaluated. Percutaneous collection drainage, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and percutaneous biliary drainage were performed for the management of the patients. Results: Mean age of the patients (15 women, 10 men) was 55. Either ultrasonography or computed tomography guided percutaneous drainage was performed in 13 patients. 9 of them completely recovered only with percutaneous drainage. In 4 of them ERCP was performed because of high drainage volume. In 9 of the patients with jaundice and high bilirubin levels ERCP was performed as the first option. And 3 patients were reoperated because of acute abdomen signs. ERCP, MRCP and PTC revealed type A in 7, type E2 in 3, type E3 in 3 and type E4 in 1 of the patients according to Strasberg classification. Conclusion: Presenting symptoms of the patients with symptomatic bile duct injury are useful in the determination of the treatment option.

  9. Percutaneous transhepatic cholelithotripsy for difficult common bile duct stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, J G; Moesgaard, F; Grønvall, S

    1998-01-01

    or ureteroscope in ten patients and by stone removal by basket in the remaining four patients. The procedure was carried out using local anesthesia in the last 11 patients. Except for two patients with transient cholangitis, no complications occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Difficult bile duct and intrahepatic stones can...

  10. Experimental study on the particles deposition in the sampling duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Charuau, J. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    A high standard of protection against the harmful effects of radioactive aerosol dissemination requires a measurement, as representative as possible, of their concentration. This measurement depends on the techniques used for aerosol sampling and transfer to the detector, as well as on the location of the latter with respect to the potential sources. The aeraulic design of the apparatus is also an important factor. Once collected the aerosol particles often have to travel through a variably shaped duct to the measurement apparatus. This transport is responsible for losses due to the particles deposition on the walls, leading to a distortion on the concentration measurements and a change in the particle size distribution. To estimate and minimize measurement errors it is important to determine the optimal transport conditions when designing a duct; its diameter and material, the radius of curvature of the bends and the flow conditions must be defined in particular. This paper presents an experimental study in order to determine, for each deposition mechanism, the retained fraction, or the deposition velocity for different flow regimes. This study has pointed out that it exists a favourable flow regime for the particle transport through the sampling ducts (2 500 < Re < 5 000). It has been established, for any particle diameters, equations to predict the aerosol penetration in smooth-walled cylindrical metal ducts.

  11. Sonographic and radiologic diagnosis of a pancreatic duct stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habscheid, W.; Kulke, H.; Heidbreder, E.

    1986-01-01

    A case is reported in which asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis of initially unknown etiology was detected as result of a routine follow-up examination of a patient with membraneproliferative glomerulonephritis. Ultrasound and endoscopic cholangio-pancreatography detected a stone in the major pancreatic duct. The stone was of such size and irregular form that endoscopic extraction was impossible. (orig.) [de

  12. Sonographic and radiologic diagnosis of a pancreatic duct stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habscheid, W.; Kulke, H.; Heidbreder, E.

    1986-09-01

    A case is reported in which asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis of initially unknown etiology was detected as result of a routine follow-up examination of a patient with membraneproliferative glomerulonephritis. Ultrasound and endoscopic cholangio-pancreatography detected a stone in the major pancreatic duct. The stone was of such size and irregular form that endoscopic extraction was impossible.

  13. Pattern and outcome of surgical management of nasolachrymal duct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest complication noted was stent extrusion before 6 weeks in 17.6% of cases. Conclusion: NLDO was mostly of congenital origin and was characterized by delayed presentation. Patients have good outcome with external DCR. Keywords: Children, dacryocystorhinostomy, naso lachrymal duct, obstruction.

  14. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, M.; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K channels...... and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K channels may be of importance....

  15. T-tube vs Primary Common Bile Duct Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Joshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Closure of the common bile duct over T-tube after exploration is a widely practiced traditional method. However, its use may give rise to many complications. We do primary closure of common bile duct after exploration. Aim of the study is to see the efficacy and safety of the primary closure. METHODS: Study was carried out to compare the results of both the techniques from 2006 to 2009 in the cases proven to have common bile duct stone with or without the features of obstructive jaundice. Post operative hospital stay and morbidities related to both the groups were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There were total 71 cases included in the study. Thirty one in T-tube group and 40 in primary closure group. T-tube was removed in most of the cases after three weeks where as average time of drain removal in primary closure group is 5.79 +/-1.79 days. Incidence of retained stone was equal in each group. Major complication in T-tube group is biliary peritonitis in four patients at the time of T-tube removal whereas none of the patient from primary closure group suffered from such major complication. CONCLUSIONS: Primary closure after the common bile duct exploration is safe and it helps to avoid the morbidities related to T-tube. Keywords: Choledocholithiasis, Primary closure, retained stone, T-tube, Ureterorenoscope.

  16. Surgical management of Stenson's duct injury using epidural catheter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-05

    Jul 5, 2012 ... Successful management of parotid duct injury depends on early diagnosis and appropriate intervention, failing of ... Mansarovar Dental College Hospital and Research Centre,. Kolar Road ... A 42-year-old male patient presented to maxillofacial .... catheter, catgut suture, and pediatric intravascular cannula.

  17. Echinococcal Cyst of the Pancreas with Cystopancreatic Duct Fistula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Echinococcal Cyst of the Pancreas with Cystopancreatic. Duct Fistula Successfully Treated by Partial Cystectomy and. Cystogastrostomy. Ahmed Elaffand, Adarsh Vijay1, Samah Mohamed, Hassan Hani Al-Battah1, Ayda Youssef, Ahmed Farahat. INTRODUCTION. Hydatid disease (HD) is a rare endemic disease in.

  18. A pilot study of bendamustine in advanced bile duct cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppmeyer, Konrad; Kreth, Florian; Wiedmann, Marcus; Mössner, Joachim; Preiss, Rainer; Caca, Karel

    2007-07-01

    We performed a pilot study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of bendamustine in patients with advanced hilar bile duct cancer and impaired liver function. Six patients with histologically proven, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the hilar bile duct were treated with bendamustine 140 mg/m intravenously on day 1 of the first cycle and with bendamustine 100 mg/m on days 1 and 2 of the second to fourth cycle. Treatment cycles were repeated every 21 days. Primary endpoint was the safety and tolerability of the treatment; secondary endpoints were response rate, time to progression and overall survival. Transient lymphopenia grade 3 occurred in all six patients. No other grade 3 or 4 toxicities were present. The most common nonhematologic toxicity was mouth dryness grade 2 in six patients. Three patients had stable disease. No partial or complete responses were observed. Median time to progression was 3.3 months; median overall survival was 6 months. Our study demonstrates that bendamustine can be safely administered in patients with hilar bile duct cancer and impaired liver function. A potential role of bendamustine in combination therapies for bile duct cancer will be a subject of further trials.

  19. Heat transfer in an asymmetrically heated duct, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Isao; Kurosaki, Yasuo

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study theoretically and experimentally the effects of nonuniform heating on turbulent heat transfer characteristics for flow in a horizontal rectangular duct ; a vertical side wall was uniformly heated, and the other wall were insulated. In our theoretical approach, the zero-equation model for turbulent eddy viscosity was employed. The effects of mesh size of finite difference on the calculation results were examined, and some refined compensation for wall temperatures and wall shear stresses by no use of fine mesh were proposed to reduce the calculation time. The heat transfer coefficients in thermally developing region for a nonuniformly heated duct obtained from numerical solutions are larger than the one for uniformly heated case. The buoyancy effects on heat transfer were evaluated. However, it was seen that the secondary flow due to buoyancy force was hardly expected to enhance heat transfer in a turbulent duct flow. Experiments were performed to measure the velocity and temperature profiles in a turbulent duct flow with a nonuniform heated wall. The experimental results were in good agreement with the theoretical ones. (author)

  20. Threshold shift: effects of cochlear implantation on the risk of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2007-04-01

    The study goals were to examine whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of meningitis in the absence of other risk factors and to understand the pathogenesis of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation. Four weeks following surgery, 54 rats (18 of which received a cochleostomy alone, 18 of which received a cochleostomy and acute cochlear implantation using standard surgical techniques, and 18 of which received a cochlear implant) were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae via three different routes of bacterial inoculation (middle ear, inner ear, and intraperitoneal) to represent all potential routes of bacterial infection from the upper respiratory tract to the meninges. The presence of a cochlear implant reduced the threshold of bacteria required to cause pneumococcal meningitis from all routes of infection in healthy animals. The presence of a cochlear implant increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis regardless of the route of bacterial infection. Early detection and treatment of pneumococcal infection such as otitis media may be required, as cochlear implantation may lead to a reduction of infectious threshold for meningitis.