WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonscience majors students

  1. The perspectives of nonscience-major students on success in community college biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Rajab, Oriana Sharon

    With more than 36% of nonscience-major community college students unable to successfully complete their general life science courses, graduation and transfer rates to four-year universities are negatively affected. Many students also miss important opportunities to gain some level of science proficiency. In an effort to address the problem of poor science achievement, this research project determined which factors were most significantly related to student success in a community college biology course. It also aimed to understand the student perspectives on which modifications to the course would best help them in the pursuit of success. Drawing heavily on the educational psychology schools of thought on motivation and self-efficacy of science learning, this study surveyed and interviewed students on their perceptions of which factors were related to success in biology and the changes they believed were needed in the course structure to improve success. The data revealed that the primary factors related to student success are the students' study skills and their perceived levels of self-efficacy. The findings also uncovered the critical nature of the professor's role in influencing the success of the students. After assessing the needs of the community college population, meaningful and appropriate curriculum and pedagogical reforms could be created to improve student learning outcomes. This study offered recommendations for reforms that can be used by science practitioners to provide a more nurturing and inspiring environment for all students. These suggestions revolved around the role of the instructor in influencing the self-efficacy and study skills of students. Providing more opportunities for students to interact in class, testing more frequently, establishing peer assistance programs, managing better the course material, and making themselves more available to students were at the forefront of the list. Examples of the potential benefits of increasing

  2. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Joseph P; Israel, Natalie; Rowland, Kimberly; Lovelace, Matthew J; Saunders, Mary Jane

    2016-03-01

    Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested "The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery" to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of non-science majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution) in academic year 2014-15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI) and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  3. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Paul Caruso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested “The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery” to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of nonscience majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution in academic year 2014–15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  4. Research and Teaching: Photovoice as a Pedagogical Tool--Student Engagement in Undergraduate Introductory Chemistry for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Mary W.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the use of Photovoice as a pedagogical tool in two introductory undergraduate chemistry courses for nonscience majors. Photovoice, historically linked to participatory action research, is a qualitative mode of inquiry in which the perspectives provided in narratives and pictures are generally personal, subjective, and unique.…

  5. Putting Students on the Hot Seat to Stimulate Interest in Biology in Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Samantha R.

    2012-01-01

    The Hot Seat is a discussion-based activity that requires students enrolled in a biology course for non-majors to pose a question to the class that is related to the current lecture topic and facilitate a brief class discussion. This paper describes the Hot Seat, how it is assessed, and how it has influenced students' attitudes toward the course…

  6. The Chemistry of Perfume: A Laboratory Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Rumbaugh, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    "The Chemistry of Perfume" is a lab-only course for nonscience majors. Students learn fundamental concepts of chemistry through the context of fragrance, a pervasive aspect of daily life. The course consists of laboratories pertaining to five units: introduction, extraction, synthesis, characterization, and application. The introduction unit…

  7. Reforming an Undergraduate Environmental Science Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the key components of a reform-based introductory undergraduate environmental science course for nonscience majors and elementary teacher candidates as well as the impact of such components on the participants. The main goals for the course were to actively engage the students in their learning and, in doing so, to enhance…

  8. The Chemistry of Perfume: A Laboratory Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Rumbaugh, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    "The Chemistry of Perfume" is a lab-only course for nonscience majors. Students learn fundamental concepts of chemistry through the context of fragrance, a pervasive aspect of daily life. The course consists of laboratories pertaining to five units: introduction, extraction, synthesis, characterization, and application. The introduction unit…

  9. Reforming an Undergraduate Environmental Science Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the key components of a reform-based introductory undergraduate environmental science course for nonscience majors and elementary teacher candidates as well as the impact of such components on the participants. The main goals for the course were to actively engage the students in their learning and, in doing so, to enhance…

  10. Using the Theme of Mass Extinctions to Teach Science to Non-Science Major College and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The general public is heavily exposed to "news" and commentary---and arts and entertainment---that either inadvertently misrepresents science or even acts to undermine it. Climate change denial and evolution denial is well funded and pervasive. Even university-educated people get little exposure to the aims, methods, debates, and results of scientific inquiry because unless they earn degrees in science they typically only take one or two introductory science courses at the university level. This presentation reports the development of a new, non-science major Seattle University course on mass extinctions throughout earth history. Seattle University is an urban, Jesuit Catholic university. The topic of mass extinctions was chosen for several reasons: (1) To expose the students to a part of current science that has rich historical roots yet by necessity uses methods and reasoning from geology, geophysics, oceanography, physics, chemistry, biology, and astronomy. This multidisciplinary course provides some coverage of sciences that the student would not typically ever see beyond secondary school. (2) To enable the students to learn enough to follow some of the recent and current debates within science (e.g., mass extinctions by asteroid impact versus massive volcanism, ocean anoxia, and ocean acidification), with the students reading some of the actual literature, such as articles in Science, Nature, or Nature Geoscience. (3) To emphasize the importance of "deep time" as evolutionary biological processes interact with massive environmental change over time scales from hundreds of millions of years down to the seconds and hours of an asteroid or comet strike. (4) To show the effects of climate change in the past, present, and future, due to both natural and anthropogenic causes. (5) To help the student critically evaluate the extent to which their future involves a human-caused mass extinction.

  11. Science Motivation Questionnaire II: Validation with Science Majors and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Brickman, Peggy; Armstrong, Norris; Taasoobshirazi, Gita

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of social cognitive theory, the motivation of students to learn science in college courses was examined. The students--367 science majors and 313 nonscience majors--responded to the Science Motivation Questionnaire II, which assessed five motivation components: intrinsic motivation, self-determination, self-efficacy, career…

  12. Experience with a Professionally Oriented Astronomy Laboratory for Nonscience Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Clarence H.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the philosophy and mechanics of a professionally oriented astronomy laboratory for nonscience majors. Design of the laboratory, description of the exercises, and the results of using this approach at the University of Kansas are also described. (HM)

  13. Cooperative and Inquiry-Based Learning Utilizing Art-Related Topics: Teaching Chemistry to Community College Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj-Benny, Tirandai; Beckford, Ian

    2014-01-01

    It is an established fact that in the United States there is a great need to improve the scientific literacy of undergraduate students, especially those who are nonscience majors. Data presented herein suggest that using simple art concepts can assist nonscience majors in better appreciating scientific facts related to chemistry. However, it is…

  14. The academic and nonacademic characteristics of science and nonscience majors in Yemeni high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaam, Mahyoub Ali

    The purposes of this study were: (a) to identify the variables associated with selection of majors; (b) to determine the differences between science and nonscience majors in general, and high and low achievers in particular, with respect to attitudes toward science, integrated science process skills, and logical thinking abilities; and (c) to determine if a significant relationship exists between students' majors and their personality types and learning styles. Data were gathered from 188 twelfth grade male and female high school students in Yemen, who enrolled in science (45 males and 47 females) and art and literature (47 males and 49 females) tracks. Data were collected by the following instruments: Past math and science achievement (data source taken from school records), Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory (1985), Integrated Science Process Skills Test, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Attitude Toward Science in School Assessment, Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, Yemeni High School Students Questionnaire. The Logistic Regression Model and the Linear Discriminant Analysis identified several variables that are associated with selection of majors. Moreover, some of the characteristics of science and nonscience majors that were revealed by these models include the following: Science majors seem to have higher degrees of curiosity in science, high interest in science at high school level, high tendency to believe that their majors will help them to find a potential job in the future, and have had higher achievement in science subjects, and have rated their math teachers higher than did nonscience majors. In contrast, nonscience majors seem to have higher degrees of curiosity in nonscience subjects, higher interest in science at elementary school, higher anxiety during science lessons than did science majors. In addition, General Linear Models allow that science majors generally demonstrate more positive attitudes towards science than do nonscience majors and they

  15. A Sustainable Energy Laboratory Course for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Stephen A.; Loxsom, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Sustainable energy is growing in importance as the public becomes more aware of climate change and the need to satisfy our society's energy demands while minimizing environmental impacts. To further this awareness and to better prepare a workforce for "green careers," we developed a sustainable energy laboratory course that is suitable for high school and undergraduate students, especially non-science majors. Thirteen hands-on exercises provide an overview of sustainable energy by demonstrating the basic principles of wind power, photovoltaics, electric cars, lighting, heating/cooling, insulation, electric circuits, and solar collectors. The order of content presentation and instructional level (secondary education or college) can easily be modified to suit instructor needs and/or academic programs (e.g., engineering, physics, renewable and/or sustainable energy).

  16. A Multi-Technique Forensic Experiment for a Nonscience-Major Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Paul S.; Zook-Gerdau, Lois Anne; Schurter, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    This multi-technique experiment with a forensic theme was developed for a nonscience-major chemistry course. The students are provided with solid samples and informed that the samples are either cocaine or a combination of drugs designed to mimic the stimulant and anesthetic qualities of cocaine such as caffeine and lidocaine. The students carry…

  17. Design of a Food Chemistry-Themed Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The physical science curriculum design at Georgia Gwinnett College requires a theme-based course (lecture and group work, and laboratory) for nonscience majors. Increased student engagement is anticipated when science topics are taught in the context of a topic of which students can select during course registration. This paper presents the course…

  18. A Multi-Technique Forensic Experiment for a Nonscience-Major Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Paul S.; Zook-Gerdau, Lois Anne; Schurter, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    This multi-technique experiment with a forensic theme was developed for a nonscience-major chemistry course. The students are provided with solid samples and informed that the samples are either cocaine or a combination of drugs designed to mimic the stimulant and anesthetic qualities of cocaine such as caffeine and lidocaine. The students carry…

  19. Design of a Food Chemistry-Themed Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The physical science curriculum design at Georgia Gwinnett College requires a theme-based course (lecture and group work, and laboratory) for nonscience majors. Increased student engagement is anticipated when science topics are taught in the context of a topic of which students can select during course registration. This paper presents the course…

  20. A Teaching Intervention to Increase Achievement of Hispanic Nonscience Majors Taking Physical Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelzer, G. Herold; Zeng, Liang

    2008-01-01

    This quasi-experimental pilot study of nonscience majors taking a physical science course at a university in South Texas was conducted on Hispanic undergraduate students, and is theory based--an application of attribution theory. That the treatment group outperformed the comparison group provides evidence of the positive effect of having students…

  1. Green Chemistry and Sustainability: An Undergraduate Course for Science and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate lecture course in Green Chemistry and Sustainability has been developed and taught to a "multidisciplinary" group of science and nonscience majors. The course introduced students to the topics of green chemistry and sustainability and also immersed them in usage of the scientific literature. Through literature…

  2. Science and the Nonscience Major: Addressing the Fear Factor in the Chemical Arena Using Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labianca, Dominick A.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an approach to minimizing the "fear factor" in a chemistry course for the nonscience major, and also addresses relevant applications to other science courses, including biology, geology, and physics. The approach emphasizes forensic science and affords students the opportunity to hone their analytical skills in an…

  3. Science and the Nonscience Major: Addressing the Fear Factor in the Chemical Arena Using Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labianca, Dominick A.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an approach to minimizing the "fear factor" in a chemistry course for the nonscience major, and also addresses relevant applications to other science courses, including biology, geology, and physics. The approach emphasizes forensic science and affords students the opportunity to hone their analytical skills in an…

  4. Green Chemistry and Sustainability: An Undergraduate Course for Science and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate lecture course in Green Chemistry and Sustainability has been developed and taught to a "multidisciplinary" group of science and nonscience majors. The course introduced students to the topics of green chemistry and sustainability and also immersed them in usage of the scientific literature. Through literature…

  5. Computer-based Astronomy Labs for Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. B. E.; Murray, S. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1998-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate two laboratory exercises, Kepler's Third Law and Stellar Structure, which are being developed for use in an astronomy laboratory class aimed at non-science majors. The labs run with Microsoft's Excel 98 (Macintosh) or Excel 97 (Windows). They can be run in a classroom setting or in an independent learning environment. The intent of the labs is twofold; first and foremost, students learn the subject matter through a series of informational frames. Next, students enhance their understanding by applying their knowledge in lab procedures, while also gaining familiarity with the use and power of a widely-used software package and scientific tool. No mathematical knowledge beyond basic algebra is required to complete the labs or to understand the computations in the spreadsheets, although the students are exposed to the concepts of numerical integration. The labs are contained in Excel workbook files. In the files are multiple spreadsheets, which contain either a frame with information on how to run the lab, material on the subject, or one or more procedures. Excel's VBA macro language is used to automate the labs. The macros are accessed through button interfaces positioned on the spreadsheets. This is done intentionally so that students can focus on learning the subject matter and the basic spreadsheet features without having to learn advanced Excel features all at once. Students open the file and progress through the informational frames to the procedures. After each procedure, student comments and data are automatically recorded in a preformatted Lab Report spreadsheet. Once all procedures have been completed, the student is prompted for a filename in which to save their Lab Report. The lab reports can then be printed or emailed to the instructor. The files will have full worksheet and workbook protection, and will have a "redo" feature at the end of the lab for students who want to repeat a procedure.

  6. "Bohr and Einstein": A Course for Nonscience Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Richard

    1976-01-01

    A study of the concepts of relativity and quantum physics through the work of Bohr and Einstein is the basis for this upper level course for nonscience students. Along with their scientific philosophies, the political and moral theories of the scientists are studied. (CP)

  7. Reaching Nonscience Students through Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 I had the chance to design a physics course for students not majoring in scientific fields. I chose to shape the course around science fiction, not as a source for quantitative problems but as a means for conveying important physics concepts. I hoped that, by encountering these concepts in narratives, students with little or no science or…

  8. Research and Teaching: Factors Related to College Students' Understanding of the Nature of Science--Comparison of Science Majors and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Matthew L.; Underwood, Eileen M.; Worch, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a more scientifically literate society, students need to understand the nature of science, which may be affected by controversial topics such as evolution. There are conflicting views among researchers concerning the relationships between understanding evolution, acceptance of evolution, and understanding of the nature of science. Four…

  9. Research and Teaching: Factors Related to College Students' Understanding of the Nature of Science--Comparison of Science Majors and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Matthew L.; Underwood, Eileen M.; Worch, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a more scientifically literate society, students need to understand the nature of science, which may be affected by controversial topics such as evolution. There are conflicting views among researchers concerning the relationships between understanding evolution, acceptance of evolution, and understanding of the nature of science. Four…

  10. Nonscience Majors' Perceptions on the Use of YouTube Video to Support Learning in an Integrated Science Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles Joseph; King, David T., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The instructor of an integrated science course for nonscience majors embedded content-related video segments from YouTube and other similar internet sources into lecture. Through this study, the instructor wanted to know students' perceptions of how video use engaged them and increased their interest and understanding of science. Written survey…

  11. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-12-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments, worksheets, and interactive classroom learning techniques such as Peer Instruction (PI) and SCALE-UP.2 It was found that the new course showed an increase in students' class participation, attendance, and overall interest, with most rating their science experience as very positive.

  12. Biological Science as an Audio-Tutorial System of Instruction for the Non-Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacket, Dorothy; Holt Imy V.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an audiotutorial program in Biological Science offered to non-science majors at Western Michigan University and reports the results of an evaluative investigation relating to this program. (JR)

  13. Use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) in Nonscience Major Course Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecka, Keith S.; Lerman, Zafra M.; Angelos, Sanford A.

    1996-06-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been utilized with nonscience majors in the courses: "Modern Methods in Science: Discovering Molecular Secrets"; "The Extraordinary Chemistry of Ordinary Things"; "From Ozone to Oil Spills: Chemistry, the Environment and You"; and "Crime Lab Chemistry: Solving Crime through Analytical Chemistry". Our efforts have centered on introducing prospective science communicators (film, video, radio, television, and journalism majors) to science relative to their majors and personal interests. Quality lecture-discussion topics, "mystery"-based laboratory activities have assisted in introducing and/or explaining specific areas of chemistry that attempt to reduce fear of subject matter. Students have also used GC-MS, as a form of alternative assessment, in course projects that have been based on their majors, personal interests, and cultural backgrounds. Students have also conducted advanced independent work in different areas of chemistry, including the analysis of nail polishes and lacquers and eleven aromatic compounds present in three different brands of gasoline.

  14. An Inquiry-Based Approach to Teaching Space Weather to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W. B., III

    2016-12-01

    Undergraduate Space Weather education is an important component of creating a society that is knowledgeable about space weather and its societal impacts. The space physics community has made great strides in providing academic education for students, typically physics and engineering majors, who are interested in pursuing a career in the space sciences or space weather. What is rarely addressed, however, is providing a broader space weather education to undergraduate students as a whole. To help address this gap, I have created an introductory space weather course for non-science majors, with the idea of expanding exposure to space weather beyond the typical physics and engineering students. The philosophy and methodologies used in this course will be presented, as well as the results of the first attempts to teach it. Using an approach more tailored to the non-scientist, courses such as this can be an effective means of broadening space weather education and outreach.

  15. Comparison of views of the nature of science between natural science and nonscience majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marie C Desaulniers; Montplaisir, Lisa M; Offerdahl, Erika G; Cheng, Fu-Chih; Ketterling, Gerald L

    2010-01-01

    Science educators have the common goal of helping students develop scientific literacy, including understanding of the nature of science (NOS). University faculties are challenged with the need to develop informed NOS views in several major student subpopulations, including science majors and nonscience majors. Research into NOS views of undergraduates, particularly science majors, has been limited. In this study, NOS views of undergraduates in introductory environmental science and upper-level animal behavior courses were measured using Likert items and open-ended prompts. Analysis revealed similarities in students' views between the two courses; both populations held a mix of naïve, transitional, and moderately informed views. Comparison of pre- and postcourse mean scores revealed significant changes in NOS views only in select aspects of NOS. Student scores on sections addressing six aspects of NOS were significantly different in most cases, showing notably uninformed views of the distinctions between scientific theories and laws. Evidence-based insight into student NOS views can aid in reforming undergraduate science courses and will add to faculty and researcher understanding of the impressions of science held by undergraduates, helping educators improve scientific literacy in future scientists and diverse college graduates.

  16. Undergraduate non-science majors' descriptions and interpretations of scientific data visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Sandra Signe

    Professionally developed and freely accessible through the Internet, scientific data maps have great potential for teaching and learning with data in the science classroom. Solving problems or developing ideas while using data maps of Earth phenomena in the science classroom may help students to understand the nature and process of science. Little is known about how students perceive and interpret scientific data visualizations. This study was an in-depth exploration of descriptions and interpretations of topographic and bathymetric data maps made by a population of 107 non-science majors at an urban public college. Survey, interviews, and artifacts were analyzed within an epistemological framework for understanding data collected about the Earth, by examining representational strategies used to understand maps, and by examining student interpretations using Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. The findings suggest that the majority of students interpret data maps by assuming iconicity that was not intended by the maps creator; that students do not appear to have a robust understanding of how data is collected about Earth phenomena; and that while most students are able to make some kinds of interpretations of the data maps, often their interpretations are not based upon the actual data the map is representing. This study provided baseline information of student understanding of data maps from which educators may design curriculum for teaching and learning about Earth phenomena.

  17. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  18. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  19. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  20. Science of Food and Cooking: A Non-Science Majors Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Deon T.; Bachman, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent emphasis on the science of food and cooking has been observed in our popular literature and media. As a result of this, a new non-science majors course, The Science of Food and Cooking, is being taught at our institution. We cover basic scientific concepts, which would normally be discussed in a typical introductory chemistry course, in the…

  1. Lens Inquiry: An Astronomy Lab for Non-science Majors at Hartnell Community College

    CERN Document Server

    Putnam, Nicole M; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Lai, David K; Moth, Pimol

    2010-01-01

    We describe a three hour inquiry activity involving converging lenses and telescopes as part of a semester-long astronomy lab course for non-science majors at Hartnell Community College in Salinas, CA. Students were shown several short demonstrations and given the chance to experiment with the materials, after which there was a class discussion about the phenomena they observed. Students worked in groups of 2-4 to design their own experiments to address a particular question of interest to them and then presented their findings to the class. An instructor-led presentation highlighted the students' discoveries and the lab's content goals, followed by a short worksheet-based activity that guided them in applying their new knowledge to build a simple telescope using two converging lenses. The activity was successful in emphasizing communication skills and giving students opportunities to engage in the process of science in different ways. One of the biggest challenges in designing this activity was covering all ...

  2. The Effect of a Computer Program Designed with Constructivist Principles for College Non-Science Majors on Understanding of Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielard, Valerie Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to learn what effect a computer program would have on academic achievement and attitude toward science of college students enrolled in a biology class for non-science majors. It became apparent that the instructor also had an effect on attitudes toward science. The researcher designed a computer program,…

  3. Medical students from natural science and nonscience undergraduate backgrounds. Similar academic performance and residency selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, R L; Sarnacki, R E; Schimpfhauser, F T; Katz, L A

    1980-06-27

    The majority of matriculating US medical students continue to major in the natural sciences as college undergraduates in the belief that this will enhance their chances of admission to and their performance in medical school. The present study compared the academic performance and residency selection of natural science and nonscience majors in three separate medical school classes at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Statistical analysis of grades in the first two years of medical school, clinical performance in the third year, and part I and part II National Board Medical Examination scores revealed no significant differences across three class replications. Residency selection among graduating seniors was also independent of undergraduate major. It is suggested that admissions committees, premedical advisors, and students reconsider their attitudes about the necessity of concentration in the natural sciences before entering medical school.

  4. Greening the Curriculum: Traditional and Online Offerings for Science and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilip, Meghna; Kerr, Margaret E.

    2016-10-01

    This chapter describes the efforts of the faculty at Worcester State University (WSU) to infuse green chemistry into the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. It specifically focuses on the structure of two stand-alone classes. One is aimed at a chemistry audience and is an upper-level elective for the major. The other is an online course aimed at a nonscience audience. Both are three-credit lecture-only classes.

  5. Non-science majors gain valuable insight studying clinical trials literature: an evidence-based medicine library assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Janet S; Martin, Lucy; Curtin, Dara; Penhale, Sara; Trueblood, Nathan A

    2004-12-01

    When faced with a diagnosis, it is empowering to be able to assess the evidence of treatment effectiveness and safety. To teach this skill to non-science majors, we assigned the "Responsible Patienthood Project" (RPP). For the RPP, students studied an array of disease and treatment literature: the final product of their work was a poster presentation, in which they did an in-depth analysis of one primary article, thus encouraging critical evaluation of experimental design, methods, and conclusions. Post-RPP, there was a 35% decrease in the student perception that they would unquestioningly accept a recommended treatment for a hypothetical diagnosis, and a 40% increase in the perception that they would consult a combination of resources, including primary articles. We recommend this project based on our results that suggest 1) non-science majors are able to successfully access and assess primary scientific literature, 2) students felt empowered by the RPP, and 3) skills in information gathering, via library instruction, may serve as a particularly helpful lifelong learning tool.

  6. Teaching Quantitative Reasoning for Nonscience Majors through Carbon Footprint Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative reasoning is a key intellectual skill, applicable across disciplines and best taught in the context of authentic, relevant problems. Here, I describe and assess a laboratory exercise that has students calculate their "carbon footprint" and evaluate the impacts of various behavior choices on that footprint. Students gather…

  7. Discovery of the Collaborative Nature of Science with Undergraduate Science Majors and Non-Science Majors through the Identification of Microorganisms Enriched in Winogradsky Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jasmine; Pinedo, Catalina Arango; Forster, Brian M

    2015-12-01

    Today's science classrooms are addressing the need for non-scientists to become scientifically literate. A key aspect includes the recognition of science as a process for discovery. This process relies upon interdisciplinary collaboration. We designed a semester-long collaborative exercise that allows science majors taking a general microbiology course and non-science majors taking an introductory environmental science course to experience collaboration in science by combining their differing skill sets to identify microorganisms enriched in Winogradsky columns. These columns are self-sufficient ecosystems that allow researchers to study bacterial populations under specified environmental conditions. Non-science majors identified phototrophic bacteria enriched in the column by analyzing the signature chlorophyll absorption spectra whereas science majors used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify the general bacterial diversity. Students then compiled their results and worked together to generate lab reports with their final conclusions identifying the microorganisms present in their column. Surveys and lab reports were utilized to evaluate the learning objectives of this activity. In pre-surveys, nonmajors' and majors' answers diverged considerably, with majors providing responses that were more accurate and more in line with the working definition of collaboration. In post-surveys, the answers between majors and nonmajors converged, with both groups providing accurate responses. Lab reports showed that students were able to successfully identify bacteria present in the columns. These results demonstrate that laboratory exercises designed to group students across disciplinary lines can be an important tool in promoting science education across disciplines.

  8. Developing Scientific Literacy in Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrich, C.; Holt, S.; Philips, J.; Laprise, S.; Simons, L.

    2004-12-01

    We present a three-tiered interdisciplinary program designed for business students at Babson College. At the foundation level, we introduce fundamental ideas in physical and biological science as they relate to a particular theme. In the intermediate tier, we discuss the technologies that arise from the broad understanding of science developed at the previous level, and their impact on society. In the optional advanced tier, we further explore the relationship between science and society. At all levels, the broader impact of technological and scientific progress is explored through discussion of current events, works of art, and popular culture.

  9. Using a dynamic, introductory-level volcanoes class as a means to introduce non-science majors to the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    At the University of California, San Diego, I teach a quarter-long, introductory Earth Science class titled "Volcanoes," which is, in essence, a functional class in volcanology designed specifically for non-majors. This large-format (enrollment ~ 85), lecture-based class provides students from an assortment of backgrounds an opportunity to acquire much-needed (and sometimes dreaded) area credits in science, while also serving as an introduction to the Earth Science major at UCSD (offered through Scripps Institution of Oceanography). The overall goal of the course is to provide students with a stimulating and exciting general science option that, using an inherently interesting topic, introduces them to the fundamentals of geoscience. A secondary goal is to promote general science and geoscience literacy among the general population of UCSD. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material. The majority of students in the class (>80%) are non-science majors and very few students (significantly, students have very little background—background that is necessary for understanding the processes involved in volcanic eruptions. Second, many non-science students have built-in anxieties with respect to math and science, anxieties that must be considered when designing curriculum and syllabi. It is essential to provide the right balance of technical information while remaining in touch with the audience. My approach to the class involves a dynamic lecture format that incorporates a wide array of multimedia, analogue demonstrations of volcanic processes, and small-group discussions of topics and concepts. In addition to teaching about volcanoes—a fascinating subject in and of itself—I take the opportunity in the first two weeks to introduce students to basic geology, including tectonics, earth materials, surface processes, and geologic time. In fact, this is a vital segment of the class, as the students

  10. Indiana secondary students' evolution learning experiences and demarcations of science from non-science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lisa A.

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has documented students' conceptual difficulties learning evolution and how student learning may be related to students' views of evolution and science. This mixed methods study addressed how 74 high school biology students from six Indiana high schools viewed their evolution learning experiences, the demarcations of science from non-science, and evolution understanding and acceptance. Data collection entailed qualitative and quantitative methods including interviews, classroom observations, surveys, and assessments to address students' views of science and non-science, evolution learning experiences, and understanding and acceptance of evolution. Qualitative coding generated several demarcation and evolution learning experience codes that were subsequently used in quantitative comparisons of evolution understanding and acceptance. The majority of students viewed science as empirical, tentative but ultimately leading to certain truth, compatible with religion, the product of experimental work, and the product of human creativity. None of the students offered the consensus NOS view that scientific theories are substantiated explanations of phenomena while scientific laws state relationships or patterns between phenomena. About half the students indicated that scientific knowledge was subjectively and socio-culturally influenced. The majority of students also indicated that they had positive evolution learning experiences and thought evolution should be taught in secondary school. The quantitative comparisons revealed how students who viewed scientific knowledge as subjectively and socio-culturally influenced had higher understanding than their peers. Furthermore, students who maintained that science and religion were compatible did not differ with respect to understanding but had higher acceptance than their peers who viewed science and religion as conflicting. Furthermore, students who maintained that science must be consistent with their

  11. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic…

  12. Discovery of the Collaborative Nature of Science with Undergraduate Science Majors and Non-Science Majors through the Identification of Microorganisms Enriched in Winogradsky Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Ramirez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s science classrooms are addressing the need for non-scientists to become scientifically literate. A key aspect includes the recognition of science as a process for discovery. This process relies upon interdisciplinary collaboration. We designed a semester-long collaborative exercise that allows science majors taking a general microbiology course and non-science majors taking an introductory environmental science course to experience collaboration in science by combining their differing skill sets to identify microorganisms enriched in Winogradsky columns. These columns are self-sufficient ecosystems that allow researchers to study bacterial populations under specified environmental conditions. Non-science majors identified phototrophic bacteria enriched in the column by analyzing the signature chlorophyll absorption spectra whereas science majors used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify the general bacterial diversity. Students then compiled their results and worked together to generate lab reports with their final conclusions identifying the microorganisms present in their column. Surveys and lab reports were utilized to evaluate the learning objectives of this activity. In pre-surveys, nonmajors’ and majors’ answers diverged considerably, with majors providing responses that were more accurate and more in line with the working definition of collaboration. In post-surveys, the answers between majors and nonmajors converged, with both groups providing accurate responses. Lab reports showed that students were able to successfully identify bacteria present in the columns. These results demonstrate that laboratory exercises designed to group students across disciplinary lines can be an important tool in promoting science education across disciplines. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory

  13. Analyzing Lead Content in Ancient Bronze Coins by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Archaeometry Laboratory with Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donais, Mary Kate; Whissel, Greg; Dumas, Ashley; Golden, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    A unique, interdisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and classics has led to the development of an experiment for nonscience majors. This instrumental analysis experiment was designed for use in an archaeology course to quantify the amount of lead in ancient bronze coins. The coins were corroded beyond visual identification, so provenance…

  14. Research and Teaching: Using Twitter in a Nonscience Major Science Class Increases Journal of College Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Nonscience majors often rely on general internet searches to locate science information. This practice can lead to misconceptions because the returned search information can be unreliable. In this article the authors describe how they used the social media site Twitter to address this problem in a general education course, BSCI 421 Diseases of the…

  15. Construction and Evaluation of an Online Microbiology Course for Nonscience Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hughes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of web-based technologies provides a new method for course delivery. As with any new technique, evaluation is a necessary tool to determine if the method is consistent with expectations. This study describes the conversion of a nonscience majors’ microbiology lecture course to online delivery and evaluates the hypothesis that the online course can be as effective as the traditional course. Course examination scores are compared between the face-to-face and online sections over a 3-year period. On all but one of the course examinations, no significant difference is found for those students in these two distinctly different course types. The success rate, as defined by those students earning grades of C or better, is high for both course types, although the traditional course success rate is slightly higher. Student evaluations of the courses are also positive, though some differences are noted. Overall, student performance in the online course is equivalent to that in the traditional course.

  16. SoSTI Course: An Elective Science Course for Thai Upper Secondary School Non-Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Phonphok, Nason; White, Orvil L.; Musikul, Kusalin

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to develop the interdisciplinary SoSTI (science of sound in traditional Thai musical instruments) course for Thai non-science upper secondary school students to study the students' attitudes toward science before and after studying from the course. The SoSTI course development is based on the interdisciplinary concept model and…

  17. Engaging Non-Science Majors Through Citizen Science Projects In Inquiry-Based Introductory Geoscience Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, R. R.; Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.; Rhodes, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although inquiry-based/problem-based methods have been successfully incorporated in undergraduate lecture classes, a survey of commonly used laboratory manuals indicates that few non-major geoscience laboratory classes use these strategies. The Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences faculty members have developed a successful introductory Environmental Geology Laboratory course for undergraduate non-majors that challenges traditional teaching methodology as illustrated in most laboratory manuals. The Environmental Geology lab activities employ active learning methods to engage and challenge students. Crucial to establishing an open learning environment is capturing the attention of non-science majors from the moment they enter the classroom. We use catastrophic ‘gloom and doom’ current events to pique the imagination with images, news stories, and videos. Once our students are hooked, we can further the learning process with use of other teaching methods: an inquiry-based approach that requires students take control of their own learning, a cooperative learning approach that requires the participation of all team members in peer learning, and a problem/case study learning approach that primarily relies on activities distilled from current events. The final outcome is focused on creating innovative methods to communicate the findings to the general public. With the general public being the audience for their communiqué, students are less intimated, more focused, and more involved in solving the problem. During lab sessions, teams of students actively engage in mastering course content and develop essential communication skills while exploring real-world scenarios. These activities allow students to use scientific reasoning and concepts to develop solutions for scenarios such as volcanic eruptions, coastal erosion/sea level rise, flooding or landslide hazards, and then creatively communicate their solutions to the public. For example, during a two

  18. Impact of backwards faded scaffolding approach to inquiry-based astronomy laboratory experiences on undergraduate non-science majors' views of scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Daniel J.

    This study explored the impact of a novel inquiry-based astronomy laboratory curriculum designed using the Backwards Faded Scaffolding inquiry teaching framework on non-science majoring undergraduate students' views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). The study focused on two aspects of NOSI: The Distinction between Data and Evidence (DvE), and The Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). Participants were 220 predominately non-science majoring undergraduate students at a small, doctoral granting, research-extensive university in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States. The student participants were enrolled in an introductory astronomy survey course with an associated laboratory section and were selected in two samples over consecutive fall and spring semesters. The participants also included four of the graduate student instructors who taught the laboratory courses using the intervention curriculum. In the first stage, student participant views of NOSI were measured using the VOSI-4 research instrument before and after the intervention curriculum was administered. The responses were quantified, and the distributions of pre and posttest scores of both samples were separately analyzed to determine if there was a significant improvement in understanding of either of the two aspects of NOSI. The results from both samples were compared to evaluate the consistency of the results. In the second stage, the quantitative results were used to strategically design a qualitative investigation, in which the four lab instructors were interviewed about their observations of how the student participants interacted with the intervention curriculum as compared to traditional lab activities, as well as their suggestions as to how the curriculum may or may not have contributed to the results of the first stage. These interviews were summarized and analyzed for common themes as to how the intervention curriculum influenced the students' understandings of the two aspect of

  19. Scientific reasoning abilities of nonscience majors in physics-based courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopher Moore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on LCTSR score, the majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Prescores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of research-verified, interactive engagement pedagogy can lead to gains in content knowledge, significant gains in theoretical content (such as force and energy are more difficult with non-STEM students. We also observe no significant gains on the LCTSR without explicit instruction in scientific reasoning patterns. These results further demonstrate that differences in student populations are important when comparing normalized gains on concept inventories, and the achievement of significant gains in scientific reasoning requires a reevaluation of the traditional approach to physics for non-STEM students.

  20. Scientific reasoning abilities of nonscience majors in physics-based courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-06-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on LCTSR score, the majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Prescores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of research-verified, interactive engagement pedagogy can lead to gains in content knowledge, significant gains in theoretical content (such as force and energy) are more difficult with non-STEM students. We also observe no significant gains on the LCTSR without explicit instruction in scientific reasoning patterns. These results further demonstrate that differences in student populations are important when comparing normalized gains on concept inventories, and the achievement of significant gains in scientific reasoning requires a reevaluation of the traditional approach to physics for non-STEM students.

  1. Scientific reasoning abilities of nonscience majors in physics-based courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopher Moore*

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on LCTSR score, the majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Prescores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of research-verified, interactive engagement pedagogy can lead to gains in content knowledge, significant gains in theoretical content (such as force and energy are more difficult with non-STEM students. We also observe no significant gains on the LCTSR without explicit instruction in scientific reasoning patterns. These results further demonstrate that differences in student populations are important when comparing normalized gains on concept inventories, and the achievement of significant gains in scientific reasoning requires a reevaluation of the traditional approach to physics for non-STEM students.

  2. Scientific reasoning abilities of non-science majors in physics-based courses

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, J Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We have found that non-STEM majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower pre-instruction on the Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. The majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget's theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Pre-scores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of...

  3. The Impact of Transformational Leadership, Experiential Learning, and Reflective Journaling on the Conservation Ethic of Tertiary-Level Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Bradley Robert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of transformational leadership, experiential learning, and reflective journaling on the conservation ethic of non-science majors in a general education survey course was investigated. The main research questions were: (1) Is the Conservation of Biodiversity professor a transformational leader? (2) Is there a difference in the…

  4. Elementary School Teachers' Knowledge of Model Functions and Modeling Processes: A Comparison of Science and Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to: (a) understand practicing teachers' knowledge of model functions and modeling processes, (b) compare the similarities and differences between the knowledge of science and non-science major teachers, and (c) explore the possible reasons for the similarities and differences between the knowledge of these 2 groups. A 4-point…

  5. Testing a Model of the Relationship of Demographic, Affective, and Fitness Variables to Academic Achievement among Non-Science Majors at an Independent University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Andrew Martin

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of specific attributes of college students to their academic achievement at an independent university in central Florida. Academic achievement was measured as the numeric score on the final exam in a survey-of-science course (EDS 1032) required for non-science majors. Attribute sets included personological, affective, and fitness variables. A hypothesized diagram of the direct and indirect effects among these attributes relative to academic achievement was developed and tested using data collected Spring 2014 from 168 students in four sections of EDS 1032 at Florida Institute of Technology. Multiple regression results revealed that 19% of the variance in a students' academic achievement was due to the influence of these three sets of research factors; this was found to be statistically significant. The results of mediation analyses also indicated that three variables had significant direct effects on academic achievement, namely gender, number of academic credits, and sports motivation. In addition, gender had a significant indirect effect on academic achievement via stress, and the number of academic credits had a significant indirect effect on academic achievement via sports motivation. These findings indicated that female students scored roughly six points higher than male students on this final exam. Also, gender's influence on academic achievement was partially attributable to the student's level of stress (e.g., male students with high levels of stress had lower grades on this final exam than female students with the same level of stress). In addition, it was found that students taking more academic credits were likely to score higher on this final exam than those students taking fewer credits. Further, as students' level of sports amotivation increased, the strength of the relationship between the number of student academic credits and academic achievement decreased. These results support Self

  6. Improving scientific learning and supporting civic engagement for undergraduate non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alana Presley

    In prior research focusing on teaching and learning science, a definitive trend toward a new approach for undergraduate non-major science courses has emerged. Instruction should be refocused from information-transfer to giving students experiences that allow them to explore and engage in their new knowledge and find ways to integrate it into their everyday lives. One technique is to focus class material on real issues of interest and relevance. Course development that allows for civic engagement and self discovery connects learning to the lives of students and their communities. This study used a quasi-- experimental design to see if students who engaged in their learning had improved learning gains, increased motivation, and ability to relate it to their lives. The results showed that students were more motivated to connect the subject to their lives when they engaged through civic engagement projects. Techniques used in this research can be used in the future to develop science courses that focus on the needs of 21st century learners.

  7. Providing a Scientific Foundation in Climate Studies for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Moran, J. M.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Lambert, J.; Blair, B. A.; Hopkins, E. J.; O'Neill, K. L.; Hyre, H. R.; Nugnes, K. A.; Moses, M. N.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change has become a politically charged topic, creating the necessity for a scientifically literate population. Therefore, the American Meteorological Society (AMS), in partnership with NASA, has produced an introductory level, climate science course that engages students, allows for course flexibility, and boosts scientific knowledge about climate. This course shares NASA’s goal of observing, understanding, and modeling the Earth system, to discover how it is changing, to better predict change, and to understand the consequences for life. In Spring 2010, AMS Climate Studies was piloted to determine the most effective method to foster an understanding of some of the more difficult concepts of climate science. This study was offered as part of the NASA grant. This presentation will report the results of that study. Faculty and students from fourteen colleges and universities throughout the country evaluated the course using pre- and post-test questions, which included multiple choice and short answer questions, weekly course content evaluations, and an extensive post-course evaluation. The large majority of participating teachers rated the overall course, scientific content, internet delivery, and study materials as ‘good’, the most positive response available. Feedback from faculty members as well as suggestions from NASA reviewers were used to enhance the final version of the textbook and Investigations Manual for the Fall 2010 academic semester. Following the proven course work of AMS Weather and AMS Ocean Studies, AMS Climate Studies is a turnkey package utilizing both printed and online materials. It covers topics such as the water in Earth’s climate system, paleoclimates, along with climate change and public policy. The Investigations include 30 complimentary lab-style activities including the Conceptual Energy Model, which explores the flow of energy from space to Earth. Additionally, the course website features Current Climate Studies where

  8. Spatial abilities, Earth science conceptual understanding, and psychological gender of university non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Alice A. (Jill)

    Research has shown the presence of many Earth science misconceptions and conceptual difficulties that may impede concept understanding, and has also identified a number of categories of spatial ability. Although spatial ability has been linked to high performance in science, some researchers believe it has been overlooked in traditional education. Evidence exists that spatial ability can be improved. This correlational study investigated the relationship among Earth science conceptual understanding, three types of spatial ability, and psychological gender, a self-classification that reflects socially-accepted personality and gender traits. A test of Earth science concept understanding, the Earth Science Concepts (ESC) test, was developed and field tested from 2001 to 2003 in 15 sections of university classes. Criterion validity was .60, significant at the .01 level. Spearman/Brown reliability was .74 and Kuder/Richardson reliability was .63. The Purdue Visualization of Rotations (PVOR) (mental rotation), the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (spatial perception), the Differential Aptitude Test: Space Relations (DAT) (spatial visualization), and the Bem Inventory (BI) (psychological gender) were administered to 97 non-major university students enrolled in undergraduate science classes. Spearman correlations revealed moderately significant correlations at the .01 level between ESC scores and each of the three spatial ability test scores. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that PVOR scores were the best predictor of ESC scores, and showed that spatial ability scores accounted for 27% of the total variation in ESC scores. Spatial test scores were moderately or weakly correlated with each other. No significant correlations were found among BI scores and other test scores. Scantron difficulty analysis of ESC items produced difficulty ratings ranging from 33.04 to 96.43, indicating the percentage of students who answered incorrectly. Mean score on the ESC was 34

  9. Battling Ecophobia: Instilling Activism in Nonscience Majors when Teaching Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Mark A.; Holden, Molly

    2011-01-01

    When learning about large-scale environmental problems such as climate change, species extinctions, overpopulation, and habitat destruction, students can become hopelessly dismayed and experience ecophobia--a state of mind in which the student is fearful of the looming environmental problems but senses that there is nothing that can be done to…

  10. Battling Ecophobia: Instilling Activism in Nonscience Majors when Teaching Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Mark A.; Holden, Molly

    2011-01-01

    When learning about large-scale environmental problems such as climate change, species extinctions, overpopulation, and habitat destruction, students can become hopelessly dismayed and experience ecophobia--a state of mind in which the student is fearful of the looming environmental problems but senses that there is nothing that can be done to…

  11. Case studies of community college non-science majors: Effects of self-regulatory interventions on biology self-efficacy and biological literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Matthew J.

    Science literacy has been at the heart of current reform efforts in science education. The focus on developing essential skills needed for individual ability to be literate in science has been at the forefront of most K--12 science curricula. Reform efforts have begun to stretch into the postsecondary arena as well, with an ever increasing dialogue regarding the need for attention to science literacy by college students, especially non-science majors. This study set out to investigate how the use of self-regulatory interventions (specifically, goal setting, concept mapping, and reflective writing) affected student biology self-efficacy and biological literacy. This study employed a qualitative research design, analyzing three case studies. Participants in the study received ten self-regulatory interventions as a set of portfolio assignments. Portfolio work was qualitatively analyzed and coded for self-efficacy, as well as evidence of biological literacy. A biology self-efficacy survey was administered pre- and post- to provide a means of self-efficacy data triangulation. Literacy data was supported via a biological literacy rubric, constructed specifically for this study. Results indicated that mastery experiences were the source of biology self-efficacy. Self-efficacy for specific tasks increased over time, and changes in self-efficacy were corroborated by the self-efficacy survey. Students were found to express biological literacy at nominal, functional, or conceptual levels depending on the specific task. This was supported by data from the biological literacy rubric scores. Final conclusions and implications for the study indicated the need for further research with more samples of students in similar and different contexts. Given the fact that the literature in this area is sparse, the results obtained here have only begun to delve into this area of research. Generalization to other biology courses or contexts outside of the one presented in this study was

  12. Using Internet-Based Robotic Telescopes to Engage Non-Science Majors in Astronomical Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, K. J.; Coble, K.; Slater, T. F.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    Responding to national science education reform documents calling for students to have more opportunities for authentic research experiences, several national projects have developed online telescope networks to provide students with Internet-access to research grade telescopes. The nature of astronomical observation (e.g., remote sites, expensive equipment, and odd hours) has been a barrier in the past. Internet-based robotic telescopes allow scientists to conduct observing sessions on research-grade telescopes half a world away. The same technology can now be harnessed by STEM educators to engage students and reinforce what is being taught in the classroom, as seen in some early research in elementary schools (McKinnon and Mainwaring 2000 and McKinnon and Geissinger 2002), middle/high schools (Sadler et al. 2001, 2007 and Gehret et al. 2005) and undergraduate programs (e.g., McLin et al. 2009). This project looks at the educational value of using Internet-based robotic telescopes in a general education introductory astronomy course at the undergraduate level. Students at a minority-serving institution in the midwestern United States conducted observational programs using the Global Telescope Network (GTN). The project consisted of the use of planetarium software to determine object visibility, observing proposals (with abstract, background, goals, and dissemination sections), peer review (including written reviews and panel discussion according to NSF intellectual merit and broader impacts criteria), and classroom presentations showing the results of the observation. The GTN is a network of small telescopes funded by the Fermi mission to support the science of high energy astrophysics. It is managed by the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University and is controlled using SkyNet. Data includes course artifacts (proposals, reviews, panel summaries, presentations, and student reflections) for six semesters plus student interviews. Using a grounded theory approach

  13. A Different Kind of Science for the Non-Science Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Hector

    This paper reports on a small scale study undertaken at the University of Iowa to examine whether students perceive a difference as to the value of learning in General Education Requirement (GER) science classes compared to learning in science application courses. It also explores the need for a different approach to the teaching of science…

  14. Developing New Pedagogy to Teach Planet Formation to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Molly; Impey, Chris David; Buxner, Sanlyn

    2016-06-01

    A first order understanding of planet formation and the scientific concepts therein is critical in order for undergraduate students to understand our place in the Universe. Furthermore, planet formation integrates the topics of gravity, angular momentum, migration, and condensation in a “story-book” fashion where students can apply these concepts to a specific event. We collected syllabi and course topics from over 30 undergraduate general-education astrobiology courses from around the globe in order to determine the extent to which professors address planet formation. Additionally, we were looking to see if faculty had developed specific or original pedagogy to teach this topic. We find on average, instructors spend ½ of a lecture discussing planet formation or they leave it out all together. In the classes where planet formation is taught more extensively, instructors use PowerPoint slides or occasional videos to teach the topic. We aim to develop new pedagogy that will allow us to better determine learning gains and student understanding of this critical topic. If students in an astrobiology class are unable to understand how our own Solar System forms, it is significantly more challenging to make parallels (or find differences) between our home in the Universe and extrasolar planetary systems.

  15. Healthcare and biomedical technology in the 21st century an introduction for non-science majors

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, George R; Samuel, Solomon Praveen

    2014-01-01

    This textbook introduces students not pursuing degrees in science or engineering to the remarkable new applications of technology now available to physicians and their patients and discusses how these technologies are evolving to permit new treatments and procedures.  The book also elucidates the societal and ethical impacts of advances in medical technology, such as extending life and end of life decisions, the role of genetic testing, confidentiality, costs of health care delivery, scrutiny of scientific claims, and provides background on the engineering approach in healthcare and the scientific method as a guiding principle. This concise, highly relevant text enables faculty to offer a substantive course for students from non-scientific backgrounds that will empower them to make more informed decisions about their healthcare by significantly enhancing their understanding of these technological advancements. This book also: ·         Presents scientific concepts from modern medical science using r...

  16. The Art of Astronomy: A New General Education Course for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; van Zee, Liese

    2017-01-01

    The Art of Astronomy is a new general education course developed at Indiana University. The topic appeals to a broad range of undergraduates and the course gives students the tools to understand and appreciate astronomical images in a new way. The course explores the science of imaging the universe and the technology that makes the images possible. Topics include the night sky, telescopes and cameras, light and color, and the science behind the images. Coloring the Universe: An Insider's Look at Making Spectacular Images of Space" by T. A. Rector, K. Arcand, and M. Watzke serves as the basic text for the course, supplemented by readings from the web. Through the course, students participate in exploration activities designed to help them first to understand astronomy images, and then to create them. Learning goals include an understanding of scientific inquiry, an understanding of the basics of imaging science as applied in astronomy, a knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum and how observations at different wavelengths inform us about different environments in the universe, and an ability to interpret astronomical images to learn about the universe and to model and understand the physical world.

  17. Estonian Science and Non-Science Students' Attitudes towards Mathematics at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldo, Indrek; Reiska, Priit

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the attitudes and beliefs towards studying mathematics by university level students. A total of 970 randomly chosen, first year, Estonian bachelor students participated in the study (of which 498 were science students). Data were collected using a Likert-type scale questionnaire and analysed with a respect to field of…

  18. Non-Science Oriented Students and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ruth

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a module called "Energy and the Human Being" within the framework of a program aimed at non-science-oriented students in senior high schools in Israel. Finds that students' attitudes toward science were positive and their understanding of the scientific concepts involved was…

  19. Finding Out What They Really Think: Assessing Non-Science Majors' Views of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard; Parra, Ruben D.

    2013-01-01

    As institutions of higher learning are increasingly held accountable for student outcomes, faculty are faced with the challenge to clearly articulate and assess what students should learn in their courses. We report on the assessment of a liberal studies learning outcome related to the nature of science, which involved 178 students from 41…

  20. Finding Out What They Really Think: Assessing Non-Science Majors' Views of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard; Parra, Ruben D.

    2013-01-01

    As institutions of higher learning are increasingly held accountable for student outcomes, faculty are faced with the challenge to clearly articulate and assess what students should learn in their courses. We report on the assessment of a liberal studies learning outcome related to the nature of science, which involved 178 students from 41…

  1. When Science and Information Literacy Meet: An Approach to Exploring the Sources of Science News with Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majetic, Cassie; Pellegrino, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The skill set associated with lifelong scientific literacy often includes the ability to decode the content and accuracy of scientific research as presented in the media. However, students often find decoding science in the media difficult, due to limited content knowledge and shifting definitions of accuracy. Faculty have developed a variety of…

  2. The teacher's role in college level classes for non-science majors: A constructivist approach for teaching prospective science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Abdullah Othman

    1997-12-01

    This interpretive research set out to investigate the characteristics of an exemplary college science instructor who endeavors to improve teaching and learning in a physical science course for prospective teachers. The course was innovative in the sense that it was designed to meet the specific needs of prospective elementary teachers who needed to have models of how to teach science in a way that employed materials and small group activities. The central purpose for this study is to understand the metaphors that Mark (a pseudonym), the chemistry instructor in the course, used as referents to conceptualize his roles and frame actions and interactions in the classroom. Within the theoretical frame of constructivism, human cognitive interests, and co-participation theories, an ethnographic research design, described by Erickson (1986), Guba and Lincoln (1989), and Gallagher (1991), was employed in the study. The main sources of data for this study were field notes, transcript analysis of interviews with the instructor and students, and analyses of videotaped excerpts. Additional data sources, such as student journals and the results of students' responses to the University/Community College Student Questionnaire which was developed by a group science education researchers at Florida State University, were employed to maximize that the assertions I constructed were consistent with the variety of data. Data analyses and interpretation in the study focused on identifying the aspects which the instructor and the researcher might find useful in reflecting to understand what was happening and why that was happening in the classroom. The analysis reveals how the instructor used constructivism as a referent for his teaching and the learning of his students. To be consistent with his beliefs and goals that prospective teachers should enjoy their journey of learning chemistry, Mark, the driver in the journey, used the roles of controller, facilitator, learner, and entertainer

  3. An investigation of factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlenga, Francis Howard

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe. The study was conducted at one of the Primary School Teachers' Colleges in Zimbabwe. A sample of two hundred and thirty-eight female student teachers was used in the study. Of these one hundred and forty-two were non-science majors who had been randomly selected, forty-one were science majors and forty-five were math majors. Both science and math majors were a convenient sample because the total enrollment of the two groups was small. All the subjects completed a survey questionnaire that had sixty-eight items. Ten students from the non-science majors were selected for individual interviews and the same was done for the science majors. A further eighteen were selected from the non-science majors and divided into three groups of six each for focus group interviews. The same was done for the science majors. The interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Data from the survey questionnaires were analyzed using Binary Logistic Regression which predicted factors that affected students' choice of science as a major. The transcribed interview data were analyzed used using domain, taxonomic and componential analyses. Results of the study indicated that elementary female students' choice of science as a major at college level is affected by students' attitudes toward science, teacher behavior, out-of-school experiences, role models, gender stereotyping, parental influence, peer influence, in-school experiences, and societal expectations, namely cultural and social expectations.

  4. Enhancing the Educational Astronomical Experience of Non-Science Majors With the Use of an iPad and Telescope (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R. M.; Burin, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    General Education (GE) classes are designed to broaden the understanding of all college and university students in areas outside their major interest. However, most GE classes are lecture type and do not facilitate hands-on experimental or observational activities related to the specific subject matter. Utilizing several astronomy application programs (apps), currently available for the iPad and iPhone, in conjunction with a small inexpensive telescope allows students unique hands-on experiences to explore and observe astronomical objects and concepts independently outside of class. These activities enhance the student's overall GE experience in a unique way not possible prior to the development of this technology.

  5. "Did You Say 50% of My Grade?"--Teaching Introductory Physics to Non-Science Majors through a Haunted Physics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Several years ago I attended an AAPT Haunted Physics Workshop taught by Dr. Tom Zepf from Creighton University. Dr. Zepf's highly successful Haunted Physics Lab at Creighton was put on every October by his physics majors. I found the concept of exhibiting physics projects in a "fun" way to students, faculty, and the public very exciting, so an…

  6. Bringing the Cosmos Down to Earth: Assessing Student Learning in a Non-major Online Astronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.

    2011-09-01

    While there has been much attention paid to improving astronomy courses for non-science majors in the past decade, a fundamental question remains: How do we know that they are in fact learning in these courses? Online courses provide a fresh vehicle for testing new approaches to assessing student learning, especially assignments which focus on the higher levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Coupling this with assignments which engage the students with the material by making it relevant to their own lives leads to new methodologies for assessing student learning.

  7. Learning Styles of Non-Science and Non-Technology Students on Technical Courses in an Information Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, Noraizan; Bahry, Farrah Diana Saiful; Yusop, Zulkefli Mohd; Abdullah, Szarina

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted among students with some or no background in science and technology subjects (non S&T students) who enrolled in the Faculty of Information Management in a Malaysian public university during semester 2009/2010. It aims to identify students' learning styles on technical courses in order to provide inputs to instructors'…

  8. Effects of Node-Link Mapping on Non-Science Majors' Meaningful Learning and Conceptual Change in a Life-Science Survey Lecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Martinez, Jayne Irene

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of node-link mapping on students' meaningful learning and conceptual change in a 1-semester introductory life-science course. This study used node-link mapping to integrate and apply the National Research Council's (NRC, 2005) three principles of human learning: engaging students' prior…

  9. The HeLa Documentary Film: An Engaging Writing and Culturally Relevant Assignment on Cell Division and Ethics for Nonscience Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diann Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Historically black institutions play a pivotal role in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers as well as promoting scientific literacy among all of its students. Students would like to have more culturally relevant assignments that reflect their life experiences as it relates to course content.  We used the HeLa documentary film, "The Way of All Flesh Film," as an effective teaching tool in the first survey course of general biology to supplement our discussion on the cell cycle and ethics in scientific studies.  Over 90% of our students preferred this additional teaching method compared to a traditional lecture only.  Furthermore, the exercise enhanced the students' writing, research, and critical thinking skills through the ethical implications of the film.

  10. How College-Level Introductory Instruction Can Impact Student Epistemological Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; Mollohan, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a survey study of college students' epistemologies about biology and learning biology. Specifically, the authors examined the differences between science and nonscience majors and their changes in epistemologies over the course of a semester of instruction.

  11. How College-Level Introductory Instruction Can Impact Student Epistemological Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; Mollohan, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a survey study of college students' epistemologies about biology and learning biology. Specifically, the authors examined the differences between science and nonscience majors and their changes in epistemologies over the course of a semester of instruction.

  12. Approaching a Conceptual Understanding of Enzyme Kinetics and Inhibition: Development of an Active Learning Inquiry Activity for Prehealth and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Chloe; Meades, Glen; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is a guided inquiry activity designed to be conducted with prenursing students using an analogous system to help develop a conceptual understanding of factors impacting enzyme kinetics and the various types of enzyme inhibition. Pre- and postconceptual understanding evaluations and effectiveness of implementation surveys were given to…

  13. Approaching a Conceptual Understanding of Enzyme Kinetics and Inhibition: Development of an Active Learning Inquiry Activity for Prehealth and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Chloe; Meades, Glen; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is a guided inquiry activity designed to be conducted with prenursing students using an analogous system to help develop a conceptual understanding of factors impacting enzyme kinetics and the various types of enzyme inhibition. Pre- and postconceptual understanding evaluations and effectiveness of implementation surveys were given to…

  14. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  15. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  16. College Students' Preinstructional Ideas about Stars and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Prather, Edward E.; Johnson, Bruce; Slater, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    This study (Note 1) investigated the beliefs about stars that students hold when they enter an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors. Students' preinstructional ideas were investigated through the use of several student-supplied-response (SSR) surveys, which asked students to describe their ideas about topics such as…

  17. A student's guide to Einstein's major papers

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the physical universe underwent a revolution in the early twentieth century - evolving from the classical physics of Newton, Galileo, and Maxwell to the modern physics of relativity and quantum mechanics. The dominant figure in this revolutionary change was Albert Einstein. In a single year, 1905, Einstein produced breakthrough works in three areas of physics: on the size and the effects of atoms; on the quantization of the electromagnetic field; and on the special theory of relativity. In 1916 he produced a fourth breakthrough work, the general theory of relativity. A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers focuses on Einstein's contributions, setting his major works into their historical context, and then takes the reader through the details of each paper, including the mathematics. This book helps the reader appreciate the simplicity and insightfulness of Einstein's ideas and how revolutionary his work was, and locate it in the evolution of scientific thought begun by the ancient...

  18. Art, Meet Chemistry; Chemistry, Meet Art: Case Studies, Current Literature, and Instrumental Methods Combined to Create a Hands-On Experience for Nonmajors and Instrumental Analysis Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivens, Delana A.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Verges, Katie J.; Jamieson, Deborah S.

    2010-01-01

    Case studies and current literature are combined with spectroscopic analysis to provide a unique chemistry experience for art history students and to provide a unique inquiry-based laboratory experiment for analytical chemistry students. The XRF analysis method was used to demonstrate to nonscience majors (art history students) a powerful…

  19. Turkish university students' knowledge of biotechnology and attitudes toward biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk-Akar, Ebru

    2016-09-10

    This study questions the presumed relation between formal schooling and scientific literacy about biotechnologies. Comparing science and nonscience majors' knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnological applications, conclusions are drawn if their formal learnings improve pupils' understandings of and attitudes toward biotechnology applications. Sample of the study consists of 403 undergraduate and graduate students, 198 nonscience, and 205 science majors. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire and the Biotechnology Attitude Questionnaire were administered. Descriptive statistics (mean and percentages), t test, and correlations were used to examine the participants' knowledge of biotechnology and attitudes toward biotechnological applications and differences as regards their majors. Although the science majors had higher knowledge and attitude scores than the nonscience majors, it is not possible to say that they have sufficient knowledge of biotechnologies. Besides, the participants' attitudes toward biotechnological applications were not considerably related to their knowledge of biotechnology. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2016.

  20. Making Sense of Scientific Biographies: Scientific Achievement, Nature of Science, and Storylines in College Students' Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seyoung

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the educative value of scientific biographies will be explored, especially for non-science major college students. During the "Scientist's life and thought" course, 66 college students read nine scientific biographies including five biologists, covering the canonical scientific achievements in Western scientific history.…

  1. University Students' Understanding of Chemistry Processes and the Quality of Evidence in Their Written Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Eulsun; Choi, Aeran; Pestel, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a process-oriented chemistry laboratory curriculum for non-science majors. The purpose of this study is both to explore university students' understanding of chemistry processes and to evaluate the quality of evidence students use to support their claims regarding chemistry processes in a process-oriented chemistry laboratory…

  2. University Students' Understanding of Chemistry Processes and the Quality of Evidence in Their Written Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Eulsun; Choi, Aeran; Pestel, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a process-oriented chemistry laboratory curriculum for non-science majors. The purpose of this study is both to explore university students' understanding of chemistry processes and to evaluate the quality of evidence students use to support their claims regarding chemistry processes in a process-oriented chemistry laboratory…

  3. College Students' Opinions of Engaging Approaches in a Physical Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Physical science courses have historically been taught from a variety of perspectives or emphases. In many cases, the instructor decides on the perspective and textbook for nonscience majors, so students rarely have a voice in the decision. This top-down approach and a potential gap between what instructors and students expect from a general…

  4. Effect of Different Types of Small-Group Activities on Students' Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Krista K.; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Teaching reform efforts in chemistry education often involve engaging students in small-group activities of different types. This study focused on the analysis of how activity type affected the nature of group conversations. In particular, we analyzed the small-group conversations of students enrolled in a chemistry course for nonscience majors.…

  5. Making Sense of Scientific Biographies: Scientific Achievement, Nature of Science, and Storylines in College Students' Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seyoung

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the educative value of scientific biographies will be explored, especially for non-science major college students. During the "Scientist's life and thought" course, 66 college students read nine scientific biographies including five biologists, covering the canonical scientific achievements in Western scientific history.…

  6. The relationship of parental influence on student career choice of biology and non-biology majors enrolled in a freshman biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, Mitzie Leigh

    Recent declines in science literacy and inadequate numbers of individuals entering science careers has heightened the importance of determining why students major in science or do not major in science and then choose a science-related career. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental influences and student career choices of both males and females majoring and not majoring in science. This study specifically examined the constructs of parental occupation, parental involvement, and parental education levels. Aspects indicated by the participants as being influencers were also examined. In addition, differences between males and females were examined. A total of 282 students participated in the study; 122 were science majors and 160 were non-science majors. The data was collected through the use of a student information survey and the Modified Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scale. The findings suggest that students indicated the desire to help others, peers, salary, and skills as influencing their career choice. In regard to the various parental influences, mother's occupation was the only construct found as a statistically significant influencer on a student's decision to major in science. The results of this study can help educators, administrators, and policy makers understand what influences students to pursue science-related careers and possibly increase the number of students entering science-related careers. The results of the study specifically provide information that may prove useful to administrators and educators in the health science fields, particularly nursing fields. The findings provide insight into why students may choose to become nurses.

  7. Why Are Students Not Majoring in Information Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstrom, Kent A.; Schambach, Thomas P.; Jones, Keith T.; Crampton, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some of the factors that influence and impact business students when they select their major and, more particularly, to examine why students are not majoring in information systems. Students in an entry level business class responded that they were more knowledgeable about careers in management, marketing,…

  8. Student-Life Stress in Education and Health Service Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathleen G.; Buot, Max; Wies, Jennifer R.; Lyzinski, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the effects of student-life stress on Education and Health Service majors (n = 195) at a private, religious, Midwestern university in the USA, we assessed student perception of overall stress level and physical stress level using the Student-life Stress Inventory. The targeted sample consisted of students with…

  9. Student-Life Stress in Education and Health Service Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathleen G.; Buot, Max; Wies, Jennifer R.; Lyzinski, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the effects of student-life stress on Education and Health Service majors (n = 195) at a private, religious, Midwestern university in the USA, we assessed student perception of overall stress level and physical stress level using the Student-life Stress Inventory. The targeted sample consisted of students with…

  10. An Analysis of Metaphors Used by Students to Describe Energy in an Interdisciplinary General Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    The meaning of the term energy varies widely in scientific and colloquial discourse. Teasing apart the different connotations of the term can be especially challenging for non-science majors. In this study, undergraduate students taking an interdisciplinary, general science course (n?=?49) were asked to explain the role of energy in five contexts:…

  11. Designing Inductive Instructional Activities in a Teacher Training Program to Enhance Conceptual Understandings in Science for Thai Science and Non-Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narjaikaew, Pattawan; Jeeravipoonvarn, Varanya; Pongpisanou, Kanjana; Lamb, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are viewed as the most significant factor affecting student learning. However, research in science education showed that teachers often demonstrate misunderstandings of science very similar to students. The purpose of this research was to correct conceptual difficulties in science of Thai primary school science and non-science teachers…

  12. Vocabulary learning strategies:Most frequently used strategies between English major students and non-English major students in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐衍洁

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare vocabulary learning strategies(VLS)used by two groups of Chinese English learners,which are English major students and non-English major students,and systematically focused on three main strategy categories. The purpose was to investigate the different VLS using frequencies between two groups of English language learners.

  13. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and…

  14. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and…

  15. Increasing Underrepresented Student Participation in Science Majors: The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl

    2006-12-01

    The University of Washington's Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is designed to increase the number of highly qualified students graduating with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees. Pre-MAP recruits underrepresented first-year students into a special seminar where the students learn research techniques and apply them to research projects conducted in small groups. Pre-MAP students also receive one-on-one mentoring from Pre-MAP graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty. The Pre-MAP seminar gives students skills that make them more attractive to U.W. faculty as research assistants, and also strengthens their candidacies as they apply for outside research programs (such as REUs) and later to graduate programs or for STEM jobs. Pre-MAP also provides an invaluable training experience for the graduate teaching assistant who leads the research seminar. This graduate student develops curricula, presents difficult concepts in the classroom, and trains students to conduct research, and thus will leave the U.W. with exceptional teaching skills and experience working with underrepresented students. By introducing undergraduate students to scientific research at the beginning of their college careers, and by providing them with academic advising and mentorship, Pre-MAP gives underrepresented students the tools and confidence they need to make the transition between entering college and declaring a STEM major. Pre-MAP is made possible in part by a two-year grant from the University of Washington's Diversity Appraisal Implementation Fund.

  16. A Sustainable Energy Laboratory Course for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Stephen A.; Loxsom, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable energy is growing in importance as the public becomes more aware of climate change and the need to satisfy our society's energy demands while minimizing environmental impacts. To further this awareness and to better prepare a workforce for "green careers," we developed a sustainable energy laboratory course that is suitable…

  17. Student Perceptions of the First Course in Accounting: Majors versus Non-Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickell, Geoffrey; Lim, Tiong Kiong; Balachandran, Balasinghan

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to the continuing debate regarding the curriculum for the first undergraduate course in accounting by examining student perceptions from studying such a course. Participants are divided into two cohorts--Accounting & Finance Majors (AFM) and Other Business Majors (OBM). Results reported in this paper indicate that…

  18. Analysis on Major Selection and Employment Situation of Minority Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    那舰

    2012-01-01

      In recent years, due to the impact of university increase enrollment policy, the slowdown of global economic growth and other factors, the Students face employment pressure has become a general social problem. And minority university students have a huge disadvantage in employment direction compared with the other ordinary university students. Exploring the ways of minority university students’employability and major selection capability are helpful to find targeted solutions and it has important practical value.

  19. Field Trips and Their Effect on Student Achievement and Attitudes: A Comparison of Physical versus Virtual Field Trips to the Indian River Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Lesley C.; Gallo, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effect of physical and virtual field trips on undergraduate, nonscience majors. No significant differences were seen in achievement, attitudes, learning styles, interactions between field trip and learning styles, or students' ability to answer questions at different levels. Results imply that both field trips promote…

  20. BOOK REVIEW: A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The core of this volume is formed by four chapters (2-5) with detailed reconstructions of the arguments and derivations in four of Einstein's most important papers, the three main papers of his annus mirabilis 1905 (on the light quantum, Brownian motion, and special relativity) and his first systematic exposition of general relativity of 1916. The derivations are given in sufficient detail and in sufficiently modernized notation (without any serious distortion of the originals) for an undergraduate physics major to read and understand them with far less effort than it would take him or her to understand (English translations of) Einstein's original papers. Each of these four papers is accompanied by a detailed introduction, which covers the conceptual development of the relevant field prior to Einstein's contribution to it and corrects some of the myths surrounding these papers that still have not been fully eradicated among physicists. (One quibble: though Kennedy correctly points out that the goal of the light quantum paper was not to explain the photoelectric effect, it is also not quite right to say that 'it was written to explain the Wien region of blackbody radiation' (p. xv). Einstein used this explanatory feat as the central argument for his light quantum hypothesis.) These four chapters then are the most valuable part of the volume. They could be used, independently of one another, but preferably in conjunction with Einstein's original texts, in courses on quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, electrodynamics, and general relativity, respectively, to add a historical component to such courses. As a historian of science embedded in a physics department who is regularly called upon to give guest lectures in such courses on the history of their subjects, I can highly recommend the volume for this purpose. However, I would not adopt this volume as (one of) the central text(s) for a course on the history of modern physics. For one thing, chapter 1, which in

  1. Determined- and Undetermined-Major Students: How Different Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Brangwyn

    1980-01-01

    Compared populations of Arts and Sciences students who had determined their majors and those who had not. The determined group was more likely to remain in school and to achieve greater academic success than the undetermined group. More women tended to have declared majors than did men. (Author)

  2. Determined- and Undetermined-Major Students: How Different Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Brangwyn

    1980-01-01

    Compared populations of Arts and Sciences students who had determined their majors and those who had not. The determined group was more likely to remain in school and to achieve greater academic success than the undetermined group. More women tended to have declared majors than did men. (Author)

  3. Should applicants to Nottingham University Medical School study a non-science A-level? A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James David

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that studying non-science subjects at A-level should be compulsory for medical students. Our admissions criteria specify only Biology, Chemistry and one or more additional subjects. This study aimed to determine whether studying a non-science subject for A-level is an independent predictor of achievement on the undergraduate medical course. Methods The subjects of this retrospective cohort study were 164 students from one entry-year group (October 2000, who progressed normally on the 5-year undergraduate medical course at Nottingham. Pre-admission academic and socio-demographic data and undergraduate course marks were obtained. T-test and hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were undertaken to identify independent predictors of five course outcomes at different stages throughout the course. Results There was no evidence that the choice of science or non-science as the third or fourth A-level subject had any influence on course performance. Demographic variables (age group, sex, and fee status had some predictive value but ethnicity did not. Pre-clinical course performance was the strongest predictor in the clinical phases (pre-clinical Themes A&B (knowledge predicted Clinical Knowledge, p Conclusion This study of one year group at Nottingham Medical School provided no evidence that the admissions policy on A-level requirements should specify the choice of third or fourth subject.

  4. Majoring in Information Systems: Reasons Why Students Select (or Not) Information Systems as a Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Johnny; Slauson, Gayla Jo

    2014-01-01

    Filling the pipeline for information systems workers is critical in the information era. Projected growth rates for jobs requiring information systems expertise are significantly higher than the projected growth rates for other jobs. Why then do relatively few students choose to major in information systems? This paper reviews survey results from…

  5. A New Majority: Low Income Students Now a Majority in the Nation's Public Schools. Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Education Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For the first time in recent history, a majority of the schoolchildren attending the nation's public schools come from low income families. The latest data collected from the states by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), evidence that 51 percent of the students across the nation's public schools were low income in 2013. The…

  6. Medical student debt and major life choices other than specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rohlfing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Median indebtedness at graduation is now more than $170,000 for graduates of US Medical Schools. Debate still exists as to whether higher debt levels influence students to choose high paying non-primary care specialties. Notably, no previous research on the topic has taken into account cost of attendance when constructing a debt model, nor has any research examined the non-career major life decisions that medical students face. Methods: Medical students were surveyed using an anonymous electronic instrument developed for this study. The survey was delivered through a link included in a study email and students were recruited from school wide listservs and through snowball sampling (students were encouraged to share a link to the survey with other medical students. No incentives were offered for survey completion. Results: Responses were recorded from 102 US Allopathic medical schools (n=3,032, with 22 institutions (11 public, 11 private meeting inclusion criteria of 10% student body response proportion (n=1,846. Students with higher debt relative to their peers at their home institution reported higher frequencies of feeling callous towards others, were more likely to choose a specialty with a higher average annual income, were less likely to plan to practice in underserved locations, and were less likely to choose primary care specialties. Students with higher aggregate amounts of medical student loan debt were more likely to report high levels of stress from their educational debt, to delay getting married and to report disagreement that they would choose to become a physician again, if given the opportunity to revisit that choice. Increases in both aggregate and relative debt were associated with delaying having children, delaying buying a house, concerns about managing and paying back educational debt, and worrying that educational debt will influence one's specialty choice. Conclusions: Medical student debt and particularly debt

  7. Ethical Perceptions among Hispanic Students: Differences by Major and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Raymond, Jr.; Moyes, Glen D.; Cortes, Angelica C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined ethical perceptions of Hispanic students by analyzing differences between (a) accounting and nonaccounting business majors and (b) women and men. The authors used the following five constructs: justice, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, and deontology. Their study incorporated 12 moral characteristics into…

  8. Academic Clustering and Major Selection of Intercollegiate Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ray G.; Ross, Sally R.; Fisher, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Although journalists and reporters have written about academic clustering among college student-athletes, there has been a dearth of scholarly analysis devoted to the subject. This study explored football players' academic major selections to determine if academic clustering actually existed. The seasons 1996, 2001, and 2006 were selected for…

  9. The Impact of New Major Offerings on Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Paul L.; O'Donnell, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    A strategy used by industry to retain customers and remain competitive is the design and launch of new products. One might then question whether the launch of new courses and new majors by colleges and universities has the potential of reducing student attrition. Combining survey data from matriculating freshmen with administrative data taken from…

  10. Ethical Perceptions among Hispanic Students: Differences by Major and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Raymond, Jr.; Moyes, Glen D.; Cortes, Angelica C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined ethical perceptions of Hispanic students by analyzing differences between (a) accounting and nonaccounting business majors and (b) women and men. The authors used the following five constructs: justice, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, and deontology. Their study incorporated 12 moral characteristics into…

  11. An Analysis of Metaphors Used by Students to Describe Energy in an Interdisciplinary General Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael

    2015-04-01

    The meaning of the term energy varies widely in scientific and colloquial discourse. Teasing apart the different connotations of the term can be especially challenging for non-science majors. In this study, undergraduate students taking an interdisciplinary, general science course (n = 49) were asked to explain the role of energy in five contexts: radiation, transportation, generating electricity, earthquakes, and the big bang theory. The responses were qualitatively analyzed under the framework of conceptual metaphor theory. This study presents evidence that non-science major students spontaneously use metaphorical language that is consistent with the conceptual metaphors of energy previously identified in the discourse of students in introductory physics, biology, and chemistry courses. Furthermore, most students used multiple coherent metaphors to explain the role of energy in these complex topics. This demonstrates that these conceptual metaphors for energy have broader applicability than just traditional scientific contexts. Implications for this work as a formative assessment tool in instruction will also be discussed.

  12. Transphobia among Students Majoring in the Helping Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Gila M

    2017-02-10

    The study was designed to further the understanding of transphobia among students majoring in the helping professions including social work, occupational therapy and nursing. The study's hypotheses examined the effects of transgender content in education (e.g. textbooks and lectures), religiosity, contact with transgender people and several socio-demographic variables with transphobia. Differences in transphobia levels between social work students and those in aligned professions were also explored. The sample consisted of 600 students of a public, urban university in NYC who participated in an on-line survey. Measures included transphobia and transgender content scales. Students reported (75%) a deficient amount of transgender content in education and almost half of the sample reported moderate to high levels of transphobia. Other findings showed that transgender content in education was positively correlated with transphobia and one-way ANOVA showed that transphobia differed significantly across the majors. The author suggestions included increasing transgender content in textbooks, lectures and class discussions as well as developing field sites that provide students with opportunities to serve this population.

  13. Influence of Instructor Personality on Student Evaluation of Teaching: A Comparison between English Majors and Non-English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, S.; Tanabe, Y.

    2015-01-01

    160 non-English major students studying at a four-year university and 193 English major students studying at a career college of foreign language in Japan completed a questionnaire regarding instruction and instructor personality. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether the students' instructional and personality ratings predicted…

  14. Predictors of psychological resilience amongst medical students following major earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frances; Bell, Caroline; Ali, Anthony; McKenzie, Janice; Boden, Joseph M; Wilkinson, Timothy; Bell, Caroline

    2016-05-06

    To identify predictors of self-reported psychological resilience amongst medical students following major earthquakes in Canterbury in 2010 and 2011. Two hundred and fifty-three medical students from the Christchurch campus, University of Otago, were invited to participate in an electronic survey seven months following the most severe earthquake. Students completed the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, the Post-traumatic Disorder Checklist, the Work and Adjustment Scale, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Likert scales and other questions were also used to assess a range of variables including demographic and historical variables (eg, self-rated resilience prior to the earthquakes), plus the impacts of the earthquakes. The response rate was 78%. Univariate analyses identified multiple variables that were significantly associated with higher resilience. Multiple linear regression analyses produced a fitted model that was able to explain 35% of the variance in resilience scores. The best predictors of higher resilience were: retrospectively-rated personality prior to the earthquakes (higher extroversion and lower neuroticism); higher self-rated resilience prior to the earthquakes; not being exposed to the most severe earthquake; and less psychological distress following the earthquakes. Psychological resilience amongst medical students following major earthquakes was able to be predicted to a moderate extent.

  15. African-American students' perceptions of their majors, future professions, and the dietetics major and profession: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Teena M; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M; Serrano, Elena; Hosig, Kathy W

    2008-07-01

    African-American professionals are underrepresented in the profession of dietetics. This preliminary qualitative study identified African-American students' perceptions of their majors, future professions, and the dietetics major/profession to understand why they did or did not enter dietetics. It was hypothesized that dietetics students chose dietetics primarily for altruistic reasons, whereas students in other fields of study did not choose dietetics due to lack of awareness of dietetics. To learn students' views, African-American college students engaged in elicitation interviews or focus group discussions. Twenty-eight women and 12 men participated. Phenomenologic analysis identified common themes and meanings: African-American students selected their majors for a variety of reasons, including desire to help people, interest in the field, recommendation from an adult, and family influence. African-American students in fields of study other than dietetics believed that the dietetics major was not selected due to lack of awareness about dietetics. Both dietetics students and students in other fields of study perceived versatility, ability to work with/help people, and to have an influence as positive qualities about their future professions. Advanced degree and training requirements, lack of diversity, and low salary were identified as negative qualities about future professions. African-American students in fields of study other than dietetics had not been exposed to the dietetics major, careers, and profession. Recruitment efforts should begin early to increase the number of African-American students in dietetics.

  16. The Scientific Attitudes of Students Major In Science in the New Teacher Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie P. Lacap

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study determined the scientific attitudes of the students major in science using descriptive method of research. Data were gathered from 153 science major students using scientific attitude scale as the main data gathering instrument. Science major students are mostly females with majority of second year students. Biology has the most number of enrolment. Majority of the respondents have low income. The level of scientific attitudes of science major students is high in terms of openmindedness, aversion to superstitions, curiosity and objectivity while moderate in terms of suspended judgment and rationality. The academic performances of the science major students were mostly satisfactory. There is no significant difference between the scientific attitudes of science major students when grouped according to gender, fields of specialization and family income. There is a significant difference between the scientific attitudes of science major students when grouped according to year level. Similarly, academic performance is significantly related to scientific attitudes.

  17. The Accounting Principles Instructor's Influence on Students' Decision To Major in Accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Shawn; Crain, John L.; Mounce, Patricia H.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 81 accounting majors, 60 business majors, 12 nonbusiness majors, and 13 undecided students in accounting principles courses found that accounting principles instructors play the most significant role in the decision to major in accounting. Many students decide to major during their first principles course. (SK)

  18. Majoring in nutrition influences BMI of female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mee Young; Shepanski, Tahirih L; Gaylis, Jaclyn B

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining healthy eating habits in college is challenging. Interventions focused on nutrition education can assist in reversing these trends of poor eating habits among college students. The purpose of the study was to identify factors affecting the dietary habits, food choices and BMI of college females majoring in nutrition (NMs) compared with non-nutrition majors (OMs). A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey study of dietary behaviour and food frequency of 202 college females was conducted at San Diego State University. Data were analysed by using t tests, χ(2) tests and regression analysis in SPSS. NMs exhibited a lower BMI than OMs (P NMs had a BMI in the range of overweight or obese; however, prevalence was three times higher for OMs, being 9·2 %. A healthier meal option was the most influential factor in NMs' meal choices whereas convenience and weight control were influential factors in OMs' meal choices. Most NMs read nutrition labels and reported that this affects their food choices. NMs exercised longer than OMs in the NMs only (P NMs compared with OMs.

  19. Epistemologies and scientific reasoning skills among undergraduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollohan, Katherine N.

    Non-cognitive factors such as students' attitudes and beliefs toward a subject and their proficiency in scientific reasoning are important aspects of learning within science disciplines. Both factors have been studied in relation to science education in various discplines. This dissertation presents three studies that investigate student epistemologies and scientific reasoning in the domain of biology education. The first study investigated students' epistemic viewpoints in two introductory biology courses, one for science majors and one for non-science majors. This quantitative investigation revealed that the majors exhibited a negative shift in their attitudes and beliefs about biology and learning biology during a semester of introductory instruction. However, the non-science majors did not exhibit a similar shift. If fact, the non-science majors improved in their attitudes and beliefs during a semester of instruction, though not significantly so. The second study expands epistemological research to a population that has often been left out of this work, that is, intermediate-level biology majors. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected to reveal that junior and senior ranked students for the most part were able to characterize their views about biology and learning biology, and were able to associate factors with their epistemic improvement. Finally, the third study expands epistemology research further to determine if scientific reasoning and student attitudes and beliefs about learning science (specifically biology) are related. After a description of how various science and engineering majors compare in their scientific reasoning skills, this study indicated that among intermediate level biology majors there is no relationship between scientific reasoning skills and epistemologies, nor is there a relationship with other educational factors, including the number of courses taken during an undergraduate career, cumulative GPA, and standardized test

  20. The Role of Student Major in Grade Perception in Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatjas, Andrew; Webb, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    The Kruger-Dunning effect was studied as it related to performance in chemistry courses based on student differences in academic background. Student major was chosen as the classification to look at the effect of students with different interests/specializations. Chemistry majors tended to predict lower performance than biology majors, while…

  1. A Comparison of Motivation to Learn English between English Major and Non-English Major Students in a Vietnamese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Huong; Spooner-Lane, Rebecca; Mergler, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Despite the plethora of literature examining higher education students' motivation to learn a second language, it is not known if students who choose to study English as their major differ from those who are required to study English as the minor component of their wider degree. Drawing on self-determination theory, this paper reports on the…

  2. Watershed Watch - Student-driven Research Experiences That Attract Undeclared Undergraduate Students Into STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. N.; Hale, S. R.; Hayden, L. B.; Graham, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    The NSF-sponsored partnership between the University of New Hampshire (UNH), Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), New Hampshire Community Technical College (NHCTC), and the College of the Albemarle (COA) has implemented a unique series of courses designed to attract undergraduate students with undeclared majors into the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. These courses incorporate student- driven research comparing the Merrimack River (NH/MA) and Pasquotank River watersheds (VA/NC). Entitled Watershed Watch (WW), the courses utilize pedagogical approaches based on hands-on, inquiry-based teaching and learning. In alternating years, a two-week WW summer institute is held in each watershed. Students conduct authentic research on various aspects of the watershed's geology, limnology, and landscape ecology. Then during the academic year, WW students enroll in a course where they are paired with faculty mentors, and engage in more in-depth research projects. Samples of student research include assessing calcium oxalate crystals as an indicator of plant stress in NH red spruce (Picea rubens) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and GIS modeling/mapping coastal NC changes resulting from postulated melting of the Greenland ice sheet. After completing the first year in a five-year funding cycle, formative/summative evaluation methods have identified the following student perceptions regarding STEM disciplines: participating students found WW to be enjoyable, exciting, and meaningful; as a result of WW, 60 percent of undeclared students from the four-year institutions (UNH/ECSU) declared a STEM major or minor; and approximately 20 percent of the two-year students (NHCTC/COA) enrolled in four-year STEM programs or are employed in STEM fields.

  3. Qualitative Characteristics of Coherence, Substitution, and Reference by Non-English Major Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the interrelation among coherence, substitution, and reference by non-English major Chinese students. The author collected data through student questionnaires. Participants included 30 non-English major Chinese undergraduate students. The findings of this study suggested that the similarities and differences were confirmed…

  4. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  5. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  6. Research on Strategies for Breakfast Nutrition Dietary of the Students Majoring in Sports Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    ... the suggestions for improving breakfast nutrition dietary of the sports training major students, since the reasonable diet can not only promote the students' physical health, but also can enhance...

  7. Establishing the Empirical Relationship Between Non-Science Majoring Undergraduate Learners' Spatial Thinking Skills and Their Conceptual Astronomy Knowledge. (Spanish Title: Estableciendo Una Relación Empírica Entre el Razonamiento Espacial de los Estudiantes de Graduación de Carreras no Científicas y su Conocimento Conceptual de la Astronomía.) Estabelecendo Uma Relação Empírica Entre o RacioCínio Espacial dos Estudantes de Graduação EM Carreiras Não Científicas e Seu Conhecimento Conceitual da Astronomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Inge; Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2013-12-01

    The astronomy education community has tacitly assumed that learning astronomy is a conceptual domain resting upon spatial thinking skills. As a first step to formally identify an empirical relationship, undergraduate students in a non-major introductory astronomy survey class at a mediumsized, Ph.D. granting, mid-western US university were given pre- and post-astronomy conceptual diagnostics and spatial reasoning diagnostics, Instruments used were the "Test Of Astronomy Standards" and "What Do You Know?" Using only fully matched data for analysis, our sample consisted of 86 undergraduate non-science majors. Students' normalized gains for astronomy surveys were low at .26 and .13 respectively. Students' spatial thinking was measured using an instrument designed specifically for this study. Correlations between the astronomy instruments' pre- to post-course gain scores and the spatial assessment instrument show moderate to strong relationships suggesting the relationship between spatial reasoning and astronomy ability can explain about 25% of the variation in student achievement. La comunidad de educación en astronomía ha supuesto de forma tácita que el aprendizaje de la astronomía consiste en un dominio conceptual fundamentado en el razonamiento espacial. Como un primer paso para identificar formalmente una relación empírica entre estas dos cosas, utilizamos como muestra los estudantes de graduación de carreras no científicas de un curso experimental en una universidad norteamericana del medioeste de porte mediano con programa de Doctorado em curso, en el cual estos estudiantes se sometieron a un diagnóstico de razonamiento espacial y conceptos astronómicos antes e después del mismo. Las herramientas utilizadas fueron el Test Of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) y el cuestionario What do you know? Utilizando solo los datos completamente consistentes para este análisis, nuestra muestra consistió en 86 estudantes de graduación. Las mejoras, depués de

  8. Why Students Pursue the Business Degree: A Comparison of Business Majors across Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David; Markham, F. Scott; Cangelosi, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Top reasons for choosing a business major indicated in responses from 671 of 2,150 students surveyed included career interest, job opportunities, and fit with abilities; least influential were reputation of major, instructional quality, and parents. Rank ordering differed among majors. All majors except management information systems ranked…

  9. Physical Education Majors' Judgments about Inclusion and Teaching Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Elliott, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the beliefs about inclusion and teaching students with disabilities of physical education (PE) majors from universities in North Carolina (NC). The participants were PE majors (n = 147) and other enrolled students (n = 30) at colleges and universities in NC. The research method was descriptive survey…

  10. Variations in University Students' Scientific Reasoning Skills across Majors, Years, and Types of Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; Wei, Xin; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates three aspects--university major, year, and institution type--in relation to student scientific reasoning. Students from three majors (science, engineering, and education), four year levels (years 1 through 4), and two tiers of Chinese universities (tiers 1 and 2) participated in the study. A large-scale written assessment…

  11. Breakthrough Strategies: Classroom-Based Practices to Support New Majority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    "Breakthrough Strategies" identifies effective strategies that faculty have used to help New Majority students--those from minority, immigrant, or disadvantaged backgrounds--build the necessary skills to succeed in college. As the proportion of New Majority students rises, there is increased attention to helping them gain access to…

  12. The Major Review: A Means for Evaluating Teacher Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    1988-01-01

    The undergraduate major review, ideally consisting of an oral examination by faculty members, pre-review submission of a reflective, philosophically oriented paper, and submission of projects and instruction-related artifacts, adds to the repertoire of techniques for identifying the most appropriate candidate for teaching. (IAH)

  13. The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction on Academic Self-Concept: Does Academic Major Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young K.; Sax, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Using cross-classified multilevel modeling, this study attempted to improve our understanding of the group-level conditional effects of student-faculty interaction by examining the function of academic majors in explaining the effects of student-faculty interaction on students' academic self-concept. The study utilized data on 11,202…

  14. Popular Psychological Myths: A Comparison of Students' Beliefs across the Psychology Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaze, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the frequency and confidence with which college students endorse popular psychological myths, contrasting introductory psychology students (at the beginning and end of the course) with upper-level psychology majors and students who have never taken Introduction to Psychology. This study builds on the existing…

  15. Teaching the Media and Information Technology Major an Introduction to Engineering of Modern Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Zakzewski

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Revolution has had a profound impact on technical and non-technical professions. Therefore, an understanding of the basic scientific and engineering principles behind computers and electronic communication is important for students from all disciplines, especially those students majoring in Media and Information Technology (MIT. The Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering at The University of Scranton has met this need through a two semester series of courses for the non-science major entitled Introduction to Consumer Technology (PHYS 104 and Information Technology (PHYS 204. Although these courses assume no prior engineering background, they provide a meaningful technical experience that includes a quantitative approach to problem solving. This paper will outline the challenges faced teaching engineering to the non-engineering major and the topics covered in the first semester of these introductory engineering courses.

  16. Using the Humanities to Teach Neuroscience to Non-majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Hewlet G; Richeimer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We developed and offered a sequence of neuroscience courses geared toward changing the way non-science students interact with the sciences. Although we accepted students from all majors and at all class levels, our target population was first and second year students who were majoring in the fine arts or the humanities, or who had not yet declared a major. Our goal was to engage these students in science in general and neuroscience in particular by teaching science in a way that was accessible and relevant to their intellectual experiences. Our methodology was to teach scientific principles through the humanities by using course material that is at the intersection of the sciences and the humanities and by changing the classroom experience for both faculty and students. Examples of our course materials included the works of Oliver Sacks, V.S. Ramachandran, Martha Nussbaum, Virginia Woolf and Karl Popper, among others. To change the classroom experience we used a model of team-teaching, which required the simultaneous presence of two faculty members in the classroom for all classes. We changed the structure of the classroom experience from the traditional authority model to a model in which inquiry, debate, and intellectual responsibility were central. We wanted the students to have an appreciation of science not only as an endeavor guided by evidence and experimentation, but also a public discourse driven by creativity and controversy. The courses attracted a significant number of humanities and fine arts students, many of whom had already completed their basic science requirement.

  17. Students' Pre-Instructional Beliefs and Reasoning Strategies About Astrobiology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Prather, Edward E.; Slater, Timothy F.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and document student beliefs and reasoning difficulties concerning topics related to astrobiology. This was accomplished by surveying over two thousand middle school, high school, and college (science and non-science majors) students. Students were surveyed utilizing student-supplied response questions focused on the definition of life and its limitations. Careful, inductive analysis of student responses revealed that the majority of students correctly identify that liquid water is necessary for life and that life forms can exist without sunlight. However, many students incorrectly state that life cannot survive without oxygen. Furthermore, when students are asked to reason about life in extreme environments, they most often cite complex organisms (such as plants, animals, and humans) rather than the more ubiquitous microorganisms. Results of this study were used to inform the development of astrobiology curriculum materials.

  18. Sense of Place and Student Engagement among Undergraduate Students at a Major Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between sense of place and student engagement among undergraduate students, in order to influence how higher education institutions view the role of the physical environment in fostering student engagement, learning, and personal development. Student engagement, a very important predictor…

  19. Predicting Community College Student's Intention to Transfer and Major in STEM: Does Student Engagement Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bianca; Starobin, Soko S.; Chen, Yu; Baul, Tushi; Kollasch, Aurelia

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of community college students' engagement on their intention to transfer and major in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field. The STEM Student Success Literacy Survey was used to collect data among all 15 community colleges in Iowa. The authors developed a measurement model for community…

  20. An analysis on the satisfaction of radiology students with their major

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study was conducted with a goal to identify the factors that determine radiology students' satisfaction with their major and to provide the basic data for efficient education and career guidance. The result indicated that the students' satisfaction with the professors' roles was high. However, overall, the level of satisfaction with the curriculum was found to be low. In addition, it was analyzed that there was a large gap between recognition and practice of self-directed learning. In the correlation analysis, the professors' roles were also found to be a very important factor. Based on the result, the professors' roles of center(teaching or state examination, students with questions etc.,), it was concluded that improvement of the radiology students' satisfaction with their major would help the students adapt themselves to the major and school successfully and develop a positive character to perform as professionals in the future.

  1. Understanding Facilitators and Barriers to the Selection of Dietetics as a major by African American students.

    OpenAIRE

    Felton, Teena M

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Facilitators And Barriers To The Selection of Dietetics As A Major By African-American Students Teena M. Felton (ABSTRACT) Less than 5% of registered dietitians are African-American individuals. Little has been done to investigate reasons for the paucity of African-American professionals in the dietetics field. The specific aim of this study was, therefore, to explore facilitators and barriers to the selection of dietetics as a major by African-American students. ...

  2. Sports Nutrition Knowledge among Mid-Major Division I University Student-Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley Andrews; Wojcik, Janet R; Boyd, Joni M.; Bowers, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Competitive athletes have goals to optimize performance and to maintain healthy body composition. Sports nutrition is a component of training programs often overlooked by student-athletes and their coaches. The purpose of this study was to examine student-athletes’ sports nutrition knowledge across sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Participants included 123 mid-major Division I university student-athletes (47 females and 76 males) from baseball, softball, m...

  3. On Students' De-Motivation, Gender, Major, and Educational Level in Iranian EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Hemmatizad, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated de-motivation among Iranian secondary high school and university students with respect to gender, major, and level of education and explored students' experiences in overcoming de-motivation. Data were gathered from 485 participants who comprised 215 male and 270 female. A 35 Likert type item de-motivation…

  4. Parental Influence on Exploratory Students' College Choice, Major, and Career Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores parental influence on exploratory students' college choice, major, and career decision making. The research began with examination of a first year academic advising model and Living Learning Community. Parental influence emerged as a key theme in student decision making processes. The project was conducted using grounded…

  5. In Their Own Words: Best Practices for Advising Millennial Students about Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Tamara; Campo, Jill; Weissman, Julie; Walmsley, Angela; Snell, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing generational theory, we explored the relationship between Millennial characteristics and students' major selection and academic advising experiences. We conducted focus groups of students with senior standing at a private, midwestern university, and we utilized a closed coding technique to analyze the qualitative data. Consistent with…

  6. In Their Own Words: Best Practices for Advising Millennial Students about Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Tamara; Campo, Jill; Weissman, Julie; Walmsley, Angela; Snell, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing generational theory, we explored the relationship between Millennial characteristics and students' major selection and academic advising experiences. We conducted focus groups of students with senior standing at a private, midwestern university, and we utilized a closed coding technique to analyze the qualitative data. Consistent with…

  7. A Comprehensive Survey on Student Perceptions of Cyberbullying at a Major Metropolitan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of students on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a student survey, the authors learn of high levels of perceptions on incidents as an issue but…

  8. Exploring Undergraduate Students' Ethical Perceptions in Barbados: Differences by Gender, Academic Major and Religiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Philmore; Persaud, Nadini

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there were differences in students' ethical perceptions based on gender, academic major and religiosity. Design/methodology/approach: A self-administered survey was conducted of 132 students at a university in Barbados, to determine ethical perceptions on five moral constructs: justice,…

  9. Student Response to a Partial Inversion of an Organic Chemistry Course for Non-Chemistry Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Kathleen S.; Brookes, David T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the student response to a two-year transformation of a one-semester organic chemistry course for nonchemistry majors. The transformed course adopted a peer led team learning approach and incorporated case studies. Student attitudes toward the course transformation were assessed throughout the semester, and adjustments to the methods were…

  10. An Examination of Factors Influencing Students Selection of Business Majors Using TRA Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Poonam

    2013-01-01

    Making decisions regarding the selection of a business major is both very important and challenging for students. An understanding of this decision-making process can be valuable for students, parents, and university programs. The current study applies the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) consumer decision-making model to examine factors that…

  11. A comparison of ethnic minority and majority students: social and academic integration, and quality of learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severiens, S.; Wolff, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines students from ethnic minorities and majorities with regard to the relationships between their social and academic integration and their quality of learning. A total of 523 students at four universities completed a questionnaire: analyses of variance were used to examine mean di

  12. An Examination of Factors Influencing Students Selection of Business Majors Using TRA Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Poonam

    2013-01-01

    Making decisions regarding the selection of a business major is both very important and challenging for students. An understanding of this decision-making process can be valuable for students, parents, and university programs. The current study applies the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) consumer decision-making model to examine factors that…

  13. "We're the Customer- We Pay the Tuition": Student Consumerism among Undergraduate Sociology Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucchi, Michael; Korgen, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Presents a questionnaire based study of sociology majors in a large U.S. sociology program that evaluates whether students view college in terms of a customer service orientation. Reports that students view higher education as a consumer-driven marketplace. Includes references. (CMK)

  14. The work–study interface: similarities and differences between ethnic minority and ethnic majority students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Meeuwisse (Marieke); L.A.L. de Meijer (Lonneke); M.Ph. Born (Marise); S.E. Severiens (Sabine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGiven the poorer academic outcomes of non-Western ethnic minority students compared to ethnic majority students, we investigated whether differences exist in work–study interface between ethnic groups. We tested a work–study interface model, in which the work-related factors work–study

  15. Student Response to a Partial Inversion of an Organic Chemistry Course for Non-Chemistry Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Kathleen S.; Brookes, David T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the student response to a two-year transformation of a one-semester organic chemistry course for nonchemistry majors. The transformed course adopted a peer led team learning approach and incorporated case studies. Student attitudes toward the course transformation were assessed throughout the semester, and adjustments to the methods were…

  16. Part Two: Learning Science Through Digital Video: Student Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of digital video for science education has become common with the wide availability of video imagery. This study continues research into aspects of using digital video as a primary teaching tool to enhance student learning in undergraduate science courses. Two survey instruments were administered to undergraduate non-science majors. Survey One focused on: a) What science is being learned from watching science videos such as a "YouTube" clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on geologic time and b) What are student preferences with regard to their learning (e.g. using video versus traditional modes of delivery)? Survey Two addressed students' perspectives on the storytelling aspect of the video with respect to: a) sustaining interest, b) providing science information, c) style of video and d) quality of the video. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. The storytelling aspect of each video was also addressed by students. Students watched 15-20 shorter (3-15 minute science videos) created within the last four years. Initial results of this research support that shorter video segments were preferred and the storytelling quality of each video related to student learning.

  17. Deciding on Science: An Analysis of Higher Education Science Student Major Choice Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen Wilson

    The number of college students choosing to major in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in the United States affects the size and quality of the American workforce (Winters, 2009). The number of graduates in these academic fields has been on the decline in the United States since the 1960s, which, according to Lips and McNeil (2009), has resulted in a diminished ability of the United States to compete in science and engineering on the world stage. The purpose of this research was to learn why students chose a STEM major and determine what decision criteria influenced this decision. According to Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behavior (TPB), the key components of decision-making can be quantified and used as predictors of behavior. In this study the STEM majors' decision criteria were compared between different institution types (two-year, public four-year, and private four-year), and between demographic groups (age and sex). Career, grade, intrinsic, self-efficacy, and self-determination were reported as motivational factors by a majority of science majors participating in this study. Few students reported being influenced by friends and family when deciding to major in science. Science students overwhelmingly attributed the desire to solve meaningful problems as central to their decision to major in science. A majority of students surveyed credited a teacher for influencing their desire to pursue science as a college major. This new information about the motivational construct of the studied group of science majors can be applied to the previously stated problem of not enough STEM majors in the American higher education system to provide workers required to fill the demand of a globally STEM-competitive United States (National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, & Institute of Medicine, 2010).

  18. The Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of College Students Majoring in Jazz Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devroop, Karendra

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the occupational aspirations and occupational expectations of college students majoring in jazz studies in the United States. Participants included the population of jazz studies majors (N = 211) at a large mid-southern university known for its prestigious and internationally recognized jazz program. A…

  19. The Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of College Students Majoring in Jazz Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devroop, Karendra

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the occupational aspirations and occupational expectations of college students majoring in jazz studies in the United States. Participants included the population of jazz studies majors (N = 211) at a large mid-southern university known for its prestigious and internationally recognized jazz program. A…

  20. Variations in University Students' Scientific Reasoning Skills Across Majors, Years, and Types of Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; Wei, Xin; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates three aspects—university major, year, and institution type—in relation to student scientific reasoning. Students from three majors (science, engineering, and education), four year levels (years 1 through 4), and two tiers of Chinese universities (tiers 1 and 2) participated in the study. A large-scale written assessment was conducted using the Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR). A series of analysis of variance showed that, although science and engineering majors exhibited higher reasoning skills than education majors and first-tier university attendees higher than second-tier university attendees, student reasoning skills measured by the LCTSR remained nearly constant across the four year levels of higher education, a recurring pattern for all majors and university tiers. Results suggest that current higher education in China has little influence on student scientific reasoning, regardless of what students learn, how long they receive higher education, and what type of institutions they attend. Implications of the study call our attention to the status quo and urge us to rethink meaningful ways that can help students increase key proficiencies needed in scientific practices, such as successful reasoning skills.

  1. Disordered Eating Behaviors and Food Addiction among Nutrition Major College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiping; Tan, Michael

    2016-10-26

    Evidence of whether nutrition students are free from food-related issues or at higher risk for eating disorders is inconsistent. This study aimed to assess disordered eating behaviors and food addiction among nutrition and non-nutrition major college students. Students (n = 967, ages 18-25, female 72.7%, white 74.8%) enrolled at a public university completed online demographic characteristics surveys and validated questionnaires measuring specific disordered eating behaviors. Academic major category differences were compared. Additionally, high risk participants were assessed by weight status and academic year. Overall, 10% of respondents were a high level of concern for developing eating disorders. About 10.3% of respondents met criteria for food addiction. In addition, 4.5% of respondents had co-occurrence of eating disorder risk and food addiction risk out of total respondents. There were no significant differences in level of concern for developing an eating disorder, eating subscales, or food addiction among academic majors. The percentage of high risk participants was lower in the underweight/normal weight group than in the overweight/obese group in health-related non-nutrition major students but not in nutrition students. Early screening, increasing awareness, and promoting healthy eating habits could be potential strategies to help treat and prevent the development of disorders or associated health conditions in nutrition as well as non-nutrition students.

  2. Disordered Eating Behaviors and Food Addiction among Nutrition Major College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of whether nutrition students are free from food-related issues or at higher risk for eating disorders is inconsistent. This study aimed to assess disordered eating behaviors and food addiction among nutrition and non-nutrition major college students. Students (n = 967, ages 18–25, female 72.7%, white 74.8% enrolled at a public university completed online demographic characteristics surveys and validated questionnaires measuring specific disordered eating behaviors. Academic major category differences were compared. Additionally, high risk participants were assessed by weight status and academic year. Overall, 10% of respondents were a high level of concern for developing eating disorders. About 10.3% of respondents met criteria for food addiction. In addition, 4.5% of respondents had co-occurrence of eating disorder risk and food addiction risk out of total respondents. There were no significant differences in level of concern for developing an eating disorder, eating subscales, or food addiction among academic majors. The percentage of high risk participants was lower in the underweight/normal weight group than in the overweight/obese group in health-related non-nutrition major students but not in nutrition students. Early screening, increasing awareness, and promoting healthy eating habits could be potential strategies to help treat and prevent the development of disorders or associated health conditions in nutrition as well as non-nutrition students.

  3. Student anxiety in introductory biology classrooms: Perceptions about active learning and persistence in the major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Benjamin J; Brigati, Jennifer R; Schussler, Elisabeth E

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers have called for implementation of active learning practices in undergraduate science classrooms as one method to increase retention and persistence in STEM, yet there has been little research on the potential increases in student anxiety that may accompany these practices. This is of concern because excessive anxiety can decrease student performance. Levels and sources of student anxiety in three introductory biology lecture classes were investigated via an online survey and student interviews. The survey (n = 327) data revealed that 16% of students had moderately high classroom anxiety, which differed among the three classes. All five active learning classroom practices that were investigated caused student anxiety, with students voluntarily answering a question or being called on to answer a question causing higher anxiety than working in groups, completing worksheets, or answering clicker questions. Interviews revealed that student anxiety seemed to align with communication apprehension, social anxiety, and test anxiety. Additionally, students with higher general anxiety were more likely to self-report lower course grade and the intention to leave the major. These data suggest that a subset of students in introductory biology experience anxiety in response to active learning, and its potential impacts should be investigated.

  4. Student Perceptions of the Integrated `Science Education' Major in Some Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongshia; He, Huachun

    2012-09-01

    The integrated science education major has been implemented for a decade in China. An investigation was conducted in 2010 to find out students' satisfaction with the programme. Participants included 27 senior students and 25 past students from six normal universities. Results show very low satisfaction. Identified reasons include the fact that the curriculum did not reflect the intended integration objectives of the major, and that the quality of science educators was inadequate to teach integrated courses. The most unsatisfactory aspects relate to the treatment of the nature of science, the integration of subject matters, and students' experience of inquiry learning in terms of both curriculum content and teaching methods. In addition to establishing an effective evaluation system, a more fundamental suggestion is to change the current normal college-based Chinese teacher education system especially in the science education sector.

  5. Varieties of English and Their Implications for Listening Teaching to English Major Students in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡琴

    2009-01-01

    As a global language, the sole ownership of English, as well as the standard of English worldwide is a eontroversial issue. This paper, based on Kachru's "three concentric circles" and some arguments about varieties of world English, is aimed to find out implications for listening teaching to English major students in China, thus help students improve the effectiveness and ef-ficiency when coping with international communication.

  6. Teachers’Role in College English Teaching for Students Majored in Arts and Sports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张霞

    2014-01-01

    With a view to keeping up with the new developments of the reform of college English teaching at present, college English teaching for students majored in arts and sports is also appealing to be improved further. And to deepen the teaching re-form, teachers, who are the mobile one of the most important factors in English teaching, should follow the principles of provid-ing different guidance for students majored in arts and sports and instructing them in accordance with their aptitude to meet the specific needs of individualized teaching. Thus they have to change their roles and can gain the inspiration from the following contents.

  7. Sports Nutrition Knowledge among Mid-Major Division I University Student-Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Andrews

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive athletes have goals to optimize performance and to maintain healthy body composition. Sports nutrition is a component of training programs often overlooked by student-athletes and their coaches. The purpose of this study was to examine student-athletes’ sports nutrition knowledge across sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Participants included 123 mid-major Division I university student-athletes (47 females and 76 males from baseball, softball, men’s soccer, track and field, and tennis. The student-athletes completed a survey questionnaire to determine adequate sports nutrition knowledge (mean ≥ 75%. The overall mean sports nutrition knowledge score for the student-athletes was 56.9% which was considered inadequate sports nutrition knowledge (mean < 75%. Only 12 student-athletes achieved adequate sports nutrition knowledge score of 75% or higher. There were no differences by sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Student-athletes’ inadequate sports nutrition knowledge may place them at nutrition risk, lead to impaired performance, and affect their lean body mass and energy levels. Athletics personnel should not assume student-athletes have adequate sports nutrition knowledge. Athletic departments may make available a board certified Sports Dietitian or Registered Dietitian and offer classroom or online courses facilitating student-athletes to optimize nutrition knowledge and behaviors.

  8. How to Read English Research Articles: A Case Study of Graduate Students Majoring in Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Krismiyati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reading research articles in English will be a special challenge for those students who speak English as a foreign language (EFL. EFL graduate students will require a specific method for helping them to cope with the articles they have to read. This study tries to offer a method for helping them to read, understand, and analyze English articles easier. This study employs evaluation and trialing. It is accompanied by pre and post surveys that will give information about the condition of the students before and after the method is implemented. This study involved graduate students majoring in Information Systems at Satya Wacana Christian University. It is expected that the method proposed will help the students to know exactly what they need to read and focus on when they read a research article so that they can use their time more efficiently and effectively.

  9. Preferences of Dental Students towards Teaching Strategies in Two Major Dental Colleges in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. AlHamdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore and compare undergraduate dental students’ views and preferences towards various teaching strategies. Methods. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to 345 male and female undergraduate dental students from the two major dental schools in Riyadh (College of Dentistry, King Saud University [KSU], and Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy [RCsDP]. Students’ preferences for various components of the lecture courses were investigated. Descriptive and crosstab analyses were used to compare the students’ preferences for each school and between genders; the chi-square test was used to measure the significance level (P=0.05. Results. The majority of students preferred having the lecture schedule announced in advance. Females preferred morning lectures, whereas male students preferred afternoon lectures. Nearly half of the students thought that attending lectures should be mandatory; most of them were from KSU. Most of the students reported preferring a PowerPoint presentation lecture. The students, particularly female students, also preferred to receive lecture handouts and study materials before the session and to have practical demonstrations after the lecture. Conclusion. Teachers should consider students’ opinions when constructing courses because this feedback would have a positive impact on the teaching environment and students’ performance.

  10. Do Biology Students Really Hate Math? Empirical Insights into Undergraduate Life Science Majors' Emotions about Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Lucas P; Runyon, Christopher R; Drake, John M; Dolan, Erin L

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate life science majors are reputed to have negative emotions toward mathematics, yet little empirical evidence supports this. We sought to compare emotions of majors in the life sciences versus other natural sciences and math. We adapted the Attitudes toward the Subject of Chemistry Inventory to create an Attitudes toward the Subject of Mathematics Inventory (ASMI). We collected data from 359 science and math majors at two research universities and conducted a series of statistical tests that indicated that four AMSI items comprised a reasonable measure of students' emotional satisfaction with math. We then compared life science and non-life science majors and found that major had a small to moderate relationship with students' responses. Gender also had a small relationship with students' responses, while students' race, ethnicity, and year in school had no observable relationship. Using latent profile analysis, we identified three groups-students who were emotionally satisfied with math, emotionally dissatisfied with math, and neutral. These results and the emotional satisfaction with math scale should be useful for identifying differences in other undergraduate populations, determining the malleability of undergraduates' emotional satisfaction with math, and testing effects of interventions aimed at improving life science majors' attitudes toward math. © 2017 L.P. Wachsmuth et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. A DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE FRESHMEN--I. STUDENTS WITH DIFFERENT CHOICES OF MAJOR FIELD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABE, CLIFFORD; HOLLAND, JOHN L.

    COLLEGE FRESHMEN PLANNING TO MAJOR IN DIFFERENT FIELDS OF STUDY ARE DESCRIBED. THE SAMPLE STUDIED INCLUDED 12,432 COLLEGE FRESHMEN ENROLLED IN 31 INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION DURING APRIL AND MAY 1964. THE AMERICAN COLLEGE SURVEY WAS USED TO ASSESS STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS. INCLUDED IN THIS SURVEY IS THE VOCATIONAL PREFERENCE INVENTORY,…

  12. Math Readiness and Preparation for Competitive College Majors and Careers: The Case of Black Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail E.

    This study examines factors that determine the enrollment of black students in the high school math courses (i.e., advanced algebra, trigonometry, calculus) that are necessary for competitive college and major field access. The data are from a local college survey of juniors and seniors who were enrolled in eight (8) local public and private…

  13. How Our Majors Believe They Learn: Student Learning Strategies in an Undergraduate Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, I set out to gain a better understanding of the learning strategies typically used by sociology majors, whether and to what extent they engage in metacognitive strategies, and whether teaching about learning results in students reporting greater use of self-regulatory behaviors. I discuss the importance of self-regulated learning…

  14. Perceptions of College-Level Music Performance Majors Teaching Applied Music Lessons to Young Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, William E.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the reflections of college music performance majors (N = 12) who were teaching private music lessons. Students were instructed to keep a journal during one private lesson of their choice per week. Results indicated initial expectations of lessons that were consistently lower than lesson evaluations after…

  15. Social Cognitive Predictors of the Interests and Choices of Computing Majors: Applicability to Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Robert W.; Lopez, Frederick G.; Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    In a replication and extension of earlier research, we examined the explanatory adequacy of the social cognitive choice model (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) in a sample of 1404 students majoring in a variety of computing disciplines at 23 historically Black and 27 predominantly White universities. Participants completed measures of self-efficacy,…

  16. How Our Majors Believe They Learn: Student Learning Strategies in an Undergraduate Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, I set out to gain a better understanding of the learning strategies typically used by sociology majors, whether and to what extent they engage in metacognitive strategies, and whether teaching about learning results in students reporting greater use of self-regulatory behaviors. I discuss the importance of self-regulated learning…

  17. Students' Expectations of a Career in Sales: A Comparison of Finance and Marketing Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Ann T.; Kuzma, John R.; Thiewes, Harold F.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the graduates majoring in Finance and Marketing will secure entry-level positions in sales, often beginning careers dedicated to the sale of financial products; yet, perceptions of this career vary significantly, dependent on a student's area of study. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the perceptions of Finance majors…

  18. When Are Students Ready for Research Methods? A Curriculum Mapping Argument for the Political Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbower, Matthew L.

    2017-01-01

    For many political science programs, research methods courses are a fundamental component of the recommended undergraduate curriculum. However, instructors and students often see these courses as the most challenging. This study explores when it is most appropriate for political science majors to enroll and pass a research methods course. The…

  19. How Social Networks Influence Female Students' Choices to Major in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinland, Kathryn Ann

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study examined how social influence plays a part in female students' choices of college major, specifically engineering instead of science, technology, and math. Social influence may show itself through peers, family members, and teachers and may encompass resources under the umbrella of social capital. The…

  20. Content-Based Internet-Assisted ESP Teaching to Ukrainian University Students Majoring in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the issues of teaching ESP to Ukrainian tertiary students majoring in psychology. The suggested approach is based on teaching English through the content matter of special subjects included in the program of training practical psychologists. The example of an ESP textbook for psychologists is used for demonstrating the…

  1. The Future of the Teaching Profession from the Perspective of Students with a Major in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Jensy Campos; Gutiérrez, Walter Solano

    2017-01-01

    The article offers the results obtained in a study where, through the application of a survey and the development of a discussion forum with students from education majors, information about their perceptions with regard to four axes related to the future of the teaching profession was obtained, as follows: the teacher profile, the student…

  2. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  3. Exploring Major Predictors of Student Satisfaction: An Input towards a Learning-Friendly School Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn L. Balmeo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study sought to determine the perceived level of importance and perceived level of satisfaction of college students on 16 areas of student service commonly provided in a tertiary education setting within any university as prescribed and observed by local and international standards of tertiary education. Each area was tested to determine the existence of a significant relationship between the measured response by respondents on their perceived level of importance and perceived level of satisfaction. The existence of a significant relationship between the two variables indicates that the given area of the learning environment is a major predictor towards student satisfaction. Item analysis was also performed on each area of the learning environment to determine specific indicators of student satisfaction. The results of this research serves as a benchmark to any university [with similar status as the locale of the study] in identifying particular areas of the learning environment that are crucial in determining student satisfaction and must be focus of university maintenance and development so as to achieve a learner-friendly school environment. The research was conducted with 399 students enrolled in Saint Louis University distributed in proportion to the population distribution of students in the different colleges within the said University.

  4. Production of Intonation Patterns of Non-English Major Student Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Luib-Beltran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study described the production of intonation pattern of the Non-English major student teachers during their on-campus teaching. The qualitative research method was used to analyze the data and describe their intonation patterns. The utterances were investigated in distinction between falling and rising intonation of wh-questions and yes/no questions. In the conduct of analysis, an interview guide was used to gather data on the language profile of the student teachers. Data confirm that the student teachers’ mother tongue (Filipino was commonly used in most of their verbal exchanges activities. It is worthy to note that the utterances of the student teachers displayed evidence of intonation patterns variation on wh-questions and yes/no questions. The erratic production of intonation patterns of the student teachers was resulted from the common linguistic phenomenon in which they tended to carry the intonation and pronunciation rules from their mother tongue (Filipino into their English spoken discourse. This qualitative research study implies that there is an interference of Filipino language in the production of the student teachers’ intonation patterns which describes the Philippine English intonation pattern for wh- questions and yes/no questions. Forthcoming studies may obtain more valued insights by gathering geographically varied samples that would include student teachers across disciplines.

  5. Grasha-Richmann college students' learning styles of classroom participation: role of gender and major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneshi, Ali Reza; Dehghan Tezerjani, Mahnaz; Mokhtarpour, Hasan

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the male and female students' learning styles of classroom participation and these styles' differences between Humanities and Science majors. 1039 individuals were selected through the proportional stratified random sampling method among undergraduate and graduate students in Humanities (n=421) and Science (n=618) faculties of Tehran University. In the Humanities group, there were 285 females and 136 males, and in the Science group, there were 208 females and 410 males. The participants answered the Grasha-Riechmann student learning styles scale. The findings indicated that the females obtained significantly higher means in collaborative, participative, and dependent styles than males, but in avoidant, and independent styles, the means for males were higher than those for females. Also, the science group's means in collaborative, participative, dependent, and competitive styles were significantly higher than those for the humanities group. According to the findings, it seems that due to psychological characteristics, female students tend to collaborate with other students of the same sex and participate in their activities. In this way, they also are more dependent on their teacher and classroom, because otherwise they will face some problems such as anxiety. In addition, it seems that science students in comparison to humanities students are more participative and collaborative because they need more collaboration in their projects and course work.

  6. Investigating the Relationship between Students' Science Knowledge and Their Reported Sources of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Romine, J.; Impey, C.; Nieberding, M.

    2015-11-01

    Building on a 25 year study of undergraduate students' science literacy, we have been investigating where students report getting information about science. In this study, we investigated the relationship between students' basic science knowledge, responses about studying something scientifically, and where they report gaining information about science. Data for this study was collected through an online survey of astronomy courses during 2014. Responses were collected from a total of 400 students through online surveys. Most survey respondents were non-science majors in the first two years of college who had taken 3 or fewer college science courses. Our results show a relationship between students who report online searches and Wikipedia as reliable sources of information and lower science literacy scores, although there was no relationship between science knowledge and where students report getting information about science. Our results suggest that information literacy is an important component to overall science literacy.

  7. Attributions of Academic Performance among Third Year and Fourth Year Biology Major Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick John B. Solar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive study aimed to determine the attributions of academic performance of third year and fourth year biology major students in the College of Education, West Visayas State University, School Year 2013-2014. The academic performance were categorized or measured in terms of test, projects, workbooks, and laboratory experiments, class participation, and attendance. The Attributions in academic performance were evaluated using the closed-form questionnairechecklist,categorized intoin termsof ability, effort, luck, or task difficulty. Mean frequency, mean percentage, Mann-Whitney U-test, two-sampled test set at 0.05 level of significance were used to determine if there were significant difference in the attribution when the students were taken according to their year level. The result of the study revealed that the Third Year biology majors attributed their academic performance to effort which is shown to have the highest percentage attribution in overall rank. There was no significant difference in the attributions of academic performance for third year and fourth year biology major students in terms of test, while the result for projects, workbooks, and laboratory experiment and class participation and attendance categories,was found out to have a significant difference in the attribution for the third and fourth years biology Major students’ academic performances.

  8. Pedagogical changes in an astronomy course for non-physics majors: Student and professor perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Katarin; Razul, Mohamed Shajahan Gulam; Powell, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Pedagogical changes were made in the delivery of a three-credit, first-year astronomy course offered to non-physics majors by a department of physics at a small undergraduate university in Canada. The professor of the course initiated this change to better meet the needs of the students enrolled. A brief description of some of the activities and teaching strategies is given, along with student and professor perceptions. Results indicate that it is possible to develop and deliver a rigorous, conceptually based astronomy course and that the effort is worth the result.

  9. Astrology in Introductory Astronomy Courses for Nonscience Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilik, Michael, II

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of a horoscope-casting laboratory exercise in the astronomy course. Indicates that students can fulfill three objectives: (1) summarize the planetary motions in the geometric universe, (2) be familiar with sidereal and solar time, and (3) be acquainted with the uses ephemerides. (CC)

  10. How social networks influence female students' choices to major in engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinland, Kathryn Ann

    Scope and Method of Study: This study examined how social influence plays a part in female students' choices of college major, specifically engineering instead of science, technology, and math. Social influence may show itself through peers, family members, and teachers and may encompass resources under the umbrella of social capital. The purpose of this study was to examine how female students' social networks, through the lens of social capital, influence her major choice of whether or not to study engineering. The variables of peer influence, parental influence, teacher/counselor influence, perception of engineering, and academic background were addressed in a 52 question, Likert scale survey. This survey has been modified from an instrument previously used by Reyer (2007) at Bradley University. Data collection was completed using the Dillman (2009) tailored design model. Responses were grouped into four main scales of the dependent variables of social influence, encouragement, perceptions of engineering and career motivation. A factor analysis was completed on the four factors as a whole, and individual questions were not be analyzed. Findings and Conclusions: This study addressed the differences in social network support for female freshmen majoring in engineering versus female freshmen majoring in science, technology, or math. Social network support, when working together from all angles of peers, teachers, parents, and teachers/counselors, transforms itself into a new force that is more powerful than the summation of the individual parts. Math and science preparation also contributed to female freshmen choosing to major in engineering instead of choosing to major in science, technology, or math. The STEM pipeline is still weak and ways in which to reinforce it should be examined. Social network support is crucial for female freshmen who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, and math.

  11. "It's been a long journey": Exploring educationally mobile students' transition into STEM majors at a university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreygue, Aimee

    Today, one third of all college students are considered educationally "mobile," which means they will change institutions during their undergraduate careers. The concept of educational mobility challenges the traditional idea of students moving through an educational pipeline in a linear fashion, and recognizes that many of today's students, including those in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), will have multiple transition points. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the transitional experiences of educationally mobile students moving into and through the STEM disciplines at a public university. Students who move from one educational environment to another undergo a significant transition process, and understanding this process for individual students and the institution's role in supporting transition has implications for educational policy. Grounded in the conceptual framework guided by Schlossberg's Transition Theory, and Swail, Redd, and Perna's Geometric Model for Student Persistence and Achievement, this study explores the following research question: How do students who are educationally mobile experience academic, social, and institutional support while transitioning into and through STEM disciplines at a four-year public university? Eighteen science and mathematics majors participated in this study, all of whom attended at least one institution of higher education prior to their current attendance at Mountain View University, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in Southern California. Participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol and completed a demographic questionnaire as well. Trustworthiness measures included member checking and peer debriefing. The findings of this study show that educationally mobile students are savvy agents of their education, and make personal and professional sacrifices in their pursuit of a STEM degree. They want to connect to like

  12. Male students give voice to supportive campus environments: A qualitative case study of undergraduate STEM majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon, Julie L.

    Research supports the importance of student engagement in enhancing student learning, success, and various desirable educational outcomes. In the last decade, the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) has been the primary instrument through which student engagement has been explored. Supportive Campus Environment, one of the five benchmarks of effective educational practice measured by NSSE, served as the foundation for this study. The challenge of successfully educating students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has been clearly documented. Recently, urgent calls have been issued to confront the shortage of students in the STEM pipeline, to minimize barriers to the achievement in STEM disciplines, and to increase the representation of racial minorities and women in STEM careers. This study employed a holistic collective case study design to examine how undergraduate men in STEM majors at a private, selective, research institution perceived the supportiveness of their campus environments. Differential perceptions of the campus environment on the basis of race (Black, Indian1, Latino, and White) and academic success were explored. Cross-case analysis revealed several common themes across all cases. Peer relationships, followed by faculty relationships, were most influential in shaping perceptions of campus environment. Race, academic success, and characteristics unique to STEM were less influential to perceptions of the campus environment. Participants distinguished feelings of a supportive campus environment from their overall perceptions of their campus environment. Further, participants routinely isolated some of their identities, experiences, and perceptions from influencing their overall perception of the campus environment. A connection between the concept of supportive campus environment and sense of belonging emerged. Participants' discussion of the NSSE Supportive Campus Environment questions provided valuable

  13. The Interaction of Student Major-Field Group and Text Content in TOEFL Reading Comprehension. TOEFL Research Reports 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Gordon A.

    It was hypothesized that a student's major-field area interacts with the text content in determining performance on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) reading passages. Results with 32,467 graduate school applicants, all nonnative English speakers, supported the study's hypothesis, as students in two major-field groups, the…

  14. Student and high-school characteristics related to completing a science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) major in college

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Brandon; Harwell, Michael; Monson, Debra; Dupuis, Danielle; Medhanie, Amanuel; Post, Thomas R.

    2012-04-01

    Background: The importance of increasing the number of US college students completing degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) has prompted calls for research to provide a better understanding of factors related to student participation in these majors, including the impact of a student's high-school mathematics curriculum. Purpose: This study examines the relationship between various student and high-school characteristics and completion of a STEM major in college. Of specific interest is the influence of a student's high-school mathematics curriculum on the completion of a STEM major in college. Sample: The sample consisted of approximately 3500 students from 229 high schools. Students were predominantly Caucasian (80%), with slightly more males than females (52% vs 48%). Design and method: A quasi-experimental design with archival data was used for students who enrolled in, and graduated from, a post-secondary institution in the upper Midwest. To be included in the sample, students needed to have completed at least three years of high-school mathematics. A generalized linear mixed model was used with students nested within high schools. The data were cross-sectional. Results: High-school predictors were not found to have a significant impact on the completion of a STEM major. Significant student-level predictors included ACT mathematics score, gender and high-school mathematics GPA. Conclusions: The results provide evidence that on average students are equally prepared for the rigorous mathematics coursework regardless of the high-school mathematics curriculum they completed.

  15. Being Smart is not Enough: the role of psychlogical factors in study success of ethnic minority and ethnic majority students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Meeuwisse (Marieke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn the past decade(s), many studies have been conducted on the differences in study success between ethnic minority students and ethnic majority students to identify explanations for the less successful academic careers of ethnic minority students. This dissertation aimed to explain the

  16. Enhancing Student Learning across Disciplines: A Case Example Using a Systems Analysis and Design Course for MIS and ACS Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Ken; Ehie, Ike C.; Somarajan, Chellappan

    2005-01-01

    This paper illustrates an approach used to enhance student learning outcomes in a combined cross-listed Systems Analysis and Design (SA&D) course and examines benefits perceived by students through analysis of assessment and students feedback. The SA&D course is a required course in both the Management Information Systems (MIS) major and the…

  17. Using the Humanities to Teach Neuroscience to Non-majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Hewlet G.; Richeimer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We developed and offered a sequence of neuroscience courses geared toward changing the way non-science students interact with the sciences. Although we accepted students from all majors and at all class levels, our target population was first and second year students who were majoring in the fine arts or the humanities, or who had not yet declared a major. Our goal was to engage these students in science in general and neuroscience in particular by teaching science in a way that was accessible and relevant to their intellectual experiences. Our methodology was to teach scientific principles through the humanities by using course material that is at the intersection of the sciences and the humanities and by changing the classroom experience for both faculty and students. Examples of our course materials included the works of Oliver Sacks, V.S. Ramachandran, Martha Nussbaum, Virginia Woolf and Karl Popper, among others. To change the classroom experience we used a model of team-teaching, which required the simultaneous presence of two faculty members in the classroom for all classes. We changed the structure of the classroom experience from the traditional authority model to a model in which inquiry, debate, and intellectual responsibility were central. We wanted the students to have an appreciation of science not only as an endeavor guided by evidence and experimentation, but also a public discourse driven by creativity and controversy. The courses attracted a significant number of humanities and fine arts students, many of whom had already completed their basic science requirement. PMID:26240533

  18. Social justice pedagogies and scientific knowledge: Remaking citizenship in the non-science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jane L.

    This dissertation contributes to efforts to rethink the meanings of democracy, scientific literacy, and non-scientist citizenship in the United States. Beginning with questions that emerged from action research and exploring the socio-political forces that shape educational practices, it shows why non-science educators who teach for social justice must first recognize formal science education as a primary site of training for (future) non-scientist citizens and then prepare to intervene in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship offered by formal science education. This model of citizenship defines (and limits) appropriate behavior for non-scientist citizens as acquiescing to the authority of science and the state by actively demarcating science from non-science, experts from non-experts, and the rational from the irrational. To question scientific authority is to be scientifically illiterate. This vision of 'acquiescent democracy' seeks to end challenges to the authority of science and the state by ensuring that scientific knowledge is privileged in all personal and public decision-making practices, producing a situation in which it becomes natural for non-scientist citizens to enroll scientific knowledge to naturalize oppression within our schools and society. It suggests that feminist and equity-oriented science educators, by themselves, are unable or unwilling to challenge certain assumptions in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship. Therefore, it is the responsibility of non-science educators who teach for social justice to articulate oppositional models of non-scientist citizenship and democracy in their classrooms and to challenge the naturalized authority of scientific knowledge in all aspects of our lives. It demonstrates how research in the field of Science & Technology Studies can serve as one resource in our efforts to intervene in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship and to support a model of

  19. The effects of topic choice in project-based instruction on undergraduate physical science students' interest, ownership, and motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2001-07-01

    Motivating nonscience majors in science and mathematics studies became one of the most interesting and important challenges in contemporary science and mathematics education. Therefore, designing and studying a learning environment, which enhances students' motivation, is an important task. This experimental study sought to explore the implications of student autonomy in topic choice in a project-based Physical Science Course for nonscience majors' on students' motivational orientation. It also suggested and tested a model explaining motivational outcomes of project-based learning environment through increased student ownership of science projects. A project, How Things Work, was designed and implemented in this study. The focus of the project was application of physical science concepts learned in the classroom to everyday life situations. Participants of the study (N = 59) were students enrolled in three selected sections of a Physical Science Course, designed to fulfill science requirements for nonscience majors. These sections were taught by the same instructor over a period of an entire 16-week semester at a large public research university. The study focused on four main variables: student autonomy in choosing a project topic, their motivational orientation, student ownership of the project, and the interest in the project topic. Achievement Goal Orientation theory became the theoretical framework for the study. Student motivational orientation, defined as mastery or performance goal orientation, was measured by an Achievement Goal Orientation Questionnaire. Student ownership was measured using an original instrument, Ownership Measurement Questionnaire, designed and tested by the researchers. Repeated measures yoked design, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and multivariate regression analysis were implemented in the study. Qualitative analysis was used to complement and verify quantitative results. It has been found that student autonomy in the project choice did not make a

  20. Ripped from the Headlines: Using Current Events and Deliberative Democracy to Improve Student Performance in and Perceptions of Nonmajors Biology Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Nicole Tinsley

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of scientific literacy, many foundational science courses are plagued by low student engagement and performance. In an attempt to improve student outcomes, an introductory biology course for nonscience majors was redesigned to present the course content within the framework of current events and deliberative democratic exercises. During each instructional unit of the redesigned course, students were presented with a highly publicized policy question rooted in biological principles and currently facing lawmakers. Working in diverse groups, students sought out the information that was needed to reach an educated, rationalized decision. This approach models civic engagement and demonstrates the real-life importance of science to nonscience majors. The outcomes from two semesters in which the redesign were taught were compared with sections of the course taught using traditional pedagogies. When compared with other versions of the same course, presenting the course content within a deliberative democratic framework proved to be superior for increasing students’ knowledge gains and improving students’ perceptions of biology and its relevance to their everyday lives. These findings establish deliberative democracy as an effective pedagogical strategy for nonmajors biology.

  1. A Module-Based Environmental Science Course for Teaching Ecology to Non-Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Using module-based courses has been suggested to improve undergraduate science courses. A course based around a series of modules focused on major environmental issues might be an effective way to teach non-science majors about ecology and ecology's role in helping to solve environmental problems. I have used such a module-based environmental…

  2. The academic majors of students taking American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dolliver, Holly; Lindbo, David; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Many papers have been written in recent years discussing the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary aspects of soil science. Therefore, it would make sense that soil science courses would be taken by students in a wide array of academic majors. To investigate this, we collected data from eight different American universities on the declared academic majors of students enrolled in soil science courses over a 10 year time period (2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years). Data was collected for seven different classes taught at the undergraduate level: introduction to soil science, soil fertility, soil management, pedology, soil biology/microbiology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. Overall trends and trends for each class were evaluated. Generally, environmental science and crop science/horticulture/agronomy students were enrolled in soil science courses in the greatest numbers. Environmental science and engineering students showed rapid increases in enrollment over the 10 years of the study, while the number of crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students declined. In the introduction to soil science classes, environmental science and crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students were enrolled in the greatest numbers, while declared soil science majors only made up 6.6% of the average enrollment. The highest enrollments in soil fertility were crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students and other agricultural students (all agricultural majors except crop science, horticulture, agronomy, or soil science). In both the soil management and pedology classes, environmental science and other agricultural students were the largest groups enrolled. Other agricultural students and students from other majors (all majors not otherwise expressly investigated) were the largest enrolled groups in soil biology/microbiology courses, and environmental science and soil science students were the largest enrolled groups in soil chemistry classes. Soil physics was the only class

  3. Events that lead university students to change their major to Information Systems: A retroductive South African case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Florence Seymour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of computing skills is a global concern as it affects national development and business success. Yet, despite high job availability and high salaries in computing professions, insufficient numbers of students are choosing to study the various computing disciplines. This South African study looks at the Information Systems (IS major which is misunderstood by high school students. This retroductive case study identifies the events which lead students to change their major to IS. The study confirms the importance of interest in a major as well as the perceived high value of a major, which feature as dominant factors in the literature. Yet these are not the initial events that lead to students changing their major to IS. Events that initiate the process include losing passion for a previous major, experiencing difficulty in a previous major as well as enjoying the introductory IS course. The paper has practical advice for IS Departments and argues for a generic first year for students as well as a focus on enjoyment and skills aligned to IS professional practice in introductory IS courses. These findings can be generalised to other majors and, hence, the theoretical contribution adds to the literature on career choice in general.

  4. It Loses Something in the Translation: Syntax and Survival of Key Words in Science and Nonscience Press Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Lynne Masel; Walters, T. N.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship between public relations practitioner and journalist in the transmission of the language of science to the public. The grammatical structure of original press releases was compared with the resulting newspaper stories for both science and nonscience releases to determine differences in syntax and editing. (Author/LRW)

  5. The Impact of Employing Brainstorming Strategy on Improving Writing Performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoush, Kholoud Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying the impact of employing brainstorming strategy on improving writing performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan. The sample of the study which consisted of 80 male and female university students was distributed into two groups; experimental (taught by brainstorming strategy) and…

  6. The Effects of High School Track Choice on Students' Postsecondary Enrollment and Majors in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Woo-jeong; Paik, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    In South Korea, college-bound students are divided into two tracks: "Munka" (??) and "Yika" (??), and this tracking ("Munka-Yika" tracking; MY tracking) considerably influences students' choice of college majors and future careers. This study aims to examine how MY tracking and other factors influence…

  7. Effect of Academic Major on Students' Use of Language Learning Strategies: A Diary Study in a Chinese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhenhui; Liu, Fulan

    2011-01-01

    The research reported here explored how students' use of language learning strategies (LLS) was affected by their academic major. The data were collected by asking students to keep a four-week diary, and then the findings were examined within the model of learning developed by Biggs. An analysis of diary entries showed that, although there were…

  8. Determinants of underage college student drinking: implications for four major alcohol reduction strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Hove, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Guided by the assumptions of the social ecological model and the social marketing approach, this study provides a simultaneous and comprehensive assessment of 4 major alcohol reduction strategies for college campuses: school education programs, social norms campaigns, alcohol counter-marketing, and alcohol control policies. Analysis of nationally representative secondary survey data among 5,472 underage students reveals that alcohol marketing seems to be the most formidable risk factor for underage drinking, followed by perceived drinking norms (injunctive norm) and lax policy enforcement. This analysis suggests that, to make social norms campaigns and alcohol control policies more effective, alcohol reduction strategies should be developed to counter the powerful influence of alcohol marketing and promotions.

  9. Perceptions of psychology as a science among university students: the influence of psychology courses and major of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M; Hinds, Ryan M; Glass, Laura A; Ryan, Joseph J

    2009-10-01

    The goal was to examine the relationship between the number of psychology courses students have taken and their perceptions of psychology as a science. Additionally, differences in perceptions of psychology among psychology, education, and natural science majors were examined. Results indicated that students who had taken four or more psychology courses had more favorable perceptions of psychology as a science compared to those who had taken no courses or one course and those who had taken two to three courses. No significant differences in overall perceptions of psychology emerged among students in the three majors.

  10. Incremental Validity of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Predicting Academic Major Selection of Undecided University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Chad A.; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the incremental validity of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a predictor of academic major choice. Undecided university students were administered the MBTI and Strong Interest Inventory (SII). Their academic major choice was recorded at the end of their fourth semester and categorized as realistic, investigative,…

  11. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy Part II: Analysis of Student Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Consiglio, D.; Gonzaga, V.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second in a series of reports on a national study of the teaching and learning of astronomy in general education, non-science major, introductory college astronomy courses (Astro 101). The results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies even after controlling for individual student characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all categories of students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies.

  12. How College Business Students Learn with Emphasis on Differences between Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Nikki; Kelly, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Students' learning styles play an important role in their success in the classroom and beyond. This study explores the learning styles of business students so that professors can better understand the instructional methods that are most beneficial for their students. A survey of 205 business students in an introductory accounting course revealed…

  13. A Survey of Tuition-Free English Major Students' Use of Language Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    In order to have a clear understanding of the differences between tuition-free students and non-tuition-free students in the strategies they employ and to prepare for the conduction of the Language Learning Strategy Course to the two groups of students, the author decided to conduct a survey as to the students' current use of language learning…

  14. Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the

  15. The Development and Implementation of an Inquiry-Based Poster Project on Sustainability in a Large Non-Majors Environmental Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Harsh, Mikaela; Harsh, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, systematic studies have indicated a significant regression in scientific literacy in nonscience students and students across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines in higher education. Of particular concern, evaluations of introductory lecture-based undergraduate courses have indicated deficiencies in…

  16. The Development and Implementation of an Inquiry-Based Poster Project on Sustainability in a Large Non-Majors Environmental Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Harsh, Mikaela; Harsh, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, systematic studies have indicated a significant regression in scientific literacy in nonscience students and students across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines in higher education. Of particular concern, evaluations of introductory lecture-based undergraduate courses have indicated deficiencies in…

  17. Practices and exploration on competition of molecular biological detection technology among students in food quality and safety major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaning; Peng, Yuke; Li, Pengfei; Zhuang, Yingping

    2017-07-08

    With the increasing importance in the application of the molecular biological detection technology in the field of food safety, strengthening education in molecular biology experimental techniques is more necessary for the culture of the students in food quality and safety major. However, molecular biology experiments are not always in curricula of Food quality and safety Majors. This paper introduced a project "competition of molecular biological detection technology for food safety among undergraduate sophomore students in food quality and safety major", students participating in this project needed to learn the fundamental molecular biology experimental techniques such as the principles of molecular biology experiments and genome extraction, PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis analysis, and then design the experiments in groups to identify the meat species in pork and beef products using molecular biological methods. The students should complete the experimental report after basic experiments, write essays and make a presentation after the end of the designed experiments. This project aims to provide another way for food quality and safety majors to improve their knowledge of molecular biology, especially experimental technology, and enhances them to understand the scientific research activities as well as give them a chance to learn how to write a professional thesis. In addition, in line with the principle of an open laboratory, the project is also open to students in other majors in East China University of Science and Technology, in order to enhance students in other majors to understand the fields of molecular biology and food safety. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):343-350, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Attention to Retention: Exploring and Addressing the Needs of College Students in STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong Jade

    2016-01-01

    Guided by well-established theories on student retention, a survey was developed and implemented to collect data about the college experience of STEM students at a four-year research university. Analysis of the survey data confirms ten constructs that captured different aspects of students' academic and social experiences. Among them, academic…

  19. Reflections on Refugee Students' Major Perceptions of Education in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareng, Chuei D.

    2010-01-01

    This reflective study explores refugee students' perceptions of the educational approach used in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya. The study focuses on my personal reflections as a teacher and a student in this camp, and as a refugee. My goal of writing this narrative is to reflect fully on the refugee students' life in a camp and then contribute to…

  20. A Research Project Using the Safran Student Interest Inventory (SSII): Discriminant Analysis of University Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, K. E.

    Safran Student Interest Inventory (SSII) data was gathered on 135 university students registered in five different faculties. A discriminant analysis of the data indicated that the SSII was a good test for separating students into faculties and therefore would make a good counselling instrument. Some results are also present using Differential…

  1. A Comparative Study of Writing Anxiety among Iranian University Students Majoring English Translation, Teaching and Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanezhad, Mahdie

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to examine writing anxiety in three groups of EFL students who use English writing in their academic programs. The main purpose of this study is to determine the level and sources of anxiety that students experience while writing in English as a foreign language. To this end, 150 university students from Iranian EFL students…

  2. A Preliminary Research on Middle School Students' Academic Subjective Well-Being and its Major Influential Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dianzhi; Zhang Ronghua

    2006-01-01

    This study is conducted with self-developed questionnaire on 910 middle school students,aimed at describing middle school students' academic subjective well-being and exploring its influential factors.Results show that (1) Academic subjective well-being of middle school students is generally low and there exist differences in different schools and grades.Students from non-key middle schools have lower academic subjective well-being than those from the key schools.Grade 2 students in both junior and senior middle schools have the lowest academic subjective well-being.(2) Factors directly affecting middle school students'academic subjective well-being are academic experience and the present academic achievements, with the former playing a major role.(3) Factors indirectly influencing middle school students' academic subjective well-being are social pressure and expected academic achievements,both of which influence students'academic subjective well-being through students' academic experience or their present academic achievements.

  3. Effect of Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning on Non-majors Biology Students' Understanding of Biological Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Breann M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) on non-majors college biology students' understanding of biological classification. This study addressed an area of science instruction, POGIL in the non-majors college biology laboratory, which has yet to be qualitatively and quantitatively researched. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods approach was used. Students' understanding of biological classification was measured in two areas: scores on pre and posttests (consisting of 11 multiple choice questions), and conceptions of classification as elicited in pre and post interviews and instructor reflections. Participants were Minnesota State University, Mankato students enrolled in BIOL 100 Summer Session. One section was taught with the traditional curriculum (n = 6) and the other section in the POGIL curriculum (n = 10) developed by the researcher. Three students from each section were selected to take part in pre and post interviews. There were no significant differences within each teaching method (p vs. M = 7.330 +/- .330; z =-1.729, p = .084) and the traditional group may have scored higher on the pretest than the posttest (M = 8.333 +/- .333 vs M = 7.333 +/- .333; z = -1.650 , p = .099). Two themes emerged after the interviews and instructor reflections: 1) After instruction students had a more extensive understanding of classification in three areas: vocabulary terms, physical characteristics, and types of evidence used to classify. Both groups extended their understanding, but only POGIL students could explain how molecular evidence is used in classification. 2) The challenges preventing students from understanding classification were: familiar animal categories and aquatic habitats, unfamiliar organisms, combining and subdividing initial groupings, and the hierarchical nature of classification. The POGIL students were the only group to surpass these challenges after the teaching intervention. This

  4. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy; Part II: Analysis of Student Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E. E.; Consiglio, D.; Rudolph, A. L.; Brissenden, G.

    2011-09-01

    This is the second in a series of reports on a national study of the teaching and learning of astronomy in general education, non-science major, introductory astronomy courses (Astro 101). We report here on the analysis of how individual student characteristics affect student learning in these classes, and whether the demonstrated positive effect of interactive learning strategies on student learning differs based on these characteristics. This analysis was conducted using data from nearly 2000 students enrolled in 69 Astro 101 classes taught across the country. These students completed a 15-question demographic survey, in addition to completing the 26-question Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) pre- and post-instruction. The LSCI was used to determine student learning via a normalized gain calculated for each student. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to determine how ascribed characteristics (personal demographic and family characteristics), obtained characteristics (academic achievement and student major), and the use of interactive learning strategies predict student learning in these classes. The results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies even after controlling for individual characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies are the same for strong and weak students, men and women, across ethnicities, and regardless of primary language. The research strongly suggests all students benefit from interactive learning strategies.

  5. Does Personality Matter? Applying Holland's Typology to Analyze Students' Self-Selection into Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. Daniel; Simpson, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized John Holland's personality typology and the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) to examine the factors that may affect students' self-selection into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. Results indicated that gender, race/ethnicity, high school achievement, and personality type were statistically…

  6. Variation in Environmentalism among University Students: Majoring in Outdoor Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Predicts Environmental Concerns and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnocky, Steven; Stroink, Mirella L.

    2011-01-01

    In a survey of Canadian university students (N = 205), the relationship between majoring in an outdoor recreation university program and environmental concern, cooperation, and behavior were examined. Stepwise linear regression indicated that enrollment in outdoor recreation was predictive of environmental behavior and ecological cooperation; and…

  7. The Mass Comm Type: Student Personality Traits, Motivations, and the Choice between News and Strategic Communication Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth Crisp; Fudge, Julie; Hubbard, Glenn T.; Filak, Vincent F.

    2013-01-01

    A study of news media and strategic communication majors (n = 273) revealed differences in regard to personality indices and impetuses for selecting to pursue degrees. Showing overall agreement in the importance of openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, strategic communication students were significantly higher in their ratings of…

  8. Student Major Field and Text Content: Interactive Effects on Reading Comprehension in the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Gordon A.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores for 32,467 graduate school applicants, all nonnative speakers of English, revealed that students in the two key major-field groups, humanities/social sciences and biological/physical sciences, performed better on reading passages related to their own groups than on other passages.…

  9. They Come but Do They Finish? Program Completion for Honors Students at a Major Public University, 1998-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, Lynne; Szarek Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the option of enrolling in honors programs and colleges at major public universities has increasingly become an alternative to elite private and public institutions for some of the brightest and most academically-talented high school graduates. To attract these high-achieving students, universities may offer applicants incentives…

  10. The Mass Comm Type: Student Personality Traits, Motivations, and the Choice between News and Strategic Communication Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth Crisp; Fudge, Julie; Hubbard, Glenn T.; Filak, Vincent F.

    2013-01-01

    A study of news media and strategic communication majors (n = 273) revealed differences in regard to personality indices and impetuses for selecting to pursue degrees. Showing overall agreement in the importance of openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, strategic communication students were significantly higher in their ratings of…

  11. Characteristics of US Students That Pursued a STEM Major and Factors That Predicted Their Persistence in Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Wei-Cheng J.

    2016-01-01

    Low participation and completion rates in the science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) careers are a world-wide concern. This study tracked American college students over a 5-year period and identifies factors that lead to choosing a STEM major and in turn successfully earning a STEM degree. Characteristics of female and minority…

  12. An Investigation of Task and Ego Oriented Goals of the Students Majoring at the Faculty of Sport Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the task and ego oriented goals of the students majoring at the Faculty of Sports Sciences at Ataturk University. For data collection, "The Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire", which was developed by Duda (1) and adapted into Turkish by Toros and Yetim (2), was used in the current study to…

  13. Variation in Environmentalism among University Students: Majoring in Outdoor Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Predicts Environmental Concerns and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnocky, Steven; Stroink, Mirella L.

    2011-01-01

    In a survey of Canadian university students (N = 205), the relationship between majoring in an outdoor recreation university program and environmental concern, cooperation, and behavior were examined. Stepwise linear regression indicated that enrollment in outdoor recreation was predictive of environmental behavior and ecological cooperation; and…

  14. Does Personality Matter? Applying Holland's Typology to Analyze Students' Self-Selection into Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. Daniel; Simpson, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized John Holland's personality typology and the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) to examine the factors that may affect students' self-selection into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. Results indicated that gender, race/ethnicity, high school achievement, and personality type were statistically…

  15. Using the Technology of Critical Thinking Development (CTD) as a Means of Forming Competencies of Students Majoring in "Life Safety"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumova, Leysan R.; Morozova, Marina A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem is caused by the need to use various teaching methods and techniques in training students majoring in pedagogical specialties while implementing the competency approach in education. Information about the technology of critical thinking development (CTD) in future teachers training is limited, and the…

  16. Measuring Student Understanding of the Process of Scientific Research through Three Modes of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok, Michelle; Rector, T.; Young, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have continued to develop "Research-Based Science Education" (RBSE) curriculum and assessment for a semester-long program in which undergraduate non-science majors participate in authentic research. The instruction is mainly astronomy-based, but can be used in any introductory science course. Currently, the curriculum is being used by five universities over an assortment of introductory science and astronomy classrooms. The primary goal of the RBSE curriculum is to develop a student's understanding of the nature and process of scientific research. We will present trends and misconceptions discovered based upon our analysis of Fall 2011 semester student responses to several types of assessments including weekly assigned reflective journal questions on the nature of science and pre/post semester concept maps. Additionally, gains observed from a pre/post semester survey of participatory students’ confidence on their science process skills abilities will be discussed.

  17. Exploring Major Predictors of Student Satisfaction: An Input towards a Learning-Friendly School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmeo, Marilyn L.; Castro, Allan B.; Caplis, Kristine Joy T.; Camba, Kizzylenn N.; Cruz, Jahziel Gillian M.; Orap, Marion G.; Cabutotan, Joroma Sol T.

    2014-01-01

    The study sought to determine the perceived level of importance and perceived level of satisfaction of college students on 16 areas of student service commonly provided in a tertiary education setting within any university as prescribed and observed by local and international standards of tertiary education. Each area was tested to determine the…

  18. Prospective Students' Reactions to the Presentation of the Computer Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Daniel Scott

    2010-01-01

    The number of students enrolling in Computer Science in colleges and Universities has declined since its peak in the early 2000s. Some claim contributing factors that intimate that prospective students fear the lack of employment opportunities if they study computing in college. However, the lack of understanding of what Computer Science is and…

  19. Ethnic incongruence and the student-teacher relationship: the perspective of ethnic majority teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.; Westhof, S.; Koomen, H.M.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Among 36 ethnic-Dutch school teachers in the Netherlands, the present study examined the role of ethnic incongruence in perceived student-teacher relationship quality. Teachers rated their relationships with 59 Turkish-Dutch, 62 Moroccan-Dutch, and 109 ethnic-Dutch students attending grades 4 throug

  20. the changing roles of teachers and students as a major trend of second language teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓颖

    2011-01-01

    teacher-centered approach certainly gave students a strong grounding in grammar.it can give them both a set of clear objectives and a clear sense of achievement we can say that teacher-centered approach gives learners a basic foundation upon which they can then build their communicative skills through student-centered approach.

  1. Pitching Environmental Science to Business Majors: Engaging Students in Renewable Energy Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Vikki L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an active learning strategy for engaging undergraduate business students, a group often ignored in scientific pedagogy, in learning about renewable energy technology and associated trade-offs. I designed a small-group activity to appeal to and engage business students, but the exercise could easily be used for a variety of…

  2. Pitching Environmental Science to Business Majors: Engaging Students in Renewable Energy Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Vikki L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an active learning strategy for engaging undergraduate business students, a group often ignored in scientific pedagogy, in learning about renewable energy technology and associated trade-offs. I designed a small-group activity to appeal to and engage business students, but the exercise could easily be used for a variety of…

  3. Evaluation of a Contemporary College English Listening Textbook for Second-year English Major Students at University Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田依婧

    2013-01-01

    The role of textbooks, as one important channel between teachers and students, has always aroused scholars’interests, but what indeed are the roles of textbook for students and teachers? This paper aims to evaluate a listening textbook that is used by English major university students in China. Three research questions are proposed which are: (1) What are the students’per⁃ceptions about the listening textbook? (2) What are the teachers’opinions about the listening textbook? (3) To what extent do students and teachers perceptions match? In order to answer these three research questions, questionnaires were designed for both students and teachers to obtain the data. This study is supported both qualitatively and quantitatively. The data of this research suggested that both students and teachers have found advantages of this listening textbook, which they may find helpful for their learning and teaching, but they are also not satisfied with some aspects of the textbook, which they think need further improvement. The students’and teachers’opinions to some extent have reached some agreement about the textbook, but students may not be so enthusiastic about the textbook, while the teachers may show much reliance on the text⁃book. This study has its limitations, but it also provides some insights for teachers and textbook writers.

  4. Evaluation of major risk factors related to depression among medical students of NRS medical college.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Prianka, Sain Sonali, Mandal Nirmal Kumar, Saha Tushar Kanti , Dey Indira, Chattopadhyay Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Medical students experience depression, burnout, and mental illness at a higher rate than general population. A better understanding of related risk factors can help target appropriate support services for them. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence of depression and identify its risk factors among undergraduate students in a medical College in Kolkata, India. Methodology: A descriptive, cross-sectional study using a two stage, stratified cluster sampling technique was used to select a sample of 289 students. Data were collected using a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire based on Becks Depression Inventory II. Results: The mean score of students on depression scale was 10.47±10.39. 22.5 % of students tested positive for some form of depression while 6.2% had severe to extreme depression. The risk factors of depressive symptoms identified were older age, lower family income, students who did not choose admission in MBBS course on their own, had addictions, felt negatively about results, faced difficulty with study course and had relationship issues. Students with relationship issues in their personal lives were 3.7 times more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms than without them. Students who faced difficulty coping with study course were 2.18 times more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms than without them. Conclusion: Academic performance alone doesn’t influence the mental health of students, rather factors like older age, socioeconomic status, role in choice of medical career, negative perception of academic performance, difficulty with study course and relationship issues are also important.

  5. Enhancing Introductory Student Motivation with a Major-Managed Course Blog: A Pilot Study

    CERN Document Server

    August, Ashley A; Cory, Bryant T; Finkley, Elliott R; Jones, Robbie D; Marshall, Dennis W; Rowley, Phillip C; Lane, W Brian

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing motivation and learning attitudes in an introductory physics course is an important but difficult task that can be achieved through class blogging. We incorporated into an introductory course a blog operated by upper-level physics students. Using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS), periodic in-class surveys, analysis of student blog comments, and post-instructional interviews, we evaluate how the blog combined with class instruction provided the students with a better sense of relevance and confidence and outline recommendations for future use of this strategy.

  6. Major influences on buying decision processes by international university students. Differences by continent of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirelli, Christian; Pilar Martínez-Ruiz, María; Gómez-Ladrón-De-Guevara, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    To analyze how food values and other variables related to dietary acculturation affect international university students' food buying decisions, this article provides an in-depth review of relevant literature related to the food buying decisions of groups of sojourners, which suggest several research hypotheses. The data collection targeted international university students in Spain and used factorial analysis of the main components together with linear parametric regressions. The resulting findings offer distinct insights, according to sojourners' continent of origin. Specifically, whereas European students exhibit a higher propensity to value sustainable production practices in the food choices, American students emphasize flavor and exhibit a greater degree of adaptation. These findings in turn suggest some key managerial recommendations and research guidelines for both private and public operators in related fields. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethnic incongruence and the student-teacher relationship: the perspective of ethnic majority teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Jochem; Westhof, Saskia; Koomen, Helma

    2012-04-01

    Among 36 ethnic-Dutch school teachers in the Netherlands, the present study examined the role of ethnic incongruence in perceived student-teacher relationship quality. Teachers rated their relationships with 59 Turkish-Dutch, 62 Moroccan-Dutch, and 109 ethnic-Dutch students attending grades 4 through 6 (M(age)=10.81 years, SD=1.05). On average, relationships were less favorable for the Moroccan-Dutch students only. However, the effects of ethnic incongruence were most pronounced among students with strong perceived inattention/hyperactivity and among teachers endorsing lower levels of multiculturalism (the view that different cultures deserve equal treatment). Results support the notion that ethnically incongruent relationships may be perceived as less favorable than ethnically congruent ones due to cultural misunderstandings and intergroup bias. Practical implications are discussed.

  8. Predicting Student Success in a Major's Introductory Biology Course via Logistic Regression Analysis of Scientific Reasoning Ability and Mathematics Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. David; Bowling, Bethany V.; Markle, Ross E.

    2017-02-01

    Studies over the last 30 years have considered various factors related to student success in introductory biology courses. While much of the available literature suggests that the best predictors of success in a college course are prior college grade point average (GPA) and class attendance, faculty often require a valuable predictor of success in those courses wherein the majority of students are in the first semester and have no previous record of college GPA or attendance. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the ACT Mathematics subject exam and Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning in predicting success in a major's introductory biology course. A logistic regression was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a combination of scientific reasoning (SR) scores and ACT math (ACT-M) scores to predict student success. In summary, we found that the model—with both SR and ACT-M as significant predictors—could be an effective predictor of student success and thus could potentially be useful in practical decision making for the course, such as directing students to support services at an early point in the semester.

  9. How to Read English Research Articles: A Case Study of Graduate Students Majoring in Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    - Krismiyati

    2014-01-01

    Reading research articles in English will be a special challenge for those students who speak English as a foreign language (EFL). EFL graduate students will require a specific method for helping them to cope with the articles they have to read. This study tries to offer a method for helping them to read, understand, and analyze English articles easier. This study employs evaluation and trialing. It is accompanied by pre and post surveys that will give information about the condition of the s...

  10. Recruiting Quality Majors: New York High School Students Experience the Geology of Southern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colberg, M. R.; Eves, R. L.; Lohrengel, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    Southern Utah University (SUU), Division of Geosciences, is faced with seriously increased competition for students within its traditional recruiting area, the direct result of nearby two-year institutions expanding their missions to four-year roles. Because of this increased competition, it is obvious that students must be recruited from new source areas. Research indicates that New York State has one of the most outstanding high school Earth Science programs in the United States, and it became a target area for recruiting quality students to the SUU geoscience program. Located in the Colorado Plateau to Basin and Range transition zone, SUU is situated in one of the most spectacular and diverse geologic regions in the world. SUU is surrounded by classic southwestern geologic exposures and extensive public lands. In order to use this resource to its maximum advantage, a one-week field program was arranged that would accommodate a maximum of 30 students from New York high schools. The target audience is comprised of juniors and seniors who have participated in an Earth science course, and have expressed an interest in a geoscience career. The field program provides students with a positive learning experience, and stresses basic geologic concepts while utilizing the stunning regional geology of southern Utah as an outdoor classroom. Students receive transferable college credit for participation. To make contact with potential participants, a letter was sent to high school principals requesting the name(s) of the earth sciences teacher(s) in the school. The response was limited (apparently principals do not forward materials to faculty members). However, there was sufficient response to conduct a field experience during late July, 2003. This initial offering was extremely successful and received positive reviews from all participants. The final results of this pilot offering are not yet known, but we are convinced that enrollment of students into SUU's program will

  11. Understandings of Nature of Science and Multiple Perspective Evaluation of Science News by Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jessica Shuk Ching; Wong, Alice Siu Ling; Yung, Benny Hin Wai

    2015-01-01

    Understandings of nature of science (NOS) are a core component of scientific literacy, and a scientifically literate populace is expected to be able to critically evaluate science in the media. While evidence has remained inconclusive on whether better NOS understandings will lead to critical evaluation of science in the media, this study aimed at…

  12. Leadership's Role in Recruitment and Retention of First Generation, Low-Income Latino Students into STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eliseo A.

    Fostering resiliency and educational success in students that are faced with adversity is not a simple task. The gap in educational success and achievement among low-income, first generation, traditionally marginalized students continues to be significant. California's educational system needs to stop the hemorrhaging from its educational pipeline, also known as the P-20 pipeline, of all students, especially those groups of students with larger gaps in educational attainment. One potential path towards fixing California's educational pipeline for all students is to form and keep partnerships with programs such as Upward Bound, AVID, and Math Engineering Science Achievement (MESA). In 2010-11, the California Department of Education (CDE) reported that over 51% of students enrolled in California's school system and 51% of all California high school seniors were Latino were Latino. Of the 231,231 Latino high school seniors, 79%, graduated. However, of those that graduated, only 26%, met University of California/California State University (UC/CSU) college entrance requirements. Even though 79% of Latinos graduated, 74% did not qualify to apply to a UC or CSU. If the majority of Latino students continue to fall through holes in the educational pipeline, companies will continue to look abroad to fill STEM jobs that remain unfilled by American workers (California Department of Education [CDE], 2012). Alongside the U.S.'s current economic woes, the lack of college preparedness and knowledge by parents and students has led to a decrease in first generation, low-income Latino students' higher education enrollment (Camacho & Lord, 2011). With strong and positive leadership from family, supplemented by the MESA program, these youths can exert their resiliency, face adversity, and overcome extraordinary barriers. Leaders in education such as teachers, coordinators, advisers, administrators, and parents are in the best position to teach students about resilience (Ginsburg, 2007

  13. The Exploration of the Helpful Roles Teacher Can Play to Help non-English Major Students Improve Their English Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈美茜

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly known that writing is an advanced skill which is essential in language learning but at the same time the most difficult task for learners. This paper is with the aim to explore helpful roles that teacher can play to help non-English ma-jor students improve their English writing, so as to help improve their writing ability in the author's context.

  14. Major Differences: Variations in Undergraduate and Graduate Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization across Academic Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Zhou, Sasha; Wagner, Blake, III; Beck, Katie; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores variations in mental health and service utilization across academic disciplines using a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students (N = 64,519) at 81 colleges and universities. We report prevalence of depression, anxiety, suicidality, and self-injury, and rates of help-seeking across disciplines, including results…

  15. Core Values and Major Issues in Student Affairs Practice: What Really Matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfgot, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    In a professional world characterized by change, uncertainty, and increased pressure to demonstrate that what they do really matters, community college student affairs professionals need clear definitions, a shared understanding of critical professional issues, and professional values that are consistent and congruent. This chapter provides those…

  16. The Impact of Changes to Finance-Major Assessment Structures on Student Engagement and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Michael; McIver, Ron P.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of assessment activities that encourage student engagement and attainment of higher-order cognitive outcomes within Bloom's Taxonomy (deep learning; Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001) supports greater use of individual and group presentations, research reports, and open-book exams. Consistent with this analysis this paper outlines changes…

  17. The Inspiration and Cultivation of Motivation in English Language Learning for English Major Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王苗苗; 秦彩凤

    2008-01-01

    Motivation plays a very important role in second language learning and acquisition.And it is also one of the affecfive variables of language learning.Therefore.foreign language teacher should pay more attention to the students'motivation in the process of language teaching for creating efficiency of teaching and learning.

  18. Major Field of Study and Student Teachers' Views on Intercultural Communicative Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czura, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effective intercultural communication depends not only on language skills, but also on the ability to apply these skills appropriately and efficiently in a variety of cross-cultural situations. The language teacher's task is to develop in their students the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will help them interact with interlocutors coming from…

  19. Promoting Information Systems Major to Undergraduate Students--A Comprehensive Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Zheng, Guangzhi

    2014-01-01

    Weak enrollment growth has been a concern for many Information Systems (IS) programs in recent years although the IT/IS job market remains strong. Stimulating undergraduate students' interest to IS programs have been a challenge. In this paper, the researchers took a comprehensive approach to study how to effectively promote a Management…

  20. Major Field of Study and Student Teachers' Views on Intercultural Communicative Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czura, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effective intercultural communication depends not only on language skills, but also on the ability to apply these skills appropriately and efficiently in a variety of cross-cultural situations. The language teacher's task is to develop in their students the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will help them interact with interlocutors coming from…

  1. Home/Hospital Instruction: Instructional Approach to Working with Students with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Cara

    2012-01-01

    School districts throughout the United States provide in-home schooling for students whose health problems, both physical and mental, prevent them from attending regular classes. This service is an outgrowth of the federal legislation which addressed the provision of education to all children with special needs. Home/Hospital teachers who serve…

  2. University Students' Visual Cognitive Styles with Respect to Majors and Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibar, Pinar Nuhoglu; Akkoyunlu, Buket

    2016-01-01

    Visual cognitive style is an individual difference that is related to the preference or visual imagery tendency of an individual of processing visual information. This study examines the visual cognitive styles of university students according to their study subject, study year and genders and includes 448 first- and third-year university students…

  3. Promoting Information Systems Major to Undergraduate Students--A Comprehensive Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Zheng, Guangzhi

    2014-01-01

    Weak enrollment growth has been a concern for many Information Systems (IS) programs in recent years although the IT/IS job market remains strong. Stimulating undergraduate students' interest to IS programs have been a challenge. In this paper, the researchers took a comprehensive approach to study how to effectively promote a Management…

  4. Major Software Vendor Puts Students on Many Campuses at Risk of Identity Theft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    At least 18 colleges are scrambling to inform tens of thousands of students that they are at risk of having their identities stolen after SunGard, a leading software vendor, reported that a laptop owned by one of its consultants was stolen. The extent of the problem is still unknown, though many of the campuses that have been identified are in…

  5. Investigation of Writing Strategies, Writing Apprehension, and Writing Achievement among Saudi EFL-Major Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2013-01-01

    The tenet of this study is to investigate the use of writing strategies in reducing writing apprehension and uncovering its effect on EFL students' writing achievement. It also attempts to explore associations between foreign language apprehension, writing achievement and writing strategies. The primary aims of the study were to explore the…

  6. Personalities and Pipelines: Exploring the Role of Personality in Student Self-Selection into STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Despite all the national efforts to increase STEM enrollment in the United States, the gap between the U.S. and other developed countries in terms of STEM graduates has widened over the last 20 years. Researchers have studied factors such as gender, race, high school GPA, and the student's socioeconomic status for their impact on STEM enrollment.…

  7. Anatomy and Physiology. Module Set II: Major Body Systems. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Surgical Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, Robert

    This document, which is the second part of a two-part set of modules on anatomy and physiology for future surgical technicians, contains the teacher and student editions of an introduction to anatomy and physiology that consists of modules on the following body systems: integumentary system; skeletal system; muscular system; nervous system;…

  8. Contrasting Student Attitudes toward Study Abroad Programs among College of Business Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Ann T.; Kuzma, John R.; Thiewes, Harold F.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of globalization has increased the demand for skills that can compete in the expanding global markets. In addition to meeting the basic skills required in particular academic disciplines, many educators have advocated that an increased international exposure should be included in students' higher educational experience. Some…

  9. Education majors' expectations and reported experiences with inquiry-based physics: Implications for student affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.

    2013-06-01

    To address a perennial need to provide K-8 teachers with a solid foundation in science, there are many physics content courses throughout the United States. One such course is Physics and Astronomy for Teachers (PAT), which relies heavily on active-learning strategies. Although PAT is successful in teaching physics content, students sometimes report dissatisfaction with the course. Such instances of poor affect are worrisome because they may influence how teachers present science in their own classrooms. Therefore, this study investigates students’ affect in terms of their pedagogical expectations and potential personal learning outcomes with respect to PAT. Two sections of PAT, each containing approximately 40 students, were observed. Students in those sections were surveyed, and a sample were interviewed (N=10). An analysis of the data in terms of an expectancy violation framework shows that while students’ expectations regarding the hands-on and interactive components of PAT were met, they received substantially fewer lectures, class discussions, and opportunities to make class presentations than they had expected, even after they had been presented with the course syllabus and informed about the specific nature of the course. Additionally, students expected PAT to be more directly linked with their future teaching careers and therefore expected more opportunities to practice teaching science than they reported receiving. This investigation serves as a case study to provide insight into why students are sometimes frustrated and confused when first encountering active-learning classes, and it implies that instructors should be cognizant of those feelings and devote resources toward explicit orientation that emphasizes the purpose of the course and reasons behind their pedagogical choices.

  10. Teaching ASTRO 101 Students the Art of Scientific Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleigh, Sharon P.; Slater, Stephanie; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Going beyond asking students to simply memorize facts about the universe, a longstanding challenge in teaching astronomy centers on successfully teaching students about the nature of science. As introductory astronomy survey courses, known widely as ASTRO 101, can sometimes be the last science course non-science majoring undergraduates take, many faculty hope to emphasize the scientific enterprise as a broad field in inquiry making valuable contributions to civilization as a whole, rather than as an isolated study of objects far from Earth. Scholars have long proposed that an understanding of the nature of science as a human endeavor requires explicit instruction. In other words, students successfully learning the facts of astronomy does not in any way ensure that students will learn anything about the nature of how astronomy is done. In a purposeful effort to improve students' understanding about the practices and discourse of astronomy, scholars working with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education research are developing a suite of carefully designed instructional sequences—called Scientific Argumentation—focused on teaching students the differences between data and evidence, how to communicate and defend evidence-based conclusions, and how to be informed skeptics of scientific claims. Early results show students moving from naïve understandings of scientific practices to more informed understandings as well as demonstrating enhanced value for science in general as an worthwhile human endeavor with far reaching benefits.

  11. Communication Education for Students in the Science and Engineering Majors based on the Process of Value and Attitude Changes of Students by Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Kenji; Nakano, Mika; Kajiwara, Toshinori

    The purpose of this study is to suggest the communication education for students in the science and engineering majors. The main characteristic of the curriculum is the process of value and attitude changes of students by debate. It is effective to cultivate well-balanced manner and matter which take significant role in any communication. The lectures provide debate training to match the proficiency of the students in order to foster thinking ability step-by-step. In the department of electrical engineering of Fukuoka Institute of the Technology, the expert of the communication and the expert of the electrical engineering team-teach the course as one of the specialized subjects. This system provides both training of technique of constructing argument and professional assessment on their contents, which it calls “two wheels of one cart”. The lectures are organized to develop students' incentive to learn with ARCS model. The questionnaires show that the communication skills acquired through debates are applied in the scenes of the real problem solving. 90% of the students reply that the series of lectures are useful and produce satisfactory results. Therefore, the proposed education is confirmed to be effective to enhance the communication skills of students.

  12. The impact of major earthquakes on the psychological functioning of medical students: a Christchurch, New Zealand study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frances A; Bell, Caroline J; Ali, Anthony N; McKenzie, Janice; Wilkinson, Timothy J

    2014-07-18

    No previous studies have systematically assessed the psychological functioning of medical students following a major disaster. To describe the psychological functioning of medical students following the earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, and identify predictors of adverse psychological functioning. 7 months following the most severe earthquake, medical students completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale, the Work and Adjustment Scale, and Likert scales assessing psychological functioning at worst and currently. A substantial minority of medical students reported moderate-extreme difficulties on the DASS subscales 7 months following the most severe earthquake (Depression =12%; Anxiety =9%; Stress =10%). Multiple linear modelling produced a model that predicted 27% of the variance in total scores on the DASS. Variables contributing significantly to the model were: year of medical course, presence of mental health problems prior to the earthquakes, not being New Zealand European, and being higher on retrospectively rated neuroticism prior to the earthquakes. Around 10% of medical students experienced moderate-extreme psychological difficulties 7 months following the most severe earthquake on 22 February 2011. Specific groups at high risk for ongoing psychological symptomatology were able to be identified.

  13. Reaching the Students: A New Approach to Enhancing Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, B. J.; Burnham, C. C.

    2002-05-01

    Most NSF supported programs directed at improving science literacy among university students who are not majoring in SMET normally target instruction in introductory science or math classes. Unfortunately these efforts seldom reach the vast majority of students at a university because students can fulfil their science requirement by taking several other classes or class sections that are not impacted by the NSF program. Ideally it would be desirable to address the issues of science literacy and science anxiety among non-science majors in a single class that is required of essentially all undergraduates. We describe such a program which is being tested at NMSU. The targeted class is the university's freshman level English class. The idea behind this effort is to provide students with the skills they will need to be successful in their science classes in a less threatening humanities environment. We describe the problems that this approach raises, suggest solutions to these problems, and then discuss the overall status of this effort.

  14. Abortion, contraceptive use, and adolescent pregnancy among first-year medical students at a major public university in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ortega, Adriana; De La Torre, Guadalupe García; Galván, Fernando; Cravioto, Patricia; Paz, Francisco; Díaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Ellertson, Charlotte; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2003-08-01

    If properly trained, medical students could become future opinion leaders in health policy and could help the public to understand the consequences of unwanted pregnancies and of abortions. The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency of unwanted pregnancies and induced abortions that had occurred among women who were first-year medical students at a major public university in Mexico City and to compare the experiences of those women with the experiences of the general population of Mexican females aged 15 to 24. In 1998 we administered a cross-sectional survey to all the first-year medical students at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, which is the largest university in Latin America. For this study we analyzed 549 surveys completed by female students. Out of the 549 women, 120 of them (22%) had been sexually active at some point. Among those 120 sexually active students, 100 of them (83%) had used a contraceptive method at some time, and 19 of the 120 (16%) had been pregnant. Of those 19 women who had been pregnant, 10 of them had had an illegal induced abortion (in Mexico, abortions are illegal except under a small number of extenuating circumstances). The reported abortion rate among the female medical students, 2%, was very low in comparison with the 11% rate for women of similar ages in the Mexican general population. The lower incidence of abortion among the female medical students indicates that when young Mexican women have access to medical information and are highly motivated to avoid unintended pregnancy and abortion, they can do so.

  15. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Students' Feelings regarding the Use of Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj-Sharma, Rawatee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparative study of two groups of learners--group 1 (25 non-science students) and group 2 (25 A-level physics students). It explores the extent to which their feelings and emotions in conjunction with their knowledge about nuclear energy impacts and influences their views and feelings about the use of…

  16. The experiences of African-American students majoring in engineering: Cognitive, non-cognitive and situational aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gloria Pinckney

    1997-12-01

    To understand the causes for the disproportionately high rate of attrition among ethnic minority students, it is important to consider not only how they differ from the majority population, but what differences exist in personal qualities and academic preparation within groups at particular types of institutions, and within particular majors. The purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of African-American students enrolled in engineering at a predominately white, selective research university to determine which cognitive, non-cognitive and situational variables impact their progress towards graduation. The goal was to see how African-American students who meet or exceed the minimum criteria for admission perceive their experience on campus, and what strategies they use to manage their day-to-day existence. The study was conducted using personal interviews guided by an open-ended questionnaire. The qualitative methodology allowed students to assess the college experience through their own cultural lens, and to identify the cognitive, non-cognitive, and situational variables important to them. Responses were sorted by class and gender, tabulated and grouped into categories. Interpretation was primarily descriptive. Consistencies, inconsistencies, patterns and relationships to concepts in the literature and to the research questions were discussed. Findings indicate that well prepared students become less confident about their commitment to engineering and their ability to succeed academically after they begin matriculating rather than before, and that redefinition of what it means to be academically successful is an effective coping mechanism to sustain the effort required to master courses. The study suggests that the current focus on the impact of the freshman year transition on student retention should be expanded to include the sophomore year. This is particularly true for institutions where engineering students spend the first year in a core

  17. The Academic, Administrative, Economic, Social, and Psychological Problems Faced by Students of Textile and Clothing Major at King Abdul-Aziz University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubyani, Noor Abdulhadi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the academic, administrative, economic, social, and psychological problems faced by students of Textile and fabric major at King Abdul-Aziz University. To achieve this purpose, a questionnaire was designed and distributed to a sample of students in the Textile and fabric major, after the use of…

  18. [An Analysis of El Camino College Students According to Their Majors, Perceptions of Academic Relevancy, and Unit and Grade Point Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Jerry

    These three separate studies of students at El Camino College (California) discuss their majors, perceptions of academic relevancy, and grade point characteristics. Sub-groups of students (freshman/sophomore, full-time/part-time) are compared according to their major divisions (physical sciences, fine arts, natural sciences, etc.) and also…

  19. SEMANTIC MAPPING TO IMPROVE READING COMPREHENSION FOR NON-ENGLISH MAJOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the problems exiting in read-ing comprehension for non-English major college stu-dents.The writer adopted semantic mapping methodsto improve their reading comprehension,which havebeen proved to be practical and effective readingstrategies after one year’s practice.

  20. UNIX Micros for Students Majoring in Computer Science and Personal Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward A.; Birch, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    Traces the history of Virginia Tech's requirement that incoming freshmen majoring in computer science each acquire a microcomputer running the UNIX operating system; explores rationale for the decision; explains system's key features; and describes program implementation and research and development efforts to provide personal information…

  1. Bridging the Gap: Helping Students from Competitive Dance Training Backgrounds Become Successful Dance Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the methods the author uses to help first-year dance majors from competitive training backgrounds expand their understanding of dance and learn to create a strong foundation for collegiate success. By acknowledging differences in dance backgrounds, carefully emphasizing the theory behind postmodern contemporary dance…

  2. Bridging the Gap: Helping Students from Competitive Dance Training Backgrounds Become Successful Dance Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the methods the author uses to help first-year dance majors from competitive training backgrounds expand their understanding of dance and learn to create a strong foundation for collegiate success. By acknowledging differences in dance backgrounds, carefully emphasizing the theory behind postmodern contemporary dance…

  3. Using Astrology to Teach Research Methods to Introductory Psychology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Roger A.; Grasha, Anthony F.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a classroom demonstration designed to test an astrological hypothesis and help teach introductory psychology students about research design and data interpretation. Illustrates differences between science and nonscience, the role of theory in developing and testing hypotheses, making comparisons among groups, probability and statistical…

  4. The knowledge, attitude and behavior on the radiation safety management for dental hygiene major students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Yeo Reong; Cho, Pyong Kon; Kim, Yong Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Daegu Catholic University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Eun Ok [Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hyon Chul [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Suseong College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jong Kyung [Radiation Safety Management Commission, Daegu Health College, (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study tries to find the educational basis based on the radiation safety knowledge, attitudes and behaviors to check the level of radiation safety behavior in domestic students who study dental hygiene. The students of 3rd and 4th grades in 83 universities which have registered on the Korean University Education Council were involved, and they were given a questionnaire for this study. The questionnaire was provided via visit with 20 copies to each university (total 1660 copies), mail by post and e-mail. Among them, we analyzed only 723 copies that we can trust. The data were analyzed with frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation and Pearson’s correlation using the SPSS/WIN 15.0. As a result, there are correlations in the students’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding the radiation safety management. It means that the education which can improve the knowledge and attitudes should be applied to increase the action level of the radiation safety. In addition, the physical environment is the most closely correlated with the individual behavior, so it will be limited to improve the behavioral levels of the radiation safety if the physical environment is not prepared. Therefore, the physical environment should be supported to enhance the level of the radiation safety activity, and to increase the individual attitude level of radiation safety. The knowledge level of the radiation safety management is relatively lower than the attitudes level, and the behavior level is the lowest. Therefore, the education policy of the safety behavior must be enhanced. For domestic students, the educational intervention is necessary to improve their behavioral level of radiation safety management because they will be able to reduce the amount of radiation exposure of their patients in dental care after getting a job.

  5. Higher Education Reform for Computer Major Students in Open and Research Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; XU Xin-shun; JIA Zhi-ping; MENG Xiang-xu

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the requirement of professional computer talents in Chinese universities, and introduces the practice in innovative educational methods taken by Shandong University in an open and research environment. In order to improve educational quality, we have carried out a serial of reforms, including "Four Experiences" aiming at diversifying study environments and fostering their adaptability and extending their vision. Students are encouraged to join "Research Assistant" program and participate in scientific projects to improve their ability in research and innovation. They also conduct "Engineering Practice" to learn latest modeling and programming skills. Compound talents characterized of solid foundation, high quality and strong practical ability are shaped through these initiatives.

  6. Gateway to Success for At-Risk Students in a Large-Group Introductory Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Diana; Verdel, Ellen

    2001-02-01

    Thirty-six entering freshmen of a designated "at-risk" population were divided between two classes of introductory chemistry for nonscience majors. Seventeen students were placed in a typical large-group lecture (n = 210) class, and the remaining 19 were placed in a special class with enrollment restricted to the selected, at-risk students. To assure equity and control for consistency, both lecture classes met at the same time. The two female instructors gave the same lectures to each class. At-risk students from both sections were required to attend supplemental instruction sections led by the same teaching assistant, and the same instructor graded all assignments. Students of both classes were encouraged to form informal collaborative groups to complete 10 in-class problem sets, which were graded on an individual basis. The at-risk students from the large-group lecture (average = 75.5) outperformed students enrolled in the special class (average = 70.6). All targeted students were successful in the large-group lecture class; however, three at-risk students in the smaller class were unsuccessful. Scaffolding from a more diverse population in the larger group may be one reason for this unexpected outcome. In the larger lecture class, students rated the collaborative assignments as being most beneficial to their success.

  7. Gesture analysis of students' majoring mathematics education in micro teaching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldini, Agnesya; Usodo, Budi; Subanti, Sri

    2017-08-01

    In the process of learning, especially math learning, process of interaction between teachers and students is certainly a noteworthy thing. In these interactions appear gestures or other body spontaneously. Gesture is an important source of information, because it supports oral communication and reduce the ambiguity of understanding the concept/meaning of the material and improve posture. This research which is particularly suitable for an exploratory research design to provide an initial illustration of the phenomenon. The goal of the research in this article is to describe the gesture of S1 and S2 students of mathematics education at the micro teaching process. To analyze gesture subjects, researchers used McNeil clarification. The result is two subjects using 238 gesture in the process of micro teaching as a means of conveying ideas and concepts in mathematics learning. During the process of micro teaching, subjects using the four types of gesture that is iconic gestures, deictic gesture, regulator gesturesand adapter gesture as a means to facilitate the delivery of the intent of the material being taught and communication to the listener. Variance gesture that appear on the subject due to the subject using a different gesture patterns to communicate mathematical ideas of their own so that the intensity of gesture that appeared too different.

  8. The Study of Social Intelligence of Students Majoring in “Industrial and civil construction”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsevich Olga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the question of the interconnection between the components of social intelligence (the N. Hall test and the D. V. Lyusin questionnaire test Emln and self-presentation tactics (the S. Lee, B. Quigley scale. To win on the market of vacancies the graduates have to know how to present themselves and their own projects, and have high social intelligence. The survey of 147 Russian students of Tyumen Industrial university has shown that the subjects with high and low levels of emotional awareness tend to resort to intimidation and managing behavior and emotions as well as such assertive self-presentation tactics as entitlement and blasting. Students with a developed ability to manage their emotions more often than the others declare their virtues and past achievements. Examinees with low and with high ability to control their emotional states can be characterized by negative and critical evaluation of others. The authors emphasize the research prospects of individual human resources where social intelligence as one of the components of the behavioral control is seen as a predictor of various self-presentation tactics, protective and assertive in particular.

  9. DISTANCE LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES IN ORGANIZING SELF-STUDY WORK OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN PHILOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Maiier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, on the basis of the analysis of didactic potentialities of three kinds of distance learning technologies (case technology, Internet technology, TV technology, the feasibility of integrating case and Internet technologies to design an "electronic case" as a means of students' self-studying in e-learning of foreign languages and cultures is substantiated. The content of educational, monitoring, motivating and informative functions of the "electronic case" in self-studying is defined. The constituent features of the "electronic case" are described. The structure examples of the "electronic case" and its content for developing business letter writing and reading skills are given. To create an "electronic case" a course management system Moodle should be used as its educational potential enables implementation of the suggested requirements for its designing.

  10. Using Social Networks to Educate Seismology to Non-Science Audiences in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, O. H.; Linkimer, L.

    2013-12-01

    5,6) showed a jump of nearly 25,000 followers. We see the RSN Facebook page as an opportunity to engage non-science audiences and encourage the population to participate in reporting seismic observations and thus providing intensity data for felt earthquakes. This approach to science education might transform the view of geological processes for Costa Ricans and might positively alter the current perception towards hazards.

  11. The impact of different college science courses on students' attitude towards science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohic, Helene

    2015-08-01

    For non-science majors, a general education course in college is often the last science course they will ever take. General education courses are often regarded by students as a right of passage in which they have no interest. Thus strict coursework might aggravate students against the matter taught, and decrease their general interest in the subject. To test whether general education courses killed the students' interest in science, we administered a science attitude inventory at the beginning and at the end of an introductory astronomy course. We compared the gain/loss in science attitude with that experienced by students of a writing course as a baseline. Finally, we evaluated the gain/loss in science attitude for students enrolled in a general education seminar on science and society, where no formal science knowledge was taught, but where the students discussed the different aspects of the relation between science and society.We find that the science and society seminar had a more positive impact on students' attitude towards science than the astronomy class, which decreased the students' confidence in their ability to understand science. This study (once tested on a larger scale) could serve as a guideline for educational policies aiming to foster a positive attitude in the population of college graduates.

  12. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of the Brain of University Students Majoring in Music and Nonmusic Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain changes flexibly due to various experiences during the developmental stages of life. Previous voxel-based morphometry (VBM studies have shown volumetric differences between musicians and nonmusicians in several brain regions including the superior temporal gyrus, sensorimotor areas, and superior parietal cortex. However, the reported brain regions depend on the study and are not necessarily consistent. By VBM, we investigated the effect of musical training on the brain structure by comparing university students majoring in music with those majoring in nonmusic disciplines. All participants were right-handed healthy Japanese females. We divided the nonmusic students into two groups and therefore examined three groups: music expert (ME, music hobby (MH, and nonmusic (NM group. VBM showed that the ME group had the largest gray matter volumes in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; BA 44, left middle occipital gyrus (BA 18, and bilateral lingual gyrus. These differences are considered to be caused by neuroplasticity during long and continuous musical training periods because the MH group showed intermediate volumes in these regions.

  13. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of the Brain of University Students Majoring in Music and Nonmusic Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kanako; Kirino, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The brain changes flexibly due to various experiences during the developmental stages of life. Previous voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have shown volumetric differences between musicians and nonmusicians in several brain regions including the superior temporal gyrus, sensorimotor areas, and superior parietal cortex. However, the reported brain regions depend on the study and are not necessarily consistent. By VBM, we investigated the effect of musical training on the brain structure by comparing university students majoring in music with those majoring in nonmusic disciplines. All participants were right-handed healthy Japanese females. We divided the nonmusic students into two groups and therefore examined three groups: music expert (ME), music hobby (MH), and nonmusic (NM) group. VBM showed that the ME group had the largest gray matter volumes in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; BA 44), left middle occipital gyrus (BA 18), and bilateral lingual gyrus. These differences are considered to be caused by neuroplasticity during long and continuous musical training periods because the MH group showed intermediate volumes in these regions.

  14. A case study of undergraduate female students majoring in math, science and engineering: An analysis of persistence and success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Michelle Smoot

    This dissertation provides information concerning the educational experience of females studying in undergraduate fields of math, engineering and science at a large research institution in the West. The majority of the participants were Project Access students, chosen because of their high achievements in science and mathematics during their secondary education. The study identifies and attempts to understand critical factors within the academic environment of science that contribute to female persistence in math, engineering and science (MES) disciplines. The study postulates that universities can make a difference in the education of women by providing programs that assure quality education and the fostering of female interest in science domains. The study recommends the incorporation of collaborative learning processes and teaching methods, cohort involvement and the fostering of study groups, encouragement of professorial associations with students, and internship and lab programs in an attempt to provide a more holistic and less fragmented education, thus benefiting women seeking MES degrees. Also, the research presented in this paper determined that the formation of positive associations and support networks was crucial to college female population studied. The interpretive study's aim is to enhance persistence rates among undergraduate students studying in math, engineering and science fields.

  15. How gender and reformed introductory physics impacts student success in advanced physics courses and continuation in the physics major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Idaykis; Potvin, Geoff; Kramer, Laird H.

    2016-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] Active-learning approaches to teaching introductory physics have been found to improve student learning and affective gains on short-term outcomes [S. Freeman et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 8410 (2014)]; however, whether or not the benefits of active learning impact women to the same degree as men has been a point of concern [A. Madsen, S. B. McKagan, and E. C. Sayre, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 9, 020121 (2013)]. Further, the long-term impacts of active-learning experiences are also understudied. At Florida International University, a Hispanic-majority institution, we have implemented Modeling Instruction (MI) and the Integrated Science Learning Environment (ISLE) in introductory physics classes for the past decade. In this empirical paper, we report on a longitudinal investigation of student performance and persistence in upper level physics courses after having previously experienced MI or ISLE in their introductory physics courses, and disaggregate students by gender. Using survival analysis methods, we find women who declare physics as a major are more likely than men to graduate with a physics degree. Women are also just as likely as men to pass through the upper division courses, with the highest failure risk for both men and women occurring in the first semester of upper-division course taking. These results reinforce the need to expand considerations of performance outcomes to be longitudinal to measure the effectiveness of the entire physics experience.

  16. High school and college introductory science education experiences: A study regarding perceptions of university students persisting in science as a major area of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, L. Denise

    The focus of this study was to investigate college students' perception of high school and college introductory science learning experiences related to persistence in science as a major area of study in college. The study included students' perceptions of the following areas of science education: (1) teacher interpersonal relationship with students, (2) teacher personality styles, (3) teacher knowledge of the content, (4) instructional methods, and (5) science course content. A survey research design was employed in the investigative study to collect and analyze data. One hundred ninety two students participated in the research study. A survey instrument entitled Science Education Perception Survey was used to collect data. The researcher sought to reject or support three null hypotheses as related to participants' perceptions of high school and college introductory science education experiences. Using binomial regression analysis, this study analyzed differences between students persisting in science and students not persisting in science as a major. The quantitative research indicated that significant differences exist between persistence in science as a major and high school science teacher traits and college introductory science instructional methods. Although these variables were found to be significant predictors, the percent variance was low and should be considered closely before concluded these as strong predictors of persistence. Major findings of the qualitative component indicated that students perceived that: (a) interest in high school science course content and high school science teacher personality and interpersonal relationships had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (b) interest in college introductory science course content had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (c) students recalled laboratory activities and overall good teaching as most meaningful to their high school science

  17. Differences of Anxiety Levels between Students of Natural Sciences and Social Studies Major Based on School Environmental Factors in Senior High Schools with Rintisan Sekolah Bertaraf Internasional Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Arviana Adamantina Putri; Leonardo Lubis; Tatang Muchtar Sutaryan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Senior High Schools with Rintisan Sekolah Bertaraf Internasional (RSBI) scheme are senior high schools that pilot international standards in learning methods and high curriculum targets. This factor may lead to a rise of anxiety amongst students, both for students in Natural Sciences major and Social Studies major. There are three factors which cause anxiety in the school environment, namely: dissatisfaction towards the curriculum, the teacher, and the school management. Metho...

  18. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and quantitative analyses, this study revealed that those students with more extended and better-organized knowledge structures, as well as those who more frequently used higher-order information processing modes, were more oriented towards achieving a higher-level informal reasoning quality. The regression analyses further showed that the "richness" of the students' knowledge structures explained 25 % of the variation in their rebuttal construction, an important indicator of reasoning quality, indicating the significance of the role of students' sophisticated knowledge structure in SSI reasoning. Besides, this study also provides some initial evidence for the significant role of the "core" concept within one's knowledge structure in one's SSI reasoning. The findings in this study suggest that, in SSI-based instruction, science instructors should try to identify students' core concepts within their prior knowledge regarding the SSI, and then they should try to guide students to construct and structure relevant concepts or ideas regarding the SSI based on their core concepts. Thus, students could obtain extended and well-organized knowledge structures, which would then help them achieve better learning transfer in dealing with SSIs.

  19. Investigating Stratification within Higher Education through Examining the Status of Students in Different Academic Majors in Terms of Cultural, Social and Economic Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Seyyed Jamal Mir

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to explore the status of stratification within higher education through measuring cultural, economic and social capital of students in major academic disciplines across universities in Urmia, Northwestern Iran. The findings indicate that there are stratification structures in the presence of students in…

  20. Effect of an Educational Booklet on Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Major Depressive Disorder in Medical Students in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha Goyal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting people in the world. It is also a growing concern in younger population particularly medical students. There are many pharmaceutical interventions for treatment of depression but there is paucity of data to determine the effect of educational intervention on the knowledge, attitude and help seeking behaviour regarding depression among medical students. Methods: An interventional study was carried out among randomly selected 100 medical students except interns over a period of 6 months from March August 2011 in a medical college in Delhi to assess the effect of educational booklet on knowledge and attitude about depression. Data was collected using pre-tested questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. Statistical significance in pre and post intervention proportions was determined using Mc Nemar test (MN and for other proportions Chi-square test. Results: The study shown that only 71% of subjects knew that depression is a disease in pre intervention phase, which rose to 88% in post intervention phase (p=0.01. Knowledge of symptoms and treatment significantly improved such as trouble falling asleep or too much sleep (p=0.03, feeling tired or decreased energy (MN=17.6, p=0.01, feeling bad about self (MN=21.8, p=0.01, speaking slowly other can notice (MN=19.1, p=0.01 and can be treated by improving awareness (MN=8.6, p=0.03, and anti-depressants do not cause much of side effects (MN=17.3, p=0.01. Most common reasons for not seeking help were thinking that there is lack of understanding by other people about the depression (63%, lack of confidentiality (49%, social stigma (30%, fear of rejection (26% and time constraints (6%. Majority of students accepted the booklet for their understanding about depression where 63% considered that it improved their knowledge to great extent. Conclusion:Educational interventional booklet should be promoted at bigger

  1. A quantitative analysis of factors that influence and predict students' intention to major in and complete an undergraduate program in STEM or non-STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuemei

    2005-11-01

    The goal of this study was to explore and understand the factors that influence students' intention to major in and complete an undergraduate program in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) discipline, in a non-STEM field, and how students' gender directly and indirectly affects their success in college. A quantitative study of three thousand four (3004) ACT-tested students who entered a Midwestern, land-grant university as freshmen in fall, 1999 was conducted based on their ACT Assessment information and their enrollment and graduation status after five years. A wide variety of variables were considered and logistic regression, factor analysis, and path analysis were used to analyze the data. The results show that students who intended to major in or completed STEM programs generally have better academic qualifications than their counterparts who intended to major in non-STEM fields. Students who intended to major in or completed STEM programs came from lower income families and smaller communities than those who intended to major in or graduated from non-STEM programs. In this study, gender's direct effect on students' college achievement is eleven times the total of gender's indirect effects through several major factors for students in both STEM fields and non-STEM fields. Perhaps nature has favored females when students' achievement is measured as their college GPA. The results also show that the overall high dropout rate is strongly associated with students' inadequate preparation in high school and family income. Out-of-school accomplishment in community service is a negative influence on their completion of a college degree. ACT scores are not necessary for prediction of college graduation.

  2. Developing Student Presentation Skills in an Introductory-Level Chemistry Course with Audio Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, Susan M.; Tierney, John; Bodek, Matthew; Fredericks, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to explain and provide rubrics for science and communication faculty as a means to help nonscience students, in basic science classes, understand that proper communication and presentation skills are a necessity in all courses and future walks of life.

  3. Construction of Teaching Skill Evaluation System for Physics Specialty Normal Major Students%流化床干燥特性曲线研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹卫东

    2015-01-01

    Teachers ’ professionalization requires normal major student must grasp practiced teaching skill . Based on the requirements of teaching skill of the physics major students , this paper constructs a teaching skill e-valuation system for the physics specialty normal major student , using analytic hierarchy process method .It pro-vides the basis for the quantitative evaluation of the teaching skill of the physics specialty normal student .%利用流化床技术对硅胶进行干燥,研究气流速度、气流温度等因素对硅胶干燥特性的影响。通过获得的恒定干燥条件下的干燥曲线、干燥速率曲线,研究气流温度、气流速度对干燥速率的影响。

  4. Determining graduation rate of students who initially enrolled as animal science majors at the University of Missouri during a consecutive four-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, G W; Ellersieck, M R

    2009-11-01

    Data obtained primarily from the Student Information System of the University of Missouri were used to determine the graduation rate of freshmen and transfer students who initially enrolled as animal science majors during the fall semester of a consecutive 4-yr period. The primary objective of this study was to determine the percentage of students who completed a bachelor of science (BS) degree in animal science. This study also investigated the predictability of graduation rate and academic performance [cumulative grade point average (GPA)] and attempted to ascertain why students changed their major or failed to complete a baccalaureate degree. Independent variables included in the analysis of data included sex, composite ACT score, high school class rank, advising group, high school graduation class size, predicted GPA, first-semester GPA, cumulative GPA, and the background of the student (farm/ranch, rural non-farm/ranch, or urban). The total number of students in the data set was 457, representing 378 who enrolled as first-semester freshmen and 79 transfer students. The data were statistically analyzed using various procedures of SAS. A questionnaire was sent to 256 former students who either did not complete a degree at the University of Missouri (n = 126) or completed a baccalaureate degree in a major other than animal science (n = 130) to determine their reason(s) for changing major or leaving the University of Missouri. Thirty-five percent of the students completed a BS degree in animal science. Approximately 14% completed a degree in some other major in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and 15% completed a baccalaureate degree in some major outside of the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the university. Another 3.9% completed a degree in veterinary medicine. Graduation rate was 67.6%, which was similar to the campus average. The use of 5 independent variables resulted in 64% accuracy at predicting graduation rate

  5. Novelty or knowledge? A study of using a student response system in non-major biology courses at a community college

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thames, Tasha Herrington

    The advancement in technology integration is laying the groundwork of a paradigm shift in the higher education system (Noonoo, 2011). The National Dropout Prevention Center (n.d.) claims that technology offers some of the best opportunities for presenting instruction to engage students in meaningful education, addressing multiple intelligences, and adjusting to students' various learning styles. The purpose of this study was to investigate if implementing clicker technology would have a statistically significant difference on student retention and student achievement, while controlling for learning styles, for students in non-major biology courses who were and were not subjected to the technology. This study also sought to identify if students perceived the use of clickers as beneficial to their learning. A quantitative quasi-experimental research design was utilized to determine the significance of differences in pre/posttest achievement scores between students who participated during the fall semester in 2014. Overall, 118 students (n = 118) voluntarily enrolled in the researcher's fall non-major Biology course at a southern community college. A total of 71 students were assigned to the experimental group who participated in instruction incorporating the ConcepTest Process with clicker technology along with traditional lecture. The remaining 51 students were assigned to the control group who participated in a traditional lecture format with peer instruction embedded. Statistical analysis revealed the experimental clicker courses did have higher posttest scores than the non-clicker control courses, but this was not significant (p >.05). Results also implied that clickers did not statistically help retain students to complete the course. Lastly, the results indicated that there were no significant statistical difference in student's clicker perception scores between the different learning style preferences.

  6. Using clickers in nonmajors- and majors-level biology courses: student opinion, learning, and long-term retention of course material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossgrove, Kirsten; Curran, Kristen L

    2008-01-01

    Student response systems (clickers) are viewed positively by students and instructors in numerous studies. Evidence that clickers enhance student learning is more variable. After becoming comfortable with the technology during fall 2005-spring 2006, we compared student opinion and student achievement in two different courses taught with clickers in fall 2006. One course was an introductory biology class for nonmajors, and the other course was a 200 level genetics class for biology majors. Students in both courses had positive opinions of the clickers, although we observed some interesting differences between the two groups of students. Student performance was significantly higher on exam questions covering material taught with clickers, although the differences were more dramatic for the nonmajors biology course than the genetics course. We also compared retention of information 4 mo after the course ended, and we saw increased retention of material taught with clickers for the nonmajors course, but not for the genetics course. We discuss the implications of our results in light of differences in how the two courses were taught and differences between science majors and nonmajors.

  7. Comparative study of bone density and body composition in college students between PE Major and Non-PE Major%体育与非体育专业大学生骨密度和体成分比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭见平; 尹海滨; 牛英群

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较体育与非体育专业大学生骨密度、身体成分的差异,为指导大学生树立科学健身意识提供参考.方法 采用美国HOLOGIC公司生产的Sahara Clinical Bone Sonometer测试仪和韩国产Biospace InBody 3.0人体成分分析仪,对邯郸职业技术学院志愿参加测试的412名大学生进行骨密度、体成分测试,其中体育专业学生198名,非体育专业学生214名.结果 体育专业学生骨密度指标测定结果均高于同性别非体育专业学生,差异均有统计学意义(P值均<0.01);体育专业男生体成分指标中的体重、蛋白质、矿物质、肌肉、去脂体重、身高质量指数高于非体育专业男生,体脂含量、体脂百分比低于非体育专业男生;体育专业女生体重、蛋白质、矿物质、肌肉、去脂体重高于非体育专业女生,体脂含量、体脂百分比低于非体育专业女生,差异均有统计学意义(P <0.05或P<0.01).结论 体育运动可以促进大学生骨密度提高,改善大学生体成分的构成,促进身体健康.%Objective To compare the differences of bone density and body composition in college students between PE major and non-PE major to learn the effect of physical exercise to body composition. Methods Body composition were measured by Body Composition Test Instrument (Biospace InBody 3.0, Korea) and the bone density were measured by Sahara Clinical Bone Sonometer Test Instrument ( HOLOGIC, USA). There were 412 college students as objectives, including 198 PE major and 214 non-PE major. Results In the term of the bone density, there were high difference between two group students (P < 0.01) , while the body composition had the same tendency. Among the male, the PE major students' weight, protein, mineral substance, muscle, fat free mass and BMI were higher than the non PE major students', and the body fat composition, body fat perceutage were lower than the non PE major students. Among the female, the PE

  8. "An Inconvenient Truth"--Is It Still Effective at Familiarizing Students with Global Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Mark A.; Reimer, Kaitlin

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry courses for nonscience majors emphasize chemical concepts and the relationship of chemical knowledge to everyday life while teaching the utility of quantitative analysis. As an introduction to the topic of global warming, the first half of "An Inconvenient Truth," released in 2006, has been shown annually since 2008 in the…

  9. Investigating Art Objects through Collaborative Student Research Projects in an Undergraduate Chemistry and Art Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary; Haaf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inspired in part by Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops, and Community of Scholars workshops, the Chemistry and Art course offered at Ithaca College is team-taught by a chemist and an art historian, underscoring the complementary nature of the two disciplines. The course, populated primarily by nonscience majors, highlights the importance of using…

  10. "An Inconvenient Truth"--Is It Still Effective at Familiarizing Students with Global Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Mark A.; Reimer, Kaitlin

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry courses for nonscience majors emphasize chemical concepts and the relationship of chemical knowledge to everyday life while teaching the utility of quantitative analysis. As an introduction to the topic of global warming, the first half of "An Inconvenient Truth," released in 2006, has been shown annually since 2008 in the…

  11. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  12. Looking Back to Move Ahead: How Students Learn Geologic Time by Predicting Future Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Rehrey, George; Treadwell, Brooke; Johnson, Claudia C.

    2012-01-01

    This Scholarship of Teaching and Learning project discusses the effectiveness of using distance metaphor-building activities along with a case study exam to help undergraduate nonscience majors understand and apply geologic time. Using action research, we describe how a scholarly teacher integrated previously published and often-used teaching…

  13. Chemistry for the Liberal Arts Student: An Ostrich in Danger of Extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Russell

    1981-01-01

    Described is an environmental chemistry course for nonscience majors at McNeese State University. The course emphasizes consumer chemistry. Topics discussed include prescription drugs, refinery processes, nuclear chemistry and chemistry and the environment. Texts, supplementary materials and a detailed course outline are included. (DS)

  14. Turkish University Students' Knowledge of Biotechnology and Attitudes toward Biotechnological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk-Akar, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    This study questions the presumed relation between formal schooling and scientific literacy about biotechnologies. Comparing science and nonscience majors' knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnological applications, conclusions are drawn if their formal learnings improve pupils' understandings of and attitudes toward biotechnology…

  15. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  16. Hands-on Science and Basic Skills Learning by Culturally and Academically Diverse Students: A Test of the IALs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitman, Francis X.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes a study to determine effects of the Integrated Activity Learning Sequence (IALS) instructional approach on fourth graders' science, mathematics, and writing achievement; to discover teachers' and students' attitudes toward this approach; and to determine if nonscience elementary teachers could develop science instructional materials.…

  17. Differences of Anxiety Levels between Students of Natural Sciences and Social Studies Major Based on School Environmental Factors in Senior High Schools with Rintisan Sekolah Bertaraf Internasional Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arviana Adamantina Putri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Senior High Schools with Rintisan Sekolah Bertaraf Internasional (RSBI scheme are senior high schools that pilot international standards in learning methods and high curriculum targets. This factor may lead to a rise of anxiety amongst students, both for students in Natural Sciences major and Social Studies major. There are three factors which cause anxiety in the school environment, namely: dissatisfaction towards the curriculum, the teacher, and the school management. Methods: This study used retrospective cohort design. Subjects were selected using the convenience sampling method. Natural Sciences students (n=32 and Social Studies students (n=14 had their anxiety level measured using the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale. The dissatisfaction towards the school environment factors was assessed using a school evaluation questionnaire. Results: The anxiety measurement showed that students in both Natural Sciences and Social Studies major experienced severe anxiety (Natural Sciences vs. Social Studies: 75% vs. 86%. The study results based on the school evaluation questionnaire showed dissatisfactions towards the three school environmental factors (curriculum factor, Natural Sciences vs. Social Studies: 59% vs. 64%; teacher factor, Natural Sciences vs. Social Studies: 3% vs. 43%; school management factor, Natural Sciences vs. Social Studies: 3% vs. 14%. The chi-square test results showed that the difference in the anxiety levels between the students of Natural Sciences and Social Studies majors was insignificant (p>0.05. Conclusions: Students of Natural Sciences and Social Studies majors of senior high schools with RSBI scheme experienced severe anxiety. However, there is no strong evidence that the school environment causes this severe anxiety.

  18. Where Students Get Their Information about Science and Technology and Assessment of That Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Llull, J.; Impey, C. D.; Tijerino, K.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS)

    2013-06-01

    The changing landscape of where people get information has created challenges and opportunities for undergraduate science instructors. The perception that students are relying less on their textbooks and more on online content has created questions about how to engage with students in science courses. We report on our work investigating where undergraduate non-major astronomy students report getting their information about science as well as their general interest in science and technology. Through pilot surveys and in-depth interviews, we have refined a survey that asks students about their general interest in science, where they get their information about science, and what it means to study something scientifically. Our work shows that our students report getting a lot of information about science from in-class presentations but turn first to the internet when they want to learn something new about science. Overall, students rate their knowledge of science higher than their knowledge of technology due to coursework that covers science but not technology. Students who are more interested in science in general also self-report higher knowledge in science and are rated higher in their understanding about how to study something scientifically. Students who are less interested in science and rate themselves less knowledgeable about science turn first to online sources when learning something new related to science. Our work has implications for instructors who engage non-science major students and those working to improve science literacy of those students. This work is supported in part through an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate Research Internship. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the

  19. The effects of social concern goals on the value of learning and on the intentions of medical students to change their majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soowon; Cho, Seunghee; Lee, Jun-Young

    2017-01-01

    In the process of developing a professional medical expertise, goals can become a psychological impetus and act as a source of retaining an individual's persistency. Therefore, the goals of medical students should be considered when designing a curriculum for health professions. The purpose of this study was to examine relative effects of goal categories on the value of learning and intention to change one's major. Data were obtained from the Korea Education Longitudinal Study, which included 1938 representative Korean college freshmen majoring in medicine, engineering, natural science and humanities. They answered a survey questionnaire about goal categories (i.e., social concern, affiliation, self-growth, leisure, wealth, and fame), the value of learning, and intention to change one's major. For medical students, social concern goals were positively related to the value of learning and negatively related to the intention to change one's major. Social concern goals decreased the intention to change one's major directly, and also indirectly through increased value of learning. Providing context for enhancing medical students' social concern goals is necessary in a medical training curriculum, not only for the students' professional development but also for improving society. GCT: Goal contents theory GPA: Grade point average KELS: Korea education longitudinal study SDLA: Self-directed learning abilities SDT: Self-determination theory.

  20. When Do Students "Learn-to-Comprehend" Scientific Sources?: Evaluation of a Critical Skill in Undergraduates Progressing through a Science Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Tamara L; Guenther, Merrilee F; Raimondi, Stacey L

    2015-05-01

    In response to the publication of Vision and Change, the biology department at Elmhurst College revised our curriculum to better prepare students for a career in science with the addition of various writing assignments in every course. One commonality among all of the assignments is the ability to comprehend and critically evaluate scientific literature to determine relevancy and possible future research. Several previous reports have analyzed specific methodologies to improve student comprehension of scientific writing and critical thinking skills, yet none of these examined student growth over an undergraduate career. In this study, we hypothesized upper-level students would be better able to comprehend and critically analyze scientific literature than introductory biology majors. Biology students enrolled in an introductory (200-level), mid- (300-level), or late-career (400-level) course were tasked with reading and responding to questions regarding a common scientific article and rating their comfort and confidence in reading published literature. As predicted, upper-level (mid- and late-career) students showed increases in comprehension and critical analysis relative to their first-year peers. Interestingly, we observed that upper-level students read articles differently than introductory students, leading to significant gains in understanding and confidence. However, the observed gains were modest overall, indicating that further pedagogical change is necessary to improve student skills and confidence in reading scientific articles while fulfilling the Vision and Change recommendations.

  1. When Do Students “Learn-to-Comprehend” Scientific Sources?: Evaluation of a Critical Skill in Undergraduates Progressing through a Science Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara L. Marsh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In response to the publication of Vision and Change, the biology department at Elmhurst College revised our curriculum to better prepare students for a career in science with the addition of various writing assignments in every course. One commonality among all of the assignments is the ability to comprehend and critically evaluate scientific literature to determine relevancy and possible future research. Several previous reports have analyzed specific methodologies to improve student comprehension of scientific writing and critical thinking skills, yet none of these examined student growth over an undergraduate career. In this study, we hypothesized upper-level students would be better able to comprehend and critically analyze scientific literature than introductory biology majors. Biology students enrolled in an introductory (200-level, mid- (300-level, or late-career (400-level course were tasked with reading and responding to questions regarding a common scientific article and rating their comfort and confidence in reading published literature. As predicted, upper-level (mid- and late-career students showed increases in comprehension and critical analysis relative to their first-year peers. Interestingly, we observed that upper-level students read articles differently than introductory students, leading to significant gains in understanding and confidence. However, the observed gains were modest overall, indicating that further pedagogical change is necessary to improve student skills and confidence in reading scientific articles while fulfilling the Vision and Change recommendations.

  2. 独立学院英语专业学生英语发音特点探究%English major students' English pronunciation in independent college

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周肖儿

    2015-01-01

    独立学院英语专业因为生源地较为集中,主要来自学院所在地区的省份;从全国大学生水平来看,其学生成绩处于中游水平;这些因素反映在学生的英语发音上,其特点较为鲜明集中.本文旨在对独立学院英语专业四个年级的学生的英语发音特点进行归纳总结,试图形成对该层次学生语音概况的描述,进而提出相应的教学改革对策,最终提高本层次学生的英语语音水平.%Independent college English major students are concentrated; From the point of the national college students' level, the student achievement in middle level; These factors are reflected in the students' English pronunciation, its characteristic is concentrated. The purpose of this paper is to four grade students for the independent college English majors of English pronunciation characteristics to sum up, trying to form a description of the level of student speech situation, and then put forward the corresponding countermeasure of teaching reform, eventually improve the level of the students' English pronunciation.

  3. Capturing Student Interest in Astrobiology through Dilemmas and Paradoxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    2005-12-01

    Traditionally, many non-science majoring undergraduates readily reveal fairly negative opinions about their introductory science survey courses that serve as general education distribution requirements. Often seen as unimportant and unrelated to helping them acquire knowledge and skills for the workplace, such general education courses carry nicknames such as "Physics for Poets" (PHYSICS101), "Bugs for Thugs" (BIOLOGY101), "Rocks for Jocks" (GEOLOGY101), and "Moons for Goons" or "Scopes for Dopes" (ASTRONOMY101). In response, many faculty are experimenting with more modern science course offerings as general education courses in an effort to improve students' attitudes, values, and interests. One might think that ASTROBIOLOGY has natural curb appeal for students. However, despite the seemingly innate appeal of a course on extraterrestrial life, when it comes right down to it, an astrobiology course is still a natural science course at its core. As such, it can suffer from the same student apathy that afflicts traditional science courses if students can not find some personal relevance or interest in the topics. One approach to more fully engaging students is to couch core course concepts in terms of what Grant Wiggin and Jay McTighe (2004, 2000) call "essential questions." Essential questions are intended create enduring understanding in students and help students find deeply meaningful personal relevance to concepts. In response, we have created a series of probing essential questions that tie central concepts in astrobiology to dilemmas, paradoxes, and moral questions with the goal of intellectually engaging our students in the human-side of the astrobiology enterprise.

  4. Increasing Student Success in Large Survey Science Courses via Supplemental Instruction in Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; Nossal, S.; Watson, L.; Timbie, P.

    2010-05-01

    Large introductory astronomy and physics survey courses can be very challenging and stressful. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Physics Learning Center (PLC) reaches about 10 percent of the students in four introductory physics courses, algebra and calculus based versions of both classical mechanics and electromagnetism. Participants include those potentially most vulnerable to experiencing isolation and hence to having difficulty finding study partners as well as students struggling with the course. They receive specially written tutorials, conceptual summaries, and practice problems; exam reviews; and most importantly, membership in small groups of 3 - 8 students which meet twice per week in a hybrid of traditional teaching and tutoring. Almost all students who regularly participate in the PLC earn at least a "C,” with many earning higher grades. The PLC works closely with other campus programs which seek to increase the participation and enhance the success of underrepresented minorities, first generation college students, and students from lower-income circumstances; and it is well received by students, departmental faculty, and University administration. The PLC staff includes physics education specialists and research scientists with a passion for education. However, the bulk of the teaching is conducted by undergraduates who are majoring in physics, astronomy, mathematics, engineering, and secondary science teaching (many have multiple majors). The staff train these enthusiastic students, denoted Peer Mentor Tutors (PMTs) in general pedagogy and mentoring strategies, as well as the specifics of teaching the physics covered in the course. The PMTs are among the best undergraduates at the university. While currently there is no UW-Madison learning center for astronomy courses, establishing one is a possible future direction. The introductory astronomy courses cater to non-science majors and consequently are less quantitative. However, the basic structure

  5. Assessment of Oral English:Testing the Non-English Major Students at Guangxi TCM University in P.R.China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lian-ying; Glen Dale Herrington

    2004-01-01

    This paper intends to give a brief overview of oral English testing for non-English major students in Guangxi Traditional Chinese Medical (TCM) University, which is located in a minority autonomous province in the southern part of P.R. China. It arises from the concrete problems facing Chinese teachers of English who feel troubled when offering an oral English test to an ever increasing number of non-English major students at the end of each semester. The frustration comes not only from the labor intensive and time consuming activity but also from the surrounding ethical issues of subjectivity by the teachers and of injustice to the students to give and receive fair marks. Moreover, there is a conflicting gap between the criteria used by the foreign native English speaking teachers and Chinese teachers of English because of their different cultural background and concept of testing. Nevertheless, an oral English test was designed and the procedures were devised, adopted, and administered to assess the student' s performance. The test and procedures, based on the national course syllabus for testing non-English majors, the level of attainment in oral English of the students, and the limited number of teaching personnel in the TCM University, utilized two different approaches. The native English speakers follow their own concept of devising formats of group testing procedures and assessment criteria forms highlighting communicative interaction. Meanwhile, the Chinese teachers of English emphasize individual rehearsed presentations and ask the student to follow up questions, to make further comment, and inquire about learning experience from the passage in order to make assessment and evaluation. Final student scores were calculated by combining daily participation of the student, the assessment foreign teacher,and the evaluation of Chinese teachers.

  6. Study of the Highly-skilled Talent Training Mode for Business English Major Rural Students:A Case Study of Higher Vocational Colleges in Anhui Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min; ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes an in-depth study of the reasons for employment problems of Business English major rural students in Anhui Province,and sets forth the appropriate highly-skilled Business English talent training mode and the corresponding recommendations.

  7. Courseware Integration into Task-Based Learning: A Case Study of Multimedia Courseware-Supported Oral Presentations for Non-English Major Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shu-Chiao

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the integration of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) multimedia courseware for oral presentations into a self-learning and elective program for non-English major students in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) setting. A computer-aided instruction approach, combined with a task-based learning approach, was adopted.…

  8. Interpreting Standardized Assessment Test Scores and Setting Performance Goals in the Context of Student Characteristics: The Case of the Major Field Test in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William; Semenik, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. The Educational Testing Service, publisher of the assessment, provides data that allow institutions to compare their own MFT-B performance to national norms, but that…

  9. Special Aspects of the Development of Health Information Systems as One of the Areas of Expertise of University Students Majoring in Professional Instrument Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Vaganova Elena

    2016-01-01

    The article describes distinguishing features of development and production economics of health information systems. Characteristics of medicine as a subject area from the point of view of developers are presented. Basics of medical informatics and the special aspects of development of medical products are proposed to be one of the areas of expertise of university students majoring in professional instrument engineering.

  10. Effects of a Recruitment Workshop on Selected Urban High School Students' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes toward Agriculture as a Subject, College Major, and Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraze, Lacee Brianne; Wingenbach, Gary; Rutherford, Tracy; Wolfskill, Lawrence A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if selected high school students' participation in a summer agricultural communications workshop affected their self-efficacy and attitudes toward agriculture as a subject, college major, and/or as a career. Data were gathered from an accessible population (N = 145), from which a purposive sample (n = 94)…

  11. Intending to stay: Positive images, attitudes, and classroom experiences as influences on students' intentions to persist in science and engineering majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyer, Mary Beth

    2000-10-01

    Contemporary research on persistence in undergraduate education in science and engineering has focused primarily on identifying the structural, social, and psychological barriers to participation by students in underrepresented groups. As a result, there is a wealth of data to document why students leave their majors, but there is little direct empirical data to support prevailing presumptions about why students stay. Moreover, researchers have used widely differing definitions and measures of persistence, and they have seldom explored field differences. This study compared three ways of measuring persistence. These constituted three criterion variables: commitment to major, degree aspirations, and commitment to a science/engineering career. The study emphasized social factors that encourage students to persist, including four predictor variables---(1) positive images of scientists/engineers, (2) positive attitudes toward gender and racial equality, (3) positive classroom experiences, and (4) high levels of social integration. In addition, because researchers have repeatedly documented the degree to which women are more likely than men to drop out of science and engineering majors, the study examined the potential impact of gender in relation to these predictor variables. A survey was administered in the classroom to a total of 285 students enrolled in a required course for either a biological sciences and or an engineering major. Predictor variables were developed from standard scales, including the Images of Science/Scientists Scale, the Attitudes toward Women Scale, the Women in Science Scale, and the Perceptions of Prejudice Scale. Based on logistic regression models, results indicate that positive images of scientists and engineers was significantly related to improving the odds of students having a high commitment to major, high degree aspirations, and high commitment to career. There was also evidence that positive attitudes toward gender and racial equality

  12. Major differences in oral health knowledge and behavior in a group of Iranian pre-university students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neamatollahi, Hossain; Ebrahimi, Masoumeh; Talebi, Maryam; Ardabili, Mana H; Kondori, Keiwan

    2011-06-01

    To establish efficient methods for self-prevention of oral diseases, assessment of dental health behavior and knowledge in various social classes is necessary. The main purpose of this study was to determine the major differences in oral health knowledge and behavior in a group of Iranian pre-university students. In this cross-sectional study, 591 pre-university students from different regions of Mashhad, Iran were randomly selected to complete a questionnaire consisting of two parts including dental health behavior and knowledge. Scores were recorded and statistical analyses performed to determine the correlation between dental health behavior and knowledge. Data was analyzed with Student's t-test, one-way analysis of variance and Pearson correlation. The mean score of dental health knowledge was significantly lower than the dental health behavior (2.95 ± 0.02 vs. 3.31 ± 0.05, P difference was observed with gender, birth location and major subject of study. The dental health behavior of Iranian pre-university students was inadequate and their dental health knowledge was at a lower level compared to their behavior. Experimental science students had better oral health behavior compared to other students.

  13. Astr 101 Students' Attitudes Towards Essays On Transits, Eclipses And Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2012-05-01

    Joliet Junior College, Joliet, IL offers a one semester introductory astronomy course each semester. We teach over 110 primarily non-science major students each semester. We use proven active learning strategies such lecture tutorials, think-pair-share questions and small group discussions to help these students develop and retain a good understanding of astrophysical concepts. Occasionally, we offer projects that allow students to explore course topics beyond the classroom. We hope that such projects will increase students' interest in astronomy. We also hope that these assignments will help students to improve their critical thinking and writing skills. In Spring 12, we are offering three short individual essay assignments in our face-to-face sections. The essays focus on transits, eclipses and occultations to highlight the 2012 transit of Venus. For the first essay, students will find images of transit and occultation events using the Astronomy Picture of the Day website and describe their chosen events. In addition, students will predict how variations in certain physical and orbital parameters would alter their particular events. The second essay involves transits, eclipses and occultations observed by spacecraft. Students will describe their transit event, their spacecraft's mission, orbital path, how the orbital path was achieved, etc. The third essay deals with transiting exoplanets. Students will choose at least two exoplanets from an exoplanet database, one of which has been discovered through the transit method. This essay will enable students to learn about detecting exoplanets and how they compare with our solar system. Details of the essay assignments and students' reactions to them will be presented at the meeting.

  14. An Epidemiologic Analysis of the Use of Dental Services and of Attitudes of Students at a Major University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Steven; Tuthill, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of an undergraduate and graduate student survey investigating (1) the state of oral pathology of the students, (2) utilization of dental services during the fifteen-months preceeding the study, (3) perceptions and utilization of local dental services, and (4) attitudes toward emergency and routine dental services at the…

  15. The Relationships between Epistemic Beliefs in Biology and Approaches to Learning Biology among Biology-Major University Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between students' epistemic beliefs in biology and their approaches to learning biology. To this end, two instruments, the epistemic beliefs in biology and the approaches to learning biology surveys, were developed and administered to 520 university biology students, respectively. By and…

  16. Students' Participation in an Interdisciplinary, Socioscientific Issues Based Undergraduate Human Biology Major and Their Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Jennifer L.; Sadler, Troy D.; Sherwood, Robert D.; Schlegel, Whitney M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether Socioscientific Issues (SSI) based learning environments affect university students' epistemological understanding of scientific inquiry differently from traditional science educational contexts. We identify and compare conceptions of scientific inquiry of students participating in an…

  17. Analytical Study of Self-Motivations among a Southwest Public University Nonpolitical Science Major Students in Required Political Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasim, Gamal; Stevens, Tara; Zebidi, Amira

    2012-01-01

    All undergraduate students are required by state law to take six credited hours in political science. This study will help us identify if differences exist in self-determination among students enrolled in American Public Policy and American Government at a large, Southwestern public university. Because some types of motivation are associated with…

  18. Follow-Up Study of Students Majoring in Banking, Finance and Credit, 1976-1981. Volume 11, Number 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas A.; Lucas, John A.

    In 1980, a follow-up study was conducted of students in the Banking, Finance, and Credit curriculum (BFC) at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC). A questionnaire was mailed to all 40 students who had achieved a degree or certificate or had passed five courses in the BFC curriculum since its establishment in fall 1976. The instrument solicited…

  19. Exploring the Anxiety State of the Science Majoring International Graduate Students with Conditional Acceptance in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2017-01-01

    As the conditionally accepted students enroll in the graduate courses, not having met the English proficiency requirement in their program yet creates a vulnerable state of mind for them. This phenomenological study explores the anxiety state of the conditionally admitted international students at a US higher institution. Six science and…

  20. Students' Personality Types, Intended Majors, and College Expectations: Further Evidence Concerning Psychological and Sociological Interpretations of Holland's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    Because it focuses on the interactions between students and their environments, Holland's theory of vocational choice provides a powerful framework for studying college experiences. The present study assessed the relative merits of psychological and sociological interpretations of Holland's theory by examining the relationships among students' …

  1. An Examination of Variables Which Influence High School Students to Enroll in an Undergraduate Engineering or Physical Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the variables which influence a high school student to enroll in an engineering discipline versus a physical science discipline. Data was collected utilizing the High School Activities, Characteristics, and Influences Survey, which was administered to students who were freshmen in an engineering or physical…

  2. Students' Personality Types, Intended Majors, and College Expectations: Further Evidence Concerning Psychological and Sociological Interpretations of Holland's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    Because it focuses on the interactions between students and their environments, Holland's theory of vocational choice provides a powerful framework for studying college experiences. The present study assessed the relative merits of psychological and sociological interpretations of Holland's theory by examining the relationships among students' …

  3. The Classroom Environment: A Major Motivating Factor towards High Academic Performance of Senior Secondary School Students in South West Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akomolafe, Comfort O.; Adesua, Veronica O.

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of the classroom environment as a motivating factor in enhancing the academic performance of secondary school students in South West Nigeria. The study adopted descriptive survey type. The population of this study comprises all students of senior secondary schools in South West Nigeria which consist of Lagos, Ogun,…

  4. Designing and Incorporating Green Chemistry Courses at a Liberal Arts College to Increase Students' Awareness and Interdisciplinary Collaborative Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanayakage, Renuka

    2013-01-01

    Two green chemistry courses have been introduced into the liberal arts curriculum at Susquehanna University. Green chemistry was integrated into an existing course, Chemical Concepts, and offered as Green Chemical Concepts for nonscience majors. This course is designed to instill an appreciation for green chemistry in a large and diverse group of…

  5. Designing and Incorporating Green Chemistry Courses at a Liberal Arts College to Increase Students' Awareness and Interdisciplinary Collaborative Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanayakage, Renuka

    2013-01-01

    Two green chemistry courses have been introduced into the liberal arts curriculum at Susquehanna University. Green chemistry was integrated into an existing course, Chemical Concepts, and offered as Green Chemical Concepts for nonscience majors. This course is designed to instill an appreciation for green chemistry in a large and diverse group of…

  6. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before and after instruction. Two goals of the instruction were to: (1) help students construct accurate scientific ideas, and (2) enhance their reasoning about socioscientific issues. The course structure included interactive lectures, case discussions, hands-on activities, and independent projects. Overall, students' understandings of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning increased from pre-test to post-test. For example, on the post-test, students gained knowledge concerning the age of an organism related to the type of stem cell it possesses. However, we found that some incorrect ideas that were evident on the pre-test persisted after instruction. For example, before and after instruction several students maintained the idea that stem cells can currently be used to produce organs.

  7. Get Your Students to do the Outreach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, E. J.

    2010-08-01

    Five radio shows; a full-page color spread in the campus newspaper; YouTube videos; an interactive activity at the local children's museum; a star party for a dorm; children's books; an outing with Boy Scouts. This is just a sampling of group projects planned and executed in a single semester by students in an introductory course for non-science majors. Everyone in the class joins a group self-organized around common interests to produce a product or activity that communicates some aspect of astronomy to a segment of the general population. These projects give the students a creative outlet to merge some of their outside interests with the course material, a practical exposure to scientific communication, an opportunity for peer instruction including peer evaluation, and a chance to hone their skills in managing group dynamics. The semester long effort begins with everyone in the class submitting individual ideas for subjects and presentation methods. After these ideas are categorized, students begin organizing the groups on a web discussion board. They articulate learning goals for the intended audience and describe how they plan to evaluate the success of the project and the attainment of these goals. The group members seek outside advice from people in other groups during one week of the course discussion section. They submit a progress report and then a first draft, the latter also sent to a different group for review. After feedback from the instructor and a week of the teaching assistant's (TA's) office hours devoted to scheduled meetings with each group, the students draft the final versions or make presentations near the end of the semester.

  8. The influence of world view on African-American college students' decisions to study science: An interpretive investigation of four cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradford F.

    In the United States, African Americans are underrepresented among employed Ph.D. holding scientists; they comprise less than 2% of the scientific population and 12% of the United States population. Educational theorists, focusing on the career choices of African Americans as the cause of underrepresentation, have identified many factors that are associated with the underrepresentation of African Americans in science. Some of these factors are: lack of interest in science, poor academic preparation, high interest in social-oriented careers, poor educational and career planning, unfavorable images of scientists, impoverished family backgrounds, and lack of confidence in ability. This plethora of factors indicates that there is yet equivocation in literature as to the cause of underrepresentation. The objective of this study is to deepen current understanding, by providing explanations for the career decisions of African American students. Adopting a theoretical framework which maintains that human behavior is directed by world view and that world view is shaped by environment, the present study seeks to analyze the world view contents of three African American college students: two science majors and one non-science major. The aim of this study is to analyze the world view contents of the students to identify the salient world view images and assumptions that influence their career decisions. The research employs interpretive methodology and a case study design. Primary methods of data collection are interview and interview analysis. The dissertation reports the results of interviews, which include explanations for each respondent's career decisions; and the influence of three factors (expectation of monetary gain, the impact of role models, and respondents' level of self-confidence in ability) on the respondents' career decisions. Findings indicate that the science major has a greater capacity, than the non-science majors, to accommodate world view images and

  9. The effects of the academic performance of college students whose major is sports on body composition and abdominal fat rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The subjects of this research are 30 students of Dong-Eui Institute of Technology in Busan city, who were grouped into two categories after applying the curriculum of the second semester of the freshman year to their classes: those whose academic performance was at the top 20% (15 students) and those whose academic performance was at the bottom 20% (15 students). For the measurement items, we measured their weight, body fat mass, body fat rates, body mass index, and abdominal fat rates by using a body composition testing machine. We then analyzed the t-test results by using the IBM SPSS ver. 18.0 program. Through this research, we found that there was a significant difference among those in the group of students whose academic performance was at the top 20% in terms of body fat mass and body fat rates, which means that academic performance has relatively little effect on body composition and abdominal fat rates. PMID:27656630

  10. How physical education teacher education majors should be prepared to teach students with hearing loss: a national needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccagnini, Kathleen J

    A national needs assessment survey is described that gathered information on current practices in physical education in both center-based schools for the deaf and mainstream programs serving deaf and hard of hearing students, grades K-12. The manner in which deaf and hard of hearing students are being served in physical education programs, the depth and breadth of curricula, and the credentials needed to teach are described. The study compares similarities and differences among physical education programs in center-based deaf institutions and mainstream schools. In summary, the study identifies areas of concentration needed in curriculum, and methods of teaching appropriate for student teacher candidates. This information has value for physical education programs that are considering revising their curricula to prepare teacher candidates who wish to work with deaf students.

  11. The effects of the academic performance of college students whose major is sports on body composition and abdominal fat rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-08-01

    The subjects of this research are 30 students of Dong-Eui Institute of Technology in Busan city, who were grouped into two categories after applying the curriculum of the second semester of the freshman year to their classes: those whose academic performance was at the top 20% (15 students) and those whose academic performance was at the bottom 20% (15 students). For the measurement items, we measured their weight, body fat mass, body fat rates, body mass index, and abdominal fat rates by using a body composition testing machine. We then analyzed the t-test results by using the IBM SPSS ver. 18.0 program. Through this research, we found that there was a significant difference among those in the group of students whose academic performance was at the top 20% in terms of body fat mass and body fat rates, which means that academic performance has relatively little effect on body composition and abdominal fat rates.

  12. Developing Student Science and Information Literacy through Contributions to the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Wiki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.; Farley, I.; Geary, A.

    2016-12-01

    Introductory-level Earth science courses provide the opportunity for science and non-science majors to expand discipline-specific content knowledge while enhancing skill sets applicable to all disciplines. The outcomes of the student work can then benefit the education and outreach efforts of an international organization - in this case, a wiki devoted exclusively to the geosciences, managed by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). The course Environment Earth at Penn State Brandywine is a general education science course with the overarching course goal for students to understand, communicate examples, and make informed decisions relating to big ideas and fundamental concepts of Earth science. To help accomplish this goal, students carry out a semester-long digital engaged scholarship project that benefits the users of the SEG Wiki (http://wiki.seg.org/). To begin with developing the literacy of students and their ability to read, interpret, and evaluate sources of scientific news, the first assignment requires students to write an annotated bibliography on a specific topic that serves as the foundation for a new SEG Wiki article. Once students have collected and summarized information from reliable sources, students learn how writing for a wiki is different than writing a term paper and begin drafting their wiki page. Students peer review each other's work for content and clarity before publishing their work on the SEG wiki. Students respond positively to this project, reporting a better understanding of and respect towards the authors of online wiki pages, as well as an overall satisfaction of knowing their work will benefit others. Links to student-generated pages and instructional materials can be found at: http://sites.psu.edu/segwiki/.

  13. Science and Non-Science Undergraduate Students' Critical Thinking and Argumentation Performance in Reading a Science News Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A scientifically literate person should be able to engage and critique science news reports about socioscientific issues from a variety of information sources. Such engagement involves critical thinking and argumentation skills to determine if claims made are justified by evidence and explained by reasonable explanations. This study explored…

  14. University Students from Single-Sex and Coeducational High Schools: Differences in Majors and Attitudes at a Catholic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiak, Christie P.; Buchanan, James P.; Hosey, Megan; Smith, Allison

    2007-01-01

    We conducted an archival study at a coeducational Catholic university to test the proposition that single-sex secondary education predicts lasting differences in college majors. Men from single-sex schools were more likely to both declare and graduate in gender-neutral majors than those from coeducational schools. Women from single-sex schools…

  15. English major student teachers’ professional identity and the teacher education%英语师范生职业认同感与教师教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕华

    2013-01-01

    The professional identity of student teachers is how student teachers think of the teacher career. The identity of English Major student teachers will affect their career choice. It is important to help student teachers construct their professional identity during the college learning. With professional knowledge and teaching skills, student teachers can adapt the role change from a student to a real teacher. Thus, the quality of the teachers for primary and middle school can be guaranteed.%  师范生职业认同即是师范生对教师职业的看法。英语师范生对于教师职业认同程度影响他们的职业选择。促使师范生在专业学习阶段中逐渐形成教师职业认同,建构英语教师应具备的专业知识及教学技能,使师范生更好地适应由学生向教师角色转变,从而保证为中小学提供高质量的师资。

  16. Video Creation: A Tool for Engaging Students to Learn Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Students today process information very differently than those of previous generations. They are used to getting their news from 140-character tweets, being entertained by You-Tube videos, and Googling everything. Thus, traditional passive methods of content delivery do not work well for many of these millennials. All students, regardless of career goals, need to become scientifically literate to be able to function in a world where scientific issues are of increasing importance. Those who have had experience applying scientific reasoning to real-world problems in the classroom will be better equipped to make informed decisions in the future. The problem to be solved is how to present scientific content in a manner that fosters student learning in today's world. This presentation will describe how the appeal of technology and social communication via creation of documentary-style videos has been used to engage students to learn scientific concepts in a university non-science major course focused on energy and the environment. These video projects place control of the learning experience into the hands of the learner and provide an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills. Students discover how to locate scientifically reliable information by limiting searches to respected sources and synthesize the information through collaborative content creation to generate a "story". Video projects have a number of advantages over research paper writing. They allow students to develop collaboration skills and be creative in how they deliver the scientific content. Research projects are more effective when the audience is larger than just a teacher. Although our videos are used as peer-teaching tools in the classroom, they also are shown to a larger audience in a public forum to increase the challenge. Video will be the professional communication tool of the future. This presentation will cover the components of the video production process and instructional lessons

  17. The Analysis on the Problems and Possible Reasons in English Writing of English Major Students in Tongren University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋萍

    2015-01-01

    The English learners and teachers both have some difficulties in English writing learning and teaching despite continuous efforts are put by teachers and students to develop their competence in L2 writing,most students still score much lower in writing part than listening and reading parts in various English level tests.Three main sections are included in the paper: The first section surveys the students’ main problems in English writing learning with my analysis of its possible factors from the respects of students and teachers,such as students’ motivation,teacher’s education and approaches to teaching writing in L2 classes.The second section presents a review of how the relevant literature suggests on the students’ problems in writing.Accordingly,I put forward several possible solutions as the attempts to change the problematic situation in L2 writing.

  18. On the causes and strategies of the major tense errors in vocational school students'English writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲玲

    2015-01-01

    English writing has been increasingly important nowadays.Cultivating students' written skills has become one of the most important tasks in vocational school English teaching. But,because of the lack of linguistic competence,effective vocabulary,and basic writing skills as well as the negative effects from mother tongue and cultural differences between China and western world,numerous kinds of mistakes occur in English writing.In view of this,the author found the most frequently-made mistake in students' English writing,based on personal teaching practice and research,is the improper employment of English tenses,and the main error converges at the present perfect tense. This thesis mainly analyzes the reasons and the possible solutions from two aspects:mother tongue transfer andtense confusion and ends up with the strategies of improving the writing abilities of the concerned students.

  19. Experimentation with and knowledge regarding water-pipe tobacco smoking among medical students at a major university in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Regina Martins

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Water-pipe tobacco smoking is becoming increasingly more common among young people. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of the use of water pipes and other forms of tobacco use, including cigarette smoking, among medical students, as well as to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of those students regarding this issue. METHODS: We administered a questionnaire to students enrolled in the University of São Paulo School of Medicine, in São Paulo, Brazil. The respondents were evaluated in their third and sixth years of medical school, between 2008 and 2013. Comparisons were drawn between the two years. RESULTS: We evaluated 586 completed questionnaires. Overall, the prevalence of current cigarette smokers was low, with a decline among males (9.78% vs. 5.26% and an increase among females (1.43% vs. 2.65% in the 3rd and 6th year, respectively. All respondents believed that health professionals should advise patients to quit smoking. However, few of the medical students who smoked received physician advice to quit. Experimentation with other forms of tobacco use was more common among males (p<0.0001. Despite their knowledge of its harmful effects, students experimented with water-pipe tobacco smoking in high proportions (47.32% and 46.75% of the third- and sixth-year students, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of experimentation with water-pipe tobacco smoking and other forms of tobacco use is high among aspiring physicians. Our findings highlight the need for better preventive education programs at medical schools, not only to protect the health of aspiring physicians but also to help them meet the challenge posed by this new epidemic.

  20. 英语专业学生的思辨能力培养的研究%On the cultivation of English major students' thinking ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董辉; 闫慧颖

    2014-01-01

    思辨能力的培养一直是研究的热点问题,国内学者普遍认为英语专业学生患有“思辨缺席”症。因此,如何培养学生的思辨能力受到学者们的广泛重视。本文从思辨能力培养的重要性入手,谈我国外语专业学生思辨能力的培养。%The cultivation of thinking ability is always a hot topic, domestic scholars generally think that English majors has"speculative default". Therefore, how to cultivate the students' thinking ability has attracted wide attention of scholars. This article from the importance of thinking ability, to discuss the training of thinking ability of English major students in China.

  1. The experiences of female high school students and interest in STEM: Factors leading to the selection of an engineering or computer science major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoways, Sharon K.

    STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education creates critical thinkers, increases science literacy, and enables the next generation of innovators, which leads to new products and processes that sustain our economy (Hossain & Robinson, 2012). We have been hearing the warnings for several years, that there simply are not enough young scientists entering into the STEM professional pathways to replace all of the retiring professionals (Brown, Brown, Reardon, & Merrill, 2011; Harsh, Maltese, & Tai, 2012; Heilbronner, 2011; Scott, 2012). The problem is not necessarily due to a lack of STEM skills and concept proficiency. There also appears to be a lack of interest in these fields. Recent evidence suggests that many of the most proficient students, especially minority students and women, have been gravitating away from science and engineering toward other professions. (President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, 2010). The purpose of this qualitative research study was an attempt to determine how high schools can best prepare and encourage young women for a career in engineering or computer science. This was accomplished by interviewing a pool of 21 women, 5 recent high school graduates planning to major in STEM, 5 college students who had completed at least one full year of coursework in an engineering or computer science major and 11 professional women who had been employed as an engineer or computer scientist for at least one full year. These women were asked to share the high school courses, activities, and experiences that best prepared them to pursue an engineering or computer science major. Five central themes emerged from this study; coursework in physics and calculus, promotion of STEM camps and clubs, teacher encouragement of STEM capabilities and careers, problem solving, critical thinking and confidence building activities in the classroom, and allowing students the opportunity to fail and ask questions in a safe environment. These

  2. Research on Learning Burnout Condition of Physical Education Major Students%体育教育专业学生学习倦怠现状研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴春成

    2012-01-01

    Based on the questionnaire survey, mathematical statistics and literature review, this paper made study on learning burnout condition of physical education major students. The result showed that there existed certain learning burnout for physical education major students at present. In the three dimensions of learning burnout, misconduct is the most serious. Male and female students had significant different on learning burnout, while the female students learning burnout is better than male students. The learning burnout had significant difference be- tween skill class and culture class, while skill class is better than culture class. The school three grade students learning burnout tend to the trend, the grade is higher, and the learning burnout is more serious.%本文采用问卷调查、数理统计、文献资料等研究方法,对体育教育专业的学生学习倦怠现状进行分析与研究。研究发现:目前体育教育专业在校学生整体上存在一定的学习倦怠,在学习倦怠的三个维度中行为不当最为严重;男女生的学习倦怠存在着显著性的差异,女生的学习倦怠情况要好于男生;技术课与理论课的学习倦怠程度有显著性差异,技术课的学习倦怠情况相对要好于理论课;体育教育专业在校三个年级的学生学习倦怠呈现年级越高,学习倦怠越为严重的趋势。

  3. Learning how to Learn : a study of English vocabulary learning strategies among English major students at a Chinese university

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ningjue

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of the strategy use of Chinese English majors in vocabulary learning; the individual differences between effective and less effective learners in employing vocabulary learning strategies and the relationship between their strategies and their outcome in English learning. In this research, 118 junior English majors inChineseUniversitywere investigated. The participants were asked to take a vocabulary test and complete a vocabulary-learning questionnaire.   The d...

  4. Teaching Materials to Enhance the Visual Expression of Web Pages for Students Not in Art or Design Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2008-01-01

    The explosive growth of the Internet has made the knowledge and skills for creating Web pages into general subjects that all students should learn. It is now common to teach the technical side of the production of Web pages and many teaching materials have been developed. However teaching the aesthetic side of Web page design has been neglected,…

  5. The Racial Identity Development of Male Student-Athletes when Blacks Are the Majority and Whites Are the Minority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Wilma J.; Closson, Rosemary B.

    2012-01-01

    Focus groups were used in the present study to explore the racial identity development of Black male and White male student-athletes on a predominantly Black, Division IA football team at a predominantly White institution (PWI). Findings indicate that the Black male football players demonstrated positive indicators of Black racial identity. The…

  6. Learning a Minoritized Language in a Majority Language Context: Student Agency and the Creation of Micro-Immersion Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePalma, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the self-reported experiences of students participating in a Galician language and culture course. Galician, a language historically spoken in northwestern Spain, has been losing ground with respect to Spanish, particularly in urban areas and among the younger generations. The research specifically focuses on informal…

  7. Trajectories of Change in Students' Self-Concepts of Ability and Values in Math and College Major Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.; Wigfield, Allan; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2015-01-01

    This study extends previous research on the long-term connections between motivation constructs in expectancy-value theory and achievement outcomes. Using growth mixture modelling, we examined trajectories of change for 421 students from 4th grade through college in their self-concept of ability (SCA) in math, interest in math, and perceived…

  8. Promoting Student Inquiry Using "Zea Mays" (Corn) Cultivars for Hypothesis-Driven Experimentation in a Majors Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Amy C.; Peters, Brenda J.; Bendixen, Conrad W.

    2014-01-01

    The AAAS Vision and Change report (2011) recommends incorporating student research experiences into the biology curriculum at the undergraduate level. This article describes, in detail, how "Zea mays" (corn) cultivars were used as a model for a hypothesis-driven short-term research project in an introductory biology course at a small…

  9. Trajectories of Change in Students' Self-Concepts of Ability and Values in Math and College Major Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.; Wigfield, Allan; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2015-01-01

    This study extends previous research on the long-term connections between motivation constructs in expectancy-value theory and achievement outcomes. Using growth mixture modelling, we examined trajectories of change for 421 students from 4th grade through college in their self-concept of ability (SCA) in math, interest in math, and perceived…

  10. The Relationship between Saudi English Major University Students' Writing Performance and Their Learning Style and Strategy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkubaidi, Miriam A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the link between writing tasks, learners' learning style preference, and writing strategy use. It also investigates if students with various proficiency levels stem from different learning style preference and use different writing strategies. This research attempts to answer the following research questions: what are the…

  11. A Reflective Self-Inquiry into My Teaching Practices with Non-English-Major Technological University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chiu-Kuei Chang; Yu, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Lung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Action research allows teachers to evaluate and gain insight into their own practices in their teaching contexts through reflection, and inquire into ways to improve their practices and student learning outcomes. This study is a reflective self-inquiry in which the research team engages in a deliberate and retrospective analysis of the principal…

  12. Teaching Materials to Enhance the Visual Expression of Web Pages for Students Not in Art or Design Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2008-01-01

    The explosive growth of the Internet has made the knowledge and skills for creating Web pages into general subjects that all students should learn. It is now common to teach the technical side of the production of Web pages and many teaching materials have been developed. However teaching the aesthetic side of Web page design has been neglected,…

  13. Promoting Student Inquiry Using "Zea Mays" (Corn) Cultivars for Hypothesis-Driven Experimentation in a Majors Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Amy C.; Peters, Brenda J.; Bendixen, Conrad W.

    2014-01-01

    The AAAS Vision and Change report (2011) recommends incorporating student research experiences into the biology curriculum at the undergraduate level. This article describes, in detail, how "Zea mays" (corn) cultivars were used as a model for a hypothesis-driven short-term research project in an introductory biology course at a small…

  14. Develop Training Standards for Undergraduate Students with Major Public Administration at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sehiemy, Zainab Abdul-Rahman; Gheith, Nervana Abdul-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Recently, public administration graduates are exposed to new set of challenges because of globalization, virtual world and using modern technology as a base of all today's dealings. It imposes PAD at faculty of economic and administration faculty to prepare its students to confront these changes in organizations in the community. Therefore, the…

  15. Designing and Incorporating Green Chemistry Courses at a Liberal Arts College to Increase Students' Awareness and Interdisciplinary Collaborative Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanayakage, Renuka

    2013-01-01

    Two green chemistry courses have been introduced into the liberal arts curriculum at Susquehanna University. Green chemistry was integrated into an existing course, Chemical Concepts, and offered as Green Chemical Concepts for nonscience majors. This course is designed to instill an appreciation for green chemistry in a large and diverse group of…

  16. A Writing Assignment For Astr 101 Students Inspired By The "Visions Of The Universe" Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2011-01-01

    The "Visions of the Universe" exhibit was created by the American Library Association, Space Telescope Science Institute and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy. The exhibit consists of 12 posters. Smaller versions of the posters can be downloaded from http://amazing-space.stsci.edu/visions/ for use at institutions that were not part of the exhibit display. We arranged to display these smaller versions at Joliet Junior College. To encourage ASTR 101 and Life in the Universe students to expand their interest in astronomy via these posters, in Spring 2010 we designed a short essay assignment that counted as one homework. This assignment involved exploring a poster topic further via the internet. In addition to learning about the topic, students were asked to critique the webpage they chose as their reference, and to recommend whether or not their chosen webpage would be a suitable resource for non-science majors. We will provide details of the assignment, and report on which exhibit topics were most popular, which websites students referred to and which they recommended for introductory astronomy courses.

  17. Systems Thinking as a Major Skill of Business Students – A New Teaching Concept at the University of Zurich, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Adam

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In our world of growing complexity, linear thinking and the belief that the whole is only the sum of its parts are evidently obsolete. Systems thinking, which promotes a holistic view of reality, is a situation-adequate handling of complex systems, and is therefore one of the most important skills of future executives in the business world. A new teaching concept was introduced one year ago by the Faculty of Business Administration at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. This concept was designed to help the students to develop abilities in thinking in models, operating complex systems and handling dynamic, non-linear situations. By use of a computer-simulated game the business students should gain knowledge about systemic realities and improve their complex-problem-solving skills. In the semester when the newly designed lecture started, the highly motivated class became aware of the problems in dealing with complexity. Documenting any significant improvements in our students' performance in playing the game was not possible, but we observed a change in their behaviour and ways of thinking in situations of complex problem-solving. Some necessary changes and adjustments in the teaching concept were made and the next class will be investigated in autumn 2003.

  18. 解析服装设计专业学生的思维风格特点%Analysis on Thinking Styles Characteristics of Fashion Designing Major Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王变荣

    2014-01-01

    Taking the fashion designing students as an example, this paper introduces the thinking style theory, classiifcation and characteristics, as well as the characteristics of the students majoring in fashion design and unique thinking style. The impact of gender, grade and teaching method on the students’ thinking style is further analyzed. This paper aims to provide certain references for the education, management and thinking style of the students majoring in fashion design.%在本文中以服装专业学生为例,简述思维风格理论、分类及特征,同时,阐述了服装设计专业学生的特点及所特有的思维风格,进一步通过性别、年级、教育教学法等因素分析其对学生思维风格的影响。本文旨在对服装设计专业学生的教育和管理以及学生思维方式提供一定的参考。

  19. Study on the Conformity Psychology of College Students Majoring in Physical Education%体育专业大学生的从众心理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 任秀红; 刘生杰

    2016-01-01

    This paper, from the sports study, sports consumption, examination and after-school life of Xinzhou Teachers College Sports professional students, investigates herd mentality. The results show that college students majoring in Physical Education in sports learning, sports consumption, examination and after-school life aspects have the common herd phenomenon. At present, we need to analyze the psychological characteristics of college students, especially physical education students in Colleges and universities, and put forward practical solutions to overcome their psychological barriers. Herd mentality is a double-edged sword. Hence, we should play a positive role in college students’ psychology, at the same time, inhibit the negative effects of herd mentality of contemporary college students, which can guide students to have healthy psychological mechanism.%从体育学习、体育消费、考试以及课余生活方面对忻州师范学院体育专业大学生进行从众心理的调查,结果表明体育专业大学生在这几方面均有着普遍的从众现象。对体育专业大学生的心理特征进行分析研究,提出克服他们心理障碍的切实可行的方案,既要发挥从众心理在大学生中的积极作用,同时又要抑制它对当代大学生的负面影响,实现引导大学生拥有健康心理机制的目标。

  20. Field trips and their effect on student achievement in and attitudes toward science: A comparison of a physical versus a virtual field trip to the Indian River Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Lesley Cochran

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of physical and virtual field trips on students' achievement in estuarine ecology and their attitudes toward science. The study also assessed the effect of students' learning styles, the interaction between group membership and learning styles, and the effect of group membership on students' ability to answer questions at different levels of Bloom's (1956) taxonomy. Working with a convenient sample of 67 freshmen and sophomore non-science majors, students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (physical, n = 32 and virtual, n = 35). Prior to treatment, students' learning styles were determined, students were pre-assessed on the two targeted measures, and all students attended four consecutive, in-class, 75-minute lectures on estuarine ecology and the Indian River Lagoon (IRL). Pre-assessed data indicated no significant differences between the groups on the two dependent measures. On the weekend following the lecture series, the physical field trip group engaged in a set of predetermined activities at the IRL for 2 hours in the morning. Later that afternoon, the virtual field trip group participated in a 2-hour virtual trip to the IRL that exactly matched the physical field trip activities. This virtual trip incorporated the CD-ROM The Living Lagoon: An Electronic Field Trip. Following each trip, students were post-assessed using the same pre-assessment instruments. MANCOVA results indicated no significant differences on all research factors (i.e., group membership, learning style, and group-learning style interaction). Data analysis also revealed that there was no significant effect of group membership on students' ability to answer questions at different levels of Bloom's taxonomy. These findings imply that educators can integrate virtual field trips that are structured in the same manner as their corresponding physical field trips without significantly impacting student achievement or attitudes.

  1. Survey of learning strategies of English major students' metacognitive monitoring%英语专业学生元认知监控学习策略调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冬艳

    2012-01-01

      本文以元认知为基础,对英语专业学生英语学习中元认知监控策略的使用情况作了调查,目的在于发现英语专业学生四级成绩是否与元认知监控策略的使用显著相关。在此基础上,对英语专业教师及学生提出一些教学及学习建议%  In this paper, based on metacognition, to make investigation on the circumstance of metacognitive monitoring strategies of English majors' English study, aims at the discovery of whether students majoring in English level Four achievement has correlation with metacognitive monitoring strategies. On the basis of this, to put forward some teaching and learning for the English teachers and students.

  2. The Application Study on Genre-based Approach in the English Exposi-tion Writing Teaching for Professional College English Major Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊文娟

    2014-01-01

    The previous studies show that the major problems faced by the students in writing can be classified into two catego-ries, that is, they don’t know“what to write”and“how to write”. The researchers found that the specific problems existing in their writings are identified as poor content, incomplete generic structure and misuse of cohesive devices. Therefore, on the basis of the previous studies, this study attempts to use Martin's genre theory to resolve the existed problems of the Professional College English major’s students in writing and enhance students’discourse writing ability. Meanwhile, this study tries to answer the fol-lowing questions:(1) Compared with the traditional writing teaching methods, whether the genre-based writing method has a sig-nificant effect to improve students' writing skills;(2) Whether the genre-based writing method is possible to increase students’in-terest in writing. The experimental result and the questionnaire show that genre-based approach in ESL writing teaching really can improve students’writing achievement and enhance students’interest in English writing.

  3. How physics instruction impacts students' beliefs about learning physics: A meta-analysis of 24 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Adrian; McKagan, Sarah B.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2015-06-01

    In this meta-analysis, we synthesize the results of 24 studies using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) and the Maryland Physics Expectations Survey (MPEX) to answer several questions: (1) How does physics instruction impact students' beliefs? (2) When do physics majors develop expert-like beliefs? and (3) How do students' beliefs impact their learning of physics? We report that in typical physics classes, students' beliefs deteriorate or at best stay the same. There are a few types of interventions, including an explicit focus on model-building and (or) developing expertlike beliefs that lead to significant improvements in beliefs. Further, small courses and those for elementary education and nonscience majors also result in improved beliefs. However, because the available data oversamples certain types of classes, it is unclear whether these improvements are actually due to the interventions, or due to the small class size, or student populations typical of the kinds of classes in which these interventions are most often used. Physics majors tend to enter their undergraduate education with more expertlike beliefs than nonmajors and these beliefs remain relatively stable throughout their undergraduate careers. Thus, typical physics courses appear to be selecting students who already have strong beliefs, rather than supporting students in developing strong beliefs. There is a small correlation between students' incoming beliefs about physics and their gains on conceptual mechanics surveys. This suggests that students with more expertlike incoming beliefs may learn more in their physics courses, but this finding should be further explored and replicated. Some unanswered questions remain. To answer these questions, we advocate several specific types of future studies: measuring students' beliefs in courses with a wider range of class sizes, student populations, and teaching methods, especially large classes with very innovative pedagogy and

  4. The relationship between paranormal beliefs and the personality trait Openness to Experience: A comparison of psychology majors with students in other disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Eric Dogan

    Paranormal beliefs (PB) are those that lie outside the explanatory realm of science. Thus, the existence of PB within a particular field of scholarship might indicate a decreased reliance on scientific methods within that field. This study evaluated the extent of PB among undergraduates majoring in the traditional sciences (biology, chemistry, and physics), psychology, and the arts and humanities. In particular, the relationship between PB and the personality trait Openness to Experience (OTE) was investigated, the goal being to both identify specific determinants of PB and better understand why PB are more prevalent in psychology compared with traditional sciences. Students majoring in the sciences, psychology, or arts and humanities were assessed across six domains of PB and six facets of the global personality trait OTE. Additionally, estimates of science education (SE) and IQ were obtained for each subject. Relationships among these variables were predicted to support the hypothesis that PB are largely determined by OTE rather than SE or IQ. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that the prevalence of PB in contemporary psychology could be explained by a relative overabundance of PB and OTE within psychology majors when compared with science majors. The obtained results confirmed that psychology majors were significantly higher in both PB and OTE compared to science majors. Furthermore, psychology majors scored lower than arts and humanities majors in PB and OTE, supporting the notion that psychology as a field occupies a position intermediate between the traditional sciences and the humanities. Regarding the determinants of PB, while SE and IQ were both shown to be significant, OTE was the single most powerful predictor of PB when considering the entire, undifferentiated sample. An unanticipated result was that determinants of PB are substantially gender-related. Among females, PB were predicted by OTE though not SE, while among males, PB were predicted by SE and

  5. Walking the Path Together from High School to STEM Majors and Careers: Utilizing Community Engagement and a Focus on Teaching to Increase Opportunities for URM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Liza

    2016-10-01

    Despite decades of efforts to increase the participation of women and people from underrepresented minority groups (URM) in science and math majors and careers, and despite the increasing diversification of the US population as a whole (Planty et al in National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC, 2008), participation in STEM majors and STEM careers (including STEM teaching) remains stubbornly male and white (Landivar in American Community Survey Reports, ACS-24, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC, 2013; National Science Foundation and National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics in Special Report NSF 15-311, Arlington, VA, 2015). This paper describes a project with two central goals: (1) to provide opportunities for URM high school students to engage in authentic science and math inquiry with the support of skilled college undergraduate mentors in the hope that these experiences will encourage these high school students to choose and persist in pursuing careers in STEM fields and, even if they do not choose those careers, to feel confident making complex, science or math-based decisions in their everyday lives and (2) to help the mentors (young people, mostly STEM majors) see teaching as a vital, intellectually challenging career that can provide them the opportunity to work for social justice in their communities. While it is unlikely that any one experience will help young people overcome the long odds that face them as they consider either path, our analysis suggests that projects of this kind can make a meaningful contribution to the effort.

  6. Walking the Path Together from High School to STEM Majors and Careers: Utilizing Community Engagement and a Focus on Teaching to Increase Opportunities for URM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Liza

    2017-02-01

    Despite decades of efforts to increase the participation of women and people from underrepresented minority groups (URM) in science and math majors and careers, and despite the increasing diversification of the US population as a whole (Planty et al in National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC, 2008), participation in STEM majors and STEM careers (including STEM teaching) remains stubbornly male and white (Landivar in American Community Survey Reports, ACS-24, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC, 2013; National Science Foundation and National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics in Special Report NSF 15-311, Arlington, VA, 2015). This paper describes a project with two central goals: (1) to provide opportunities for URM high school students to engage in authentic science and math inquiry with the support of skilled college undergraduate mentors in the hope that these experiences will encourage these high school students to choose and persist in pursuing careers in STEM fields and, even if they do not choose those careers, to feel confident making complex, science or math-based decisions in their everyday lives and (2) to help the mentors (young people, mostly STEM majors) see teaching as a vital, intellectually challenging career that can provide them the opportunity to work for social justice in their communities. While it is unlikely that any one experience will help young people overcome the long odds that face them as they consider either path, our analysis suggests that projects of this kind can make a meaningful contribution to the effort.

  7. 土建类大学毕业生价值观调查研究%Investigation on Values of College Graduate Students Majoring in Civil Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王惠玉; 王力琼; 赵磊

    2011-01-01

    The values of 436 college students of 3 majors in civil engineering graduated in 2011 were investigated by using the questionnaire method, where the questions were mainly selected from the 'World Values Survey,China 2007,[8]designed by Research Center for Contemporary China of Peking University. The research data were then analyzed by statistics and non-metric dimensional scaling method. The results showed that these students had positively patriotism and national pride, and were very interested in society, politics, science progresses and life meanings with the similar understandings or opinions. Happy family was the primary life goal only followed by career success for the most students. The relationships among 10 basic values defined by Schwartz were much different for students with different majors, genders, residences before college life,consumptions,provinces,one-child or multi-child families, which indicated those factors have some impact on the values of the students. For the whole sample, 10 basic values of civil engineering students newly graduated from university had the characteristics of clustering. Hedonism and power were negatively related to the other values,and the distribution of achievement value was much different from the structural relationship proposed by Schwartz and testified by many other overseas researches, which might be attributed to the deferent understandings of achievement between the Eastern culture and Western culture. The methods and results could be referred to the research and education for college students.%选择北京大学国情研究中心编制的《2007年全国公民价值观状况调查问卷》[8]中的部分问题,采用问卷调查的方法,对436名2011届土建类部分专业的大学毕业生进行价值观调查.对调研数据采用数理统计和多尺度降维方法进行相关性分析.结果表明:土建类毕业生大多具有较高的爱国热情和民族自豪感,对社会、政治、科技进步和人

  8. Creativity and practice in cultivating model of Japanese major students%日语专业人才培养模式改革实践探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金盛爱

    2015-01-01

    本文探讨了我校日语专业人才培养模式改革的指导思想及具体措施,从优化课程体系和完善教学内容、注重实践能力培养、加强师资队伍建设、加强教风建设严把教学管理等方面进行了阐释。%The thesis discusses the guiding ideas of the creativity and practice in cultivating model of Japanese major students and it also expounds the consequence of the measures .This process includes optimizing curricu-lum system,improving teaching contents ,paying attention to the cultivation of practical ability ,enhancing the teaching stuffs ,reinforcing the construction of a good studying atmosphere and the teaching management .

  9. Higher vocational college English major students' translation ability%高职院校英语专业学生翻译能力培养探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾令志

    2015-01-01

    高职院校英语专业的学生普遍存在着双语语言基础知识薄弱,翻译策略欠缺,语言外能力不足,知识面狭窄的现象。翻译教学应根据行业要求,有针对性地调整课程内容,改进教学模式,提高学生翻译能力,培养适应社会需要的专业人才。%English major students in higher vocational colleges generally exist in bilingual language foundation knowledge is weak, lack of translation strategy, language ability is insufficient, narrow range of knowledge of phenomena. Translation teaching should be based on industry demand, targeted to adjust the course content, improving teaching model, to improve students' translation ability, cultivate professional talents to satisfy the needs of the society.

  10. Attribution Style of Students of Tennis Major in Colleges and Universities%高校网球专修学生归因方式的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冉; 杨玉林

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, T test, analysis of variance, multiple comparisons are used to analyze the 180 students with different sexes and training period of tennis major in Tianjin Institute of Physical Education and Xi'an Institute of Physical Education. Through the analysis the paper understands the attribution characteristics of current students specializing in tennis, and discusses the relationship between the attribution style and different sex and training period.%本文采用T检验、方差分析、多重比较对天津体育学院以及西安体育学院共180名网球专修学生进行不同性别、不同训练年限的分析.了解目前高校网球专修学生的归因特点,探讨高校网球专修学生归因方式在不同性别、不同训练年限之间的关系.

  11. Using student generated blogs to create a global perspective on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Students in an introductory Global Climate Change college course develop a global perspective on climate change causes, impacts, and mitigation through the use of student generated content in the form of blogging. The students are from diverse backgrounds and mostly non-science majors. They each create a blog for an assigned country. They are immersed in active learning through daily activities that teach them to use numerical data to create and analyze graphs for their blogs. Students are familiarized with other science skills as well, such as how to critically evaluate their sources. This method of using student generated content and active learning encourages students to immerse themselves in the viewpoint of people living in other countries. This creates a tangible understanding of the global stakes of climate change and fosters an emotional involvement in what otherwise might have been an abstract or intimidating topic. The front page of the course blog opens with a world map and a feed from each student's blog. Upon clicking on a country on the world map, the reader is taken to the blog page created by the student in charge of that country. The United States is reserved as a sample page created by the instructor. Throughout the semester, students follow a series of assignments that build their knowledge of the geography, climate, and culture of their assigned country, and these appear as tabs, or informational pages, on their blog. Students are taught to use Excel and they each create temperature and precipitation graphs that compare the climate of a city in their assigned country to that of their home city. Students then write their first blog post on their country's contribution to climate change and how that compares to other countries in the world by importing carbon dioxide emissions data into Excel and creating their own graphs to be used as images in their blog post. The second blog post covers potential climate change impacts on their assigned country

  12. 非英语专业学生学习风格喜好研究%A Study on Non-English Major College Students' Learning Style Preferences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯英琪

    2010-01-01

    本文的研究主要包括两个方面内容:非英语专业大学生学习风格倾向和学习风格与语言学习成绩间的关系.学习风格作为学习者自身差异的因素,受到了极大的关注,但是对非英语专业大学生外语学习风格的研究工作较少.本研究采取了Joy Reid的学习风格调查问卷、访谈和标准测试等方法,同时使用SPSS 13.0对数据进行分析.探讨非英语专业学生就6种学习风格的使用喜好,通过了解大学生的学习风格,教师在教学中能把教学风格与学习风格相匹配,提高课堂教学效率,同时教师可针对不同学生的学习风格采取不同的教学方法.%This thesis is to study the learning styles preferences of non-English major students and to study relationship between learning style and academic achievement of foreign language. Learning styles have been acquired great concern as learner's own different factors, but learning styles study on foreign language of non-English major college student is less. This study adopts Joy Reid's Perceptual Learning Styles Preference Survey questionnaire, interviews, and standard test methods, using SPSS 13.0 for data analysis,to look into these six learning styles by analyzing the use preference. Findings of this study suggest that students in the college in question generally showed a variety of style preferences in English learning. Therefore, teaching approaches and methods should be varied to accommodate the diversified learning style preferences

  13. Construction of Teaching Skill Evaluation System for Physics Specialty Normal Major Students%物理师范生教学技能综合评价体系的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春晓; 吴长海

    2015-01-01

    Teachers ’ professionalization requires normal major student must grasp practiced teaching skill . Based on the requirements of teaching skill of the physics major students , this paper constructs a teaching skill e-valuation system for the physics specialty normal major student , using analytic hierarchy process method .It pro-vides the basis for the quantitative evaluation of the teaching skill of the physics specialty normal student .%教师专业化要求师范生必须掌握娴熟的教学技能。以物理学专业对教师教学技能的要求为基础,利用层次分析法构建了物理师范生教学技能综合评价体系,为定量评价师范生教学技能提供依据。

  14. Inquiry Into Reflective Practices of Student Teachers Majoring in English Education During Practicum%学生教师反思实践模式探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹颖

    2015-01-01

    尽管国内学者对教师反思实践的理论进行了热烈的探讨,但他们的研究集中于在职教师实践性知识的发展上,甚少涉及学生教师的反思实践。在该研究中,我们设计了反思干预方案,让一群英语教育专业学生教师在实习期间进行小组反思,收集自己的教学点滴,与学校和大学指导老师开三方会议,利用翔实的自我评价表和总结性评价表进行自评和他评。通过分析学生教师实习后的总结日志,我们发现学生教师在实习期间能对教学的各个方面进行不同程度的反思,该反思实践对他们的专业成长起到了促进作用。%Although Chinese educators heatedly have discussed the theories of reflective practices,their research has centered on the development of practical knowledge of in-service teachers and seldom explored the reflective practices of pre-service teachers. In the current study,we designed intervention on reflective practices of student teachers majoring in English education during their practicum. They were required to reflect collectively,collect their teaching data,had meeting with school mentors and university tutors,and self and peer assess their teaching using as pre - designed assessing scheme. Through analysis of 41 student teachers ’ journals written after practicum,the findings shows that the intervention seemed to urge student teachers to reflective different aspects of teaching in a varied degree. In addition, the reflective practices appeared to facilitate student teachers ’ professional development in terms of reflective ability,understanding of teaching,teaching skills and classroom management as well as self-knowledge and understanding of teaching profession.

  15. Using student motivation to design groups in a non-majors biology course for team-based collaborative learning: Impacts on knowledge, views, attitudes, and perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kristi L.

    The importance of student motivation and its connection to other learning variables (i.e., attitudes, knowledge, persistence, attendance) is well established. Collaborative work at the undergraduate level has been recognized as a valuable tool in large courses. However, motivation and collaborative group work have rarely been combined. This project utilized student motivation to learn biology to place non-major biology undergraduates in collaborative learning groups at East Carolina University, a mid-sized southeastern American university, to determine the effects of this construct on student learning. A pre-test measuring motivation to learn biology, attitudes toward biology, perceptions of biology and biologists, views of science, and content knowledge was administered. A similar post-test followed as part of the final exam. Two sections of the same introductory biology course (n = 312) were used and students were divided into homogeneous and heterogeneous groups (based on their motivation score). The heterogeneous groups (n = 32) consisted of a mixture of different motivation levels, while the homogeneous groups (n = 32) were organized into teams with similar motivation scores using tiers of high-, middle-, and low-level participants. Data analysis determined mixed perceptions of biology and biologists. These include the perceptions biology was less intriguing, less relevant, less practical, less ethical, and less understandable. Biologists were perceived as being neat and slightly intelligent, but not very altruistic, humane, ethical, logical, honest, or moral. Content knowledge scores more than doubled from pre- to post-test. Half of the items measuring views of science were not statistically significantly different from pre- to post-test. Many of the factors for attitudes toward biology became more agreeable from pre- to post-test. Correlations between motivation scores, participation levels, attendance rates, and final course grades were examined at both the

  16. An Empirical Study of Independent Undertaking for College Students Majoring in Arts%艺术类大学生自主创业实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉苓

    2011-01-01

    艺术类大学生自主创业已成为一种不可或缺的就业方式,是国家倡导并予以扶持的一种就业渠道。本文以活跃在辽沈大地社会艺术培训市场中的音乐美术专业大学生自主创业群体为实例,在对艺术类大学生自主创业拥有的优势资源和体现的社会价值予以论述的同时,指出目前存在的来自社会环境、学校家庭、个人方面的问题,并就此提出相应对策:一是优化创业环境;二是强化创业教育;三是开启创业思路。%Nowadays,art students start their own businesses have become an indispensable means of employment,and also has become one kind of employment channel which the nation advocates and supports.Taking the student group who are majoring in music and fine arts and starting their undertakings dynamically in the social arts training markets in Liaoning province as an example,and at the same time discussing the advantage of resources and the social value of the art students' starting their own businesses,this thesis points out the existing problems of the social environment,school,family,and personal problems,and proposes the solution: first,optimizing the business environment;secondly,strengthening entrepreneurship education;thirdly,broadening business ideas.

  17. Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyereh Aminisani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Competency-based education has been recommended in training and education of public health to reduce the gap between traditional teaching and the competencies required in practice. Epidemiology as a fundamental of public health science has come to attention. The aim of this study was to introduce a complementary core competency program for Master of Science (MSc in epidemiology students in Iran. Methods: A workgroup in the department of statistics and epidemiology of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences including five epidemiologists and three biostatisticians prepared an outline of complementary core competencies for epidemiology MSc students. In the first step several discussion rounds were done to review the current curriculum, then the workgroup sought students’ opinions to find out about their needs. In addition, a review of the current literature around the topic was done. In the final step the program components were developed by the workgroup and initially implemented. Results: A complementary program consists of eight domains: general knowledge, problem finding, data analysis and interpretation, communications, management, consultation, leadership skills and professionalism. This program focused on basic competencies and those competencies outside the major field for a graduate of epidemiology to enhance their knowledge, attitude and skills. The program was scheduled to run in the third semester and approximate time for completion was three months. Conclusion: The development and initial implementation of the complementary core competency program was successful and the authors will attempt to extend the program and evaluate the implementation phase.

  18. Using Multiple Methods to teach ASTR 101 students the Path of the Sun and Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2015-01-01

    It seems surprising that non-science major introductory astronomy students find the daily path of the Sun and shadows created by the Sun challenging to learn even though both can be easily observed (provided students do not look directly at the Sun). In order for our students to master the relevant concepts, we have usually used lecture, a lecture tutorial (from Prather, et al.) followed by think-pair-share questions, a planetarium presentation and an animation from the Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project to teach these topics. We cover these topics in a lecture-only, one semester introductory astronomy course at Joliet Junior College. Feedback from our Spring 2014 students indicated that the planetarium presentation was the most helpful in learning the path of the Sun while none of the four teaching methods was helpful when learning about shadows cast by the Sun. Our students did not find the lecture tutorial to be much help even though such tutorials have been proven to promote deep conceptual change. In Fall 2014, we continued to use these four methods, but we modified how we teach both topics so our students could gain more from the tutorial. We hoped our modifications would cause students to have a better overall grasp of the concepts. After our regular lecture, we gave a shorter than usual planetarium presentation on the path of the Sun and we asked students to work through a shadow activity from Project Astro materials. Then students completed the lecture tutorial and some think-pair-share questions. After this, we asked students to predict the Sun's path on certain days of the year and we used the planetarium projector to show them how well their predictions matched up. We ended our coverage of these topics by asking students a few more think-pair-share questions. In our poster, we will present our approach to teaching these topics in Fall 2014, how our Fall 2014 students feel about our teaching strategies and how they fared on related test questions.

  19. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  20. 中职院校焊接专业学生学习情况初探%The learning situation of vocational college welding major students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢子健

    2012-01-01

      The welding is an important work of current manufacturing industry. This paper studies the present situation and the existing problems of classroom teaching and practical training of secondary vocational welding major students, from accelerating the reform of classroom teaching, improving the quality of teachers, strengthening safety management and other aspects to propose suggestions to improve welding professional learning and training.%  焊接是当前制造业不可缺少的重要作业工种之一。根据中职院校焊接专业学生在课堂教学和实习培训等方面现状及存在的问题,从加快课堂教学改革、提高教师队伍素质、加强安全管理等方面提出了改进焊接专业学习和实训的建议。

  1. 英语专业语法课课程设计与评价%Designing and Assessing English Grammar Course for English Major Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽华; 李青芮; 李文涛

    2014-01-01

    The essay surveys reflectively and critically on the designing and assessing of module 3131023-a English grammar course for English major students. It mainly falls back on Biggs’ constructive alignment and Print’s cyclical models as theoretical supporting. The final finding is that 3131023 is not very well aligned because of the contradictory between learning activity based on portfolio and traditional timed examination as summative assessment. The future recommendation is a combination of a peer assessment and journal writing.%本文以Biggs 的建构性的配合手段和Print周期性课程设计模式为理论依据,对英语专业语法课教学目的、课堂活动和评价方法进行了反思,认为现有的以终结性的测试方式和教学活动存在着不一致,建议语法课程应多采用形成性评价的方式。

  2. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Ana C.

    likely to withdraw from the course than occasional or non-SI participants. In biology, no relationship between SI participation, gender, and student ethnic background was found. In chemistry, female students were significantly more likely to attend SI regularly than males. Chemistry minority students had significantly higher representation among occasional SI participants. An important implication involved the use of pedagogical approaches that make lecture classrooms more interactive and encourage student motivation and engagement. This study could be replicated in other science and non-science courses that offer SI sessions. Additional factors in the success of SI programs and student motivation can be added, such as SI leaders' experience and major. Follow-up studies on students who completed the courses included in this study can be conducted to determine whether they reenrolled in other science courses, continued attending SI sessions, and gained self-regulated learning skills.

  3. Major Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set contains roadway centerlines for major roads (interstates and trunk highways) found on the USGS 1:24,000 mapping series. These roadways are current...

  4. Major Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  5. Research on the Construction of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Learning Situation--A Case Study of the Tourism Management Major in Guangdong Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is inconformity between quality of graduate education and social demand in our country. Graduate students' ability can't meet the demand of national innovation and changing the cultivation mode of graduate student is imminent. Enlightened by the open and independent "student-centered" postgraduate education in foreign…

  6. 浅谈理工科学生自我效能感的培养%Analysis on the Self-efficacy Training of the Students of Science and Engineering Major

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪芹

    2011-01-01

    This thesis summarizes the psychological problems met with students of science and engineering major in colleges.It propose a tentative view on how to improve the self-efficacy of college students of science and engineering major,combining the problem with the self-efficacy theory.%通过分析大学理工科学生学习心理中存在的问题,结合班杜拉的自我效能理论,对于理工科学生自我效能感的提高途径,提出试探性的看法。

  7. 谈高校非舞蹈专业学生的形体训练的探究%Physical Training of Non-dancing Major Students in Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈一帆

    2014-01-01

    The physical training of non-dancing major students in universities need to conduct based on psychological characteristics, physical characteristics and usability of these non-dancing major students, and then suitably select contents and methods of teaching.%院在高校当中对非舞蹈专业学生进行形体训练,需要根据这些非舞蹈专业学生的心理特点以及身体特点、实用性等方面进行,然后对教学的内容和方法进行适当的选择。

  8. 本硕为英语教育专业学生课堂表现%Class performance of English education graduate students whoever majored in EE bachelor program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任艺

    2013-01-01

    English education is a key major in many col eges not only on bachelor program but also on master program. How the English education graduates who ever majored in English education bachelor perform and how they view their new curriculum and teaching styles are studied in this paper. The results show that students like EE master program better but there are some disadvantages to improve.

  9. The Impact of Police College Students'Learning Motivation on Their Major Identity%公安院校大学生学习动机对专业认同的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘启刚; 周立秋

    2015-01-01

    为考察公安院校大学生学习动机对专业认同的影响,以某公安院校228名大学生为调查对象,采用“大学生学习动机量表”和“大学生专业认同问卷”进行测量。结果表明,公安院校大学生学习动机和专业承诺处于中等偏上水平;除个别维度外,公安院校大学生专业认同与学习动机存在显著正相关;内生动机对专业认同及其附属维度均具有显著的预测效果,外生动机对认知性、行为性与专业认同总分具有显著的预测效果。%In order to investigate the impact of police college students'learning motivation on their major identity, this study used col-lege students'learning motivation scale and college students'major identity scale.228 police college students were tested.The results showed that the police college students'learning motivation and major identity was above medium level; most dimensions of the police college students'learning motivation and major identity were significantly positively correlated; The results of regression showed that the intrinsic motivation has effective prediction variable to major identity, and the extrinsic motivation has effective prediction variable to cog-nition, behavior and the total sore of specialty identity.

  10. Research on the Cultivating Strategies of Students Major in Financial Management%浅析高校财务管理专业人才培养策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙峰

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of market economy in China, domestic financial industry, the new market participants are added to make financial management professional college students' employment is facing more fierce competition. Therefore, how to cultivate high quality financial management professionals have become the key determinants of teaching level in colleges and universities. Based on the analysis of financial management in the present market professional graduates employment situation, as well as the problems that exist in the setting of the major of colleges and universities, put forward the necessary way of development of innovation, to cultivate the financial manager to take important role better.%随着我国市场经济的迅速发展,国内金融业中新的市场参与者不断加入,对于金融财务人才的需求不断增加,但是我国金融财务人才应用能力却没有完全满足市场需求,使得财务管理专业的大学生就业面临着更加激烈的竞争.因此,如何让培养出高质量的财务管理专业人才,也成为了决定高校教学水平的关键.在分析现阶段市场中财务管理专业毕业生就业情况、以及高校该专业设置中存在的问题后,提出创新的必要的发展方式,对更好地培养具有综合能力的财务类人才起重要作用.

  11. "To Finally Understand How to Do Well Is the Hardest Part": Seeing the Transfer Journey, Research and Research-Inclusive Careers through the Eyes of Undergraduate Transfer Students Pursuing Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Tola Latola Marie

    2014-01-01

    This multi-case qualitative study explored how University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) undergraduate science major transfer students' backgrounds, transfer journey, previous research and/or other academic experiences and future aspirations shaped perceptions and beliefs about research, research-inclusive careers and integration and engagement…

  12. Preliminary Analysis on the Present Situation and Countermeasures of Learning Literature in English for the Students of English Major%英语专业学生英语文学学习现状及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵彤; 立木文兰

    2012-01-01

      英语文学是英语专业学生的一门十分重要的课程,它是英语专业高年级学生的必修课。英语文学是英语专业学生提高和丰富自身英语文化的重要途径。本文通过对我院英语专业学生英语文学的学习现状,简析了英语文学学习困难的原因,并提出相应建议和策略%  Literature in English is a very important course for the students of English major. It is a compulsory course for the senior students of English major. Learning literature in English is an important way to improve and deepen English culture for the students of English major. Through a questionnaire on learning literature in English for the students of English major in our college,this paper briefly analyses the difficult reasons on learning literature in English and presents some advices and countermeasures on how to learn literature in English.

  13. Empirical Analysis of the Major Identity and Its Influence on Employment Act after Graduation for Students Major in Property Management%物业管理专业本科生专业认同及对择业行为影响的实证分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海波; 黄蕾

    2014-01-01

    The paper empirically analyzes the major identity of students major in property management during the period of studying at school and its influence on their employment acts after graduation by using the methods of regression analysis and factor analysis.Re-sults show that major consciousness,major teaching,major values and major environment have strong positive effects on major identity in the composition of property management major identity,and major prejudice has a weak negative effect on professional identity.The major identity of undergraduate students major in property management during the period of studying at school does not have a positive impact on the employment act after graduation.Finally,the paper puts forward some suggestions on how to improve the major identity and professional employment rate for students major in property management.%通过问卷调查,运用回归和因子分析法对物业管理本科毕业生在校期间的专业认同和毕业后的择业行为进行了实证研究。研究结果表明,在物业管理专业认同的构成中,专业意识、专业教学、专业价值和专业环境对专业认同具有较强的正影响,专业偏见对专业认同具有较弱的负影响;物业管理本科生在校期间的专业认同对毕业后的择业行为并不具有积极影响。最后,本文针对如何提升物业管理本科生的专业认同和专业内就业率提出了相关建议。

  14. Marketing Skill Training for Students of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Major in Higher Vocational Colleges%高职制冷空调专业学生营销技能培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林永进

    2014-01-01

    The necessity for teaching the knowledge and skills of marketing to engineering majors students is described. For students of refrigeration and air conditioning major in higher vocational colleges, curriculum and teaching content of selling courses is studied and confirmed. And it proposed requirements for instructors. The advantages of marketing skill training for students in graduation practice and order classes is discussed.%阐述了对工科类专业学生传授营销知识和技能的必要性,针对高职空调专业学生,研究确定了营销类课程的设置和教学内容,并提出了对授课教师的要求,讨论了在毕业实习和企业订单班中培养学生营销技能的优势。

  15. 多途径构建“以学生为中心”的英语国家概况教学%The Application of "Student-Centered" Approach in an Introduction to Major English-speaking Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永宁

    2012-01-01

    英国国家概况是英语专业学生的必修课.传统的教学模式在该课程的教授中存在一定的局限性,以学生为中心的教学模式可以调动学生学习的自主性和创造性,激发学生学习的热情,有效提高教学效果.%An Introdution to Major English-speaking Countries is the required courses of English major. The traditional teaching pattern has some limitations in the course teaching. Student-centered teaching mode can mobilize students' learning initiative and creativity, and stimulate the students' enthusiasm of study, effectively improve the teaching effect.

  16. Learning About Energy Resources Through Student Created Video Documentaries in the University Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A.

    2010-12-01

    Students enrolled in an undergraduate non-science majors’ Energy Perspectives course created 10-15 minute video documentaries on topics related to Energy Resources and the Environment. Video project topics included wave, biodiesel, clean coal, hydro, solar and “off-the-grid” energy technologies. No student had any prior experience with creating video projects. Students had Liberal Arts academic backgrounds that included Anthropology, Theater Arts, International Studies, English and Early Childhood Education. Students were required to: 1) select a topic, 2) conduct research, 3) write a narrative, 4) construct a project storyboard, 5) shoot or acquire video and photos (from legal sources), 6) record the narrative, and 7) construct the video documentary. This study describes the instructional approach of using student created video documentaries as projects in an undergraduate non-science majors’ science course. Two knowledge survey instruments were used for assessment purposes. Each instrument was administered Pre-, Mid- and Post course. One survey focused on the skills necessary to research and produce video documentaries. Results showed students acquired enhanced technology skills especially with regard to research techniques, writing skills and video editing. The second survey assessed students’ content knowledge acquired from each documentary. Results indicated students’ increased their content knowledge of energy resource topics. Students reported very favorable evaluations concerning their experience with creating “Ken Burns” video project documentaries.

  17. Using Word Associations for Assessing Non Major Science Students' Knowledge Structure before and after General Chemistry Instruction: The Case of Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakiboglu, Canan

    2008-01-01

    Determining students' knowledge structure is important for assessing what a learner knows about a domain of knowledge. Traditional assessment methods are not always appropriate for exploring students' knowledge structure and changes during the learning period. This study investigates how the existing knowledge structure of the learners interacts…

  18. Relationship Between Performance and Interpersonal Relationship of P. E. Major Students%体育专业大学生学习成绩与人际关系相关关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱建龙

    2011-01-01

    Used literature consultation,psychological measurement and mathematical statistics method,took 108 students in physical health major and social sports major of a university in Wuhan as research object,to research the relationship of their performance and their interpersonal relation-ship.The results revealed that the performance of senior students and freshmen had significant dif-ference,the performance of stable major students and new-established major students had significant difference;the interpersonal relationship level of P.E.major students was fairly high,but the range was wide,and different P.E.major students' interpersonal relationship had no significant difference;the theoretic performance and interpersonal relationship of P.E.major student had no significant correlationship,but technical performance and interpersonal relationship had significant correlation-ship.%采用文献资料、心理测验和数理统计研究方法,以武汉某所高校体育保健和社会体育两个专业108名学生为研究对象,对他们的学习成绩与人际关系相关关系进行了研究.研究结果显示:大学高年级学生与大一新生学习成绩有显著性差异,稳定专业学生成绩与新办专业学生成绩存在显著差异;体育专业大学生人际关系水平较高,但极差较大,不同体育专业学生人际关系无显著差异;体育专业学生的理论成绩与人际关系水平无显著相关性,而运动技术成绩与人际关系水平存在高度显著相关性.

  19. The Cultivating Core Competence Strategy of Higher Vocational Business English Major Students%浅析高职高专商务英语专业学生核心竞争力培育策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓红

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of Business English profession Heilongjiang Agricultural Engineering Vocational College to foster vocational business English major students core competitiveness,the author sums up the three cultivating strategy of the core competitiveness of Business English major students which are the formulation of programs,practical students management system and perfect practice teaching system.So to provide practical operation channel for Business English major students cultivate core competence theory,and provide solutions for business English professional cultivation.%从培育高职高专商务英语专业学生核心竞争力出发,结合黑龙江农业工程职业学院商务英语专业现状,归纳总结培育商务英语专业学生核心竞争力的三大策略,立足人才培方案的制定,以切实可行的学生管理体系为保障,配以完善的实践教学体系,从而为培育商务英语专业学生核心竞争力理论提供实践操作途径,商务英语专业培育实践应用性人才提供方案。

  20. 高校音乐专业大学生思想政治教育策略研究%Research on the Strategies of Ideological and Political Education for Music Major Students in Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静斐; 许曦

    2015-01-01

    As a special group in college students, music major college students have special profession, special educa-tional mode and special way of daily life. In the continuously changing era today, the ideology of the music major col-lege students who are in pursuit of free creation is easy to be affected by the social trend. Their ideology even shows diversified characteristics. As a result, how to innovate the way and method of ideological and political education for music major college students and form the effective educational strategies is a new topic faced by the ideological and poli-tical educators at present.%音乐专业大学生是大学中一个特殊的群体,专业特殊、教育方式特殊、日常生活方式特殊.在时代变革的今天,崇尚创作自由的音乐专业大学生的思想容易受社会潮流影响,其思想更是表现出多种多样的特点.因此,如何创新音乐专业大学生的思想政治教育方式方法,形成有效的教育策略,就是当下思想政治教育工作者所面临的新课题.

  1. About the Positive Impact on the Employment of College Students Major in Arts through Volunteer Service%志愿服务经历对文科专业大学生就业的积极影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄晓华; 章洁

    2014-01-01

    The employment of college students has become the highly-focused livelihood issue of government and society. To promote the employment of college students has become the important bounden duty of all colleges and universities. The difficult employment of college students is the most evident in liberal arts majors in local colleges. As an important carrier of social practice, volunteer service is exerting more and more important effect on enhancing students' vocational skills and social adaptability. It is worthy of further research on promoting employment of college students who major in liberal arts.%大学生就业问题已经成为政府和社会高度关注的民生问题,促进大学生就业已成为高校义不容辞的重要责任。大学生就业难在地方普通高校文科专业体现最为明显,而志愿服务作为重要的社会实践载体,对提升大学生的职业技能和社会适应性正产生越来越重要的影响,其对文科专业大学生就业的促进作用值得深入研究。

  2. Innovation and entrepreneurship education of management major students under the new normal state%新常态下管理类大学生创新创业教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹雪娇

    2016-01-01

    目前,我国经济形势不佳,就业压力不断增大。为促进大学生就业,需要适应当前的经济、就业新常态,加强大学生创新创业教育,鼓励、扶持大学生创新创业。本文分析了管理类大学生创新创业教育的重要性,提出了新常态下管理类大学生创新创业教育的对策。%At present, China's economic situation is not good, the employment pressure is increasing. In order to promote the employment of college students, we need to adapt to the current economic and employment of the new normal, to strengthen college students' innovation and entrepreneurship education, to encourage and support the innovation and entrepreneurship of college students. This paper analyzes the importance of the management major students' innovation and entrepreneurship education, and puts forward the countermeasures for the innovation and entrepreneurship education of management major students under the new normal conditions.

  3. A Study on the Psychological Crisis Early-Warning Model for Students of Pre-school Education Major%幼师生心理危机预警模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2011-01-01

    幼师生心理危机是影响学校稳定和发展的重要因素。针对预警在幼师生心理危机管理中的重要性,结合心理危机产生的原因,提出了幼师生心理危机预警指标体系。考虑到指标信息的模糊性,引入多层次模糊综合评判方法,建立了幼师生心理危机预警模型,以期在实践中得到应用。%The psychological crisis of students' of pre-school education major is an important factor influencing the stability and development of the school. In view of the importance of early warning in management of psychological crisis of students of pre-school education major and the causes of psychological crisis, this paper proposes the psychological crisis early- warning system for students of pre-school education major. Taking into account the ambiguity of index information, multi- level fussy comprehensive evaluation is introduced to construct a psychological crisis early-warning model for students of preschool education major, aiminz to be annlied in nractice.

  4. Major Decisions: Motivations for Selecting a Major, Satisfaction, and Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Stebleton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the relationship between students' motivations for choosing academic majors and their satisfaction and sense of belonging on campus. Based on a multi-institutional survey of students who attended large, public, research universities in 2009, the results suggest that external extrinsic motivations for selecting a major…

  5. Physics momentum 'stars' draw majors

    CERN Multimedia

    Lindström, I

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of University of Arizona students declaring physics as their major has doubled, amid a national decline. According to a recent report by the National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics, it is the university's dedication to its undergraduate physics program which draws students in (1 page).

  6. Émigré Albert Eckstein’s Legacy on Health Care Modernization in Turkey: Two Generations of Students Who Have Made Major Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günay-Erkol, Çimen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1933, with lightening speed, Turkey began reforming its legal and health care delivery systems as well as its system of higher education using refugees fleeing the Nazis. These eminent intellectuals were saved by way of formal government invitations and formed a vibrant academic atmosphere in Turkey. For many America was out of reach because of restrictive immigration laws and wide spread anti-Semitic hiring bias at its universities. This paper documents the respect and gratitude for one of the émigrés held by former students and students of their students in Turkey today, for Albert Eckstein and his contributions to Turkey’s pediatrics and public health.

  7. Access of Career Planning for Students Majored in Network Engineering%基于网络工程专业学生职业生涯规划的实现路径管窥

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张劭臻

    2011-01-01

    立足大学生职业生涯规划的实质,针对网络工程专业学生职业生涯规划的现状分析,从加强专业认知、优势盘点与职业认知与雇佣能力建构三个方面入手,提升其就业竞争力.%Based on the essence of career planning of college students, the paper analyses present situation of career planning of students majored in network engineering, and suggests students to improve their employability in job hunting by means of strengthening professional awareness, inventorying advantages and building career awareness and employment capacity.

  8. 日语专业学生跨文化交际能力培养策略研究%On the cultivation of Cross-Culture communication competence for students of Japanese major

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜庆立

    2014-01-01

    跨文化交际能力是日语专业学生能力培养的主要目标之一。当前,不少日语专业学生在词汇、文法、阅读等方面具有较为扎实的基础,然而在跨文化交际能力方面存在较大的不足。通过分析日语专业学生跨文化交际能力缺失的原因,探讨行之有效的培养策略。%Cross-Culture communication competence is a major part of the comprehensive competence for students in Japanese major. Most of the students are proficient in vocabulary, grammar, reading and other linguistic aspects, but are inadequate in Cross-Culture communication. This article tries to discuss about the effective strategies to help students cultivate the Cross-Culture communication competence through analyzing the reasons for lacking of this non-linguistic competence among students.

  9. Employment Anxiety Reasons of Students Majoring in PE and Coping Strategy%体育专业大学生就业焦虑因素分析及其应对策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚麟

    2012-01-01

    As the college students majored in sports are limited from their own, by the school and social, they faces more and more severe employment situation in recent years. It is difficult to solve the problem of employment for sports specialty. The article discusses the major forming reasons of influencing the employment anxiety of college students, and puts forward the coping strategy for preventing and intervening the related problems, solving the university student anxiety of employmen, and helping students to healthy learning and growth.%体育专业大学生受来自于自身、学校及其社会等三方面因素的限制,面对近年来越来越严峻的就业形势,要解决体育专业就业的问题并非一朝一夕的问题.文章探讨了当前影响我国体育专业大学生产生就业焦虑心理的主要形成原因,并就大学生的焦虑成因提出一些应对对策,对相关的问题进行预防和干预,解决大学生焦虑的心理问题,帮助大学生健康地学习和成长.

  10. 计算机类专业高职学生职业能力提升策略研究%Research on the Strategies to Enhance Professional Competence for Vocational School Students Majoring in Computer Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丹青

    2014-01-01

    运用《霍兰德职业倾向测验量表》,对高职院校计算机类专业学生调查分析表明学生的职业倾向主要是社会型、艺术型和企业型。因此,针对高职院校学生职业倾向和个性特征,提出根据学生的个性特征,结合专业特性,增加拓展知识领域的课程,实施分阶段分层次的教学模式,并在教学中,开展个性化教学,关注对学生进行职业引导。%The "Holland vocational aptitude test scale" survey on vocational school students majoring in computer science showed that students' career tendencies are mainly social, artistic and business oriented. A phased, hierarchical teaching model is proposed based on student’s vocational orientation and personality traits. The model is tailored to different majors and different student professional orientation, with additional courses to broaden knowledge base. The model emphasizes individualized teach-ing with a purpose to provide students with vocational guidance.

  11. The Relationships among High School STEM Learning Experiences and Students' Intent to Declare and Declaration of a STEM Major in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottia, Martha Cecilia; Stearns, Elizabeth; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin; Moller, Stephanie; Parker, Ashley Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Background/Context: Schools are integral to augmenting and diversifying the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce. This is because K-12 schools can inspire and reinforce students' interest in STEM, in addition to academically preparing them to pursue a STEM career. Previous literature emphasizes the importance of…

  12. Mentors for Undergraduates in Technical Disciplines: A Collaborative Effort by Faculty, Student Development Professionals, and Alumni To Improve Undergraduate Retention and Success in Technical Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Elizabeth; Wells-Glover, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Describes a program at Fontbonne College (Missouri) by the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and Office of Multicultural Affairs that identified eight high-risk, first- and second-year students and matched them with four alumni mentors as part of a one-credit career management course. Evaluation showed improved academic performance…

  13. "… it is a major challenge to guide pupils in a field they believe they master." – student teachers on dealing with pupils' digital everyday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl F. Dons

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article is to answer the following research question: How can we prepare student teachers to deal with pupils who have a wide range of day-to-day experiences of the digital world? This question arises out of the understanding that today's student-teacher training is inadequately equipped to realize the potential for learning found in the way that digital technology is now an integral part of the social and cultural practices of children and young people. Based on theory and practice from research and development activities in primary and lower secondary school, the article points out some perspectives connected to the technology culture of children and young people that may have importance for the professional training of student teachers. The article concludes by summarizing some findings from a research project in general teacher education, where it is argued that student teachers can be qualified to cope with the way children and young people use technology by teaching them to adopt solutions based on personal publishing. In many ways the article deals with classical issues in the education field; how the relations between cognition, learning, technology and fellow-citizenship raise practical issues connected to teaching and learning (Dewey, 1915; 1938; 1958.

  14. The Educational Significance of Japanese Books in University Library for Japanese Major Students%高校图书馆日文图书对日语专业大学生的教育意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冰

    2016-01-01

    Japanese books, which are an important part in university library's collection, contain a large number of knowledge and information related to Japan's language, history, geography, literature and economy, and are very important resources that can help students who major in Japanese improve their learning abilities and qualities.This paper analyzes the employment situation of Japanese major students and the application status of Japanese books, and points out that university library should realize the educational value of Japanese books though strengthening university library's management and service of Japanese books and giving full play to the functions of Japanese major teachers and students.%日文图书是高校图书馆馆藏的重要组成部分,其中蕴藏着大量有关日本语言、历史、地理、文学、经济的知识和信息,是日语专业学生提高自身学习能力和素质的重要资源. 分析了日语专业学生的就业形势及日文图书的利用现状,指出应通过加强高校图书馆的日文图书管理和服务工作、发挥日语专业师生的作用来实现日文图书的教育价值.

  15. Undergraduate honors students' images of science: Nature of scientific work and scientific knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael L.

    This exploratory study assessed the influence of an implicit, inquiry-oriented nature of science (NOS) instructional approach undertaken in an interdisciplinary college science course on undergraduate honor students' (UHS) understanding of the aspects of NOS for scientific work and scientific knowledge. In this study, the nature of scientific work concentrated upon the delineation of science from pseudoscience and the value scientists place on reproducibility. The nature of scientific knowledge concentrated upon how UHS view scientific theories and how they believe scientists utilize scientific theories in their research. The 39 UHS who participated in the study were non-science majors enrolled in a Honors College sponsored interdisciplinary science course where the instructors took an implicit NOS instructional approach. An open-ended assessment instrument, the UFO Scenario, was designed for the course and used to assess UHS' images of science at the beginning and end of the semester. The mixed-design study employed both qualitative and quantitative techniques to analyze the open-ended responses. The qualitative techniques of open and axial coding were utilized to find recurring themes within UHS' responses. McNemar's chi-square test for two dependent samples was used to identify whether any statistically significant changes occurred within responses from the beginning to the end of the semester. At the start of the study, the majority of UHS held mixed NOS views, but were able to accurately define what a scientific theory is and explicate how scientists utilize theories within scientific research. Postinstruction assessment indicated that UHS did not make significant gains in their understanding of the nature of scientific work or scientific knowledge and their overall images of science remained static. The results of the present study found implicit NOS instruction even with an extensive inquiry-oriented component was an ineffective approach for modifying UHS

  16. How to Settle the Problems in English Teaching of Art Major Students%正确看待艺术类学生英语教学中的难题,可化腐朽为神奇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李解人

    2014-01-01

    In the art college enrollment, the English grades of the art major students become lower and lower. So lots of students with poor English can come into art universities and bec ome a member of it. According to this problem, the teachers in art uni-versities can use English teaching strategies properly and reason-ably, divide the students into different levels according to their English grades and teach them properly, reduce the difficulty of textbooks, adjust the attendance measures, improve the quality of teachers to settle this problem. If teachers use these methods ap-propriately, stimulating students' interest in English learning will not be a difficult task. The students with poor English can also learn something in English class.%随着艺术类院校招生门槛的进一步降低,大量英语基础较差的学生进入艺术类院校。针对这些学生的特点,如果能恰当运用合理的英语教学策略;分层次教学;适当降低教材的难度;调整考勤办法;提高教师素养。那么,激发起学生学习英语的兴趣,并不是难事;再差的学生也能学有所成。

  17. Science-Technology-Society literacy in college non-majors biology: Comparing problem/case studies based learning and traditional expository methods of instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John S.

    This study used a multiple response model (MRM) on selected items from the Views on Science-Technology-Society (VOSTS) survey to examine science-technology-society (STS) literacy among college non-science majors' taught using Problem/Case Studies Based Learning (PBL/CSBL) and traditional expository methods of instruction. An initial pilot investigation of 15 VOSTS items produced a valid and reliable scoring model which can be used to quantitatively assess student literacy on a variety of STS topics deemed important for informed civic engagement in science related social and environmental issues. The new scoring model allows for the use of parametric inferential statistics to test hypotheses about factors influencing STS literacy. The follow-up cross-institutional study comparing teaching methods employed Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) to model the efficiency and equitability of instructional methods on STS literacy. A cluster analysis was also used to compare pre and post course patterns of student views on the set of positions expressed within VOSTS items. HLM analysis revealed significantly higher instructional efficiency in the PBL/CSBL study group for 4 of the 35 STS attitude indices (characterization of media vs. school science; tentativeness of scientific models; cultural influences on scientific research), and more equitable effects of traditional instruction on one attitude index (interdependence of science and technology). Cluster analysis revealed generally stable patterns of pre to post course views across study groups, but also revealed possible teaching method effects on the relationship between the views expressed within VOSTS items with respect to (1) interdependency of science and technology; (2) anti-technology; (3) socioscientific decision-making; (4) scientific/technological solutions to environmental problems; (5) usefulness of school vs. media characterizations of science; (6) social constructivist vs. objectivist views of theories; (7

  18. Feminist Physics Education: Deconstructed Physics and Students' Multiple Subjectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammula, Diane Crenshaw

    Physics is one of the least diverse sciences; in the U.S. in 2010, only 21% of bachelors degrees in physics were awarded to women, 2.5% to African Americans, and 4% to Hispanic Americans (AIP, 2012). Though physics education reform efforts supporting interactive engagement have doubled students' learning gains (Hake, 1998), gender and race gaps persist (Brewe et al., 2010; Kost, Pollock, & Finkelstein, 2009). When students' subjectivities align with presentations of physics, they are more likely to develop positive physics identities (Hughes, 2001). However, both traditional and reformed physics classrooms may present physics singularly as abstract, elite, and rational (Carlone, 2004). Drawing from feminist science, I argue that binaries including abstract / concrete, elite / accessible, and rational / emotional are hierarchal and gendered, raced and classed. The words on the left define conventional physics and are associated with middle class white masculinity, while the words on the right are associated with femininity or other, and are often missing or delegitimized in physics education, as are females and minorities. To conceptualize a feminist physics education, I deconstructed these binaries by including the words on the right as part of doing physics. I do not imply that women and men think differently, but that broadening notions of physics may allow a wider range of students to connect with the discipline. I used this conceptual framework to modify a popular reformed physics curriculum called Modeling Instruction (Hestenes, 1987). I taught this curriculum at an urban public college in an introductory physics course for non-science majors. Twenty-three students of diverse gender, race, ethnic, immigrant and class backgrounds enrolled. I conducted an ethnography of the classroom to learn how students negotiate their subjectivities to affiliate with or alienate from their perceptions of physics, and to understand how classroom experiences exacerbate or

  19. 南京体育学院健美操专项学生英语水平的研究%A Study of English Proficiency of Students Major In Calisthenics Specialty Of Nanjing Sport Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚瑶; 袁野

    2012-01-01

    通过文献资料法、问卷调查法、数理统计法对南京体育学院健美操专项学生英语水平进行了调查与分析,探讨了英语对当今体育院校学生的重要性。分析了体育院校在英语的教学方面应该遵循的方法及手段。通过调查发现,健美操专项学生的英语水平比较低;绝大多数同学们在课后没有花时间进行英语的学习;同学们的交流能力不强,在课后同学们运用英语的能力不强。%This study has done an investigation and analysis through the literature,questionnaire survey method and mathematical statistics study of English proficiency of students major in calisthenics specialty of Nanjing sport institute,and then discussed the importance of English proficiency for students in sports institutions.In addition,this study has analyzed the method and means that English teaching should follow in sport institutes.According to the survey,students major in calisthenics specialty have a relatively low level of English proficiency,an overwhelming majority of the students have not spend time for English study,and result in a poor ability in English communication.

  20. "We All We Got": Considering Peer Relationships as Multi-Purpose Sustainability Outlets among Millennial Black Women Graduate Students Attending Majority White Urban Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apugo, Danielle L.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the use of peer relationships among graduate millennial Black women (GMBW) in majority white urban universities as methods of mentorship and sustainability. Though informally constructed, the women in this study purposed their peer relationships to fill a void often satisfied through formal mentor relationships. Findings from…

  1. English Teaching Strategy based on Learning Motivation of Nursing Major Students%护理专业英语学习动机与教学策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白亚楠

    2015-01-01

    In the process of English teaching, the students,learning motivation is an important factor to influence learning effects. More and more researches show that learning motivation is closely related to learners’learning attitude, learning strategy and learning achievement, which is also the direct cause and driving force of their learning behavior. From the perspective of educa⁃tional psychology, this paper aims to propose the appropriate teaching strategy recommendations on how to improve students , Eng⁃lish learning motivation based on the survey of nursing students’English learning motivation and interviews with some students.%在英语教学过程中,学生的学习动机是影响学习效果的一个重要因素。越来越多的研究表明,学习动机与学习者的学习态度、学习策略、学习成绩有着密切关系,是其学习行为的直接原因和内部动力。该文从教育心理学的角度,对护理专业学生的英语学习动机进行了问卷调查,并结合对部分学生的访谈分析其英语学习动机情况,从而就如何提高学生的英语学习动力,提出相应的教学策略建议。

  2. What does it take to create an effective and interactive learning environment with 700 students in a college Gen. Ed. Astro Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Edward E.; Brissenden, G.; Cormier, S.; Eckenrode, J.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2012-01-01

    College-level general education (gen ed.) curricula in the US have many goals: exposing students to the breadth of human ideas; elevating their reading comprehension, writing abilities, critical reasoning skills; and providing an understanding of, and appreciation for, subjects outside of their chosen field of study. Unfortunately the majority of the teaching and learning for gen ed. courses takes place in large enrollment courses. In the wake of the recent US financial crisis, many institutions of higher learning face extreme budget cuts, leading many faculty to teach in substantially larger classes with increasingly fewer resources. At the University of Arizona this issue manifests itself in mega-classes with enrollments from 700-1400. We discuss key programmatic and pedagogical changes involved in successfully implementing proven collaborative learning strategies into an Astro 101 mega-class. From devising new ways to hand out and collect papers, to altering course seating, to outlawing cell phones and laptops, to implementing new ways of administering tests. We take a "what ever it takes” approach to engineering this mega-course environment so it can succeed as a learner-centered classroom. Paramount to the success of this course has been the creation of the new CAE Ambassadors program which advances the leadership role of prior non-science majors along the continuum from student, to teaching assistant, to science education researcher, to STEM minor. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  3. 高职汽车专业学生职业技能竞赛发展与赛制完善%On Development and Improvement of Vocational Skills Competition among Students Majored in Automobile in Higher Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕天维

    2015-01-01

    At present, theresultsof students' vocational skill competition have become an important indicatorto weigh the comprehensive strength to run a schooland also an important assessment index of thesocial influence. This paper takes students' vocational skill competitionof automobile major as the research object, analyzes the development status of stu-dents' vocational skill competitionin automobilemajor, surveyes the main problems existing instudents' vocational skills competition in automobile major, and combined with the problems, proposes relevant countermeasures and suggestions.%当前,职业技能竞赛成果已经成为衡量高职院校办学综合实力和社会影响力的重要评价指标。以高职汽车专业学生职业技能竞赛为研究对象,分析了高职汽车专业学生职业技能竞赛发展情况,调研了高职汽车专业学生职业技能竞赛现存主要问题,并结合问题提出了有针对性的对策建议。

  4. 高校艺术设计专业摄影课程现状分析%Analysis on the Current Situation of Photography Course for College Students Majoring in Art Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    As a basic professional course which is designed for college students majoring in art design, photography should meet the needs of different students. For better teaching effect, the teaching aims, content and method selection should be appropri-ately adjusted. This essay analyzes and discusses how to integrate basic photography knowledge and applied skills with the stu-dents' major objectives.%  摄影作为高校艺术设计专业的一门专业基础课程,在教学中应适应不同专业学生的需求,在教学目标定位、教学内容选择、教学方法运用上进行适度的调整和变化,以达到良好的教学效果,本文就如何在摄影的基础知识与技术应用的基础上联系学生专业方向进行课程教学进行了分析与探讨。

  5. 高职院校电子商务专业学生沟通能力的培养%Promoting the Communication Skill of Electronic Commerce Major Students in Higher Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉琼

    2011-01-01

    The weak communication awareness and ability of electonic commerce major students in higher vocational colleges doesn't match the vocational request of electronic ecommerce post. Students, specialty and enterprise lead to low communication skill especially mote the communication skill of electronic language expression ability. This article discusses about the strategy to procommerce major students in higher vocatinal colleges based on the " threein one" pattern.%高职院校电子商务专业学生的沟通意识和能力整体较弱,这与电子商务类岗位的任职要求不相符。导致电子商务学生沟通能力特别是语言表达能力薄弱的主要原因来自于三方面因素:学生、专业、企业。本文基于“三维一体”模式探讨了提升高职院校电子商务学生沟通能力的培养策略,旨在给电子商务学生、专业在沟通能力培养方面提供参考。

  6. Develop research of adult education of English major students learning motivation strategy%成人教育英语专业学生学习动机策略的培养研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白蓝

    2015-01-01

    In the second language learning, learning motivation in language learners' individual factors is one of the most dynamic factors. Stimulate students' learning motivation is beneficial to cultivate the students' interest in learning, improve the students' English level. Based on the school of continuing education, English major students as the research object, focus on how to develop the adult education students' learning motivation. At present, the adult education in learning form is too loose, teaching time is too concentrated, English foundation is generally poor. In order to solve the difficulties of students, this paper put forward the strategies of the learning motivation, including create a good learning atmosphere, hierarchical teaching model and set up diversified learning goals.%在二语学习中,学习动机是语言学习者个体因素中最具能动性的因素之一.激发学生的学习动机有利于培养学生的学习兴趣,提高学生英语水平.本文以继续教育学院英语专业学生为研究对象,集中探讨如何培养成人教育学生的学习动机.目前,成人教育在学习形式上过于松散、授课时间过于集中、英语基础普遍较差.为了解决学生面临的困难,本文提出激发学习动机的策略,具体包括营造良好的学习氛围,组织分层次教学模式以及树立多元化学习目标.

  7. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  8. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  9. Suicidal ideation and sex differences in relation to 18 major psychiatric disorders in college and university students: anonymous web-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupler, Larry A; Hong, Jennifer Y; Gibori, Ron; Blitchington, Timothy F; Krishnan, K Ranga R

    2015-04-01

    College/university students are at high risk for psychiatric disorder and suicide secondary to age, campus stressors, and social pressures. We therefore report frequencies of 18 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision disorders and suicidal ideation (SI) acquired anonymously from a Web site receiving 113,181 visits from more than 1,500 predominantly US colleges/universities. Depression was foremost, followed by social phobia and eating disorders. Substance-related disorders were less frequent than expected. SI occurred in 47.1% of students, with women evidencing somewhat stronger findings than men. SI was more associated with substance, bipolar, and panic disorders than depression. Self-reported emotional volatility exceeded thoughts of self-harm for all disorders. The results support two subtypes of suicide risk: dysphoric premeditators and those primarily angry and/or impulsive. Clinicians and researchers should therefore consider suicide as an independent psychopathological phenomenon that includes emotional volatility as a risk factor and thoroughly evaluate psychiatric disorders potentially conferring greater suicidal propensity than depression.

  10. 艺术类与非艺术类大学生注意集中能力的差异研究%Study on the difference of focused attention between art and nor art majors college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊卿; 骆芋竹

    2014-01-01

    为探讨艺术类与非艺术类大学生注意集中能力的差异,选取艺术类和非艺术类大学生各32名为被试,利用BD Ⅱ310型注意集中能力测定仪对他们的注意集中能力进行实验研究。结果显示:(1)不同专业大学生在成功时间上没有显著差异,艺术类大学生在脱靶次数上显著少于非艺术类大学生。(2)不同专业同性别的大学生在成功时间上不存在显著差异,在脱靶次数上艺术类男生显著少于非艺术类男生,艺术类女生显著多于非艺术类女生。(3)噪音干扰对被试的成功时间有显著影响,但对脱靶次数无显著影响。结论:艺术类大学生注意集中能力好于非艺术类,艺术类男生注意集中能力好于非艺术类,非艺术类女生注意集中能力好于艺术类。%To explore the differences of focused attention between art and nor art students ,64 art and non art students were tested by the BD Ⅱ 310 attention instruments .The results showed :(1) there was no significant difference between art and non art students in success time ,but non art students’ failure numbers were more than art students .(2) The suc-cess time of the same gender had no significant difference between different majors ,but male art students’ failure numbers were less than non art students while female art students’ failure numbers were more than non art students .(3) The noise had effect on success time ,but had no effect on failure numbers .So the following conclusions could be reached :Art students performed better than non art in focused attention ,art boys’ focused attention was better than non art while art girls’ fo-cused attention was worse than non art major girls’ .

  11. 专业教育在高职艺术专业学生管理中的运用研究%On the Implementation of Professional Education to the Students Majoring in Art in Higher Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包洋; 钱靓

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of the students majoring in art in higher vocational colleges,we should implement effective management in line with their professional characteristics and practice;implement emotional-oriented education to be the guide of the students;combine art with professional features to achieve good student management;rationally formulate the students' professional learning to explore new ways of students management,so as to provide better services for the students' success.%针对高职艺术专业学生特点,应实施符合其专业特点和行之有效的学生管理方法,以情感教育为导向,做好学生思想引路人;结合艺术专业特点,做好学生管理工作;合理规划专业学习,探索学生管理新途径,更好地为学生成长成才服务。

  12. Satisfaction with College Major: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsom, Amy; Coughlin, Julie

    2015-01-01

    All college students must eventually choose and complete a major. Many switch majors, and some change it multiple times. Despite extensive literature addressing factors that influence students' initial choice of major, few scholars have examined students' experiences after enrollment in a selected major. In this study, we used a grounded theory…

  13. The Nonscience of Human Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1974-01-01

    Possible reasons for the current resurgence of biological determinism are discussed. Deterministic arguments are classified as being based on the general human species or based on presumed differences among racial groups. The first type of argument is presented and some alternate interpretations proposed. (LS)

  14. 论法学专业学生实践能力的培养%Practical Ability Cultivating of College Student in Law Majoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴贵春

    2014-01-01

    It is the aim of legal education to cultivate applied talent in college .The common way is to strengthen the practical teaching , improve students practical ability .We must establish the concept of training applied talents ,reforming the traditional teaching methods ,establishing the construction of prac-tice teaching course system and cultivating the practice teaching of law faculty to fit the necessary from the social.%培养应用型人才是法学教育的目的所在。加强法学专业实践教学,提高学生实践能力,必须确立应用型人才培养理念,改革传统教育教学方法,构建实践教学课程体系,培养法学实践教学教师队伍。

  15. Analysis of Three Major Factors on Restricting Students ’Self-employment%制约大学生自主创业三大因素之浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琼

    2012-01-01

      随着市场经济的发展,大学生就业的途径越来越多。大学生自主创业作为新兴事物有其特殊性。研究其现状,了解其利弊,有针对性地采取有效措施,帮助大学生成功自主创业,于个人、家庭、社会都是非常有意义的。%  With the development of market economy, there are more and more ways to find job. Self-employment as a new thing has its particularity significance. Studying the situation, understanding the advantages and disadvantages, taking effective measures will help students succeed their self-employment. All these things are meaningful to individuals, families and the whole community.

  16. Career perspectives and reality for pedagogy graduates in 2012 using the example of the students of the University of Wrocław majoring in rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kozłowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article is the issue of career development of students that have graduated from 5-years pedagogy studies with the master diploma at the University of Wrocław in 2011. The article is supposed to confront the assumed profi le of the pedagogy graduates placed on the university website with the reality on the job market. The essential assumption of the article is the attempt to receive the most possible comprehensive picture of the former students’ career perspectives and the reality they encounter on the basis of their relation, not only the statistics available. The article will also cover the analysis of the qualifications gained during the studies but also all other factors that turned out to be helpful to find an employment consistent with their expectations.

  17. 中兽医专业高职高专学生信心培养和兴趣激发%Raising confidence and stimulating interest of TCVM major students in higher vocational education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫新城; 王晓丹; 周平平; 马爱团; 霍海伟

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve study confidence and interests of the traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM) students and to advance the quality of education, the author investigated the reason and countermeasure of this actuality. We think the reasons are the students are short of study confidence and interests because of bad performance record on admission, deficiency of apprehension of higher vocational education and the stronger philosophy nature of traditional Chinese veterinary medicine foundation knowledge; the method of clearing new starting point, revealing major superiority, strengthening practice teaching, applying encourage appreciation and setting up expectation and etc could help students to get confidence, stimulate study interests, elevate study enthusiasm and it is important to raise students of traditional Chinese veterinary medicine major in higher vocational education.%为了提高中兽医专业高职高专学生的学习信心和兴趣,提高教学质量,对影响学生信心培养的原因和对策进行了研究.分析认为,学生入学成绩差、对职业教育的认识欠缺和中兽医知识的哲学性强是导致当前中兽医专业高职高专学生学习信心不足、缺乏学习兴趣的主要原因;在教学过程,通过明确教学新起点、展现中兽医专业优势、加强实践教学、采用鼓励性评价和设置期望等方式帮助学生培养学习信心和学习兴趣,提高学习积极性,取得了良好的效果.

  18. 高等院校市场营销专业学生实践能力提升策略研究%Research on Promotion Strategy of Universities Students' Practical Ability Majoring in Marketing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洪杰; 孙焱

    2016-01-01

    高等院校如何有效培养营销专业学生的实践能力是推进素质教育和大众创业亟需解决的重要命题。论文从学生自身、教师师资和学校组织等方面分析了当前高等院校营销专业学生实践能力培养方面存在的问题,提出了革新课堂案例教学设计,推进角色扮演、引导学生服务小企业、搭建电商服务平台、创建创业孵化平台、搭建企业对话平台等提升高等院校营销专业大学生实践能力的策略。%It is an important issue for universities to improve practical the ability of students majoring in marketing for quality education and mass entrepreneurship. This paper analyzes the current problems which lie in practice abilities of students ma-joring in marketing from such factors as students, teachers and organization, and then puts forward some strategies as reforming case teaching design, role-playing, guiding student service to small businesses, building E-commerce service platform, creating business incubator platform and building enterprise platform for dialogue.

  19. 体育院校不同专业师生间心理关系的研究%Research on the Psychological Relationship of Different Majors between Teachers and Students in Physical Education Institutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐平

    2012-01-01

    通过文献资料法、问卷调查法、专家访谈法,对全国4所体育院校运动训练专业与体育教育专业篮球专选组的学生进行调查,分析在教育教学活动过程中,师生关系中的教学关系及人际关系两个层面的特征,及其对不同专业师生间关系的影响。通过对两个专业学生各方面特点的差异进行对比与分析,提出师生关系在作用过程中,如何作出的相应的调整,以提高教育教学效果。%Based on the recent studies of the teach-student relationship from its essence to the analysis on its multi-levels,the paper conducted a survey among students majoring in athletic training and physical education of basketball in four domestic sports universities to investigate the characteristics of teaching and learning relationship and interpersonal relationship between teachers and students.The research methods applied in the study include literature review,survey and professional interview.By comparing and analyzing the differences between two majors in various aspects,this paper attempts to imply adjustment of the teacher-student relationship to facilitate teaching and learning.

  20. SkyGlowNet: Multi-Disciplinary Independent Student Research in Environmental Light at Night Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; DeBenedetti, J. C.; Flurchick, K. M.

    2014-07-01

    SkyGlowNet uses Internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) to monitor sky brightness over school sites. The data are used professionally and in STEM outreach to study natural and artificial sources of sky brightness, light pollution, energy efficiency, and environmental and health impacts of artificial night lighting. The iSBM units are owned by participating institutions and managed by faculty or students via proprietary Internet links. Student data are embargoed for two semesters to allow students to analyze data and publish results, then they are moved to a common area where students from different institutions can collaborate. The iSBM units can be set to operate automatically each night. Their data include time, sky brightness, weather conditions, and other related parameters. The data stream can be viewed and processed online or downloaded for study. SkyGlowNet is a unique, multi-disciplinary, real science program aiding research for science and non-science students.

  1. Personality, academic majors and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Anna; Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Larsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Personality–performance research typically uses samples of psychology students without questioning their representativeness. The present article reports two studies challenging this practice. Study 1: group differences in the Big Five personality traits were explored between students (N = 1067......) in different academic majors (medicine, psychology, law, economics, political science, science, and arts/humanities), who were tested immediately after university enrolment. Study 2: six and a half years later the students’ academic records were obtained, and predictive validity of the Big Five personality...... traits and their subordinate facets was examined in the various academic majors in relation to Grade Point Average (GPA). Significant group differences in all Big Five personality traits were found between students in different academic majors. Also, variability in predictive validity of the Big Five...

  2. Exploration on Strategies to Cultivate the Positive Psy-chological Quality of Male Students Majoring in Preschool Education%学前教育专业男生积极心理品质培养策略探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓艳华

    2015-01-01

    Positive psychological quality includes the sum of a series of psychological behaviors including individual thought, e-motion and behavior, such as love, optimism, challenge, devotion . In recent years, our country announces policies and regula-tions to encourage males to enter preschool education industry, resulting in more and more male students majoring in preschool education, but many male students majoring in preschool educa-tion have some psychological problems, such as professional i-dentity confusion, occupation identity, self-drive and so on. The aim of this paper is to help male students majoring in preschool education establish correct values, carry out career planning, in-crease their self-confidence and pride, strengthen occupation skill training, enhance their sense of mission and responsibility, and seek training methods suitable for male students majoring in preschool education.%积极心理品质包含个体思想、情感和行为等一系列心理行为,如爱心、乐观、挑战、奉献等方面。近年来,国家在政策法规方面鼓励男性进入幼儿教育行业,越来越多男生选择学前教育专业,但很多的学前教育专业男生存在专业认同困惑、职业认同感低、自我内驱力低等心理方面的问题。要帮助学前教育专业男生树立正确的价值观,进行职业生涯的规划,增加其自信心和自豪感;加强职业技能培养,增强其使命感与责任感,寻找适合学前教育专业男生的培养方式。

  3. 造口专业护理研究生培养模式的专家调查研究%Investigations on the training mode of graduate students majoring in stoma nursing care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武佩佩; 李秋洁; 郭杰; 洪素

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the training mode of graduate students majoring in stoma nursing care. Methods The Delphi technique was used to run an investigation on 22 experts in terms of their opinion about the training mode of graduate students majoring in stoma nursing care by questionnaires for two rounds. Results According to the experts, theoretical curriculum for the major should include 34 courses; 45. 45% experts argued that the length of clinical practice should last 1 - 1. 5 years; as for mentor panels, 45. 45% experts selected double-certificated teachers as students mentors, others preferred 3-party mentoring which would include a nursing supervisor, a medical supervisor and a senior nurse practitioner. Conclusion There is significant agreement among the experts as to the training mode of graduate students majoring in stoma nursing. The findings of this study may therefore be of value in providing references for the development of a master degree program in stoma nursing.%目的 构建造口专业护理研究生的培养模式,提高其培养质量.方法 采用Delphi法对22名专家就造口专业护理研究生的课程设置、实践时间及导师组设置进行2轮函询.结果 确定的培养模式中理论课程34门;临床实践时间设置中45.45%的专家认为应在1.0~1.5年;导师组设置中45.45%的专家选择双师型导师,其余专家选择护理硕士导师、医学硕士导师和临床资深护师.结论 专家对确定的培养模式协调性较高,可为今后造口专业学位护理研究生的培养提供参考依据.

  4. Exploration on Math Quality Training Mechanism of Computer Major Students%计算机专业学生数学素质培养机制探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华昱; 时念云; 钟敏

    2012-01-01

    Maths is closed related to the theory and course system of computer major, math quality plays an important role in the development of computer science and personnel training. Based on current status of math education and talents quality requirement of computer major, from the aspects of teaching reform, course content and practice link, this paper proposes an effective maths quality training mechanism and gives detailed implementation schemes.%数学与计算机专业的理论和课程体系祭密相关,数学素质对计算机学科的发展和人才培养起到重要作用。针对计算机专业数学教育现状和计算机专业人才素质要求,本文从教学改革、课程内容和实践环节等方面,提出了一种有效的数学素质培养机制,并给出了具体实现方案。

  5. The Cultivation of Students Oriented Teaching of German Second Foreign Language in Majors of Engineering%工科专业二外德语教学的导向意识培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王松; 周文姝

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the teaching of German as the second foreign language in the Majors of Engineering. Purpose is to meet the practical needs of the students in German learning by developing the students oriented consciousness in teaching. Starting from the common problems which the students mostly meet in German learning, changes of teaching method should be found in aspects like error correction timing in oral practice, more extensive multimedia application, writing, the effect of language transfer and diversified test methods, so that teaching can better service for students and solve their practical problems in life and work. It has been proved in more than two years teaching practice that the students oriented teaching method could help the students in majors of engineering obviously more to learn German as the second foreign language than the traditional teaching method which takes the teacher as the center in class and can improve the teaching effect.%该文是以二外德语课堂教学为立足点,以工科专业学生为教学对象,以满足学生学习需求为目的,提出在教学中注重导向意识培养,从现有的、普遍的和常见的问题下手,从口语纠错时机、多媒体应用宽度、提升写作的重视程度、英语与德语之间的迁移效应、测试的多样化等多角度实施有针对性的教学改变,引导教学解决学生的学习问题,使教学能够更好地为学生学习服务。经过近两年的教学实践证明,二外德语教学的导向意识培养有利于工科专业学生的德语学习和提升教学效果。

  6. Psychology Degree Beliefs and Stereotypes: Differences in the Perceptions of Majors and Non-Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Hurst, Jennifer R.; Johnson, Quinn R.

    2016-01-01

    Very little research examines the beliefs and stereotypes students have about the discipline and major of psychology. Previous research has found that psychology majors report hearing a variety of such beliefs and stereotypes more often from their fellow students than from their family members. In the current study, psychology majors/minors and…

  7. Psychology Degree Beliefs and Stereotypes: Differences in the Perceptions of Majors and Non-Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Hurst, Jennifer R.; Johnson, Quinn R.

    2016-01-01

    Very little research examines the beliefs and stereotypes students have about the discipline and major of psychology. Previous research has found that psychology majors report hearing a variety of such beliefs and stereotypes more often from their fellow students than from their family members. In the current study, psychology majors/minors and…

  8. Higher vocational English majors listening classroom and expand students' vision%高职英语专业听力课堂与拓展学生视野

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉香

    2015-01-01

    英语教学非常注重听、说、读、写.而只有在综合英语课程中才能包括这几大方面,但该课程只是英语学习者学习过程中的一部分,如何多方面的进行教学?其他课程需要及时有效的进行辅助.听力课堂就是其中非常重要的一门课程.听力课堂的传统教学方式已不再适应时代发展的要求.英语学习不仅仅是对语法、句法结构的学习,更多的是要感知生活,学会将语言运用到实际中,提高学习能力,丰富一个人的思想,形成积极,乐观,热情,向上的人生态度.因此,我想要通过英语听力课堂,为同学们带来不一样的英语世界.而英语视频材料是英语听力学习,乃至英语学习的好帮手,在英语听力课堂教学中,我们应当充分发挥其作用,帮助我们的学生将枯燥变有趣,在学习基础知识的同时,扩展视野.%English teaching is very focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing. But only in comprehensive English course includes the several aspects, but the course is only part of the process of learners of English learning, how many to teach? Other courses need to be timely and effective support. Listening class is one of the very important courses. Traditional listening classroom teaching mode no longer adapt to the requirement of times development. English learning is not only the learning of grammar, syntax structure, more is to feel life, learn to apply language practice, improve the ability to learn, enrich a person's thoughts, form the positive, optimistic, enthusiasm, upward attitude towards life. So I want to English listening class, to bring the students to English world. But English video material is English listening study, and even the good helper of English learning, in English listening teaching, we should give full play to the role, to help our students will become interesting, boring at the same time of learning the basic knowledge, expand field of vision.

  9. Exploration on the Network Management Model of Internship for Students Majoring in Biology and Food Science%高职生物食品类专业顶岗实习网络管理模式探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李英华; 沈素媚; 詹忠根; 叶素丹

    2012-01-01

    在分析高职生物食品类专业顶岗实习管理特点的基础上,讨论了高职生物食品类专业顶岗实习网络管理必要性和可行性,提出了高职生物食品类专业定岗实习网络管理的人员素质要求,网络管理的主要内容以及网络管理的注意事项,指出顶岗实习网络管理将因为其高效性和方便性成为高职学生顶岗实习的主要管理途径。%Through analyzing the management features of higher vocational college internship for students majoring in biology and food science,the feasibility and necessity of network management on internship were discussed.The qualification of internship network manager,the content and the attentions of internship network management were put forward.It pointed out that internship network management model would be the major approach on the management of vocational college students' internship for its efficiency and conveniences.

  10. The Teaching Reform Practice for Enhancing the Programming Skills of Students in Computer Major%提升计算机专业学生编程技能的教改实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚明; 项顺伯

    2013-01-01

    @@@@According to the requirement of talent cultivation to meet the developing needs of nation and society, the teaching re?form practice to enhance the programming skills of students in computer major is in progress. Through the introduction of teaching in Android exploring, a contest for the practice platform and leading students to in-depth study and practice in three application do?mains of java have achieved good results, which can provide certain reference function for teaching reform of Application-oriented undergraduate institutes in computer major.%根据人才培养要适应国家和社会发展需要的要求,进行提升计算机专业学生编程技能的教改实践.通过引入 An?droid开发教学,以竞赛为实践平台以及在Java三大应用领域引领学生深入学习和实践,取得了较好的效果,可为教学应用型本科院校计算机教学改革提供一定的参考作用.

  11. Research on the Characteristics of Sports Consciousness of Art and Music Majors Students in Colleges and Universities%高校艺术生体育意识特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄亚彬

    2014-01-01

    近些年来,针对艺术生在接受高等教育中的独特表现,如何开展思想教育与学科教育工作,已成为业界教育工作者普遍关心的重要课题。以艺术生的体育意识为研究目标,对其意识形态深入剖析,从而对该类大学生的终身体育观作出更为客观、深入的研究与判断,旨在为后续更具针对性地行为对策与教学模式研究奠定基础。%In recent years , in view of the unique performance of the art and music majors students receiv-ing higher education , how to carry out ideological education and discipline education work has become an important subject for education workers to universal concern of.Taking the art and music student's sports consciousness as the research target , this paper analyzes its ideology , makes a more objective , in-depth research and judgment of the lifelong sports view of this kind of students , to lay foundation for the subse-quent more targeted behavior countermeasures and study on teaching mode.

  12. Training of students' comprehensive ability of music performance major in the new era%浅论新时期音乐表演专业学生综合能力的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴曼

    2014-01-01

    音乐表演专业学生综合能力的培养,是高校艺术人才培养的目标要求,需要顾及音乐人才市场需求,结合学生实际,变革教学方式,创新培养方法。一些最基本的策略创新包括:以学生的发展为本,突出能力培养的人本化;突出应用性,改革音乐表演专业教学模式;加强实践教学,提升学生的技能应用能力等。%The cultivation of comprehensive ability of students majoring in music performance, is the objective of the art talent cultivation, need to take into account the needs of music talent market, combined with the reality of students, reform the teaching ways, innovate training method. Some of the most basic policy innovation includes:Basing on the development of students, the ability cultivation of humanity;to highlight the application, to reform music teaching mode;strengthen the practice of teaching, to enhance the skills of the students’ application ability.

  13. 控烟课程对不同专业学生干预效果比较研究%Comparative study on effects of tobacco control curriculum in different major students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹慧; 那立欣; 陶雨春; 张作明; 张婧媛; 董宏伟; 王丽敏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the impact of tobacco control curriculum on self-efficacy of tobacco control in different major of public health students, and offer theoretical foundation for improving tobacco control curriculum.Methods We offered tobacco control curriculum for 150 public health students (including students of preventive medicine and public service administration research direction) in medical university of Harbin, and investigated twice general self-efficacy, smoking selfefficacy and tobacco control self-efficacy before and after tobacco control curriculum, then compared intervention effects between two major students by t test.Results There were no differences of tobacco control self-efficacy, smoking self-efficacy and general self-efficacy between two major students, t values were-0.832 (P=0.407), 0.190 (P=0.849) and-0.492 (P=0.624).The tobacco control self-efficacy (t=-3.566, P=0.001) and general self-efficacy (t=-2.237, P=0.028) increased remarkably but smoking self-efficacy (t=-1.102, P=0.273) in preventive medicine students after intervention.And all of three kinds of self-efficacy were not gotten better by intervention in public service administration students.There was no obvious difference of intervention effects between tobacco control self-efficacy and general self-efficacy among preventive medicine students (t=1.541, P=0.125).Conclusions The improvement of preventive medicine students by tobacco control curriculum is better than that of public service administration students.We should further perfect the tobacco control course, and on the one hand, improve the intervention effect of students majoring in course of public health management;on the other hand, strengthen the target effects of the tobacco control curriculum to students' tobacco control self-efficacy and smoking self-efficacy.%目的 比较控烟课程对公共卫生不同专业学生控烟自我效能感的影响,为完善控烟课程提供理论依据.方法

  14. 高校日语专业学生听力能力薄弱的原因及对策%Reason and Countermeasure for the Listening Weakness of Japanese-Majored Students in Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝杰

    2014-01-01

    大学日语专业学生听力能力薄弱是个普遍现象。如何很好地解决这个问题,一直困扰着我们。我们对教学中观察到的问题及其原因进行了深层细致的分析和探究,并就相应对策进行了教改实验,结果表明:扫清心理障碍,加强基础语音教学,科学进行听前指导和听后活动,与日本留学生开展经常性的语言交流活动等,有助于提高学生的听力水平。%The listening weakness of Japanese-majored students is caused mainly by language skill and psycho-logical problems. How to solve this weakness is the problem that bothers us for some time. We have analyzed and explored in depth the problems and their causes in the teaching process,and conducted experiment in teaching. The result shows that clearing away psychological problems,enhancing teaching in basic pronunciation,scientifi-cally conducting activities before and after listening, and communicating with Japanese over-sea students frequently will help to improve the listening ability of the students.

  15. Issues Related to the Teaching of Statistical Software for Students Majoring in Statistics:Exploration and Practice%统计软件课程教学改革的探索与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    This research proposes the concrete ideas and methods of the teaching of statistical software for students majoring in statistics, after analyzing current problems of this course. As for innovating teaching contents, we need to emphasize the teaching of data analysis and simulation. We need to inspire students' in-terest for statistical software and foster their thinking ability dur-ing the class. We have practiced in the statistical software classes, and the feedbacks from students are very good.%  通过对高等院校统计学专业统计软件课程教学现状的分析,本文提出了统计软件课程教学改革的具体思路和方法。在教学内容创新上,要注重数据处理和随机模拟方法;在教学方法革新中,要注重激发学生学习的兴趣,努力培养学生的思考能力。在教学环节,我们将课程改革的思路和方法付诸实践,取得了良好的效果。

  16. Comparison of Textbook Expenses of College Students Majoring In Science and Liberal Arts%文理类专业大学生教材费用支出比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房明

    2014-01-01

    为调查和分析高校学生的教材费支出情况,以太原理工大学文理类专业本科生为研究对象,比较分析各专业学生在校期间实际教材费支出。结果表明,文理类学生平均教材费支出1442元,其中轻纺学院专业的教材费支出最多,主要是由于人们对生活质量的要求越来越高,从而对艺术领域的人才需求量越来越大。%For the investigation and analysis of college students learning materials, this paper takes taiyuan university of science and liberal arts majors as the research object, the comparative analysis of the actual materials expenses during the period of school for students from all departments. The results show that the liberal arts students learning materials spending an average of 1442 RMB, the largest textile college professional learning materials spending, mainly due to people is higher and higher requirement for the quality of life, thus the growing demand for talents in the field of art people.

  17. Analysis of Works Creation Crux of Students Majoring in Film and TV%高校影视专业学生作品创作症结分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明

    2014-01-01

    影视作品创作是检验高校影视专业学生学习成果的标准,也是影视专业学生必须掌握的一项技能。近年来由于影视文化市场的繁荣,越来越多的学生进入了各类、各级院校的影视专业学习。但由于整个大环境的影响,加上学生在学习当中出现的诸多问题,国内各地、各级院校影视专业的学生创作出来的作品大多不尽如人意。我们必须重视这些问题,并寻求解决之道,使得学生的创作可以达到我们的期望值,使得他们的专业素养可以达到岗位的需求。%The creation of film and television works is a standard for testing the learning outcomes of students majoring in film and television, and also a skill they must master .In recent years, due to the prosperity of film cultural market , more and more students began their professional learning in different kinds and levels of film and television institutions .However , due to the im-pact of the environment and the problems occurring in students'learning, the works created by the students majoring in film and television are not very satisfactory .We must pay attention to these issues and find solutions so that the students'works can meet our expectations , and their professional quality can meet demands of jobs .Otherwise it would have a very negative impact on the Chinese film industry which is in the midst of a rising .

  18. 旅游管理专业实习实践内容科学化探讨%Designing Specialized Practice in a Scientific Approach for Students Majoring in Tourism Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹继宏

    2013-01-01

    以黑龙江省部分高校旅游管理专业学生为对象的问卷调查结果显示:学生普遍认为实习实践比较重要。被调查者认为个人沟通和协调能力、品质及态度、相关工作经验、管理知识和技能、良好的教育背景对未来从事旅游相关工作影响较大,其重要程度依次递减。高校在旅游管理专业实习实践内容的安排上,应调整实习强度,注重培养学生沟通能力和个人品质及态度的培养,加强学生相关工作经验的积累,为学生应用管理知识和技能创造机会,使教育教学的质量得以提升,满足旅游人力资源市场的需求。%A questionnaire survey targeting on students majoring in tourism management at some higher educational institutions in Hei-longjiang was conducted with a conclusion that most students believe practice is significant. Respondents of the survey think that personal communication and coordination ability, character, attitude, work experience, management expertise, and a strong education background are vital, in a less important order, to the future professional performance of students majoring in tourism management. Colleges and uni-versities should give more attention to practice arrangements, focusing on students' communication skills and personal character. They should also offer opportunities for students to accumulate work experience and use what they learned. In so doing, colleges and universities could improve their education quality to meet demands of tourism human resource market.

  19. Implementation of the Second Major Requirement for Teacher Education Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Deborah A.; And Others

    An exploratory study was conducted in North Carolina to examine the impact on teacher education programs of improved academic preparation for undergraduate teacher education majors. This report describes one such approach--the requirement that in addition to general college and teacher preparation courses, undergraduate education students complete…

  20. Thinking about the education and management of the international postgraduate students majoring in clinical medicine%关于临床医学专业留学研究生培养管理的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林青; 周清泉

    2014-01-01

    With the quick development of China’ s economic power and education globalization, the education cause of the international medical graduate students in China has developed rapidly both in quantity and quality. This paper discussed the difficulties and countermeasures in the whole process of education and management of the international postgraduate students majoring in clinical medicine. Imple-mentation of the stringent eligibility of entrance, enhancement of the graduate supervisors ’ ability and quality, establishment of the one-on-one learning group and construction of feedback system are the key points. With these effective measures, the outstanding education model for cultivating the international postgraduate students majoring in clinical medicine.%随着我国经济科技实力的增强和教育全球化的推进,我国医学留学生教育规模不断扩大。根据多年的教学管理工作经验,本文对临床医学专业留学研究生培养管理的难点进行了系统的总结和分析,并结合工作实际,提出了严把入学语言关、加强导师队伍建设、合理安排课程、成立“一对一”互助小组、建立反馈机制等相应的对策,形成了适应临床医学专业留学研究生培养要求的管理模式。