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Sample records for nonrepetitive intergenic regions

  1. Feline Non-repetitive Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Database for Forensic Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, R. A.; Kurushima, J. D.; Billings, N. C.; Grahn, J.C.; Halverson, J. L.; Hammer, E.; Ho, C.K.; Kun, T. J.; Levy, J.K.; Lipinski, M. J.; Mwenda, J.M.; Ozpinar, H.; Schuster, R.K; Shoorijeh, S.J.; Tarditi, C. R.; Waly, N.E.; Wictum, E. J.; Lyons, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    The domestic cat is the one of the most popular pets throughout the world. A by-product of owning, interacting with, or being in a household with a cat is the transfer of shed fur to clothing or personal objects. As trace evidence, transferred cat fur is a relatively untapped resource for forensic scientists. Both phenotypic and genotypic characteristics can be obtained from cat fur, but databases for neither aspect exist. Because cats incessantly groom, cat fur may have nucleated cells, not only in the hair bulb, but also as epithelial cells on the hair shaft deposited during the grooming process, thereby generally providing material for DNA profiling. To effectively exploit cat hair as a resource, representative databases must be established. This study evaluates 402 bp of the mtDNA control region (CR) from 1,394 cats, including cats from 25 distinct worldwide populations and 26 breeds. Eighty-three percent of the cats are represented by 12 major mitotypes. An additional 8.0% are clearly derived from the major mitotypes. Unique sequences were found in 7.5% of the cats. The overall genetic diversity for this data set was 0.8813 ± 0.0046 with a random match probability of 11.8%. This region of the cat mtDNA has discriminatory power suitable for forensic application worldwide. PMID:20457082

  2. Feline non-repetitive mitochondrial DNA control region database for forensic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, R A; Kurushima, J D; Billings, N C; Grahn, J C; Halverson, J L; Hammer, E; Ho, C K; Kun, T J; Levy, J K; Lipinski, M J; Mwenda, J M; Ozpinar, H; Schuster, R K; Shoorijeh, S J; Tarditi, C R; Waly, N E; Wictum, E J; Lyons, L A

    2011-01-01

    The domestic cat is the one of the most popular pets throughout the world. A by-product of owning, interacting with, or being in a household with a cat is the transfer of shed fur to clothing or personal objects. As trace evidence, transferred cat fur is a relatively untapped resource for forensic scientists. Both phenotypic and genotypic characteristics can be obtained from cat fur, but databases for neither aspect exist. Because cats incessantly groom, cat fur may have nucleated cells, not only in the hair bulb, but also as epithelial cells on the hair shaft deposited during the grooming process, thereby generally providing material for DNA profiling. To effectively exploit cat hair as a resource, representative databases must be established. The current study evaluates 402 bp of the mtDNA control region (CR) from 1394 cats, including cats from 25 distinct worldwide populations and 26 breeds. Eighty-three percent of the cats are represented by 12 major mitotypes. An additional 8.0% are clearly derived from the major mitotypes. Unique sequences are found in 7.5% of the cats. The overall genetic diversity for this data set is 0.8813±0.0046 with a random match probability of 11.8%. This region of the cat mtDNA has discriminatory power suitable for forensic application worldwide.

  3. A genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi intergenic regions.

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    Leonardo G Panunzi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas Disease. Recently, the genomes of representative strains from two major evolutionary lineages were sequenced, allowing the construction of a detailed genetic diversity map for this important parasite. However this map is focused on coding regions of the genome, leaving a vast space of regulatory regions uncharacterized in terms of their evolutionary conservation and/or divergence. METHODOLOGY: Using data from the hybrid CL Brener and Sylvio X10 genomes (from the TcVI and TcI Discrete Typing Units, respectively, we identified intergenic regions that share a common evolutionary ancestry, and are present in both CL Brener haplotypes (TcII-like and TcIII-like and in the TcI genome; as well as intergenic regions that were conserved in only two of the three genomes/haplotypes analyzed. The genetic diversity in these regions was characterized in terms of the accumulation of indels and nucleotide changes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on this analysis we have identified i a core of highly conserved intergenic regions, which remained essentially unchanged in independently evolving lineages; ii intergenic regions that show high diversity in spite of still retaining their corresponding upstream and downstream coding sequences; iii a number of defined sequence motifs that are shared by a number of unrelated intergenic regions. A fraction of indels explains the diversification of some intergenic regions by the expansion/contraction of microsatellite-like repeats.

  4. Nonrepetitive Colouring via Entropy Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Dujmović, Vida; Wood, David R

    2011-01-01

    A vertex colouring of a graph is \\emph{nonrepetitive} if there is no path whose first half receives the same sequence of colours as the second half. A graph is nonrepetitively $k$-choosable if given lists of at least $k$ colours at each vertex, there is a nonrepetitive colouring such that each vertex is coloured from its own list. It is known that every graph with maximum degree $\\Delta$ is $c\\Delta^2$-choosable, for some constant $c$. We prove this result with $c=4$. We then prove that every subdivision of a graph with sufficiently many division vertices per edge is nonrepetitively 6-choosable. The proofs of both these results are based on the Moser-Tardos entropy-compression method, and a recent extension by Grytczuk, Kozik and Micek for the nonrepetitive choosability of paths. Finally, we prove that every graph with pathwidth $k$ is nonrepetitively ($2k^2+6k+1$)-colourable.

  5. Ribosomal operon intergenic sequence region (ISR) heterogeneity in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

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    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are closely related species that can not be distinguished by their 16S or 23S rRNA gene sequences. However, the intergenic sequence region (ISR) that is between the 16S and 23S genes is markedly different and characteristic for each species. A peculiarit...

  6. Intergenic regions of Borrelia plasmids contain phylogenetically conserved RNA secondary structure motifs

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    Delihas Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borrelia species are unusual in that they contain a large number of linear and circular plasmids. Many of these plasmids have long intergenic regions. These regions have many fragmented genes, repeated sequences and appear to be in a state of flux, but they may serve as reservoirs for evolutionary change and/or maintain stable motifs such as small RNA genes. Results In an in silico study, intergenic regions of Borrelia plasmids were scanned for phylogenetically conserved stem loop structures that may represent functional units at the RNA level. Five repeat sequences were found that could fold into stable RNA-type stem loop structures, three of which are closely linked to protein genes, one of which is a member of the Borrelia lipoprotein_1 super family genes and another is the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein_1 (CRASP-1 family. Modeled secondary structures of repeat sequences display numerous base-pair compensatory changes in stem regions, including C-G→A-U transversions when orthologous sequences are compared. Base-pair compensatory changes constitute strong evidence for phylogenetic conservation of secondary structure. Conclusion Intergenic regions of Borrelia species carry evolutionarily stable RNA secondary structure motifs. Of major interest is that some motifs are associated with protein genes that show large sequence variability. The cell may conserve these RNA motifs whereas allow a large flux in amino acid sequence, possibly to create new virulence factors but with associated RNA motifs intact.

  7. De Novo Identification of Regulatory Regions in Intergenic Spaces of Prokaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, P; Garcia, E; Mcloughlin, K; Ovcharenko, I

    2007-02-20

    This project was begun to implement, test, and experimentally validate the results of a novel algorithm for genome-wide identification of candidate transcription-factor binding sites in prokaryotes. Most techniques used to identify regulatory regions rely on conservation between different genomes or have a predetermined sequence motif(s) to perform a genome-wide search. Therefore, such techniques cannot be used with new genome sequences, where information regarding such motifs has not yet been discovered. This project aimed to apply a de novo search algorithm to identify candidate binding-site motifs in intergenic regions of prokaryotic organisms, initially testing the available genomes of the Yersinia genus. We retrofitted existing nucleotide pattern-matching algorithms, analyzed the candidate sites identified by these algorithms as well as their target genes to screen for meaningful patterns. Using properly annotated prokaryotic genomes, this project aimed to develop a set of procedures to identify candidate intergenic sites important for gene regulation. We planned to demonstrate this in Yersinia pestis, a model biodefense, Category A Select Agent pathogen, and then follow up with experimental evidence that these regions are indeed involved in regulation. The ability to quickly characterize transcription-factor binding sites will help lead to a better understanding of how known virulence pathways are modulated in biodefense-related organisms, and will help our understanding and exploration of regulons--gene regulatory networks--and novel pathways for metabolic processes in environmental microbes.

  8. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

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    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  9. Partial Deletion of the L-Segment Intergenic Region Produces an Attenuated Machupo Virus that Protects Guinea Pigs Against Lethal Guanarito Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    1 Golden, J.W. et al. Machupo virus live-attenuated vaccine Partial deletion of the L-segment intergenic region produces an attenuated Machupo...had a 35 nucleotide deletion in the L-segment non-coding intergenic region . Contrary to Car91, Car68 produced a lethal infection in guinea pigs with...Keywords: Arenavirus, Machupo virus, Guanarito virus, intergenic region , live-attenuated vaccines, cross-protection 45 TR-17-030 DISTRIBUTION

  10. Sequence analysis of rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS) as a tool for phylogenetic studies in Trichoderma spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercatelli Elisabetta; Pecchia Susanna; Ciliegi Sandro; Vannacci Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    @@ Different from ribosomal genes, which contain highly conserved sequences that are detected in all organisms, the intergenic spacer of rDNA (IGS) appears to be the most rapidly-evolving spacer region. For this reason we tested this region for phylogenetic studies.

  11. A small intergenic region drives exclusive tissue-specific expression of the adjacent genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Valle Estela M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II is unidirectional from most genes. In plants, divergent genes, defined as non-overlapping genes organized head-to-head, are highly represented in the Arabidopsis genome. Nevertheless, there is scarce evidence on functional analyses of these intergenic regions. The At5g06290 and At5g06280 loci are head-to-head oriented and encode a chloroplast-located 2-Cys peroxiredoxin B (2CPB and a protein of unknown function (PUF, respectively. The 2-Cys peroxiredoxins are proteins involved in redox processes, they are part of the plant antioxidant defence and also act as chaperons. In this study, the transcriptional activity of a small intergenic region (351 bp shared by At5g06290 and At5g06280 in Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized. Results Activity of the intergenic region in both orientations was analyzed by driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene during the development and growth of Arabidopsis plants under physiological and stressful conditions. Results have shown that this region drives expression either of 2cpb or puf in photosynthetic or vascular tissues, respectively. GUS expression driven by the promoter in 2cpb orientation was enhanced by heat stress. On the other hand, the promoter in both orientations has shown similar down-regulation of GUS expression under low temperatures and other stress conditions such as mannitol, oxidative stress, or fungal elicitor. Conclusion The results from this study account for the first evidence of an intergenic region that, in opposite orientation, directs GUS expression in different spatially-localized Arabidopsis tissues in a mutually exclusive manner. Additionally, this is the first demonstration of a small intergenic region that drives expression of a gene whose product is involved in the chloroplast antioxidant defence such as 2cpb. Furthermore, these results contribute to show that 2cpb is related to the heat stress defensive system

  12. Differentiation of Closely Related Carnobacterium Food Isolates Based on 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer Region Polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Kabadjova, Petia; Dousset, Xavier; Le Cam, Virginie; Prevost, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    A novel strategy for identification of Carnobacterium food isolates based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of PCR-amplified 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) was developed. PCR amplification from all Carnobacterium strains studied always yielded three ISR amplicons, which were designated the small ISR (S-ISR), the medium ISR (M-ISR), and the large ISR (L-ISR). The lengths of these ISRs varied from one species to another. Carnobacterium divergens NCDO 2763T a...

  13. Molecular Epidemiology and Sequencing of the G-L Intergenic Region of Rabies Viruses Isolated in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Li MENG; QI-You XIAO; Guan-Mu DONG; Ge-Lin XU; Jia-Xin YAN; Ping-Gang MING; Jie WU; Xiao-Ming YANG; He-Tian MING; Feng-Cai ZHU; Dun-Jin ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    A group of 25 rabies viruses (RABVs),recovered from 24 dogs and one human case,were collected from various areas in China between 2004 and 2006.Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the G-L intergenic region were carried out in 25 street RABV isolates and CTN vaccine strains of 7 generations.The study was based on the comparison of a 519 bp nucleotide sequence,encompassing the G-L intergenic region.The nucleotide sequence homologies of Chinese street strains were from 95.5% to 100%.The phylogenetic analysis showed that all Chinese isolates clearly supported the placement of all Chinese viruses in Lyssavirus genotype 1 and they were distributed according to their geographical origins.All of the Chinese strains were closely related but they could still be divided into two groups:group of street strains and group of CTN strains.This study presents details about the molecular epidemiology of rabies viruses based on the sequences of the G-L Intergenic region.

  14. Replication intermediate analysis confirms that chromosomal replication origin initiates from an unusual intergenic region in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Brassinga, A K; Marczynski, G T

    2001-11-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus possesses a developmental cell cycle that restricts chromosome replication to a stalked cell type. The proposed C.crescentus chromosome replication origin (Cori) lies between hemE and RP001, an unusual intergenic region not previously associated with bacterial replication origins, although a similar genomic arrangement is also present at the putative replication origin in the related bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii. The cloned Cori supports autonomous plasmid replication selectively in the stalked cell type implying that replication of the entire chromosome also initiates between hemE and RP001. To confirm this location, we applied the 2-D (N/N) agarose gel electrophoresis technique to resolve and identify chromosome replication intermediates throughout a 30 kb region spanning Cori. Replication initiation in Cori was uniquely characterized by an 'origin bubble and Y-arc' pattern and this observation was supported by simple replication fork 'Y-arc' patterns that characterized the regions flanking Cori. These replication forks originated bi-directionally from within Cori as determined by the fork direction assay. Therefore, chromosomal replication initiates from the unusual hemE/RP001 intergenic region that we propose represents a new class of replication origins.

  15. Effects of structural changes in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region on D-serine deaminase synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, E; Nikam, S S; Palchaudhuri, S

    1991-02-01

    Single-base-pair changes well upstream of its transcription initiation site resulted in partially to fully constitutive expression of the D-serine deaminase structural gene, dsdA, independently of the cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP-binding protein complex and of the specific D-serine deaminase activator protein. These promoter mutations appear to define a consensus sequence that is repeated several times. Basal expression of dsdA+ was also strongly enhanced by subcloning on multicopy plasmids, by the DNA gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, and in dsdC(Con) mutants by increasing growth temperature. These results suggest that activation of dsdA+ expression by the dsdC-encoded protein involves distortion of promoter DNA. A dsdA translation start at bp -731 was verified by subcloning of dsdC+. Plasmid-specified activator at a high concentration interfered with chromosomal dsdC(Con) expression, and the interference was enhanced by deletion of most of the intergenic region from the plasmid. Even at a high concentration, however, plasmid-specified activator did not activate expression of chromosomal dsdA+, and in one case it was actually repressive. These results confirm the strong cis tropism of plasmid-specified dsdC-encoded protein and suggest that it is mediated by multiple sites in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region.

  16. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

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    Augix Guohua Xu

    Full Text Available Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20% represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  17. Absence of DNA sequence diversity of the intergenic spacer 1 region in Malassezia nana isolates from cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bellis, Filippo; Castellá, Gemma; Cabañes, F Javier; Bond, Ross

    2010-03-01

    Malassezia nana is a recently-described lipophilic yeast that has been isolated from the ear canals and skin of cats in Japan and Europe and from Brazilian cattle with or without otitis externa. Previous reports have demonstrated that significant intra-species variability exists in the DNA sequence of the intergenic spacer 1 region (IGS1), particularly amongst M. globosa, M. restricta and M. pachydermatis, and that certain IGS genotypes are associated with various epidemiological factors, including host disease status. In the present study, we demonstrated that the IGS1 sequences of 12 UK isolates of M. nana from cats and of six isolates from Spain (5 cat, 1 dog) were identical to each other and to CBS 9557, the M. nana type culture originally obtained from a Japanese cat with otitis externa. Further studies are needed to determine whether other genotypes of M. nana can be identified and associated with geographical regions and the species and disease status of mammalian hosts.

  18. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength.

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    Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Brunel, Joanna; Dosnon, Marion; Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Gruet, Antoine; Lazert, Carine; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe; Longhi, Sonia; Gerlier, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3'end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region.

  19. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  20. The Xis2d protein of CTnDOT binds to the intergenic region between the mob and tra operons.

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    Hopp, Crystal M; Gardner, Jeffrey F; Salyers, Abigail A

    2015-09-01

    CTnDOT is a 65kbp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) that carries genes encoding both tetracycline and erythromycin resistances. The excision operon of this element encodes Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc proteins involved in the excision of CTnDOT from host chromosomes. These proteins are also required in the complex transcriptional regulation of the divergently transcribed transfer (tra) and mobilization (mob) operons of CTnDOT. Transcription of the tra operon is positively regulated by Xis2c and Xis2d, whereas, transcription of the mob operon is positively regulated by Xis2d and Exc. Xis2d is the only protein that is involved in the excision reaction, as well as the transcriptional regulation of both the mob and tra operons. This paper helps establish how Xis2d binds the DNA in the mob and tra region. Unlike other excisionase proteins, Xis2d binds a region of dyad symmetry. The binding site is located in the intergenic region between the mob and tra promoters, and once bound Xis2d induces a bend in the DNA. Xis2d binding to this region could be the preliminary step for the activation of both operons. Then the other proteins, like Exc, can interact with Xis2d and form higher order complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 116S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads

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    Sima eTokajian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 to 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2 mol% to 57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITSnone (without tRNA genes, ITSAla(TGC, ITSAla (TGC+Ile (GAT, ITSIle (GAT+Ala (TGC and ITS Ile (GAT+Pseudo. All of the identified tRNAAla (TGC molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNAIle (GAT molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2.

  2. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence.

  3. Expressing activity of promoter elements of large intergenic region from cotton leaf curl virus in host plant*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a type of single-stranded DNAvirus, belonging to geminivirus of subgroup III. In order to determine the function of CLCuV large intergenic region (LIR), total DNA of CLCuV-infected cotton leaves was used as template, and fragment of LIR was obtained by PCR and inserted into clone vector. The fragment of LIR was fused with gus reporter gene and nos terminator in the orientation of transcription of virion sense and complementary sense respectively, and the plant expression vectors were constructed. GUS activity of Agrobacterium-mediated transgenic tobacco was measured. The result indicated that LIR showed strong promoter activity in complementary sense gene orientation. Average GUS activity of the complementary sense promoter was 5-6 times that of CaMV 35S promoter, and the highest GUS activity of individual plant was ten times of that of CaMV 35S promoter. Histochemical localization confirmed its activity in both mesophyll and vascular tissues. Activity of virion sense of LIR was rather low. Thus LIR isolated from CLCuV could be used as a novel strong promoter in plant genetic manipulation.

  4. An attenuated Machupo virus with a disrupted L-segment intergenic region protects guinea pigs against lethal Guanarito virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Joseph W; Beitzel, Brett; Ladner, Jason T; Mucker, Eric M; Kwilas, Steven A; Palacios, Gustavo; Hooper, Jay W

    2017-07-05

    Machupo virus (MACV) is a New World (NW) arenavirus and causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (HF). Here, we identified a variant of MACV strain Carvallo termed Car(91) that was attenuated in guinea pigs. Infection of guinea pigs with an earlier passage of Carvallo, termed Car(68), resulted in a lethal disease with a 63% mortality rate. Sequencing analysis revealed that compared to Car(68), Car(91) had a 35 nucleotide (nt) deletion and a point mutation within the L-segment intergenic region (IGR), and three silent changes in the polymerase gene that did not impact amino acid coding. No changes were found on the S-segment. Because it was apathogenic, we determined if Car(91) could protect guinea pigs against Guanarito virus (GTOV), a distantly related NW arenavirus. While naïve animals succumbed to GTOV infection, 88% of the Car(91)-exposed guinea pigs were protected. These findings indicate that attenuated MACV vaccines can provide heterologous protection against NW arenaviruses. The disruption in the L-segment IGR, including a single point mutant and 35 nt partial deletion, were the only major variance detected between virulent and avirulent isolates, implicating its role in attenuation. Overall, our data support the development of live-attenuated arenaviruses as broadly protective pan-arenavirus vaccines.

  5. Mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region contribute to Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol.

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    Cui, Zhenling; Li, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Song; Yang, Hua; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi; Ge, Baoxue

    2014-11-01

    The rapid increase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol (EMB) threatens the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB). We investigated the role of mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region (IGR) in EMB-resistant clinical strains from east China. A total of 767 M. tuberculosis clinical strains were collected and analyzed for their drug susceptibility to EMB using the MGIT 960 system and MIC assay, and the embC-embA IGRs of these strains were sequenced. The transcriptional activity of the embC-embA IGR mutations was examined by reporter gene assays in recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains, and the effect of IGR mutations on its binding to EmbR, a transcription regulator of embAB, was analyzed by gel mobility shift assays. Correlation coefficient analysis showed that the embC-embA IGR mutation is associated with EMB resistance. The clinical strains carrying IGR mutations had a much higher level of embA and embB mRNA as well as higher MICs to EMB. IGR mutations had higher transcriptional activity when transformed into M. smegmatis strains. Mutated IGRs bound to EmbR with much higher affinity than wild-type fragments. The sensitivity of molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) with IGR mutations as an additional marker increased from 65.5% to 73.5%. Mutations of the embC-embA IGR enhance the binding of EmbR to the promoter region of embAB and increase the expression of embAB, thus contributing to EMB resistance. Therefore, identification of IGR mutations as markers of EMB resistance could increase the sensitivity of molecular DST.

  6. Identification of Carnobacterium Species by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism of the 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region and Species-Specific PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Rachman, Cinta; Kabadjova, Petia; Valcheva, Rosica; Prévost, Hervé; Dousset, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    The genus Carnobacterium is currently divided into the following eight species: Carnobacterium piscicola, C. divergens, C. gallinarum, C. mobile, C. funditum, C. alterfunditum, C. inhibens, and C. viridans. An identification tool for the rapid differentiation of these eight Carnobacterium species was developed, based on the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer region (ISR). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of this 16S-23S rDNA ISR was performed in ord...

  7. Phylogeny of Panax using chloroplast trnC-trnD intergenic region and the utility of trnC-trnD in interspecific studies of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chunghee; Wen, Jun

    2004-06-01

    Sequences of the chloroplast trnC-trnD region and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained for all species of Panax L. (the ginseng plant genus, Araliaceae) to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships. The trnC-trnD phylogeny is congruent with the ITS phylogeny for the diploid taxa of Panax. This study is the first use of the trnC-trnD sequence data for phylogenetic analysis at the interspecific level. We evaluated this DNA region for its phylogenetic utility at the lower taxonomic level for flowering plants. The trnC-trnD region includes the trnC-petN intergenic spacer, the petN gene, the petN-psbM intergenic spacer, the psbM gene, and the psbM-trnD intergenic spacer. The petN and psbM genes are small, 90 and 104-114 bp across angiosperms, respectively, and have conserved sequences. We have designed universal amplification and sequencing primers within these two genes. Using these primers, we have successfully amplified the entire trnC-trnD region for a diversity of flowering plant groups, including Aralia L. (Araliaceae), Calycanthus L. (Calycanthaceae), Corylus L. (Betulaceae), Hamamelis L. (Hamamelidaceae), Hydrocotyle L. (Apiaceae), Illigera Blume (Hernandiaceae), Nelumbo Adans. (Nelumbonaceae), Nolana L. ex L.f. (Solanaceae), Prunus L. (Rosaceae), and Staphylea L. (Staphyleaceae). In Panax, the trnC-trnD region provides a similar number of informative phylogenetic characters as the ITS regions and a slightly higher number of informative characters than the chloroplast ndhF gene. We thus demonstrate the utility of the trnC-trnD region for lower-level phylogenetic studies in flowering plants.

  8. Identification of Trichosporon spp. Strains by Sequencing D1/D2 Region and Sub-typing by Sequencing Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region of Ribosomal DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingsi ZENG; Cristina Maria de Souza Motta; Kazutaka Fukushima; Kayoko Takizawa; Oliane Maria Correia Magalhes; Rejane Pereira Neves; Kazuko Nishimura

    2009-01-01

    To re-identify and further group 25 isolates of Trichosporon spp. identified morphologically previously, sequences of D1/D2 region of large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of 25 tested strains for identification and those of ribosomal intergenic space 1 (IGS1) region of 11 strains for sub-grouping were detected. The identifications of tested strains were changed except 6 strains. According to the alignment of the IGS1 region, 6 T. asahii isolates tested fell into 4 groups and 5 T. faecale isolates into 3 groups. Polymorphism of 2 T.japonicum isolates was found in 10 positions. With the alignments obtained in this research compared with the relative GenBank entries, it was found that T. asahii, T.faecale and T.japonicum species were divided into 7, 3 and 2 subtypes respectively. Morphological and biophysical methods are not sufficient for Trichosporon spp. identification. Sequencing becomes neces-sary for Trichosporon diagnosis. There is obvious diversity within a species.

  9. New approaches for genotyping of Helicobacter pylori based on amplification of polymorphisms in intergenic DNA regions and at the insertion site of the cag pathogenicity island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereswill, S; Schönenberger, R; Thies, C; Stähler, F; Strobel, S; Pfefferle, P; Wille, L; Kist, M

    2000-11-01

    The population of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori shows a high degree of genetic diversity. It is well established that heterogeneity at the isolate level is caused by nucleotide transitions within genes, differences in the gene order, and by genetic instability of single genes as well as of a large virulence-associated genomic DNA region, the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Analysis of intergenic regions with specific PCR-assays developed in this study, revealed that DNA polymorphisms in the noncoding DNA localized in front of the genes ribA and vacA and at the insertion site of the cag PAI contribute to the genetic diversity of H. pylori and are useful for differentiation of individual isolates. Thirteen individual genotypes were identified by PCR analysis of these polymorphic loci in 487, 241, and 182 clinical H. pylori isolates. Sequence analysis revealed that genetic variability in front of genes ribA and vacA, and in the intergenic region at the PAI insertion site is caused by insertion and deletions of so-far-unknown DNA sequences as well as by parts of the H. pylori IS elements IS605 and IS606, respectively. The new genotypes identified could be used to differentiate antrum and corpus isolates from the same patients. Their combination with vacA allele subtypes and with the cagA status allowed to differentiate 140 isolates in 51 subtypes. In 36 cases the corresponding genotype patterns were isolate specific. In summary, the results confirm that DNA polymorphisms in intergenic regions contribute to the genetic diversity of H. pylori. Although individual H. pylori genotypes were not associated with peptic ulcer disease, the PCR-based approaches for their detection developed here should be of use for further investigation of genetic diversity in H. pylori and for epidemiological purposes.

  10. Detection of two Bartonella tamiae-like sequences in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) using 16S-23S intergenic spacer region-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Sarah A; Miller, Melissa K; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Levy, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    Four hundred and sixty-six questing Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) from Carolina County, VA, and 98 questing A. americanum from Chatham County, NC, were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the Bartonella 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. Two amplicons, approximately 270-280 bp, were detected in two ticks from Virginia. Based upon PCR and sequencing, an adult male and adult female tick harbored DNA sequences closely related to Bartonella tamiae (DQ395180). Bartonella DNA was not detected in A. americanum from North Carolina. Potential transmission of Bartonella spp. by A. americanum should be the focus of future experimental studies.

  11. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  12. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  13. Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions (ISR) in representatives of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Bao, Jing-Ting; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2007-05-01

    The complete sequences of 32 intergenic spacer regions (ISR) from Acidithiobacillus strains, including 29 field strains isolated from coal, copper, molybdenum mine wastes or sediment of different geoclimatic regions in China, reference strain ATCC19859 and the type strains of the two species were determined. These data, together with other sequences available in the GenBank database, were used to carry out the first detailed assessment of the inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the ISR sequences and to infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus. The total length of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of the Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ranged from 451 to 490 bp, and from 434 to 456 bp, respectively. The degree of intrageneric ISR sequence similarity was higher than the degree of intergeneric similarity, and the overall similarity values of the ISRs varied from 60.49% to 84.71% between representatives of different species of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Sequences from the spacer of the A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans strains ranged from 86.71% to 99.56% and 92.36% to 100% similarity, respectively. All Acidithiobacillus strains were separated into three phylogenetic major clusters and seven phylogenetic groups. ISR may be a potential target for the development of in situ hybridization probe aimed at accurately detecting acidithiobacilli in the various acidic environments.

  14. Identification of clinically relevant nonhemolytic Streptococci on the basis of sequence analysis of 16S-23S intergenic spacer region and partial gdh gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Dargis, Rimtas;

    2009-01-01

    Nonhemolytic streptococci (NHS) cause serious infections, such as endocarditis and septicemia. Many conventional phenotypic methods are insufficient for the identification of bacteria in this group to the species level. Genetic analysis has revealed that single-gene analysis is insufficient...... for the identification of all species in this group of bacteria. The aim of the present study was to establish a method based on sequence analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) region and the partial gdh gene to identify clinical relevant NHS to the species level. Sequence analysis of the ITS region....... A phylogenetic algorithm based on the analysis of partial gdh gene sequences revealed three distinct clusters. We suggest that sequence analysis of the combination of the ITS region and the partial gdh gene can be used in the reference laboratory for the species-level identification of NHS....

  15. Genome-wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA interactions are enriched in intergenic regions and gene promoters and correlate with infection-induced differential gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Stephen Dumler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: i intergenic regions predicted to be matrix attachment regions (MARs; ii within predicted lamina-associated domains; and iii at promoters ≤3,000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome re-organizer. AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity.

  16. Fusion of HMGA1 to the LPP/TPRG1 intergenic region in a lipoma identified by mapping paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoke; Zamolyi, Renata Q; Zhang, Hongying; Pannain, Vera L; Medeiros, Fabiola; Erickson-Johnson, Michele; Jenkins, Robert B; Oliveira, Andre M

    2010-01-01

    Ordinary lipoma frequently harbors rearrangement of HMGA2. LPP is the most common partner gene to HMGA2, but has not been seen fused to HMGA1. We report the fusion of HMGA1 to the intergenic region between LPP and TPRG1 in a lipoma. Conventional cytogenetic analysis of an abdominal-wall lipoma diagnosed in a 60-year-old woman showed a t(3;6)(q27;p21). Molecular cytogenetic mapping of available paraffin-embedded tissues revealed the fusion of HMGA1 to a 139-kb genomic region between the LPP and TPRG1 loci. No rearrangement of HMGA2 was found. The biological function of this novel fusion could be similar to the role of HMGA2-LPP in tumorigenesis.

  17. Biosynthesis and characterization of a non-repetitive polypeptide derived from silk fibroin heavy chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gaoqiang; Wu, Mingyang; Yi, Honggen; Wang, Jiannan, E-mail: wangjn@suda.edu.cn

    2016-02-01

    Silk fibroin heavy chain is the major protein component of Bombyx mori silk fibroin and is composed of 12 repetitive and 11 non-repetitive regions, with the non-repetitive domain consisting of a hydrophilic polypeptide chain. In order to determine the biomedical function of the non-repetitive domain or potentially use it to modify hydrophobic biomaterials, high-purity isolation is necessary. Previously, we cloned and extended a gene motif (f(1)) encoding the non-repetitive domain. Here, this motif and its multimers are inserted into a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion-protein expression vector. Motif f(1) and multimers f(4) and f(8) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells following isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction, purified by GST-affinity chromatography, and single bands of purified fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8), were visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Target polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8), were cleaved clearly from the GST-fusion tag following thrombin digestion. Mass spectrometry results indicate that the molecular weights associated with fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8) are 31.5, 43.8, and 59.0 kDa, respectively, and with the cleaved polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8) are 4.8, 16.8, and 32.8 kDa, respectively. The F(1), F(4), and F(8) polypeptide chains are negatively charged with isoelectric points (pI) of 3.3, 3.2, and 3.0, respectively. The molecular weight and pI values of the polypeptide chains are consistent with the predicted values and the amino acid compositions similar to predicted sequences. FTIR and CD results show the molecular conformation of F(1) was mainly random coil, and more stable α-helix structure formed in longer molecular chain. - Highlights: • A non-repetitive domain and its multimers of silk fibroin were expressed by E. coli. • The corresponding target polypeptides F(1), F(4) and F(8) were cleaved clearly. • Their

  18. Ribosomic DNA intergenic spacer 1 region is useful when identifying Candida parapsilosis spp. complex based on high-resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Sara; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Marconi, Marco; Buitrago, María José; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Kersey, Paul J; Mellado, Emilia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuesta, Isabel

    2014-07-01

    The epidemiology of Candida parapsilosis and the closely related species C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis has changed in recent years, justify the need to identify this complex at the species level. In this study we investigate the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) to evaluate the utility of this gene region as a phylogenetic molecular marker and the suitability of a high-resolution melting (HRM) strategy based on this region for identification of members of the C. parapsilosis spp. complex. We sequenced the IGS1 and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rDNA from 33 C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains. Although both regions are useful in identifying species, comparative sequence analysis showed that the diversity in the IGS1 region was higher than in the ITS sequences. We also developed an HRM analysis that reliably identifies C. parapsilosis spp. complex based on the amplification of 70 bp in the IGS1 region. All isolates were correctly identified with a confidence interval >98%. Our results demonstrate that HRM analysis based on the IGS1 region is a powerful tool for distinguishing C. parapsilosis from cryptic species.

  19. Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA methylation has been linked to genome regulation and dysregulation in health and disease respectively, and methods for characterizing genomic DNA methylation patterns are rapidly emerging. We have developed/refined methods for enrichment of methylated genomic fragments using the methyl-binding domain of the human MBD2 protein (MBD2-MBD) followed by analysis with high-density tiling microarrays. This MBD-chip approach was used to characterize DNA methylation patterns across all non-repetitive sequences of human chromosomes 21 and 22 at high-resolution in normal and malignant prostate cells. Results Examining this data using computational methods that were designed specifically for DNA methylation tiling array data revealed widespread methylation of both gene promoter and non-promoter regions in cancer and normal cells. In addition to identifying several novel cancer hypermethylated 5' gene upstream regions that mediated epigenetic gene silencing, we also found several hypermethylated 3' gene downstream, intragenic and intergenic regions. The hypermethylated intragenic regions were highly enriched for overlap with intron-exon boundaries, suggesting a possible role in regulation of alternative transcriptional start sites, exon usage and/or splicing. The hypermethylated intergenic regions showed significant enrichment for conservation across vertebrate species. A sampling of these newly identified promoter (ADAMTS1 and SCARF2 genes) and non-promoter (downstream or within DSCR9, C21orf57 and HLCS genes) hypermethylated regions were effective in distinguishing malignant from normal prostate tissues and/or cell lines. Conclusions Comparison of chromosome-wide DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells revealed significant methylation of gene-proximal and conserved intergenic sequences. Such analyses can be easily extended for genome-wide methylation analysis in health and disease. PMID:21669002

  20. Identification of Candida species by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of intergenic spacer regions of ribosomal DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, D W; Wilson, M.J.; Lewis, M A; Potts, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The PCR was used to amplify a targeted region of the ribosomal DNA from 84 Candida isolates. Unique product sizes were obtained for Candida guilliermondii, Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata, and Candida pseudotropicalis. Isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida stellatoidea, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei could be identified following restriction digestion of the PCR products.

  1. Expression of Trypanosoma cruzi surface antigen FL-160 is controlled by elements in the 3' untranslated, the 3' intergenic, and the coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, D; La Flamme, A C; Van Voorhis, W C

    1999-07-30

    The FL-160 surface antigen gene family of T. cruzi consists of hundreds of members of 160 kDa glycoproteins expressed in trypomastigotes, but not in epimastigotes. Steady-state levels of FL-160 mRNA were 80 to 100-fold higher in trypomastigotes than in epimastigotes, yet transcription rates were equivalent between the lifecycle stages. Luciferase reporter constructs demonstrated that the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and intergenic region (IR) following the coding sequence of FL-160 was sufficient to generate 8-fold higher luciferase expression in trypomastigotes compared with epimastigotes. Transfection of 3' UTR/IR deletion constructs revealed cis-acting elements which conferred a trypomastigote-specific expression pattern similar to that of FL-160. Parasites treated with translation and transcription inhibitors, cyclohexamide and Actinomycin D, respectively, displayed a stage-specific pattern of FL-160 mRNA degradation. Epimastigotes, but not trypomastigotes, treated with the inhibitors accumulated a 1.4 Kb FL-160 cleavage product. The cleavage site mapped to a 31 base poly-purine tract in the FL-160 coding region. The first 526 aa of FL-160, containing the 31 base poly-purine tract and several smaller tracts, were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from the T. cruzi tubulin locus. Stable transformants expressed 4-fold more FL-160:GFP fusion mRNA and 12-fold more fusion protein in the trypomastigote stage than in the epimastigote stage suggesting post-transcriptional and translational control elements. These data reveal at least two distinct control mechanisms for trypomastigote-specific expression of FL-160 surface glycoproteins, one involving the 3' UTR/IR and one involving the coding region of FL-160.

  2. Length polymorphisms for intergenic spacer regions of 16S-23S rDNA in members of the new hydrogen-producing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A method based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) -23S rDNA intergenic spacer regions (ISR) was developed for the identification of species within the novel group hydrogen-producing anaerobes. The sizes of the PCR products varied from 1264 to 398 bp. Strain of isolate Rennanqilyf 3 was characterized as having products of 1262, 398, 638, 437 and 436 bp. The isolate Rennanqilyf 1 had product of 1264 bp. The isolate Rennanqilyf 13 had products of 1261, 579 and 485 bp. Of the 3 species of the novel group hydrogenproducing anaerobes examined, no one was indistinguishable. Two environmental isolates were identified as hydrogen-producing bacteria, which were new species in present taxon. Rennanqilyf 3 could not be associated With any Clostridium sp. Studied. Rennanqilyf 1 could be classified into Clostridium genus. The combination between 16S rDNA equencing and length polymorphisms of IRS in 16S-23S rDNA is a better method for determining species of the hydrogen-producing bacteria.

  3. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructanstructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Laura K.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg of genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was further qualified by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  4. Existence of HbF Enhancer Haplotypes at HBS1L-MYB Intergenic Region in Transfusion-Dependent Saudi β-Thalassemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Cyrus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. β-Thalassemia and sickle cell disease are genetic disorders characterized by reduced and abnormal β-globin chain production, respectively. The elevation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF can ameliorate the severity of these disorders. In sickle cell disease patients, the HbF level elevation is associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs, BCL11A, HBG2 promoter, and HBS1L-MYB intergenic region. This study elucidates the existence of the variants in these three QTLs to determine their association with HbF levels of transfusion-dependent Saudi β-thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods. A total of 174 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients and 164 healthy controls from Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were genotyped for fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the three QTL regions using TaqMan assay on real-time PCR. Results. Genotype analysis revealed that six alleles of HBS1L-MYB QTL (rs9376090C p=0.0009, rs9399137C p=0.008, rs4895441G p=0.004, rs9389269C p=0.008, rs9402686A p=0.008, and rs9494142C p=0.002 were predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. In addition, haplotype analysis revealed that haplotypes of HBS1L-MYB (GCCGCAC p=0.022 and HBG2 (GTT p=0.009 were also predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. Furthermore, the HBS1L-MYB region also exhibited association with the high HbF cohort. Conclusion. The stimulation of HbF gene expression may provide alternative therapies for the amelioration of the disease severity of β-thalassemia.

  5. Existence of HbF Enhancer Haplotypes at HBS1L-MYB Intergenic Region in Transfusion-Dependent Saudi β-Thalassemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrus, Cyril; Vatte, Chittibabu; Borgio, J Francis; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah; Chathoth, Shahanas; Nasserullah, Zaki A; Jarrash, Sana Al; Sulaiman, Ahmed; Qutub, Hatem; Alsaleem, Hassan; Alzahrani, Alhusain J; Steinberg, Martin H; Ali, Amein K Al

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives. β-Thalassemia and sickle cell disease are genetic disorders characterized by reduced and abnormal β-globin chain production, respectively. The elevation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) can ameliorate the severity of these disorders. In sickle cell disease patients, the HbF level elevation is associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs), BCL11A, HBG2 promoter, and HBS1L-MYB intergenic region. This study elucidates the existence of the variants in these three QTLs to determine their association with HbF levels of transfusion-dependent Saudi β-thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods. A total of 174 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients and 164 healthy controls from Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were genotyped for fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the three QTL regions using TaqMan assay on real-time PCR. Results. Genotype analysis revealed that six alleles of HBS1L-MYB QTL (rs9376090C p = 0.0009, rs9399137C p = 0.008, rs4895441G p = 0.004, rs9389269C p = 0.008, rs9402686A p = 0.008, and rs9494142C p = 0.002) were predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. In addition, haplotype analysis revealed that haplotypes of HBS1L-MYB (GCCGCAC p = 0.022) and HBG2 (GTT p = 0.009) were also predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. Furthermore, the HBS1L-MYB region also exhibited association with the high HbF cohort. Conclusion. The stimulation of HbF gene expression may provide alternative therapies for the amelioration of the disease severity of β-thalassemia.

  6. Existence of HbF Enhancer Haplotypes at HBS1L-MYB Intergenic Region in Transfusion-Dependent Saudi β-Thalassemia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Borgio, J. Francis; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah; Nasserullah, Zaki A.; Jarrash, Sana Al; Sulaiman, Ahmed; Qutub, Hatem; Alsaleem, Hassan; Alzahrani, Alhusain J.; Steinberg, Martin H.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives. β-Thalassemia and sickle cell disease are genetic disorders characterized by reduced and abnormal β-globin chain production, respectively. The elevation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) can ameliorate the severity of these disorders. In sickle cell disease patients, the HbF level elevation is associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs), BCL11A, HBG2 promoter, and HBS1L-MYB intergenic region. This study elucidates the existence of the variants in these three QTLs to determine their association with HbF levels of transfusion-dependent Saudi β-thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods. A total of 174 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients and 164 healthy controls from Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were genotyped for fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the three QTL regions using TaqMan assay on real-time PCR. Results. Genotype analysis revealed that six alleles of HBS1L-MYB QTL (rs9376090C p = 0.0009, rs9399137C p = 0.008, rs4895441G p = 0.004, rs9389269C p = 0.008, rs9402686A p = 0.008, and rs9494142C p = 0.002) were predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. In addition, haplotype analysis revealed that haplotypes of HBS1L-MYB (GCCGCAC p = 0.022) and HBG2 (GTT p = 0.009) were also predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. Furthermore, the HBS1L-MYB region also exhibited association with the high HbF cohort. Conclusion. The stimulation of HbF gene expression may provide alternative therapies for the amelioration of the disease severity of β-thalassemia. PMID:28280727

  7. A distal intergenic region controls pancreatic endocrine differentiation by acting as a transcriptional enhancer and as a polycomb response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanaud-Glavieux, Corinne; García-Hurtado, Javier; Sauty, Claire; Guerci, Aline; Ferrer, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Lineage-selective expression of developmental genes is dependent on the interplay between activating and repressive mechanisms. Gene activation is dependent on cell-specific transcription factors that recognize transcriptional enhancer sequences. Gene repression often depends on the recruitment of Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, although the sequences that underlie the recruitment of PcG proteins, also known as Polycomb response elements (PREs), remain poorly understood in vertebrates. While distal PREs have been identified in mammals, a role for positive-acting enhancers in PcG-mediated repression has not been described. Here we have used a highly efficient procedure based on lentiviral-mediated transgenesis to carry out in vivo fine-mapping of, cis-regulatory sequences that control lineage-specific activation of Neurog3, a master regulator of pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Our findings reveal an enhancer region that is sufficient to drive correct spacio-temporal expression of Neurog3 and demonstrate that this same region serves as a PRE in alternative lineages where Neurog3 is inactive. PMID:28225770

  8. Nonrepetitive Colourings of Planar Graphs with $O(\\log n)$ Colours

    CERN Document Server

    Dujmović, Vida; Joret, Gwenaël; Wood, David R

    2012-01-01

    A vertex colouring of a graph is \\emph{nonrepetitive} if there is no path for which the first half of the path is assigned the same sequence of colours as the second half. The \\emph{nonrepetitive chromatic number} of a graph $G$ is the minimum integer $k$ such that $G$ has a nonrepetitive $k$-colouring. Whether planar graphs have bounded nonrepetitive chromatic number is one of the most important open problems in the field. Despite this, the best known upper bound is $O(\\sqrt{n})$ for $n$-vertex planar graphs. We prove a $O(\\log n)$ upper bound.

  9. Evolution of the rpoB-psbZ region in fern plastid genomes: notable structural rearrangements and highly variable intergenic spacers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ying-Juan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rpoB-psbZ (BZ region of some fern plastid genomes (plastomes has been noted to go through considerable genomic changes. Unraveling its evolutionary dynamics across all fern lineages will lead to clarify the fundamental process shaping fern plastome structure and organization. Results A total of 24 fern BZ sequences were investigated with taxon sampling covering all the extant fern orders. We found that: (i a tree fern Plagiogyria japonica contained a novel gene order that can be generated from either the ancestral Angiopteris type or the derived Adiantum type via a single inversion; (ii the trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS of the filmy fern Vandenboschia radicans was expanded 3-fold due to the tandem 27-bp repeats which showed strong sequence similarity with the anticodon domain of trnY; (iii the trnY-trnE IGSs of two horsetail ferns Equisetum ramosissimum and E. arvense underwent an unprecedented 5-kb long expansion, more than a quarter of which was consisted of a single type of direct repeats also relevant to the trnY anticodon domain; and (iv ycf66 has independently lost at least four times in ferns. Conclusions Our results provided fresh insights into the evolutionary process of fern BZ regions. The intermediate BZ gene order was not detected, supporting that the Adiantum type was generated by two inversions occurring in pairs. The occurrence of Vandenboschia 27-bp repeats represents the first evidence of partial tRNA gene duplication in fern plastomes. Repeats potentially forming a stem-loop structure play major roles in the expansion of the trnY-trnE IGS.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographical regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced-leader genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Carolina I; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M; Tomasini, Nicolás; da Silva, Alexandre; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba, Cesar A Cuba; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2010-12-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harbouring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia+Tc Id, Tc Ia+Tc Ie and Tc Id+Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographic regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced leader genes✯

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Carolina I.; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M.; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M.; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V.; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M.; Tomasini, Nicolás; Silva, Alex Da; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba Cuba, Cesar A.; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J.; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harboring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia + Tc Id, Tc Ia + Tc Ie and Tc Id + Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time. PMID:20670628

  12. BAC-end microsatellites from intra and inter-genic regions of the common bean genome and their correlation with cytogenetic features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Wohlgemuth Blair

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites are very useful for genetic mapping. In this study novel SSRs were identified in BAC-end sequences (BES from non-contigged, non-overlapping bacterial artificial clones (BACs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. These so called "singleton" BACs were from the G19833 Andean gene pool physical map and the new BES-SSR markers were used for the saturation of the inter-gene pool, DOR364×G19833 genetic map. A total of 899 SSR loci were found among the singleton BES, but only 346 loci corresponded to the single di- or tri-nucleotide motifs that were likely to be polymorphic (ATT or AG motifs, principally and useful for primer design and individual marker mapping. When these novel SSR markers were evaluated in the DOR364×G19833 population parents, 136 markers revealed polymorphism and 106 were mapped. Genetic mapping resulted in a map length of 2291 cM with an average distance between markers of 5.2 cM. The new genetic map was compared to the most recent cytogenetic analysis of common bean chromosomes. We found that the new singleton BES-SSR were helpful in filling peri-centromeric spaces on the cytogenetic map. Short genetic distances between some new singleton-derived BES-SSR markers was common showing suppressed recombination in these regions compared to other parts of the genome. The correlation of singleton-derived SSR marker distribution with other cytogenetic features of the bean genome is discussed.

  13. Comparative bioinformatics and experimental analysis of the intergenic regulatory regions of Bacillus cereus hbl and nhe enterotoxin operons and the impact of CodY on virulence heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Elisabeth eBöhm

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a food contaminant with greatly varying enteropathogenic potential. Almost all known strains harbor the genes for at least one of the three enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl and CytK. While some strains show no cytotoxicity, others have caused outbreaks, in rare cases even with lethal outcome. The reason for these differences in cytotoxicity is unknown. To gain insight into the origin of enterotoxin expression heterogeneity in different strains, the architecture and role of 5’ intergenic regions (5’IGRs upstream of the nhe and hbl operons was investigated. In silico comparison of 142 strains of all seven phylogenetic groups of B. cereus sensu lato proved the presence of long 5’IGRs upstream of the nheABC and hblCDAB operons, which harbor recognition sites for several transcriptional regulators, including the virulence regulator PlcR, redox regulators ResD and Fnr, the nutrient-sensitive regulator CodY as well as the master regulator for biofilm formation SinR. By determining transcription start sites, unusually long 5’ untranslated regions (5’UTRs upstream of the nhe and hbl start codons were identified, which are not present upstream of cytK-1 and cytK-2. Promoter fusions lacking various parts of the nhe and hbl 5’UTR in B. cereus INRA C3 showed that the entire 331 bp 5’UTR of nhe is necessary for full promoter activity, while the presence of the complete 606 bp hbl 5’UTR lowers promoter activity. Repression was caused by a 268 bp sequence directly upstream of the hbl transcription start. Luciferase activity of reporter strains containing nhe and hbl 5’IGR lux fusions provided evidence that toxin gene transcription is upregulated by the depletion of free amino acids. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the branched-chain amino acid sensing regulator CodY binds to both nhe and hbl 5’UTR downstream of the promoter, potentially acting as a nutrient-responsive roadblock repressor of toxin gene transcription

  14. Comparative Bioinformatics and Experimental Analysis of the Intergenic Regulatory Regions of Bacillus cereus hbl and nhe Enterotoxin Operons and the Impact of CodY on Virulence Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Maria-Elisabeth; Krey, Viktoria M; Jeßberger, Nadja; Frenzel, Elrike; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food contaminant with greatly varying enteropathogenic potential. Almost all known strains harbor the genes for at least one of the three enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl, and CytK. While some strains show no cytotoxicity, others have caused outbreaks, in rare cases even with lethal outcome. The reason for these differences in cytotoxicity is unknown. To gain insight into the origin of enterotoxin expression heterogeneity in different strains, the architecture and role of 5' intergenic regions (5' IGRs) upstream of the nhe and hbl operons was investigated. In silico comparison of 142 strains of all seven phylogenetic groups of B. cereus sensu lato proved the presence of long 5' IGRs upstream of the nheABC and hblCDAB operons, which harbor recognition sites for several transcriptional regulators, including the virulence regulator PlcR, redox regulators ResD and Fnr, the nutrient-sensitive regulator CodY as well as the master regulator for biofilm formation SinR. By determining transcription start sites, unusually long 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) upstream of the nhe and hbl start codons were identified, which are not present upstream of cytK-1 and cytK-2. Promoter fusions lacking various parts of the nhe and hbl 5' UTR in B. cereus INRA C3 showed that the entire 331 bp 5' UTR of nhe is necessary for full promoter activity, while the presence of the complete 606 bp hbl 5' UTR lowers promoter activity. Repression was caused by a 268 bp sequence directly upstream of the hbl transcription start. Luciferase activity of reporter strains containing nhe and hbl 5' IGR lux fusions provided evidence that toxin gene transcription is upregulated by the depletion of free amino acids. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the branched-chain amino acid sensing regulator CodY binds to both nhe and hbl 5' UTR downstream of the promoter, potentially acting as a nutrient-responsive roadblock repressor of toxin gene transcription. PlcR binding sites are

  15. Minor contribution of mutations at iniA codon 501 and embC-embA intergenic region in ethambutol-resistant clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Suhail

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethambutol (EMB is a first-line drug for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB. Resistance to EMB in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is mediated by mutations in several genes involved in arabinan synthesis notably three emb (arabinosyl transferase and iniA (isoniazid-inducible genes. Most epidemiologically unrelated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis strains contain mutations at embB codons 306, 406 and 497, embC-embA intergenic region (IGR and iniA codon 501 (iniA501. Objective To develop a more comprehensive molecular screen for EMB-resistance detectioamong epidemiologically unrelated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis strains previously analyzed for embB codon 306, 406 and 497 mutations by including analysis of mutations at iniA501 and in embC-embA IGR. Methods Fifty consecutive and phenotypically documented EMB-resistant and 25 pansusceptible M. tuberculosis strains isolated from 75 different TB patients over a four-year period in Kuwait were analyzed. Mutations at iniA501 were detected by PCR amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP patterns generated with Hpy 99 I. Direct DNA sequencing was used to confirm RFLP results and for detecting mutations in embC-embA IGR. Results Nearly same number of EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis strains were resistant to EMB alone and EMB together with additional resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid (9 of 50, 18% and 11 of 50, 22%, respectively. All the 25 pansusceptible strains contained wild-type sequences at iniA501 and in embC-embA IGR. The analysis of 50 EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates showed that only one strain contained a mutated iniA501 while no mutation was detected in embC-embA IGR in any of the isolate. Conclusion Analysis of iniA501 and embC-embA IGR in epidemiologically unrelated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in Kuwait indicate that mutations at these locations occur very infrequently and their inclusion for the development of a

  16. Phylogenetic and biogeographic implications inferred by mitochondrial intergenic region analyses and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and B. brongniartii

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    Typas Milton A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The entomopathogenic fungi of the genus Beauveria are cosmopolitan with a variety of different insect hosts. The two most important species, B. bassiana and B. brongniartii, have already been used as biological control agents of pests in agriculture and as models for the study of insect host - pathogen interactions. Mitochondrial (mt genomes, due to their properties to evolve faster than the nuclear DNA, to contain introns and mobile elements and to exhibit extended polymorphisms, are ideal tools to examine genetic diversity within fungal populations and genetically identify a species or a particular isolate. Moreover, mt intergenic region can provide valuable phylogenetic information to study the biogeography of the fungus. Results The complete mt genomes of B. bassiana (32,263 bp and B. brongniartii (33,920 bp were fully analysed. Apart from a typical gene content and organization, the Beauveria mt genomes contained several introns and had longer intergenic regions when compared with their close relatives. The phylogenetic diversity of a population of 84 Beauveria strains -mainly B. bassiana (n = 76 - isolated from temperate, sub-tropical and tropical habitats was examined by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of two mt intergenic regions (atp6-rns and nad3-atp9 and the nuclear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 domain. Mt sequences allowed better differentiation of strains than the ITS region. Based on mt and the concatenated dataset of all genes, the B. bassiana strains were placed into two main clades: (a the B. bassiana s. l. and (b the "pseudobassiana". The combination of molecular phylogeny with criteria of geographic and climatic origin showed for the first time in entomopathogenic fungi, that the B. bassiana s. l. can be subdivided into seven clusters with common climate characteristics. Conclusions This study indicates that mt genomes and in particular intergenic regions provide molecular phylogeny tools that combined with criteria of

  17. The intergenic region between the divergently transcribed niiA and niaD genes of Aspergillus nidulans contains multiple NirA binding sites which act bidirectionally.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The niaD and niiA genes of Aspergillus nidulans, which code, respectively, for nitrate and nitrite reductases, are divergently transcribed, and their ATGs are separated by 1,200 bp. The genes are under the control of the positively acting NirA transcription factor, which mediates nitrate induction. The DNA binding domain of NirA was expressed as a fusion protein with the glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum. Gel shift and footprint experiments have shown that in the intergenic r...

  18. An intergenic region shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana is a tissue specific and stress inducible bidirectional promoter analyzed in transgenic arabidopsis and tobacco plants.

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    Joydeep Banerjee

    Full Text Available On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985 are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85 showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87. The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications.

  19. H2A.Z demarcates intergenic regions of the plasmodium falciparum epigenome that are dynamically marked by H3K9ac and H3K4me3.

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    Richárd Bártfai

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and their enzymes are promising targets for malaria therapeutic intervention; however, the epigenetic component of gene expression in P. falciparum is poorly understood. Dynamic or stable association of epigenetic marks with genomic features provides important clues about their function and helps to understand how histone variants/modifications are used for indexing the Plasmodium epigenome. We describe a novel, linear amplification method for next-generation sequencing (NGS that allows unbiased analysis of the extremely AT-rich Plasmodium genome. We used this method for high resolution, genome-wide analysis of a histone H2A variant, H2A.Z and two histone H3 marks throughout parasite intraerythrocytic development. Unlike in other organisms, H2A.Z is a constant, ubiquitous feature of euchromatic intergenic regions throughout the intraerythrocytic cycle. The almost perfect colocalisation of H2A.Z with H3K9ac and H3K4me3 suggests that these marks are preferentially deposited on H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes. By performing RNA-seq on 8 time-points, we show that acetylation of H3K9 at promoter regions correlates very well with the transcriptional status whereas H3K4me3 appears to have stage-specific regulation, being low at early stages, peaking at trophozoite stage, but does not closely follow changes in gene expression. Our improved NGS library preparation procedure provides a foundation to exploit the malaria epigenome in detail. Furthermore, our findings place H2A.Z at the cradle of P. falciparum epigenetic regulation by stably defining intergenic regions and providing a platform for dynamic assembly of epigenetic and other transcription related complexes.

  20. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak based on the inter-genomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Atreyi; Majumdar, Anasuya; Ghosh, Ranajit K

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak. ISR classes 'a' and 'g' were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O 139 serogroup and post-O 139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  1. Extensive transduction of nonrepetitive DNA mediated by L1 retrotransposition in cancer genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Tubio (Jose M.); Y. Li (Yilong); Y.S. Ju (Young Seok); I. Martincorena (Inigo); S.L. Cooke (Susanna); M. Tojo (Marta); G. Gundem (Gunes); C.P. Pipinikas (Christodoulos); J. Zamora (Jorge); J.W. Raine (John); D. Menzies; P. Roman-Garcia (Pablo); A. Fullam (Anthony); M. Gerstung (Moritz); A. Shlien (Adam); P.S. Tarpey (Patrick); E. Papaemmanuil (Elli); S. Knappskog (Stian); P. van Loo (Peter); M. Ramakrishna (Manasa); H. Davies (Helen); J. Marshall (John); D.C. Wedge (David); J. Teague (Jon); A. Butler (Adam); S. Nik-Zainal (Serena); L.B. Alexandrov (Ludmil); S. Behjati (Sam); L.R. Yates (Lucy); N. Bolli (Niccolò); L. Mudie (Laura); C. Hardy (Claire); S. Martin (Sandra); S. McLaren (Stuart); S. O'Meara (Sarah); E. Anderson (Elizabeth); M. Maddison (Mark); S. Gamble (Stephen); C. Foster (Christopher); A.Y. Warren (Anne); H.J. Whitaker (Heather); D. Brewer (Daniel); R. Eeles (Rosalind); C. Cooper (Colin); D. Neal (David); A.G. Lynch (Andy); T. Visakorpi (Tapio); W.B. Isaacs (William); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); C. Caldas (Carlos); C. Desmedt (Christine); C. Sotiriou (Christos); S. Aparicio (Sam); J.A. Foekens (John); J. Eyfjord; S. Lakhani (Sunil); G. Thomas (Gilles); O. Myklebost (Ola); P.N. Span (Paul); A.L. Børresen-Dale (Anne Lise); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M.J. Vijver (Marc ); A. Vincent-Salomon (Anne); G.G. van den Eynden (Gert); A.M. Flanagan (Adrienne); P.A. Futreal (Andrew); H. Janes (Holly); G.S. Bova (G. Steven); M.R. Stratton (Michael); U. McDermott (Ultan); P.J. Campbell (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLong interspersed nuclear element–1 (L1) retrotransposons are mobile repetitive elements that are abundant in the human genome. L1 elements propagate through RNA intermediates. In the germ line, neighboring, nonrepetitive sequences are occasionally mobilized by the L1 machinery, a proces

  2. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O139 outbreak based on the intergenomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atreyi Ghatak; Anasuya Majumdar; Ranajit K Ghosh

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O139 outbreak. ISR classes ‘a’ and ‘g’ were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O139 serogroup and post-O139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  3. Sequence Analysis and Comparison of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and 16S/23S Intergenic Spacer Region of Greening Bacterium Associated with Yellowing Disease (Huanglongbing) of Kinnow Mandarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K N; Baranwal, V K; Haq, Q M R

    2012-03-01

    High incidence (up to 40%) of symptoms of yellowing and yellow mottling was observed in 5-8 years old orchards of kinnow mandarin {Citrus reticulate Balanco ('King' × 'Willow mandarin')} in the Punjab state of India during a survey in January 2007. These symptoms are often confused with nutrient deficiency and other stress related disorders. However, a greening bacterium has been attributed to cause the disease. The disease was graft transmissible and sequencing of 16S rRNA, 16S/23S intergenic spacer region and 23S rRNA of the greening bacterium associated with yellowing disease in kinnow mandarin confirmed it to be Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus ('Ca L. asiaticus') showing maximum identity of 95.9% with 'Ca L. asiaticus' from USA and Brazil in 16S rRNA. The study indicates definite association of 'Ca L. asiaticus' with yellowing/chlorotic mottling symptoms of greening disease of kinnow mandarin in Punjab state of India.

  4. The identification of two Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes from domestic and sylvatic transmission cycles in Colombia based on a single polymerase chain reaction amplification of the spliced-leader intergenic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Marcela Villa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A single polymerase chain reaction (PCR reaction targeting the spliced-leader intergenic region of Trypanosoma cruzi I was standardised by amplifying a 231 bp fragment in domestic (TcIDOM strains or clones and 450 and 550 bp fragments in sylvatic strains or clones. This reaction was validated using 44 blind coded samples and 184 non-coded T. cruzi I clones isolated from sylvatic triatomines and the correspondence between the amplified fragments and their domestic or sylvatic origin was determined. Six of the nine strains isolated from acute cases suspected of oral infection had the sylvatic T. cruzi I profile. These results confirmed that the sylvatic T. cruzi I genotype is linked to cases of oral Chagas disease in Colombia. We therefore propose the use of this novel PCR reaction in strains or clones previously characterised as T. cruzi I to distinguish TcIDOMfrom sylvatic genotypes in studies of transmission dynamics, including the verification of population selection within hosts or detection of the frequency of mixed infections by both T. cruzi I genotypes in Colombia.

  5. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argüello-Astorga Gerardo R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in

  6. Intergenic spacer length variants in Old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ana Carvalho; Henrique Guedes-Pinto; José Lima-Brito

    2011-08-01

    The intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA is highly variable, but is location specific in the nucleolar organizer region of the chromosomes. This study provides an event of high level of polymorphism / size variation and occurrence of 14 unique phenotypes in 48 landraces of Portuguese bread wheat cultivars for IGS-amplified products obtained by PCR-RFLP technique performed with TaqI. The attendant IGS polymorphism has been used to deduce affinities between landraces. Some of the high molecular weight IGS allelic variants were also probed for their chromosomal localization by sequential silver nitrate staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, only the intergenic spacer allelic variant of 3.1 kb could be successfully hybridized, and was observed to be physically located on the chromosome pair 1B in the NOR loci of the cultivar ‘Magueija’.

  7. Human Disease-Associated Genetic Variation Impacts Large Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Westra, Harm-Jan; Karjalainen, Juha; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Esko, Tonu; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Almeida, Rodrigo; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofker, Marten H.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fu, Jingyuan; Withoff, Sebo; Metspalu, Andres; Franke, Lude; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vosa, Urmo

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has become clear that only a small percentage (7%) of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are located in protein-coding regions, while the remaining 93% are located in gene regulatory regions or in intergenic regions. Thus, the understanding of how genetic variation

  8. Fixed parameter algorithms for restricted coloring problems: acyclic, star, nonrepetitive, harmonious and clique colorings

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, Victor; Maia, Ana Karolinna; Martins, Nicolas; Sampaio, Rudini Menezes

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain polynomial time algorithms to determine the acyclic chromatic number, the star chromatic number, the Thue chromatic number, the harmonious chromatic number and the clique chromatic number of $P_4$-tidy graphs and $(q,q-4)$-graphs, for every fixed $q$. These classes include cographs, $P_4$-sparse and $P_4$-lite graphs. All these coloring problems are known to be NP-hard for general graphs. These algorithms are fixed parameter tractable on the parameter $q(G)$, which is the minimum $q$ such that $G$ is a $(q,q-4)$-graph. We also prove that every connected $(q,q-4)$-graph with at least $q$ vertices is 2-clique-colorable and that every acyclic coloring of a cograph is also nonrepetitive.

  9. Regulatory roles of conserved intergenic domains in vertebrate Dlx bigene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Noël; Jarinova, Olga; Amores, Angel; Long, Qiaoming; Hatch, Gary; Park, Byung Keon; Rubenstein, John L R; Ekker, Marc

    2003-04-01

    Dlx homeobox genes of vertebrates are generally arranged as three bigene clusters on distinct chromosomes. The Dlx1/Dlx2, Dlx5/Dlx6, and Dlx3/Dlx7 clusters likely originate from duplications of an ancestral Dlx gene pair. Overlaps in expression are often observed between genes from the different clusters. To determine if the overlaps are a result of the conservation of enhancer sequences between paralogous clusters, we compared the Dlx1/2 and the Dlx5/Dlx6 intergenic regions from human, mouse, zebrafish, and from two pufferfish, Spheroides nephelus and Takifugu rubripes. Conservation between all five vertebrates is limited to four sequences, two in Dlx1/Dlx2 and two in Dlx5/Dlx6. These noncoding sequences are >75% identical over a few hundred base pairs, even in distant vertebrates. However, when compared to each other, the four intergenic sequences show a much more limited similarity. Each intergenic sequence acts as an enhancer when tested in transgenic animals. Three of them are active in the forebrain with overlapping patterns despite their limited sequence similarity. The lack of sequence similarity between paralogous intergenic regions and the high degree of sequence conservation of orthologous enhancers suggest a rapid divergence of Dlx intergenic regions early in chordate/vertebrate evolution followed by fixation of cis-acting regulatory elements.

  10. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment. PMID:28262684

  11. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  12. PATH: a work sampling-based approach to ergonomic job analysis for construction and other non-repetitive work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, B; Paquet, V; Punnett, L; Lee, D; Moir, S

    1996-06-01

    A high prevalence and incidence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders have been reported in construction work. Unlike industrial production-line activity, construction work, as well as work in many other occupations (e.g. agriculture, mining), is non-repetitive in nature; job tasks are non-cyclic, or consist of long or irregular cycles. PATH (Posture, Activity, Tools and Handling), a work sampling-based approach, was developed to characterize the ergonomic hazards of construction and other non-repetitive work. The posture codes in the PATH method are based on the Ovako Work Posture Analysing System (OWAS), with other codes included for describing worker activity, tool use, loads handled and grasp type. For heavy highway construction, observations are stratified by construction stage and operation, using a taxonomy developed specifically for this purpose. Observers can code the physical characteristics of the job reliably after about 30 h of training. A pilot study of six construction laborers during four road construction operations suggests that laborers spend large proportions of time in nonneutral trunk postures and spend approximately 20% of their time performing manual material handling tasks. These results demonstrate how the PATH method can be used to identify specific construction operations and tasks that are ergonomically hazardous.

  13. Atypical epigenetic mark in an atypical location: cytosine methylation at asymmetric (CNN sites within the body of a non-repetitive tomato gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iusem Norberto D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic DNA methylation is one of the most studied epigenetic processes, as it results in a direct and heritable covalent modification triggered by external stimuli. In contrast to mammals, plant DNA methylation, which is stimulated by external cues exemplified by various abiotic types of stress, is often found not only at CG sites but also at CNG (N denoting A, C or T and CNN (asymmetric sites. A genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis has shown that CNN methylation is preferentially concentrated in transposon genes and non-coding repetitive elements. We are particularly interested in investigating the epigenetics of plant species with larger and more complex genomes than Arabidopsis, particularly with regards to the associated alterations elicited by abiotic stress. Results We describe the existence of CNN-methylated epialleles that span Asr1, a non-transposon, protein-coding gene from tomato plants that lacks an orthologous counterpart in Arabidopsis. In addition, to test the hypothesis of a link between epigenetics modifications and the adaptation of crop plants to abiotic stress, we exhaustively explored the cytosine methylation status in leaf Asr1 DNA, a model gene in our system, resulting from water-deficit stress conditions imposed on tomato plants. We found that drought conditions brought about removal of methyl marks at approximately 75 of the 110 asymmetric (CNN sites analysed, concomitantly with a decrease of the repressive H3K27me3 epigenetic mark and a large induction of expression at the RNA level. When pinpointing those sites, we observed that demethylation occurred mostly in the intronic region. Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel genomic distribution of CNN methylation, namely in the transcribed region of a protein-coding, non-repetitive gene, and the changes in those epigenetic marks that are caused by water stress. These findings may represent a general mechanism for the

  14. Adaptive ILC algorithms of nonlinear continuous systems with non-parametric uncertainties for non-repetitive trajectory tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Lv, Mang-Mang; Ho, John K. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, two adaptive iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms are presented for nonlinear continuous systems with non-parametric uncertainties. Unlike general ILC techniques, the proposed adaptive ILC algorithms allow that both the initial error at each iteration and the reference trajectory are iteration-varying in the ILC process, and can achieve non-repetitive trajectory tracking beyond a small initial time interval. Compared to the neural network or fuzzy system-based adaptive ILC schemes and the classical ILC methods, in which the number of iterative variables is generally larger than or equal to the number of control inputs, the first adaptive ILC algorithm proposed in this paper uses just two iterative variables, while the second even uses a single iterative variable provided that some bound information on system dynamics is known. As a result, the memory space in real-time ILC implementations is greatly reduced.

  15. Modified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region restriction endonuclease analysis for species identification of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs, compared with identification using classical methods and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Banach, Tomasz; Kowalski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of bacteria to at least the species level is currently the basis for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections. This is particularly important in the case of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, whose resistance profile is often correlated with their species (e.g. resistance to vancomycin). In this study, we evaluated restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region for species identification of Enterococcus. The utility of the method was compared with that of phenotypic methods [biochemical profile evaluation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)]. Identification was based on 21 Enterococcus reference strains, of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. casseliflavus, E. gallinarum, E. avium, E. cecorum and E. columbae, and 47 Enterococcus field strains isolated from pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the ITS-PCR product using HinfI, RsaI and MboI, in the order specified, enabled species differentiation of the Enterococcus reference and field strains, and in the case of the latter, the results of species identification were identical (47/47) to those obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, as a result of digestion with MboI, a unique restriction profile was also obtained for the strains (3/3) identified by MALDI-TOF MS as E. thailandicus. In our opinion, restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region of Enterococcus may be a simple and relatively fast (less than 4 h) alternative method for identifying the species occurring most frequently in humans and animals.

  16. Self-sustaining non-repetitive activity in a large scale neuronal-level model of the hippocampal circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorcioni, Ruggero; Hamilton, David J; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2008-10-01

    The mammalian hippocampus is involved in spatial representation and memory storage and retrieval, and much research is ongoing to elucidate the cellular and system-level mechanisms underlying these cognitive functions. Modeling may be useful to link network-level activity patterns to the relevant features of hippocampal anatomy and electrophysiology. Investigating the effects of circuit connectivity requires simulations of a number of neurons close to real scale. To this end, we construct a model of the hippocampus with 16 distinct neuronal classes (including both local and projection cells) and 200,000 individual neurons. The number of neurons in each class and their interconnectivity are drawn from rat anatomy. Here we analyze the emergent network activity and how it is affected by reducing either the size or the connectivity diversity of the model. When the model is run with a simple variation of the McCulloch-Pitts formalism, self-sustaining non-repetitive activity patterns consistently emerge. Specific firing threshold values are narrowly constrained for each cell class upon multiple runs with different stochastic wiring and initial conditions, yet these values do not directly affect network stability. Analysis of the model at different network sizes demonstrates that a scale reduction of one order of magnitude drastically alters network dynamics, including the variability of the output range, the distribution of firing frequencies, and the duration of self-sustained activity. Moreover, comparing the model to a control condition with an equivalent number of (excitatory/inhibitory balanced) synapses, but removing all class-specific information (i.e. collapsing the network to homogeneous random connectivity) has surprisingly similar effects to downsizing the total number of neurons. The reduced-scale model is also compared directly with integrate-and-fire simulations, which capture considerably more physiological detail at the single-cell level, but still fail

  17. The Origin of Garden Chrysanthemums and Molecular Phylogeny of Dendranthema in China based on Nucleotide Sequences of nrDNA ITS, trnT-trnL and trnL-trnF Intergenic Spacer Regions in cpDNA%基于核糖体DNA的ITS序列和叶绿体trnT-trnL及trnL-trnF基因间区的菊花起源与中国菊属植物分子系统学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵惠恩; 汪小全; 陈俊愉; 洪德元

    2003-01-01

    Several sequences were applied to resolve phylogenetic relationships within Dendranthema and clarify the origin of garden chrysanthemums including sequences of nrDNA ITS, trnT-trnL and trnL-trnF intergenic spacer regions in cpDNA. The relationships among the species are so close that the three sequences could only provide limited information. From the evidence presented, we suggest that: ① D.rhmobifolium be the chloroplast donor of D.vestitum (HN) with the resembling morphology and the same trnT/L IGS sequence. ② D.vestitum, a putative ancestor, may be not the chloroplast donor of garden chrysanthemums. D.lavand-ulifolium might be the chloroplast donor of the type population of D.indicum (HN) or the direct chloroplast donor of the ancient garden chrysanthemum cultivar. ③ D.zawaskii might be not the ancestor of garden chrysanthemums.

  18. Structure of the exceptionally large nonrepetitive carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-82164.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Petersen, Bent O; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Duus, Jens Ø; Helander, Ilkka M

    2003-07-01

    The structures of the oligosaccharides obtained after acetic acid hydrolysis and alkaline deacylation of the rough-type lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-82164 were analysed using NMR spectroscopy, MS and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing by a decasaccharide fragment, and some minor variants lacking the terminal glucose residue. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS that could be deduced from experimental results consists of 25 monosaccharides (including the previously found Ara4NP residue in lipid A) arranged in a well-defined nonrepetitive structure: We presume that the shorter variant with R1 = H represents the core-lipid A part of the LPS, and the additional fragment is present instead of the O-specific polysaccharide. Structures of this type have not been previously described. Analysis of the deacylation products obtained from the LPS of the smooth strain, VTT E-79100T, showed that it contains a very similar core but with one different glycosidic linkage.

  19. Structural analysis of two length variants of the rDNA intergenic spacer from Eruca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmikumaran, M; Negi, M S

    1994-03-01

    Restriction enzyme analysis of the rRNA genes of Eruca sativa indicated the presence of many length variants within a single plant and also between different cultivars which is unusual for most crucifers studied so far. Two length variants of the rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) from a single individual E. sativa (cv. Itsa) plant were cloned and characterized. The complete nucleotide sequences of both the variants (3 kb and 4 kb) were determined. The intergenic spacer contains three families of tandemly repeated DNA sequences denoted as A, B and C. However, the long (4 kb) variant shows the presence of an additional repeat, denoted as D, which is a duplication of a 224 bp sequence just upstream of the putative transcription initiation site. Repeat units belonging to the three different families (A, B and C) were in the size range of 22 to 30 bp. Such short repeat elements are present in the IGS of most of the crucifers analysed so far. Sequence analysis of the variants (3 kb and 4 kb) revealed that the length heterogeneity of the spacer is located at three different regions and is due to the varying copy numbers of repeat units belonging to families A and B. Length variation of the spacer is also due to the presence of a large duplication (D repeats) in the 4 kb variant which is absent in the 3 kb variant. The putative transcription initiation site was identified by comparisons with the rDNA sequences from other plant species.

  20. Identifying putative breast cancer-associated long intergenic non-coding RNA loci by high density SNP array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu eJiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-throughput transcript discoveries have yielded a growing recognition of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs, a class of arbitrarily defined transcripts (>200 nt that are primarily produced from the intergenic space. LincRNAs have been increasingly acknowledged for their expressional dynamics and likely functional associations with cancers. However, differential gene dosage of lincRNA genes between cancer genomes is less studied. By using the high-density Human Omni5-Quad BeadChips (Illumina, we investigated genomic copy number aberrations in a set of seven tumor-normal paired primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs established from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. This Beadchip platform includes a total of 2,435,915 SNP loci dispersed at an average interval of ~700 nt throughout the intergenic region of the human genome. We mapped annotated or putative lincRNA genes to a subset of 332,539 SNP loci, which were included in our analysis for lincRNA-associated copy number variations (CNV. We have identified 122 lincRNAs, which were affected by somatic CNV with overlapped aberrations ranging from 0.14% to 100% in length. LincRNA-associated aberrations were detected predominantly with copy number losses and preferential clustering to the ends of chromosomes. Interestingly, lincRNA genes appear to be much less susceptible to CNV in comparison to both protein-coding and intergenic regions (CNV affected segments in percentage: 1.8%, 37.5% and 60.6%, respectively. In summary, our study established a novel approach utilizing high-resolution SNP array to identify lincRNA candidates, which could functionally link to tumorigenesis, and provide new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Sequence analysis of the rDNA intergenic spacer of Metarhizium strains isolated in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Y. Yanaka-Schäfer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the extent of genetic variability of rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS in Metarhizium sp., 34 strains (27 isolated in Brazil were sequenced and analyzed together with an additional 20 Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae sequences retrieved from GenBank. Overall, the global nucleotide diversity for the region under study was of 0.090, while for the Brazilian isolates it was only 0.016. Phylogenetic analyses showed four well-supported groups (A, B, C, and D, one of which (D has not been previously identified. All but one of the Brazilian strains cluster in this novel D phylogroup, suggesting that the genetic variation found in Brazil is a subset of the worldwide M. anisopiliae var. anisopliae variation.

  2. Functional analysis of an intergenic non-coding sequence within mce1 operon of M.tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Mridula

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mce operons play an important role in the entry of M. tuberculosis into macrophages and non-phagocytic cells. Their non-redundant function as well as complex regulation is implied by the phenotype of mce mutants. Recently, mce1 operon was found to extend over 13 genes, fadD5 (Rv0166 being the first gene of the operon. The presence of a non-coding sequence of 200 base pairs between Rv0166 and Rv0167 is peculiar to mce1 among the four mce operons of M.tuberculosis. We have examined the function of this region. Results We predicted putative promoter activity of the 200 base pairs of non-coding, intergenic region between Rv0166 and Rv0167 in silico using MEME software and designate it as intergenic promoter, IGPr. We demonstrate both promoter activity and a putative negative regulatory function of this fragment by reporter assays carried out in the surrogate host M.smegmatis. We find that the repressive elements not only control the native promoter but also repress a heterologous promoter of M.smegmatis. The higher activity of the intergenic promoter in a clinical isolate in comparison with the wild type sequence from M.tuberculosis H37Rv could be correlated with a point mutation within the negative element. We have mapped two transcription start sites for mce1 operon both of which are utilized in M.tuberculosis H37Rv as well as the clinical isolate VPCI591. Our studies show that the promoter activity in the non-coding region is relevant not only in reporter gene expression but also in the expression of mce1 operon in M. tuberculosis cells grown in synthetic medium. Conclusion The mce operon of M.tuberculosis H37Rv potentially can be transcribed from two promoters P1 and P2, former mapping upstream of Rv0166 and the latter in the non-coding intergenic region between Rv0166 and Rv0167. The transcription initiation from P1 results in a transcript with Rv0166 while that from P2 will be without it. The sequences between the

  3. Sequences in the intergenic spacer influence RNA Pol I transcription from the human rRNA promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W.M.; Sylvester, J.E. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    In most eucaryotic species, ribosomal genes are tandemly repeated about 100-5000 times per haploid genome. The 43 Kb human rDNA repeat consists of a 13 Kb coding region for the 18S, 5.8S, 28S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and transcribed spacers separated by a 30 Kb intergenic spacer. For species such as frog, mouse and rat, sequences in the intergenic spacer other than the gene promoter have been shown to modulate transcription of the ribosomal gene. These sequences are spacer promoters, enhancers and the terminator for spacer transcription. We are addressing whether the human ribosomal gene promoter is similarly influenced. In-vitro transcription run-off assays have revealed that the 4.5 kb region (CBE), directly upstream of the gene promoter, has cis-stimulation and trans-competition properties. This suggests that the CBE fragment contains an enhancer(s) for ribosomal gene transcription. Further experiments have shown that a fragment ({approximately}1.6 kb) within the CBE fragment also has trans-competition function. Deletion subclones of this region are being tested to delineate the exact sequences responsible for these modulating activities. Previous sequence analysis and functional studies have revealed that CBE contains regions of DNA capable of adopting alternative structures such as bent DNA, Z-DNA, and triple-stranded DNA. Whether these structures are required for modulating transcription remains to be determined as does the specific DNA-protein interaction involved.

  4. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom.

  5. Transposable element insertions in long intergenic non-coding RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar eKannan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TE are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences, followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TE-derived sequences in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the RIDL (Repeat Insertion Domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and in particular functional diversification, of lincRNA genes.

  6. Genomic organization of Tropomodulins 2 and 4 and unusual intergenic and intraexonic splicing of YL-1 and Tropomodulin 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoghbi Huda Y

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tropomodulins (TMODs are a family of proteins that cap the pointed ends of actin filaments. Four TMODs have been identified in humans, with orthologs in mice. Mutations in actin or actin-binding proteins have been found to cause several human diseases, ranging from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to immunodefiencies such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. We had previously mapped Tropomodulin 2 (TMOD2 to the genomic region containing the gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 5 (ALS5. We determined the genomic structure of Tmod2 in order to better analyze patient DNA for mutations; we also determined the genomic structure of Tropomodulin 4 (TMOD4. Results In this study, we determined the genomic structure of TMOD2 and TMOD4 and found the organization of both genes to be similar. Sequence analysis of TMOD2 revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in ALS5 patients or controls. Interestingly, we discovered that another gene, YL-1, intergenically splices into TMOD4. YL-1 encodes six exons, the last of which is 291 bp from a 5' untranslated exon of TMOD4. We used 5' RACE and RT-PCR from TMOD4 to identify several intergenic RACE products. YL-1 was also found to undergo unconventional splicing using non-canonical splice sites within exons (intraexonic splicing to produce several alternative transcripts. Conclusions The genomic structure of TMOD2 and TMOD4 have been delineated. This should facilitate future mutational analysis of these genes. In addition, intergenic splicing at TMOD4/YL-1 was discovered, demonstrating yet another level of complexity of gene organization and regulation.

  7. Genome-assisted development of nuclear intergenic sequence markers for entomopathogenic fungi of the Metarhizium anisopliae species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, R M; Rehner, S A

    2013-03-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi in the genus Metarhizium are useful for biological control programmes against economically important arthropod pests worldwide. However, understanding the true diversity and ecology of these organisms is hampered by convergent morphologies between species. The application of molecular techniques has enabled greater resolution of species than allowed by morphology alone. In particular, the commonly used biocontrol agent M. anisopliae was found to be a species complex composed of nine species. This prior work was conducted with commonly used markers in fungal phylogenetics (BTUB, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF), which likely under-represent diversity in the M. anisopliae complex. Using sequence data from nuclear genomes of M. acridum and M. robertsii we identified regions of conserved gene synteny and developed primers to amplify intergenic regions of seven loci. Using ex-type and authenticated tissue specimens for species in the M. anisopliae complex, we demonstrate that sequence data derived from intergenic loci is more variable and phylogenetically informative than previously available markers. These new markers will facilitate investigations at or below the species level for the M. anisopliae complex. The method of marker development employed here should be extendable to any group with sufficiently divergent genome data available.

  8. Unusual structure of ribosomal DNA in the copepod Tigriopus californicus: intergenic spacer sequences lack internal subrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R S; Metz, E C; Flowers, J M; Willett, C S

    2005-01-03

    Eukaryotic nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is typically arranged as a series of tandem repeats coding for 18S, 5.8S, and 28S ribosomal RNAs. Transcription of rDNA repeats is initiated in the intergenic spacer (IGS) region upstream of the 18S gene. The IGS region itself typically consists of a set of subrepeats that function as transcriptional enhancers. Two important evolutionary forces have been proposed to act on the IGS region: first, selection may favor changes in the number of subrepeats that adaptively adjust rates of rDNA transcription, and second, coevolution of IGS sequence with RNA polymerase I transcription factors may lead to species specificity of the rDNA transcription machinery. To investigate the potential role of these forces on population differentiation and hybrid breakdown in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, we have characterized the rDNA of five T. californicus populations from the Pacific Coast of North America and one sample of T. brevicornicus from Scotland. Major findings are as follows: (1) the structural genes for 18S and 28S are highly conserved across T. californicus populations, in contrast to other nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes previously studied in these populations. (2) There is extensive differentiation among populations in the IGS region; in the extreme, no homology is observed across the IGS sequences (>2 kb) from the two Tigriopus species. (3) None of the Tigriopus IGS sequences have the subrepeat structure common to other eukaryotic IGS regions. (4) Segregation of rDNA in laboratory crosses indicates that rDNA is located on at least two separate chromosomes in T. californicus. These data suggest that although IGS length polymorphism does not appear to play the adaptive role hypothesized in some other eukaryotic systems, sequence divergence in the rDNA promoter region within the IGS could lead to population specificity of transcription in hybrids.

  9. Quantitative modeling of a gene's expression from its intergenic sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abul Hassan Samee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling a gene's expression from its intergenic locus and trans-regulatory context is a fundamental goal in computational biology. Owing to the distributed nature of cis-regulatory information and the poorly understood mechanisms that integrate such information, gene locus modeling is a more challenging task than modeling individual enhancers. Here we report the first quantitative model of a gene's expression pattern as a function of its locus. We model the expression readout of a locus in two tiers: 1 combinatorial regulation by transcription factors bound to each enhancer is predicted by a thermodynamics-based model and 2 independent contributions from multiple enhancers are linearly combined to fit the gene expression pattern. The model does not require any prior knowledge about enhancers contributing toward a gene's expression. We demonstrate that the model captures the complex multi-domain expression patterns of anterior-posterior patterning genes in the early Drosophila embryo. Altogether, we model the expression patterns of 27 genes; these include several gap genes, pair-rule genes, and anterior, posterior, trunk, and terminal genes. We find that the model-selected enhancers for each gene overlap strongly with its experimentally characterized enhancers. Our findings also suggest the presence of sequence-segments in the locus that would contribute ectopic expression patterns and hence were "shut down" by the model. We applied our model to identify the transcription factors responsible for forming the stripe boundaries of the studied genes. The resulting network of regulatory interactions exhibits a high level of agreement with known regulatory influences on the target genes. Finally, we analyzed whether and why our assumption of enhancer independence was necessary for the genes we studied. We found a deterioration of expression when binding sites in one enhancer were allowed to influence the readout of another enhancer. Thus, interference

  10. CONVERGENCE ANALYSIS IN SENSE OF LEBESGUE-p NORM OF DECENTRALIZED NON-REPETITIVE ITERATIVE LEARNING CONTROL FOR LINEAR LARGE-SCALE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoe RUAN; Huizhuo WU; Na LI; Baiwu WAN

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a decentralized iterative learning control strategy is embedded into the procedure of hierarchical steady-state optimization for a class of linear large-scale industrial processes which consists of a number of subsystems. The task of the learning controller for each subsystem is to iteratively generate a sequence of upgraded control inputs to take responsibilities of a sequential step functional control signals with distinct scales which are determined by the local decision-making units in the two-layer hierarchical steady-state optimization processing. The objective of the designated strategy is to consecutively improve the transient performance of the system. By means of the generalized Young inequality of convolution integral, the convergence of the learning algorithm is analyzed in the sense of Lebesgue-p norm. It is shown that the inherent feature of system such as the multi-dimensionality and the interaction may influence the convergence of the non-repetitive learning rule. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme and the validity of the conclusion.

  11. Structural Basis of IgE Binding to α- and γ-Gliadins: Contribution of Disulfide Bonds and Repetitive and Nonrepetitive Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameri, Hamza; Brossard, Chantal; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Gohon, Yann; Paty, Evelyne; Beaudouin, Etienne; Moneret-Vautrin, Denise-Anne; Drouet, Martine; Solé, Véronique; Wien, Frank; Lupi, Roberta; Larré, Colette; Snégaroff, Jacques; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-07-29

    Wheat products cause IgE-mediated allergies. The present study aimed to decipher the molecular basis of α- and γ-gliadin allergenicity. Gliadins and their domains, the repetitive N-terminal and the nonrepetitive C-terminal domains, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Their secondary structures and their IgE binding capacity were compared with those of natural proteins before and after reduction/alkylation. Allergenicity was evaluated with sera from patients who had a wheat food allergy or baker's asthma. The secondary structures of natural and recombinant proteins were slightly different. Compared with natural gliadins, recombinant proteins retained IgE binding but with reduced reactivity. Reduction/alkylation decreased IgE binding for both natural and recombinant gliadins. Although more continuous epitopes were identified in the N-terminal domains of α- and γ-gliadins, both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains contributed to IgE binding. As for other members of the prolamin superfamily, disulfide bonds appear to be of high importance for IgE binding.

  12. Inferring a role for methylation of intergenic DNA in the regulation of genes aberrantly expressed in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almamun, Md; Kholod, Olha; Stuckel, Alexei J; Levinson, Benjamin T; Johnson, Nathan T; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2017-01-17

    A complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of pre-B ALL is lacking. In this study, we integrated DNA methylation data and gene expression data to elucidate the impact of aberrant intergenic DNA methylation on gene expression in pre-B ALL. We found a subset of differentially methylated intergenic loci that were associated with altered gene expression in pre-B ALL patients. Notably, 84% of these regions were also bound by transcription factors (TF) known to play roles in differentiation and B-cell development in a lymphoblastoid cell line. Further, an overall downregulation of eRNA transcripts was observed in pre-B ALL patients and these transcripts were associated with the downregulation of putative target genes involved in B-cell migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. The identification of novel putative regulatory regions highlights the significance of intergenic DNA sequences and may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of pre-B ALL.

  13. Evidence of uneven selective pressure on different subsets of the conserved human genome; implications for the significance of intronic and intergenic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKenzie Alasdair

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human genetic variation produces the wide range of phenotypic differences that make us individual. However, little is known about the distribution of variation in the most conserved functional regions of the human genome. We examined whether different subsets of the conserved human genome have been subjected to similar levels of selective constraint within the human population. We used set theory and high performance computing to carry out an analysis of the density of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs within the evolutionary conserved human genome, at three different selective stringencies, intersected with exonic, intronic and intergenic coordinates. Results We demonstrate that SNP density across the genome is significantly reduced in conserved human sequences. Unexpectedly, we further demonstrate that, despite being conserved to the same degree, SNP density differs significantly between conserved subsets. Thus, both the conserved exonic and intronic genomes contain a significantly reduced density of SNPs compared to the conserved intergenic component. Furthermore the intronic and exonic subsets contain almost identical densities of SNPs indicating that they have been constrained to the same degree. Conclusion Our findings suggest the presence of a selective linkage between the exonic and intronic subsets and ascribes increased significance to the role of introns in human health. In addition, the identification of increased plasticity within the conserved intergenic subset suggests an important role for this subset in the adaptation and diversification of the human population.

  14. Intergenic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome reveal high rates of global gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Jeffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive efforts devoted to collecting human polymorphism data, little is known about the role of gene flow in the ancestry of human populations. This is partly because most analyses have applied one of two simple models of population structure, the island model or the splitting model, which make unrealistic biological assumptions. Results Here, we analyze 98-kb of DNA sequence from 20 independently evolving intergenic regions on the X chromosome in a sample of 90 humans from six globally diverse populations. We employ an isolation-with-migration (IM model, which assumes that populations split and subsequently exchange migrants, to independently estimate effective population sizes and migration rates. While the maximum effective size of modern humans is estimated at ~10,000, individual populations vary substantially in size, with African populations tending to be larger (2,300–9,000 than non-African populations (300–3,300. We estimate mean rates of bidirectional gene flow at 4.8 × 10-4/generation. Bidirectional migration rates are ~5-fold higher among non-African populations (1.5 × 10-3 than among African populations (2.7 × 10-4. Interestingly, because effective sizes and migration rates are inversely related in African and non-African populations, population migration rates are similar within Africa and Eurasia (e.g., global mean Nm = 2.4. Conclusion We conclude that gene flow has played an important role in structuring global human populations and that migration rates should be incorporated as critical parameters in models of human demography.

  15. Use of the CP and CPm Intergene Sequences to Discriminate CTV Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a need to develop a rapid assay to distinguish potentially mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus. Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains (VT, ...

  16. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Duc

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the

  17. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  18. α-MSH regulates intergenic splicing of MC1R and TUBB3 in human melanocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalziel, Martin; Kolesnichenko, Marina; das Neves, Ricardo Pires; Iborra, Francisco; Goding, Colin; Furger, André

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing enables higher eukaryotes to increase their repertoire of proteins derived from a restricted number of genes. However, the possibility that functional diversity may also be augmented by splicing between adjacent genes has been largely neglected. Here, we show that the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a critical component of the facultative skin pigmentation system, has a highly complex and inefficient poly(A) site which is instrumental in allowing intergenic spl...

  19. The Mitochondrial Genome of Conus textile, coxI-coxII Intergenic Sequences and Conoidean Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The cone snails belong to the superfamily Conoidea, comprising ∼10,000 venomous marine gastropods. We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of Conus textile. The gene order is identical in Conus textile, Lophiotoma cerithiformis (another Conoidean gastropod), and the neogastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta, (not in the superfamily Conoidea). However, the intergenic interval between the coxI/coxII genes, was much longer in C. textile (165 bp) than in any other previously analyzed gastropo...

  20. Structure of rrn operons in pathogenic non-cultivable treponemes: sequence but not genomic position of intergenic spacers correlates with classification of Treponema pallidum and Treponema paraluiscuniculi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejková, Darina; Zobaníková, Marie; Pospísilová, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Mikalová, Lenka; Weinstock, George M; Smajs, David

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the sequences of the two rRNA (rrn) operons of pathogenic non-cultivable treponemes, comprising 11 strains of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA), five strains of T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), two strains of T. pallidum ssp. endemicum (TEN), a simian Fribourg-Blanc strain and a rabbit T. paraluiscuniculi (TPc) strain. PCR was used to determine the type of 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacers in the rrn operons from 30 clinical samples belonging to five different genotypes. When compared with the TPA strains, TPc Cuniculi A strain had a 17 bp deletion, and the TPE, TEN and Fribourg-Blanc isolates had a deletion of 33 bp. Other than these deletions, only 17 heterogeneous sites were found within the entire region (excluding the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region encoding tRNA-Ile or tRNA-Ala). The pattern of nucleotide changes in the rrn operons corresponded to the classification of treponemal strains, whilst two different rrn spacer patterns (Ile/Ala and Ala/Ile) appeared to be distributed randomly across species/subspecies classification, time and geographical source of the treponemal strains. It is suggested that the random distribution of tRNA genes is caused by reciprocal translocation between repetitive sequences mediated by a recBCD-like system.

  1. Topological organization of multichromosomal regions by the long intergenic noncoding RNA Firre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Goff, Loyal A; Trapnell, Cole; Williams, Adam; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Sun, Lei; McClanahan, Patrick; Hendrickson, David G; Sauvageau, Martin; Kelley, David R; Morse, Michael; Engreitz, Jesse; Lander, Eric S; Guttman, Mitch; Lodish, Harvey F; Flavell, Richard; Raj, Arjun; Rinn, John L

    2014-02-01

    RNA, including long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), is known to be an abundant and important structural component of the nuclear matrix. However, the molecular identities, functional roles and localization dynamics of lncRNAs that influence nuclear architecture remain poorly understood. Here, we describe one lncRNA, Firre, that interacts with the nuclear-matrix factor hnRNPU through a 156-bp repeating sequence and localizes across an ~5-Mb domain on the X chromosome. We further observed Firre localization across five distinct trans-chromosomal loci, which reside in spatial proximity to the Firre genomic locus on the X chromosome. Both genetic deletion of the Firre locus and knockdown of hnRNPU resulted in loss of colocalization of these trans-chromosomal interacting loci. Thus, our data suggest a model in which lncRNAs such as Firre can interface with and modulate nuclear architecture across chromosomes.

  2. RFLP of analyses of an intergenic spacer region of chloroplast DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-11-16

    Nov 16, 2006 ... Several studies are being made to get high productive wheats throughout the world ... using SAHN clustering unweighted pair group method using arith- ..... report, 353 College of Agriculture University of Missouri, Columbia.

  3. An improved PCR method for direct identification of Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) using conchocelis based on a RUBISCO intergenic spacer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao; DONG Dong; WANG Guangce; ZHANG Baoyu; PENG Guang; XU Pu; TANG Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    An improved method of PCR in which the small segment of conchocelis is amplified directly without DNA extraction was used to amplify a RUBISCO intergenic spacer DNA fragment from nine species of red algal genus Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta), including Porphyra yezoensis (Jiangsu, China), P. haitanensis (Fujian, China), P. oligospermatangia (Qingdao, China), P. katadai (Qingdao, China), P. tenera (Qingdao, China), P. suborboculata (Fujian, China), P. pseudolinearis (Kogendo, Korea), P. linearis (Devon, England), and P. fallax (Seattle, USA). Standard PCR and the method developed here were both conducted using primers specific for the RUBISCO spacer region, after which the two PCR products were sequenced. The sequencing data of the amplicons obtained using both methods were identical, suggesting that the improved PCR method was functional. These findings indicate that the method developed here may be useful for the rapid identification of species of Porphyra in a germplasm bank. In addition, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the RUBISCO spacer and partial rbcS sequence, and the results were in concordant with possible alternative phylogenies based on traditional morphological taxonomic characteristics, indicating that the RUBISCO spacer is a useful region for phylogenetic studies.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Avena based on chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH and single-copy nuclear gene Acc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Hai; Baum, Bernard R; Zhou, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Jun; Wei, Yu-Ming; Ren, Chang-Zhong; Xiong, Fang-Qiu; Liu, Gang; Zhong, Lin; Zhao, Gang; Peng, Yuan-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Two uncorrelated nucleotide sequences, chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH and acetyl CoA carboxylase gene (Acc1), were used to perform phylogenetic analyses in 75 accessions of the genus Avena, representing 13 diploids, seven tetraploid, and four hexaploids by maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Phylogenic analyses based on the chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH confirmed that the A genome diploid might be the maternal donor of species of the genus Avena. Two haplotypes of the Acc1 gene region were obtained from the AB genome tetraploids, indicating an allopolyploid origin for the tetraploid species. Among the AB genome species, both gene trees revealed differences between Avena agadiriana and the other species, suggesting that an AS genome diploid might be the A genome donor and the other genome diploid donor might be the Ac genome diploid Avena canariensis or the Ad genome diploid Avena damascena. Three haplotypes of the Acc1 gene have been detected among the ACD genome hexaploid species. The haplotype that seems to represent the D genome clustered with the tetraploid species Avena murphyi and Avena maroccana, which supported the CD genomic designation instead of AC for A. murphyi and A. maroccana.

  5. DNA Hypomethylation in Intragenic and Intergenic Enhancer Chromatin of Muscle-Specific Genes Usually Correlates with their Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Paterson, Heather L; Lacey, Michelle; Ehrlich, Melanie

    2016-12-01

    Tissue-specific enhancers are critical for gene regulation. In this study, we help elucidate the contribution of muscle-associated differential DNA methylation to the enhancer activity of highly muscle-specific genes. By bioinformatic analysis of 44 muscle-associated genes, we show that preferential gene expression in skeletal muscle (SkM) correlates with SkM-specific intragenic and intergenic enhancer chromatin and overlapping foci of DNA hypomethylation. Some genes, e.g., CASQ1 and FBXO32, displayed broad regions of both SkM- and heart-specific enhancer chromatin but exhibited focal SkM-specific DNA hypomethylation. Half of the genes had SkM-specific super-enhancers. In contrast to simple enhancer/gene-expression correlations, a super-enhancer was associated with the myogenic MYOD1 gene in both SkM and myoblasts even though SkM has < 1 percent as much MYOD1 expression. Local chromatin differences in this super-enhancer probably contribute to the SkM/myoblast differential expression. Transfection assays confirmed the tissue-specificity of the 0.3-kb core enhancer within MYOD1's super-enhancer and demonstrated its repression by methylation of its three CG dinucleotides. Our study suggests that DNA hypomethylation increases enhancer tissue-specificity and that SkM super-enhancers sometimes are poised for physiologically important, rapid up-regulation.

  6. The mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata: a mitogenome with a large number of intergenic spacers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynara de Melo Rodovalho

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS, and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp, given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans.

  7. Genetic variability within n-rDNA region of ectomycorrhizal isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    fungi based on phenotypic characters required expert taxonomist ... and intraspecific variation in SSU-ITS region of rRNA genes of ..... the intergenic spacer region, has evolved much faster, and the .... We also suggest that the development of.

  8. Disruption of a Large Intergenic Noncoding RNA in Subjects with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Maussion, Gilles; Crapper, Liam; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Blumenthal, Ian; Hanscom, Carrie; Chiang, Colby; Lindgren, Amelia; Pereira, Shahrin; Ruderfer, Douglas; Diallo, Alpha B.; Lopez, Juan Pablo; Turecki, Gustavo; Chen, Elizabeth S.; Gigek, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Large intergenic noncoding (linc) RNAs represent a newly described class of ribonucleic acid whose importance in human disease remains undefined. We identified a severely developmentally delayed 16-year-old female with karyotype 46,XX,t(2;11)(p25.1;p15.1)dn in the absence of clinically significant copy number variants (CNVs). DNA capture followed by next-generation sequencing of the translocation breakpoints revealed disruption of a single noncoding gene on chromosome 2, LINC00299, whose RNA ...

  9. Concerted actions of a thermo-labile regulator and a unique intergenic RNA thermosensor control Yersinia virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Böhme

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Expression of all Yersinia pathogenicity factors encoded on the virulence plasmid, including the yop effector and the ysc type III secretion genes, is controlled by the transcriptional activator LcrF in response to temperature. Here, we show that a protein- and RNA-dependent hierarchy of thermosensors induce LcrF synthesis at body temperature. Thermally regulated transcription of lcrF is modest and mediated by the thermo-sensitive modulator YmoA, which represses transcription from a single promoter located far upstream of the yscW-lcrF operon at moderate temperatures. The transcriptional response is complemented by a second layer of temperature-control induced by a unique cis-acting RNA element located within the intergenic region of the yscW-lcrF transcript. Structure probing demonstrated that this region forms a secondary structure composed of two stemloops at 25°C. The second hairpin sequesters the lcrF ribosomal binding site by a stretch of four uracils. Opening of this structure was favored at 37°C and permitted ribosome binding at host body temperature. Our study further provides experimental evidence for the biological relevance of an RNA thermometer in an animal model. Following oral infections in mice, we found that two different Y. pseudotuberculosis patient isolates expressing a stabilized thermometer variant were strongly reduced in their ability to disseminate into the Peyer's patches, liver and spleen and have fully lost their lethality. Intriguingly, Yersinia strains with a destabilized version of the thermosensor were attenuated or exhibited a similar, but not a higher mortality. This illustrates that the RNA thermometer is the decisive control element providing just the appropriate amounts of LcrF protein for optimal infection efficiency.

  10. Concerted Actions of a Thermo-labile Regulator and a Unique Intergenic RNA Thermosensor Control Yersinia Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortmann, Jens; Seekircher, Stephanie; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Berger, Evelin; Pisano, Fabio; Thiermann, Tanja; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Narberhaus, Franz; Dersch, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Expression of all Yersinia pathogenicity factors encoded on the virulence plasmid, including the yop effector and the ysc type III secretion genes, is controlled by the transcriptional activator LcrF in response to temperature. Here, we show that a protein- and RNA-dependent hierarchy of thermosensors induce LcrF synthesis at body temperature. Thermally regulated transcription of lcrF is modest and mediated by the thermo-sensitive modulator YmoA, which represses transcription from a single promoter located far upstream of the yscW-lcrF operon at moderate temperatures. The transcriptional response is complemented by a second layer of temperature-control induced by a unique cis-acting RNA element located within the intergenic region of the yscW-lcrF transcript. Structure probing demonstrated that this region forms a secondary structure composed of two stemloops at 25°C. The second hairpin sequesters the lcrF ribosomal binding site by a stretch of four uracils. Opening of this structure was favored at 37°C and permitted ribosome binding at host body temperature. Our study further provides experimental evidence for the biological relevance of an RNA thermometer in an animal model. Following oral infections in mice, we found that two different Y. pseudotuberculosis patient isolates expressing a stabilized thermometer variant were strongly reduced in their ability to disseminate into the Peyer's patches, liver and spleen and have fully lost their lethality. Intriguingly, Yersinia strains with a destabilized version of the thermosensor were attenuated or exhibited a similar, but not a higher mortality. This illustrates that the RNA thermometer is the decisive control element providing just the appropriate amounts of LcrF protein for optimal infection efficiency. PMID:22359501

  11. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; González, Laura F; Kimani, Paul M; Butare, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes region of Central Africa, including a large group of landraces from Rwanda as well as varieties from primary centers of diversity and from neighboring countries of Central Africa, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, using 30 fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers and automated allele detection. In addition, the landraces were evaluated for their seed iron and zinc concentration to determine if genetic diversity influenced nutritional quality. Principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses allowed the separation of the landraces into 132 Andean and 195 Mesoamerican (or Middle American) genotypes with 32 landraces and 6 varieties intermediate between the gene pools and representing inter-gene pool introgression in terms of seed characteristics and alleles. Genetic diversity and the number of alleles were high for the collection, reflecting the preference for a wide range of seed types in the region and no strong commercial class preference, although red, red mottled and brown seeded beans were common. Observed heterozygosity was also high and may be explained by the common practice of maintaining seed and plant mixtures, a coping strategy practiced by Central African farmers to reduce the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Finally, nutritional quality differed between the gene pools with respect to seed iron and zinc concentration, while genotypes from the intermediate group were notably high in both minerals. In conclusion, this study has shown that

  12. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

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    Witoon Purahong

    Full Text Available Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Furthermore, amplified DNA stemming from mitochondrial or chloroplast templates might strongly bias the obtained fingerprints. In this study, we determined the applicability of three different B-ARISA primer sets to the study of bacterial communities. The results from in silico analysis harnessing publicly available sequence databases showed that all three primer sets tested are specific to bacteria but only two primers sets assure high bacterial taxa coverage (1406f/23Sr and ITSF/ITSReub. Considering the study of bacteria in a plant interface, the primer set ITSF/ITSReub was found to amplify (in silico sequences of some important crop species such as Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays. Bacterial genera and plant species potentially amplified by different primer sets are given. These data were confirmed when DNA extracted from soil and plant samples were analyzed. The presented information could be useful when interpreting existing B-ARISA results and planning B-ARISA experiments, especially when plant DNA can be expected.

  13. Heterogeneity within the gram-positive anaerobic cocci demonstrated by analysis of 16S-23S intergenic ribosomal RNA polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K E; Davies, C E; Wilson, M J; Stephens, P; Lewis, M A O; Hall, V; Brazier, J; Thomas, D W

    2002-11-01

    Peptostreptococci are gram-positive, strictly anaerobic bacteria which, although regarded as members of the commensal human microflora, are also frequently isolated from sites of clinical infection. The study of this diverse group of opportunist pathogens has been hindered by an inadequate taxonomy and the lack of a valid identification scheme. Recent re-classification of the Peptostreptococcus family into five distinct genus groups has helped to clarify the situation. However, this has been on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence determinations, which are both time-consuming and expensive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphisms for the rapid differentiation of the currently recognised taxa within the group of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. A collection comprising 19 reference strains with representatives of each of the 15 species, two close relatives and two of the well-characterised groups, together with 38 test strains was studied. All strains were identified to species group level by phenotypic means. Amplification of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) with universal primers produced distinct banding patterns for all the 19 reference strains and the patterns could be differentiated easily visually. However, of the 38 test strains, less than half could be speciated from ISR analysis alone. Only five groups produced correlating banding patterns for all members tested (Peptoniphilus lacrimalis, P. ivorii, Anaerococcus octavius, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Micromonas micros). For other species, either the type strain differed significantly from other species members (e.g., A. hydrogenalis) or there appeared to be considerable intra-species variation (e.g., A. vaginalis). Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for the 'trisimilis' and 'betaGAL' groups showed that both are most closely related to the Anaerococcus group. This work highlights the heterogeneous nature of a number of Peptostreptococcus

  14. Optimisation of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis for the estimation of microbial diversity in fynbos soil

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    Karin Jacobs

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA has become a commonly used molecular technique for the study of microbial populations in environmental samples. The reproducibility and accuracy of ARISA, with and without the polymerase chain reaction (PCR are important aspects that influence the results and effectiveness of these techniques. We used the primer set ITS4/ITS5 for ARISA to assess the fungal community composition of two sites situated in the Sand Fynbos. The primer set proved to deliver reproducible ARISA profiles of the fungal community composition with little variation observed between ARISA-PCRs. Variation that occurred in a sample due to repeated DNA extraction is expected for ecological studies. This reproducibility made ARISA a useful tool for the assessment and comparison of diversity in ecological samples. In this paper, we also offered particular suggestions concerning the binning strategy for the analysis of ARISA profiles.

  15. Genome-wide identification, characterization and evolutionary analysis of long intergenic noncoding RNAs in cucumber.

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    Zhiqiang Hao

    Full Text Available Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs are intergenic transcripts with a length of at least 200 nt that lack coding potential. Emerging evidence suggests that lincRNAs from animals participate in many fundamental biological processes. However, the systemic identification of lincRNAs has been undertaken in only a few plants. We chose to use cucumber (Cucumis sativus as a model to analyze lincRNAs due to its importance as a model plant for studying sex differentiation and fruit development and the rich genomic and transcriptome data available. The application of a bioinformatics pipeline to multiple types of gene expression data resulted in the identification and characterization of 3,274 lincRNAs. Next, 10 lincRNAs targeted by 17 miRNAs were also explored. Based on co-expression analysis between lincRNAs and mRNAs, 94 lincRNAs were annotated, which may be involved in response to stimuli, multi-organism processes, reproduction, reproductive processes, and growth. Finally, examination of the evolution of lincRNAs showed that most lincRNAs are under purifying selection, while 16 lincRNAs are under natural selection. Our results provide a rich resource for further validation of cucumber lincRNAs and their function. The identification of lincRNAs targeted by miRNAs offers new clues for investigations into the role of lincRNAs in regulating gene expression. Finally, evaluation of the lincRNAs suggested that some lincRNAs are under positive and balancing selection.

  16. Cotranscription and intergenic splicing of the PPARG and TSEN2 genes in cattle

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    Amarger Valérie

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intergenic splicing resulting in the combination of mRNAs sequences from distinct genes is a newly identified mechanism likely to contribute to protein diversity. Few cases have been described, most of them involving neighboring genes and thus suggesting a cotranscription event presumably due to transcriptional termination bypass. Results We identified bovine chimeric transcripts resulting from cotranscription and intergenic splicing of two neighboring genes, PPARG and TSEN2. These two genes encode the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors γ1 and γ2 and the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease 2 homolog and are situated in the same orientation about 50 kb apart on bovine chromosome 22q24. Their relative position is conserved in human and mouse. We identified two types of chimeric transcripts containing all but the last exon of the PPARG gene followed by all but the first exon of the TSEN2 gene. The two chimers differ by the presence/absence of an intermediate exon resulting from transcription of a LINE L2 sequence situated between the two genes. Both transcripts use canonical splice sites for all exons coming from both genes, as well as for the LINE L2 sequence. One of these transcripts harbors a premature STOP codon and the other encodes a putative chimeric protein combining most of the PPARγ protein and the entire TSEN2 protein, but we could not establish the existence of this protein. Conclusion By showing that both individual and chimeric transcripts are transcribed from PPARG and TSEN2, we demonstrated regulation of transcription termination. Further, the existence and functionality of a chimeric protein harboring active motifs that are a priori unrelated is hypothesized.

  17. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergeni...

  18. Application of rps16 Intron and trnL-trnF Intergenic Spacer Sequences to Identify Rengas Clone Riau

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    Dewi Indriyani Roslim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rengas clone Riau has been identified using morphological characters and molecular technique with a psbA-trnH intergenic spacer, however, this method can only determine its taxonomic status at genus level, namely Gluta sp.  This study reports application two DNA barcodes, i.e. rps16 intron and trnL-trnF intergenic spacer, to identify Rengas clone Riau.  The methods included collection of the leaves from Kajuik Lake, total DNA isolation, electrophoresis, PCR (polymerase chain reaction, gel purification and sequencing.  The rps16 intron size was 659 bp and the trnL-trnF intergenic spacer was 527 bp. The BLASTn analysis showed that sequences of the rps16 intron and the trnL-trnF intergenic spacer of Gluta sp clone Riau had 100% similarity to those of G. renghas deposited in GenBank.  These results were supported by high max score, high total score, query cover = 100%, and E-value = 0.  The dendrograms also showed the closest relationship of Gluta sp clone Riau with G. renghas deposited in GenBank compared to other species of Gluta.  In conclusion, this study succeeded in identifying Rengas clone Riau as Gluta renghas by using sequences of the rps16 intron and the trnL-trnF intergenic spacer. A combination of DNA barcodes could be applied to identify various plants as long as the database for the DNA barcodes is available in public database such as GenBank. 

  19. The structure of a single unit of ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) including intergenic subrepeats in the Australian bulldog ant Myrmecia croslandi (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2004-02-01

    A complete single unit of a ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of M. croslandi was sequenced. The ends of the 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes were determined by using the sequences of D. melanogaster rDNAs as references. Each of the tandemly repeated rDNA units consists of coding and non-coding regions whose arrangement is the same as that of D. melanogaster rDNA. The intergenic spacer (IGS) contains, as in other species, a region with subrepeats, of which the sequences are different from those previously reported in other insect species. The length of IGSs was estimated to be 7-12 kb by genomic Southern hybridization, showing that an rDNA repeating unit of M. croslandi is 14-19 kb-long. The sequences of the coding regions are highly conserved, whereas IGS and ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences are not. We obtained clones with insertions of various sizes of R2 elements, the target sequence of which was found in the 28S rRNA coding region. A short segment in the IGS that follows the 3' end of the 28S rRNA gene was predicted to form a secondary structure with long stems.

  20. Disruption of a large intergenic noncoding RNA in subjects with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkowski, Michael E; Maussion, Gilles; Crapper, Liam; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Blumenthal, Ian; Hanscom, Carrie; Chiang, Colby; Lindgren, Amelia; Pereira, Shahrin; Ruderfer, Douglas; Diallo, Alpha B; Lopez, Juan Pablo; Turecki, Gustavo; Chen, Elizabeth S; Gigek, Carolina; Harris, David J; Lip, Va; An, Yu; Biagioli, Marta; Macdonald, Marcy E; Lin, Michael; Haggarty, Stephen J; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Kellis, Manolis; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G; Natowicz, Marvin R; Shen, Yiping; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Ernst, Carl

    2012-12-07

    Large intergenic noncoding (linc) RNAs represent a newly described class of ribonucleic acid whose importance in human disease remains undefined. We identified a severely developmentally delayed 16-year-old female with karyotype 46,XX,t(2;11)(p25.1;p15.1)dn in the absence of clinically significant copy number variants (CNVs). DNA capture followed by next-generation sequencing of the translocation breakpoints revealed disruption of a single noncoding gene on chromosome 2, LINC00299, whose RNA product is expressed in all tissues measured, but most abundantly in brain. Among a series of additional, unrelated subjects referred for clinical diagnostic testing who showed CNV affecting this locus, we identified four with exon-crossing deletions in association with neurodevelopmental abnormalities. No disruption of the LINC00299 coding sequence was seen in almost 14,000 control subjects. Together, these subjects with disruption of LINC00299 implicate this particular noncoding RNA in brain development and raise the possibility that, as a class, abnormalities of lincRNAs may play a significant role in human developmental disorders. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis as a tool for monitoring methanogenic Archaea changes in an anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Możejko, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of a newly-designed PCR primer pair in examination of methanogenic Archaea in a digester treating plant biomass was evaluated by Ribosmal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA). To find a suitable approach, three variants of RISA were tested: (1) standard, polyacrylamide gel-based, (2) automated, utilized capillary electrophoresis (GA-ARISA), and (3) automated microfluidics-based (MF-ARISA). All three techniques yielded a consistent picture of archaeal community structure changes during anaerobic digestion monitored for more than 6 weeks. While automated variants were more practical for handling and rapid analysis of methanogenic Archaea, the gel-based technique was advantageous when micro-organism identification was required. A DNA-sequence analysis of dominant bands extracted from the gel revealed that the main role in methane synthesis was played by micro-organisms affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri. The obtained results revealed that RISA is a robust method allowing for detailed analysis of archaeal community structure during organic biomass conversion into biogas. In addition, our results showed that GA-ARISA has a higher resolution and reproducibility than other variants of RISA and could be used as a technique for tracking changes in methanogenic Archaea in an anaerobic digester.

  2. Epistasis in intra- and inter-gene pool crosses of the common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, J C; Ramalho, M A P; Abreu, A F B

    2016-02-26

    Epistasis has been shown to have an important role in the genetic control of several quantitative traits in the common bean. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of epistasis in intra- and inter-pool gene crosses of the common bean. Four elite lines adapted to Brazilian conditions were used as parents, two from the Andean gene pool (ESAL 686; BRS Radiante) and two from the Mesoamerican gene pool (BRSMG Majestoso; BRS Valente). Four F2 populations were obtained: "A" (ESAL 686 x BRS Radiante), "B" (BRSMG Majestoso x BRS Valente), "C" (BRS Radiante x BRSMG Majestoso), and "D" (BRS Valente x ESAL 686). A random sample of F2 plants from each population was backcrossed to parents and F1 individuals, according to the triple test cross. Three types of progenies from each population were evaluated in contiguous trials. Seed yield and 100-seed weight were evaluated. Dominance genetic variance was predominant in most cases. However, the estimates of genetic variance may be biased by the occurrence of linkage disequilibrium and epistasis. Epistasis was detected for both traits; however, the occurrence differed among the populations and between the two traits. The results of this study reinforce the hypothesis that epistasis is present in the genetic control of traits in the common bean and suggest that the phenomenon is more frequent in inter-gene pool crosses than in intra-gene pool crosses.

  3. Computational identification of human long intergenic non-coding RNAs using a GA-SVM algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqiu; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shiyuan; Chen, Xi; Yu, Xuexin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a new type of non-coding RNAs and are closely related with the occurrence and development of diseases. In previous studies, most lincRNAs have been identified through next-generation sequencing. Because lincRNAs exhibit tissue-specific expression, the reproducibility of lincRNA discovery in different studies is very poor. In this study, not including lincRNA expression, we used the sequence, structural and protein-coding potential features as potential features to construct a classifier that can be used to distinguish lincRNAs from non-lincRNAs. The GA-SVM algorithm was performed to extract the optimized feature subset. Compared with several feature subsets, the five-fold cross validation results showed that this optimized feature subset exhibited the best performance for the identification of human lincRNAs. Moreover, the LincRNA Classifier based on Selected Features (linc-SF) was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) based on the optimized feature subset. The performance of this classifier was further evaluated by predicting lincRNAs from two independent lincRNA sets. Because the recognition rates for the two lincRNA sets were 100% and 99.8%, the linc-SF was found to be effective for the prediction of human lincRNAs.

  4. A novel intergenic ETnII-β insertion mutation causes multiple malformations in polypodia mice.

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    Jessica A Lehoczky

    Full Text Available Mouse early transposon insertions are responsible for ~10% of spontaneous mutant phenotypes. We previously reported the phenotypes and genetic mapping of Polypodia, (Ppd, a spontaneous, X-linked dominant mutation with profound effects on body plan morphogenesis. Our new data shows that mutant mice are not born in expected Mendelian ratios secondary to loss after E9.5. In addition, we refined the Ppd genetic interval and discovered a novel ETnII-β early transposon insertion between the genes for Dusp9 and Pnck. The ETn inserted 1.6 kb downstream and antisense to Dusp9 and does not disrupt polyadenylation or splicing of either gene. Knock-in mice engineered to carry the ETn display Ppd characteristic ectopic caudal limb phenotypes, showing that the ETn insertion is the Ppd molecular lesion. Early transposons are actively expressed in the early blastocyst. To explore the consequences of the ETn on the genomic landscape at an early stage of development, we compared interval gene expression between wild-type and mutant ES cells. Mutant ES cell expression analysis revealed marked upregulation of Dusp9 mRNA and protein expression. Evaluation of the 5' LTR CpG methylation state in adult mice revealed no correlation with the occurrence or severity of Ppd phenotypes at birth. Thus, the broad range of phenotypes observed in this mutant is secondary to a novel intergenic ETn insertion whose effects include dysregulation of nearby interval gene expression at early stages of development.

  5. A long-term demasculinization of X-linked intergenic noncoding RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Vibranovski, Maria D; Zhang, Li; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yong E; Li, Xinmin; Zhang, Wenxia; Fan, Qichang; VanKuren, Nicholas W; Long, Manyuan; Wei, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles of noncoding RNAs in sex-related pathways, but little is known about the evolutionary forces acting on these noncoding RNAs. Profiling the transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster with whole-genome tiling arrays found that 15% of male-biased transcribed fragments are intergenic noncoding RNAs (incRNAs), suggesting a potentially important role for incRNAs in sex-related biological processes. Statistical analysis revealed a paucity of male-biased incRNAs and coding genes on the X chromosome, suggesting that similar evolutionary forces could be affecting the genomic organization of both coding and noncoding genes. Expression profiling across germline and somatic tissues further suggested that both male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) and sexual antagonism could contribute to the chromosomal distribution of male-biased incRNAs. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the evolutionary age of male-biased incRNAs is a significant predictor of their chromosomal locations. In addition to identifying abundant sex-biased incRNAs in the fly genome, our work unveils a global picture of the complex interplay between noncoding RNAs and sexual chromosome evolution.

  6. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-11-02

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of 'breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes.

  7. LOC100287225, novel long intergenic non-coding RNA, misregulates in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Mina; Safaralizadeh, Reza; Feizi, Mohammad Ali Hosseinpour; Ravanbakhsh, Reyhaneh; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Hashemzadeh, Shahryar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the world; therefore, extensive research is needed to find new molecular therapeutic targets and biomarkers. LncRNA (long non-coding RNA), a new class of non-coding RNAs, has a crucial role in the onset and progression of various cancers including colorectal cancer. Research on lncRNA is still at initial stages and underlying molecular mechanisms of the vast majority of lncRNA have remained unclear. LOC100287225 is one of these novel lncRNAs (long intergenic non-coding RNA) located in the long arm of the chromosome 18. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of LOC100287225 in colorectal tissue, and its misregulation in CRC patients. Quantitative real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to investigate the LOC100287225 expression in pairs of tumorous and adjacent tumor-free tissues of 39 colorectal cancer patients. Also, the relationship between the clinicopathology and expression of LOC100287225 was determined. QRT-PCR results revealed that not only is LOC100287225 expressed in the intestinal tissue, but has also been misregulated during tumorigenesis. Moreover, LOC100287225 RNA relative expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues compared with adjacent tumor-free tissues (P< 0.001). RNA expression level of LOC100287225 did not show significant correlation with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that LOC100287225 misregulation could be a potential target for gene therapy in colorectal cancer.

  8. Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods for Microbial Community Analysis in Indonesian Tempe Employing Amplified Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis

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    CECILIA ANNA SEUMAHU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tempe fermentation involved complex microbial communities which are only revealed partially through culture dependent methods. Culture-independent methods would be potential to unravel this complex microbial fermentation. Appropriate DNA extraction is an essential tool to obtain reliable data from culture independent method. In this study, we employed two commercial DNA extraction methods to find the best one for microbial community characterization employing amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA. Our result showed that PowerFood Microbial DNA Isolation Kit-MOBIO (PFMDIK is an excellent method for microbial DNA extraction from tempe. It gave high quantity and quality of DNA suitable for PCR amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer to yield a diverse and reproducible ARISA profile.

  9. Negative correlation between expression level and evolutionary rate of long intergenic noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managadze, David; Rogozin, Igor B; Chernikova, Diana; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Koonin, Eugene V

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain numerous genes for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). The functions of the lncRNAs remain largely unknown but their evolution appears to be constrained by purifying selection, albeit relatively weakly. To gain insights into the mode of evolution and the functional range of the lncRNA, they can be compared with much better characterized protein-coding genes. The evolutionary rate of the protein-coding genes shows a universal negative correlation with expression: highly expressed genes are on average more conserved during evolution than the genes with lower expression levels. This correlation was conceptualized in the misfolding-driven protein evolution hypothesis according to which misfolding is the principal cost incurred by protein expression. We sought to determine whether long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs) follow the same evolutionary trend and indeed detected a moderate but statistically significant negative correlation between the evolutionary rate and expression level of human and mouse lincRNA genes. The magnitude of the correlation for the lincRNAs is similar to that for equal-sized sets of protein-coding genes with similar levels of sequence conservation. Additionally, the expression level of the lincRNAs is significantly and positively correlated with the predicted extent of lincRNA molecule folding (base-pairing), however, the contributions of evolutionary rates and folding to the expression level are independent. Thus, the anticorrelation between evolutionary rate and expression level appears to be a general feature of gene evolution that might be caused by similar deleterious effects of protein and RNA misfolding and/or other factors, for example, the number of interacting partners of the gene product.

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

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    Jianqin Li

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8 and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8. The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  11. Population genetic structure and phylogeographical pattern of a relict tree fern, Alsophila spinulosa (Cyatheaceae), inferred from cpDNA atpB- rbcL intergenic spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Guopei; Gu, Hongya

    2004-11-01

    Sequences of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) atpB- rbcL intergenic spacers of individuals of a tree fern species, Alsophila spinulosa, collected from ten relict populations distributed in the Hainan and Guangdong provinces, and the Guangxi Zhuang region in southern China, were determined. Sequence length varied from 724 bp to 731 bp, showing length polymorphism, and base composition was with high A+T content between 63.17% and 63.95%. Sequences were neutral in terms of evolution (Tajima's criterion D=-1.01899, P>0.10 and Fu and Li's test D*=-1.39008, P>0.10; F*=-1.49775, P>0.10). A total of 19 haplotypes were identified based on nucleotide variation. High levels of haplotype diversity (h=0.744) and nucleotide diversity (Dij=0.01130) were detected in A. spinulosa, probably associated with its long evolutionary history, which has allowed the accumulation of genetic variation within lineages. Both the minimum spanning network and neighbor-joining trees generated for haplotypes demonstrated that current populations of A. spinulosa existing in Hainan, Guangdong, and Guangxi were subdivided into two geographical groups. An analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the genetic variation (93.49%, Phistory. Gene genealogies together with coalescent theory provided significant information for uncovering phylogeography of A. spinulosa.

  12. Effects of structural changes in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region on D-serine deaminase synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    McFall, E; Nikam, S S; Palchaudhuri, S

    1991-01-01

    Single-base-pair changes well upstream of its transcription initiation site resulted in partially to fully constitutive expression of the D-serine deaminase structural gene, dsdA, independently of the cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP-binding protein complex and of the specific D-serine deaminase activator protein. These promoter mutations appear to define a consensus sequence that is repeated several times. Basal expression of dsdA+ was also strongly enhanced by subcloning on multicopy plasmids, by the ...

  13. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of prot

  14. Expressing activity of promoter elements of large intergenic region from cotton leaf curl virus in host plant*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Yingqiu; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Jiao Jiujiu, Grey hydrogeologic system analysis and time series model, Survey Science and Technology (in Chinese), 1987,(10): 39-43.[2]Li Shuwen, Wang Baolai, Xiao Guoqiang, A compound model of grey and periodic scrape and its application in groundwater prediction, Journal of Hebei Institute of Architectural Science & Technology (in Chinese), 1992, (3): 246-251.[3]Wang Qingyin, Li Shuwen, Grey distributed parameter model and groundwater analog, Journal of Hebei Institute of Architectural Science & Technology (in Chinese), 1992, (3): 66-70.[4]Guo Chunqing, Xia Riyuan, Liu Zhenglin, Gray Systematic Theory and Methodological Study of Krast Groundwater Resources Evaluation (in Chinese), Beijing: Geological Publishing House, 1993, 3-60.[5]Wang Qingyin, Liu Kaidi, The Mathematical Method of Grey Systematic Theory and Its Application (in Chinese), Chengdu: Publishing House of Southwestern China University of Communication, 1990, 23-27.[6]Wang Qingyin, Wu Heqing, The concept of grey number and its property, in Proceedings of NAFIPS98, USA, 1998,45-49.[7]Givoli, D., Doukhovni, I., Finite element programming approach for contact problems with geometrical nonlinearity, Computers and Structures, 1996, (8): 31-41.[8]Li Shuwen, Wang Zhiqiang, Wu Qiang, The superiority of storage-centered finite element method in solving seepage problem, Coal Geology and Exploration (in Chinese), 1999, (5): 46-49.

  15. Analysis of stress-induced duplex destabilization (SIDD properties of replication origins, genes and intergenes in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replication and transcription, the two key functions of DNA, require unwinding of the DNA double helix. It has been shown that replication origins in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain an easily unwound stretch of DNA. We have used a recently developed method for determining the locations and degrees of stress-induced duplex destabilization (SIDD for all the reported replication origins in the genome of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Results We have found that the origins are more susceptible to SIDD as compared to the non-origin intergenic regions (NOIRs and genes. SIDD analysis of many known origins in other eukaryotes suggests that SIDD is a common property of replication origins. Interestingly, the previously shown deletion-dependent changes in the activities of the origins of the ura4 origin region on chromosome 3 are paralleled by changes in SIDD properties, suggesting SIDD’s role in origin activity. SIDD profiling following in silico deletions of some origins suggests that many of the closely spaced S. pombe origins could be clusters of two or three weak origins, similar to the ura4 origin region. Conclusion SIDD appears to be a highly conserved, functionally important property of replication origins in S. pombe and other organisms. The distinctly low SIDD scores of origins and the long range effects of genetic alterations on SIDD properties provide a unique predictive potential to the SIDD analysis. This could be used in exploring different aspects of structural and functional organization of origins including interactions between closely spaced origins.

  16. High variability of the gvpA-gvpC region in Microcystis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gas vesicles provide buoyancy to Microcystis and other common cyanobacterial bloom-forming species. gvpA and gvpC are structural genes encoding gas vesicle proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of 10 Microcystis strains/uncultured samples showed that gvpC and each intergenic segment of the gvpA-gvpC region can be divided into two types. The combination of different types of gvpC and intergenic segments is an important factor that diversifies this genomic region. Some Microcystis strains isolated in China possess a 172 to 176 bp sequence tag in the intergenic segment between gvpA and gvpC. The gvpA-gvpC region in Microcystis can be divided into at least 4 classes and more numbers of subclasses. Compared to rbcLX and other regions, the high variability of the gvpA-gvpC region should be more useful in identifying geographical isolates or ecotypes of Microcystis.

  17. Analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (IGSs) of marine vibrios for species-specific signature DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Simon K Y; Wang, H Z; Law, Sheran H W; Wu, Rudolf S S; Kong, Richard Y C

    2002-05-01

    Vibrios are widespread in the marine environment and a few pathogenic species are known to be commonly associated with outbreaks of diarrheal diseases in humans due to the consumption of raw or improperly cooked seafood. However, there are also many Vibrio species which are potentially pathogenic to vertebrate and invertebrate aquatic animals, and of which little is known. In an attempt to develop rapid PCR detection methods for these latter class of vibrios, we have examined the 16S-23S intergenic spacers (IGSs) of 10 lesser-known Vibrio species and successfully developed species-specific primers for eight of them--Vibrio costicola, V. diazotrophicus, V. fluvialis, V. nigripulchritudo, V. proteolyticus, V. salmonicida, V. splendidus and V. tubiashii. The IGS amplicons were amplified using primers complementary to conserved regions of the 16S and 23S rRNA genes, and cloned into plasmid vectors and sequenced. Analysis of the IGS sequences showed that 37 ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons representing seven different IGS types have been cloned from the 10 vibrios. The three IGS types--IGS(0), IGS(IA) and IGS(Glu)--were the most prevalent forms detected. Multiple alignment of representative sequences of these three IGS types from different Vibrio species revealed several domains of high sequence variability, which were used to design species-specific primers for PCR. The specificity of the primers were evaluated using total DNA prepared from different Vibrio species and bacterial genera. The results showed that the PCR method can be used to reliably detect eight of the 10 Vibrio species in marine waters in this study.

  18. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chernikova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important.

  19. Capturing intergenerativity: the use of student reflective journals to identify learning within an undergraduate course in gerontological nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan M; Reitmaier, Amy B; Smith, Linda Reveling; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    The benefits of intergenerational contact between older and young adults have been demonstrated; yet, nursing programs have underexplored the potential of such relationships for enhancing student learning. This article presents an analysis of student reflective journals as part of an evaluation of an undergraduate gerontological nursing course. The course aims to create positive learning experiences by involving older adults as partners in student learning. Older adults are recruited to receive visits from a designated student to share aspects of their life and experiences. Students write reflective journals based on these visits as a method of evaluating their learning. A framework analysis of 80 journals completed by 59 students identified four major themes representing the impact of these visits on student learning: becoming aware, making connections, seeing the unique person, and valuing intergenerational relationships. The analysis suggests the relevance of the concept of intergenerativity in illuminating shared benefits of the practicum experience.

  20. A ribosomal RNA gene intergenic spacer based PCR and DGGE fingerprinting method for the analysis of specific rhizobial communities in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Oliveira, VM; Manfio, GP; Coutinho, HLD; Keijzer-Wolters, AC; van Elsas, JD

    2006-01-01

    A direct molecular method for assessing the diversity of specific populations of rhizobia in soil, based on nested PCR amplification of 16S-23S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences, was developed. Initial generic amplification of bacterial rDNA IGS sequences from soil DNA was

  1. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus 1R PCR assay for detection of Raoultella sp. isolates among strains identified as Klebsiella oxytoca in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, Sophie A; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Goldstein, Fred W; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2003-04-01

    The enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus 1R PCR method, which provided recognizable profiles for reference strains of the three species of Raoultella and the two genetic groups of Klebsiella oxytoca, was applied to 19 clinical isolates identified as K. oxytoca. By this method, as confirmed by species-specific gene sequencing, two Raoultella ornithinolytica and two unclassifiable K. oxytoca isolates were identified.

  2. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  3. High prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda and their identification using sizes of intergenic spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ryo; Qiu, Yongjin; Igarashi, Manabu; Magona, Joseph W; Zhou, Lijia; Ito, Kimihito; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-12-01

    The spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several tick-borne rickettsioses in humans worldwide. This study was intended to determine the prevalence of SFG rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from 7 districts across Uganda. In addition to sequencing of gltA and ompA genes, identification of Rickettsia species based on the sizes of highly variable intergenic spacers, namely, dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet) was carried out. Application of multiplex PCR for simultaneous amplification of 3 spacers combined with capillary electrophoresis separation allowed simple, accurate, and high-throughput fragment sizing with considerable time and cost savings. Rickettsia genus-specific real-time PCR detected 136 positives out of 140 samples, giving an overall prevalence of 97.1%. Most samples (n=113) had a size combination of 225, 195, and 341 bp for dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet), respectively, which was identical to that of R. africae, a causative agent of African tick bite fever. In addition, several samples had size variants in either dksA-xerC or rpmE-tRNA(fMet). Nonetheless, the partial sequences of gltA and ompA genes of samples of all size combinations showed the greatest similarity to R. africae (99.3-100% for gltA and 98.1-100% for ompA). Given these results, it is highly possible that the tested ticks were infected with R. africae or closely related species. This is a first report on molecular genetic detection of R. africae and its high endemicity in Uganda. Clinicians in this country should be aware of this pathogen as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness. This study provided a starting point for the development of Rickettsia species identification based on the sizes of intergenic spacers. The procedure is simple, rapid, and cost-effective to perform; hence it might be particularly well suited for preliminary species identification in epidemiological investigations. The results

  4. Pan-Cancer Analyses Reveal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs Relevant to Tumor Diagnosis, Subtyping and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Travers; Peplowska, Karolina; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Shen, Yi; Molnar, Janos; Yu, Herbert; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Fogelgren, Ben; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X

    2016-05-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a relatively new class of non-coding RNAs that have the potential as cancer biomarkers. To seek a panel of lincRNAs as pan-cancer biomarkers, we have analyzed transcriptomes from over 3300 cancer samples with clinical information. Compared to mRNA, lincRNAs exhibit significantly higher tissue specificities that are then diminished in cancer tissues. Moreover, lincRNA clustering results accurately classify tumor subtypes. Using RNA-Seq data from thousands of paired tumor and adjacent normal samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identify six lincRNAs as potential pan-cancer diagnostic biomarkers (PCAN-1 to PCAN-6). These lincRNAs are robustly validated using cancer samples from four independent RNA-Seq data sets, and are verified by qPCR in both primary breast cancers and MCF-7 cell line. Interestingly, the expression levels of these six lincRNAs are also associated with prognosis in various cancers. We further experimentally explored the growth and migration dependence of breast and colon cancer cell lines on two of the identified lncRNAs. In summary, our study highlights the emerging role of lincRNAs as potentially powerful and biologically functional pan-cancer biomarkers and represents a significant leap forward in understanding the biological and clinical functions of lincRNAs in cancers.

  5. A New Intergenic α-Globin Deletion (α-αΔ125) Found in a Kabyle Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Lacan, Philippe; Cadet, Estelle; Bignet, Patricia; Dumesnil, Cécile; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Joly, Philippe; Rochette, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We have identified a deletion of 125 bp (α-α(Δ125)) (NG_000006.1: g.37040_37164del) in the α-globin gene cluster in a Kabyle population. A combination of singlex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have been used to identify the molecular defect. Sequencing of the abnormal PCR amplification product revealed a novel α1-globin promoter deletion. The endpoints of the deletion were characterized by sequencing the deletion junctions of the mutated allele. The observed deletion was located 378 bp upstream of the α1-globin gene transcription initiation site and leaves the α2 gene intact. In some patients, the α-α(Δ125) deletion was shown to segregate with Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) and/or Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) or a β-thalassemic allele. The α-α(Δ125) deletion has no discernible effect on red cell indices when inherited with no other abnormal globin genes. The family study demonstrated that the deletion is heritable. This is the only example of an intergenic α2-α1 non coding DNA deletion, leaving the α2-globin gene and the α1 coding part intact.

  6. Genome-wide identification of long intergenic noncoding RNA genes and their potential association with domestication in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhong-Yin; Li, Ai-Min; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Liu, Yan-Hu; Irwin, David M; Xie, Hai-Bing; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-06-02

    Thousands of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) have been identified in the human and mouse genomes, some of which play important roles in fundamental biological processes. The pig is an important domesticated animal, however, pig lincRNAs remain poorly characterized and it is unknown if they were involved in the domestication of the pig. Here, we used available RNA-seq resources derived from 93 samples and expressed sequence tag data sets, and identified 6,621 lincRNA transcripts from 4,515 gene loci. Among the identified lincRNAs, some lincRNA genes exhibit synteny and sequence conservation, including linc-sscg2561, whose gene neighbor Dnmt3a is associated with emotional behaviors. Both linc-sscg2561 and Dnmt3a show differential expression in the frontal cortex between domesticated pigs and wild boars, suggesting a possible role in pig domestication. This study provides the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of pig lincRNAs.

  7. Correlation of maple sap composition with bacterial and fungal communities determined by multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2011-08-01

    During collection, maple sap is contaminated by bacteria and fungi that subsequently colonize the tubing system. The bacterial microbiota has been more characterized than the fungal microbiota, but the impact of both components on maple sap quality remains unclear. This study focused on identifying bacterial and fungal members of maple sap and correlating microbiota composition with maple sap properties. A multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA) method was developed to presumptively identify bacterial and fungal members of maple sap samples collected from 19 production sites during the tapping period. Results indicate that the fungal community of maple sap is mainly composed of yeast related to Mrakia sp., Mrakiella sp., Guehomyces pullulans, Cryptococcus victoriae and Williopsis saturnus. Mrakia, Mrakiella and Guehomyces peaks were identified in samples of all production sites and can be considered dominant and stable members of the fungal microbiota of maple sap. A multivariate analysis based on MARISA profiles and maple sap chemical composition data showed correlations between Candida sake, Janthinobacterium lividum, Williopsis sp., Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Mrakia sp., Rhodococcus sp., Pseudomonas tolaasii, G. pullulans and maple sap composition at different flow periods. This study provides new insights on the relationship between microbial community and maple sap quality.

  8. Molecular typing among beef isolates of Escherichia coli using consensus repetitive intergenic enterobacteria-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoolkifli, Nurliyana Wan; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd

    2013-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-Polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the presence of Shiga toxin gene-I (Stx1) and Shiga toxin gene-2 (Stx2). These isolates were originated from imported raw beef which are come from two countries namely Australia and India. The isolation of E. coli was conducted by using Eosin Methylene Blue Agar (EMBA). A total of 94 strains had been isolated from 30 samples of imported raw beefand 42 strains had been detected positively E. coli by doing biochemical tests. All strains had been tested and the results of biochemical tests showed that 3 strains were from Australia samples while the other 39 strains were from India samples. The biochemical tests used are Indole test, Methyl Red test, Voges-Proskauer test and Citrate test. All the 42 strains were examined for Shiga toxin (stx1 and stx2) gene detection by two pair primers which are stx2F (5'-TTCTTCGGTATCCTATTCCC-3'), stx2R (5'-ATGCATCTCTGGTCATTGTA-3'), stx1F (5'-CAGTTAATGTGGTGGCGAAG-3'), and stx1R (5'-CTGTCACAGTAACAACCGT-3'). The results showed that none of the strains are positive for Shiga toxin gene. Application of ERIC-PCR method towards E. coli had successfully shown the high diversity polymorphism in 21 different genome types of DNA with primers ERIC1R (5'- CACTTAGGGGTCCTCGAATGTA- 3') and ERIC2R (5'- AAGTAAGTGACTGGGGTGACGC- 3').

  9. Effectiveness of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori strain differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, S Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-07-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation.

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals long intergenic non-coding RNAs involved in skeletal muscle growth and development in pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Cheng; Li, Jingxuan; Luo, Wenzhe; Li, Long; Hu, An; Fu, Yuhua; Hou, Ye; Li, Changchun

    2017-08-18

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play essential roles in numerous biological processes and are widely studied. The skeletal muscle is an important tissue that plays an essential role in individual movement ability. However, lincRNAs in pig skeletal muscles are largely undiscovered and their biological functions remain elusive. In this study, we assembled transcriptomes using RNA-seq data published in previous studies of our laboratory group and identified 323 lincRNAs in porcine leg muscle. We found that these lincRNAs have shorter transcript length, fewer exons and lower expression level than protein-coding genes. Gene ontology and pathway analyses indicated that many potential target genes (PTGs) of lincRNAs were involved in skeletal-muscle-related processes, such as muscle contraction and muscle system process. Combined our previous studies, we found a potential regulatory mechanism in which the promoter methylation of lincRNAs can negatively regulate lincRNA expression and then positively regulate PTG expression, which can finally result in abnormal phenotypes of cloned piglets through a certain unknown pathway. This work detailed a number of lincRNAs and their target genes involved in skeletal muscle growth and development and can facilitate future studies on their roles in skeletal muscle growth and development.

  11. Local repeat sequence organization of an intergenic spacer in the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to DNA expansion and sequence scrambling: a complex mode of “copy-choice replication”?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra D Wagle; Subhojit Sen; Basuthkar J Rao

    2001-12-01

    Parent-specific, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were obtained from total genomic DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Such parent-specific RAPD bands (genomic fingerprints) segregated uniparentally (through mt+) in a cross between a pair of polymorphic interfertile strains of Chlamydomonas (C. reinhardtii and C. minnesotti), suggesting that they originated from the chloroplast genome. Southern analysis mapped the RAPD-markers to the chloroplast genome. One of the RAPD-markers, ``P2” (1.6 kb) was cloned, sequenced and was fine mapped to the 3 kb region encompassing 3′ end of 23S, full 5S and intergenic region between 5S and psbA. This region seems divergent enough between the two parents, such that a specific PCR designed for a parental specific chloroplast sequence within this region, amplified a marker in that parent only and not in the other, indicating the utility of RAPD-scan for locating the genomic regions of sequence divergence. Remarkably, the RAPD-product, ``P2” seems to have originated from a PCR-amplification of a much smaller (about 600 bp), but highly repeat-rich (direct and inverted) domain of the 3 kb region in a manner that yielded no linear sequence alignment with its own template sequence. The amplification yielded the same uniquely ``sequence-scrambled” product, whether the template used for PCR was total cellular DNA, chloroplast DNA or a plasmid clone DNA corresponding to that region. The PCR product, a ``unique” new sequence, had lost the repetitive organization of the template genome where it had originated from and perhaps represented a ``complex path” of copy-choice replication.

  12. USE OF 16S-23S INTERGENIC TRANSCRIBED SPACER IN IDENTIFICATION AND COMMUNITY ANALYSIS OF BACTERIA%基因间隔序列(ITS)在细菌分类鉴定和种群分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雪松; 杨虹; 李道棠; 韩文卿

    2003-01-01

    Use of 16S -23S intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) variability, as a relatively new method, is becoming an important supplement to the molecular methods based on 16S rRNA for which has a fairly constant size and is not divergent enough to give good separation in close relationships. This paper summarizes the structures and characteristics of ITS regions that are extremely variable in copy number, length and sequence per genome. The ITS region can be amplified easily taking advantage of conserved nucleotide stretches at the 5′of the 16S and 3′of the 23S gene, and the amplicon can contain different amounts of the 16S rDNA by choosing primers at different conserved areas within this gene. These primers are listed and discussed for perfecting the methodology of ITS. Furthermore, some recent progresses on the taxonomy, identification and community analysis of bacteria by means of ITS in epidemiology, ecology and artificial environment are reviewed, as well, the virtues and limitations of that method are discussed. Fig 2, Tab 1, Ref 51

  13. Increased expression of long intergenic non-coding RNA LINC00152 in gastric cancer and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Qianqian; Ge, Jiaxin; Shao, Yongfu; Sun, Weiliang; Song, Haojun; Xia, Tian; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2014-06-01

    It has been known that differential expression of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays critical roles in carcinogenesis. However, the significance of lncRNA, especially long intergenic ncRNA (lincRNA, the main type of lncRNA family), in the diagnosis of gastric cancer is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the expression level of LINC00152, a newfound lincRNA, in gastric carcinoma and its clinical association. The expression of LINC00152 in 71 pairs of tumorous and adjacent normal tissues from patients with gastric cancer was detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. And then, the potential associations between its level in gastric cancer tissue and the clinicopathological features were analyzed. Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for differentiating patients with gastric cancer from patients with benign gastric diseases. The results showed that the expression level of LINC00152 in gastric carcinoma was significantly increased, compared with matched normal tissue (P=0.045) and normal mucosa from health control (P=0.004), respectively. Levels of LINC00152 in gastric cancer cell lines, BGC-823, MGC-803, and SGC-7901, were significantly higher than those in human normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. In addition, high expression of LINC00152 was correlated with invasion (P=0.042). LINC00152 levels in gastric juice from patients with gastric cancer were further found significantly higher than those from normal controls (P=0.002). Moreover, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was up to 0.645 (95 % CI=0.559-0.740, P=0.003). This study highlights that lincRNA LINC00152 might be a novel biomarker for predicting gastric cancer.

  14. Detection of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk to prevent late blowing in cheese by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panelli, Simona; Brambati, Eva; Bonacina, Cesare; Feligini, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum has been identified as the main causal agent of the late blowing defect in cheese, with major effects on quality and commercial value. In this work, for the first time, we applied automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) approach to diagnose the presence of C. tyrobutyricum in raw milk before cheesemaking. A species-specific primer set was designed and used for this original application of the ARISA. Sensitivity of detection, reproducibility of the fluorescent PCR assay, and repeatability of the capillary electrophoretic analysis of amplicons were evaluated using DNA extracted from milk added with known amounts of C. tyrobutyricum genome copies, ranging from 3 × 10(6) to 3. Results indicated that the sensitivity of the technique permits to detect the bacterium in all the samples. The reproducibility, evaluated by analyzing 3 sets of serial dilutions, resulted satisfactory, with little deviation within PCR reactions amplifying the same starting amount of template (standard deviations ≤ 0.1, coefficients of variation ≤ 3%). The peaks' fluorescence displayed an evident correspondence with the number of genome copies contained in each dilution. The capillary electrophoretic analysis, tested by running a single PCR product per dilution point in 10 repeats, resulted efficient and highly repeatable, with excellent coefficients of variation ≤ 2% and standard deviations ≤ 0.1 in all the sample sets. This application of ARISA gives good estimates of the total C. tyrobutyricum DNA content allowing a specific, fine-scale resolution of this pollutant species in a complex system as milk. A further advantage linked to the automatization of the process.

  15. Identification of Aedes aegypti Long Intergenic Non-coding RNAs and Their Association with Wolbachia and Dengue Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayvan Etebari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae. aegypti genome for lincRNA discovery. This led to the identification of 3,482 putative lincRNAs. These lincRNA genes displayed a slightly lower GC content and shorter transcript lengths compared to protein-encoding genes. Ae. aegypti lincRNAs also demonstrate low evolutionary sequence conservation even among closely related species such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae. We examined their expression in dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2 and Wolbachia infected and non-infected adult mosquitoes and Aa20 cells. The results revealed that DENV-2 infection increased the abundance of a number of host lincRNAs, from which some suppress viral replication in mosquito cells. RNAi-mediated silencing of lincRNA_1317 led to enhancement in viral replication, which possibly indicates its potential involvement in the host anti-viral defense. A number of lincRNAs were also differentially expressed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. The results will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lncRNAs in insects and may prove to be beneficial in developing new ways to control vectors or inhibit replication of viruses in them.

  16. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus: nucleolar dominance in the absence of intergenic spacer subrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jonathan M; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    A common feature of interspecific animal and plant hybrids is the uniparental silencing of ribosomal RNA gene transcription, or nucleolar dominance. A leading explanation for the genetic basis of nucleolar dominance in animal hybrids is the enhancer-imbalance model. The model proposes that limiting transcription factors are titrated by a greater number of enhancer-bearing subrepeat elements in the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the dominant cluster of genes. The importance of subrepeats for nucleolar dominance has repeatedly been supported in competition assays between Xenopus laevis and X. borealis minigene constructs injected into oocytes. However, a more general test of the importance of IGS subrepeats for nuclear dominance in vivo has not been conducted. In this report, rRNA gene expression was examined in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus. This species offers a rare opportunity to test the role of IGS subrepeats in nucleolar dominance because the internal subrepeat structure, found in the IGS of virtually all animal and plant species, is absent in T. californicus. Our results clearly establish that nucleolar dominance occurs in F1 and F2 interpopulation hybrids of this species. In the F2 generation, nucleolar dominance appears to break down in some hybrids in a fashion that is inconsistent with a transcription factor titration model. These results are significant because they indicate that nucleolar dominance can be established and maintained without enhancer-bearing repeat elements in the IGS. This challenges the generality of the enhancer-imbalance model for nucleolar dominance and suggests that dominance of rRNA transcription in animals may be determined by epigenetic factors as has been established in plants.

  17. Identification of Aedes aegypti Long Intergenic Non-coding RNAs and Their Association with Wolbachia and Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etebari, Kayvan; Asad, Sultan; Zhang, Guangmei; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae. aegypti genome for lincRNA discovery. This led to the identification of 3,482 putative lincRNAs. These lincRNA genes displayed a slightly lower GC content and shorter transcript lengths compared to protein-encoding genes. Ae. aegypti lincRNAs also demonstrate low evolutionary sequence conservation even among closely related species such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae. We examined their expression in dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and Wolbachia infected and non-infected adult mosquitoes and Aa20 cells. The results revealed that DENV-2 infection increased the abundance of a number of host lincRNAs, from which some suppress viral replication in mosquito cells. RNAi-mediated silencing of lincRNA_1317 led to enhancement in viral replication, which possibly indicates its potential involvement in the host anti-viral defense. A number of lincRNAs were also differentially expressed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. The results will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lncRNAs in insects and may prove to be beneficial in developing new ways to control vectors or inhibit replication of viruses in them. PMID:27760142

  18. Detailed characterization of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome reveals novel genes and intergenic splicing associated with pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Lawrence W

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional control of embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency has been a subject of intense study. Transcriptional regulators including Oct4 (Oct3/4 index, Sox2 and Nanog are fundamental for maintaining the undifferentiated state. However, the ES cell transcriptome is not limited to their targets, and exhibits considerable complexity when assayed with microarray, MPSS, cDNA/EST sequencing, and SAGE technologies. To identify novel genes associated with pluripotency, we globally searched for ES transcripts not corresponding to known genes, validated their sequences, determined their expression profiles, and employed RNAi to test their function. Results Gene Identification Signature (GIS analysis, a SAGE derivative distinguished by paired 5' and 3' transcript end tags, identified 153 candidate novel transcriptional units (TUs distinct from known genes in a mouse E14 ES mRNA library. We focused on 16 TUs free of artefacts and mapping discrepancies, five of which were validated by RTPCR product sequencing. Two of the TUs were revealed by annotation to represent novel protein-coding genes: a PRY-domain cluster member and a KRAB-domain zinc finger. The other three TUs represented intergenic splicing events involving adjacent, functionally unrelated protein-coding genes transcribed in the same orientation, with one event potentially encoding a fusion protein containing domains from both component genes (Clk2 and Scamp3. Expression profiling using embryonic samples and adult tissue panels confirmed that three of the TUs were unique to or most highly expressed in ES cells. Expression levels of all five TUs dropped dramatically during three distinct chemically induced differentiation treatments of ES cells in culture. However, siRNA knockdowns of the TUs did not alter mRNA levels of pluripotency or differentiation markers, and did not affect cell morphology. Conclusion Transcriptome libraries retain considerable potential for novel

  19. The 28S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer from Crithidia fasciculata: repeated sequences, length heterogeneity, putative processing sites and potential interactions between U3 small nucleolar RNA and the ribosomal RNA precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnare, M N; Collings, J C; Spencer, D F; Gray, M W

    2000-09-15

    In Crithidia fasciculata, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene repeats range in size from approximately 11 to 12 kb. This length heterogeneity is localized to a region of the intergenic spacer (IGS) that contains tandemly repeated copies of a 19mer sequence. The IGS also contains four copies of an approximately 55 nt repeat that has an internal inverted repeat and is also present in the IGS of Leishmania species. We have mapped the C.fasciculata transcription initiation site as well as two other reverse transcriptase stop sites that may be analogous to the A0 and A' pre-rRNA processing sites within the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) of other eukaryotes. Features that could influence processing at these sites include two stretches of conserved primary sequence and three secondary structure elements present in the 5' ETS. We also characterized the C.fasciculata U3 snoRNA, which has the potential for base-pairing with pre-rRNA sequences. Finally, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of large subunit rRNA in both C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei involves 3'-terminal addition of three A residues that are not present in the corresponding DNA sequences.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships in Solanaceae and related species based on cpDNA sequence from plastid trnE-trnT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Montewka Melotto-Passarin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergenic spacers of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA are very useful in phylogenetic and population genetic studiesof plant species, to study their potential integration in phylogenetic analysis. The non-coding trnE-trnT intergenic spacer ofcpDNA was analyzed to assess the nucleotide sequence polymorphism of 16 Solanaceae species and to estimate its ability tocontribute to the resolution of phylogenetic studies of this group. Multiple alignments of DNA sequences of trnE-trnT intergenicspacer made the identification of nucleotide variability in this region possible and the phylogeny was estimated by maximumparsimony and rooted with Convolvulaceae Ipomoea batatas, the most closely related family. Besides, this intergenic spacerwas tested for the phylogenetic ability to differentiate taxonomic levels. For this purpose, species from four other families wereanalyzed and compared with Solanaceae species. Results confirmed polymorphism in the trnE-trnT region at different taxonomiclevels.

  1. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  2. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. germplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Gioia

    Full Text Available Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2% than in America (12.3%. The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  3. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobia associated with horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.] grown in South India based on glnII, recA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; Ganesan, Govindan; Kalita, Michał; Kaushik, Raghavan; Saranya, Balamurugan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam; Sudha, Nair

    2011-04-01

    Horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.) is an important grain legume and fodder crop in India. Information on root nodule endosymbionts of this legume in India is limited. In the present study, 69 isolates from naturally occurring root nodules of horsegram collected from two agro-eco-climatic regions of South India was analyzed by generation rate, acid/alkali reaction on YMA medium, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS), and sequence analyses of IGS and housekeeping genes glnII and recA. Based on the rDNA IGS RFLP by means of three restriction enzymes rhizobia were grouped in five clusters (I-V). By sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA IGS identified genotypes of horsegram rhizobia were distributed into five divergent lineages of Bradyrhizobium genus which comprised (I) the IGS type IV rhizobia and valid species B. yuanmingense, (II) the strains of IGS type I and Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS 3257 isolated from Vigna sp., (III) the strains of the IGS type II and Bradyrhizobium sp. CIRADAc12 from Acacia sp., (IV) the IGS type V strains and Bradyrhizobium sp. genospecies IV, and (V) comprising genetically distinct IGS type III strains which probably represent an uncharacterized new genomic species. Nearly, 87% of indigenous horsegram isolates (IGS types I, II, III, and V) could not be related to any other species within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogeny based on housekeeping glnII and recA genes confirmed those results found by the analysis of the IGS sequence. All the isolated rhizobia nodulated Macrotyloma sp. and Vigna spp., and only some of them formed nodules on Arachis hypogeae. The isolates within each IGS type varied in their ability to fix nitrogen. Selection for high symbiotic effective strains could reward horsegram production in poor soils of South India where this legume is largely cultivated.

  4. Promoter regions of Plasmodium vivax are poorly or not recognized by Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Portillo Hernando A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterologous promoter analysis in Plasmodium has revealed the existence of conserved cis regulatory elements as promoters from different species can drive expression of reporter genes in heterologous transfection assays. Here, the functional characterization of different Plasmodium vivax promoters in Plasmodium falciparum using luciferase as the reporter gene is presented. Methods Luciferase reporter plasmids harboring the upstream regions of the msp1, dhfr, and vir3 genes as well as the full-length intergenic regions of the vir23/24 and ef-1α genes of P. vivax were constructed and transiently transfected in P. falciparum. Results Only the constructs with the full-length intergenic regions of the vir23/24 and ef-1α genes were recognized by the P. falciparum transcription machinery albeit to values approximately two orders of magnitude lower than those reported by luc plasmids harbouring promoter regions from P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. A bioinformatics approach allowed the identification of a motif (GCATAT in the ef-1α intergenic region that is conserved in five Plasmodium species but is degenerate (GCANAN in P. vivax. Mutations of this motif in the P. berghei ef-1α promoter region decreased reporter expression indicating it is active in gene expression in Plasmodium. Conclusion Together, this data indicates that promoter regions of P. vivax are poorly or not recognized by the P. falciparum transcription machinery suggesting the existence of P. vivax-specific transcription regulatory elements.

  5. Genomic relationships of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains evaluated by ribotyping, sequence analysis of ribosomal intergenic regions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fussing, V.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the genomic relationship among 112 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains obtained throughout Europe and North America. HindIII ribotyping of the strains resulted in five ribotypes of high similarity (87-98%). Sequence analysis of the riboso...

  6. Development and Validation of an Improved PCR Method Using the 23S-5S Intergenic Spacer for Detection of Rickettsiae in Dermacentor variabilis Ticks and Tissue Samples from Humans and Laboratory Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakumanu, Madhavi L; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Sutton, Haley T; Meshnick, Steven R; Nicholson, William L; Apperson, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    A novel nested PCR assay was developed to detectRickettsiaspp. in ticks and tissue samples from humans and laboratory animals. Primers were designed for the nested run to amplify a variable region of the 23S-5S intergenic spacer (IGS) ofRickettsiaspp. The newly designed primers were evaluated using genomic DNA from 11Rickettsiaspecies belonging to the spotted fever, typhus, and ancestral groups and, in parallel, compared to otherRickettsia-specific PCR targets (ompA,gltA, and the 17-kDa protein gene). The new 23S-5S IGS nested PCR assay amplified all 11Rickettsiaspp., but the assays employing other PCR targets did not. The novel nested assay was sensitive enough to detect one copy of a cloned 23S-5S IGS fragment from "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii." Subsequently, the detection efficiency of the 23S-5S IGS nested assay was compared to those of the other three assays using genomic DNA extracted from 40 adultDermacentor variabilisticks. The nested 23S-5S IGS assay detectedRickettsiaDNA in 45% of the ticks, while the amplification rates of the other three assays ranged between 5 and 20%. The novel PCR assay was validated using clinical samples from humans and laboratory animals that were known to be infected with pathogenic species ofRickettsia The nested 23S-5S IGS PCR assay was coupled with reverse line blot hybridization with species-specific probes for high-throughput detection and simultaneous identification of the species ofRickettsiain the ticks. "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii,"R. montanensis,R. felis, andR. belliiwere frequently identified species, along with some potentially novelRickettsiastrains that were closely related toR. belliiandR. conorii. Copyright © 2016 Kakumanu et al.

  7. ERIC-PCR技术对单增李斯特菌的溯源分析%Biotracing the source of Listeria monocytogenes strains by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海泉; 朱颖; 姜文洁; 孙晓红; 吴启华; 潘迎捷; 赵勇

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC )-PCR was used to genotype 17 strains of Listeria monocytogenes,which were isolated from pork samples of the three market,and we investigated the correlation between the genotype,regional distribution and prevalence among L monocytogenes strains. L monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was used as positive control. The result showed that 17 isolates were identified as six special genotypes,and genotype IV was the dominant one as the main pollution group,which were isolated from the third market. The strains isolated from the first and second market were genotype I and genotype IV .respcetively. The result suggested that ERIC-PCR was suitable to investigate the biotracing of L. monocytogenes and it was a more rapid,efficient,and accurate molecular typing method than traditional serotyping methods.%以质控菌株ATCC 19115为对照,采用ERIC-PCR方法对从三个市场猪肉样品分离到的17株单增李斯特菌(Listeria monocytogenes)进行了基因分型,探讨了单增李斯特菌基因型与区域分布及流行性的关联性.结果表明,17株单增李斯特菌菌株可分为六个主要基因类群,其中Ⅳ型菌株最多,为主要污染类群,而这些菌株来自于市场三;市场一和市场二分离到的菌株主要分别为Ⅰ型和Ⅳ型.因此,ERIC-PCR方法适用于对单增李斯特菌的溯源分析和流行病学调查,具有简单、方便、快捷、准确的特点.

  8. Identification of a novel DRB1 allele through intergenic recombination between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB3∗02 in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijin; Liu, Xiangjun; Li, Erwei; Zhao, Chenyan; Liu, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Youchun; Lu, Fengmin

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a novel DRB1 allele was revealed by routine HLA-SBT typing noted for its extensive mismatches to any known DRB1 alleles within the exon 2. Sequences containing the exons 2, 3 of HLA-DRB1, their surrounding introns, and the full-length cDNA of DRB1 were analyzed to determine a possible recombination event. Interestingly, the sequences of entire exon 2 were characterized as DRB3(∗)02:02:01:01/02; while exon 3 were characterized as DRB1(∗)14 like alleles. Further analysis of the sequences using Simplot software suggested that an intergenic recombinant event (i.e. exchange of sequence between non-allelic genes) may have occurred between DRB3(∗)02 allele and DRB1(∗)14 like allele, and the recombination sites are located at intron 1 and the boundary of exon 2 and intron 2 of DRB1. There are 5 CGGGG sequences flanking each side of exon 2 could serve as potential recombination site. Moreover, the full-length cDNA of the novel allele has been identified. The exon 1 and exon 3 to exon 6 share the same sequence as DRB1(∗)14 like alleles. At the mRNA level, the new allele has no significant difference when compared with the other DRB1 allele. This novel recombinant allele is also found to be paternally inherited. In conclusion, this is the first report of a DRB1 and DRB3 intergenic recombination event involving whole exon 2, which generate a new DRB1(∗)14:141.

  9. An intergenic risk locus containing an enhancer deletion in 2q35 modulates breast cancer risk by deregulating IGFBP5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszynski, Asaf; Hong, Chi-Chen; Lam, Kristin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lytle, Christian; Yao, Song; Zhang, Yali; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Wu, Anna H; Van Den Berg, David; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Wong, Tien Y; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Klevebring, Daniel; Czene, Kamila; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Darabi, Hatef; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cox, Angela; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Shah, Mitul; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Hamann, Ute; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Bandera, Elisa; Amos, Chris; Ambrosone, Christine; Easton, Douglas F; Cole, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in females. Previous association studies have identified variants on 2q35 associated with the risk of breast cancer. To identify functional susceptibility loci for breast cancer, we interrogated the 2q35 gene desert for chromatin architecture and functional variation correlated with gene expression. We report a novel intergenic breast cancer risk locus containing an enhancer copy number variation (enCNV; deletion) located approximately 400Kb upstream to IGFBP5, which overlaps an intergenic ERα-bound enhancer that loops to the IGFBP5 promoter. The enCNV is correlated with modified ERα binding and monoallelic-repression of IGFBP5 following oestrogen treatment. We investigated the association of enCNV genotype with breast cancer in 1,182 cases and 1,362 controls, and replicate our findings in an independent set of 62,533 cases and 60,966 controls from 41 case control studies and 11 GWAS. We report a dose-dependent inverse association of 2q35 enCNV genotype (percopy OR = 0.68 95%CI 0.55-0.83, P = 0.0002; replication OR = 0.77 95% CI 0.73-0.82, P = 2.1 × 10(-19)) and identify 13 additional linked variants (r(2 )>( )0.8) in the 20Kb linkage block containing the enCNV (P = 3.2 × 10(-15) - 5.6 × 10(-17)). These associations were independent of previously reported 2q35 variants, rs13387042/rs4442975 and rs16857609, and were stronger for ER-positive than ER-negative disease. Together, these results suggest that 2q35 breast cancer risk loci may be mediating their effect through IGFBP5.

  10. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes regi...

  11. The molecular diversity analysis of Auricularia auricula-judae in China by nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The grouping information obtained in the present work provides significant information for further genetic improvement in A. auricula-judae, and suggested that the IGS region can be used as an excellent tool for identification of genetic variation.

  12. The 5' non-translated region of Varroa destructor virus 1 (genus Iflavirus): structure prediction and IRES activity in Lymantria dispar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.; Roode, E.C.; Pleij, C.W.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Structure prediction of the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of four iflavirus RNAs revealed two types of potential internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which are discriminated by size and level of complexity, in this group of viruses. In contrast to the intergenic IRES of dicistroviruses, the potenti

  13. The 5' non-translated region of Varroa destructor virus 1 (genus Iflavirus): structure prediction and IRES activity in Lymantria dispar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.; Roode, E.C.; Pleij, C.W.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Structure prediction of the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of four iflavirus RNAs revealed two types of potential internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which are discriminated by size and level of complexity, in this group of viruses. In contrast to the intergenic IRES of dicistroviruses, the potenti

  14. Cloning, Sequencing and Analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers (IGSs) of Two Strains of Vibrio vulnificus%2株创伤弧菌的16S-23S rDNA间区的克隆、测序及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓先余; 陈晓艳; 王智学; 欧普; 何建国

    2006-01-01

    . vulnificus ATCC27562 available at GenBank revealed several highly conserved sequence blocks in the non- coding regions flanking the tRNA genes within all of strains, most notably the first 40 and last 200 nucleotides, which can be targeted to design species-specific PCR primers or detection probes. The structural variations of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers lay a foundation for developing diagnostic methods for V. vulnificus.

  15. Identification of novel growth phase- and media-dependent small non-coding RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes M49 using intergenic tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patenge Nadja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have attracted attention as a new class of gene regulators in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Genome-wide screening methods have been successfully applied in Gram-negative bacteria to identify sRNA regulators. Many sRNAs are well characterized, including their target mRNAs and mode of action. In comparison, little is known about sRNAs in Gram-positive pathogens. In this study, we identified novel sRNAs in the exclusively human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes M49 (Group A Streptococcus, GAS M49, employing a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. GAS is an important pathogen that causes diseases ranging from mild superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes of the naso-pharynx, to severe toxic and invasive diseases. Results We identified 55 putative sRNAs in GAS M49 that were expressed during growth. Of these, 42 were novel. Some of the newly-identified sRNAs belonged to one of the common non-coding RNA families described in the Rfam database. Comparison of the results of our screen with the outcome of two recently published bioinformatics tools showed a low level of overlap between putative sRNA genes. Previously, 40 potential sRNAs have been reported to be expressed in a GAS M1T1 serotype, as detected by a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. Our screen detected 12 putative sRNA genes that were expressed in both strains. Twenty sRNA candidates appeared to be regulated in a medium-dependent fashion, while eight sRNA genes were regulated throughout growth in chemically defined medium. Expression of candidate genes was verified by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. For a subset of sRNAs, the transcriptional start was determined by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR analysis. Conclusions In accord with the results of previous studies, we found little overlap between different screening methods, which underlines the fact that a comprehensive analysis of s

  16. An H3-H4 histone gene pair in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus, contains an intergenic dyad symmetry element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D; Brown, D; Wells, D

    1991-01-01

    Histone genes are one of the most widely studied multigene families in eucaryotes. Over 200 histone genes have been sequenced, primarily in vertebrates, echinoderms, fungi and plants. We present here the structure and genomic orientation of an H3-H4 histone gene pair from the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. These histone gene sequences are the first to be determined for the class Crustacea and among the first to be determined for protostomes. The H4 and H3 genes in Tigriopus are shown to be adjacent, to have opposite polarity, and to contain a 26 bp region of dyad symmetry centrally located within the spacer region between the two genes. A similarly located dyad element has been found in yeast which contributes to the coordinated cell cycle control of the adjacent histone genes. The Tigriopus H3-H4 histone gene pair is clustered with one H2A and two H2B histone genes on a 15 kb genomic Bam H1 fragment. The H4 gene sequence predicts an H4 protein with an unusual serine to threonine substitution at the amino terminal residue. The H3 gene sequence predicts an H3 protein which is identical to the vertebrate H3.2 histone.

  17. Adaptation of the short intergenic spacers between co-directional genes to the Shine-Dalgarno motif among prokaryote genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caro, Albert Pallejà; García-Vallvé, Santiago; Romeu, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    influence the stop codon usage or the spacing lengths between co-directional genes. RESULTS: The SD sequences for 530 prokaryote genomes have been predicted using computer calculations of the base-pairing free energy between translation initiation regions and the 16S rRNA 3' tail. Genomes with a large......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In prokaryote genomes most of the co-directional genes are in close proximity. Even the coding sequence or the stop codon of a gene can overlap with the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence of the downstream co-directional gene. In this paper we analyze how the presence of SD may...... number of genes with the SD sequence concentrate this regulatory motif from 4 to 11 bps before the start codon. However, not all genes seem to have the SD sequence. Genes separated from 1 to 4 bps from a co-directional upstream gene show a high SD presence, though this regulatory signal is located...

  18. Informational redundancy of tRNA(4Ser) and tRNA(7Ser) genes in Drosophila melanogaster and evidence for intergenic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, J; Sinclair, D A; Hayashi, S; Tener, G M; Grigliatti, T A

    1991-05-20

    Variant tRNA genes have been widely observed in multicellular eukaryotes. Recent biochemical studies have shown that some of them are expressed in a tissue- or a stage-specific manner. These findings would thus imply that certain modified tRNAs may be crucial for the development of the organism. Using Drosophila melanogaster as a model, we have taken a combined genetic and molecular approach to examine critically the possible biological functions of tRNA(4, 7Ser) genes. We showed that at least 50% of the total templates can be deleted from the genome without inducing abnormal phenotypes such as Minute, or a decrease in viability. In addition, two of the tRNASer variant genes that are unique in sequence are also completely dispensable. This strongly implies that even though they may be expressed in vivo, they play no essential role in the development of the fruitfly. By comparison with some of the corresponding tRNA genes in another sibling species, Drosophila erecta, our results suggest strongly that the variants are products non-reciprocal exchanges among the tRNA(4, 7Ser), genes. Such intergenic recombination events may have a major influence in the concerted evolution of the two gene families.

  19. Regionalism, Regionalization and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu C. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained development is a concept associating other concepts, in its turn, in the EU practice, e.g. regionalism, regionalizing and afferent policies, here including structural policies. This below text, dedicated to integration concepts, will limit on the other hand to regionalizing, otherwise an aspect typical to Europe and to the EU. On the other hand, two aspects come up to strengthen this field of ideas, i.e. the region (al-regionalism-(regional development triplet has either its own history or precise individual outline of terms.

  20. Cytomolecular analysis of ribosomal DNA evolution in a natural allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and its putative ancestors – dissecting complex repetitive structure of intergenic spacers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Borowska-Zuchowska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n=30, which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n=10 and B. stacei (2n=20. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 kb and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level.

  1. CHIR99021 promotes self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells by modulation of protein-encoding gene and long intergenic non-coding RNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yongyan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Ai, Zhiying [Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); College of Life Sciences, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Yao, Kezhen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Cao, Lixia; Du, Juan; Shi, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); College of Life Sciences, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Guo, Zekun, E-mail: gzk@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zhylab@hotmail.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-10-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely in vitro and differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. These unique properties make them exceptionally valuable for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, the practical application of ESCs is limited because it is difficult to derive and culture ESCs. It has been demonstrated that CHIR99021 (CHIR) promotes self-renewal and enhances the derivation efficiency of mouse (m)ESCs. However, the downstream targets of CHIR are not fully understood. In this study, we identified CHIR-regulated genes in mESCs using microarray analysis. Our microarray data demonstrated that CHIR not only influenced the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by stabilizing β-catenin, but also modulated several other pluripotency-related signaling pathways such as TGF-β, Notch and MAPK signaling pathways. More detailed analysis demonstrated that CHIR inhibited Nodal signaling, while activating bone morphogenetic protein signaling in mESCs. In addition, we found that pluripotency-maintaining transcription factors were up-regulated by CHIR, while several developmental-related genes were down-regulated. Furthermore, we found that CHIR altered the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and long intergenic non-coding RNAs. Quantitative real-time PCR results were consistent with microarray data, suggesting that CHIR alters the expression pattern of protein-encoding genes (especially transcription factors), epigenetic regulatory genes and non-coding RNAs to establish a relatively stable pluripotency-maintaining network. - Highlights: • Combined use of CHIR with LIF promotes self-renewal of J1 mESCs. • CHIR-regulated genes are involved in multiple pathways. • CHIR inhibits Nodal signaling and promotes Bmp4 expression to activate BMP signaling. • Expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and lincRNAs is altered by CHIR.

  2. Genotypic Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from Different Sources in the North-West Province, South Africa, Using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus PCR Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Njie Ateba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In many developing countries, proper hygiene is not strictly implemented when animals are slaughtered and meat products become contaminated. Contaminated meat may contain Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7 that could cause diseases in humans if these food products are consumed undercooked. In the present study, a total of 94 confirmed E. coli O157:H7 isolates were subjected to the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC polymerase chain reaction (PCR typing to generate genetic fingerprints. The ERIC fragments were resolved by electrophoresis on 2% (w/v agarose gels. The presence, absence and intensity of band data were obtained, exported to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Office 2003 and used to generate a data matrix. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA and complete linkage algorithms were used to analyze the percentage of similarity and matrix data. Relationships between the various profiles and/or lanes were expressed as dendrograms. Data from groups of related lanes were compiled and reported on cluster tables. ERIC fragments ranged from one to 15 per isolate, and their sizes varied from 0.25 to 0.771 kb. A large proportion of the isolates produced an ERIC banding pattern with three duplets ranging in sizes from 0.408 to 0.628 kb. Eight major clusters (I–VIII were identified. Overall, the remarkable similarities (72% to 91% between the ERIC profiles for the isolate from animal species and their corresponding food products indicated some form of contamination, which may not exclude those at the level of the abattoirs. These results reveal that ERIC PCR analysis can be reliable in comparing the genetic profiles of E. coli O157:H7 from different sources in the North-West Province of South Africa.

  3. Upregulated long intergenic noncoding RNA KRT18P55 acts as a novel biomarker for the progression of intestinal-type gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma B

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bin Ma,* Jiajun Wang,* Yongxi Song, Peng Gao, Jingxu Sun, Xiaowan Chen, Yuchong Yang, Zhenning Wang Department of Surgical Oncology and General Surgery, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs with dysregulated expression levels have been investigated in numerous types of different cancer. Whether lncRNAs can predict the progression of gastric cancer (GC still remains largely unclear. The aim of our study was to investigate whether KRT18P55, a novel intergenic lncRNA, can be a predictive biomarker for GC. Methods: To determine the expression levels of KRT18P55 in GC, we evaluated it in five GC cell lines (SGC-7901, MGC-803, BGC-823, AGS, and HG27 and 97 GC tissue samples in comparison with a normal control by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, the association with patient clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed to identify the clinical significance of KRT18P55. We also used publicly accessible data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to further verify the expression levels and clinical significance of KRT18P55. Furthermore, a receiver operating characteristic curve was also conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of KRT18P55 for GC. Results: A significant upregulation was observed in GC cell lines (P<0.01 and tissue samples (P<0.01. This finding was consistent with the results of 29 pairs of GC tissue samples from TCGA (P<0.01. Additionally, we indicated that the increased expression of KRT18P55 was related to the progression of intestinal type (P=0.032, which was also supported by results of independent GC cohorts from TCGA (P<0.01. However, we did not find significant difference in prognosis between patients with high and low expression of KRT18P55 (P>0.05. Finally, KRT18P55 showed potential diagnostic value for GC with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of

  4. Restrição do 16S-23S DNAr intergênico para avaliação da diversidade de Azospirillum amazonense isolado de Brachiaria spp. Restriction of 16S-23S intergenic rDNA for diversity evaluation of Azospirillum amazonense isolated from different Brachiaria spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Bueno dos Reis Junior

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a diversidade intra-específica de isolados de Azospirillum amazonense e estabelecer a possível influência de diferentes espécies de Brachiaria ssp. e diferentes condições edafoclimáticas. A caracterização da diversidade desses isolados foi conduzida, utilizando-se a análise de restrição da região intergênica 16S-23S DNAr. As estirpes estudadas separaram-se em dois grupos, definidos a 56% de similaridade. As espécies de Brachiaria ssp. influenciaram a diversidade de estirpes. A maioria dos isolados oriundos de B. decumbens e B. brizantha está inserida no primeiro grupo, enquanto os oriundos de B. humidicola concentram-se no segundo grupo.The aim of this work was to study the intra-specific diversity of Azospirillum amazonense isolates and to establish possible influences of different Brachiaria spp. and edaphoclimatic conditions. The characterization of the diversity among the isolates of A. amazonense studied was conducted using restriction analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region. The evaluated strains were separated in two groups, defined at 56% of similarity. Brachiaria spp. showed effects on strain diversity. Most part of the isolates from B. decumbens and B. brizantha are inserted in the first group, while B. humidicola isolates concentrate in the second group.

  5. Asociación del intervalo intergenésico y la morbimortalidad materno fetal en el Hospital María Auxiliadora de San Juan de Miraflores, Lima. 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Huamaní Cueto, Silvia Constanza

    2015-01-01

    Determina la asociación del intervalo intergenésico sobre la morbilidad materno fetal en el Hospital María Auxiliadora, 2014. Material y métodos: estudio descriptivo correlacional y retrospectivo; la muestra estuvo conformada por 7631 historias clínicas de gestantes que dieron parto, y cuyo embarazo finalizó en un nacido vivo o muerto; se estudió 3138 historias clínicas de gestantes divididas en intervalos según criterios de inclusión. Los datos fueron obtenidos del Sistema Informático Perina...

  6. Conserved gene arrangement in the origin region of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    A 23-kb fragment of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome spanning the dnaA region has been isolated as a cosmid clone. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5-kb portion shows that the genes for the RNase P protein (rnpA), ribosomal protein L34 (rpmH), the replication initiator protein (dnaA), and the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (dnaN) are present in the highly conserved gene arrangement found in all eubacterial genomes studied so far. The dnaA-dnaN intergenic region is approximately 1 k...

  7. Sequence Analysis of SSR-Flanking Regions Identifies Genome Affinities between Pasture Grass Fungal Endophyte Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline van Zijll de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species of the Neotyphodium and Epichloë genera are endophytes of pasture grasses showing complex differences of life-cycle and genetic architecture. Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been developed from endophyte-derived expressed sequence tag (EST collections. Although SSR array size polymorphisms are appropriate for phenetic analysis to distinguish between taxa, the capacity to resolve phylogenetic relationships is limited by both homoplasy and heteroploidy effects. In contrast, nonrepetitive sequence regions that flank SSRs have been effectively implemented in this study to demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of grass fungal endophytes. Consistent patterns of relationships between specific taxa were apparent across multiple target loci, confirming previous studies of genome evolution based on variation of individual genes. Evidence was obtained for the definition of endophyte taxa not only through genomic affinities but also by relative gene content. Results were compatible with the current view that some asexual Neotyphodium species arose following interspecific hybridisation between sexual Epichloë ancestors. Phylogenetic analysis of SSR-flanking regions, in combination with the results of previous studies with other EST-derived SSR markers, further permitted characterisation of Neotyphodium isolates that could not be assigned to known taxa on the basis of morphological characteristics.

  8. Identification of the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yue-Sheng; Deng, Guang-Fei; Sun, Xun-Sha; Yi, Yong-Hong; Su, Tao; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2011-08-01

    To identify the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA (miRNA) genes, we analyzed the 5' flanking regions of intergenic miRNAs and intronic miRNAs. With the TSSG program prediction, we found that the ratio of intronic-s miRNA genes with a least one promoter was significantly lower than those of intergenic miRNA genes and intronic-a miRNA genes. More than half of the miRNA genes have only one promoter and less than 20% of the miRNA genes have more than three promoters in the 5-kb upstream regions. All potential promoters are randomly distributed within these regions. Approximately 60% of the miRNA promoters have a TATA-like box, being significantly higher than that of all human promoters. Luciferase reporter assays showed that 22 of the 30 promoters drove gene expression in HEK-293 cells, indicating a high accuracy of the promoter prediction. This study lays a foundation for future investigation into the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of human miRNA genes.

  9. Novel microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms refine the tylosis with oesophageal cancer (TOC) minimal region on 17q25 to 42.5 kb: sequencing does not identify the causative gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Joanne E; Cole, Charlotte G; Huckle, Elisabeth J; Byrne, Shaun; McRonald, Fiona E; Rowbottom, Lynn; Ellis, Anthony; Shaw, Joan M; Leigh, Irene M; Kelsell, David P; Dunham, Ian; Field, John K; Risk, Janet M

    2004-05-01

    Tylosis (focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma) is associated with the early onset of squamous cell oesophageal cancer in three families. Linkage and haplotype analyses have previously mapped the tylosis with oesophageal cancer ( TOC) locus to a 500-kb region on chromosome 17q25 that has also been implicated in sporadically occurring squamous cell oesophageal cancer. In the current study, 17 additional putative microsatellite markers were identified within this 500-kb region by using sequence data and seven of these were shown to be polymorphic in the UK and US families. In addition, our complete sequence analysis of the non-repetitive parts of the TOC minimal region identified 53 novel and six known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in one or both of these families. Further fine mapping of the TOC disease locus by haplotype analysis of the seven polymorphic markers and 21 of the 59 SNPs allowed the reduction of the minimal region to 42.5 kb. One known and two putative genes are located within this region but none of these genes shows tylosis-specific mutations within their protein-coding regions. Alternative mechanisms of disease gene action must therefore be considered.

  10. Differentiation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic regions, and development of a species specific oligonucleotide for in situ detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fussing, Vivian; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.;

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize and determine intraspecies and interspecies relatedness of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to Actinobacillus lignieresii and Actinobacillus suis by sequence analysis of the ribosomal operon and to find a species-specific area for in situ detection of A...

  11. Genotypic and symbiotic diversity of Rhizobium populations associated with cultivated lentil and pea in sub-humid and semi-arid regions of Eastern Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Riah, N.; Béna, Gilles; Djekoun, A.; Heulin, K.; De Lajudie, Philippe; Laguerre, G.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic structure of rhizobia nodulating pea and lentil in Algeria, Northern Africa was determined. A total of 237 isolates were obtained from root nodules collected on lentil (Lens culinaris), proteaginous and forage pea (Pisum sativum) growing in two eco-climatic zones, sub-humid and semi-arid, in Eastern Algeria. They were characterised by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region (IGS), and the nodD-F symbiotic region. The combination of...

  12. Identification of Biomphalaria havanensis and Biomphalaria obstructa populations from Cuba using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofânia HDA Vidigal

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available In Cuba, several Biomphalaria species have been reported such as B. orbignyi, B. schrammi, B. helophila, B. havanensis and B. peregrina; only the latter three are considered as potential hosts of Schistosoma mansoni. The specific identification of Biomphalaria species is based on anatomical and morphological characters of genital organs and shells. The correct identification of these snails is complicated by the high variation in these characters, similarity among species and in some cases by the small size of the snails. In this paper, we reported the classical morphological identification, the use of PCR and RFLP analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA genes for molecular identification of seven snail populations from different localities in Cuba. Using morphological and molecular analysis, we showed that among the studied Cuban Biomphalaria populations only B. havanensis and B. obstructa species were found.

  13. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes.

  14. Genetic variability within Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genospecies established by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer in ixodes ricinus ticks from the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdáková, Markéta; Beati, Lorenza; Pet'ko, Branislav; Stanko, Michal; Fish, Durland

    2003-01-01

    In Europe the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex is represented by five distinct genospecies: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia valaisiana, and Borrelia lusitaniae. These taxonomic entities are known to differ in their specific associations with vertebrate hosts and to provoke distinct clinical manifestations in human patients. However, exceptions to these rules have often been observed, indicating that strains belonging to a single genospecies may be more heterogeneous than expected. It is, therefore, important to develop alternative identification tools which are able to distinguish Borrelia strains not only at the specific level but also at the intraspecific level. DNA from a sample of 370 Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in the Czech Republic was analyzed by PCR for the presence of a approximately 230-bp fragment of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer of Borrelia spp. A total of 20.5% of the ticks were found to be positive. The infecting genospecies were identified by analyzing the amplified products by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method with restriction enzyme MseI and by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The two methods were compared, and PCR-SSCP analysis appeared to be a valuable tool for rapid identification of spirochetes at the intraspecific level, particularly when large samples are examined. Furthermore, by using PCR-SSCP analysis we identified a previously unknown Borrelia genotype, genotype I-77, which would have gone unnoticed if RFLP analysis alone had been used.

  15. Assessment of the genetic diversity of Frankia microsymbionts of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. plants growing in a Tunisian date-palm oasis by analysis of PCR amplified nifD-K intergenic spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gtari, Maher; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boudabous, Abdellatif

    2007-03-01

    Diversity of Frankia microsymbionts of non-native Elaeagnus angustifolia L. plants spontaneously growing in a Tunisian desertic retreat area, the date-palm oasis of Tozeur, was investigated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR-sequencing techniques targeting the nifD-K intergenic spacer. Three PCR-RFLP haplotypes (I, II, and III) were detected among collected nodules. Haplotype I was detected at all five sampling sites and dominated the other haplotypes present at these sites. This haplotype was also exhibited by strain BMG5.10, which was isolated by a plant-capturing assay in 1998 from soil collected in the same locality, qualifying it to be the most competitive haplotype in the edapho-climatic condition of the studied desertic date-palm oasis. nifD-K sequences of the three haplotypes formed a closely related phylogenetic subgroup. These results suggest that Frankia variability is constrained by severe edapho-climatic conditions of retreated desert in Tunisian area.

  16. Phylogenetic diversity based on rrs, atpD, recA genes and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia faba and Pisum sativum in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Nery; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris

    2008-03-01

    In this study 17 isolates from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum var. macrocarpum growing in different soils from Peru were isolated and characterized. The isolates, presenting 11 different RAPD profiles, were distributed in three groups on the basis of their 16S-RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S-RFLP groups I, II and III were closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii DSM 30141 (=ATCC 14480), R. leguminosarum bv. viciae DSM 30132(T) and Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) (=USDA 9032(T)), respectively. The analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and two housekeeping genes, atpD and recA, confirmed the identification of strains from group I, however those from groups II and III were phylogenetically divergent to strains DSM 30132(T) and CFN42(T). These results support the fact that the 16S rRNA gene is not adequate for identification at species level within genus Rhizobium and suggest the existence of putative new species within the phylogenetic group of R. leguminosarum. They also confirm the need of a taxonomic revision of R. leguminosarum since the reference strains of the three biovars included in this study are phylogenetically divergent according to their ITS, atpD and recA gene sequences.

  17. A gene expression map for the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Gauhar, Zareen; Mason, Christopher; Halasz, Gabor; van Batenburg, Marinus F; Rifkin, Scott A; Hua, Sujun; Herreman, Tine; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Barbano, Paolo Emilio; Bussemaker, Harmen J; White, Kevin P

    2004-10-22

    We used a maskless photolithography method to produce DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences tiled throughout the genome of Drosophila melanogaster and across predicted splice junctions. RNA expression of protein coding and nonprotein coding sequences was determined for each major stage of the life cycle, including adult males and females. We detected transcriptional activity for 93% of annotated genes and RNA expression for 41% of the probes in intronic and intergenic sequences. Comparison to genome-wide RNA interference data and to gene annotations revealed distinguishable levels of expression for different classes of genes and higher levels of expression for genes with essential cellular functions. Differential splicing was observed in about 40% of predicted genes, and 5440 previously unknown splice forms were detected. Genes within conserved regions of synteny with D. pseudoobscura had highly correlated expression; these regions ranged in length from 10 to 900 kilobase pairs. The expressed intergenic and intronic sequences are more likely to be evolutionarily conserved than nonexpressed ones, and about 15% of them appear to be developmentally regulated. Our results provide a draft expression map for the entire nonrepetitive genome, which reveals a much more extensive and diverse set of expressed sequences than was previously predicted.

  18. Short communication: Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococcus species from goat milk with the API Staph identification test and with transfer RNA-intergenic spacer PCR combined with capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, G; De Visscher, A; Collar, C A; Bacon, D A C; Maga, E A; Murray, J D; Supré, K; De Vliegher, S; Haesebrouck, F; Rowe, J D; Nielen, M; van Werven, T

    2012-12-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most commonly isolated bacteria from goat milk, but they have often been identified with phenotypic methods, which may have resulted in misclassification. The aims of this paper were to assess the amount of misclassification of a phenotypic test for identifying CNS species from goat milk compared with transfer RNA intergenic spacer PCR (tDNA-PCR) followed by capillary electrophoresis, and to apply the tDNA-PCR technique on different capillary electrophoresis equipment. Milk samples were collected from 416 does in 5 Californian dairy goat herds on 3 occasions during lactation. In total, 219 CNS isolates were identified at the species level with tDNA-PCR and subjected to the API 20 Staph identification test kit (API Staph; bioMérieux, Durham, NC). If the same species was isolated multiple times from the same udder gland, only the first isolate was used for further analyses, resulting in 115 unique CNS isolates. According to the tDNA-PCR test, the most prevalent CNS species were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus caprae, and Staphylococcus simulans. Typeability with API staph was low (72%). Although the API Staph test was capable of identifying the majority of Staph. epidermidis and Staph. caprae isolates, sensitivity for identification of Staph. simulans was low. The true positive fraction was high for the 3 most prevalent species. It was concluded that the overall performance of API Staph in differentiating CNS species from goat milk was moderate to low, mainly because of the low typeability, and that genotypic methods such as tDNA-PCR are preferred.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis have different beta-lactamase expression phenotypes but are homogeneous in the ampC-ampR genetic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, J I; Ciofu, O; Høiby, N

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from 1 of 17 cystic fibrosis patients produced secondary beta-lactamase in addition to the ampC beta-lactamase. Isolates were grouped into three beta-lactamase expression phenotypes: (i) beta-lactam sensitive, low basal levels and inducible beta-lactamase production......; (ii) beta-lactam resistant, moderate basal levels and hyperinducible beta-lactamase production; (iii) beta-lactam resistant, high basal levels and constitutive beta-lactamase production. Apart from a base substitution in the ampR-ampC intergenic region of an isolate with moderate...

  20. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    OpenAIRE

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A V; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan A...

  1. Multimodal behavioral treatment of nonrepetitive, treatment-resistant nightmares: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Barry A

    2004-12-01

    A 23-yr.-old young woman presenting with a 17-yr. history of nightmares was treated with a variety of behavioral and self-regulatory techniques. The nightmares were unusual in that they did not have an obviously common theme as in most published reports, and, therefore, did not readily lend themselves to several frequently used techniques. Although previous treatment episodes had not affected the incidence of the nightmares, a combination of relaxation procedures, a mnemonic to increase lucid dreaming, and dream rehearsal upon waking from a nightmare resulted in a sharp decrease in the frequency of nightmares in four sessions. Further improvement was reported over the next nine months as additional techniques were introduced and other problems treated, and was maintained during a 9-mo. follow-up.

  2. The Cosine Error: A Bayesian Procedure for Treating a Non-repetitive Systematic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lira Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An inconsistency with respect to variable transformations in our previous treatment of the cosine error example with repositioning (Metrologia, vol. 47, pp. R1–R14 is pointed out. The problem refers to the measurement of the vertical height of a column of liquid in a manometer. A systematic effect arises because of the possible deviation of the measurement axis from the vertical, which may be different each time the measurement is taken. A revised procedure for treating this problem is proposed; it consists in straightforward application of Bayesian statistics using a conditional reference prior with partial information. In most practical applications, the numerical differences between the two procedures will be negligible, so the interest of the revised one is mainly of conceptual nature. Nevertheless, similar measurement models may appear in other contexts, for example, in intercomparisons, so the present investigation may serve as a warning to analysts against applying the same methodology we used in our original approach to the present problem.

  3. Genetic typing of vibrio parahaemolyticus with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences%副溶血性弧菌肠道细菌基因间重复序列基因分型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋启发; 叶硕; 徐景野; 章丹阳

    2013-01-01

    目的 检测副溶血性弧菌热稳定溶血素(TDH)基因(tdh),并采用肠道细菌基因间重复序列(Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-PCR,ERIC-PCR)基因分型技术对tdh阳性和阴性菌株进行聚类分析.方法 PCR法扩增79株分离自患者和海产品中的副溶血性弧菌tdh基因.ERIC-PCR分型PCR产物中某一特定大小片段存在标记为1,否则标记为0,形成二进制独特矩阵,定义为一个基因型,用聚类分析软件NTsys 2.10e对所有菌株、tdh阳性组和阴性组进行聚类分析.结果 患者组、海产品组中分离菌株tdh阳性率分别为87.8% (43/49)和3.3% (1/30),患者中所分离的副溶血性弧菌tdh阳性率明显高于环境中所分离的(x2=19.11,P<0.01).79例菌株可获得产物长度160 bp、360 bp、420 bp、500 bp、680 bp、800 bp、950 bp、1 100 bp、1 350 bp、1 550 bp、1 800 bp、2 100 bp和2400 bp共13种大小不同的PCR产物片段,所有菌株根据扩增片段分布可分为17类,有3个明显族.结论 ERIC-PCR聚类分析结果表明,我国分离的副溶血性弧菌具有较高基因多态性,tdh阴性组离散度高于tdh阳性组.

  4. Influence of detachment procedure and diet on recovery of solid-associated bacteria from sheep ruminal digesta and representativeness of bacterial isolates as assessed by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S; Tejido, M L; Ranilla, M J; Martínez, M E; Saro, C; Carro, M D

    2009-11-01

    Six ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep were used in a partially replicated 4 x 4 Latin square experiment designed to evaluate the efficiency of 3 detachment procedures (DP) to recover solid-associated bacteria (SAB) from ruminal digesta. The 4 experimental diets contained forage to concentrate (F:C) ratios of 70:30 or 30:70 with either alfalfa hay or grass hay as the forage. Bacterial biomass was labeled with 15NH4Cl. The DP were 1) MET: digesta was incubated at 38 degrees C for 15 min with saline solution (0.9% NaCl) containing 0.1% methylcellulose under continuous shaking; 2) STO: digesta was mixed with cold saline solution and homogenized with a stomacher for 5 min at 230 rpm; 3) FRE: digesta was immediately frozen at -20 degrees C for 72 h, thawed at 4 degrees C, mixed with saline solution and subjected to STO procedure. Common to all treatments was storing at 4 degrees C for 24 h after the treatment, homogenization, filtration, and resuspension of digesta 2 times in the treatment solutions. The automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used to analyze the similarity between bacterial communities attached to the digesta and those in the pellet obtained after each DP. There were no significant F:C x DP or forage x DP interactions for any variable. On average, STO treatment detached 65.8% of SAB from ruminal digesta, about 1.2 and 1.5 times more than FRE and MET treatments, respectively. Total recovery of SAB in STO pellets (48.9%) was greater compared with FRE (31.7%) and MET (33.1%), values being greater for high-forage compared with high-concentrate diets. Similarity index between the bacteria attached to digesta and those in the pellets were lower for FRE (48.2%) compared with MET (54.1%) and STO (54.1%), which suggests that FRE could have destroyed cell integrity of some bacterial species, thus reducing the bacterial diversity present in the pellets. The STO method was the most effective removing SAB from digesta, but

  5. Detecting non-coding selective pressure in coding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchette Mathieu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics approaches, where orthologous DNA regions are compared and inter-species conserved regions are identified, have proven extremely powerful for identifying non-coding regulatory regions located in intergenic or intronic regions. However, non-coding functional elements can also be located within coding region, as is common for exonic splicing enhancers, some transcription factor binding sites, and RNA secondary structure elements affecting mRNA stability, localization, or translation. Since these functional elements are located in regions that are themselves highly conserved because they are coding for a protein, they generally escaped detection by comparative genomics approaches. Results We introduce a comparative genomics approach for detecting non-coding functional elements located within coding regions. Codon evolution is modeled as a mixture of codon substitution models, where each component of the mixture describes the evolution of codons under a specific type of coding selective pressure. We show how to compute the posterior distribution of the entropy and parsimony scores under this null model of codon evolution. The method is applied to a set of growth hormone 1 orthologous mRNA sequences and a known exonic splicing elements is detected. The analysis of a set of CORTBP2 orthologous genes reveals a region of several hundred base pairs under strong non-coding selective pressure whose function remains unknown. Conclusion Non-coding functional elements, in particular those involved in post-transcriptional regulation, are likely to be much more prevalent than is currently known. With the numerous genome sequencing projects underway, comparative genomics approaches like that proposed here are likely to become increasingly powerful at detecting such elements.

  6. Phylogenetic relationships in the Gesnerioideae (Gesneriaceae) based on nrDNA ITS and cpDNA trnL-F and trnE-T spacer region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Elizabeth A; Roalson, Eric H; Skog, Laurence E; Boggan, John K; Idnurm, Alexander

    2002-02-01

    The Gesnerioideae includes most of the New World members of the Gesneriaceae family and is currently considered to include five tribes: Beslerieae, Episcieae, Gesnerieae, Gloxinieae, and Napeantheae. This study presents maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS), and the chloroplast DNA trnL intron, trnL-trnF intergenic spacer region, and trnE-trnT intergenic spacer region sequences. The ITS and cpDNA data sets strongly support the monophyly of a Beslerieae/Napeantheae clade; an Episcieae clade; a Gesnerieae clade; a Gloxinieae clade minus Sinningia, Sinningia relatives, and Gloxinia sarmentiana; and a Sinningia/Paliavana/Vanhouttea clade. This is the first study to provide strong statistical support for these tribes/clades. These analyses suggest that Sinningia and relatives should be considered as a separate tribe. Additionally, generic relationships are explored, including the apparent polyphyly of Gloxinia. Chromosome number changes are minimized on the proposed phylogeny, with the exception of the n = 11 taxa of the Gloxinieae. Scaly rhizomes appear to have been derived once in the Gloxinieae sensu stricto. The number of derivations of the inferior ovary is unclear: either there was one derivation with a reversal to a superior ovary in the Episcieae, or there were multiple independent derivations of the inferior ovary.

  7. Sequence characteristics and divergent evolution of the chloroplast psbA-trnH noncoding region in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, D C; Chen, S L; Xiao, P G

    2010-01-01

    The psbA-trnH intergenic region is among the most variable regions in the gymnosperm chloroplast genome. It is proposed as suitable for DNA barcoding studies and is useful in phylogenetics at the species level. This region consists of two parts differing in their evolutionary characteristics: 1) the psbA 3’UTR (untranslated region) and 2) the psbA-trnH intergenic spacer. We compared the sequence and RNA secondary structure of the psbA 3’ UTR across gymnosperms and found consensus motifs corresponding to the stem portions of the RNA stem-loop structures and a consensus TGGATTGTTATGT box. The psbA-trnH spacer is highly variable in length and composition. Tandem repeats that form stem-loop structures were detected in both the psbA 3’ UTR and the psbA-trnH spacer. The presence of promoters and stem-loop structures in the psbA-trnH spacer and high sequence variation in this region suggest that psbA and trnH in some gymnosperms are independently transcribed. A comparison of chloroplast UTRs across gymnosperms offer clues to the identity of putative regulatory elements and information on selective constraints imposed on the chloroplast non-coding regions. The present study should inspire researchers to explore the full potential of the psbA-trnH non-coding sequence and to further stimulate its application in a broader spectrum of studies, not limited to phylogenetics and DNA barcoding.

  8. Short ultraconserved promoter regions delineate a class of preferentially expressed alternatively spliced transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Christian; Köhler, Sebastian; Schulz, Marcel H; Manke, Thomas; Bauer, Sebastian; Robinson, Peter N

    2009-11-01

    Ultraconservation has been variously defined to describe sequences that have remained identical or nearly so over long periods of evolution to a degree that is higher than expected for sequences under typical constraints associated with protein-coding sequences, splice sites, or transcription factor binding sites. Most intergenic ultraconserved elements (UCE) appear to be tissue-specific enhancers, whereas another class of intragenic UCEs is involved in regulation of gene expression by means of alternative splicing. In this study we define a set of 2827 short ultraconserved promoter regions (SUPR) in 5 kb upstream regions of 1268 human protein-coding genes using a definition of 98% identity for at least 30 bp in 7 mammalian species. Our analysis shows that SUPRs are enriched in genes playing a role in regulation and development. Many of the genes having a SUPR-containing promoter have additional alternative promoters that do not contain SUPRs. Comparison of such promoters by CAGE tag, EST, and Solexa read analysis revealed that SUPR-associated transcripts show a significantly higher mean expression than transcripts associated with non-SUPR-containing promoters. The same was true for the comparison between all SUPR-associated and non-SUPR-associated transcripts on a genome-wide basis. SUPR-associated genes show a highly significant tendency to occur in regions that are also enriched for intergenic short ultraconserved elements (SUE) in the vicinity of developmental genes. A number of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are overrepresented in SUPRs and SUEs, including those for transcription factors of the homeodomain family, but in contrast to SUEs, SUPRs are also enriched in core-promoter motifs. These observations suggest that SUPRs delineate a distinct class of ultraconserved sequences.

  9. Regional Competition in Maghreb Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EL AMOURI ALLAL

    2016-01-01

    Great powers focus on cooperation instead of competition in their regions in order to maintain stability and develop the economy of their regions and the world in general. The United States for example created the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFT

  10. Africa Region

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of HIV/AIDS on» Gross Domestic Product (GGP) in the WHO. Africa Region ... methods) and for economic evaluations of treatment, prevention and promotion. , programmes. ..... develop new products), for which we could not find data ...

  11. Regional odontodysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, D N; Bailoor, D; Patel, B

    2011-01-01

    Regional odontodysplasia is an unusual developmental anomaly in which ectodermal and mesodermal tooth components are affected. We present a rare case of a developmental anomaly called regional odontodysplasia or 'ghost teeth' in a 12-year-old Indian girl. The anomaly affected right maxillary permanent teeth. The mandibular teeth were unaffected. The clinical, radiographic and histological features are reviewed. The management of affected patients is discussed.

  12. Regional odontodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia is an unusual developmental anomaly in which ectodermal and mesodermal tooth components are affected. We present a rare case of a developmental anomaly called regional odontodysplasia or ′ghost teeth′ in a 12-year-old Indian girl. The anomaly affected right maxillary permanent teeth. The mandibular teeth were unaffected. The clinical, radiographic and histological features are reviewed. The management of affected patients is discussed.

  13. RISSC: a novel database for ribosomal 16S-23S RNA genes spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, J; Bescós, I; Rodríguez-Sala, J J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    2001-01-01

    A novel database, under the acronym RISSC (Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Sequence Collection), has been created. It compiles more than 1600 entries of edited DNA sequence data from the 16S-23S ribosomal spacers present in most prokaryotes and organelles (e.g. mitochondria and chloroplasts) and is accessible through the Internet (http://ulises.umh.es/RISSC), where systematic searches for specific words can be conducted, as well as BLAST-type sequence searches. Additionally, a characteristic feature of this region, the presence/absence and nature of tRNA genes within the spacer, is included in all the entries, even when not previously indicated in the original database. All these combined features could provide a useful documentation tool for studies on evolution, identification, typing and strain characterization, among others.

  14. Enxertia intergenérica de cultivares de nespereira no porta-enxerto de marmeleiro 'japonês' Intergeneric grafting of loquat cultivars using 'Japonese' quince tree as rootstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, foram desenvolvidos alguns trabalhos pioneiros com a utilização do marmeleiro (Cydonia oblonga Mill. como porta-enxertos para as nespereiras (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb. Lindl.. O sucesso da utilização dessa enxertia intergenérica está relacionado, principalmente, à redução do porte da planta. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho estudar técnicas de enxertia de cultivares de nespereiras, utilizando-se o marmeleiro 'Japonês' (Chaenomeles sinensis (Thouin Koehne como nova opção de porta-enxerto. Mudas de marmeleiro 'Japonês' com um ano de idade (altura próxima a 110 cm e diâmetro de 0,85 cm na região de enxertia, a 15 cm acima do colo, mantidos em sacos plásticos com dimensões de 18 x 30 cm (capacidade de 3 L, foram enxertados pelos métodos de borbulhia em placa e garfagem em fenda cheia, em duas diferentes épocas: outono (abril e inverno (julho. Utilizaram-se cinco cultivares de nespereira de importância econômica no Brasil: 'Mizuho', 'Néctar de Cristal' (IAC 866-7, 'Mizauto' (IAC 167-4, 'Mizumo' (IAC 1567-411 e 'Centenária' (IAC 1567-420. Pelo método de borbulhia, não houve nenhuma borbulha brotada quando esta foi realizada no outono, apenas duas borbulhas da 'Mizauto', 'Néctar de Cristal' e 'Centenária' brotaram quando esta foi realizada no inverno, no entanto, com baixo crescimento. Já, por garfagem, maiores porcentagens de brotação e crescimento dos enxertos foram obtidas quando a enxertia foi realizada no inverno, com destaque para as nespereiras 'Mizuho', 'Centenária' e 'Néctar de Cristal'.In Brazil, some pioneer studies were carried out using quince seedlings (Cydonia oblonga Mill. as rootstock for loquat (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb. Lindl.. The main advantage of this intergeneric grafting use is plant size reduction. The success of using this intergeneric grafting is related mainly to plant size reduction. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study grafting techniques of loquat cultivars using

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF INTERGENIC SPACERS BASED PCR ASSAY FOR DETECTION OF GIARDIALAMBLIA%犬猫贾第虫IGS序列特异性检测方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雅文; 刘远佳; 郑国超; 谭立娉; 胡伟; 罗琴; 林丽琴; 路鹏云; 李国清

    2013-01-01

    The intergenic spacers (IGS) were amplified in PCR from nuclear ribosomal DNAs of two Giardialamblia strains (assemble D from dog and assemble F from cat) isolated from feces of naturally infected pets in Guangzhou. The PCR products were purified, cloned and sequenced. The resulting nucleotide sequences were compared with related sequences in the GenBank databases. The IGS sequences were 1355 bp for the canine Giardia strain and 1388 bp for the feline Giardia strain. The interspecific difference in the IGS sequence might serve as a genetic marker for the identification and differentiation of Giardia lamblia. Furthermore, a PCR detection method was developed based on IGS sequence. The established PCR assay specifically amplified IGS sequence of G. lamblia but not all control parasites such as Toxocaracanis etc. The minimum detection limit of G.lamblia was 82 fg. Total 84 clinical samples were tested using this method. The positive rate of clinical samples was 3.57%, higher than 2.38%by traditional method.%应用PCR技术对广州市某宠物寄养所采集的一株D型犬源贾第虫和一株F型猫源贾第虫的核糖体IGS序列进行了扩增、克隆、测序,将测序结果与GenBank已上传的贾第虫相应序列进行比对分析,基于贾第虫IGS序列建立了具有良好特异性和敏感性的PCR检测方法,并对84份临床粪样进行了检测。结果显示,D型犬源贾第虫和F型猫源贾第虫的IGS序列长分别为1355 bp和1388 bp,贾第虫IGS序列存在多态性现象,种间差异明显,可以作为区分不同基因型的分子标记;建立的PCR方法能特异性扩增犬源贾第虫核糖体IGS序列,而犬蛔虫等对照虫体DNA均不能扩增,该方法对贾第虫DNA的最小检测量为82 fg,对84份临床粪样的检出率为3.57%,比传统镜检法高出2.38%,具有一定的临床应用价值。

  16. Superhelical destabilization in regulatory regions of stress response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiquan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization (SIDD analysis exploits the known structural and energetic properties of DNA to predict sites that are susceptible to strand separation under negative superhelical stress. When this approach was used to calculate the SIDD profile of the entire Escherichia coli K12 genome, it was found that strongly destabilized sites occur preferentially in intergenic regions that are either known or inferred to contain promoters, but rarely occur in coding regions. Here, we investigate whether the genes grouped in different functional categories have characteristic SIDD properties in their upstream flanks. We report that strong SIDD sites in the E. coli K12 genome are statistically significantly overrepresented in the upstream regions of genes encoding transcriptional regulators. In particular, the upstream regions of genes that directly respond to physiological and environmental stimuli are more destabilized than are those regions of genes that are not involved in these responses. Moreover, if a pathway is controlled by a transcriptional regulator whose gene has a destabilized 5' flank, then the genes (operons in that pathway also usually contain strongly destabilized SIDD sites in their 5' flanks. We observe this statistically significant association of SIDD sites with upstream regions of genes functioning in transcription in 38 of 43 genomes of free-living bacteria, but in only four of 18 genomes of endosymbionts or obligate parasitic bacteria. These results suggest that strong SIDD sites 5' to participating genes may be involved in transcriptional responses to environmental changes, which are known to transiently alter superhelicity. We propose that these SIDD sites are active and necessary participants in superhelically mediated regulatory mechanisms governing changes in the global pattern of gene expression in prokaryotes in response to physiological or environmental changes.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of regions similar to promoters of histone genes

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2010-05-28

    Background: The purpose of this study is to: i) develop a computational model of promoters of human histone-encoding genes (shortly histone genes), an important class of genes that participate in various critical cellular processes, ii) use the model so developed to identify regions across the human genome that have similar structure as promoters of histone genes; such regions could represent potential genomic regulatory regions, e.g. promoters, of genes that may be coregulated with histone genes, and iii/ identify in this way genes that have high likelihood of being coregulated with the histone genes.Results: We successfully developed a histone promoter model using a comprehensive collection of histone genes. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation test, the model produced good prediction accuracy (94.1% sensitivity, 92.6% specificity, and 92.8% positive predictive value). We used this model to predict across the genome a number of genes that shared similar promoter structures with the histone gene promoters. We thus hypothesize that these predicted genes could be coregulated with histone genes. This hypothesis matches well with the available gene expression, gene ontology, and pathways data. Jointly with promoters of the above-mentioned genes, we found a large number of intergenic regions with similar structure as histone promoters.Conclusions: This study represents one of the most comprehensive computational analyses conducted thus far on a genome-wide scale of promoters of human histone genes. Our analysis suggests a number of other human genes that share a high similarity of promoter structure with the histone genes and thus are highly likely to be coregulated, and consequently coexpressed, with the histone genes. We also found that there are a large number of intergenic regions across the genome with their structures similar to promoters of histone genes. These regions may be promoters of yet unidentified genes, or may represent remote control regions that

  18. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  19. Complete gene sequence of spider attachment silk protein (PySp1) reveals novel linker regions and extreme repeat homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaw, Ro Crystal; Saski, Christopher A; Hayashi, Cheryl Y

    2017-02-01

    Spiders use a myriad of silk types for daily survival, and each silk type has a unique suite of task-specific mechanical properties. Of all spider silk types, pyriform silk is distinct because it is a combination of a dry protein fiber and wet glue. Pyriform silk fibers are coated with wet cement and extruded into "attachment discs" that adhere silks to each other and to substrates. The mechanical properties of spider silk types are linked to the primary and higher-level structures of spider silk proteins (spidroins). Spidroins are often enormous molecules (>250 kDa) and have a lengthy repetitive region that is flanked by relatively short (∼100 amino acids), non-repetitive amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions. The amino acid sequence motifs in the repetitive region vary greatly between spidroin type, while motif length and number underlie the remarkable mechanical properties of spider silk fibers. Existing knowledge of pyriform spidroins is fragmented, making it difficult to define links between the structure and function of pyriform spidroins. Here, we present the full-length sequence of the gene encoding pyriform spidroin 1 (PySp1) from the silver garden spider Argiope argentata. The predicted protein is similar to previously reported PySp1 sequences but the A. argentata PySp1 has a uniquely long and repetitive "linker", which bridges the amino-terminal and repetitive regions. Predictions of the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of A. argentata PySp1 identify regions important to protein self-assembly. Analysis of the full complement of A. argentata PySp1 repeats reveals extreme intragenic homogenization, and comparison of A. argentata PySp1 repeats with other PySp1 sequences identifies variability in two sub-repetitive expansion regions. Overall, the full-length A. argentata PySp1 sequence provides new evidence for understanding how pyriform spidroins contribute to the properties of pyriform silk fibers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  20. Regional odontodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimma Reddy B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia (ROD is a rare developmental anomaly involving both mesodermal and ectodermal components in a group of contiguous teeth. It affects the primary and permanent dentitions in the maxilla and the mandible or both, however, the maxilla is frequently involved. Although the etiology of the ROD is uncertain, it has been suggested that numerous other factors play a role. The treatment plan should be based on the degree of involvement as well as the functional and esthetic needs in each case. This article reports the case of a 5-year-old boy presenting a rare anomaly on the right side of the maxillary arch. The treatment performed was rehabilitation with temporary partial acrylic denture and periodic checkups. The extraction was followed by rehabilitation with dental implants. The main aim of this article is to provide valuable information to pediatric dentists about the review and treatment alternatives for ROD.

  1. The Rhodomonas salina mitochondrial genome: bacteria-like operons, compact gene arrangement and complex repeat region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauth, Amy M; Maier, Uwe G; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the mitochondrial genome structure and gene content of a putatively ancestral group of eukaryotes, the cryptophytes, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Rhodomonas salina. The 48 063 bp circular-mapping molecule codes for 2 rRNAs, 27 tRNAs and 40 proteins including 23 components of oxidative phosphorylation, 15 ribosomal proteins and two subunits of tat translocase. One potential protein (ORF161) is without assigned function. Only two introns occur in the genome; both are present within cox1 belong to group II and contain RT open reading frames. Primitive genome features include bacteria-like rRNAs and tRNAs, ribosomal protein genes organized in large clusters resembling bacterial operons and the presence of the otherwise rare genes such as rps1 and tatA. The highly compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.7 kb long, repeat-containing intergenic region. Repeat motifs approximately 40-700 bp long occur up to 31 times, forming a complex repeat structure. Tandem repeats are the major arrangement but the region also includes a large, approximately 3 kb, inverted repeat and several potentially stable approximately 40-80 bp long hairpin structures. We provide evidence that the large repeat region is involved in replication and transcription initiation, predict a promoter motif that occurs in three locations and discuss two likely scenarios of how this highly structured repeat region might have evolved.

  2. The nitrogen-fixation island insertion site is conserved in diazotrophic Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from distal and close geographical regions.

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    Anastasia Venieraki

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen fixers within the genus Pseudomonas has been established and so far most isolated strains are phylogenetically affiliated to Pseudomonas stutzeri. A gene ortholog neighborhood analysis of the nitrogen fixation island (NFI in four diazotrophic P. stutzeri strains and Pseudomonas azotifigens revealed that all are flanked by genes coding for cobalamin synthase (cobS and glutathione peroxidise (gshP. The putative NFIs lack all the features characterizing a mobilizable genomic island. Nevertheless, bioinformatic analysis P. stutzeri DSM 4166 NFI demonstrated the presence of short inverted and/or direct repeats within both flanking regions. The other P. stutzeri strains carry only one set of repeats. The genetic diversity of eleven diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates was also investigated. Multilocus sequence typing grouped nine isolates along with P. stutzeri and two isolates are grouped in a separate clade. A Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis grouped the eleven isolates into four distinct genotypes. We also provided evidence that the putative NFI in our diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates is flanked by cobS and gshP genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the putative NFI of Pseudomonas sp. Gr65 is flanked by inverted repeats identical to those found in P. stutzeri DSM 4166 and while the other P. stutzeri isolates harbor the repeats located in the intergenic region between cobS and glutaredoxin genes as in the case of P. stutzeri A1501. Taken together these data suggest that all putative NFIs of diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates are anchored in an intergenic region between cobS and gshP genes and their flanking regions are designated by distinct repeats patterns. Moreover, the presence of almost identical NFIs in diazotrophic Pseudomonas strains isolated from distal geographical locations around the world suggested that this horizontal gene transfer event may have taken place early in the evolution.

  3. The nitrogen-fixation island insertion site is conserved in diazotrophic Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from distal and close geographical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venieraki, Anastasia; Dimou, Maria; Vezyri, Eleni; Vamvakas, Alexandros; Katinaki, Pagona-Artemis; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Tampakaki, Anastasia; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen fixers within the genus Pseudomonas has been established and so far most isolated strains are phylogenetically affiliated to Pseudomonas stutzeri. A gene ortholog neighborhood analysis of the nitrogen fixation island (NFI) in four diazotrophic P. stutzeri strains and Pseudomonas azotifigens revealed that all are flanked by genes coding for cobalamin synthase (cobS) and glutathione peroxidise (gshP). The putative NFIs lack all the features characterizing a mobilizable genomic island. Nevertheless, bioinformatic analysis P. stutzeri DSM 4166 NFI demonstrated the presence of short inverted and/or direct repeats within both flanking regions. The other P. stutzeri strains carry only one set of repeats. The genetic diversity of eleven diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates was also investigated. Multilocus sequence typing grouped nine isolates along with P. stutzeri and two isolates are grouped in a separate clade. A Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis grouped the eleven isolates into four distinct genotypes. We also provided evidence that the putative NFI in our diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates is flanked by cobS and gshP genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the putative NFI of Pseudomonas sp. Gr65 is flanked by inverted repeats identical to those found in P. stutzeri DSM 4166 and while the other P. stutzeri isolates harbor the repeats located in the intergenic region between cobS and glutaredoxin genes as in the case of P. stutzeri A1501. Taken together these data suggest that all putative NFIs of diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates are anchored in an intergenic region between cobS and gshP genes and their flanking regions are designated by distinct repeats patterns. Moreover, the presence of almost identical NFIs in diazotrophic Pseudomonas strains isolated from distal geographical locations around the world suggested that this horizontal gene transfer event may have taken place early in the evolution.

  4. The DNA methylome and transcriptome of different brain regions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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    Yun Xiao

    Full Text Available Extensive changes in DNA methylation have been observed in schizophrenia (SC and bipolar disorder (BP, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of these disorders. Here, we performed genome-scale DNA methylation profiling using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (MeDIP-seq on two brain regions (including frontal cortex and anterior cingulate in 5 SC, 7 BP and 6 normal subjects. Comparing with normal controls, we identified substantial differentially methylated regions (DMRs in these two brain regions of SC and BP. To our surprise, different brain regions show completely distinct distributions of DMRs across the genomes. In frontal cortex of both SC and BP subjects, we observed widespread hypomethylation as compared to normal controls, preferentially targeting the terminal ends of the chromosomes. In contrast, in anterior cingulate, both SC and BP subjects displayed extensive gain of methylation. Notably, in these two brain regions of SC and BP, only a few DMRs overlapped with promoters, whereas a greater proportion occurs in introns and intergenic regions. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that important psychiatric disorder-related biological processes such as neuron development, differentiation and projection may be altered by epigenetic changes located in the intronic regions. Transcriptome analysis revealed consistent dysfunctional processes with those determined by DMRs. Furthermore, DMRs in the same brain regions from SC and BP could successfully distinguish BP and/or SC from normal controls while differentially expressed genes could not. Overall, our results support a major role for brain-region-dependent aberrant DNA methylation in the pathogenesis of these two disorders.

  5. Regional genomic instability predisposes to complex dystrophin gene rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Junko; Magner, Daniel B; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Schmitt, Eric S; White, Lisa D; Crowe, Carol A; Merrill, Michelle; Jayakar, Parul; Rajadhyaksha, Aparna; Eng, Christine M; del Gaudio, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and the majority of cases are due to DMD gene rearrangements. Despite the high incidence of these aberrations, little is known about their causative molecular mechanism(s). We examined 792 DMD/BMD clinical samples by oligonucleotide array-CGH and report on the junction sequence analysis of 15 unique deletion cases and three complex intragenic rearrangements to elucidate potential underlying mechanism(s). Furthermore, we present three cases with intergenic rearrangements involving DMD and neighboring loci. The cases with intragenic rearrangements include an inversion with flanking deleted sequences; a duplicated segment inserted in direct orientation into a deleted region; and a splicing mutation adjacent to a deletion. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that 7 of 12 breakpoints combined among 3 complex cases aligned with repetitive sequences, as compared to 4 of 30 breakpoints for the 15 deletion cases. Moreover, the inversion/deletion case may involve a stem-loop structure that has contributed to the initiation of this rearrangement. For the duplication/deletion and splicing mutation/deletion cases, the presence of the first mutation, either a duplication or point mutation, may have elicited the deletion events in an attempt to correct preexisting mutations. While NHEJ is one potential mechanism for these complex rearrangements, the highly complex junction sequence of the inversion/deletion case suggests the involvement of a replication-based mechanism. Our results support the notion that regional genomic instability, aided by the presence of repetitive elements, a stem-loop structure, and possibly preexisting mutations, may elicit complex rearrangements of the DMD gene.

  6. Genomic selective constraints in murid noncoding DNA.

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    Daniel J Gaffney

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has suggested that there are many more selectively constrained, functional noncoding than coding sites in mammalian genomes. However, little is known about how selective constraint varies amongst different classes of noncoding DNA. We estimated the magnitude of selective constraint on a large dataset of mouse-rat gene orthologs and their surrounding noncoding DNA. Our analysis indicates that there are more than three times as many selectively constrained, nonrepetitive sites within noncoding DNA as in coding DNA in murids. The majority of these constrained noncoding sites appear to be located within intergenic regions, at distances greater than 5 kilobases from known genes. Our study also shows that in murids, intron length and mean intronic selective constraint are negatively correlated with intron ordinal number. Our results therefore suggest that functional intronic sites tend to accumulate toward the 5' end of murid genes. Our analysis also reveals that mean number of selectively constrained noncoding sites varies substantially with the function of the adjacent gene. We find that, among others, developmental and neuronal genes are associated with the greatest numbers of putatively functional noncoding sites compared with genes involved in electron transport and a variety of metabolic processes. Combining our estimates of the total number of constrained coding and noncoding bases we calculate that over twice as many deleterious mutations have occurred in intergenic regions as in known genic sequence and that the total genomic deleterious point mutation rate is 0.91 per diploid genome, per generation. This estimated rate is over twice as large as a previous estimate in murids.

  7. Context differences reveal insulator and activator functions of a Su(Hw binding region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A Soshnev

    Full Text Available Insulators are DNA elements that divide chromosomes into independent transcriptional domains. The Drosophila genome contains hundreds of binding sites for the Suppressor of Hairy-wing [Su(Hw] insulator protein, corresponding to locations of the retroviral gypsy insulator and non-gypsy binding regions (BRs. The first non-gypsy BR identified, 1A-2, resides in cytological region 1A. Using a quantitative transgene system, we show that 1A-2 is a composite insulator containing enhancer blocking and facilitator elements. We discovered that 1A-2 separates the yellow (y gene from a previously unannotated, non-coding RNA gene, named yar for y-achaete (ac intergenic RNA. The role of 1A-2 was elucidated using homologous recombination to excise these sequences from the natural location, representing the first deletion of any Su(Hw BR in the genome. Loss of 1A-2 reduced yar RNA accumulation, without affecting mRNA levels from the neighboring y and ac genes. These data indicate that within the 1A region, 1A-2 acts an activator of yar transcription. Taken together, these studies reveal that the properties of 1A-2 are context-dependent, as this element has both insulator and enhancer activities. These findings imply that the function of non-gypsy Su(Hw BRs depends on the genomic environment, predicting that Su(Hw BRs represent a diverse collection of genomic regulatory elements.

  8. Engineering of core promoter regions enables the construction of constitutive and inducible promoters in Halomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Li, Teng; Ji, Weiyue; Wang, Qiuyue; Zhang, Haoqian; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Lou, Chunbo; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Halomonas strain TD01, a newly identified halophilic bacterium, has proven to be a promising low-cost host for the production of chemicals. However, genetic manipulation in Halomonas sp. is still difficult due to the lack of well-characterized and tunable expression systems. In this study, a systematic, efficient method was exploited to construct both a constitutive promoter library and inducible promoters. Porin, a highly expressed protein in Halomonas TD01, was first identified from the Halomonas TD01 proteome. Subsequent study of the intergenic region upstream of porin led to the identification of a core promoter region, including -10 and -35 elements. By randomizing the sequence between the -35 and -10 elements, a constitutive promoter library was obtained with 310-fold variation in transcriptional activity; an inducible promoter with a >200-fold induction was built by integrating a lac operator into the core promoter region. As two complementary expression systems, the constitutive and inducible promoters were then employed to regulate the biosynthetic pathway of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in Halomonas TD01, demonstrating the usefulness of the expression systems, furthermore, they could be applied in future metabolic engineering of Halomonas TD strains, and the systematic method used in this study can be generalized to other less-characterized bacterial strains.

  9. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Ctenoptilum vasava (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Pyrginae and Its Phylogenetic Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiasheng Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We here report the first complete mitochondrial (mt genome of a skipper, Ctenoptilum vasava Moore, 1865 (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Pyrginae. The mt genome of the skipper is a circular molecule of 15,468 bp, containing 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 24 putative transfer RNA (tRNA, genes including an extra copy of trnS (AGN and a tRNA-like insertion trnL (UUR, 13 protein-coding genes and an AT-rich region. All protein-coding genes (PCGs are initiated by ATN codons and terminated by the typical stop codon TAA or TAG, except for COII which ends with a single T. The intergenic spacer sequence between trnS (AGN and ND1 genes also contains the ATACTAA motif. The AT-rich region of 429 bp is comprised of nonrepetitive sequences, including the motif ATAGA followed by an 19 bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like (AT3 (TA9 element next to the ATTTA motif, an 11 bp poly-A adjacent to tRNAs. Phylogenetic analyses (ML and BI methods showed that Papilionoidea is not a natural group, and Hesperioidea is placed within the Papilionoidea as a sister to ((Pieridae + Lycaenidae + Nymphalidae while Papilionoidae is paraphyletic to Hesperioidea. This result is remarkably different from the traditional view where Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea are considered as two distinct superfamilies.

  10. Systematics and evolution of tribe Sinningieae (Gesneriaceae): evidence from phylogenetic analyses of six plastid DNA regions and nuclear ncpGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Mathieu; Chautems, Alain; Spichiger, Rodolphe; Kite, Geoffrey; Savolainen, Vincent

    2003-03-01

    For nearly all species in the three genera of tribe Sinningieae (Gesneriaceae), Sinningia, Paliavana, and Vanhouttea (mostly in southeastern Brazil) plus 10 outgroups, we have sequenced six non-coding DNA regions (i.e., plastid intergenic spacers trnT-trnL, trnL-trnF, trnS-trnG, atpB-rbcL, and introns in the trnL and rpl16 genes) and four introns in nuclear plastid-expressed glutamine synthetase gene (ncpGS). Separate and combined analyses of these data sets using maximum parsimony supported the monophyly of Sinningieae, but the genera Paliavana and Vanhouttea were found embedded within Sinningia; therefore a new infrageneric classification is here proposed. Mapping of pollination syndromes on the DNA-based trees supported multiple origins of hummingbird and bee syndromes and derivation of moth and bat syndromes from hummingbird flowers. Perennial tubers were derived from perennial stems in non-tuberous plants.

  11. Conserved gene arrangement in the origin region of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, M J; Schmidt, F J

    1992-01-01

    A 23-kb fragment of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome spanning the dnaA region has been isolated as a cosmid clone. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5-kb portion shows that the genes for the RNase P protein (rnpA), ribosomal protein L34 (rpmH), the replication initiator protein (dnaA), and the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (dnaN) are present in the highly conserved gene arrangement found in all eubacterial genomes studied so far. The dnaA-dnaN intergenic region is approximately 1 kb and contains a cluster of at least 12 DnaA boxes with a consensus sequence of TTGTCCACA matching the consensus DnaA box in the phylogenetically related Micrococcus luteus. Two DnaA boxes precede the dnaA sequence. We propose that the chromosomal origin (oriC) of S. coelicolor lies between dnaA and dnaN. In related work, J. Zakrzewska-Czerwinska and H. Schrempf (J. Bacteriol. 174:2688-2693, 1992) have identified the homologous sequence from the closely-related Streptomyces lividans as capable of self-replication. PMID:1577691

  12. A New Revised DNA Cramp Tool Based Approach of Chopping DNA Repetitive and Non-Repetitive Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Hari Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In vogue tremendous amount of data generated day by day by the living organism of genetic sequences and its accumulation in database, their size is growing in an exponential manner. Due to excessive storage of DNA sequences in public databases like NCBI, EMBL and DDBJ archival maintenance is tedious task. Transmission of information from one place to another place in network management systems is also a critical task. So To improve the efficiency and to reduce the overhead of the database need of compression arises in database optimization. In this connection different techniques were bloomed, but achieved results are not bountiful. Many classical algorithms are fails to compress genetic sequences due to the specificity of text encoded in dna and few of the existing techniques achieved positive results. DNA is repetitive and non repetitive in nature. Our proposed technique DNACRAMP is applicable on repetitive and non repetitive sequences of dna and it yields better compression ratio in terms of bits per bases. This is compared with existing techniques and observed that our one is the optimum technique and compression results are on par with existing techniques.

  13. Sequence variation at cpDNA regions of watermelon and related wild species: implications for the evolution of Citrullus haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Fenny; Lang, Ping

    2004-11-01

    Sequencing analysis of one coding and four noncoding cpDNA regions was conducted to infer biogeographic and evolutionary relationships in the genus Citrullus. Eighteen taxa from diverse geographical areas were included. A low number of parsimony informative characters (1.1%) was observed at the ∼4 kb section of cpDNA. Variability within Citrullus was detected primarily at noncoding regions of high A + T content. Substitution rates varied from 0-0.48% for ndhF with A + T content of 68.4% to 0.39- 1.69% for the intergenic region of atpA with A + T content of 82.8%, mainly resulting in indels and transversions. Indels at several regions acted as valuable parsimony informative markers. Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus, the cultivated watermelon, and C. ecirrhosus and C. rehmii from Namibia, lacked molecular variability. The genus Citrullus is supported monophyletically and shows two main clades, one of which contains C. colocynthis. In the other clade, C. rehmii is sister to a clade containing C. ecirrhosus and C. lanatus. Two clades were recovered within C. lanatus, consisting of domesticated watermelon and wild citron, var. citroides. Five haplotypes within C. colocynthis were used to deduce colonization routes of the species. Biogeographic patterns point to separate colonization events into Africa and the Far East.

  14. Desenvolvimento regional: a diversidade regional como potencialidade

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    José Odim Degrandi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the second half of the twentieth century the debate on regional development in Brazil received special attention, especially among economists and geographers. Two main approaches stand out in the debate: one that understands the promotion of regional development from the reduction / elimination of regional inequalities, and the other proposes the understanding of regional diversity and potentiality for developing regions. The first was and still remains hegemonic, being evidenced both in scientific papers and in documents guiding public policies in the area. The latter is evidenced most clearly from the 1990s on, a period when the concept of region is resumed under a new approach. This paper aims to clarify the meaning of each of these concepts in order to contribute to the qualification of the discussion on regional development.

  15. Desenvolvimento regional: a diversidade regional como potencialidade

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    Virginia Elisabeta Etges

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ao longo da segunda metade do século XX o debate sobre desenvolvimento regional no Brasil recebeu atenção especial, principalmente, entre economistas e geógrafos. Dois enfoques principais se destacam no debate: um, que entende a promoção do desenvolvimento regional a partir da redução/eliminação das desigualdades regionais; outro, que propõe a compreensão da diversidade regional como potencialidade para o desenvolvimento de regiões. O primeiro foi e continua sendo hegemônico, evidenciado tanto em trabalhos científicos quanto em documentos norteadores das políticas públicas na área. Já o segundo evidencia-se mais claramente a partir da década de 1990, período em que o conceito de região é retomado sob um novo enfoque. Neste trabalho pretende-se explicitar o significado de cada uma dessas concepções, no intuito de contribuir para a qualificação da discussão sobre desenvolvimento regional.Palavras-chave | Desenvolvimento regional; diversidade regional; potencialidades; região.Código JEL | O18; R11; R58. REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT: REGIONAL DIVERSITY AS POTENTIALAbstractThroughout the second half of the twentieth century the debate on regional development in Brazil received special attention, especially among economists and geographers. Two main approaches stand out in the debate: one that understands the promotion of regional development from the reduction / elimination of regional inequalities, and the other proposes the understanding of regional diversity and potentiality for developing regions. The first was and still remains hegemonic, being evidenced both in scientific papers and in documents guiding public policies in the area. The latter is evidenced most clearly from the 1990s on, a period when the concept of region is resumed under a new approach. This paper aims to clarify the meaning of each of these concepts in order to contribute to the qualification of the discussion on regional development.Keywords | Regional

  16. Detection of XIIA phytoplasma group on cultivar Župljanka in Župa vineyard region by RFLP analysis of 16s rDNA sequences

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    Jošić Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 'Bois noir' (BN is an important grapevine disease associated with phytoplasmas belonging to ribosomal subgroup 16SrXII-A. Phytoplasmas cause diseases in several hundred plant species. The number of infected cultivars is growing each year and it is important to follow the spreading of the phytoplasma in the different regions and identify which strains are present in specific regions on specific cultivars. Phytoplasmas are identified and classified based on direct sequencing of phytoplasma 16S rDNA or the 16S to 23S intergenic spacer region, but this approach is not always practical when a large number of unknown phytoplasmas is to be analyzed. Classification by RFLP analysis has provided a simple and rapid method that can be used to differentiate and identify a large number of unclarified phytoplasmas. Our objective was to investigate presence of phytoplasmas of 16SrXII-A group (Stolbur in Zupa vineyard region. Detection was based on RFLP analysis of 16s rDNA sequences using four restriction enzymes: Tru1I, AluI, KpnI and TaqI. We identified phytoplasmas of XIIA group on two of three investigated cultivars (Zupljanka and Frankovka, but not on Plovdina in the Zupa vineyard regions (Gornje Rataje and Tules locality. This is the first report of Stolbur phytoplasma on cv. Zupljanka in Zupa region.

  17. Central Region Regionally Ecological Significant Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This is an analysis of regionally significant Terrestrial and Wetland Ecological Areas in the seven county metropolitan area. Individual forest, grassland and...

  18. Epigenetics in schizophrenia: a pilot study of global DNA methylation in different brain regions associated with higher cognitive functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Alelú-Paz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to discover genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders have been frustrating and often fruitless. Concern is building about the need to understand the complex ways in which nature and nurture interact to produce mental illness. We analyze the epigenome in several brain regions from schizophrenic patients with severe cognitive impairment using high-resolution (450k DNA methylation array. We identified 159 differentially methylated CpG sites included in known and novel candidate genes sequences as well as in and intergenic sequences wich functions remain unknown. We found that altered DNA methylation is not restricted to a particular region, but includes others such as CpG shelves and gene bodies, indicating the presence of different DNA methylation signatures depending on the brain area analyzed. Our findings suggest that epimutations are not relatables between different tissues or even between tissues’ regions, highlighting the need to adqueately study brain samples to obtain reliable data concerning the epigenetics of schizophrenia.

  19. Variability among the most rapidly evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific: implications of pairwise genome comparisons in Pyrus (Rosaceae and other angiosperms for marker choice.

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    Nadja Korotkova

    Full Text Available Plastid genomes exhibit different levels of variability in their sequences, depending on the respective kinds of genomic regions. Genes are usually more conserved while noncoding introns and spacers evolve at a faster pace. While a set of about thirty maximum variable noncoding genomic regions has been suggested to provide universally promising phylogenetic markers throughout angiosperms, applications often require several regions to be sequenced for many individuals. Our project aims to illuminate evolutionary relationships and species-limits in the genus Pyrus (Rosaceae-a typical case with very low genetic distances between taxa. In this study, we have sequenced the plastid genome of Pyrus spinosa and aligned it to the already available P. pyrifolia sequence. The overall p-distance of the two Pyrus genomes was 0.00145. The intergenic spacers between ndhC-trnV, trnR-atpA, ndhF-rpl32, psbM-trnD, and trnQ-rps16 were the most variable regions, also comprising the highest total numbers of substitutions, indels and inversions (potentially informative characters. Our comparative analysis of further plastid genome pairs with similar low p-distances from Oenothera (representing another rosid, Olea (asterids and Cymbidium (monocots showed in each case a different ranking of genomic regions in terms of variability and potentially informative characters. Only two intergenic spacers (ndhF-rpl32 and trnK-rps16 were consistently found among the 30 top-ranked regions. We have mapped the occurrence of substitutions and microstructural mutations in the four genome pairs. High AT content in specific sequence elements seems to foster frequent mutations. We conclude that the variability among the fastest evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific and thus cannot be precisely predicted across angiosperms. The often lineage-specific occurrence of stem-loop elements in the sequences of introns and spacers also governs lineage-specific mutations. Sequencing

  20. The Regional Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2013-01-01

    is largely dependent on regional media systems, yet the role this regional dimension plays has been largely overlooked. This article presents a comparative study of climate-change coverage in three geo-cultural regions, The Middle East, Scandinavia, and North America, and explores the link between global...... climate-change communication and regional media systems. It finds that regional variations in climate-change communication carry important communicative implications concerning perceptions of climate change's relevance and urgency...

  1. EVALUATING FUNCTIONAL REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Drobne

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we suggest an approach to evaluate the number and composition of functional regions. Suggested approach is based on basic characteristics of functional regions, that are (1 more intensive intra-regional than the inter-regional interactions and (2 internal social and economic heterogeneity. Those characteristics are measured by factors estimated in spatial interaction model. The approach to evaluate functional regions was applied to Slovenia for three time periods.

  2. Accurate prediction of a minimal region around a genetic association signal that contains the causal variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochdanovits, Zoltán; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Jonker, Marianne; Hoogendijk, Witte J; van der Vaart, Aad; Heutink, Peter

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies have been very successful in identifying loci for complex traits. However, typically these findings involve noncoding and/or intergenic SNPs without a clear functional effect that do not directly point to a gene. Hence, the challenge is to identify the causal variant responsible for the association signal. Typically, the first step is to identify all genetic variation in the locus region, usually by resequencing a large number of case chromosomes. Among all variants, the causal one needs to be identified in further functional studies. Because the experimental follow up can be very laborious, restricting the number of variants to be scrutinized can yield a great advantage. An objective method for choosing the size of the region to be followed up would be highly valuable. Here, we propose a simple method to call the minimal region around a significant association peak that is very likely to contain the causal variant. We model linkage disequilibrium (LD) in cases from the observed single SNP association signals, and predict the location of the causal variant by quantifying how well this relationship fits the data. Simulations showed that our approach identifies genomic regions of on average ∼50 kb with up to 90% probability to contain the causal variant. We apply our method to two genome-wide association data sets and localize both the functional variant REP1 in the α-synuclein gene that conveys susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and the APOE gene responsible for the association signal in the Alzheimer's disease data set.

  3. Regional Alternative Transportation Evaluation, Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Region 6 (Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming) RATE found that visitors to many stations enjoy activities that...

  4. Region 9 RTOC Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) Charter as amended 11/13/2014: Mission, Goals, Scope, Structure & Membership, Meetings, Administration, Charter Amendment/Review, and Current Working Draft.

  5. CONCEPTS OF REGIONALIZATION, REGIONAL SUBSYSTEMS, REGIONAL COMPLEXES AND REGIONAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN CONTEMPORARY IR

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    Alexei D. Voskressenski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The article examines theoretical aspects of regional dimension in international relations and the ways to apply in practice the results of world politics’ analysis from the viewpoint of regional and macro-regional levels. It also considers the key discussion points on regions and macro-regions in the world and Russian research literature. The author concludes that this is exactly the new IR concepts of regional level which should become the prototype of original Russian regional and country studies. These studies need to have a higher degree of theoretical conceptualization of regional level as their basis. Such an approach will enable the researchers to draw deep and unconventional conclusions of practical use especially as far as the non-Western parts of the world which are traditionally less examined by Western researchers, theorists and practitioners are concerned.

  6. Drycleaner Database - Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Drycleaner Database (R7DryClnDB) which tracks all Region7 drycleaners who notify...

  7. Intergenic and intragenic conjugal transfer of multiple antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... resistant gene among bacteria in the surface water of Bangladesh. Our observation ... resistant bacteria, scientists are trying to realize how so many different ..... genetic changes in transconjugant associated with the tetracycline ... The prospect of using GEMs in environmental manage- ment raises the issue ...

  8. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of intergenic spacers and small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    2016-11-23

    Nov 23, 2016 ... 24˚28'49.88N/86˚42'0.00E/249.8. 5.10±0.20 3.20±0.01. 2 .... agarose gel were eluted using the QIA quick gel extraction kit. (Qiagen, Hilden ... Genomic DNA from the two microsporidian isolates was amplified with primers ... DNA from transformed Escherichia coli cells, the plasmids were digested with.

  9. Long intergenic noncoding RNAs: novel drivers of human lymphocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria ePanzeri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of a foreign antigen, CD4+ naïve T lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into subsets with distinct functions. This process is fundamental for the proper immune system function, as CD4+ T cells orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune response. Traditionally, this differentiation event has been regarded as the acquisition of an irreversible cell fate so that memory and effector CD4+ T subsets were considered terminally differentiated cells or lineages. Consequently, these lineages are conventionally defined thanks to their prototypical set of cytokines and transcription factors. However, recent findings suggest that CD4+ T lymphocytes possess a remarkable phenotypic plasticity, as they can often redirect their functional program depending on the milieu they encounter. Therefore new questions are now compelling such as which are the molecular determinants underlying plasticity and stability and how the balance between these two opposite forces drives the cell fate. As already mentioned, in some cases the mere expression of cytokines and master regulators could not fully explain lymphocytes plasticity. We should consider other layers of regulation, including epigenetic factors such as the modulation of chromatin state or the transcription of noncoding RNAs, whose high cell-specificity give a hint on their involvement in cell fate determination. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in understanding CD4+ T lymphocytes subsets specification from an epigenetic point of view. In particular, we will emphasize the emerging importance of noncoding RNAs as key players in these differentiation events. We will also present here new data from our laboratory highlighting the contribution of long noncoding RNAs in driving human CD4+ T lymphocytes differentiation.

  10. HRM: HII Region Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Kepley, Amanda K.; Balser, Dana S.

    2017-07-01

    HII Region Models fits HII region models to observed radio recombination line and radio continuum data. The algorithm includes the calculations of departure coefficients to correct for non-LTE effects. HII Region Models has been used to model star formation in the nucleus of IC 342.

  11. Redefining Regional Economic Layout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2010-01-01

    @@ In 2009, the Chinese government approved planning for 9 regional development zones, including plans for the Taiwan Strait West Bank Economic Zone, the Guanzhong-Tianshui Economic Zone, the Jiangsu Coastal Region, the Tumen River Region and Yellow River High-efficient Ecological Economic Zone, among others.

  12. Redefining Regional Economic Layout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2011-01-01

    @@ In 2009, the Chinese government approved planning for 9 regional development zones, including plans for the Taiwan Strait West Bank Economic Zone, the Guanzhong-Tianshui Economic Zone, the Jiangsu Coastal Region, the Tumen River Region and Yellow River High-efficient Ecological Economic Zone, among others.

  13. Balancing Regional Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN XINZHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ An early version of a regional economic plan for the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region is under scrutiny by the State Council,China's cabinet.The draft,which could be passed and implemented by May,will focus on the energy,tourism,iron and steel,new agriculture and recycling economy sectors in the autonomous region.

  14. Genetic diversity of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from pea (Pisum sativum) in subtropical regions of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Diversity of 42 isolates from effective nodules of Pisum sativum in different geographical regions of China were studied using 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns, 16S rRNA sequencing, 16S–23S rRNA inter-genic spacer (IGS) region RFLP patterns and G-C rich random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The isolates were distributed in two groups on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns group I were very closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370. Group II consisting of WzP3 and WzP15 was closely related to Rhizobium etli CFN42. The analysis of the 16S–23S IGS RFLP pat-terns divided the isolates into 18 genotypes and four groups. Group I was clustered with R. legumino-sarum USDA2370. Group II consisted of YcP2, YcP3 and CqP7. The strains of group III were distributed abroad. Group IV consisted of WzP3, WzP15 and R. etli CFN42. RAPD divided the isolates into nine clusters in which group IV only consisted of YcP2 and the strains of group V and IX were from Wenzhou and Xiantao, respectively. This assay demonstrated the geographical effect on genetic diversity of pea rhizobia.

  15. Genetic diversity of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from pea (Pisum sativum) in subtropical regions of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG ChengYun; YANG JiangKe; LI YouGuo; ZHOU JunOhu

    2008-01-01

    Diversity of 42 isolates from effective nodules of Pisum sativum in different geographical regions of China were studied using 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns, 16S rRNA sequencing, 16S-23S rRNA inter-genic spacer (IGS) region RFLP patterns and G-C rich random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The isolates were distributed in two groups on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns group Ⅰ were very closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370. Group Ⅱ consisting of WzP3 and WzP15 was closely related to Rhizobium etli CFN42. The analysis of the 16S-23S IGS RFLP pat-terns divided the isolates into 18 genotypes and four groups. Group Ⅰ was clustered with R. legumino-sarum USDA2370. Group Ⅱ consisted of YcP2, YcP3 and CqP7. The strains of group Ⅲ were distributed abroad. Group Ⅳ consisted of WzP3, WzP15 and R. etli CFN42. RAPD divided the isolates into nine clusters in which group Ⅳ only consisted of YcP2 and the strains of group Ⅴ and Ⅸ were from Wenzhou and Xiantao, respectively. This assay demonstrated the geographical effect on genetic diversity of pea rhizobia.

  16. Non-coding genomic regions possessing enhancer and silencer potential are associated with healthy aging and exceptional survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangkyu; Welsh, David A; Myers, Leann; Cherry, Katie E; Wyckoff, Jennifer; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2015-02-28

    We have completed a genome-wide linkage scan for healthy aging using data collected from a family study, followed by fine-mapping by association in a separate population, the first such attempt reported. The family cohort consisted of parents of age 90 or above and their children ranging in age from 50 to 80. As a quantitative measure of healthy aging, we used a frailty index, called FI34, based on 34 health and function variables. The linkage scan found a single significant linkage peak on chromosome 12. Using an independent cohort of unrelated nonagenarians, we carried out a fine-scale association mapping of the region suggestive of linkage and identified three sites associated with healthy aging. These healthy-aging sites (HASs) are located in intergenic regions at 12q13-14. HAS-1 has been previously associated with multiple diseases, and an enhancer was recently mapped and experimentally validated within the site. HAS-2 is a previously uncharacterized site possessing genomic features suggestive of enhancer activity. HAS-3 contains features associated with Polycomb repression. The HASs also contain variants associated with exceptional longevity, based on a separate analysis. Our results provide insight into functional genomic networks involving non-coding regulatory elements that are involved in healthy aging and longevity.

  17. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Ixodes cf. neuquenensis and Ixodes sigelos ticks from the Patagonian region of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Patrick S; Bottero, Maria Noelia Saracho; Carvalho, Luis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Lareschi, Marcela; Venzal, José M; Nava, Santiago

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to detect Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection in ixodid ticks from the Patagonia region in the south of Argentina. Therefore, ticks were collected on rodents in the provinces of Chubut, Río Negro and Santa Cruz. These ticks were identified as nymphs of Ixodes cf. neuquenensis and Ixodes sigelos. The B. burgdorferi s.l. infection was tested by a battery of PCR methods targeting the gene flagellin (fla) and the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region (IGS). Three pools of I. sigelos nymphs from Chubut and Santa Cruz provinces as well as one pool of I. cf. neuquenensis nymphs from Río Negro province were tested positive in the fla-PCR. The samples of I. sigelos were also positive for the IGS-PCR. Phylogenetically, the haplotypes found in the positive ticks belong to the B. burgdorferi s.l. complex, and they were closely related to Borrelia chilensis, a genospecies isolated from Ixodes stilesi in Chile. The pathogenic relevance of the Borrelia genospecies detected in both I. neuquenensis and I. sigelos is unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential shuffling of native genetic diversity across introduced regions in a brown alga: aquaculture vs. maritime traffic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Marie; Engel, Carolyn R; Viard, Frédérique

    2005-04-12

    Worldwide marine invaders, such as the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida, offer challenging models for unraveling the apparent paradox of sustainable settlement of exotic species over a large spectrum of environments. Two intergenic noncoding mitochondrial loci were found to be highly informative at the within-species level. Twenty-five haplotypes were found over the whole dataset (333 base pairs, 524 individuals, and 24 populations). The native range showed striking population genetic structure stemming from low diversity within and high differentiation among populations, a pattern not observed in the introduced range of this seaweed. Contrary to classical expectations of founding effects associated with accidental introduction of exotic species, most of the introduced populations showed high genetic diversity. At the regional scale, genetic diversity and sequence divergence showed contrasting patterns in the two main areas of introduction (Europe and Australasia), suggesting different processes of introduction in the two regions. Gene genealogy analyses point to aquaculture as a major vector of introduction and spread in Europe but implicate maritime traffic in promoting recurrent migration events from the native range to Australasia. The multiplicity of processes and genetic signatures associated with the successful invasion confirms that multiple facets of global change, e.g., aquaculture practices, alteration of habitats, and increased traffic, act in synergy at the worldwide level, facilitating successful pandemic introductions.

  19. Local, Regional or Global?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler Asmussen, Christian

    This paper proposes a multidimensional index of regional and global orientation which can be used in confirmatory studies with econometric methodologies. Unlike extant measures, the index is objectively scaled and controls for home country orientation and market size differences. The index is shown...... in fact reflects strong home country biases.Keywords: globalization; regional integration; global strategy; regional strategy; local strategy; triad; liability of foreignness...... to be consistent with models of internationalization that incorporate different assumptions about strategic choice and global competition. Preliminary results show that large multinationals follow home region oriented internationalization paths, although much of the regional effect reported by previous studies...

  20. Molecular phylogeny of several common Gracilaria species in-ferred from 18S rRNA, cox2-3 intergenic spacer and RUBISCO spacer sequence comparisons%几种江蓠属海藻3个分子序列的系统学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵小波; 逄少军; 刘峰

    2013-01-01

      分析了我国沿海几种常见的江蓠属(Gracilaria)海藻的18S rRNA 基因、cox2-3间隔区以及RUBISCO间隔区的分子序列,并结合GenBank现有的相关数据进行了分子系统学关系分析,为江蓠属的系统进化和分类地位提供了新的佐证。结果表明,基于cox2-3间隔区、以及 RUBISCO间隔区序列构建的MP (Maximum parsimony)进化树较为相似,而与基于18S rRNA构建的进化树略有不同。这主要是由于18S rRNA更为保守的原因;扁江蓠与脆江蓠在3个系统树中均聚合成支,显示了它们之间具有较近的亲缘关系;龙须菜与江蓠属海藻具有较远的遗传距离,在3个进化树中,龙须菜也均位于进化树的基部,单独成支,证实龙须菜并不隶属于江蓠属,且分化相对较早。%Sequences of three molecular markers (18S rRNA, cox2-3 intergenic spacer and RUBISCO spacer), in combination with data from GenBank, were used to analyze the phylogentic relations of Gracilaria species col-lected from the coast of China. Phylogenetic trees that were constructed using cox2-3 and RUBISCO spacer se-quences exhibited the same pattern but differed slightly from that of the 18S rRNA-based phylogenetic tree due to a higher degree of conservation of the latter. Gracilaria textorii was sister to G. chouae in all three trees showing the close relationship between the two species. The results further confirm that the Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis does not belong to the genus Gracilaria. Results also indicate an earlier evolution status of G.lemaneiformis based on these three sequence comparisons.

  1. Evolving Regional Security in the Andean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-19

    security forces or judicial systems reduces the effectiveness of regional cooperation. Past efforts to achieve consensus among the Andean states have...Trimestre 2001. Nuñez, Joseph. Una Arquitectura para la Seguridad del Siglo XXI par alas Américas: Cooperación Multilateral, Paz y Poder Flexible

  2. Critical Environmental Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR SOROCOVSCHI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A short etymological interpretation of the notion of regions (Rette Lineatte, etc.. The region is: R= f (S+P, where S is space and P is power. There follows an evaluation of the characteristics of the region and the presentation of different approaches to the region. From the classic ideas (von Humboldt, 1885, Dokuceaev, 1899, Herbertson, 1905, and others we get to a wide interpretative array of what we accept as organizational spatial units of geographical reality. The environmental region has important connotations with regard to the system as a surrounded element (man, society and the adjacent system. Critical environmental regions are areas where there already exists interactive degradation. The critical character may be physical, hence the “geocritical regions” or the result of human impact, hence the “anthropocritical regions.” Critical situations are differentiated at the local, regional, and global level. In order to understand critical regional situations we must refer to the following characteristics: fragility, resilience, and vulnerability. Still there are few environmental studies on critical regions and work must be done in this field.

  3. Robotics and regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mohamad; Giacalone, Marilu; Hemmerling, Thomas M

    2014-10-01

    Robots in regional anesthesia are used as a tool to automate the performance of regional techniques reducing the anesthesiologist's workload and improving patient care. The purpose of this review is to show the latest findings in robotic regional anesthesia. The literature separates robots in anesthesia into two groups: pharmacological robots and manual robots. Pharmacological robots are mainly closed-loop systems that help in the titration of anesthetic drugs to patients undergoing surgery. Manual robots are mechanical robots that are used to support or replace the manual gestures performed by anesthesiologists. Although in the last decade researchers have focused on the development of decision support systems and closed-loop systems, more recent evidence supports the concept that robots can also be useful in performing regional anesthesia techniques. Robots can improve the performance and safety in regional anesthesia. In this review, we present the developments made in robotic and automated regional anesthesia, and discuss the current state of research in this field.

  4. Urban and regional planning

    OpenAIRE

    Pinson, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Urban and regional planning is a notion that encompasses the whole set of social activities aimed at anticipating, representing and regulating the development of an urban or a regional area. It thus articulates intellectual activities of study and prospective, of social and economic forecasting with more concrete activities such as infrastructure programming, land reservation and land use regulation. Planning operates at different scales: neighborhood, city or region. The concept of governanc...

  5. Entrepreneurship and regional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine

    This literature review examines how entrepreneurship and regional development has been previously addressed theoretically and empirically. Regional Science and Entrepreneurship are two fields with their own distinct literature's. The question is therefore, how do these two fields talk about...... the respective other? What are the commonalities and differences? The purpose of this article is to create an analytical synthesis by combining the insights of the two literature's in order to gain a fuller understanding of the relation between entrepreneurship and regional development....

  6. Connecting to Regional Markets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coulibaly, Souleymane; Thomsen, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Central Asian food processors face a number of constraints when they attempt to export to the region and beyond. The Central Asian economies in focus here are landlocked, and thus lack easy access to sea transport. In addition, the region's transport network was built to reinforce the interdepend......, and makes a novel attempt to examine how these factors lead to challenges for local food processing producers trying to sell their products in the region and beyond....

  7. Regions in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Čokert

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The reasons behind the need to prepare a law on regions are both internal and external in nature. We need regions as a second level of local government primarily to counter internal development problems and the need for decentralisation in Slovenia. Developmentaly stagnant and depressed areas account for more than 70% of Slovene territory. The share of founds earmarked directly from central government for regional promotion is falling and is lower than the average in European Union countries. Analyses of population and employment, and of the economic, infrastructure and educational capacities of the Slovene regions reveal serious regional differences. The reasons for the establishment of regions in Slovenia also lie in the diversity of regional problems, which are different in Zasavje, Pomurje, Gorenjska or Primorska. Any restriction to an administrative territorial division would blur the special regional features which, even by Europe-wide comparision, are characteristic of Slovenia. And we cannot simplify the tackling of urgent regional problems as being a matter for relations between the central government and a large number of very diverse municipalities.

  8. Border region studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Williams, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The contemporary conditions of academic capitalism exert pressures on researchers to avoid ‘peripheral’ journals and ‘unfashionable’ topics. Here an attempt is made to shed light onto the structure of one such ‘offbeat’ field, namely ‘border region studies’, by discussing its geographical...... distribution, key themes, significance and impact. The review suggests that border region studies can be considered a significant and important ‘branch’ of regional studies, which accounts for a small but increasing proportion of regional studies research particularly in Europe and North America. Four main...

  9. Regional Redistribution and Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manasse, Paolo; Schultz, Christian

    We study a model with free migration between a rich and a poor region. Since there is congestion, the rich region has an incentive to give the poor region a transfer in order to reduce immigration. Faced with free migration, the rich region voluntarily chooses a transfer, which turns out...... to be equal to that a social planner would choose. Provided migration occurs in equilibrium, this conclusion holds even in the presence of moderate mobility costs. However, large migration costs will lead to suboptimal transfers in the market solution...

  10. Regional Redistribution and Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manasse, Paolo; Schultz, Christian

    We study a model with free migration between a rich and a poor region. Since there is congestion, the rich region has an incentive to give the poor region a transfer in order to reduce immigration. Faced with free migration, the rich region voluntarily chooses a transfer, which turns out...... to be equal to that a social planner would choose. Provided migration occurs in equilibrium, this conclusion holds even in the presence of moderate mobility costs. However, large migration costs will lead to suboptimal transfers in the market solution...

  11. European Regional Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Brian Canizaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, beginning with the publication in 2003 of Liane Lefaivre and Alexander Tzonis’ 'Critical Regionalism', followed by my 'Architectural Regionalism: Collected Writings on Place, Identity, Modernity and Tradition 'in 2007, there has been a quiet resurgence in the discourse of architectural regionalism.' 'Leuven University Press’s 'Regionalism and Modernity: Architecture in Western Europe 1914–1940 'continues in this direction, with eleven chapters devoted to variations of the regionalist tendency in European architecture focused primarily on Belgium and France, but also Great Britain, Italy, and Germany.

  12. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  13. Regional Size, Wealth and EU Regional Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Pavía

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los fondos de convergencia tienen como objetivo estimular el crecimiento de las regiones menos desarrolladas dentro de la Unión Europea. Para que una región pueda ser elegida debe ser catalogada como NUTS-2. Sin embargo, como es bien conocido, el valor que toma cualquier variable no es independiente de la escala espacial (y temporal utilizada. El objetivo de este artículo es mostrar la gran sensibilidad que muestra el criterio utilizado en la UE para seleccionar regiones de convergencia y evaluar el impacto que tendría en la distribución del presupuesto entre los diferentes países la utilización de una división territorial diferente.

  14. macro-regional, local y micro- regional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guadalupe Vargas Hernández

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone analizar las implicaciones del desarrollo en los niveles macro-regional, local y micro- regional, a partir de la hipótesis central de la teoría del desarrollo que plantea que el desarrollo económico traerá consigo el desarrollo político y social. Después de hacer de un acercamiento conceptual al desarrollo, se repasan brevemente las teorías del desarrollo existentes como herramientas de análisis de la realidad. En la discusión se concluye que los procesos de desarrollo locales y regionales requieren de una transformación sustancial de las relaciones negociadas entre los agentes económicos y los actores políticos. Ante el paulatino retroceso que en las sociedades contemporáneas está teniendo el Estado de bienestar, uno de los principales retos es el empoderamiento de las organizaciones sociales y comunitarias para que desempeñen activamente su rol en los procesos de desarrollo local y regional.

  15. Tourism of Khmelnytskyi region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Інна Шоробура

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The peculiarities of tourism in Khmelnytskyi region, its priority areas, types, including cultural-educational, environmental, sportrecreative and others have been revealed in the article. The basic tasks of tourism development in the region, aimed at the formation and protection of the tourism-recreational sector, market of competitive services, attraction of maximum number of tourists to the region, etc. have been cleared out. The attention is focused on the main tourist potential of Khmelnytskyi region, including National Nature Park «Podilski Tovtry», National historical-cultural nature reserve «Kamianets», «Samchyky», Medzhybizh regional historical-ethnographic museum-fortress, sanatorium-resort facilities based on mineral waters and others. The attention is paid to the increase in income from tourism. Traditional hospitality of the population of the region, especially in rural areas, provides the possibility to combine tourists’ accommodation with the study of rural customs and traditions directly in the villages. Tourism in Khmelnytskyi region will be attractive to all tourists who want to eat healthy food, to stay outdoors and enjoy the beauty of the region. Also the article tells us about the development of other directions and familiarizes tourists with other enticements of Khmelnytskyi region using the positive brand of Kamianets-Podilskyi. All three potential areas of tourism development (historical tourism in Kamianets-Podilskyi, recreational tourism on rivers, lakes and in the forests, as well as rural tourism can be combined within the global promotion of nature and traditions of the region. It is indicated that Khmelnytskyi is a promising tourist region of Ukraine. The main problems of the region are inadequate tourism infrastructure, accommodation facilities, food and roads. The experience of the tourism cluster «Oberih» (Protective Charm proves the perspectives of agritourism. Developing these two areas together, we

  16. Biogeography of Deep-sea benthic bacteria at regional scale (LTER HAUSGARTEN, Fram Strait, Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Jacob

    Full Text Available Knowledge on spatial scales of the distribution of deep-sea life is still sparse, but highly relevant to the understanding of dispersal, habitat ranges and ecological processes. We examined regional spatial distribution patterns of the benthic bacterial community and covarying environmental parameters such as water depth, biomass and energy availability at the Arctic Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER site HAUSGARTEN (Eastern Fram Strait. Samples from 13 stations were retrieved from a bathymetric (1,284-3,535 m water depth, 54 km in length and a latitudinal transect (∼ 2,500 m water depth; 123 km in length. 454 massively parallel tag sequencing (MPTS and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA were combined to describe both abundant and rare types shaping the bacterial community. This spatial sampling scheme allowed detection of up to 99% of the estimated richness on phylum and class levels. At the resolution of operational taxonomic units (97% sequence identity; OTU3% only 36% of the Chao1 estimated richness was recovered, indicating a high diversity, mostly due to rare types (62% of all OTU3%. Accordingly, a high turnover of the bacterial community was also observed between any two sampling stations (average replacement of 79% of OTU3%, yet no direct correlation with spatial distance was observed within the region. Bacterial community composition and structure differed significantly with increasing water depth along the bathymetric transect. The relative sequence abundance of Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes decreased significantly with water depth, and that of Deferribacteres increased. Energy availability, estimated from phytodetrital pigment concentrations in the sediments, partly explained the variation in community structure. Overall, this study indicates a high proportion of unique bacterial types on relatively small spatial scales (tens of kilometers, and supports the sampling design of the LTER site HAUSGARTEN to

  17. Regional utvikling og partnerskap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, H.; Gjertsen, A.

    2004-01-01

    in European matters as envisaged in the ?Europe of the Regions? slogan. The aim of this chapter is to examine the transformation of regional policy in Denmark from the perspective of political decentralization and Europeanization in order to establish to what extent recent changes have increased the capacity...

  18. Emergence of regional clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Østergaard, Christian Richter; Dalum, Bent

    2010-01-01

    The literature on regional clusters has increased considerably during the last decade. The emergence and growth patterns are usually explained by such factors as unique local culture, regional capabilities, tacit knowledge or the existence of location-specific externalities (knowledge spillovers,...

  19. toward star forming regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Jordan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se reportan observaciones de la línea J= 1 → 0 de 12CS en 20 regiones de formación estelar utilizando el telescopio Haystack de 37m del MIT. También se observaron tres regiones en la línea J= 1 → 0 de 13CS, y cinco regiones en la transición de 44 GHz de CH3OH (JK = 70 → 61 A+. Las emisiones de 13CS y CH3OH fueron detectadas en todas las regiones observadas, y la emisión de 12CS fue detectada en 19 de las 20 regiones, 11 de las cuales son nuevas detecciones. Se encontró una alta correlación entre el ancho de la línea de 12CS y la distancia a las regiones, lo que indica que la emisión de 12CS J= 1 → 0 podrá ser utilizada para estimar las distancias a regiones de formación estelar. Asimismo se reporta la detección de variabilidad de los máseres de CH3OH (44 GHz en la mayoría de las regiones observadas.

  20. Forest regions of Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. Arno

    1979-01-01

    In this paper, Montana is divided into eight geographic subdivisions called "forest regions," based on distributions of tree and undergrowth species and the relationship of these patterns to climate and topography. The regions serve as a geographic reference for describing patterns of forest vegetation across the State. Data on the distributions of plant...

  1. The Wealth of Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nistotskaya, Marina; Charron, Nicholas; Lapuente, Victor

    2015-01-01

    . Using original survey data on QoG from 172 regions in eighteen European Union countries, we find that regions where governments are perceived by their citizens as impartial and free from corruption have on average significantly more SMEs. We also find that in less corrupt countries the spatial...

  2. Regionalism, Devolution and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanor, Vernon

    1977-01-01

    Described are effects of political decentralization in the United Kingdom on political and social institutions, particularly education. The author concludes that regionalism could yield advantages of power decentralization, diversity of decision making, and educational systems which are more closely connected to regional and local traditions.…

  3. Politics, Planning and Regionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukosky, Jerome

    The concept of regionalism identifies the issues in public affairs pertaining to a region and develops structures through which citizens can participate in the decisionmaking process. This speech describes educational decisions in the State of New York as affected by local decentralization and by concentration of power at the State level. Relevant…

  4. Ad Hoc Rural Regionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamin, Elisabeth M.; Marcucci, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    A new regionalism has been much documented and researched for metropolitan areas; this article documents that there is a new rural regionalism as well. In the United States, these groups appear most likely to emerge in areas that are challenged by outcomes characterizing globalization's effects on the rural condition: namely, exurban or…

  5. The Scandinavian regional model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Lidström, Anders; Røiseland, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    This article maps how the sub-national regional levels of governance in Denmark, Norway and Sweden have changed from a high degree of institutional convergence to a pattern of institutional divergence. It analyses the similarities and differences in the changes in regional governance and discusses...

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the mantid shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda): Novel non-coding regions features and phylogenetic implications of the Stomatopoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2010-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda) was determined; a circular molecule of 15,783 bp in length. The gene content and arrangement are consistent with the pancrustacean ground pattern. The mt control region of O. oratoria is characterized by no GA-block near the 3' end and different position of [TA(A)]n-blocks compared with other reported Stomatopoda species. The sequence of the second hairpin structure is relative conserved which suggests this region may be a synapomorphic character for the Stomatopoda. In addition, a relative large intergenic spacer (101 bp) with higher A+T content than that in control region was identified between the tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the current dataset of complete mt genomes strongly support the Stomatopoda is closely related to Euphausiacea. They in turn cluster with Penaeoidea and Caridea clades while other decapods form a separate group, which rejects the monophyly of Decapoda. This challenges the suitability of Stomatopoda as an outgroup of Decapoda in phylogenetic analyses. The basal position of Stomatopoda within Eumalacostraca according to the morphological characters is also questioned.

  7. Bridging regional innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2013-01-01

    The topics of regional innovation systems (RIS) and cross-border regions attract increasing attention, but few studies combine the themes. Further, the existing empirical studies of cross-border innovation and knowledge creation analyse one case at one point in time, thus, making it difficult...... to assess the progress of integration in the regions, as well as the effect of cross-border innovation policies. Consequently, important questions are left unanswered, including the central research question of this paper: does the sudden removal of significant physical barriers directly impacts...... collaboration activity in cross-border innovation systems? This paper examines regional integration in the Oresund Region over time. It deals with a specific part of the RIS, as it analyses research collaboration between actors from the Danish and Swedish sides, with a specific emphasis on the biotech industry...

  8. Crisis and Regional Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dosenrode, Søren

    ‘Crisis’ has been a word frequently heard of over the last couple of years, both in a global meaning (e.g. the environmental crisis, the financial crisis) and also in a more regional or national meaning, many times related to Africa (Horn of Africa, Ivory Coast, DR Congo, Zimbabwe, Ivory Coast...... at the processes of regional integration in relation to ‘crisis’ in Africa and Europe. First, this paper will look at the concept of ‘crisis’, before it moves on to discuss ‘regional integration’ and the correlation between the two, emphasizing the approaches of neo-functionalism and federal theory...

  9. Constructing Regional advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asheim, Bjørn T.; Boschma, Ron; Cooke, Phil

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a regional innovation policy model based on the idea of constructing regional advantage. This policy model brings together concepts like related variety, knowledge bases and policy platforms. Related variety attaches importance to knowledge spillovers across complementary...... economic development within and between regions in action lines appropriate to incorporate the basic principles behind related variety and differentiated knowledge bases....... sectors. The paper categorizes knowledge into ‘analytical’ (science based), ‘synthetic’ (engineering based) and ‘symbolic’ (arts based) in nature, with different requirements of ‘virtual’ and real proximity mixes. The implications of this are traced for evolving ‘platform policies’ that facilitate...

  10. Connecting to Regional Markets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coulibaly, Souleymane; Thomsen, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Central Asian food processors face a number of constraints when they attempt to export to the region and beyond. The Central Asian economies in focus here are landlocked, and thus lack easy access to sea transport. In addition, the region's transport network was built to reinforce...... the interdependence of the then Soviet republics, while conflicting economic interests make cross-border cooperation difficult. Based on extensive fieldwork on infrastructure systems and firm export strategies, this paper identifies contemporary infrastructure and transportation issues within the Central Asian region...

  11. Regional ocean data assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher A; Moore, Andrew M; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Cornuelle, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  12. Regional Ocean Data Assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Edwards, Christopher A.

    2015-01-03

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  13. First record of Borrelia burgdorferi B31 strain in Dermacentor nitens ticks in the northern region of Parana (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Dib Gonçalves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of DNA of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l. in ticks that feed on horses used for animal traction in rural Jataizinho, Parana, Brazil. Between February and June 2008, a total of 224 ticks was collected of which 75% were identified as Dermacentor nitens and 25% as Amblyomma cajenense. To amplify B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA, the intergenic space region (ISR between the 5S (rrf 23S (rrl rRNA genes was used as targets for nested-PCR. Two ticks of the D. nitens species were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. Both species showed a fragment of 184 bp, but the sequencing revealed 99.9% homology with the B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s. strain B31. These results showed, for the first time, the presence of spirochete DNA infecting ticks that parasitize horses used for animal traction, in the rural municipality mentioned. In conclusion, this study opens up promising prospects for determining the infection rate of B. burgdorferi s.s. genospecies or other species in the equine population, as well as the impact of the infection rate on Lyme disease in the state of Parana.

  14. Chloroplast DNA variation and phylogeography of Ligularia tongolensis (Asteraceae), a species endemic to the Hengduan Mountains region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Feng WANG; Yue-Zhi PAN; Xun GONG; Yu-Chung CHIANG; Chiaki KURODA

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we aimed to study the genetic variation and phylogeographic pattern of Ligularia tongolensis, a perennial herb endemic to the Hengduan Mountains region of China. We sequenced two chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) intergenic spacers (trnQ-5'rps 16, trnL-rpl32) in 140 individuals from 14 populations of three groups (Jinshajiang vs. Yalongjiang vs. Wumeng) within this species range. High levels of haplotype diversity (Hd= 0.814)and total genetic diversity (Ht = 0.862) were detected at the species level, based on a total of 12 haplotypes identified.Low levels of intrapopulation diversity (Hs = 0.349), high levels of genetic divergence (Gst = 0.595, Nst = 0.614,Fst = 0.597), and the absence of isolation by distance tests were also found in L. tongolensis. Furthermore, H2 and H5, the dominant haplotypes that located at internal nodes and deviated from extinct ancestral haplotype in the network, were found to be shared between Jinshajiang and Yalongjiang groups. These results indicate that past fragmentation may be the important factor responsible for the present phylogeographical pattern of L. tongolensis.Meanwhile, the locations occupied by each group might have served as independent refugia for L. tongolensis during the Quaternary glaciation. Unimodal mismatch distribution and star-like genealogies indicated this species underwent past demographic expansion events, with expansion ages of 274 ka BP.

  15. Sequence-level analysis of the diploidization process in the triplicated FLOWERING LOCUS C region of Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jung Sun; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Lim, Ki-Byung; Choi, Beom-Soon; Kim, Jin-A; Jin, Mina; Park, Jee Young; Lim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ho-Il; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kang, Jason Jongho; Hong, Jin-Han; Kim, Chang-Bae; Bhak, Jong; Bancroft, Ian; Park, Beom-Seok

    2006-06-01

    Strong evidence exists for polyploidy having occurred during the evolution of the tribe Brassiceae. We show evidence for the dynamic and ongoing diploidization process by comparative analysis of the sequences of four paralogous Brassica rapa BAC clones and the homologous 124-kb segment of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5. We estimated the times since divergence of the paralogous and homologous lineages. The three paralogous subgenomes of B. rapa triplicated 13 to 17 million years ago (MYA), very soon after the Arabidopsis and Brassica divergence occurred at 17 to 18 MYA. In addition, a pair of BACs represents a more recent segmental duplication, which occurred approximately 0.8 MYA, and provides an exception to the general expectation of three paralogous segments within the B. rapa genome. The Brassica genome segments show extensive interspersed gene loss relative to the inferred structure of the ancestral genome, whereas the Arabidopsis genome segment appears little changed. Representatives of all 32 genes in the Arabidopsis genome segment are represented in Brassica, but the hexaploid complement of 96 has been reduced to 54 in the three subgenomes, with compression of the genomic region lengths they occupy to between 52 and 110 kb. The gene content of the recently duplicated B. rapa genome segments is identical, but intergenic sequences differ.

  16. Spearheading Regional Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Shortly after the ASEAN Regional Forum in Kuala Lumpur, Thai Ambassador and rotating Chairman of the ASEAN Beijing Committee, Jullapong Nonsrichai, answered questions from Beijing Review reporter Yan Wei on ASEAN's role and the China-ASEAN relationship.

  17. Regional Air Quality Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on regional air quality, including trace level SO2, nitric acid, ozone, carbon monoxide, and NOy; and particulate sulfate, nitrate, and...

  18. Regional Snowfall Index (RSI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Climatic Data Center is now producing the Regional Snowfall Index (RSI) for significant snowstorms that impact the eastern two thirds of the U.S. The...

  19. From corridor to region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne; Jespersen, Per Homann

    2006-01-01

    The corridor between Oslo and Berlin is by the politicians of the regional authorities in the Scandinavian part of the corridor seen a region with unique qualities and a large innovation and growth potential. In order to explore and develop this potential an In-terreg project has been launched. E...... this task by applying principles of participative planning and with action research methodology are involving stakeholders in the process of defining, developing and disseminating the idea of the Corridor of Innovation and Cooperation - COINCO.......The corridor between Oslo and Berlin is by the politicians of the regional authorities in the Scandinavian part of the corridor seen a region with unique qualities and a large innovation and growth potential. In order to explore and develop this potential an In-terreg project has been launched...

  20. Region 9 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada) with some reservation border areas of adjacent states included (adjacent areas...

  1. Vestnorden. A functional region?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grétar Þór Eyþórsson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the issue of what kind of a region Vestnorden is. The need for such a discussion arises from the challenges posed by globalisation for the idea and construction of the West Nordic space, and the need to observe how this regional unit counters these processes. The article is based on an analytical framework which presupposes that a functional region has to consist of four elements. First, whether the space has its own institutions for decision making; second, how far there is economic complementarities among the involved nations and territories; third, to what degree they have common economic interests; and finally, to what extent social, cultural and historical ties exist between the territories involved. The article argues that there is an urgent need to discuss and reorient the institutional functionality of Vestnorden as a regional unit.

  2. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  3. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  4. Regional Entrepreneurial Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ DANIEL LORENZO GÓMEZ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship between regional development and the creation of new companies from a micro perspective of institutional approach, focusing on the most relevant stakeholders involved in the process. The contribution of entrepreneurs to regional economic growth has been subject of special attention by the authorities, what is needed for a system of references to assess the adequacy of public programs for the promotion of entrepreneurial activity. Based on the concept of Balanced Scorecard, which provides a logical structure that relates and integrates and allows indicators refl ect the interests of stakeholders in shaping the Balanced Scorecard, the authors propose a Regional Entrepreneurship Scorecard (RES, as a tool for monitoring policies and programmes aimed at promoting start-ups. This RES uses information from international GEM project, which offers a vision of reality enterprising in different countries and regions.

  5. Aeromagnetic Regional Grid Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several regions are represented in this unique collection of earth surface measurements of magnetic field parameters and their related anomalies. The DNAG Magnetics...

  6. Regional monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, B.V.; Soldat, J.K.

    1957-08-26

    The purpose of the Regional Monitoring program is to conduct surveys to detect, measure, and to evaluate environmental radiation, particularly that of HAPO origin. Estimations of total environmental dose and HAPO's contribution to this dose, in units of fraction of public exposure limits, are calculated. Corollary functions include the use of Regional Monitoring data to establish and predict trends in environmental exposure components, and to facilitate correlation of environmental radioactivity with plant processes, process changes, and waste disposal practices.

  7. Regional anesthesia for pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Türk, Hacer Şebnem; Işıl, Canan Tülay; Açık, Mehmet Eren; Ediz, Naim; Sayın, Pınar; Tombul, Merih; Oba, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Relevancy to regional anesthesia in pediatrics has increased, because it is complementary to general anesthesia, allows conscious postoperative analgesia without respiratory depression, technical difficulties have been defeated and new local anesthetics have been improved. Therefore we reported data of patients who underwent pediatric surgery and received regional anesthesia.Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of all patients, who were operated in the pediatric ...

  8. On regional geomagnetic charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    When regional geomagnetic charts for areas roughly the size of the US were compiled by hand, some large local anomalies were displayed in the isomagnetic lines. Since the late 1960s, when the compilation of charts using computers and mathematical models was started, most of the details available in the hand drawn regional charts have been lost. One exception to this is the Canadian magnetic declination chart for 1980. This chart was constructed using a 180 degrees spherical harmonic model. -from Author

  9. Transient regional osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are uncommon and probably underdiagnosed bone diseases characterized by pain and functional limitation mainly affecting weight-bearing joints of the lower limbs. These conditions are usually self-limiting and symptoms tend to abate within a few months without sequelae. Routine laboratory investigations are unremarkable. Middle aged men and women during the last months of pregnancy or in the immediate post-partum period are principally affected. Osteopenia with preservation of articular space and transitory edema of the bone marrow provided by magnetic resonance imaging are common to these two conditions, so they are also known by the term regional transitory osteoporosis. The appearance of bone marrow edema is not specific to regional transitory osteoporosis but can be observed in several diseases, i.e. trauma, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, avascular osteonecrosis, infections, tumors from which it must be differentiated. The etiology of this condition is unknown. Pathogenesis is still debated in particular the relationship with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, with which regional transitory osteoporosis is often identified. The purpose of the present review is to remark on the relationship between transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis with particular attention to the bone marrow edema pattern and relative differential diagnosis.

  10. North American Regional Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    North America is an energy community fortunate to be endowed with a rich and varied resource base. It consumes about a third of the world's energy and produces about one quarter of world energy supply. North America depends on a mix of complementary energy sources that should remain competitive but not in conflict. The current supply mix varies between Canada, the United States and Mexico, but fossil fuels are dominant across the region, leaving the three member countries vulnerable to a myriad of risks associated with traditional supply sources. Energy trade between all three countries is also a major contributor to the region's economy. Thus, the impetus for collaboration across the region has grown out of the common goals of energy security and economic prosperity. The goal of the WEC regional group was to discuss avenues for advancing North American cooperation and coordination on a range of energy issues. An additional objective was to develop policy recommendations that will facilitate effective development and use of the region's energy resources. Results and recommendtaions are summarized from three forums that focused on the pertinent issues of energy trade, energy efficiency and energy diversification. The inaugural forum (Energy Trade) was held in Washington, D.C. in the fall of 2005. The following summer, the second forum (Energy Efficiency) took place in Mexico City. The third forum (Energy Diversification) was hosted in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

  11. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  12. Genotypic and symbiotic diversity of Rhizobium populations associated with cultivated lentil and pea in sub-humid and semi-arid regions of Eastern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riah, Nassira; Béna, Gilles; Djekoun, Abdelhamid; Heulin, Karine; de Lajudie, Philippe; Laguerre, Gisèle

    2014-07-01

    The genetic structure of rhizobia nodulating pea and lentil in Algeria, Northern Africa was determined. A total of 237 isolates were obtained from root nodules collected on lentil (Lens culinaris), proteaginous and forage pea (Pisum sativum) growing in two eco-climatic zones, sub-humid and semi-arid, in Eastern Algeria. They were characterised by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region (IGS), and the nodD-F symbiotic region. The combination of these haplotypes allowed the isolates to be clustered into 26 distinct genotypes, and all isolates were classified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. Symbiotic marker variation (nodD-F) was low but with the predominance of one nod haplotype (g), which had been recovered previously at a high frequency in Europe. Sequence analysis of the IGS further confirmed its high variability in the studied strains. An AMOVA analysis showed highly significant differentiation in the IGS haplotype distribution between populations from both eco-climatic zones. This differentiation was reflected by differences in dominant genotype frequencies. Conversely, no host plant effect was detected. The nodD gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that symbiotic gene diversity in pea and lentil nodulating rhizobial populations in Algeria was low compared to that reported elsewhere in the world.

  13. Analysis of gene order data supports vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin operon and genome rearrangements in the 5' flanking region in genus Mannheimia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    examined the gene order in the 5' flanking region of the leukotoxin operon and found that the 5' flanking gene strings, hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC, are peculiar to M. haemolytica + M. glucosida and M. granulomatis, respectively, whereas the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is present in M. ruminalis......, the supposed sister group of M. haemolytica + M. glucosida, and in the most ancient subclade M. varigena. In M. granulomatis, we found remnants of the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC in the xylB-lktC intergenic region. CONCLUSIONS: These observations indicate that the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is more ancient...... than the hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC gene strings. The presence of (remnants of) the ancient gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC among any subclades within genus Mannheimia supports that it has been vertically inherited from the last common ancestor of genus Mannheimia to any ancestor of the diverging...

  14. Regionalization Lessons from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Denmark is a small Northern European country with an extensive welfare state and a strong commitment to maintaining a universal healthcare system. Like the other countries in the Nordic region, Denmark has a long tradition of democratically governed local and regional governments with extensive...... and coordination. Regions and municipalities in Denmark are governed by directly elected democratic councils. The Danish case is thus an example of democratic decentralization, but within a framework of national coordination and fiscal control. In spite of the difference in size and historical traditions...... there are also many similarities between Canada and Denmark, particularly in terms of health and social policy goals and aspirations, and in terms of the commitment to a comprehensive, universal healthcare system. These similarities provide interesting opportunities for comparison....

  15. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine

    of entrepreneurship). This study sets out to obtain an in-depth understanding of the micro-, community-, and regional-level localized entrepreneurial processes as well as the way in which these processes are intertwined with the spatial context. The contribution of this dissertation lies in the illustration of how...... influenced by such interactions? In approaching these questions, this dissertation focuses on why entrepreneurs act (the causes of entrepreneurship, anchored in the context), how they act (the entrepreneurial practices, action, and activities), and what happens when they act (the outcomes and impact......, culture, history, and natural resources. The insights of this thesis are believed to be vital for understanding why certain types of local entrepreneurship prevail in certain regions. This can further our knowledge of how to foster and enable entrepreneurship in lagging regions. In addition, this study...

  16. From corridor to region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne; Jespersen, Per Homann

    2006-01-01

    The corridor between Oslo and Berlin is by the politicians of the regional authorities in the Scandinavian part of the corridor seen a region with unique qualities and a large innovation and growth potential. In order to explore and develop this potential an In-terreg project has been launched. E...... this task by applying principles of participative planning and with action research methodology are involving stakeholders in the process of defining, developing and disseminating the idea of the Corridor of Innovation and Cooperation - COINCO....

  17. Regional utvikling og partnerskap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, H.; Gjertsen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, Danish regional policy has changed dramatically. As of January 1991, all central government incentive schemes were terminated, and since then the main components of spatial economic policy have been a host of subnational initiatives and the European Structural...... of Danish regions to pursue their own agendas with regard to economic development, and explore the organizational strategies pursued by varies tiers of government in this process of rapid and profound policy change. The text is divided into three parts. The following section provides a brief outline...... to the possible role of the European and other tiers of government in the process....

  18. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  19. Constructing Regional advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asheim, Bjørn T.; Boschma, Ron; Cooke, Phil

    2011-01-01

    sectors. The paper categorizes knowledge into ‘analytical’ (science based), ‘synthetic’ (engineering based) and ‘symbolic’ (arts based) in nature, with different requirements of ‘virtual’ and real proximity mixes. The implications of this are traced for evolving ‘platform policies’ that facilitate......This paper presents a regional innovation policy model based on the idea of constructing regional advantage. This policy model brings together concepts like related variety, knowledge bases and policy platforms. Related variety attaches importance to knowledge spillovers across complementary...

  20. Regione “Test”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gasparini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In “Test” region 75% of women (aged 24-64 are screened regularly, meaning every 3 years. A cost-effectiveness analysis shows that, considering regional tariffs, the multiple cohort (12-year-old + 25-year-old women vaccination strategy with a 50% coverage, even if the coverage is much lower than 90%, could prevent 8 cases of cervicocarcinoma and 4 related deaths more than the vaccination of only 12-year-old girls, and thus proves to be cost-effective (8,721 €/QALY.

  1. REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaduva Maria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional development policies in the EU Member States have included tools whoseimportance varied from one country to another. Can be identified by negative incentives forregional development policy towards location in crowded areas or control over the location,the reallocation of economic activities in national territory, creation of adequateinfrastructure, measures to enhance development, financial incentives granted toenterprises. Sustainable business development, rehabilitation of social infrastructure,including social housing and improved social services. Improved regional and localtransportation are key areas of intervention rehabilitation and upgrading of county roads,city streets, including road construction and rehabilitation of belt.

  2. Genetic and antigenic analysis of Babesia bigemina isolates from five geographical regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madruga Claudio R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular epidemiological study was performed with Babesia bigemina isolates from five geographical regions of Brazil. The genetic analysis was done with random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD, repetitive extragenic palindromic elements-polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR that showed genetic polymorphism between these isolates and generated fingerprinting. In RAPD, ILO872 and ILO876 primers were able to detect at least one fingerprinting for each B. bigemina isolate. The amplification of B. bigemina DNA fragments by REP-PCR and ERIC-PCR gave evidence for the presence in this haemoprotozoan of the sequences described previously in microorganisms of the bacterial kingdom. For the first time it was demonstrated that both techniques can be used for genetic analysis of a protozoan parasite, although the ERIC-PCR was more discriminatory than REP-PCR. The dendogram with similarity coefficient among isolates showed two clusters and one subcluster. The Northeastern and Mid-Western isolates showed the greatest genetic diversity, while the Southeastern and Southern isolates were the closest. The antigenic analysis was done through indirect fluorescent antibody technique and Western blotting using a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against epitopes on the merozoite membrane surface, rhoptries and membrane of infected erythrocytes. As expected, the merozoite variable surface antigens, major surface antigen (MSA-1 and MSA-2 showed antigenic diversity. However, B cell epitopes on rhoptries and infected erythrocytes were conserved among all isolates studied. In this study it was possible to identify variable and conserved antigens, which had already been described as potential immunogens. Considering that an attenuated Babesia clone used as immunogen selected populations capable of evading the immunity induced by this vaccine, it is necessary to

  3. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  4. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  5. Platforms to Regional Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Besides Canton Fair,China has many other important export and import fairs.Among them,three regional fairs,namely East China Fair(ECF),China Kunming Import & Export Commodities Fair(known as Kunming Fair),and Dalian Import & Export Commodities Fair(DIECF)ale worth the focus.

  6. Promoting regional mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne

    Pricing of transport has been part of EU's common transport policy since this gained momentum in the early 1990s. Since then, it has been closely connected to the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) and to rising demands of efficient mobility systems at a local, regional and Community scale....

  7. Modern regional innovation policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip; Ortega-Argiles, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the evolution of regional innovation policy into the mainstream of public policy. The paper examines the empirical and theoretical developments which have shifted much of the focus on innovation-related issues to matters of economic geography. As well as academic material we also

  8. Regionalizing global climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, A.J.; Arneth, A.; Ganzeveld, L.N.

    2012-01-01

    Global climate models simulate the Earth's climate impressively at scales of continents and greater. At these scales, large-scale dynamics and physics largely define the climate. At spatial scales relevant to policy makers, and to impacts and adaptation, many other processes may affect regional and

  9. Global, Local, or Regional?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Alain; Geisler Asmussen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    of analysis, in addition to the country-level and the global level. Regional strategy analysis requires a fundamental rethink of mainstream theories in the international strategy sphere. This rethink involves, inter alia, internalization theory, with its resource-based view and transaction cost economics...

  10. Eastern Baltic Sea Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny Grandjean Gøgsig

    2016-01-01

    Kort over den østlige Østersøregion i middelalderen med angivelse af lokaliteter omtalt i antologien, placeret på s.8 i bogen "Church and Belief in the Middle Ages", red. Kirsi Salonen & Sari Katajala-Peltomaa (Amsterdam, 2016)....

  11. Regionalizing global climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, A.J.; Arneth, A.; Ganzeveld, L.N.

    2012-01-01

    Global climate models simulate the Earth's climate impressively at scales of continents and greater. At these scales, large-scale dynamics and physics largely define the climate. At spatial scales relevant to policy makers, and to impacts and adaptation, many other processes may affect regional and

  12. Regionalism and Secession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Sobre Cataluña (Madrid: Los Libros de la Catarata, 2014), 112. 269 Ibid. 60 autonomy and not independence.270 Catalan nationalists, aided by the media...de Escritos Sobre Cataluña. Madrid: Los Libros de la Catarata, 2014. Domorenok, Ekaterina,. “The Committee of the Regions: In Search of Identity

  13. Migration and regional inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Lianqing; Swider, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    rising, regional inequality has actually decreased, and most recently, remained stable. Our study suggests that China’s unique migratory regime is crucial to understanding these findings. We conduct a counterfactual simulation to demonstrate how migration and remittances have mitigated income inequality...

  14. Australia's Regional Youth Exodus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines media coverage of youth outmigration from Tasmania in the context of Australia's regional crisis. Focuses on how young people are constructed by others and positioned in others' visions of their rural home towns. Discusses two recurring narratives: strategies to keep youth at home, and preoccupation with the "best and brightest"…

  15. Benchmarks: WICHE Region 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarks: WICHE Region 2012 presents information on the West's progress in improving access to, success in, and financing of higher education. The information is updated annually to monitor change over time and encourage its use as a tool for informed discussion in policy and education communities. To establish a general context for the…

  16. REGIONAL CUSTOMS DIRECTORATES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CABA STEFAN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of a regional customs directorate is analyzed. A new approach of the managerial system, in the European integration context, is presented. The customs system is one of the first “doors” to a new economic, social and cultural community. For

  17. Regionalism in Scottish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Dougal

    1976-01-01

    It is well-known that Scottish universities are highly local institutions and that over two-fifth of Scottish university students live at home. Attempts to ascertain if this regionalism has relaxed over the past twenty years with student grant regulations, improvement in communications and the increasing affluence of today's society. (Author/RK)

  18. Regionalism. Clip and Save.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the art movement, called Regionalism, discussing the painters involved and describing the characteristics of the art movement. Provides a set of learning activities and background information on John Steuart Curry. Includes a discussion of Curry's painting, "Tornado Over Kansas," and a reproduction of the painting. (CMK)

  19. Approaching Regional Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Shah, Ali; Kazmi, Atia

    The report contains ideas on enhanced cooperation on both security and economy. It is a particular relevant read for regional political decision makers, institutions, private companies, and researchers that wish to gain insight into the present and future political and economic developments...

  20. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  1. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.;

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified ...

  2. Accurate prediction of a minimal region around a genetic association signal that contains the causal variant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Bochdanovits (Zoltan); J. Simón-Sánchez (Javier); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); A. van der Vaart (Aad); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, genome-wide association studies have been very successful in identifying loci for complex traits. However, typically these findings involve noncoding and/or intergenic SNPs without a clear functional effect that do not directly point to a gene. Hence, the challenge is to

  3. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified ...

  4. Banks, regions and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Alessandrini

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available From the 1980s onwards the banking sectors in all the industrialised countries have been experiencing intense restructuring, aggregation and consolidation, radically changing their ownership structures and geography. Whatever the reasons behind such restructuring processes, the globalisation of the credit markets, the consolidation of banking structures, the removal of barriers to the free location of banks and their penetration of peripheral markets pose two main questions. Will integration of the banking systems lead to a narrowing or a widening of the development gap between regions? What relations will there be between financial centres and the periphery, and how will financial labour be divided between national (international banks and local (regional banks? The aim of this paper is to address such questions in the light of recent developments in the theoretical and empirical literature on financial integration.

  5. Regional Stability & Peacebuilding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    It seems that regional decision makers during the last two decades has been unable to produce a sustainable peacebuilding plan for the region and it is questionable whether any remarkable change will occur in the near future. Some would argue that the political differences are simply too far apart...... continue to face, internal challenges even if agreements with a conflicting state are settled. This only underlines the necessity of initiating sustainable initiatives that are capable of affecting politicians from within, or even to some extent have the capability to bypass the political level....... With contributions from leading international scholars within the field of security studies this book sets out to explain the main security knots preventing stability to emerge and on that basis to test whether a different approach in addressing these knots. By pursuing an innovative and different approach...

  6. Regional Renewable Energy Cooperatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, P.; Brown, M. B.; Byrne, J. M.; Harrison, T.; Mueller, R.; Peacock, K.; Usher, J.; Yalamova, R.; Kroebel, R.; Larsen, J.; McNaughton, R.

    2014-12-01

    We are building a multidisciplinary research program linking researchers in agriculture, business, earth science, engineering, humanities and social science. Our goal is to match renewable energy supply and reformed energy demands. The program will be focused on (i) understanding and modifying energy demand, (ii) design and implementation of diverse renewable energy networks. Geomatics technology will be used to map existing energy and waste flows on a neighbourhood, municipal, and regional level. Optimal sites and combinations of sites for solar and wind electrical generation (ridges, rooftops, valley walls) will be identified. Geomatics based site and grid analyses will identify best locations for energy production based on efficient production and connectivity to regional grids and transportation. Design of networks for utilization of waste streams of heat, water, animal and human waste for energy production will be investigated. Agriculture, cities and industry produce many waste streams that are not well utilized. Therefore, establishing a renewable energy resource mapping and planning program for electrical generation, waste heat and energy recovery, biomass collection, and biochar, biodiesel and syngas production is critical to regional energy optimization. Electrical storage and demand management are two priorities that will be investigated. Regional scale cooperatives may use electric vehicle batteries and innovations such as pump storage and concentrated solar molten salt heat storage for steam turbine electrical generation. Energy demand management is poorly explored in Canada and elsewhere - our homes and businesses operate on an unrestricted demand. Simple monitoring and energy demand-ranking software can easily reduce peaks demands and move lower ranked uses to non-peak periods, thereby reducing the grid size needed to meet peak demands. Peak demand strains the current energy grid capacity and often requires demand balancing projects and

  7. Regional Strategic Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    nation’s productivity. b. Guatemala. Several leftist guerrilla groups continue to challenge Guatemala’s fragile democracy ( Organizacion Revolucionario de...light industry and textiles. Mexico’s industrial sector is much greater than that of the rest of the region. The Pan American Highway is a good...boon to the local economy, we may consume scarce resources normally available to domestic industry at its peril. Second, local resources may be rapidly

  8. Regional Seismic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-31

    Baikal to the Pamirs, earthquakes occuring in the Baikal region, Sinkiang , the Gobi desert, southwest China and the Himalayas generated Lg/P ratios...data were obtained from stations within the USSR from earthquake events occuring in Baikal, Sinkiang , the Gobi desert, Southwest China and the...earthquakes originating in the Sinkiang province and recorded by seismo- graphic stations along the Pamir-Lena River profile [25] 0 - recorded by short

  9. Northwest Regional Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschultz, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Objectives are to establish a continuing, inclusive National process that: 1) synthesizes relevant science and information 2) increases understanding of what is known & not known 3) identifies information needs related to preparing for climate variability and change, and reducing climate impacts and vulnerability 4) evaluates progress of adaptation & mitigation activities 5) informs science priorities 6) builds assessment capacity in regions and sectors 7) builds understanding & skilled use of findings

  10. Andean region study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    New opportunities for climate change mitigation arising from a higher energy integration among Andean Pact nations were analysed within the framework of the UNEP/GEF Project. Apart from the search for regional mitigation actions, the study was mainly aimed at detecting methodological problems which arise when passing from a strictly national view to the co-ordination of regional actions to deal with climate change. In accordance with the available resources and data, and in view of the mainly methodological nature of the project, it was decided to analyse the opportunities to delve into the energy integration of the Region as regards electricity and natural gas industries and their eventual impact on the emission of greenhouse gases. Although possibilities of setting up electricity and natural gas markets are real, their impacts on GHG emission from the energy system would not prove substantially higher than those which the nations could achieve through the use of their own energy resources, in view that the Andean systems are competitive rather than complementary. More in-depth studies and detail information will be required - unavailable for the present study - to be able to properly evaluate all benefits associated with higher energy integration. Nevertheless, the supply of natural gas to Ecuador seems to be the alternative with the highest impact on GHG emission. If we were to analyse the supply and final consumption of energy jointly, we would most certainly detect additional mitigation options resulting from higher co-operation and co-ordination in the energy field. (EHS)

  11. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Michael B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dennison, Deborah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, Jave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Hoyt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Miller, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The fallout from a nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill 100,000 or more people through exposure to external gamma (fallout) radiation. Existing buildings can reduce radiation exposure by placing material between fallout particles and exposed people. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was tasked with developing an operationally feasible methodology that could improve fallout casualty estimates. The methodology, called a Regional Shelter Analysis, combines the fallout protection that existing buildings provide civilian populations with the distribution of people in various locations. The Regional Shelter Analysis method allows the consideration of (a) multiple building types and locations within buildings, (b) country specific estimates, (c) population posture (e.g., unwarned vs. minimally warned), and (d) the time of day (e.g., night vs. day). The protection estimates can be combined with fallout predictions (or measurements) to (a) provide a more accurate assessment of exposure and injury and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of various casualty mitigation strategies. This report describes the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology, highlights key operational aspects (including demonstrating that the methodology is compatible with current tools), illustrates how to implement the methodology, and provides suggestions for future work.

  12. SERVICES AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven ILLERIS

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this contribution is to discuss what roles the different economic sectors, and in particular services activities (the tertiary sector play in regional development, understood as growth in production, incomes and employment in weakly developedregions. This question is approached in two ways. The contribution first contains a – primarily theoretical – re-examination of the so-called economic base model, which states that services play a passive role in regional development. The discussion leads to substantial modifications of the model. The second approach is more empirical. It will take as its point of departure the proposition – often heard, but rarely examined – that since service activities are more concentrated in big cities than other activities and in recent decades have shown higher growth rates than other economic activities, it follows that the economic development is now pulled towards big city regions. Examined by way of a statistical analysisin Denmark and France, this proposition could not be verified.

  13. Regionalization Lessons from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Denmark is a small Northern European country with an extensive welfare state and a strong commitment to maintaining a universal healthcare system. Like the other countries in the Nordic region, Denmark has a long tradition of democratically governed local and regional governments with extensive responsibilities in organizing welfare state services. The Danish healthcare system has demonstrated an ability to increase productivity, while at the same time maintaining a high level of patient satisfaction. Ongoing reforms have contributed to these results, as well as a firm commitment to innovation and coordination. Regions and municipalities in Denmark are governed by directly elected democratic councils. The Danish case is thus an example of democratic decentralization, but within a framework of national coordination and fiscal control. In spite of the difference in size and historical traditions there are also many similarities between Canada and Denmark, particularly in terms of health and social policy goals and aspirations, and in terms of the commitment to a comprehensive, universal healthcare system. These similarities provide interesting opportunities for comparison.

  14. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management (RSM): Regional Sediment Budget for the West Maui Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program Hawaii Regional Sediment Management (RSM): Regional Sediment Budget...for the West Maui Region Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Jessica H. Podoski, Thomas D. Smith, Zeki Demirbilek, Lihwa Lin, and...acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program ERDC/CHL TR-16-5 June 2016 Hawaii Regional Sediment

  15. A novel statistical method to estimate the effective SNP size in vertebrate genomes and categorized genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhongming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local environment of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs contains abundant genetic information for the study of mechanisms of mutation, genome evolution, and causes of diseases. Recent studies revealed that neighboring-nucleotide biases on SNPs were strong and the genome-wide bias patterns could be represented by a small subset of the total SNPs. It remains unsolved for the estimation of the effective SNP size, the number of SNPs that are sufficient to represent the bias patterns observed from the whole SNP data. Results To estimate the effective SNP size, we developed a novel statistical method, SNPKS, which considers both the statistical and biological significances. SNPKS consists of two major steps: to obtain an initial effective size by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS test and to find an intermediate effective size by interval evaluation. The SNPKS algorithm was implemented in computer programs and applied to the real SNP data. The effective SNP size was estimated to be 38,200, 39,300, 38,000, and 38,700 in the human, chimpanzee, dog, and mouse genomes, respectively, and 39,100, 39,600, 39,200, and 42,200 in human intergenic, genic, intronic, and CpG island regions, respectively. Conclusion SNPKS is the first statistical method to estimate the effective SNP size. It runs efficiently and greatly outperforms the algorithm implemented in SNPNB. The application of SNPKS to the real SNP data revealed the similar small effective SNP size (38,000 – 42,200 in the human, chimpanzee, dog, and mouse genomes as well as in human genomic regions. The findings suggest strong influence of genetic factors across vertebrate genomes.

  16. Measuring the prevalence of regional mutation rates: an analysis of silent substitutions in mammals, fungi, and insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuch Brian B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patterns of mutation vary both within and across genomes. It has been shown for a few mammals that mutation rates vary within the genome, while for unknown reasons, the sensu stricto yeasts have uniform rates instead. The generality of these observations has been unknown. Here we examine silent site substitutions in a more expansive set (20 mammals, 27 fungi, 4 insects to determine why some genomes demonstrate this mosaic distribution and why others are uniform. Results We applied several intragene and intergene correlation tests to measure regional substitution patterns. Assuming that silent sites are a reasonable approximation to neutrally mutating sequence, our results show that all multicellular eukaryotes exhibit mutational heterogeneity. In striking contrast, all fungi are mutationally uniform – with the exception of three Candida species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and C. tropicalis. We speculate that aspects of replication timing may be responsible for distinguishing these species. Our analysis also reveals classes of genes whose silent sites behave anomalously with respect to the mutational background in many species, indicating prevalent selective pressures. Genes associated with nucleotide binding or gene regulation have consistently low silent substitution rates in every mammalian species, as well as multiple fungi. On the other hand, receptor genes repeatedly exhibit high silent substitution rates, suggesting they have been influenced by diversifying selection. Conclusion Our findings provide a framework for understanding the regional mutational properties of eukaryotes, revealing a sharp difference between fungi and multicellular species. They also elucidate common selective pressures acting on eukaryotic silent sites, with frequent evidence for both purifying and diversifying selection.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of the fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fang; Wang, Lin; Wu, Song; Li, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Lei; Huang, Guo-Ming; Niu, Chun-Jing; Liu, Yan-Qun; Li, Ming-Gang

    2010-03-29

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) was determined. The genome is a circular molecule 15 481 bp long. It presents a typical gene organization and order for completely sequenced lepidopteran mitogenomes, but differs from the insect ancestral type for the placement of tRNA(Met). The nucleotide composition of the genome is also highly A + T biased, accounting for 80.38%, with a slightly positive AT skewness (0.010), indicating the occurrence of more As than Ts, as found in the Noctuoidea species. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons, except for COI, which is tentatively designated by the CGA codon as observed in other lepidopterans. Four of 13 PCGs harbor the incomplete termination codon, T or TA. All tRNAs have a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNAs, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN), the DHU arm of which could not form a stable stem-loop structure. The intergenic spacer sequence between tRNA(Ser)(AGN) and ND1 also contains the ATACTAA motif, which is conserved across the Lepidoptera order. The H. cunea A+T-rich region of 357 bp is comprised of non-repetitive sequences, but harbors several features common to the Lepidoptera insects, including the motif ATAGA followed by an 18 bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like (AT)(8) element preceded by the ATTTA motif, an 11 bp poly-A present immediately upstream tRNA(Met). The phylogenetic analyses support the view that the H. cunea is closerly related to the Lymantria dispar than Ochrogaster lunifer, and support the hypothesis that Noctuoidea (H. cunea, L. dispar, and O. lunifer) and Geometroidea (Phthonandria atrilineata) are monophyletic. However, in the phylogenetic trees based on mitogenome sequences among the lepidopteran superfamilies, Papillonoidea (Artogeia melete, Acraea issoria, and Coreana raphaelis) joined basally within the monophyly of Lepidoptera, which is different to the traditional classification.

  18. OECD Reviews of Regional Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maguire, Karen; Marsan, Giulia Ajmone; Nauwelaers, Claire;

    This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth.......This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth....

  19. OECD Reviews of Regional Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maguire, Karen; Marsan, Giulia Ajmone; Nauwelaers, Claire

    This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth.......This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth....

  20. Regiones cognitivas en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robayo Camilo Alberto

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Como parte del proyecto en curso: "regiones cognitivas en Colombia", respaldado por Colciencias y el Centro de Investigaciones de la Universidad Pedagógica, este libro constituye el primer informe y sienta las bases para la segunda etapa en la que se están examinando las correlaciones entre estilos cognitivos, comprensión de lenguaje y procesamiento matemático. Redactado en estilo transparente y conciso, este libro asume el reto de explorar y dar consistencia experimental a una regionalización ecocultural de Colombia, enfocándose desde la problemática de la educación. El bajo nivel en logros específicos por área curricular y la concentración de dicha situación por regiones en el país permiten que esta investigación se proyecte desde el inicio como una crítica a los modelos pedagógicos vigentes y una propuesta para su renovación.

  1. Transient regional osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Marquina, Antonio; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Ángel; Cano, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Transient regional osteoporosis (TRO) is a disease that predisposes to fragility fracture in weight bearing joints of mid-life women and men. Pregnant women may also suffer the process, usually at the hip. The prevalence of TRO is lower than the systemic form, associated with postmenopause and advanced age, but may be falsely diminished by under-diagnosis. The disease may be uni- or bilateral, and may migrate to distinct joints. One main feature of TRO is spontaneous recovery. Pain and progressive limitation in the functionality of the affected joint(s) are key symptoms. In the case of the form associated with pregnancy, difficulties in diagnosis derive from the relatively young age at presentation and from the clinical overlapping with the frequent aches during gestation. Densitometric osteoporosis in the affected region is not always present, but bone marrow edema, with or without joint effusion, is detected by magnetic resonance. There are not treatment guidelines, but the association of antiresorptives to symptomatic treatment seems to be beneficial. Surgery or other orthopedic interventions can be required for specific indications, like hip fracture, intra-medullary decompression, or other.

  2. Regional migratory osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahir, John G. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.cahir@nnuh.nhs.uk; Toms, Andoni P. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) is an uncommon disease characterised by a migrating arthralgia involving the weight bearing joints of the lower limb. The typical imaging findings on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and bone scintigraphy are described and illustrated. Men in their fifth and sixth decades of life are most commonly affected. The most common presentation is with proximal to distal spread in the lower limb. The world literature has been reviewed which has revealed 63 documented cases of regional osteoporosis or bone marrow oedema with migratory symptoms. Most of these cases have not been labelled as RMO and therefore the condition is probably under-diagnosed. The radiology of RMO is indistinguishable from transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) except for the migratory symptoms and the two conditions are likely to be part of the same spectrum of disease. Systemic osteoporosis is a more recently recognised accompanying feature that hints at an underlying aetiology and an approach to the management of this condition.

  3. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe inv1+ regulatory region is unusually large and contains redundant cis-acting elements that function in a SAGA- and Swi/Snf-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sejin; Spatt, Dan; Winston, Fred

    2012-08-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe inv1(+) gene encodes invertase, the enzyme required for hydrolysis of sucrose and raffinose. Transcription of inv1(+) is regulated by glucose levels, with transcription tightly repressed in high glucose and strongly induced in low glucose. To understand this regulation, we have analyzed the inv1(+) cis-regulatory region and the requirement for the trans-acting coactivators SAGA and Swi/Snf. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire 1-kilobase intergenic region between the inv1(+) TATA element and the upstream open reading frame SPCC191.10 does not significantly alter regulation of inv1(+) transcription. However, a longer deletion that extends through SPCC191.10 abolishes inv1(+) induction in low glucose. Additional analysis demonstrates that there are multiple, redundant regulatory regions spread over 1.5 kb 5' of inv1(+), including within SPCC191.10, that can confer glucose-mediated transcriptional regulation to inv1(+). Furthermore, SPCC191.10 can regulate inv1(+) transcription in an orientation-independent fashion and from a distance as great as 3 kb. With respect to trans-acting factors, both SAGA and Swi/Snf are recruited to SPCC191.10 and to other locations in the large inv1(+) regulatory region in a glucose-dependent fashion, and both are required for inv1(+) derepression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inv1(+) regulation in S. pombe occurs via the use of multiple regulatory elements and that activation can occur over a great distance, even from elements within other open reading frames.

  4. Chloroplast DNA analysis of Tunisian cork oak populations (Quercus suber L.): sequence variations and molecular evolution of the trnL (UAA)-trnF (GAA) region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdessamad, A; Baraket, G; Sakka, H; Ammari, Y; Ksontini, M; Hannachi, A Salhi

    2016-10-24

    Sequences of the trnL-trnF spacer and combined trnL-trnF region in chloroplast DNA of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) were analyzed to detect polymorphisms and to elucidate molecular evolution and demographic history. The aligned sequences varied in length and nucleotide composition. The overall ratio of transition/transversion (ti/tv) of 0.724 for the intergenic spacer and 0.258 for the pooled sequences were estimated, and indicated that transversions are more frequent than transitions. The molecular evolution and demographic history of Q. suber were investigated. Neutrality tests (Tajima's D and Fu and Li) ruled out the null hypothesis of a strictly neutral model, and Fu's Fs and Ramos-Onsins and Rozas' R2 confirmed the recent expansion of cork oak trees, validating its persistency in North Africa since the last glaciation during the Quaternary. The observed uni-modal mismatch distribution and the Harpending's raggedness index confirmed the demographic history model for cork oak. A phylogenetic dendrogram showed that the distribution of Q. suber trees occurs independently of geographical origin, the relief of the population site, and the bioclimatic stages. The molecular history and cytoplasmic diversity suggest that in situ and ex situ conservation strategies can be recommended for preserving landscape value and facing predictable future climatic changes.

  5. Loss of imprinting at the Dlk1-Gtl2 locus caused by insertional mutagenesis in the Gtl2 5' region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appelbe Oliver K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dlk1 and Gtl2 genes define a region of mouse chromosome 12 that is subject to genomic imprinting, the parental allele-specific expression of a gene. Although imprinted genes play important roles in growth and development, the mechanisms by which imprinting is established and maintained are poorly understood. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs, which carry methylation on only one parental allele, are involved in imprinting control at many loci. The Dlk1-Gtl2 region contains three known DMRs, the Dlk1 DMR in the 3' region of Dlk1, the intergenic DMR 15 kb upstream of Gtl2, and the Gtl2 DMR at the Gtl2 promoter. Three mouse models are analyzed here that provide new information about the regulation of Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinting. Results A previously existing insertional mutation (Gtl2lacZ, and a targeted deletion in which the Gtl2 upstream region was replaced by a Neo cassette (Gtl2Δ5'Neo, display partial lethality and dwarfism upon paternal inheritance. Molecular characterization shows that both mutations cause loss of imprinting and changes in expression of the Dlk1, Gtl2 and Meg8/Rian genes. Dlk1 levels are decreased upon paternal inheritance of either mutation, suggesting Dlk1 may be causative for the lethality and dwarfism. Loss of imprinting on the paternal chromosome in both Gtl2lacZ and Gtl2Δ5'Neo mice is accompanied by the loss of paternal-specific Gtl2 DMR methylation, while maternal loss of imprinting suggests a previously unknown regulatory role for the maternal Gtl2 DMR. Unexpectedly, when the Neo gene is excised, Gtl2Δ5' animals are of normal size, imprinting is unchanged and the Gtl2 DMR is properly methylated. The exogenous DNA sequences integrated upstream of Gtl2 are therefore responsible for the growth and imprinting effects. Conclusion These data provide further evidence for the coregulation of the imprinted Dlk1 and Gtl2 genes, and support a role for Dlk1 as an important neonatal growth factor. The

  6. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  7. Strengthening regional safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palhares, L.; Almeida, G.; Mafra, O. [Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear cooperation between Argentina and Brazil has been growing since the early 1980`s and as it grew, so did cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) was formed in December 1991 to operate the Common System of Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (SCCC). In April 1994, ABACC and the DOE signed an Agreement of Cooperation in nuclear material safeguards. This cooperation has included training safeguards inspectors, exchanging nuclear material measurement and containment and surveillance technology, characterizing reference materials, and studying enrichment plant safeguards. The goal of the collaboration is to exchange technology, evaluate new technology in Latin American nuclear facilities, and strengthen regional safeguards. This paper describes the history of the cooperation, its recent activities, and future projects. The cooperation is strongly supported by all three governments: the Republics of Argentina and Brazil and the United States.

  8. Regional transmission subsystem planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa Bortoni, Edson da [Quadrante Softwares Especializados Ltda., Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Bajay, Sergio Valdir; Barros Correia, Paulo de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Santos, Afonso Henriques Moreira; Haddad, Jamil [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work presents an approach for the planning of transmission systems by employing mixed--integer linear programming to obtain a cost and operating characteristics optimized system. The voltage loop equations are written in a modified form, so that, at the end of the analysis, the model behaves as a DC power flow, with the help of the two Kirchhoff`s laws, exempting the need of interaction with an external power flow program for analysis of the line loading. The model considers the occurrence of contingencies, so that the final result is a network robust to the most severe contingencies. This whole technique is adapted to the regional electric power transmission subsystems. (author) 9 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues.

  10. EPA Regional Boundaries (EPA.EPA_REGIONS) GIS Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Each EPA Regional Office is responsible within its states for the execution of the Agency's programs. EPA has ten regional offices, each of which is responsible for...

  11. Challenges Towards Sustainable Tourism for Regional Development of Vlore Region

    OpenAIRE

    Aleks Prifti; Engjellushe Zenelaj

    2013-01-01

    Vlora has great potential for regional development. Tourism can be as a catalyst for theeconomic growth but still have many challenges for sustainable tourism regionaldevelopment. Regional development is one ofthe most important dimensions and key ofEU policy, which is designedto: ensure convergence between the different member statesand regions; ensure regional competitiveness and employment;ensure territorialcooperation. Vlora has all the potential to bean attractive tourismdestination. Res...

  12. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M.; Jagust, William J.

    2015-01-01

    See Sorg and Grothe (doi:10.1093/brain/awv302) for a scientific commentary on this article. In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir (18F) positron emission tomography, 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake

  13. Regional Sociological Research Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Vladimirovich Morev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of RAS in conducting sociological research on the territory of the Vologda Oblast and the Northwestern Federal District. It describes the historical aspects of formation of the system for public opinion monitoring and examines its theoretical and methodological foundations. The author of the article analyzes the structure of monitoring indicators and provides a brief interpretation of research findings that reflect social wellbeing and social perception trends. In addition, the paper analyzes people’s attitude toward the activities of federal and regional authorities, trends in social well-being, consumer sentiment and also the complex indicator – the index of public sentiment in the region – developed by ISEDT RAS researchers. The results of sociological studies carried out at ISEDT RAS correlate with the dynamics of the all-Russian public opinion polls conducted by the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM, Levada-Center, etc. They indicate that Russian society gradually adapts to new conditions of life after the collapse of the USSR. Besides, opinion polls show the most important features of the post-Soviet Russian history at its present stage; they are associated with the intensification of international political relations, the consequences of the “Crimean spring” and the new challenges Russia’s economy is facing now. The article concludes that as global community, of which Russian society is part, is evolving, sociological knowledge begins to play an increasingly important role in administration and national security; this is associated with the greater importance attached to intangible development factors. Therefore, a necessary prerequisite for administration effectiveness in all its stages is to implement the results of sociological research on social

  14. American Red Cross Chapter Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Regions are part of the national field level structure to support chapters. The Regions role is admistrative as well as provides oversight and program technical...

  15. Distances to star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The determination of accurate distances to star-forming regions are discussed in the broader historical context of astronomical distance measurements. We summarize recent results for regions within 1 kpc and present perspectives for the near and more distance future.

  16. Regional Employment Growth, Shocks and Regional Industrial Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, J.R.; Østergaard, Christian Richter

    2015-01-01

    The resilience of regional industries to economic shocks has gained a lot of attention in evolutionary economic geography recently. This paper uses a novel quantitative approach to investigate the regional industrial resilience of the Danish information and communication technology (ICT) sector...... to the shock following the burst of the dot.com bubble. It is shown that regions characterized by small and young ICT service companies were more adaptable and grew more than others, while diversity and urbanization increased the sensitivity to the business cycle after the shock. Different types of resilient...... regions are found: adaptively resilient, rigidly resilient, entrepreneurially resilient and non-resilient regions....

  17. Regional employment growth, shocks and regional industrial resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jacob Rubæk; Østergaard, Christian Richter

    2013-01-01

    The resilience of regional industries to economic shocks has gained a lot of attention in evolutionary economic geography recently. This paper uses a novel quantitative approach to investigate the regional industrial resilience of the Danish ICT sector to the shock following the burst of the dot......-com bubble. It is shown that regions characterised by small and young ICT service companies were more adaptable and grew more than others, while diversity and urbanisation increased the sensitivity to the business cycle after the shock. Different types of resilient regions are found: adaptively resilient......, rigidly resilient, entrepreneurially resilient and non-resilient regions....

  18. RISK REGION. POINTS OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR SOROCOVSCHI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with three fundamental issues related to natural risks. The first issue concerns the definition and characteristics of the risk region. The second issue talks about identification of criteria that underly risk regions demarcation and ranking. The analyze of European risk regions exposed to major natural risks and the frequency identification of natural risks affecting major regions of Romania are the topics addressed in the last part of the paper.

  19. Phylogenetic placement of the spider genus Nephila (Araneae: Araneoidea) inferred from rRNA and MaSp1 gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hong-Chun; Zhou, Kai-Ya; Song, Da-Xiang; Qiu, Yang

    2004-03-01

    The family status of the genus Nephila, which belongs to Tetragnathidae currently but Araneidae formerly, was reexamined based on molecular phylogenetic analyses. In the present study, 12S and 18S rRNA gene fragments of eight species of spiders were amplified and sequenced. In addition, 3'-end partial cDNA of major ampullate spidroin-1 (MaSp1) gene of Argiope amoena was cloned and sequenced, and the 3'-end non-repetitive region's cDNA sequence of MaSp1 gene and the predicted amino acid sequence of C-terminal non-repetitive region of MaSp1 were aligned with some previously known sequences. The resulting phylogeny showed that Araneidae and Tetragnathidae are not a sister group in the superfamily Araneoidea, and the genus Nephila is closer to the genera of the family Araneidae rather than to those of Tetragnathidae. We suggest that the genus Nephila should be transferred back to Araneidae. Or the subfamily Nephilinae might be elevated to family level after it was redefined and redelimited. Furthermore, the study showed that 3'-end non-repetitive region's cDNA sequence of MaSp1 gene and C-terminal non-repetitive region's amino acid sequence of MaSp1 are useful molecular markers for phylogenetic analysis of spiders.

  20. regional economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Stimson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo propone que un círculo virtuoso para el desarrollo sostenible de una ciudad o región se logra a través de un proceso por el que el liderazgo proactivo y fuerte y las instituciones efectivas refuerzan la capacidad y aptitud de un lugar para hacer un mejor uso de sus dotaciones de recursos y lograr un mercado mejorado que consiga ser competitivo y emprendedor. Se propone que el funcionamiento de una ciudad o región en un punto en el tiempo y la trayectoria de su desarrollo económico a lo largo del tiempo puede representarse por su posición en un Cubo de resultados de Competitividad Regional. El artículo propone una nueva estructura de modelo donde el desarrollo económico y funcionamiento de una ciudad o región sea un resultado dependiente de cómo sus dotaciones de recursos y mercado ajustadas como variables cuasi-independientes son mediadas por la interacción entre el liderazgo, instituciones y espíritu empresarial como variables intervinientes. Las experiencias de un cierto número de casos de estudio de ciudades dentro de una variedad de lugares en EE.UU., Europa, Asia y Australia se exploran dentro de esa estructura.

  1. Regional odontodysplasia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Magalhães

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia (RO is a rare developmental anomaly involving both mesodermal and ectodermal dental components in a group of contiguous teeth. It affects the primary and permanent dentitions in the maxilla and mandible or both jaws. Generally it is localized in only one arch. The etiology of this dental anomaly is uncertain. Clinically, affected teeth have an abnormal morphology, are soft on probing and typically discolored, yellow or yellowish-brown. Radiographically, the affected teeth show a "ghostlike" appearance. This paper reports the case of a 5-year-old girl presenting this rare anomaly on the left side of the maxillary arch, which crossed the midline. The primary maxillary left teeth (except for the canine and the primary maxillary right central incisor were missing due to previous extractions. The permanent teeth had a "ghostlike" appearance radiographically. The treatment performed was rehabilitation with temporary partial acrylic denture and periodic controls. In the future, the extraction of affected permanent teeth and rehabilitation with dental implants will be evaluated. The presentation of this case adds valuable information to pediatric dentists to review special clinical and radiographic features of RO, which will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of patients with this condition.

  2. Sudurnes Regional Heating Corp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The Svartsengi geothermal area is close to the town of Grindavik on the Rekjanes peninsula and is part of an active fissure swarm, lined with crater-rows and open fissures and faults. The high-temperature area has an area of 2 sq. km and shows only limited signs of geothermal activity at the surface. The reservoir, however, contains lots of energy and at least 8 wells supply the Svartsengi Power Plant with steam. The steam is not useable for domestic heating purposes so that heat exchangers are used to heat cold groundwater with the steam. Some steam is also used for producing 16.4 MW{sub e} of electrical power. The article shows the distribution system piping hot water to nine towns and the Keflavik International Airport. The effluent brine from the Svartsengi Plant is disposed of into a surface pond, called the Blue Lagoon, popular to tourists and people suffering from psoriasis and other forms of eczema seeking therapeutic effects from the silica rich brine. This combined power plant and regional district heating system (cogeneration) is an interesting and unique design for the application of geothermal energy.

  3. Teaching Regional Perspectives in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreath, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Defines Canadian regionalism in terms of geographical features and their political, social, and economic implications, rather than in terms of political and provincial boundaries. The significance of regionalism is mentioned as an important topic for Canadian studies. Increasing awareness and acceptance of regional perspectives is presented as an…

  4. Vigna mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants sampled in different agronomical-ecological-climatic regions of India are nodulated by Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; N'Zoue, Angèle; Moulin, Lionel; Depret, Géraldine; Laguerre, Gisèle

    2009-10-01

    Vigna mungo, Vigna radiata and Vigna unguiculata are important legume crops cultivated in India, but little is known about the genetic resources in native rhizobia that nodulate these species. To identify these bacteria, a core collection of 76 slow-growing isolates was built from root nodules of V. mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants grown at different sites within three agro-ecological-climatic regions of India. The genetic diversity of the bacterial collection was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) region, and the symbiotic genes nifH and nodC. One rDNA IGS type grouped 91% of isolates, but more diversity was found at the symbiotic loci (17 symbiotic genotypes). Overall, no host plant specificity was shown, the three host plant species sharing common bradyrhizobial genotypes that represented 62% of the collection. Similarly, the predominant genotypes were found at most sampling sites and in all agro-ecological-climatic regions. Phylogenies inferred from IGS sequencing and multi-locus sequence analysis of the dnaK, glnII and recA genes indicated that all isolates but one were clustered with the Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense species. The nifH phylogeny also grouped the different nif haplotypes within a cluster including B. yuanmingense, except for one infrequent nif haplotype which formed a new lineage within the Bradyrhizobium genus. These results may reflect a long history of co-evolution between B. yuanmingense and Vigna spp. in India, while intra-species polymorphism detected in the symbiotic loci may be linked with the long history of diversification of B. yuanmingense coinciding with that of its host legumes.

  5. Regions. [Africa, Middle East].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    This discussion of population focuses on the regions of Africa and the Middle East. In South Africa more white women are working but fewer black women work. The overall result is that the percentage of women who work is declining. Marita de Beer, research liaison executive at the South African Advertising Research Foundation, reports that the female population grew by 31% in the past 10 years while the number of working women has grown by only 11%. Among blacks the female population rose by 36%, but the number of workers among them declined by about 1%. Married women are among the fastest growing groups of working women in South Africa. The most recent estimate of the population of Nigeria is 92 million. According to Professor Vremudia Diejomaoh, Nigeria's population will probably reach 155 million by 2000 with 33% living in urban areas. In Saudi Arabia the Pan Arab Research Center recently completed a census of retail outlets in 3 metropolitan areas: Jeddah, Riyadh, and Dammam. The types of outlets surveyed include large supermarkets, small supermarkets, groceries with and without deep freeze, tobacco shops, meat shop/delis, small cafeterias, large restaurants/hotels, cosmetics shops or perfumeries, camera stores, toy shops, pharmacies, watch and gift shop, newsstands, department store, and appliance outlets. Using the Census of Retail Outlets as a base, Pan Arab Research Center also has a new distribution audit system that will cover 500 outlets. By plotting Arab countries according to their population policies and their current growth rates, it is possible to project where the middle class will grow fastest in the Arab world. The countries that have declining growth rates and strong population programs designed to encourage lower fertility rates among women are Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Lebanon. The countries most likely to have a better per capita distribution of resources within this decade are those where governments encourage reductions in

  6. Thinking regionally: narrative, the medical humanities and region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Keir

    2015-06-01

    Drawing on multiple literatures from history, geography, anthropology, sociology and literature, this essay asks questions about what we mean by region and why narratives of region should matter to the medical humanities. The essay surveys how region can be used as a lens of analysis, exploring the various academic approaches to region and their limitations. It argues that regions are dynamic but also unstable as a category of analysis and are often used uncritically by scholars. In encouraging scholars working in the medical humanities to be aware that regions are not simple objective or analytical boxes, the essay shows how an awareness of region helps challenge metropolitan whiggism and ideas of core and periphery to give a more prominent place to hinterlands, market towns and rural environments. Furthermore, the essay considers how incorporating region into our understanding of illness can offer new insights. It demonstrates the need for scholars to be attuned to the narratives constructed around regions, suggesting that regions can be viewed as discursive formations that provide a frame for understanding both collective and personal ideas of, and responses to, health and illness, disease and healing, to create what Megan Davies calls a more nuanced 'intellectual cartography'.

  7. Segmental duplication as one of the driving forces underlying the diversity of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Richeng

    2011-01-01

    , the divergence level within the gene segments is significantly different from that in the intergenic regions indicating that these regions may have been subject to different selection pressures and that the IGHV gene segments in this region are functionally important. Conclusions Non-reciprocal genetic rearrangements associated with large duplicate sequence blocks could substantially contribute to the IGHV region diversity. Since the resulting polymorphisms may affect the number, composition and organization of the gene segments in this region, it may have significant impact on the function of the IGHV gene segment repertoire, antibody diversity, and therefore, the immune system. Because one of the gene segments, 3-30 (1.9III, is associated with autoimmune diseases, it could be of diagnostic significance to learn about the variants in the haplotypes by using the multiplex haplotype analysis system used in the present study with DNA sequence tags specific for the variants of all gene segments in this region.

  8. Caspian Region in the System of International Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosov Gennadiy Vladimirovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The given research paper presents an attempt to analyze the Caspian region from the point of view of its cross-border specifics. In contrast to the traditional understanding of the Caspian region as the region of heightened geopolitical significance the authors analyze its peculiarities and potential in the context of the cross-border cooperation dynamics. It is especially emphasized that the Caspian region may be considered as a cross-border region which, despite the substantial similarities is different from international transnational regions. The authors focus attention on a key contradiction of the Caspian region. On the one hand, national interests and foreign policy of the states-members of the Caspian region (Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia and Turkmenistan have a national country and regional importance, since their implementation will form an effective regional security system. On the other hand, the Caspian region attracts the attention of the world powers, becoming a subject of their interest, as it is of great importance for world energy markets and has status of a transit zone between Europe and Asia. For Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia, Turkmenistan the Caspian status is combined with their most important characteristic of post-Soviet states - shared long historical stage of development within the Soviet Union. The article distinguished and analyzed four main periods of establishment of cross-border cooperation in the Caspian region. The national specificity of modernization reforms in all the countries of the Caspian region have interrelations with further development of cross-border cooperation, the priority of that performs convergence of Caspian states on a number of strategic issues, including economic cooperation and security.

  9. Illustration of Single-Regional and Inter-Regional Approach in Regional Input-Output Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Šafr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Analytical works usually use single-regional approach which does not demand so much data. However, this approach disregards flows of output among regions. This leads to a misrepresentation of results which can be eliminated by using Inter-regional input-output model that requires more data to be employed. This paper illustrates the differences between the two different approaches of regional input-output model construction and their results. We construct inter-regional and single-regional models for all 14 regions of the Czech Republic and with 82 products according to the Classification of Products CZ-CPA. The results are compared on the level of Leontief’s matrix and multipliers. We use graphical illustrations to depict the systematicness of differences. The single-regional approach proves a systematic undervaluation of specific products and regions contrary to other regions. The graphical analysis shows the significance of the connection among regions. This illustrates the disadvantage of the single regional approach. Finally, the results confirm the idea of a signifiant analytical misrepresentation of impacts modelled by this approach in the case of data for the Czech Republic.

  10. Sketch of a strategy for the Basilicata region: Towards an operational regional development program Basilicata region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, R.A.; Crescenzi, R.; Esteves, A.M.; Percoco, M.; de Propris, L.; Thiene, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this report is to come up with useful suggestions, in collaboration with the Region of Basilicata and other local stakeholders, which may be used as input to develop a strategic vision for the Basilicata region, and to set up an Operational Regional Development Program 2014-2020.

  11. A candidate gene approach identifies the TRAF1/C5 region as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fina A S Kurreeman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population. The disease results from the interplay between an individual's genetic background and unknown environmental triggers. Although human leukocyte antigens (HLAs account for approximately 30% of the heritable risk, the identities of non-HLA genes explaining the remainder of the genetic component are largely unknown. Based on functional data in mice, we hypothesized that the immune-related genes complement component 5 (C5 and/or TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1, located on Chromosome 9q33-34, would represent relevant candidate genes for RA. We therefore aimed to investigate whether this locus would play a role in RA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a multitiered case-control study using 40 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the TRAF1 and C5 (TRAF1/C5 region in a set of 290 RA patients and 254 unaffected participants (controls of Dutch origin. Stepwise replication of significant SNPs was performed in three independent sample sets from the Netherlands (ncases/controls = 454/270, Sweden (ncases/controls = 1,500/1,000 and US (ncases/controls = 475/475. We observed a significant association (p < 0.05 of SNPs located in a haplotype block that encompasses a 65 kb region including the 3' end of C5 as well as TRAF1. A sliding window analysis revealed an association peak at an intergenic region located approximately 10 kb from both C5 and TRAF1. This peak, defined by SNP14/rs10818488, was confirmed in a total of 2,719 RA patients and 1,999 controls (odds ratiocommon = 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.39, pcombined = 1.40 x 10(-8 with a population-attributable risk of 6.1%. The A (minor susceptibility allele of this SNP also significantly correlates with increased disease progression as determined by radiographic damage over time in RA patients (p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Using a candidate-gene approach we have identified a

  12. A Declining Region: Provincial Renaissance Revisited (Case of Volgograd Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdova Yuliya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes findings yielded by the empirical study performed in the framework of an RGNF grant entitled “Image of a region as a communicative strategy for the authorities and mass media”. The methods of study included expert survey and formal survey (N=1000, July-September 2013, studying the opinion of respondents who were either internal experts residing in the Volgograd region (N=20; May-September 2013 or external experts who reside outside the region but maintain stable ties with the representatives of state and municipal authorities, regional mass media and business. The findings indicate that the Volgograd region has fallen behind other modernized Russian regions, that young people tend to leave it, that a negative image of the region as a declining territory persists. Answers to the open question “What is unacceptable for you in the existing image of the Volgograd region?” revealed major problems determining the local context of a declining region, and those were issues associated with inefficient regional/municipal administration: “the condition of the roads”, “constant replacement of people in the administration”, “politics as a whole”, “a destitute region without a good manager”, “unemployment”, “countryside is dying off”, “indifference of the authorities”, “roads, housing and public utilities and the administration”, “the authorities are not responsible for the people”, “the authorities do not solve the problems of the city or its people”, “thieving”, “dishonest authorities”, “the region goes to rack and ruin, no kindergartens or jobs”, “one cannot even walk in the streets”, “corruption”, “a stagnant region with low pay”, “no perspectives in the future”, “the region is stagnating due to corruption among officials”. According to the local Census Bureau, the Volgograd region can be classified as a declining territory where the population decline

  13. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Adriano Maia; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee’s permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that “facilitators” under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and

  14. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Maia dos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee’s permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table. The study determined that “facilitators” under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of

  15. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Adriano Maia dos; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-08-01

    To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee's permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that "facilitators" under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and intermediate institutionalism. The regional interagency committee

  16. REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT'S PERSPECTIVES IN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai, OPRESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing regions' importance in Europe represents a striking phenomenon in the last years. Regional development is an evolving process that aims at reducing socio-economic disparities at the level of a certain territory, while boosting its potential. One of the European Union objectives is to sustain balanced and sustainable economic and social progress, strengthening economic and social cohesion of member countries. An important role in this process is played by the regions, which are considered closer to the citizens. In European states, the forms of regionalization correspond to different administrative and political realities existing in those countries. Models applied varies by the powers given to regional authorities, involved institutions, the degree of decentralization, being several types of regionalization.

  17. Regional Inflation and Financial Dollarization

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Martin; de Haas, Ralph; Sokolov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We exploit variation in consumer price inflation across 71 Russian regions to examine the relationship between the perceived stability of the domestic currency and financial dollarization. Our results show that regions with higher inflation experience an increase in deposit dollarization and a decrease in the dollarization of loans to households and firms in non-tradable sectors. The negative impact of inflation on credit dollarization is weaker in regions with less integrated banking markets...

  18. Institution Building for African Regionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Khadiagala, Gilbert M.

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1960s, African states have embraced regional integration as a vital mechanism for political cooperation and for pooling resources to overcome problems of small and fragmented economies. In building meaningful institutions for regionalism, however, Africans have faced the challenges of reconciling the diversities of culture, geography, and politics. As a result, African regional institutions are characterized by multiple and competing mandates and weak institutionalization. This stud...

  19. Regional approaches to hospital preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldin, Beth; Lam, Clarence; Franco, Crystal; Press, David; Waldhorn, Richard; Toner, Eric; O'Toole, Tara; Inglesby, Thomas V

    2007-03-01

    This article describes issues related to the engagement of hospitals and other community partners in a coordinated regional healthcare preparedness and response effort. The report is based on interviews with public health and hospital representatives from 13 regions or states across the country. It aims to identify key ingredients for building successful regional partnerships for healthcare preparedness as well as critical challenges and policy and practical recommendations for their development and sustainability.

  20. Status of Goos Regional Alliances

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Creation of regional GOOS bodies has substantially increased the number of Member States engaged in GOOS. This is happening through three complementary mechanisms: (i) creation of subsidiary bodies within the intergovernmental structure of the IOC (NEAR-GOOS, IOCARIBE-GOOS, Black Sea GOOS, WIOMAP); (ii) creation of regional groups within alternative intergovernmental structures operating on behalf of IOC (PacificGOOS in SOPAC); and (iii) creation of regional associations (EuroG...

  1. Regional Stability & Lessons Learned in Regional Peace Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Johnsen, Anton Asklund

    , and many of them were addressed at the conference: The withdrawal of international military forces, the Taliban, India/Pakistan relations, the need for regionalism, China’s role, EU and ASEAN as models for inspiration and regional perspectives from Iran and Afghanistan were all part of the talks...

  2. Regions and the Territorial Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ianos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Territorial cohesion is an important target of European Union, constantly promoted by its institutions and their representatives. In the context of the Europe 2020 strategy, one of the most important support documents, the region represents a very important issue, being considered to be the key to its successfulness. The region is seen as a support for the smart growth and all the operational policy concepts try to make use of the spatial potential, by taking better account of the territorial specificities. Two main questions play attention: the need to transform the present-day developmental regions into administrative ones is a priority? What kind of regionalization it must to be promoted? Correlating these issues with already defined territorial cohesion, the administrative region is a real tool for the future territorial development. The experience of the last 14 years asks urgently the building of a new territorial administrative reform, giving competences to regions. For instant, each development region is a construction resulted from a free association of the counties. Their role in the regional development is much reduced one, because their regional councils are not elected; decisions taken at this level are consultative for the social, economical, cultural or political actors.

  3. THE REGIONAL STRUCTURE OF SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina TODOROVIC

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches some of the characteristics of the regional development of Serbia, from the perspective of two models of territorial organization: one is governmental (administrative and statistical, and the other is functional. The imbalances in the levels of development of various territorial units of Serbia (regional disproportions are the consequence of many structural disharmonies, material limitations, and problems with populationstructure, during many years, all worsened by political and economic events at the end of the twentieth century. Also, in this paper we point out the main characteristics of undeveloped regions, the criteria with which we can define them, and a typology of the municipalities inside each such region.

  4. METHODOLOGY OF REGIONAL ECONOMY OPTIMIZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ainabek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development of the national economy directly depends on the optimality of its composite parts. This can be addressed through the appropriate balance of the sectors and the regions, the inner parts of their structure based on a common criterion of the evaluation of cost variables characterizing the parameters of the functioning of the regional actors. This paper shows theoretical principles and economic-mathematical model of optimization of the regional economy and the relations between the center and the regions based on the author’s approach.

  5. Deciphering Genomic Regions for High Grain Iron and Zinc Content Using Association Mapping in Pearl Millet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, N.; Satyavathi, C. Tara; Bharadwaj, C.; Nepolean, T.; Sankar, S. Mukesh; Singh, Sumer P.; Meena, Mahesh C.; Singhal, Tripti; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition, especially deficiency of two mineral elements, iron [Fe] and zinc [Zn] in the developing world needs urgent attention. Pearl millet is one of the best crops with many nutritional properties and is accessible to the poor. We report findings of the first attempt to mine favorable alleles for grain iron and zinc content through association mapping in pearl millet. An association mapping panel of 130 diverse lines was evaluated at Delhi, Jodhpur and Dharwad, representing all the three pearl millet growing agro-climatic zones of India, during 2014 and 2015. Wide range of variation was observed for grain iron (32.3–111.9 ppm) and zinc (26.6–73.7 ppm) content. Genotyping with 114 representative polymorphic SSRs revealed 0.35 mean gene diversity. STRUCTURE analysis revealed presence of three sub-populations which was further supported by Neighbor-Joining method of clustering and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). Marker-trait associations (MTAs) were analyzed with 267 markers (250 SSRs and 17 genic markers) in both general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM), however, MTAs resulting from MLM were considered for more robustness of the associations. After appropriate Bonferroni correction, Xpsmp 2261 (13.34% R2-value), Xipes 0180 (R2-value of 11.40%) and Xipes 0096 (R2-value of 11.38%) were consistently associated with grain iron and zinc content for all the three locations. Favorable alleles and promising lines were identified for across and specific environments. PPMI 1102 had highest number (7) of favorable alleles, followed by four each for PPMFeZMP 199 and PPMI 708 for across the environment performance for both grain Fe and Zn content, while PPMI 1104 had alleles specific to Dharwad for grain Fe and Zn content. When compared with the reference genome Tift 23D2B1-P1-P5, Xpsmp 2261 amplicon was identified in intergenic region on pseudomolecule 5, while the other marker, Xipes 0810 was observed to be overlapping with aspartic

  6. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Regional Sediment Budget for the Poipu Region of Kauai, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    represent regular maintenance activities such as dredging, bypassing, or nourishment . The region addressed in this study has experienced one or more of these...Hawaii Coastal Geology Group US United States USACE US Army Corps of Engineers USGS US Geological Survey WIS Wave Information Study ERDC/CHL...This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) reviews the development of a regional sediment budget for the Poipu Region on the

  7. The political economy of regionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Goyal (Sanjeev); K. Staal (Klaas)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe examine the incentives of regions to unite and separate. Separation allows for greater influence over the nature of political decision making while unification allows regions to exploit economies of scale in the provision of government. Our paper explores the influence of size, locati

  8. Regional Inflation and Financial Dollarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, M.; de Haas, R.; Sokolov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We exploit variation in consumer price inflation across 71 Russian regions to examine the relationship between the perceived stability of the local currency and financial dollarization. Our results show that regions with higher inflation experience an increase in the dollarization of house

  9. PLANNING DESIGN OFCOMPUTER REGION NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SongWei; GaoZhuang; GaoSong

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, authors describe the characters and the present situation of computer region network. Moreover, authors put forward the method to plan and design ration ally the computer regional network system depending on the actual situation, in order to share the resources of software and hardware resources of the network in best way and get higher efficiency of information management.

  10. Regional Inflation and Financial Dollarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, M.; de Haas, R.; Sokolov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We exploit variation in consumer price inflation across 71 Russian regions to examine the relationship between the perceived stability of the local currency and financial dollarization. Our results show that regions with higher inflation experience an increase in the dollarization of

  11. Adoption Resource Directory: Region X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983

    State, regional, and national adoption resources are described in this directory for residents of Region X states (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington). Emphasizing the adoption of children with special needs, the directory gives organizational contacts for parents in various stages of the adoption process and mentions resources for social…

  12. Analysis of regional climate strategies in the Barents region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himanen, S.; Inkeroeinen, J.; Latola, K.; Vaisanen, T.; Alasaarela, E.

    2012-11-15

    Climate change is a global phenomenon with especially harsh effects on the Arctic and northern regions. The Arctic's average temperature has risen at almost twice the rate as elsewhere in the past few decades. Since 1966, the Arctic land area covered by snow in early summer has shrunk by almost a fifth. The Barents Region consists of the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia (i.e. the European part of Russia). Climate change will cause serious impacts in the Barents Region because of its higher density of population living under harsh climatic conditions, thus setting it apart from other Arctic areas. In many cases, economic activities, like tourism, rely on certain weather conditions. For this reason, climate change and adaptation to it is of special urgency for the region. Regional climate change strategies are important tools for addressing mitigation and adaptation to climate change as they can be used to consolidate the efforts of different stakeholders of the public and private sectors. Regional strategies can be important factors in achieving the national and international goals. The study evaluated how the national climate change goals were implemented in the regional and local strategies and programmes in northern Finland. The specific goal was to describe the processes by which the regional strategies were prepared and implemented, and how the work was expanded to include the whole of northern Finland. Finally, the Finnish preparatory processes were compared to case examples of processes for preparing climate change strategies elsewhere in the Barents Region. This analysis provides examples of good practices in preparing a climate change strategy and implementing it. (orig.)

  13. COMBINATION OF GOALS STRATEGY REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Yu. Lapigin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the tools to identify strategicallyimportant objectives of regional development is not enough to build a developmentperspective, relying on something special,what distinguishes each region from therest. The article discusses approaches to the formation of the regional developmentstrategy, which is based on goals set by the results of the analysis of the main factors inthe development of the region. The study is based on the methodology of systems theoryand methods of strategic management. The most important results should include tools tobuild the tree of strategic objectives resultingfrom the implementation of the algorithm forconstructing planes of analysis and development of the region. The results can be used to develop a strategy for the developmentof socio-economic systems of various typesand forms.

  14. Regional Development of Eastern Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hergezelová

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The aim of the work is to provide an overview of regional development in Eastern Slovakia, where are Košice and Prešov Region. The originality of the work lies in the work of enriching the SWOT analysis from the author Eve Rajčáková, which is given in the book deals with the issue of Regional development and regional policy of the European Union and Slovakia. Research question: The conditions of life of people in eastern Slovakia. Method: For writing this contribution will be used method of analysis and statistics. Knowledge on this subject have been looking on the internet and in books and sources of information publicly available. Using the data collected, we dealt with the issue of regional development in the Košice and Prešov regions. Results: The topic was the beginning focused on the overall characteristics of eastern Slovakia. Furthermore, we are at work we dealt with social and economic phenomena in both regions of eastern Slovakia. We focused on GDP, unemployment and tourism, which is in the region is widespread. Society: It is well known that there are obviously different living conditions in eastern Slovakia as in other parts of Slovakia. People are forced to, mainly because of employment, leave their region to move or commute to work to the west. The paper point out the right of this negative phenomenon that is quite visible - high unemployment. Limitations: The limits of work are limited by problems of regional development in eastern Slovakia, mainly focusing on economic and social phenomena in the society.

  15. Pleiotropic Associations of Allelic Variants in a 2q22 Region with Risks of Major Human Diseases and Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Kulminski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gaining insights into genetic predisposition to age-related diseases and lifespan is a challenging task complicated by the elusive role of evolution in these phenotypes. To gain more insights, we combined methods of genome-wide and candidate-gene studies. Genome-wide scan in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study (N = 9,573 was used to pre-select promising loci. Candidate-gene methods were used to comprehensively analyze associations of novel uncommon variants in Caucasians (minor allele frequency~2.5% located in band 2q22.3 with risks of coronary heart disease (CHD, heart failure (HF, stroke, diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (ND, and mortality in the ARIC study, the Framingham Heart Study (N = 4,434, and the Health and Retirement Study (N = 9,676. We leveraged the analyses of pleiotropy, age-related heterogeneity, and causal inferences. Meta-analysis of the results from these comprehensive analyses shows that the minor allele increases risks of death by about 50% (p = 4.6×10-9, CHD by 35% (p = 8.9×10-6, HF by 55% (p = 9.7×10-5, stroke by 25% (p = 4.0×10-2, and ND by 100% (p = 1.3×10-3. This allele also significantly influences each of two diseases, diabetes and cancer, in antagonistic fashion in different populations. Combined significance of the pleiotropic effects was p = 6.6×10-21. Causal mediation analyses show that endophenotypes explained only small fractions of these effects. This locus harbors an evolutionary conserved gene-desert region with non-coding intergenic sequences likely involved in regulation of protein-coding flanking genes ZEB2 and ACVR2A. This region is intensively studied for mutations causing severe developmental/genetic disorders. Our analyses indicate a promising target region for interventions aimed to reduce risks of many major human diseases and mortality.

  16. Planned regional development: the creation of learning regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, P.H.; Kranendonk, R.P.; Laurentzen, L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, new ways of working in business and management, regional development and governmental steering (phases, levels, changes and growth perspectives) will be identified and described using both theoretical and empirical evidence from the case of Greenport Venlo.

  17. regional. Un análisis para las regiones europeas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Camacho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pese a encontrarnos inmersos en una economía globalizada, la innovación es en muchos aspectos un fenómeno esencialmente regional, donde los servicios (ignorados hasta ahora, y en particular aquellos denominados como servicios intensivos conocimiento (SIC, adquieren un papel central, gracias a su capacidad para transmitir conocimiento, en especial de tipo tácito. El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar una primera aproximación empírica a los efectos asociados a la localización de SIC, tomando 107 regiones europeas. Los resultados obtenidos apoyan la hipótesis de que los SIC ejercen un impacto positivo sobre el desempeño innovador regional, impacto que podría desbordarse hacia las regiones vecinas.

  18. The Region is Dead, Long Live the Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian; Metzger, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    If it today is commonly accepted that regions are ‘constructs’ – then who or what construct them, for what reasons, and by which means? How are they made manifest and durable as both mental geographies and mundane everyday realities (cf. Metzger, 2013)? Paasi (2010, p.2298) suggests that regions...... become actualized through “a plethora of practices, discourses, relations and connections that can have wider origins in space and time but are assembled and connected in historically contingent ways in cultural, economic and political contexts and struggles”. Furthermore, he suggests that regions...... practices that have led to the formation and more recently encroaching dissipation of a well-known EUropean region: Öresund. In this endeavour we will make an effort to be sensitive to how Öresund as a spatial entity interrelates with, depends upon or partially challenges/is challenged by other geographical...

  19. Region 8 (Pacific Southwest Region) FY 2012 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  20. Regiune, regional, regionalizare şi reprezentare politică (Region, regional, regionalisation and political representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş-Andrei PREUTESCU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Romania is at a crossroad to shape and redefine its regional territorial-administrative design as an European Union member. A regionalization process is at a controversial point in this moment and is necessarry to see if this process could have a significant impact to develop and consolidate democracy in this country. Following the main aspects of regionalism, regionalization and political discourses amoung politicians, the purpose of this article is to see if their is any kind of connection between regionalization process and the involvement of the citizens in public decisions. More so, the new institutional design could consolidate democracy and increase the public responsabilities from both sides: decision makers and citizens. Doing so could lead to better public policies in accordance with needs, expectations and desires of the citizens. In this way, what is called as „regional identity”, or„ local identity” could have more significance in the public imagination and consciousness. Furthermore the so called „movement” for better and developed communities is being shaped in this direction by political discourses and political ideas. What can create better conditions for shaping these democratic options is to have an important political and civic culture once the regionalization process is implemented. The progression of economy, tourism, political representation, culture, and institutions is a consequence of how much these elements are compatible in the regionalization process.

  1. Regional Branding: Building Brand Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Margarisová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional branding is one of several ways to promote rural regions and support development of socially, culturally and environmentally oriented economies in areas that are interesting due to their natural and cultural heritage. The article attempts to review the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of branding as conveyed by leading authors in the marketing field. The aim of this paper is to define brand as a broad complex of variables, which are used in building of its identity as a basis for creating value proposition and the position of a brand. Article briefly describes the most comprehensive labeling system for regional products at the micro-regional level is the one guaranteed by Association of Regional Brands (ARB. The main contribution of this article is a theoretical model of strategic management of a regional brand, which captures the interdependence of the individual steps of brand building as well as stakeholders. The starting point for building of brand value is a strategic analysis of the brand, including analysis of customer and competitors. The analysis of external factors is followed by analysis of the brand itself. The resulting relationship between the brand and the customer is based on value proposition representing benefits (functional, emotional, self‑expression. The concept of total product is connected with the concept of total brand and it is offered to the customer as a regional product. Finally it suggests possibilities for further research.

  2. From Concept of the Region to Regional Image of Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Rajović

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The focus of work is the understanding of the problems of regional development in recent times is becoming increasingly important socio - economic issue. The paper seeks to argue that the context and Regional Development provides an opportunity to resolve the paradox of development interpreted by many researchers. Issues of Regional Development of Montenegro for more than half a century did not have adequate theoretical or practical foundation. New current models of economic growth and development were based on sector priorities and policies, the short and medium term objectives. In order to slow down the aging process of the population of Montenegro and mitigate its effects, it is necessary to increase the birth rate, which would encourage the gradual rejuvenation of the population. The second group of measures relates to immigration, and the third to increase youth employment in order to prevent any more numerous emigrations. The problem employment/unemployment is one of the most socio - economic problems in Montenegro. Therefore, in the management regional development policy at EU level, special importance is given to finding adequate mechanisms and instruments that will contribute to the better functioning of labor markets, and thus to a more balanced regional development. In Montenegro, it is necessary to elaborate a new concept, a comprehensive regional development, which will be based on demographic, natural, economic and socio-cultural resources.

  3. Regional strategies for global leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghemawat, Pankaj

    2005-12-01

    The leaders of such global powerhouses as GE, Wal-Mart, and Toyota seem to have grasped two crucial truths: First, far from becoming submerged by the rising tide of globalization, geographic and other regional distinctions may in fact be increasing in importance. Second, regionally focused strategies, used in conjunction with local and global initiatives, can significantly boost a company's performance. The business and economic data reveal a highly regionalized world. For example, trade within regions, rather than across them, drove the surge of international commerce in the second half of the twentieth century. Regionalization is also apparent in foreign direct investment, companies' international sales, and competition among the world's largest multinationals. Harvard Business School Professor Pankaj Ghemawat says that the most successful companies employ five types of regional strategies in addition to--or even instead of--global ones: home base, portfolio, hub, platform, and mandate. Some companies adopt the strategies in sequence, but the most nimble switch from one to another and combine approaches as their markets and businesses evolve. At Toyota, for example, exports from the home base continue to be substantial even as the company builds up an international manufacturing presence. And as Toyota achieves economies of scale and scope with a strong network of hubs, the company also pursues economies of specialization through interregional mandates. Embracing regional strategies requires flexibility and creativity. A company must decide what constitutes a region, choose the most appropriate strategies, and mesh those strategies with the organization's existing structures. In a world that is neither truly global nor truly local, finding ways of coordinating within and across regions can deliver a powerful competitive advantage.

  4. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern English is an international language inthe world.Besides Great Britain,English is spokenas first language in 39 countries.These countries arelocated in different regions with different naturalfeatures,history development and cultural character-istics.Thus,English used in these different regionscarries its own regional character—forming Englishregional varieties.The main English regional varieties are:BritishEnglish,American English,Canadian English andSouth African English.Canada is a rich country inNorth America with its own characteristics,which of

  5. Regional climate change mitigation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, Ian H. [UNEP Collaborating Centre on Energy and Environment, and Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the key methodological issues that arise from an analysis of regional climate change mitigation options. The rationale for any analysis of regional mitigation activities, emphasising both the theoretical attractiveness and the existing political encouragement and the methodology that has been developed are reviewed. The differences arising from the fact that mitigation analyses have been taken from the level of the national - where the majority of the work has been completed to date - to the level of the international - that is, the `regional` - will be especially highlighted. (EG)

  6. Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the Phycomyces carB and carRA genes correlate with the kinetics of their mRNA accumulation in response to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Catalina; Benito, Ernesto P; Orejas, Margarita; Alvarez, María Isabel; Eslava, Arturo P

    2010-09-01

    Carotene biosynthesis in Phycomyces is photoinducible and carried out by phytoene dehydrogenase (encoded by carB) and a bifunctional enzyme possessing lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities (carRA). A light pulse followed by periods of darkness produced similar biphasic responses in the expression of the carB and carRA genes, indicating their coordinated regulation. Specific binding complexes were formed between the carB-carRA intergenic region and protein extracts from wild type mycelia grown in the dark or 8min after irradiation. These two conditions correspond to the points at which the expression of both genes is minimal, suggesting that these binding complexes are involved in the down-regulation of photocarotenogenesis in Phycomyces. Protein extracts from carotene mutants failed to form the dark retardation complex, suggesting a role of these genes in the regulation of photocarotenogenesis. In contrast, protein extracts from phototropic mutants formed dark retardation complexes identical to that of the wild type. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Penguins of the Magellan region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bingham

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The Magellan region, including the Falkland Islands, is one of the world´s most important areas for seabirds, and especially penguins. World-wide there are 17 species of penguin; 7 of these regularly breed around the coastal waters of South America, and 5 within the Magellan region. These are the King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus, Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua, Rockhopper Penguin (Eudyptes c. chrysocome, Macaroni Penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus and Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus. During the last five years, a review of the breeding populations of penguins within the Magellan region was conducted. This work included population censuses of all the surface breeding species throughout the Falkland Islands and southern South America. The results of this work are presented, along with other cited information, to provide a summary of the current knowledge of penguin populations within the Magellan region.

  8. Hydrologic landscape regions of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hydrologic landscape regions group areas according to their similarity in landscape and climate characteristics. These characteristics represent variables assumed to...

  9. Vietnam and the regional crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, Pietro Paolo

    2002-01-01

    inflows, should be understood in the broader frame of regional contingencies, and not be simplistically explained as investors' discontent (i.e., in order to pressure Vietnamese authorities into implementing a more orthodox neo-liberal agenda). And in a post-crisis regional economic reorganisation......The paper explores the linkages between Vietnam and the regional economy before and after the East Asian financial crisis of 1997 and 1998, indicating that the country is more closely associated with the region than normally assumed. Thus, key indicators, such as falling foreign direct investment...... (including a restructuring of the so-called 'flying geese' pattern) Vietnam's chances of benefitting from closer integration in the world economy will depend on a clearcut industrial and trade policy, rather than on embarking a so-called 'neutral trade regime'. Preliminary evidence seems to indicate...

  10. Regional transport sector mitigation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Peter [EECG Consultants, Gaborone (Botswana)

    1998-10-01

    The rationale for conducting climate change mitigation studies in the transport sector is on the premise that: The transport sector is the second largest consumer of fossil fuels in the region; The regional transport sector is an area with high opportunity for infrastructural development under UNFCCC financial mechanism; The regional transport sector is crucial in the SADC region for trade and coupled with the Trade Protocol will play a major role in development hence the need to make it efficient in terms of energy demand and provision of services; The sector offers many mitigation options but with a challenge to evaluate their energy saving and GHG saving potential and yet there is need to quantify possible emission reduction for possible future emission trading. This is also a sector with potential to qualify for financing through Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) recently stipulated in the Kyoto Protocol. (au)

  11. Region 7 Title V facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web map shows the Region 7 Title V facilities (Clean Air Act major sources), any Class I areas within 300 km of R7 States, and any Tribal areas within 50 miles...

  12. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 9 (AZ, CA, HI, NV, AS, GU) is provided here.

  13. Isolated Echinococcosis of cervical region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khare, Pratima; Kala, Pooja; Gupta, Renu; Chauhan, Nidhi

    2014-01-01

    .... We report here a very rare case of isolated hydatid cyst in a 45-year-old female patient, who presented with swelling in right cervical region about 5 cm below the angle of mandible with no evidence...

  14. Groundwater Vulnerability Regions of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The regions onThis map represent areas with similar hydrogeologic characteristics thought to represent similar potentials for contamination of groundwater and/or...

  15. Census Bureau Regional Office Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The Census Bureau has six regional offices to facilitate data collection, data dissemination and geographic operations within their boundary. The surveys these...

  16. The Landform Regions of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — A landscape is a collection of land shapes or land forms. Landform regions are a grouping of individual landscape features that have a common geomophology. In Iowa,...

  17. Euroregions in the Podrinje region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Branka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Regionalization is a contemporary conception of a development within a society. We are interested in cooperation at regions whose area is intersected by the national border. One of those borders is the Drina River that in different periods had changeable role of connecting or separating. In this way we want to stress the necessity of making a stronger, functional connection and developing of overall process of integration in the Podrinje region, on a land between the two republics-Serbia and the Republic of Srpska, because we think that this area has the most reasons for that, but so far it has been done very little. The first attempts to form Euroregions in Lower Podrinje region have already started, but it lacks many activities for this area to receive a cross-border role that it deserves.

  18. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 6 (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX) is provided here.

  19. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the conformity SIP adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, OH, WI) is provided here.

  20. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 10 (AK, ID, OR, WA) is provided here.

  1. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 1 (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT) is provided here.

  2. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 2 (NJ, NY, PR, VI) is provided here.

  3. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 3 (DE, DC, MD, PA, VA, WV) is provided here.

  4. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 4 (AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN) is provided here.

  5. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 7 (IA, KS, MO, NE) is provided here.

  6. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 3 (CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY) is provided here.

  7. Regions compete for French synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Ten regions in France have placed bids to host the planned national synchrotron Soleil. Leading contenders include a joint bid from Ile-de-France and Essonne for Orsay, offering FF 1 billion towards the construction costs (2 paragraphs).

  8. [Regional anesthesia and cancer immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Toru; Mori, Katsuya; Inoue, Kei; Suzuki, Takeshi; Morisaki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Regional anesthesia has been widely applied as an excellent method for perioperative analgesia. Recent studies suggested that regional anesthesia is a promising approach to minimize the risk of surgical site infection and postoperative cancer recurrence, subsequently providing the benefits to the long-term outcome. In particular, it is of great interest that regional anesthesia might be able to reduce cancer recurrence. In cancer patients, innate immunity against cancer could be depressed, resulting in the predisposition to evoke metastasis. Besides, during the perioperative periods, tumor immunity is significantly depressed due to surgical pain, activation of sympathetic nervous system, inflammatory responses, and others. In this review article, we discuss the tumor immunity during the perioperative period, with focus on the alterations of tumor immunity and regional anesthesia.

  9. US Forest Service Regional Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting all the National Forest System lands administered by a Region. The area encompasses private lands, other governmental agency...

  10. Region 9 NPL Sites - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  11. EPA Region 1 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a dataset of Tribal/Native American lands in the New England region. EPA notes that there are some disputes over the exact boundaries of the territories of...

  12. Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin-Acevedo, Madeleine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "From School to Jobs: Africa's Dilemma" (Moulin-Acevedo); "Helping Change in Eastern Europe"; "Recognizing the Dignity of Indigenous Peoples"; "An Employment Plan for Pakistan"; and "Around the Continents." (JOW)

  13. Regional differences of consumer preferences when shopping for regional products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Kalábová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents partial results of a research on consumer preferences when shopping for groceries. It is focused on regional products and consumer preferences in relation to the country of origin of food products. The main objective of this paper is to find the existence of spatial relationships between spatial deployment of regional products and consumer preferences for regional products. It will be necessary to create a data model for monitoring the deployment of regional products and also a data model for tracking important indicators of consumer behavior in all regions of the Czech Republic. The results are based on questionnaire survey that was conducted within the period from October 2010 to January 2011 on a sample of 3767 respondents from the Czech Republic, via both online questionnaires and their printed version. For the data collection the questionnaire system ReLa, developed by the Department of Marketing and Trade at Faculty of Business and Economics at Mendel University in Brno, was used. Data was processed with statistical software STATISTICA (ver. 10. Spatial visualisation was processed with GIS software ArcGIS (ver. 10.1. Preferences for food of Czech origin were analysed in relation to identification criteria. The research results show that the origin of food has an important role in consumer purchase decision-making. There is no significant difference in importance of this factor based on gender of consumers, however, we could prove moderate dependence on respondent’s occupation, education and age. We could also experience regional differences in levels of preferences of local products or products of Czech origin in regard of 14 regions of the Czech Republic. χ2 (N = 3767 = 245.25; p < 0.001. Value of Pearson’s coefficient of contingency is 0.334.

  14. ESPC Regional Arctic Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the Navy the capability to conduct short-term (1 week) to extended (2 weeks) coupled weather forecasts for the Arctic region. APPROACH To...sensitivity of the Arctic weather forecast to key numerical parameters; and 5) conduct extensive validation and verification of the coupled system and...SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ESPC Regional Arctic Prediction System 5a. CONTRACT

  15. Sport Tourism: Regional Promotion Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Nuno; Ribeiro, J. Cadima; Viseu, José

    2004-01-01

    The main purposes of this paper are (i) to analyze the regional promotion strategies of the UEFA Euro 2004 and (ii) to contribute for the improvement of planning and implementation strategies of tourism marketing at regional level. Data regarding these strategies were collected and synthesided. We verified if these match some of the theoretical issues of promotion and tourism marketing. Despite the fact that already many studies have been made, internationally, on the impact of ...

  16. Detection of Complex Salient Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petia Radeva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of interest point detectors is to find, in an unsupervised way, keypoints easy to extract and at the same time robust to image transformations. We present a novel set of saliency features based on image singularities that takes into account the region content in terms of intensity and local structure. The region complexity is estimated by means of the entropy of the gray-level information; shape information is obtained by measuring the entropy of significant orientations. The regions are located in their representative scale and categorized by their complexity level. Thus, the regions are highly discriminable and less sensitive to confusion and false alarm than the traditional approaches. We compare the novel complex salient regions with the state-of-the-art keypoint detectors. The presented interest points show robustness to a wide set of image transformations and high repeatability as well as allow matching from different camera points of view. Besides, we show the temporal robustness of the novel salient regions in real video sequences, being potentially useful for matching, image retrieval, and object categorization problems.

  17. Social attitudes and regional inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Muštra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the budgets of the European Union (EU become tighter, the questions about the effectiveness of EU’s expenditure, especially the most important parts such as Cohesion policy, are hotly debated. The aim of this paper is to examine whether the presence of social attitudes may influence the effectiveness of EU budget expenditure, measured by the level of regional inequalities. The analysis starts by focusing on individuals’ attitudes towards income from their own effort and income which is derived from other people’s effort, having in mind that individual actions depend on their attitudes. The next step establishes the link between the income from other people’s effort with the re-distributive dimension of the EU budget, considering that different attitudes among individuals in the EU could lead to significant differences in effectiveness of this redistributive policy among European regions and, consequently, diverse regional inequalities. Empirical research uses data for 27 EU countries observed over two waves of European Value Surveys: 1999-2000 (Wave 1 and 2008–2009 (Wave 2. The results indicate a significant role of social attitudes for regional inequalities, which raises the question of the appropriateness of simplification and uniform regional policy instruments in solving EU regional problems.

  18. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, L D; Johnstone, B M; Bania, T M; Balser, Dana S; Wenger, Trey V; Cunningham, V

    2015-01-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions contains $\\sim2000$ HII region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic HII region mid-infrared morphology of WISE $12\\,\\,\\mu\\,m$ emission surrounding $22\\,\\mu\\,m$ emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope (GBT) hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) and radio continuum detections at X-band (9GHz; 3cm) of 302 WISE HII region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone $225^{\\circ} > l > -20^{\\circ}$, $|b| \\le 6^{\\circ}$. Here we extend the sky coverage of our HII region Discovery Survey (HRDS), which now contains nearly 800 HII regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, five have ($l, b, v$) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to ...

  19. Solar transition region above sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, H; Teriaca, L; Landi, E; Marsch, E

    2009-01-01

    We study the TR properties above sunspots and the surrounding plage regions, by analyzing several sunspot spectra obtained by SUMER in March 1999 and November 2006. We compare the SUMER spectra observed in the umbra, penumbra, plage, and sunspot plume regions. The Lyman line profiles averaged in each region are presented. For the sunspot observed in 2006, the electron densities, DEM, and filling factors of the TR plasma in the four regions are also investigated. The self-reversals of the Lyman line profiles are almost absent in umbral regions at different locations (heliocentric angle up to $49^\\circ$) on the solar disk. In the sunspot plume, the Lyman lines are also not reversed, whilst the lower Lyman line profiles observed in the plage region are obviously reversed. The TR densities of the umbra and plume are similar and one order of magnitude lower than those of the plage and penumbra. The DEM curve of the sunspot plume exhibits a peak centered around $\\log(T/\\rm{K})\\sim5.45$, which exceeds the DEM of oth...

  20. Promotion and regional development. Implementation of regional productive development agencies. The case of Maule region, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Yamil Alul González

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Regional Productive Development Agencies implemented in Chile in 2006, were developed as a way to answer the longing desire to territorially decentralize, and that the own Regions be whom define their future. The Agencies have the responsibility to develop innovation and productive development Agendas in participative processes, which means with public, academic and private actors. Also, the Agencies have the mission to implement Competitive Improvement Plans-PMC (clusters in prioritized economic sectors by the own region. These PMC are leaded by private actors in each sector.

  1. REGIONAL ECONOMIC GROWTH THROUGH TOURISM. THE CASE OF REGION WEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoi Ionut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The regional development should aim to correlate and integrate tourism among the other integrative parts of the regional and local development, taking into account the fact that a region’s prosperity as effect of tourism development may be shown clearly in several stages: on the spot (as a result of direct consumption of the tourist product, on short term (through continuous absorption of the work-force and encouraging the welcoming commerce and in the long run (concentrating capital for investment in the general infrastructure and the one of tourism, in structures of reception for tourism and in the development of urban services. The analysis of intra-regional disparities as part of the economic growth at the level of Region West starts off with the idea that each component county has a different landscape, which favored or inhibited their economic growth; in the same time, each component county has its own specific, which can be promoted through tourism, inducing in time a regional income, and respectively, a social-economic and cultural growth of less developed areas.

  2. Regional sinkhole susceptibility maps: The Latium Region case (central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vigna, F.; Teoli, P.; Mazza, R.; Leoni, G.; Capelli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Several and frequent studies were internationally presented about landslide susceptibility, meanwhile in literature is missing a broad diffusion of studies regarding sinkhole susceptibility. That's why sinkhole recurrence depends on several geological conditions related to specific geological and hydrogeological context (sinkhole prone area) that vary case by case. Notwithstanding this regionalization problem of sinkhole recurrence, in the central Appenine sedimentary basins (Italy) a certain number of geological, geomorphologic and hydrogeological conditions (sinkhole predisposing issues) can be considered in common between the surveyed sinkholes. Eventually this could be compared with similar geological conditions and sinkhole occurrence in the rest of Italy or in other countries. In this case study is presented a probabilistic approach regarding the Latium Region deriving from the comparison between the regional sinkhole inventory realized during a precedent project and the dataset of the new Hydrogeological Map of Latium Region (scale 1:100.000). Indexed elements, chosen because associated to the majority of sinkhole phenomena, are: outcropping lithologies, water table depth, main faults (even if buried), hydrothermal springs, land use and the epicentres of recent earthquakes. These indexed elements were weighted and combined in a matrix which preliminary result is the sinkhole susceptibility map of Latium Region. When definitively validated, this approach could be suitable for local authorities to planning more targeted studies in major hazard areas.

  3. Traditional and regional food in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbicka, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Regional and traditional products in the European Union - basic legal regulations. Traditional and regional products in the Polish legislation. National and regional food quality schemes. Quality and safety or traditional and regional food. Polish traditional and regional products registered with the European Union and their characteristics. Opportunities for and barriers to the development of the market of traditional and regional products in Poland.

  4. THE ENVIRONMENT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Bechis Liviu; MOSCVICIOV, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the difference between the two concepts regionalism and regionalization. It also presents the three types of regionalism analysis depending on the dimension and the nature of the relations: regionalism at national level, transnational regionalism and international regionalism analysis.

  5. Regional Aspects of New Industrialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakov Petrovich Silin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the authors substantiate the need to consider the regional economic and other conditions when carrying out various essential transformations in the national economy of the country. We have argued the importance of new industrialization for overcoming the technological lag of the country and its regions and for supporting the large-scale structural transformations. We have proved that the complex set of the interconnected concepts and the theories of macro- and microlevels may be the theoretical platform for the paradigm of new industrialization. These are the theory of economic growth, the theory of the modernization of the economy, the theory of the change of technological ways during the industrial revolutions, theories of innovative development, developments in the field of the institutional theory. The authors have shown that the transition to new industrialization is the fundamental historical pattern for the majority of the countries of the world, including industrially developed ones. The purpose of the article is to identify the brightest tendencies and features of the development of the Ural macro-region in the years of market reforms as well as the definition of the strategic transformations in the context of the formation of new industrialization. The hypothesis of the research assumes that the revealed regional features of the Ural macroregion’s economic development are the prerequisites of its development as the centre of the modernization of the Russian economy. On the basis of the analysis of three groups of statistic data for the twenty-five year period of liberal and monetary reforms, the brightest tendencies and features of the development of the Ural macro-region are revealed. We have emphasized that the Ural macro-region has managed to keep its historically developed code — the industrial model of the economy, which have been developing for many decades. The authors have made a significant contribution of

  6. Regional Disparities along the Romanian-Hungarian Border Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EGON NAGY

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the actual state and condition of territorial inequalities at the Romanian-Hungarian border region, which shows - at present - an evident advantage of the Hungarian side, from the point of view of complex socio-economical aspects. This advantage is especially outstanding for the Hungarian side in the field of infrastructural supply (drinking water, natural gas, and public sewage networks, but it is valid for some characteristics of human capital, too, (above all, with regard to the illiteracy rate and the proportion of highly skilled persons with bachelor degree. Despite these difficulties, these inequalities are not insurmountable and should not affect efficient cross-border cooperation between the two countries. This regional inventory facilitates the evaluation of the starting-point of this kind of cooperation and also depicts some aspects of the interregional cooperation of the four counties north of the Romanian-Hungarian border region which belong to the Carpathian Euroregion.

  7. Users guide to REGIONAL-1: a regional assessment model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Eadie, W.J.; Powell, D.C.

    1979-09-01

    A guide was prepared to allow a user to run the PNL long-range transport model, REGIONAL 1. REGIONAL 1 is a computer model set up to run atmospheric assessments on a regional basis. The model has the capability of being run in three modes for a single time period. The three modes are: (1) no deposition, (2) dry deposition, (3) wet and dry deposition. The guide provides the physical and mathematical basis used in the model for calculating transport, diffusion, and deposition for all three modes. Also the guide includes a program listing with an explanation of the listings and an example in the form of a short-term assessment for 48 hours. The purpose of the example is to allow a person who has past experience with programming and meteorology to operate the assessment model and compare his results with the guide results. This comparison will assure the user that the program is operating in a proper fashion.

  8. NWRS Region 7 Inventory & Monitoring Regional Annual Report, FY2011 : Alaska Region FY 2011 Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report for Region 7 discusses the goals and objectives of the Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) program for fiscal year 2011. The introduction discusses...

  9. Regional Community and International Relations: the Volgograd Region Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danakari Richard A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the complex and controversial problems of the new regional communities’ formation and the impact of the interethnic relations sphere on them. The author notes that the processes of interaction between representatives of different cultures and civilizations, ethnic groups and religions have become increasingly controversial and tense in the context of continuous social dynamics. Similarly to the Russian society as a whole, regional communities are in a state of transitivity. They get transformed, they acquire new qualities such as multicasting and heterogeneity, multi-ethnicity and multi-confessionalism, fragmentarity and multiculturality. This fact increases the risks and uncertainties, problematizes future prospects. National non-governmental organizations are increasingly positioning themselves as civil society institutions at the present stage of social development at the regional level. They perform a difficult dual task: on the one hand, they ensure the preservation and development of history, native language, culture, ethnic traditions, and on the other hand, they work on the integration, on the common identity and the Russian nation formation. On the territory of the Volgograd region, largely due to the active cooperation of regional authorities and local authorities with national public associations, international and inter-confessional relations are stable. The basis of such activity is respect for history, native language, culture, tradition, religion, national dignity of all people in the region, regardless of their belonging to a certain ethnic group or religion. Over two decades of accumulated considerable experience of joint inter-ethnic dialogue and cooperation, provided tolerance and peace, harmony and mutual understanding between people of different ethnicities and religions in the country.

  10. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association

  11. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Regional Sediment Budget for the Kekaha Region of Kauai, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    study regions, have been developed by the University of Hawaii Coastal Geology Group (UH CGG) (Fletcher et al. 2012) for the US Geological Survey...maintenance activities such as dredging, bypassing, or nourishment . The region addressed in this study has experienced one or more of these activities... Coastal Geology Group US United States USACE US Army Corps of Engineers USGS US Geological Survey WIS Wave Information Study ERDC/CHL CHETN

  12. Regional Development Disparities In Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana - Craciun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Regional economic integration provides both, developing countries and the least developed, the ability to enjoy the benefits of a larger „European “market, whether it is their home or their adoptive home. This issue gains a larger dimension in the context of economic crisis and euro zone. The argument for this statement is that regional development disparities may negatively affect economic cohesion from European space. There were identified two obstacles of the efficient use of European resources. The first one is the geographic barrier: the inability to make labor division due to barrier restrictions. The second one is the lack of an entrepreneurial culture. The entrepreneurial culture provides the flexibility of economy - in particular, the structural flexibility to cope with changes in the division of labor. These disparities can be gradual changed, and they are primarily result from autonomous technological innovations made ​​in response to depletion of resources or affected environment. Analyzing regional development disparities there were applied well known research methods: analytical and statistical method. The analysis consists on selecting and describing a set of indicators “measures” for regional competitiveness, able to show the situation of the region in metric terms, but also from economic point of view.

  13. Vital coalitions, vital regions; cooperation in sustainable, regional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Many rural regions in Europe are undergoing a dynamic transition, driven by forces of urbanisation and agricultural development, new patterns of production and consumption, and new societal demands. However, while the historical rural-urban divide is eroding, rural landscapes are becoming more impor

  14. Regional profile, energy-impacted communities: Region VIII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    This report has data on population, administration, finance, housing, health and safety, human services, education, and water and sewage for 325 energy-impacted communities. A review of current and potential energy developments in the region shows over 900 energy resource impacts listed for the 325 impacted communities. Coal development represents over one-third of the developments listed. Communities reporting coal development are distributed as follows: Colorado (36), Montana (42), North Dakota (61), South Dakota (13), Utah (73), and Wyoming (35). Energy-conversion initiatives represent another high incidence of energy-resource impact, with uranium development following closely with 83 communities reporting uranium development impact in the region. These projections indicate continued development of regional energy resources to serve national energy requirements. The 325 impacted communities as reported: Colorado (46), Montana (73), North Dakota (62), South Dakota (21), Utah (80), and Wyoming (43) follow a distribution pattern similar to that of future projects which illustrates that no area of the region will escape the impacts of energy development. (ERA citation 04:041706)

  15. Extending Regional Seismic Travel Time (RSTT) Tomography to New Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Seism . Soc. Am. 59, 1365–1398. Flanagan, M. P., D. A. Dodge, and S. C. Myers (2008). GT merge process: Version 2.0, LLNL technical report, LLNL-TR...Validation of regional and teleseismic travel-time models by relocating ground-truth events, Bull. Seism . Soc. Amer. 94: 897–919. Zhao, L.-S. (1993

  16. Vital coalitions, vital regions; cooperation in sustainable, regional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Many rural regions in Europe are undergoing a dynamic transition, driven by forces of urbanisation and agricultural development, new patterns of production and consumption, and new societal demands. However, while the historical rural-urban divide is eroding, rural landscapes are becoming more

  17. Regional welfare disparities and regional economic growth in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Huy Hoang,

    2009-01-01

    This study had multiple objectives. First, it aimed at examining regional inequality in several welfare variables, such as health and education during the 1998-2004 period, and per capita income over time from 1990 to 2006. The first objective of the study was to gain a better understanding about

  18. Employment growth and regional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Rikard; Hansen, Høgni Kalsø; Winther, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the potential drivers behind uneven regional development in the context of employment growth in Denmark and Sweden. In particular, we are interested in the roles of urbanization, industrial change and the rise of the new economy as manifested in the growth of the two economies...... in 2002–2007. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to analyse the impact of a number of key industrial sectors on regional employment growth in the two countries. The empirical analysis is based on longitudinal matched employer–employee data retrieved from official registers in each economy from 2002...... economies, we find that, although in general these economies react relatively similarly to changes, embarking on a narrower analysis of the individual sectors reveals marked national differences. This indicates that context matters in the analysis of regional economic dynamics in terms of structure, system...

  19. Regional Cooperation to Strengthen Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnini, Margot; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

    2016-06-06

    President Obama’s decision over four years ago to ”pivot” toward Asia represented an important strategic shift in American foreign policy and a rebalancing of U.S. economic and security engagement in the Asia-Pacific countries. The United States has since supported a variety of regional initiatives aimed at promoting nuclear security and safeguards. When a new regional organization, the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network (APSN) was established in 2010, DOE/NNSA became an early member and enthusiastic advocate. Launched on the initiative of Australia, Japan, Republic of Korea, and Indonesia, the APSN aims to strengthen the quality and effectiveness of safeguards implementation in the Asia-Pacific region.

  20. Regional sea level change in the Thailand-Indonesia region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoglio-Marc, L.; Becker, M. H.; Buchhaupt, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is expected that the regional sea level rise will strongly affect particular regions with direct impacts including submergence of coastal zones, rising water tables and salt intrusion into groundwaters. It can possibly also exacerbate other factors as floodings, associated to storms and hurricanes, as well as ground subsidence of anthropogenic nature. The Thailand-Vietnam-Indonesian region is one of those zones. On land, the Chao-Praya and Mekong Delta are fertile alluvial zones. The potential for sea level increases and extreme floodings due to global warming makes the Deltas a place where local, regional, and global environmental changes are converging. We investigate the relative roles of regional and global mechanisms resulting in multidecadal variations and inflections in the rate of sea level change. Altimetry and GRACE data are used to investigate the variation of land floodings. The land surface water extent is evaluated at 25 km sampling intervals over fifteen years (1993-2007) using a multisatellite methodology which captures the extent of episodic and seasonal inundations, wetlands, rivers, lakes, and irrigated agriculture, using passive and active (microwaves and visible observations. The regional sea level change is analysed during the period 1993-2012 using satellite altimetry, wind and ocean model data, tide gauge data and GPS. The rates of absolute eustatic sea level rise derived from satellite altimetry through 19-year long precise altimeter observations are in average higher than the global mean rate. Several tide gauge records indicate an even higher sea level rise relative to land. We show that the sea level change is closely linked to the ENSO mode of variability and strongly affected by changes in wind forcing and ocean circulation. We have determined the vertical crustal motion at a given tide gauge location by differencing the tide gauge sea level time-series with an equivalent time-series derived from satellite altimetry and by computing

  1. Automatic thoracic body region localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, PeiRui; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, YuBing; Xie, ShiPeng; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    Radiological imaging and image interpretation for clinical decision making are mostly specific to each body region such as head & neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. For automating image analysis and consistency of results, standardizing definitions of body regions and the various anatomic objects, tissue regions, and zones in them becomes essential. Assuming that a standardized definition of body regions is available, a fundamental early step needed in automated image and object analytics is to automatically trim the given image stack into image volumes exactly satisfying the body region definition. This paper presents a solution to this problem based on the concept of virtual landmarks and evaluates it on whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. The method first selects a (set of) reference object(s), segments it (them) roughly, and identifies virtual landmarks for the object(s). The geometric relationship between these landmarks and the boundary locations of body regions in the craniocaudal direction is then learned through a neural network regressor, and the locations are predicted. Based on low-dose unenhanced CT images of 180 near whole-body PET/CT scans (which includes 34 whole-body PET/CT scans), the mean localization error for the boundaries of superior of thorax (TS) and inferior of thorax (TI), expressed as number of slices (slice spacing ≍ 4mm)), and using either the skeleton or the pleural spaces as reference objects, is found to be 3,2 (using skeleton) and 3, 5 (using pleural spaces) respectively, or in mm 13, 10 mm (using skeleton) and 10.5, 20 mm (using pleural spaces), respectively. Improvements of this performance via optimal selection of objects and virtual landmarks and other object analytics applications are currently being pursued. and the skeleton and pleural spaces used as a reference objects

  2. Social Facilitation: the Kaliningrad Region and Russian Mainland Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toropov Pavel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors look at the concept of social facilitation as a possible component of Russian social consolidation in the course of social reforms. The article focuses on the results of an empirical study of the levels and characteristics of competence in social facilitation, which is here understood as the ability to apply certain knowledge and systems of skills and as a success rate of actions based on experience in improving the conditions of social development. The study was conducted in the Kaliningrad region in 2012—2013. The data was obtained through a survey of 400 respondents using the authors’ methodology encompassing eight basic elements of competence and a structured interview aimed at a better understanding of the subject of the study and attitudes towards it. The data is compared against the results of a similar study in two regions of central Russia with similar conditions. The results suggest a disharmonic and inconsistent structure of competence in social facilitation, low motivation for social activity in youth, and a narrow range of ideas about possible areas of personal activities in the current conditions. Gender differences are identified in the level and structure of competence. The authors believe that certain differences in competence components identified through mathematical methods are determined by the geographical characteristics of the Kaliningrad region — its exclave nature, a relatively small territory, and proximity to the EU countries. It is stressed that the regional conditions affecting motivation, forms and areas of activities, and structure of experience should be taken into account in selecting means and methods of organising youth activities. They can also serve as a basis for the regional youth policy.

  3. Connectivity graphs of uncertainty regions

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, Erin; Lenchner, Jonathan; Sember, Jeff; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Stege, Ulrike; Stolpner, Svetlana; Weibel, Christophe; Whitesides, Sue

    2010-01-01

    We study a generalization of the well known bottleneck spanning tree problem called "Best Case Connectivity with Uncertainty": Given a family of geometric regions, choose one point per region, such that the length of the longest edge in a spanning tree of a disc intersection graph is minimized. We show that this problem is NP-hard even for very simple scenarios such as line segments and squares. We also give exact and approximation algorithms for the case of line segments and unit discs respectively.

  4. Governance in regional development planning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to lay part of the groundwork for a new project aimed at exploring governance aspects concerned with regional development planning (RDP) in Denmark. The fundamental objective is to help establish and clarify a number of research questions to delve into the conditions...... and opportunities for anchoring and implementing such RDP. The paper mainly adopts a descriptive approach to portray tentative pathways to explore and discuss regional governance structures, procedures and practices that are being developed in establishing new RDP processes, strategies and plans....

  5. Afghanistan's Role in Regional Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Karzai

    2006-01-01

    @@ At the invitation of Cui Liru, President of China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR), Mr.Hamid Karzai,President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, paid a visit to CICIR on June 20, 2006.In his speech before an audience of several hundred researchers, President Karzai addressed many issues Afghanistan is now facing, including the achievements of peace and reconstruction, the necessities and ways for Afghanistan to re-join in the regional affairs and the international community, the role of Afghanistan in the regional development and prosperity, and the meaning of a stable Afghanistan to China. Following are the contents of his speech.

  6. Geospatial Absorption and Regional Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOAN MAC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The geospatial absorptions are characterized by a specific complexity both in content and in their phenomenological and spatial manifestation fields. Such processes are differentiated according to their specificity to pre-absorption, absorption or post-absorption. The mechanisms that contribute to absorption are extremely numerous: aggregation, extension, diffusion, substitution, resistivity (resilience, stratification, borrowings, etc. Between these mechanisms frequent relations are established determining an amplification of the process and of its regional effects. The installation of the geographic osmosis phenomenon in a given territory (a place for example leads to a homogenization of the geospatial state and to the installation of the regional homogeneity.

  7. Fibromatosis of the Submandibular Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Nan Chang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromatoses are benign tumors that can occur anywhere in the body. They are locally aggressive and tend to recur; they also cause considerable morbidity, particularly when they arise in the head and neck. Fibromatosis in the submandibular region is rare. Here, we present a case of fibromatosis of the submandibular region in a 42-year-old female who presented with a right submandibular mass. The patient underwent complete excision of the fibromatosis, showed negative margins and had no adjuvant therapy. Her recovery was uneventful, and there was no recurrence or neurological deficit 1 year after the operation.

  8. Kagami-Ogata syndrome: a clinically recognizable upd(14)pat and related disorder affecting the chromosome 14q32.2 imprinted region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tsutomu; Kagami, Masayo

    2016-02-01

    Human chromosome 14q32.2 carries paternally expressed genes including DLK1 and RTL1, and maternally expressed genes including MEG3 and RTL1as, along with the germline-derived DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) and the postfertilization-derived MEG3-DMR. Consistent with this, paternal uniparental disomy 14 (upd(14)pat), and epimutations (hypermethylations) and microdeletions affecting the IG-DMR and/or the MEG3-DMR of maternal origin, result in a unique phenotype associated with characteristic face, a small bell-shaped thorax with coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly and polyhydramnios. Recently, the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' (KOS) has been approved for this clinically recognizable disorder. Here, we review the current knowledge about KOS. Important findings include the following: (1) the facial 'gestalt' and the increased coat-hanger angle constitute pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood/puberty; (2) the unmethylated IG-DMR and MEG3-DMR of maternal origin function as the imprinting control centers in the placenta and body respectively, with a hierarchical interaction regulated by the IG-DMR for the methylation pattern of the MEG3-DMR in the body; (3) RTL1 expression level becomes ~2.5 times increased in the absence of functional RTL1as-encoded microRNAs that act as a trans-acting repressor for RTL1; (4) excessive RTL1 expression and absent MEG expression constitute the primary underlying factor for the phenotypic development; and (5) upd(14)pat accounts for approximately two-thirds of KOS patients, and epimutations and microdeletions are identified with a similar frequency. Furthermore, we refer to diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  9. Kagami–Ogata syndrome: a clinically recognizable upd(14)pat and related disorder affecting the chromosome 14q32.2 imprinted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tsutomu; Kagami, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Human chromosome 14q32.2 carries paternally expressed genes including DLK1 and RTL1, and maternally expressed genes including MEG3 and RTL1as, along with the germline-derived DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) and the postfertilization-derived MEG3-DMR. Consistent with this, paternal uniparental disomy 14 (upd(14)pat), and epimutations (hypermethylations) and microdeletions affecting the IG-DMR and/or the MEG3-DMR of maternal origin, result in a unique phenotype associated with characteristic face, a small bell-shaped thorax with coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly and polyhydramnios. Recently, the name ‘Kagami–Ogata syndrome' (KOS) has been approved for this clinically recognizable disorder. Here, we review the current knowledge about KOS. Important findings include the following: (1) the facial ‘gestalt' and the increased coat-hanger angle constitute pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood/puberty; (2) the unmethylated IG-DMR and MEG3-DMR of maternal origin function as the imprinting control centers in the placenta and body respectively, with a hierarchical interaction regulated by the IG-DMR for the methylation pattern of the MEG3-DMR in the body; (3) RTL1 expression level becomes ~2.5 times increased in the absence of functional RTL1as-encoded microRNAs that act as a trans-acting repressor for RTL1; (4) excessive RTL1 expression and absent MEG expression constitute the primary underlying factor for the phenotypic development; and (5) upd(14)pat accounts for approximately two-thirds of KOS patients, and epimutations and microdeletions are identified with a similar frequency. Furthermore, we refer to diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26377239

  10. Dual detection of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella species by real-time PCR targeting the 23S-5S rRNA gene spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Benson, R; Pelish, T; Brown, E; Winchell, J M; Fields, B

    2010-03-01

    Although the majority of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) are caused by Legionella pneumophila, an increasing number of other Legionella species have been reported to cause human disease. There are no clinical presentations unique to LD and hence accurate laboratory tests are required for early diagnosis. Therefore, we designed a real-time PCR assay that targets the 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer region (23S-5S PCR) and allows for detection of all Legionella species and discrimination of L. pneumophila from other Legionella species. In total, 271 isolates representing 50 Legionella species were tested and the assay was validated using 39 culture-positive and 110 culture-negative patient specimens collected between 1989 and 2006. PCR-positive results were obtained with all 39 culture-positive samples (100% sensitivity). Specimens that tested positive according to 23S-5S PCR, but were culture-negative, were further analysed by DNA sequencing of the amplicon or the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene. In addition to L. pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella cincinnatiensis and Legionella micdadei were identified in the specimens. The assay showed a 7-log dynamic range displaying a sensitivity of 7.5 CFU/mL or three genome equivalents per reaction. Sixty-one specimens containing viruses or bacteria other than Legionellae were negative according to 23S-5S PCR, demonstrating its specificity. Use of this assay should contribute to the earlier detection of respiratory disease caused by Legionella species, as well as to increased rates of detection.

  11. China from a regional perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    The paper explains the political economic background for China's insertion to the world system. It furthermore expands on a critical perspective on China's soft power strategy. It goes on to discuss China's foreign policy strategy towards Southeast Asia and China's rivalry with the US in the region....

  12. Multimodal analgesia and regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero Tornero, C; Fernández Rodríguez, L E; Orduña Valls, J

    Multimodal analgesia provides quality analgesia, with fewer side effects due to the use of combined analgesics or analgesic techniques. Regional anaesthesia plays a fundamental role in achieving this goal. The different techniques of regional anaesthesia that include both peripheral and central blocks in either a single dose or in continuous infusion help to modulate the nociceptive stimuli that access the central level. The emergence of the ultrasound as an effective system to perform regional anaesthesia techniques has allowed the development of new regional anaesthesia techniques that formerly could not be carried out since only neurostimulation or skin references were used. It is essential to take into account that even with effective blocking it is advisable to associate other drugs by other routes, in this way we will be able to reduce the required doses individually and attempt to achieve a synergistic, not purely additive, effect. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. GIS i region Skadarskog jezera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Skadar Lake Region represents one of the most important centers of geodiversity and biodiversity for Western Balkan and SE Europe. The largest part of this Region has the status of the National Park since 1983. International recognition of the importance of Skadar Lake ecosystems come in 1995, when the Lake was designated as Ramsar site. The geographical information system (GIS that we have created has provided an excellent tool for valorization and protection of all natural values and potential of Skadar Lake Region. The GIS of Skadar Lake Region is organized for the territory of about 4500 km2 and is divided (by type and format into various data forms: Raster data: georeferenced raster topographic maps, satellite imaginary, digital model of precipitation, digital model of temperature; Vector data: geology, hydrogeology, hydrology (Adriatic sea, lakes, rivers, underground water, springs, soil, temperature, precipitation, irrigation areas, vegetation, biomes, border of protected areas, locality of important animal species, other important localities (archeological, cultural, border of NP, state border; Digital elevation model (DEM -resolution 20m and Database. Except of ecological conservation this information system will be helpful to a wide circle of users in the areas of natural, biotechnical, technical, economic and social sciences.

  14. China's Regional Development and Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Mukherjee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: China's Regional Development and Tibet By Rongxing Guo. Singapore: Springer, 2016. xxii + 195 pp. Hardcover: US$ 99.99. ISBN 978-981-287-956-1. E-book: US$ 69.99. ISBN 978-981-287-958-5.

  15. Regional approaches to water pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.; Bolt, van der F.J.E.

    1996-01-01

    General aspects of regional modelling of environmental impacts of non-point sources of pollution are discussed. Models range from simple budget to very complex structural models. In groundwater pollution studies structural models are preferable. The choice of the model depends on the aim of the rese

  16. Renewable Energy in European Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The regional dynamics of energy innovation, in particular the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy in the EU, is discussed within the framework of neo-Schumpeterian theory. The EU’s 4.2% average annual growth in renewable energy production in the last decade has been accompanied by diverging

  17. Regional approaches to water pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.; Bolt, van der F.J.E.

    1996-01-01

    General aspects of regional modelling of environmental impacts of non-point sources of pollution are discussed. Models range from simple budget to very complex structural models. In groundwater pollution studies structural models are preferable. The choice of the model depends on the aim of the rese

  18. Higher Education and European Regionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Lindsay

    2001-01-01

    Speculates about the relationship between two fundamental social changes occurring in Europe: the development of a mass higher education system and the slow decay of the old states that were inherited from the 19th century, eroded from below by various movements for national and regional autonomy, and eroded from above by the growing power and…

  19. Biocapacity optimization in regional planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianjun; Yue, Dongxia; Li, Kai; Hui, Cang

    2017-01-01

    Ecological overshoot has been accelerating across the globe. Optimizing biocapacity has become a key to resolve the overshoot of ecological demand in regional sustainable development. However, most literature has focused on reducing ecological footprint but ignores the potential of spatial optimization of biocapacity through regional planning of land use. Here we develop a spatial probability model and present four scenarios for optimizing biocapacity of a river basin in Northwest China. The potential of enhanced biocapacity and its effects on ecological overshoot and water consumption in the region were explored. Two scenarios with no restrictions on croplands and water use reduced the overshoot by 29 to 53%, and another two scenarios which do not allow croplands and water use to increase worsened the overshoot by 11 to 15%. More spatially flexible transition rules of land use led to higher magnitude of change after optimization. However, biocapacity optimization required a large amount of additional water resources, casting considerable pressure on the already water-scarce socio-ecological system. Our results highlight the potential for policy makers to manage/optimize regional land use which addresses ecological overshoot. Investigation on the feasibility of such spatial optimization complies with the forward-looking policies for sustainable development and deserves further attention.

  20. Desmoid Fibromatosis of Submandibular Region

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Head and Neck Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University ... and neck. With tumors in this region, patients usually present with trismus ..... Cancer. 2004;100:612‑20. 17. Poon R, Smits R, Li C, Jagmohan‑Changur S, Kong M, Cheon S, et al.