WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonreligious private schools

  1. Private Schools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This Private Schools feature dataset is composed of all Private elementary and secondary education features in the United States as defined by the Private School...

  2. Procrustes and Private Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Beverley

    1983-01-01

    R. J. Royce (Journal of Philosophy of Education; v16 p105-13) argues that private school education may be better or worse than state schooling and, because of this inequality, it must be abolished. Royce's arguments are analyzed to determine if abolishing private schooling would create a fairer society. (SR)

  3. Film Images of Private Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, David

    2000-01-01

    Examines public debate over private education in the context of the Hollywood dramatic feature film. Analyses four recent films that all portray private schools negatively. Film representation of public schools is more optimistic. Asserts that the films ignore or misrepresent three strengths of private education: effective leadership, small school…

  4. How To Pick a Perfect Private School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Harlow G.

    This book offers consumer information for parents who are considering enrolling their child in a private school. Beginning with a descriptive overview of private schools, the guide discusses advantages of private schools, how to finance a private school education, and how to determine a child's educational needs. The book offers criteria for…

  5. An Analysis of Private School Closings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Lakshmi; Sjoquist, David L.; Walker, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    We add to the small literature on private school supply by exploring exits of K-12 private schools. We find that the closure of private schools is not an infrequent event and use national survey data from the National Center for Education Statistics to study closures of private schools. We assume that the probability of an exit is a function of…

  6. View from a Private School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Counters Jonathan Kozol's concerns about educational vouchers, insisting that $2,500 could buy a quality private school education in Montgomery, Alabama. Critiques other voucher articles in the November 1992 "Educational Leadership" issue by challenging Alex Molnar's common school system concept and Arnold Fege's substitution of societal consensus…

  7. Financing a Private School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    A recent National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) survey of more than 1,200 individuals who filed financial aid forms underscores the central role financial aid plays in their ability to pursue a private education for their children. This article highlights the survey findings, demonstrating why school leaders need to thoroughly analyze…

  8. Public Schools: Make Them Private.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Milton

    1997-01-01

    A voucher system enabling parents to choose freely the schools their children attend is the most feasible way to improve education. Vouchers will encourage privatization. That will unleash the drive, imagination, and energy of competitive free enterprise to revolutionize the education process. Government schools will be forced to improve to retain…

  9. Private Schooling and the Status Attainment Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lionel S.; Wanner, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Examines effects of a private school education on educational, occupational, and earnings attainments. Using subsamples of respondents who attended private schools only and public schools only, the so-called private school advantage and its function in transmitting background related advantages is analyzed. (Author/DB)

  10. Mathematic Achievement of Canadian Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Francoise Jane; Wei, Yichun; Clifton, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    Very little Canadian research has examined the academic achievement of private school students. Data from The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 were used to examine the achievement of private school students. The study found that private school students outperformed their public school peers. In addition, the students'…

  11. PRIVATE PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN OGBOMOSO, OYO STATE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contribution of parents' socioeconomic status to the type of pupils' nutrition in public & private ... children in Ogbomoso North Local Government Area, Nigeria. Continuing .... level of Education Private Primary School Public Primary School.

  12. An Analysis of Private School Mission Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerema, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a study of private school mission/vision statements using content analysis. Statements from private schools in British Columbia, Canada, that provided instruction to Grade 12 students were analyzed to explore the diversity that lies within the private school sector. The concepts that emerged from the analysis were grouped into five…

  13. Private Schools Hail Changes to IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2005-01-01

    Private school students with special needs are among the intended beneficiaries of the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Parents and private school advocates hope changes in the newest version of the law will make it easier for them to get school district services without having to enroll in public schools. Under the…

  14. Private Schools Hail Changes to IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2005-01-01

    Private school students with special needs are among the intended beneficiaries of the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Parents and private school advocates hope changes in the newest version of the law will make it easier for them to get school district services without having to enroll in public schools. Under the…

  15. 34 CFR 200.10 - Applicability of a State's academic assessments to private schools and private school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... private schools and private school students. 200.10 Section 200.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of... assessments to private schools and private school students. (a) Nothing in § 200.1 or § 200.2 requires a private school, including a private school whose students receive services under subpart A of this part...

  16. Private Schools Opt for Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    The common standards are not just for public schools. With all but four states having adopted them since 2010, districts have little choice but to implement the Common Core State Standards. But many private schools are also making the transition. Many Roman Catholic, Lutheran, and other private schools have adopted at least portions of the…

  17. Private Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Francis; Henseke, Golo; Vignoles, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Though a relative small part of the school sector, private schools have an important role in British society, and there are policy concerns about their negative effect on social mobility. Other studies show that individuals who have attended a private school go on to have higher levels of educational achievement, are more likely to secure a…

  18. Competition for Private and State School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Francis; Machin, Stephen; Murphy, Richard; Zhu, Yu

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the role of private schools in the teachers' labour market. Private schools employ an increasingly-disproportionate share of teachers in Britain, relative to the number of their pupils. Their teachers are more likely than state school teachers to possess post-graduate qualifications, and to be specialists in shortage subjects.…

  19. Competition for Private and State School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Francis; Machin, Stephen; Murphy, Richard; Zhu, Yu

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the role of private schools in the teachers' labour market. Private schools employ an increasingly-disproportionate share of teachers in Britain, relative to the number of their pupils. Their teachers are more likely than state school teachers to possess post-graduate qualifications, and to be specialists in shortage subjects.…

  20. Do Private Schools Provide Competition for Public Schools?

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Minter Hoxby

    1994-01-01

    Arguments in favor of school choice depend on the idea that competition between schools improves the quality of education. However, we have almost no empirical evidence on whether competition actually affects school quality. In this study, I examine the effects of inter-school competition on public schools by using exogenous variation in the availability and costs of private school alternatives to public schools. Because low public school quality raises the demand for private schools as subst...

  1. Private Schools, Choice and The Ethical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Sonia; Suissa, Judith

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the relationship between the existence of private schools and public attitudes towards questions about educational provision. Data from the 2010 British Social Attitudes survey suggest that parents who choose to send children to private schools may become more entrenched in their support for more extensive forms of…

  2. Mental health services at selected private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Sherwin, Tierney E; Baggish, Rosemary C; Tacy, Peter B; Meehan, Thomas P

    2004-04-01

    Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism for addressing their students' mental health needs. Understanding that need requires data to guide the services and programs a school may put in place. Having data helps inform those services, and comparative data from other schools provides feedback and perspective. This project surveyed type and frequency of mental health problems experienced by students who received a formal evaluation at 11 private schools in Connecticut during academic year 2001-2002.

  3. The Unintended Effects of Private School Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Calmar; Serritzlew, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We examine whether competition from private schools improves public school performance and expenditure. It is difficult methodologically to isolate the effect of competition, but we use new measures of competition in both the public and the private school sector and a data set comprising detailed...... background information on more than 35,000 public school students in the Danish voucher system. This design provides a relatively firm support for the conclusion that competition does not improve achievement of public school students but that it increases public expenditure per student. Finally, we argue...

  4. Markets & Myths: Autonomy in Public & Private Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Rubin Glass

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available

    School choice is the most controversial education policy issue of the 1990s. John Chubb and Terry Moe's Politics, Markets and America's Schools stimulated this investigation. They concluded that teacher and administrator autonomy was the most important influence on student achievement. They assumed that the organization of private schools offered greater autonomy resulting in higher student achievement and that the bureaucracy of public schools stifles autonomy limiting student achievement. The research undertaken here elaborates, elucidates, and fills in the framework of teacher and principal autonomy in public and private secondary schools. Interviews of more than thirty teachers and administrators in six high schools, observations, field notes, and analysis of documents collected in the field form the empirical base of this work. The sites included three private, independent, nondenominational secondary schools which are college preparatory and three public secondary schools noted for high graduation rates and offering numerous advanced placement courses.

    The feelings expressed by both public and private school participants in this study testify to equally high degrees of autonomy. Issues that emerged from data analysis in this study which mitigate and shape autonomy include the following: conflicting and contradictory demands, shared beliefs, layers of protection, a system of laws, funding constraints and matters of size of the institution. These issues challenge oversimplified assertions that differences of any importance exist between the autonomy experienced by professionals in public and private high schools. This study reveals the complexity of the concept of autonomy and challenges the myth that teachers and principals in private schools enjoy autonomy and freedom from democratic bureaucracy that their public school counterparts do not.

  5. How Are Private School Enrolment Patterns Changing across Indian Districts with a Growth in Private School Availability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, Amita; Creed, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The private school sector in India has grown significantly but the equity implications of this growth are not well understood. Traditionally private schools have been patronised by more educated and better-off families. Evidence also suggests a preference for enrolling male children in private schools. With the growth in the private school sector…

  6. Technology in Nonsectarian and Religious Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Anthony J.; Gibbs, Michael G.; Guerrero, Rosalie; McDevitt, Patrick J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors report the results of a survey on technology access and use in both religious and nonsectarian schools in the state of Illinois. Four hundred surveys were sent to a cross section of private schools, with a response rate of 45%. The study demonstrates there were only minimal differences between sectarian and…

  7. A Survey of Idaho's Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In this memo, we synthesize information collected recently in two private school surveys, one conducted by the U.S. Department of Education and another by the Friedman Foundation and the Idaho Federation of Independent Schools (IDFIS). After a brief description of the data sources, we present the key survey findings in two sections.

  8. Private Schools, Nevada, 2009, Nevada Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Nevada private schools locations. Nevada Department of Education Nevada private schools list for school year 2008-2009. Locations furnishe by the US EPA Region 9.

  9. "Affordable" Private Schools in South Africa. Affordable for Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languille, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The paper sets out to challenge the notions of "affordable" private schools in the context of South Africa. It is guided by one main question: "affordable private schools for whom?" It argues that, contrary to claims by its public and private proponents, affordable private schools in South Africa do not cater for poor children.…

  10. A study on subsidization of private schools in China

    OpenAIRE

    高, 暁楠

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Paper is to analyze the policies of subsidization of private schools in China, mainly base on the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Promotion of Privately-run Schools and the Regulations for the implementation of this standardization law, which have been promulgated recently. But for the particularity of private schools in China, the general view of the private schools in China, includes the concept of private school and the idea of subsidization of private schools,...

  11. Private Schools and Public Benefit: Fees, Fee Remissions, and Subsidies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The level of fee remissions offered by private schools bears upon the scope for relying on private schools to provide public benefit. Analyses of education voucher systems have generally ignored the possibility that they will partially crowd out school-financed fee remissions. Moreover, variation in fee remissions between private schools may be…

  12. 34 CFR 76.654 - Benefits for private school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benefits for private school students. 76.654 Section 76... Schools § 76.654 Benefits for private school students. (a) Comparable benefits. The program benefits that a subgrantee provides for students enrolled in private schools must be comparable in quality, scope...

  13. Private Schools: Who Benefits? PISA in Focus. No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    At some point in their child's education, many parents have considered whether it would be worth the expense to enrol their child in a private school. For parents, private schools may offer a particular kind of instruction that is not available in public schools. If private schools also attract higher-performing students and better teachers than…

  14. Why Indiana Voucher Parents Choose Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, Indiana enacted the broadest school voucher program in the country. In the program's first year, almost 4,000 families used vouchers to attend participating private schools, with the number of students applying for vouchers more than doubling in each of the following two years, to 9,324 students in 2012-13, and 19,809 in 2013-14. The…

  15. Commodity Administrative Manual. Public and Private Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This manual was developed for agencies receiving food commodities distributed to eligible schools and noneducational organizations by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) through the California State Department of Education's Office of Surplus Property. It covers rules, regulations, and forms for recipients who are public or private schools…

  16. International Determinants of Private School Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Leslie; Rutkowski, David; Plucker, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The current study uses Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data to investigate international determinants of private school attendance. In particular, we seek to understand whether student achievement and home background factors such as socioeconomic status (SES) or motivational and goal-oriented factors are more predictive…

  17. Parentally Placed Private School Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    This document focuses on state education agency (SEA) support for child find, consultation and provision of equitable service provisions for parentally placed private school students with disabilities. Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) completed this activity as part of its cooperative…

  18. Fundraising Basics for Private School Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Arthur H.

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the process behind setting up and implementing a "capital campaign": a program for raising money for new or renovated facilities at private K-12 schools. The report covers tax information regarding gifts to institutions then offers advice for setting up a comprehensive development program, including fundraising software and…

  19. More Private Schools for Nonnative Students? Migrant Performance in Private Schools of Differing National Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jungbauer-Gans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Migrant children from most countries are disadvantaged in school. We investigate which characteristics of both school and societal contexts influence the achievements of migrant students. We argue that living conditions and inequality in a society as a whole may affect the chances of minority members and the function that private schools perform in the process of social reproduction of inequality. We investigate in particular the question of whether migrant students attending private schools show a better performance than those attending public schools. The analyses of the paper are based on the data collected in the PISA 2006 survey. Our main results are that the lower mathematics and reading competencies of migrant students can partly be explained by the socioeconomic status and cultural capital of the family and—to a marginal degree—by school characteristics. Initially, students in private independent schools have some advantages that disappear after controlling for country attributes. In both fields of knowledge, migrants obtain better results in private government-dependent schools (interaction effect; this, however, can be traced back to their families' socioeconomic origin and cultural capital. We detect that students in private independent schools reach lower competency levels in wealthier societies (GNP.

  20. Private Funds for Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addonizio, Michael F.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses sources of nontraditional revenue for public school systems: the result of donor activities (the solicitation of goods, services, and money via direct and indirect donations); enterprise activities (the selling or leasing of services or facilities); and shared or cooperative activities (pooling functions with other agencies or…

  1. The Elementary Private School Recognition Program: Mike Mulligan's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals, the selection criteria, and the selection process of the Elementary Private School Recognition Program. Includes a listing, by states, of the 60 private elementary schools selected for 1985-86 recognition. (IW)

  2. The Public Good in English Private School Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyask, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    There exist some rare private schools that attempt to mitigate the anti-democratic qualities of the private schooling sector in England. This article reports on a study of private schools that aim to promote equality and participation through some aspects of their operations. It considers to what extent the governance structures within the schools…

  3. 34 CFR 76.660 - Use of private school personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of private school personnel. 76.660 Section 76.660... Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Participation of Students Enrolled in Private Schools § 76.660 Use of private school personnel. A subgrantee may use program funds to pay for the services of an...

  4. The Public Good in English Private School Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyask, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    There exist some rare private schools that attempt to mitigate the anti-democratic qualities of the private schooling sector in England. This article reports on a study of private schools that aim to promote equality and participation through some aspects of their operations. It considers to what extent the governance structures within the schools…

  5. 45 CFR 2516.310 - May private school students participate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May private school students participate? 2516.310... May private school students participate? (a) Yes. To the extent consistent with the number of students... private nonprofit elementary or secondary schools, the State, Indian tribe, or LEA must (after...

  6. Exploring Arkansas's Private Education Sector. School Survey Series #6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    This report synthesizes information about Arkansas's private schools from two separate surveys conducted by the Friedman Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE). If the Friedman Foundation survey data are representative of the state's private schools, then Arkansas's private schools have enough empty seats to increase current…

  7. Negotiating between Family, Peers and School: Understanding the World of Government School and Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucharita, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper, based on an ethnographic study of a government school and a low-cost private school in Andhra Pradesh, India, argues that the students of a government school and a private school have two different worlds and are socialised differently. As children progress from childhood to adolescence, the transition is accompanied by…

  8. Multiple Choice: How Public School Leaders in New Orleans' Saturated Market View Private School Competitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Huriya; Li, Dongmei M.

    2016-01-01

    School choice policies, such as charter schools and vouchers, are in part designed to induce competition between schools. While several studies have examined the impact of private school competition on public schools, few studies have explored school leaders' perceptions of private school competitors. This study examines the extent to which public…

  9. The Law of Contract and the Private School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Deirdre J.; Duncan, Robyn M.

    1986-01-01

    Explores contract law governing relationships between the student and school authorities, the teacher and the school, and the school and third parties in Australian private schools. Shows that government schools do not meet the conditions for enforceable contracts under Australian law. Includes seven references. (MLH)

  10. The Law of Contract and the Private School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Deirdre J.; Duncan, Robyn M.

    1986-01-01

    Explores contract law governing relationships between the student and school authorities, the teacher and the school, and the school and third parties in Australian private schools. Shows that government schools do not meet the conditions for enforceable contracts under Australian law. Includes seven references. (MLH)

  11. 34 CFR 300.141 - Requirement that funds not benefit a private school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirement that funds not benefit a private school... Their Parents in Private Schools § 300.141 Requirement that funds not benefit a private school. (a) An... instruction in a private school or to otherwise benefit the private school. (b) The LEA must use funds...

  12. Private School Choice in the Chicago Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, William

    2015-01-01

    The determinants of private school choice in the Chicago metropolitan area are examined. Particular attention is given to the effects of race and ethnicity. Results include non-Hispanic White, Blacks, and Hispanics having a higher demand for private schools where there are higher concentrations of Blacks. Non-Hispanic Whites also have a higher…

  13. Teachers’ organisational behaviour in public and private funded schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honingh, M.E.; Oort, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to compare teachers' organisational behaviour in publicly- and privately-funded schools in the Dutch Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector. Design/methodology/approach - A percentage of all middle managers in publicly and privately funded schools (72

  14. Teachers’ organisational behaviour in public and private funded schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honingh, M.E.; Oort, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to compare teachers' organisational behaviour in publicly- and privately-funded schools in the Dutch Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector. Design/methodology/approach - A percentage of all middle managers in publicly and privately funded schools (72 p

  15. Public and Private Schools: Evidence on Tuition Tax Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterall, James S.; Levin, Henry M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the conclusion reached by Coleman, Hoffer and Kilgore in their report "Public and Private Schools" that tuition tax credits would increase minority and low-income family participation in private, secondary schools. The implications of estimates of enrollment changes from tuition tax credits are analyzed. (AM)

  16. Some Salient Features of Guatemala's Public and Private School Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Ruano

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to analyze the formulation and implementation of educational policy processes in relation to private schools in Guatemala. Specifically, how bilingual education is defined and implemented in the private education sector in Guatemala City where the largest number of privately run establishments exist. Given the great deficits in the provision of educational coverage in the public sector, there has been an explosive expansion of private institutions which have very different levels of quality. Through an analysis of the administrative processes within the Guatemalan Government in general and its Education Ministry in particular as well as of the governance arrangements existing in the private school sector, an overall view of the curricular and policy decisions taken by private schools in the formulation and implementation of bilingual education is presented. This study was based on a sample of six private schools which cater to higher income segments of Guatemala City’s student population. Some of the relevant findings of this study include, the existence of a situation of quasi autonomous institutional functioning of the private sector, extreme differentials in the quality of services provided, inadequate levels of teacher and school administrator’s training as well as lack of cooperation between public and private sector schools.

  17. Athletic Trainer Services in Public and Private Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Alicia M; Pryor, Riana R; Vandermark, Lesley W; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-01-01

     The presence of athletic trainers (ATs) in secondary schools to provide medical care is crucial, especially with the rise in sports participation and resulting high volume of injuries. Previous authors have investigated the level of AT services offered, but the differences in medical care offered between the public and private sectors have not been explored.  To compare the level of AT services in public and private secondary schools.  Concurrent mixed-methods study.  Public and private secondary schools in the United States.  A total of 10 553 secondary schools responded to the survey (8509 public, 2044 private).  School administrators responded to the survey via telephone or e-mail. Descriptive statistics depict national data. Open-ended questions were evaluated through content analysis.  A greater percentage of public secondary schools than private secondary schools hired ATs. Public secondary schools provided a higher percentage of full-time, part-time, and clinic AT services than private secondary schools. Only per diem AT services were more frequent in the private sector. Regardless of the extent of services, reasons for not employing an AT were similar between sectors. Common barriers were budget, school size, and lack of awareness of the role of an AT. Unique to the public sector, remote location was identified as a challenge faced by some administrators.  Both public and private secondary schools lacked ATs, but higher percentages of total AT services and full-time services were available in the public sector. Despite differences in AT services, both settings provided a similar number of student-athletes with access to medical care. Barriers to hiring ATs were comparable between public and private secondary schools; however, remote location was a unique challenge for the public sector.

  18. United States private schools have higher rates of exemptions to school immunization requirements than public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jana; Tserenpuntsag, Boldtsetseg; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Halsey, Neal

    2014-07-01

    To compare medical, religious, and personal belief immunization exemption rates between private and public schools in US. Exemption rates were calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention School Immunization Assessment Surveys for the 2009-2010 school year excluding states with incomplete survey data. Standardized exemption rates weighted on enrollments in public and private schools were calculated. Differences in exemption rates between public and private schools were tested using Wilcoxon signed rank test. The overall state exemption rate was higher in US private than public schools, 4.25% (SD 4.27) vs 1.91% (1.67), P = .0001 and private schools had higher exemption rates for all types of exemptions; medical 0.58% (0.71) vs 0.34% (0.34) respectively (P = .0004), religious 2.09% (3.14) vs 0.83% (1.05) respectively (P = .0001), and personal belief 6.10% (4.12) vs 2.79% (1.57), respectively (P = .006). Overall exemption rates were significantly higher in states that allowed personal belief exemptions. Exemption rates were significantly higher in US private than in public schools. Children attending private schools may be at higher risk of vaccine-preventable diseases than public school children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Review of the Empirical Research on Private School Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalite, Anna J.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Parents in the United States have had the legal right to choose the school their child attends for a long time. Traditionally, parental school choice took the form of families moving to a neighborhood with good public schools or self-financing private schooling. Contemporary education policies allow parents in many areas to choose from among…

  20. EVALUATION OF PRIVATE SCHOOL LOCATION IN THE ISTANBUL METROPOLITAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet TOPÇU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investment in education is considered important for economic growth and poverty alleviation. In many developed and developing countries families contribute privately to the education of their children as a result of continuously shrinking public budgets. Also, in Istanbul private primary schools were supported by the government in order to answer to increasing demand due to continuous rural migration and to create a competitive educational market to improve the quality of primary education. This paper, first, analyzes the spatial distribution of private primary schools according to the concentric rings and illustrates the gap between the center and the periphery and among the districts. Then, the relationships between the number of private primary schools and demand and the characteristics of the districts are investigated by a regression analysis. According to the results, the number of public primary schools is the most important factor and GDP per capita is the second factor to affect the number of private primary schools in the districts. Currently, the cluster of private primary schools mainly in high-income districts does not allow developing a competitive educational market at the metropolitan level. It is expected that a more balanced market will be develop as the urban structure of Istanbul adjusted to the neo-liberal economies in the future. The results are useful for urban planners, investors and policy makers. Further research is suggested to investigate the impact of private primary schools on the quality of public primary school education in Istanbul.

  1. Athletic Trainer Services in US Private Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Alicia; Pryor, Riana R; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-09-01

    Availability of athletic trainer (AT) services in US secondary schools has recently been reported to be as high as 70%, but this only describes the public sector. The extent of AT coverage in private secondary school settings has yet to be investigated and may differ from the public secondary school setting for several reasons, including differences in funding sources. To determine the level of AT services in US private secondary schools and identify the reasons why some schools did not employ ATs. Concurrent mixed-methods study. Private secondary schools in the United States. Of 5414 private secondary schools, 2044 (38%) responded to the survey. School administrators responded to the survey via telephone or e-mail. This instrument was previously used in a study examining AT services among public secondary schools. Descriptive statistics provided national data. Open-ended questions were evaluated through content analysis. Of the 2044 schools that responded, 58% (1176/2044) offered AT services, including 28% (574/2040) full time, 25% (501/2042) part time, 4% (78/1918) per diem, and 20% (409/2042) from a hospital or clinic. A total of 84% (281 285/336 165) of athletes had access to AT services. Larger private secondary schools were more likely to have AT services available. Barriers to providing AT services in the private sector were budgetary constraints, school size and sports, and lack of awareness of the role of an AT. More than half of the surveyed private secondary schools in the United States had AT services available; however, only 28% had a full-time AT. This demonstrates the need for increased medical coverage to provide athletes in this setting the appropriate level of care. Budgetary concerns, size of the school and sport offerings, and lack of awareness of the role of the AT continued to be barriers in the secondary school setting.

  2. Physical Education Policies and Practices in California Private Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2017-02-01

    Physical education (PE) is mandated in most states, but few studies of PE in private schools exist. We assessed selected PE policies and practices in private secondary schools (grades 6 to 12) in California using a 15-item questionnaire related to school characteristics and their PE programs. Responding schools (n = 450; response rate, 33.8%) were from 37 counties. Most were coeducational (91.3%) and had a religious affiliation (83%). Secular schools had more PE lessons, weekly PE min, and smaller class sizes. Most schools met guidelines for class size, but few met national recommendations for weekly PE minutes (13.7%), not permitting substitutions for PE (35.6%), and programs being taught entirely by PE specialists (29.3%). Private schools, which serve about 5 million US children and adolescents, may be falling short in providing quality PE. School stakeholders should encourage adoption and implementation of policies and practices that abide by professional guidelines and state statutes.

  3. The Development and Dissemination of Council of Europe Policy on Education about Religions and Non-Religious Convictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article, written from an insider perspective, and in a personal capacity (the author has been involved with the Council of Europe's work on religion and education since its inception in 2002), gives an account of the developing interest in the study of religions (and latterly non-religious convictions) in publicly funded schools by the…

  4. Do children in private Schools learn more than in public Schools? Evidence from Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Wendelspiess Chávez Juárez, Florian

    2010-01-01

    In this study I try to answer the question whether private schools do better in the human capital accumulation process than public schools in Mexico. The analysis is based on panel data including out-of-school cognitive skill tests, which allows dealing with some potential endogeneity problems due to the selection process into private schools. The absolute advantage of private school graduates in cognitive skills disappears once controlling for the selection bias, where no positive eect is fo...

  5. 34 CFR 76.658 - Funds not to benefit a private school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funds not to benefit a private school. 76.658 Section... Schools § 76.658 Funds not to benefit a private school. (a) A subgrantee may not use program funds to finance the existing level of instruction in a private school or to otherwise benefit the private school...

  6. Policy Perspective: School Turnaround in England. Utilizing the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper, written by strategic partner of the Center on School Turnaround (CST), Julie Corbett, provides research and examples on England's approach to turning around its lowest performing schools. The English education system utilizes private vendors to support chronically low-performing schools and districts. The introduction is followed by…

  7. Does Private School Competition Improve Public School Performance? The Case of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Amrit

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the survey of the Ministry of Education, Nepal-2005 for school leaving certificate (SLC) exam, this paper attempts to estimate the impact of private school competition on public school performance for the case of Nepal. The study uses the number of private schools in the neighborhood as a measure of competition. The identification…

  8. Does Private School Competition Improve Public School Performance? The Case of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Amrit

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the survey of the Ministry of Education, Nepal-2005 for school leaving certificate (SLC) exam, this paper attempts to estimate the impact of private school competition on public school performance for the case of Nepal. The study uses the number of private schools in the neighborhood as a measure of competition. The identification…

  9. The Privatization of Schooling: Problems and Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph

    Views about privatization's advantages and disadvantages vary widely in the educational research literature. These disparate views are shaped by reviewers' frames of reference and the evaluation criteria that they use. This book was written to help readers develop more refined lenses for viewing the privatization movement. Chapter 1 asserts that…

  10. Private Schooling for Low-Income Families: A Census and Comparative Survey in East Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James; Dixon, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    A census and survey of schools in the slums of East Delhi, India, explored the nature and extent of private education serving low-income families, and compared inputs to public and private schooling. Around two-thirds of all schools were private unaided, with more unrecognised private than government schools. Teaching activity was found to be…

  11. 34 CFR 76.655 - Level of expenditures for students enrolled in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Enrolled in Private Schools § 76.655 Level of expenditures for students enrolled in private schools. (a... funds on: (1) A student enrolled in a private school who receives benefits under the program; and (2) A... spend a different average amount on program benefits for students enrolled in private schools if the...

  12. 34 CFR 76.652 - Consultation with representatives of private school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consultation with representatives of private school... Enrolled in Private Schools § 76.652 Consultation with representatives of private school students. (a) An... representatives of students enrolled in private schools before the subgrantee makes any decision that affects the...

  13. 34 CFR 694.6 - Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... private schools? 694.6 Section 694.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... private schools? (a) GEAR UP services to students attending private schools must be provided— (1) By..., agency, or organization. (b) In providing GEAR UP services to students attending private schools, the...

  14. Private schools and "Latino flight" from black schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, Robert W

    2002-11-01

    Several recent studies provided evidence that white students' choice between private and public schools is influenced by the racial composition of the local student population. None of these studies, however, examined whether Latinos are also fleeing to private schools in response to black schoolchildren. I explore the "Latino-flight" hypothesis using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study and a recently released confidential data set from the National Center for Educational Statistics. In probit regressions for the probability of Latinos attending private schools, I found a large, positive, and statistically significant coefficient on the black share of the school-age population. The coefficient estimates imply that a 10-percentage point increase in the black share increases the probability of private school attendance by 25.7% to 33.2% among Latino 8th graders and 35.2% to 52.2% among Latino 10th graders. I interpret these results as providing evidence of "Latino flight" from public schools into private schools. I did not find evidence that Latinos respond differently to black schoolchildren than do whites.

  15. Shanghai's Administrative Model for Private Schools during the Republican Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kouzhu

    2008-01-01

    Private schools were very prosperous in Shanghai during the Republican period. Shanghai Municipal Educational Bureau adopted a pattern of indirect management, especially attaching importance to normalizing and guiding the mechanism for operating a school by taking the basic measures for the registration administration. Meanwhile, appropriate…

  16. An Evaluation of the Private High School Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Dolgun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating curricula of private high schools in line with opinions of teachers working at the related high schools, and identifying any related problems. Screening model is used as a quantitative research method in the study. The "element-based curriculum evaluation model" is taken as basis for evaluation of the…

  17. Corporal Punishment in Private Schools: The Case of Kathmandu, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Jeevan; Park, Sae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate the situation of corporal punishment which is being practiced in Nepalese schools going against new policies that promote the non-violence teaching. It was based on original qualitative study of one private school of Kathmandu (the capital city of Nepal) having more than 2000 students and 100 teachers.…

  18. Private school activities and psychosomatic problems in Japanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Kaku, R; Nakagawa, K; Kaneko, Z

    1975-01-01

    This paper investigates the relation between private school activities and psychosomatic problems in Japanese elementary school children. Of 1,073 children studied, 67.3 percent attended private schools to study such subjects as calligraphy, abacus, and music. Of these children, 25.3 percent attended three to four times per week, and 18.1 percent five times and more. Statistical analysis showed that frequently attending children exhibited symptoms of dizziness, sleep disturbance, and other psycholphsiological problems. The results may warn educators as well as parents of some of the unfavorable effects of these extracurricular activities.

  19. Neoliberal Ideology in a Private Sudbury School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marguerite Anne Fillion

    2017-01-01

    Educational researchers have called attention to how neoliberal ideology has profoundly and detrimentally influenced public education systems, but less attention has been paid to how neoliberalism influences "private" educational institutions. This article examines the influence of neoliberal ideology on education in the USA through an…

  20. 49 CFR 605.18 - Comments by private school bus operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Comments by private school bus operators. 605.18... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SCHOOL BUS OPERATIONS School Bus Agreements § 605.18 Comments by private school bus operators. Private school bus operators may file written comments on an applicant's...

  1. Paying for Quality? Associations between Private School Income, Performance and Use of Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Peter; Davies, Neil M.

    2014-01-01

    Education policy in England has explicitly aimed to remodel state schools in the image of independent, private, schools. However, the body of research evidence on the operation of private schools is very small. Critics have frequently argued that, in contrast to state schools, private schools use resources efficiently because their autonomy gives…

  2. Growth charts and obesity prevalence among Lebanese private schools adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakar, Hilda; Salameh, Pascale R

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish weight, height and body mass index curves and to calculate the prevalence of obesity by sex and age groups in Lebanese adolescents of private schools. Body weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were measured among 12299 adolescents aged 10 to 18 years from Lebanese private schools. Adolescents' growth charts were established. Obesity and at risk of obesity individuals were identified according to International Obesity Taskforce thresholds, and our numbers were compared to those of other countries. Curves of weight, height and BMI were drawn. In boys, 10.1% were obese and 28.8% at risk of obesity. In girls, 4.2% were obese and 19.0% were at risk of obesity. Lebanese private schools adolescents, particularly boys, present high prevalences of obesity and risk of obesity. Pediatricians should identify early adolescents at greater risk, in order to achieve a more favorable prognosis.

  3. The Impact of Charter Schools on Public and Private School Enrollments. Policy Analysis. No. 707

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Charter schools are publicly funded schools that have considerable independence from public school districts in their curriculum development and staffing decisions, and their enrollments have increased substantially over the past two decades. Charter schools are changing public and private school enrollment patterns across the United States. This…

  4. Internationalisation Strategies of Brazilian Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Andrea; Nogueira, Maria Alice

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to reflect on unequal schooling opportunities in Brazil, focusing on certain characteristics that mark, nowadays, the schooling trajectories of young people from middle- and high-income families. Our previous researches showed that an important part of these families are increasingly investing in international…

  5. Public Infrastructure, Location of Private Schools and Primary School Attainment in an Emerging Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sarmistha

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that access to public infrastructure plays a crucial role on the presence of private schools in a community, as it could not only minimise the cost of production, but also ensure a high return to private investment. Results using community, school and child/household-level PROBE survey data from five north Indian states provide…

  6. A Regional Study of Attitudes toward Public Schools, Private Schools and Tuition Tax Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John H.; Woodson, Marvin C., Jr.

    A questionnaire survey of 982 people in 4 shopping malls in the Piedmont region of South Carolina sought to assess public attitudes about the quality of public and private schools, proposed federal tuition tax credit legislation, tax support for private schools, and outcomes should tuition tax credits be adopted. Respondents were asked to "grade"…

  7. A Case Study of Private Schools in Kibera: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Pauline; Tooley, James

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an update on our earlier paper on the introduction by the Kenyan government in 2003 of free primary education (FPE), and its impact on low-fee private schools. First, published papers that have used our contribution as a springboard for discussion are critically reviewed. The argument and supporting evidence that the poor are…

  8. 340 The Challenges and Prospects of Managing Private School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... Indexed African Journals Online: www.ajol.info. An International ... The Private School System is part of the education system in Rivers State as indeed other parts of .... Ready platforms as ―Miracle Centres‖. ➢ Limited/Non ...

  9. A Case Study of Private Schools in Kibera: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Pauline; Tooley, James

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an update on our earlier paper on the introduction by the Kenyan government in 2003 of free primary education (FPE), and its impact on low-fee private schools. First, published papers that have used our contribution as a springboard for discussion are critically reviewed. The argument and supporting evidence that the poor are…

  10. Enabling School Structures, Trust, and Collective Efficacy in Private International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Julie A.; Summers, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the role of enabling school structures, collegial trust, and collective efficacy in 15 pre-Kindergarten to 12th grade international, private schools in South and Central America and Mexico. While most of these schools shared an "American" curriculum the local culture and school norms affected the climate of the…

  11. Variation in exemptions to school immunization requirements among New York State private and public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun-Kuang; Nadeau, Jessica; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Shaw, Jana

    2014-12-12

    School immunization requirements have ensured high vaccination rates and have helped to control vaccine-preventable diseases. However, vaccine exemptions have increased in the last decade. This study compared New York State private versus public schools with respect to medical and religious exemption rates. This retrospective study utilizes New York State Department of Health Immunization Survey data from the 2003 through 2012 academic years. Schools were categorized as private or public, the former further categorized by religious affiliation. Rates of medical and religious vaccine exemptions were compared by school category. From 2003 to 2012, religious exemptions increased in private and public schools from 0.63% to 1.35% and 0.17% to 0.29% (Spearman's R: 0.89 and 0.81), respectively. Among private schools, increases in religious exemption rates during the study period were observed in Catholic/Eastern Orthodox, Protestant/Other Christian, Jewish, and secular schools (Spearman's R=0.66, 0.99, 0.89, and 0.93), respectively. Exemption rate ratios in private schools compared to public schools were 1.39 (95% CI 1.15-1.68) for medical and 3.94 (95% CI: 3.20-4.86) for religious exemptions. Among private school students, all school types except for Catholic/Eastern Orthodox and Episcopal affiliates were more likely to report religious exemptions compared to children in public schools. Medical and religious exemption rates increased over time and higher rates were observed among New York State private schools compared to public schools. Low exemption rates are critical to minimize disease outbreaks in the schools and their community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Freedom of Expression in Private Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBon, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Considers that, contrary to the conventional wisdom, far less censorship is applied to the educational process in non-public than in public schools. Gives tips on avoiding censorship: establish a quality paper, have a written editorial policy, establish the paper as a forum, encourage substantive stories, and eliminate prior administrative review.…

  13. 34 CFR 300.130 - Definition of parentally-placed private school children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... children with disabilities enrolled by their parents in private, including religious, schools or facilities... Disabilities Enrolled by Their Parents in Private Schools § 300.130 Definition of parentally-placed...

  14. Monopoly vs. Markets: The Empirical Evidence on Private Schools & School Choice. School Choice Issues in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2007-01-01

    This study presents new findings comparing public and private high schools using top-quality data from the Education Longitudinal Study (ELS), a long-term research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. The ELS project tracks individual data on thousands of students, allowing researchers to conduct much better analyses than are…

  15. 78 FR 68987 - Guides for Private Vocational and Distance Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... CFR Part 254 Guides for Private Vocational and Distance Education Schools AGENCY: Federal Trade... the ``Guides for Private Vocational and Home Study Schools'') in May 1972, and they became effective... private vocational or distance education schools. The Guides provide the basis for voluntary compliance...

  16. 34 CFR 200.66 - Requirements to ensure that funds do not benefit a private school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... private school. 200.66 Section 200.66 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.66 Requirements to ensure that funds do not benefit a private school. (a) An LEA must use funds under subpart A of this part to provide services that supplement...

  17. 34 CFR 75.119 - Information needed if private school students participate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information needed if private school students... PROGRAMS How To Apply for a Grant Application Contents § 75.119 Information needed if private school... students enrolled in private schools, the application must include the information required of subgrantees...

  18. 34 CFR 300.325 - Private school placements by public agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Private school placements by public agencies. 300.325... Programs, and Educational Placements Development of Iep § 300.325 Private school placements by public... child to, a private school or facility, the agency must initiate and conduct a meeting to develop an IEP...

  19. 34 CFR 75.650 - Participation of students enrolled in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation of students enrolled in private schools... Participation of students enrolled in private schools. If the authorizing statute for a program requires a grantee to provide for participation by students enrolled in private schools, the grantee shall provide a...

  20. 34 CFR 200.62 - Responsibilities for providing services to private school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.62 Responsibilities for providing services to private school children. (a) After timely and meaningful consultation with appropriate officials of private schools, an LEA must— (1) In accordance with §§ 200.62 through 200.67 and section 1120 of the ESEA...

  1. How Old Is Old? Employing Elderly Teachers in the Private Sector Schools in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuwanthi, L. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore why private sector schools in Sri Lanka employ elderly teachers (ETs). This paper used semi-structured in-depth interviews with 9 employers/principals in the private sector schools in Sri Lanka. The study found that the reasons for employing ETs in the private sector schools were shortfall of English medium…

  2. 34 CFR 300.129 - State responsibility regarding children in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Children in Private Schools § 300.129 State responsibility regarding children in private schools. The State must have in effect policies and procedures that ensure that LEAs, and, if applicable, the SEA, meet the private school...

  3. 78 FR 8499 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Private School Universe Survey 2013-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Private School Universe Survey 2013-16 AGENCY... in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Private School...: 6,410. Abstract: The Private School Universe Survey (PSS) is the NCES collection of basic data from...

  4. 34 CFR 200.65 - Determining equitable participation of teachers and families of participating private school...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proportionate to the number of private school children from low-income families residing in participating public... families of participating private school children. 200.65 Section 200.65 Education Regulations of the... Determining equitable participation of teachers and families of participating private school children....

  5. Extracurricular Physical Activity Programs in California Private Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2017-09-20

    Interscholastic, intramural, and club physical activity (PA) programs can be important contributors to student PA accrual at schools. Few studies have assessed factors related to the provision of these extracurricular PA programs, especially in private schools. We used a 16-item questionnaire to assess the associations and influences of selected factors relative to extracurricular PA program policies and practices in 450 private California secondary schools. Associations were evaluated using contingency table analyses (i.e., chi-squared, effect size, and post-hoc analyses). Six factors were associated with schools providing extracurricular PA programs: school location, level, enrollment, and religious classification and whether the physical education (PE) program met state PE time standards and was taught by PE specialists. Both static factors (e.g., school location, level, enrollment, and religious affiliation) and modifiable factors (e.g., meeting PE standards and employing specialists) affect the provision of extracurricular PA programs. As education is state-mandated, additional study is recommended to assess the generalizability of these findings to other states and to public schools.

  6. School-Based Management: Views from Public and Private Elementary School Principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Apodaca-Tucker

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed the principal questionnaire contained in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K database regarding the extent to which school-based management was reported as having been implemented differently by public and by private elementary school principals. Statistical analyses indicated many differences in the degree of influence reported to be present on the part of principals, parents, and other groups on important decisions made at schools. Differences in school-based management between our public and private elementary school principals were linked to the extant literature. Moreover, recommendations for further research were discussed.

  7. The Impact of Private Schools on Educational Attainment in the State of São Paulo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jonathan M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a comprehensive dataset on secondary school students in Brazil to examine the impact of private school enrollment on educational attainment in São Paulo. The results show that private school students (across all levels of tuition) perform better than their public school counterparts on Brazil's high school exit exam, even after…

  8. The Impact of Private Schools on Educational Attainment in the State of São Paulo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jonathan M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a comprehensive dataset on secondary school students in Brazil to examine the impact of private school enrollment on educational attainment in São Paulo. The results show that private school students (across all levels of tuition) perform better than their public school counterparts on Brazil's high school exit exam, even after…

  9. The Effects of Competition from Private Schooling on French Public School Districts in the Province of Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Stephen J.; Bernier, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    The Province of Quebec subsidizes nearly 50% of private education, and at the same time heavily regulates private schools. To date, no studies have been done to determine the effect of the unique nature of competition from K-12 private schools on public school education of the sort found in Quebec. The authors used multiple regression to determine…

  10. The Effects of Competition from Private Schooling on French Public School Districts in the Province of Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Stephen J.; Bernier, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    The Province of Quebec subsidizes nearly 50% of private education, and at the same time heavily regulates private schools. To date, no studies have been done to determine the effect of the unique nature of competition from K-12 private schools on public school education of the sort found in Quebec. The authors used multiple regression to determine…

  11. Program Evaluation on the Implementation of a Middle School Concept in Private Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James Chapman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of implementing a middle school concept in three private Christian schools using Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP model of program evaluation. The National Middle School Survey was used to measure faculty and administrative perceptions of both the value and actual implementation of middle school…

  12. Erasing the Myths on How School Choice Would Impact Texas Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    For more than 20 years school choice programs have provided parents opportunities to send their children to public or private schools more suited to their needs. Choice and competition in education benefits students. Today, 21 states and Washington, D.C., have school choice programs serving more than one million students. Impressively, nine out of…

  13. Public Rules on Private Schools: Measuring the Regulatory Impact of State Statutes and School Choice Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a framework for understanding the impacts of state government statutes regulating private schools, regulations distinct to a given school choice program, and any regulatory growth over a program's lifespan. Examining school choice programs in operation for at least a few years provides important context and comparisons for…

  14. Food environment and policies in private schools in Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Neha; Riddell, Lynn; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    School food policies and services have the potential to influence the food practices and eating behaviours of adolescents which in turn may affect their lifestyles and health in adulthood. The aim of this qualitative investigation was to describe the opinions of adolescents, their parents, nutrition educators and school principals about the prevailing food environment and canteen policies in Indian schools. Fifteen adolescents aged 14-15 years, 15 parents, 12 teachers and 10 principals from 10 private schools in Kolkata, India participated in semi-structured interviews. The interview questions were primarily based on the existing literature related to school food environments and policies. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and assessed thematically. Throughout the 52 interviews, a number of inadequacies of the school food environment and policies were revealed. These included the absence of written food policies, the widespread supply of unhealthy foods, inadequate provision of healthy foods, misleading messages about food communicated by school authorities, lack of cleanliness in the school canteen and the high cost of canteen food. Current school food environments do not appear to promote healthy eating among adolescents. Therefore, it is important to upgrade the quality of food services in Indian schools through adoption of healthy eating policies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A non-religious spirituality from a Christian tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià Corbí

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes in the ways of survival in human societies, passing quickly from pre-industrial to industrial societies or industrial societies to knowledge societies, characterized by innovation and constant change, require a kind of a non religious spirituality not tied to beliefs. No need to go to Eastern spiritual traditions, Buddhism, Yoga or Advaita Vedanta to show and experience the possibility of a non-religious spirituality; also within the Christian tradition, we find authors that allow non-religious spirituality. We can count on an important notion of Nicholas of Cusa: The "No-Other" as the  absolute dimension of all reality. The Cusano considers that this term is more appropriate to describe that absolute of all reality then the term God. It is also very convenient to live a spirituality that does not divide reality into two poles: the mundane and the divine, the relative and absolute in this world and the next.

  16. Increasing Diversity in Emerging Non-religious Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hassall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary growth in non-religious populations has given rise to novel communities with unique perspectives on social issues. We describe a study of diversity within speakers at conferences organised by and attended by the atheist community. We analyse trends in diversity of 630 speakers, corresponding to 1223 speaking slots at 48 conferences conducted for the purpose of discussing or espousing non-religious views over the period 2003–2014. Diversity among speakers (defined using multivariate statistics in terms of the representation of women and non-white people increased significantly over time during the period studied. This broadening participation may have arisen from interventions to address issues of representation or may simply reflect a generational shift in the demographics of the community. However, on-going problems with data collection and the imbalance in the social cost of identifying as non-religious between different social groups continue to impede efforts to reduce barriers to equality within this growing movement.

  17. When Duties Are Not Enough: Principal Leadership and Public or Private School Management in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, José; Muñoz, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    The Chilean education system is an emblematic case of school management privatization, with the majority of schools operating under government funding, but private administration. This article addresses the incidence of this dimension on school leadership, showing the differences and continuities established among primary school principals in the…

  18. Public and Private School Performance in Nepal: An Analysis Using the SLC Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Amrit

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the survey of the Ministry of Education, Nepal-2005 for School Leaving Certificate Exam, this paper analyzes public and private school performance in Nepal. The ordinary least square estimates suggest that private school students perform better than public school students. However, the problem of self-selection bias arises, as…

  19. When Duties Are Not Enough: Principal Leadership and Public or Private School Management in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, José; Muñoz, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    The Chilean education system is an emblematic case of school management privatization, with the majority of schools operating under government funding, but private administration. This article addresses the incidence of this dimension on school leadership, showing the differences and continuities established among primary school principals in the…

  20. Public and Private School Performance in Nepal: An Analysis Using the SLC Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Amrit

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the survey of the Ministry of Education, Nepal-2005 for School Leaving Certificate Exam, this paper analyzes public and private school performance in Nepal. The ordinary least square estimates suggest that private school students perform better than public school students. However, the problem of self-selection bias arises, as…

  1. TOTAL QUALITY SCHOOL CHARACTERISTICS: STUDIES IN PRIVATE AND STATE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supramono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to analyze efforts accomplished by private and state elementary schools in improving five characteristics of Total Quality School. This descriptive thesis makes use of interviews and questionnaires as data collection methods. In addition, this study data is obtained from schools’ principals, teachers, students, several students' parents, and committees. The study result showed that both schools have applied efforts in improving five characteristics of Total Quality School: focus on customer, total involvement, measurement, commitment, and continuous improvement characteristics. However, both schools should do more efforts on several aspects of total quality school, in order to make the schools more qualified.

  2. Comparison of public and private school teachers and school principals’ opinions in Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine public and private school teachers’ opinions on different aspects of their professional associations and provisions and also asks principals about teachers’ conduct and their views on the Nigerian curriculum. To conduct this study, qualitative and quantitative research models were used to investigate differences between the two organizations. Quantitative data was collected by distributing questionnaires to 118 teachers in the Abuja Municipal Area Council (AMAC, Nigeria. To conduct the qualitative analysis, 15 teachers from two schools were selected (a total of 30 teachers to answer 5 discussion questions concerning their views on the Nigerian educational system. The findings revealed that private school teachers are at an advantage when it comes to provision of resources and technology, professional development and to some degree salaries. Both public and private school teachers felt being a teacher did not bring them respect in their community. Government policy makers need to study private schools and how they operate to see how they can make changes to produce the revolutionary reform needed in education. 30 principals’ interviews revealed that public school teachers are not easily held accountable for misconduct due to the structure of leadership, while private school teachers are held accountable and any form of unprofessionalism easily leads to termination of employment.

  3. Evaluating the Effects of Governmental Regulations on South Korean Private Cram Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaesung; Cho, Rosa Minhyo

    2016-01-01

    Using two nationally representative datasets, this paper examines how the imposition of a curfew on private cram schools affects the consumption of private tutoring services as well as the time use patterns of Korean high school students. To identify the impact of the curfew, this study capitalizes on inter-city/province variation in private cram…

  4. Fifty Educational Markets: A Playbook of State Laws and Regulations Governing Private Schools. School Choice Issues in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammons, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    There is a widespread misperception that private schools avoid government oversight or are "unregulated." In fact, private schools are subject to a wide variety of laws and regulations that run the gamut from reasonable rules to ensure health and safety to unreasonable rules that interfere with school curricula, preventing schools from pursuing…

  5. The One Laptop School: Equipping Rural Elementary Schools in South India through Public Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byker, Erik Jon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a Public Private Partnership (PPP) program in South India that provided information and communication technology (ICT) to rural elementary schools. The article examined the current status of rural, government-run elementary schools in India by reviewing reports like the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) in India.…

  6. Dietary habits and physical activity levels in Jordanian adolescents attending private versus public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyem, R F; Al-Hazzaa, H M; Abu-Mweis, S S; Bawadi, H A; Hammad, S S; Musaiger, A O

    2014-07-08

    The present study examined differences in dietary habits and physical activity levels between students attending private and public high schools in Jordan. A total of 386 secondary-school males and 349 females aged 14-18 years were randomly recruited using a multistage, stratified, cluster sampling technique. Dietary habits and physical activity level were self-reported in a validated questionnaire. The prevalence of obesity was significantly higher among adolescents in private (26.0%) than in public schools (16.7%). The frequency of breakfast intake was significantly higher among adolescents in private schools, whereas French fries and sweets intake was significantly higher in public schools. Television viewing showed a significant interaction with school type by sex. A higher rate of inactivity was found among students attending private schools. Despite a slightly better overall dietary profile for students in private schools, they had a higher rate of overweight and obesity compared with those in public schools.

  7. School health services and its practice among public and private primary schools in Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuponiyi, Olugbenga Temitope; Amoran, Olorunfemi Emmanuel; Kuponiyi, Opeyemi Temitola

    2016-04-06

    Globally the number of children reaching school age is estimated to be 1.2 billion children (18% of the world's population) and rising. This study was therefore designed to determine the school health services available and its practices in primary schools in Ogun state, Western Nigeria. The study was a comparative cross-sectional survey of private and public primary schools in Ogun state using a multi-stage sampling technique. Participants were interviewed using a structured, interviewer administered questionnaire and a checklist. Data collected was analyzed using the SPSS version 15.0. A total of 360 head teachers served as respondents for the study with the overall mean age of 45.7 ± 9.9 years. More than three quarters of the respondents in both groups could not correctly define the school health programme. There were no health personnel or a trained first aider in 86 (47.8%) public and 110 (61.1%) private schools but a nurse/midwife was present in 57 (31.7%) and 27 (15.0%) public and private schools. (χ(2) = 17.122, P = 0.002). In about 95% of the schools, the teacher carried out routine inspection of the pupils while periodic medical examination for staff and pupils was carried out in only 13 (7.2%) public and 31 (17.2%) private schools (χ(2) = 8.398, P = 0.004). A sick bay/clinic was present in 26 (14.4%) and 67 (37.2%) public and private schools respectively (χ(2) = 24.371, P = 0.001). The practice of school health programme was dependent on the age (χ(2) = 12.53, P = 0.006) and the ethnicity of the respondents (χ(2) = 6.330, P = 0.042). Using multivariate analysis only one variable (type of school) was found to be a predictor of school health programme. (OR 4.55, CI 1.918-10.79). The study concludes that the practice of the various components of school health services was poor but better in private primary schools in Nigeria. Routine inspection by teachers was the commonest form of health appraisal. This may suggest that more health personnel need to

  8. Overweight and Obesity among Adolescents, A Comparative Study Between Government and Private Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Lipilekha; Pattanaik, Sumitra; Sahu, Trilochan; Rao, E Venkata

    2015-09-01

    To compare prevalence of overweight/obesity among adolescent school children of government and private schools. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 1800 children aged 10-16 years. Body mass index (BMI), Waist circumference (WC), Hip circumference (HC), and Neck circumference (NC) were measured using standard guidelines. The prevalence of overweight obesity was 27.8% (private schools 45.2%, government schools 10.5%). BMI, WC, NC, and Waist-hip ratio were significantly higher among private school students. A differential strategic plan may be needed to prevent and control obesity among adolescent school children.

  9. How Do Private Sector Schools Serve the Public Good by Fostering Inclusive Service Delivery Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Martin; Tichy, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Conversations about promoting educational reforms that redress educational inequities often ignore private schools as irrelevant. Yet pursuits of inclusivity in private sector schools serve the public interest. This article focuses on how the system of Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of St. Louis has been purposefully striving for 2 decades to…

  10. The Tax-Credit Scholarship Audit: Do Publicly Funded Private School Choice Programs Save Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    This report follows up on previous work that examined the fiscal effects of private school voucher programs. It estimates the total fiscal effects of tax-credit scholarship programs--another type of private school choice program--on state governments, state and local taxpayers, and school districts combined. Based on a range of assumptions, these…

  11. An Inspector Calls: The Regulation of 'Budget' Private Schools in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, J.; Dixon, P.

    2005-01-01

    Research explored the regulatory regime, both 'on paper' and 'in practice', for private unaided schools serving low-income families ('budget' private schools), in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. Interviews were conducted with school managers, teachers, parents, and senior government officials and politicians. A Supreme Court Judgement rules out…

  12. Marketing Strategies and Students' Enrolment in Private Secondary Schools in Calabar Municipality, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchendu, Chika C.; Nwafor, Innocent A.; Nwaneri, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated marketing strategies and students' enrolment in private secondary schools in Calabar Municipality, Cross River State. One research question was raised and two null hypotheses formulated to guide the study. Thirty two (32) school administrators in 32 private secondary schools in the study area constitute the study population…

  13. Nepali Private Schools and Tolerated Illegality: A Foucauldian Analysis of Privatisation of Education in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma Poudyal, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The Education Act 1971 is the main policy document under which schools in Nepal are operated. With the change in political regime, this policy has been amended as per the ideology of the incoming regime. Although private schools started to show their influence in Nepal in the late 1980s, excessive growth of private schools began with the…

  14. The Effect of Private School Vouchers on Political Participation: Experimental Evidence from New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Deven; Chingos, Matthew M.; Campbell, David E.

    2017-01-01

    In 1997, the New York School Choice Scholarships Foundation Program (SCSF) randomly offered three-year scholarships to attend private schools to approximately 1,000 low-income families in New York City. In this paper we leverage exogenous variation generated by the SCSF to estimate the causal effect of the private school voucher offer--and the…

  15. Does Private Schooling Narrow Wealth Inequalities in Learning Outcomes? Evidence from East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcott, Benjamin; Rose, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    In many low- and lower-middle-income countries, private schools are often considered to offer better quality of education than government schools. Yet, there is a lack of evidence to date on their role in reducing inequalities: namely, the extent to which private schooling improves learning among the most disadvantaged children. Our paper uses…

  16. Private Giving to Public Schools and Districts in Los Angeles County: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Ron; Krop, Cathy; Kaganoff, Tessa; Ross, Karen E.; Brewer, Dominic J.

    In an era of dependence on nonflexible funding by states, private support is a desirable source of funding. Anecdotal reports and a limited body of documented research suggest districts and schools are pursuing private support with increased sophistication and aggressiveness. This pilot study is designed to provide schools and school districts…

  17. 34 CFR 200.64 - Factors for determining equitable participation of private school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... amount of funds generated by private school children from low-income families under paragraph (a)(2) of... generated by children from low-income families under § 200.78 who attend that private school. (b) Services... from low-income families residing in participating public school attendance areas. (ii) The LEA......

  18. 34 CFR 300.132 - Provision of services for parentally-placed private school children with disabilities-basic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... their parents in private, including religious, elementary schools and secondary schools located in the... Eligibility Children with Disabilities Enrolled by Their Parents in Private Schools § 300.132 Provision...

  19. Developing an Attitude Scale towards Private Schools: A Validity and Reliability Study

    OpenAIRE

    OTRAR, MUSTAFA; KANDEMİR, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a Likert type scale to determine the attitudes of public school teachers towards private schools. The working group of research consists of 511 teachers working at 29 public schools in Istanbul, Kartal selected by random sampling. Applications were conducted during the 2014-2015 school year. First of all, it was aimed to develop an assessment instrument that measures the attitudes of teachers towards private schools. As a result of Lawshe analysis,...

  20. A discrete choice experiment studying students' preferences for scholarships to private medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Rei; Kakihara, Hiroaki

    2016-02-09

    The shortage of physicians in rural areas and in some specialties is a societal problem in Japan. Expensive tuition in private medical schools limits access to them particularly for students from middle- and low-income families. One way to reduce this barrier and lessen maldistribution is to offer conditional scholarships to private medical schools. A discrete choice experiment is carried out on a total of 374 students considering application to medical schools. The willingness to receive a conditional scholarship program to private medical schools is analyzed. The probability of attending private medical schools significantly decreased because of high tuition, a postgraduate obligation to provide a service in specific specialty areas, and the length of time of this obligation. An obligation to provide a service in rural regions had no significant effect on this probability. To motivate non-applicants to private medical schools to enroll in such schools, a decrease in tuition to around 1.2 million yen (US$ 12,000) or less, which is twice that of public schools, was found to be necessary. Further, it was found that non-applicants to private medical schools choose to apply to such schools even with restrictions if they have tuition support at the public school level. Conditional scholarships for private medical schools may widen access to medical education and simultaneously provide incentives to work in insufficiently served areas.

  1. 34 CFR 300.131 - Child find for parentally-placed private school children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluate all children with disabilities who are enrolled by their parents in private, including religious... with Disabilities Enrolled by Their Parents in Private Schools § 300.131 Child find for parentally... with § 300.301. (f) Out-of-State children. Each LEA in which private, including religious,...

  2. Awareness of dengue fever among school children: a comparison between private and government schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kalra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is the mosquito born viral disease spreading its tentacles all over the world. Dengue constitutes for major cause of deaths in children. According to WHO, globally it was estimated that approximately 70-100 million people were infected every year. Therefore, the study has been conducted with the aim to assess knowledge regarding dengue fever among school children. Methodology: Total of 500 children were selected from 9th and 10th class of private and government schools using total enumerative sampling technique. Data was collected using questionnaire method. After assessing knowledge classes were taken by investigators focusing on prevention of dengue fever. Results: Finding of study revealed that among Private schools excellent knowledge was found in 06 (01.2% children, good in 123 (24.6% children, average 112 (22.4% children and poor in 02 (00.41 whereas in Government schools none of students had excellent knowledge, 76(15.2% children were having good knowledge, 178(35.6% children were having average knowledge & 03 (00.6 children were having poor knowledge. The mean knowledge scores were higher in students of Private schools i.e. 31.45 ± 6.41 as compared to students of Government schools i.e. 28.17 ± 5.39 at t=6.19 (p=0.00. Conclusion: It is concluded that majority of school students of private and government schools were having average knowledge regarding prevention of dengue fever. Therefore, there is need for further information, education and communication programs regarding prevention of dengue fever and this can be achieved by organizing health education campaigns in community involving schools.

  3. Stunting and weight statuses of adolescents differ between public and private schools in urban Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juwara, Alimatou; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Ying; Chen, Hsin-Jen

    2016-07-01

    This study assessed the disparity in nutritional status of adolescents between public and private schools in urban Gambia. This is a school-based cross-sectional study in six private and six public upper basic schools in urban Gambia. This study recruited 491 students from public and 469 students from private schools (13-15 years of age). The prevalence of stunting (WHO height-for-age Z school students and 4.5 % for private schools. After adjustment for children's sex, age, and family socioeconomic status, the differences in prevalence of stunting and underweight were significant between public and private schools. Private school students are more likely to be overweight/obese (WHO BMI-for-age Z > +1SD) (OR = 2.85, 95 % CI 1.55-5.22), but less likely to be thin (BMI-for-age Z school students. Children from lower income families had lower odds for overweight/obese than normal weight, compared to those from higher income families (OR = 0.34 [0.15-0.76]). Public and private schools in urban regions of the Gambia may face different nutritional challenges due to differences in school environment and resources.

  4. A comparative study of school based violence and strategies for control in public and private secondary schools in Osun State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omisore, A G; Omisore, B; Adelekan, B; Afolabi, O T; Olajide, F O; Arije, O O; Agunbiade, O I

    2012-01-01

    Violence is universal; it occurs in schools (both public and private). The study aim was to assess the rates of violence as well as existing violence prevention strategies in public and private schools in Osun state. A cross sectional study was conducted among 800 secondary school students (599 in public and 201 in private schools) selected by multistage sampling technique using quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. The mean age for all the respondents was 14.26 years +/- 2.001 Males make up about 51% of the respondents in both public and private schools. Respondents from public schools assaulted other students and staff with a weapon more than their colleagues in private schools (24.7% and 9.7% against 12.9% and 6.5% respectively). The commonest violence 'prevention' strategy in both schools was punishment for violent acts (>90%). Respondents in public schools perpetrated and experienced virtually all forms of school-related violence more than those in private, schools. There were mild differences in existing violence prevention strategies in both schools. School connectedness seems to be a major factor in the differential rates of violence between both groups of schools.

  5. Public/Private School Partnerships: What Can Be Learned from Corporate School Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinners, Kathleen D.

    This paper reports on a larger study that described public/private school partnerships throughout the U.S. The study described collaborations in terms of their goals, organizational structure, support, commonalities and differences, and evaluations. The present essay discusses how these partnerships provide a model for understanding what…

  6. The Transformation of a Private University's School of Nursing, 1999-2009: An Historical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selick, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the transformation of the School of Nursing at a private university in a Middle Atlantic state during the years 1999 to 2009. The secondary purpose of this study was to determine the leadership style of the Director of the School of Nursing at this private university in a Middle Atlantic state that led this…

  7. Pupil Control Ideology and Behavior as Predictors of Environmental Robustness: Public and Private Schools Compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenburg, Fred C.

    1991-01-01

    Questionnaires examined differences between public and private schools regarding teachers' pupil control ideology and behavior. Teachers and students completed three survey instruments. Only pupil control ideology differed significantly between public and private schools. Pupil control behavior was the best predictor of environmental robustness.…

  8. The Impact of Private Sector Competition on Public Schooling in Kuwait: Some Socio-Educational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shehab, Ali Jasem

    2010-01-01

    With the diminishing model of the welfare state, public education in Kuwait is facing the challenges of the competition of private schools, while the private sector has always struggled against the monopolistic power of the public schools that educate a broad spectrum of K-12 students. This article presents estimates of the effect of private…

  9. A Qualitative Content Analysis of Sexual Abuse Prevention and Awareness Programming in Texas Private School Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naterman, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine to what extent private school athletic administrators have implemented programming specifically aimed at combatting the problem of childhood sexual abuse in sport. The study examined published policies and procedures overseen by private school athletic administrators to determine to what extent their…

  10. 34 CFR 200.87 - Responsibilities for participation of children in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities for participation of children in private schools. 200.87 Section 200.87 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... children in private schools. An SEA and its operating agencies must conduct programs and projects under...

  11. Impact of Private Secondary Schooling on Cognitive Skills: Evidence from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mehtabul; Kingdon, Geeta; Wu, Kin Bing

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effect of attending private secondary school on educational achievement, as measured by students' scores in a comprehensive standardized math test, in two Indian states: Orissa and Rajasthan. We use propensity score matching (PSM) to control for any systematic differences between students attending private secondary schools and…

  12. The Impact of Private Sector Competition on Public Schooling in Kuwait: Some Socio-Educational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shehab, Ali Jasem

    2010-01-01

    With the diminishing model of the welfare state, public education in Kuwait is facing the challenges of the competition of private schools, while the private sector has always struggled against the monopolistic power of the public schools that educate a broad spectrum of K-12 students. This article presents estimates of the effect of private…

  13. The Private School Market in Kuwait: A Field Study on Educational Investment Behavior of Kuwaiti Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Abdulmuhsen Ayedh

    2014-01-01

    The current study aims at exploring Kuwaiti families' educational investment behavior pursuant to the selection of a specific private school for their children from the private school market. Using the quantitative approach and the principles of marketing research, a survey was administered to a randomly selected sample of Kuwaiti families (n =…

  14. Are Private Schools Better Than Public Schools? Appraisal for Ireland by Methods for Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffermann, Danny; Landsman, Victoria

    2011-09-01

    In observational studies the assignment of units to treatments is not under control. Consequently, the estimation and comparison of treatment effects based on the empirical distribution of the responses can be biased since the units exposed to the various treatments could differ in important unknown pretreatment characteristics, which are related to the response. An important example studied in this article is the question of whether private schools offer better quality of education than public schools. In order to address this question we use data collected in the year 2000 by OECD for the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Focusing for illustration on scores in mathematics of 15-years old pupils in Ireland, we find that the raw average score of pupils in private schools is higher than of pupils in public schools. However, application of a newly proposed method for observational studies suggests that the less able pupils tend to enroll in public schools, such that their lower scores is not necessarily an indication of bad quality of the public schools. Indeed, when comparing the average score in the two types of schools after adjusting for the enrollment effects, we find quite surprisingly that public schools perform better on average. This outcome is supported by the methods of instrumental variables and latent variables, commonly used by econometricians for analyzing and evaluating social programs.

  15. The neural correlates of religious and nonreligious belief.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Harris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While religious faith remains one of the most significant features of human life, little is known about its relationship to ordinary belief at the level of the brain. Nor is it known whether religious believers and nonbelievers differ in how they evaluate statements of fact. Our lab previously has used functional neuroimaging to study belief as a general mode of cognition [1], and others have looked specifically at religious belief [2]. However, no research has compared these two states of mind directly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to measure signal changes in the brains of thirty subjects-fifteen committed Christians and fifteen nonbelievers-as they evaluated the truth and falsity of religious and nonreligious propositions. For both groups, and in both categories of stimuli, belief (judgments of "true" vs judgments of "false" was associated with greater signal in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area important for self-representation [3], [4], [5], [6], emotional associations [7], reward [8], [9], [10], and goal-driven behavior [11]. This region showed greater signal whether subjects believed statements about God, the Virgin Birth, etc. or statements about ordinary facts. A comparison of both stimulus categories suggests that religious thinking is more associated with brain regions that govern emotion, self-representation, and cognitive conflict, while thinking about ordinary facts is more reliant upon memory retrieval networks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While religious and nonreligious thinking differentially engage broad regions of the frontal, parietal, and medial temporal lobes, the difference between belief and disbelief appears to be content-independent. Our study compares religious thinking with ordinary cognition and, as such, constitutes a step toward developing a neuropsychology of religion. However, these findings may also further our understanding of how the

  16. Evaluation of theory of mind: A study with students from public and private schools

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues,Marisa Cosenza; Pelisson, Maíze Carla Costa; Silveira,Flávia Fraga; Ribeiro, Nathalie Nehmy; Silva, Renata de Lourdes Miguel da

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the development of the theory of mind in preschool children aged 4 and 5 years old, along with potential interactions among gender, age and whether children were from private or public schools. A total of 178 children (91 students from public schools and 87 from private schools) participated in the study. After securing ethical compliance with applicable guidelines, we applied the Theory-of-Mind-Scale. There was no evidence of differences regarding gender (p< 0.38). Differ...

  17. Low-Fee Private Schools in England and in Less Economically Developed Countries. What Can Be Learnt from a Comparison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walford, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    There has been a growing amount of research on low-fee private schools in less economically developed countries, but much less on low-fee private schools in developed countries. Yet, low-fee private schools have also been a recent feature of the educational landscape in countries such as Canada, the USA, Australia and Great Britain. This paper…

  18. 34 CFR 200.67 - Requirements concerning property, equipment, and supplies for the benefit of private school...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supplies for the benefit of private school children. 200.67 Section 200.67 Education Regulations of the... by Local Educational Agencies Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.67 Requirements concerning property, equipment, and supplies for the benefit of private school children. (a) The...

  19. 34 CFR 299.8 - What are the requirements to ensure that funds do not benefit a private school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... benefit a private school? 299.8 Section 299.8 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... to Private School Students and Teachers § 299.8 What are the requirements to ensure that funds do not benefit a private school? (a) An agency or consortium of agencies shall use funds under a program listed...

  20. Students Achievements in English at Jordanian Private and Public Schools and Parents Attitudes Towards Teaching Their Children at Private Ones: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Natour, Amal; Hijazi, Dima

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing private and public schools in terms of students' achievement in English Language and parents' attitudes towards teaching their children in private schools. To achieve the aim of the study the researchers conducted a test to measure students' achievements in English language and they also distributed a questionnaire…

  1. Ocular Morbidity among Children Attending Government and Private Schools of Kathmandu Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Shrestha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children from the developing world are more prone to going blind from avoidable and preventable causes. In Nepal, children in private schools are reported to have a higher ocular morbidity than those in government schools, with myopia being the major cause of the morbidity. This study was designed to evaluate ocular morbidity in students from both types of school. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, comparative study among students from government and private schools of Kathmandu. Eye examination was carried out evaluating visual acuity, color vision, refractive status, binocular vision status, and anterior and posterior segment findings. Results: A total of 4,228 students from government and private schools were evaluated. The prevalence of ocular morbidity was 19.56 % with refractive error (11.9 % being the major cause of the morbidity, followed by strabismus and infective disorders. No signifi cant difference in the prevalence of ocular morbidity and refractive status was found in the students from government and private schools. Conclusions: A signifi cant number of children of school-going age have ocular morbidity with no signifi cant difference in the prevalence in the students from government and private schools. Research exploring the effect of various risk factors in the progression of myopia would be helpful to investigate the refractive status in children from these different types of schools. Keywords: Myopia, ocular morbidity, school Students

  2. Affordability of Private Schools: Exploration of a Conundrum and towards a Definition of "Low-Cost"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James; Longfield, David

    2016-01-01

    The affordability of private education is a contentious issue. While the extent of "low-cost" private schooling is widely accepted, there is no agreement on what "low-cost" means in this context and how this relates to affordability for poor families. This paper addresses the lacuna in the literature by defining…

  3. The Development of Local Private Primary and Secondary Schooling in Hong Kong, 1841-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Randall, E. Vance; Tam, Man Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is a historical review of the development of private primary and secondary education in Hong Kong from 1841-2012. The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolving relationship between the state and private schools in Hong Kong. Design/methodology/approach: This paper utilizes sources from published official documents,…

  4. The Effectiveness of Private Voucher Education: Evidence from Structural School Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Bernardo; Mizala, Alejandra; Repetto, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors analyze the effect of private voucher education on student academic performance using new data on Chilean students and a novel identification strategy. Most schools in Chile provide either primary or secondary education. The authors analyze the effect of private voucher education on students who are forced to enroll at…

  5. High Blood Pressure among Students in Public and Private Schools in Maceio, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo S Ferreira

    Full Text Available The prevalence of hypertension in childhood is increasing, and investigation of its distribution is important for planning timely interventions. This study assessed the prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP and associated factors in students between 9 and 11 years of age enrolled in public and private schools in Maceió, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed in a probabilistic sample of students (10.3 ± 0.5 years. The students were selected from a systematic sampling of 80 schools (40 public and 40 private. To maintain similar proportions of students existing in public and private schools in Maceió, 21 and 14 students were randomly selected from each public and private school, respectively. The prevalence ratio (PR was estimated using Poisson regression. A total of 1,338 students were evaluated (800 from public schools and 538 from private schools. No differences were observed between school types in terms of student age and gender (p > 0.05. The prevalence of obesity (19.9% vs. 9.0%; PR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.67-2.92 and hypertension (21.2% vs. 11.4%; PR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.45-2.40 were higher in private schools. The association between high blood pressure and type of school (public or private remained statistically significant even after adjustment for obesity (PR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.19-1.97.(a students from private schools have higher socioeconomic status, BMI, and HBP prevalence compared to those of public school; (b among the evaluated students, the prevalence of obesity only partially explained the higher prevalence of high blood pressure among students from private schools. Other factors related to lifestyle of children from private schools may explain the higher prevalence of HBP. This results show the need to implement measures to promote healthy lifestyles in the school environment, since children with HBP are more likely to become hypertensive adults. Therefore, early detection and intervention in children with HBP is an important

  6. High Blood Pressure among Students in Public and Private Schools in Maceió, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Haroldo S; Lúcio, Glícia Maris A; Assunção, Monica L; Silva, Bárbara Coelho V; Oliveira, Juliana S; Florêncio, Telma Maria M T; Geraldes, Amandio Aristides R; Horta, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in childhood is increasing, and investigation of its distribution is important for planning timely interventions. This study assessed the prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP) and associated factors in students between 9 and 11 years of age enrolled in public and private schools in Maceió, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed in a probabilistic sample of students (10.3 ± 0.5 years). The students were selected from a systematic sampling of 80 schools (40 public and 40 private). To maintain similar proportions of students existing in public and private schools in Maceió, 21 and 14 students were randomly selected from each public and private school, respectively. The prevalence ratio (PR) was estimated using Poisson regression. A total of 1,338 students were evaluated (800 from public schools and 538 from private schools). No differences were observed between school types in terms of student age and gender (p > 0.05). The prevalence of obesity (19.9% vs. 9.0%; PR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.67-2.92) and hypertension (21.2% vs. 11.4%; PR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.45-2.40) were higher in private schools. The association between high blood pressure and type of school (public or private) remained statistically significant even after adjustment for obesity (PR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.19-1.97). (a) students from private schools have higher socioeconomic status, BMI, and HBP prevalence compared to those of public school; (b) among the evaluated students, the prevalence of obesity only partially explained the higher prevalence of high blood pressure among students from private schools. Other factors related to lifestyle of children from private schools may explain the higher prevalence of HBP. This results show the need to implement measures to promote healthy lifestyles in the school environment, since children with HBP are more likely to become hypertensive adults. Therefore, early detection and intervention in children with HBP is an important action

  7. Donating the Voucher: An Alternative Tax Treatment of Private School Enrollment. NBER Working Paper No. 18525

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwick, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10 percent of school-age children in the United States are enrolled in private schools, relieving the financial burden on public school systems, and the taxpayers who support them, of the cost of their education. At present, the tax code does not allow families who provide this financial relief an income tax deduction, even though…

  8. Measuring Outcomes: A Follow-Up of Minnesota Private Career School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard W.; Smith, Edward J.

    In Phase I of a study, all students (n=4,488) enrolled in schools in the Minnesota Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (MAPPS) completed a quality assessment instrument to evaluate their school. In Phase II, a sample of 2,000 students who completed the initial assessment were followed up to measure completion, placement, and student…

  9. [Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents of public and private schools. Salta City, Argentina, 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, Susana Judith; Jubany, Lilian Laura

    2010-10-01

    South America is now at a stage of epidemiological transition, changing the condition of high prevalence of underweight and stunting, to a scene marked by increases in obesity that accompanies chronic diseases, such us cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Surveillance of risk factors associated with them is considered a priority. To establish the prevalence of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in adolescents in public and private schools in the city of Salta, and observe the socioeconomic characteristics and presence of cardiovascular risk factors in parents. Cross-sectional design, adolescents aged 16 to 20 years of public and private schools. Anthropometric, biochemical, food, social, lifestyle and family history variables. Adolescents of private schools had higher average values of cholesterol, LDL and glucose. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in public schools was 15% and 14.2% in private, and of hypertension 11.3% and 12.2%, respectively. It was noted higher consumption of sweets, sodas and juices; 35.1% and 42.5% of adolescents in public and private schools, did not perform physical activity, 14.2% and 27.1% smoked and 66.2% and 54.7%, respectively, consumed alcohol at weekend. The prevalence of obesity in mothers of public school students was significantly higher. There is evidence of the emergence of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in adolescents with different characteristics as belonging to public or private schools, but both groups involved in an unhealthy family environment.

  10. Saudi Parents’ Attitudes towards Using English as a Medium of Instruction in Private Primary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Al-Qahtani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to investigate Saudi parents’ attitudes towards using English as a medium of instruction (EMI in private primary schools.The study also attempted to find the reasons why Saudi parents prefer EMI private schools for their children. Additionally, it examined the effects of using EMI on children’s Arabic language and culture, and their educational achievement in the next levels. The sample was 68 Saudi parents who have their children in a private primary school. The study used a questionnaire for data collection. It used a mixed design since data were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were analyzed through statistical analysis (SPSS while qualitative data were analyzed through content analysis using the categorization of themes. The results of this study showed that Saudi parents have positive attitudes towards using EMI in international private primary schools. Many Saudi parents prefer to send their children to EMI private primary schools, because they realize the importance of English as an international language, which can provide better opportunities for their children in the future. Also, they prefer to send their children to these schools, where English is used as a medium of instruction, because it is more effective if the child learned the language at an early age. However, some parents expressed a belief that English has negatively affected their children’s Arabic language. Keywords: English medium instruction, Bilingual education, Parents, Attitudes, Private schools

  11. Slow progress in changing the school food environment: nationally representative results from public and private elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2012-09-01

    Children spend much of their day in school, and authorities have called for improvements in the school food environment. However, it is not known whether changes have occurred since the federal wellness policy mandate took effect in 2006-2007. We examined whether the school food environment in public and private elementary schools changed over time and examined variations by school type and geographic division. Survey data were gathered from respondents at nationally representative samples of elementary schools during the 2006-2007 and 2009-2010 school years (respectively, 578 and 680 public schools, and 259 and 313 private schools). Topics assessed included competitive foods, school meals, and other food-related practices (eg, school gardens and nutrition education). A 16-item food environment summary score was computed, with possible scores ranging from 0 (least healthy) to 100 (healthiest). Multivariate regression models were used to examine changes over time in the total school food environment score and component items, and variations by US census division. Many practices improved, such as participation in school gardens or farm-to-school programs, and availability of whole grains and only lower-fat milks in lunches. Although the school food environment score increased significantly, the magnitude of change was small; as of 2009-2010 the average score was 53.5 for public schools (vs 50.1 in 2006-2007) and 42.2 for private schools (vs 37.2 in 2006-2007). Scores were higher in public schools than in private schools (Pschool size. For public schools, scores were higher in the Pacific and West South Central divisions compared with the national average. Changes in the school food environment have been minimal, with much room remaining for improvement. Additional policy changes may be needed to speed the pace of improvement. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cheaper by the Dozen: Using Sibling Discounts at Catholic Schools to Estimate the Price Elasticity of Private School Attendance. NBER Working Paper No. 15461

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Susan; Gruber, Jonathan; Li, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    The effect of vouchers on sorting between private and public schools depends upon the price elasticity of demand for private schooling. Estimating this elasticity is empirically challenging because prices and quantities are jointly determined in the market for private schooling. We exploit a unique and previously undocumented source of variation…

  13. Cheaper by the Dozen: Using Sibling Discounts at Catholic Schools to Estimate the Price Elasticity of Private School Attendance. NBER Working Paper No. 15461

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Susan; Gruber, Jonathan; Li, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    The effect of vouchers on sorting between private and public schools depends upon the price elasticity of demand for private schooling. Estimating this elasticity is empirically challenging because prices and quantities are jointly determined in the market for private schooling. We exploit a unique and previously undocumented source of variation…

  14. Ocular morbidity among children attending government and private schools of Kathmandu valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R K; Joshi, M R; Ghising, R; Rizyal, A

    2011-01-01

    Children from the developing world are more prone to going blind from avoidable and preventable causes. In Nepal, children in private schools are reported to have a higher ocular morbidity than those in government schools, with myopia being the major cause of the morbidity. This study was designed to evaluate ocular morbidity in students from both types of school. This was a cross-sectional, comparative study among students from government and private schools of Kathmandu. Eye examination was carried out evaluating visual acuity, color vision, refractive status, binocular vision status, and anterior and posterior segment findings. A total of 4,228 students from government and private schools were evaluated. The prevalence of ocular morbidity was 19.56 % with refractive error (11.9 %) being the major cause of the morbidity, followed by strabismus and infective disorders. No significant difference in the prevalence of ocular morbidity and refractive status was found in the students from government and private schools. A significant number of children of school-going age have ocular morbidity with no significant difference in the prevalence in the students from government and private schools. Research exploring the effect of various risk factors in the progression of myopia would be helpful to investigate the refractive status in children from these different types of schools.

  15. Why students of public and private schools in Costa Rica obtain different academic achievement?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gregorio Giménez; Geovanny Castro Aristizábal

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we use the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition methodology, applied to the pisa 2012 database, in order to identify the causes of the differences in academic results between public and private Costa Rican schools...

  16. Assessment practices for students with learning disabilities in Lebanese private schools: A national survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ElSaheli-Elhage, Rasha; Sawilowsky, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study is to discover, describe, and compare the assessment practices of teachers and administrators working with students with learning disabilities in Lebanese private schools via...

  17. Private and public schools dichotomies in the adoption and use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the adoption and use of information and communication technology. ... Findings equally revealed that private secondary schools increase their ICT use by ... high cost of ICT facilities, improper training of ICT personnel among others were ...

  18. Why Does Private School Enrollment Grow? Evidence from Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narodowski, Mariano; Moschetti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, a process of privatization took place in the Argentine education system. This paper seeks to explain the growth of private enrollments in Argentina over the last years. Drawing on the concept of quasi-monopoly, we run a random-effects estimation on panel data to analyze the determinants of the…

  19. An analysis of factors that affect public and private school science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Walberg, Herbert J.

    Data on 30,030 sophomores in the High School and Beyond project were analyzed to test the private school superiority hypothesis for science achievement. The supposition that private schools are superior to public schools in producing science achievement is rejected on the basis of the present analysis. Major differences in science achievement between public and private schools appear attributable to relatively fixed characteristics of students and to their experiences beyond the school environment, rather than to factors easily alterable by educators. The authors point out and discuss the value of homework, the problem of excessive television viewing, the influence of parental involvement in education, and the effect of the amount of academic classes taken.Received: 5 September 1985

  20. Prevalence of overweight and underweight in public and private schools in the Seychelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovet, Pascal; Chiolero, Arnaud; Madeleine, George; Paccaud, Fred

    2010-05-03

    We compared the prevalence of body weight categories between public and private schools in the Seychelles, a rapidly developing small island state in the African region. In 2004-2006, weight and height were measured and self-reported information on physical activity collected in children of three selected grades in all schools in the country. Overweight, obesity and thinness were defined according to standard criteria. Based on 8 462 students (377 in private schools), the prevalence of overweight (including obesity) was markedly higher in private than public schools (boys: 37% [95% CI: 31-44] vs. 15% [14-16]; girls: 33% [26-41] vs. 20% [19-22]). The prevalence of thinness grade 1 was lower in private than public schools (boys: 9% [5-13] vs. 20% [19-21]; girls: 13% [8-18] vs. 19% [18-20]). Students in private schools reported more physical activity at leisure time while students in public schools reported larger weekly walking time. Our findings suggest that school type may be a useful indicator for assessing the association between socio-economic status and overweight in children, and that overweight affects wealthy children more often than others in developing countries.

  1. [Knowledge of emergency contraception among adolescents in public and private Brazilian high schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Hoga, Luiza Akiko Komura

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to analyze the level of knowledge concerning emergency contraception among adolescents in public and private high schools. This was a cross-sectional study with 705 students 15 to 19 years of age enrolled in public and private high schools in a municipality in São Paulo State, Brazil. The authors used stratified probabilistic sampling by type of school and systematic sampling by class. Sexual initiation and use of emergency contraception were reported by 24.9% of private school students and 32% of public school students. The mean score on knowledge was 3.87 (SD = 2.12) in public schools and 5.14 (SD = 2.00) in private schools. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that higher scores on knowledge concerning emergency contraception were associated with: enrollment in private schools, female gender, older adolescents, sexual initiation, previous use of emergency contraception, and knowing someone who had used the method. The study concludes that few adolescents are properly informed about the method and that many harbor persistent misconceptions.

  2. Using School Scholarships to Estimate the Effect of Private Education on the Academic Achievement of Low Income Students in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Priyanka; Mizala, Alejandra; Repetto, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This paper estimates the impact of private education on the academic achievement of low-income students in Chile. To deal with selection bias, we use propensity score matching to compare the test scores of reduced-fee paying, low-income students in private voucher schools to those of similar students in public schools and free private voucher…

  3. A comparative study of mid-day meal beneficiaries and private school attendees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Bhargava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is undergoing a rapid demographic transition accompanied by an epidemiologic and nutritional transition. The nutritional status of school-going children who form a major section of the population, can give an indication of the changing trends in nutritional profile of the population. According to Planning Commission report, 2010, Mid Day Meal (MDM Program has been successful in addressing classroom hunger and the objective of social equity in government school attendees. Aims & Objectives: To study the pattern of school lunch intake and nutritional status in private and government school-going children of district Dehradun. Material & Methods: This was an observational cross-sectional study in district Dehradun in government and private schools, with participants from class 1 to 12. A 24-hour dietary recall was done to measure caloric intake. Height and weight were measured using Microtoise (accuracy 0.1cm and digital weighing machine (Omron Model: HN286, accuracy 100 gm. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS, version 22. Nutritional status was classified using WHO cut-offs and analyzed using AnthroPlus Software. Student t-test was used to compare caloric intake of subgroups. Association between nutritional status and other variables was assessed using Chi-squared test. Results: Using WHO cut-offs, the proportion of thin children was 5.4% in private school and 21.5% in MDM beneficiaries of government schools. The proportion of children who were overweight was 27.7% in private schools and 3.6% in government schools (p<.0.05. The caloric content of school lunch was 271 Kcal in private school attendees and 375 Kcal in MDM beneficiaries. Proportion of children who skipped school lunch increased as they progressed in higher classes, and this proportion was greater in students of government schools beyond class VIII. Conclusion: The study highlights the need for more large scale nutritional surveys with school lunch in focus.

  4. Start Later, Sleep Later: School Start Times and Adolescent Sleep in Homeschool vs. Public/Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Shaheed, Keisha; Ambler, Devon

    2014-01-01

    Homeschool students provide a naturalistic comparison group for later/flexible school start times. This study compared sleep patterns and sleep hygiene for homeschool students and public/private school students (grades 6-12). Public/private school students (n=245) and homeschool students (n=162) completed a survey about sleep patterns and sleep hygiene. Significant school group differences were found for weekday bedtime, wake time, and total sleep time, with homeschool students waking later and obtaining more sleep. Homeschool students had later school start times, waking at the same time that public/private school students were starting school. Public/private school students had poorer sleep hygiene practices, reporting more homework and use of technology in the hour before bed. Regardless of school type, technology in the bedroom was associated with shorter sleep duration. Later school start times may be a potential countermeasure for insufficient sleep in adolescents. Future studies should further examine the relationship between school start times and daytime outcomes, including academic performance, mood, and health. PMID:25315902

  5. Start Later, Sleep Later: School Start Times and Adolescent Sleep in Homeschool Versus Public/Private School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J; Shaheed, Keisha; Ambler, Devon

    2016-01-01

    Homeschooled students provide a naturalistic comparison group for later/flexible school start times. This study compared sleep patterns and sleep hygiene for homeschooled students and public/private school students (grades 6-12). Public/private school students (n = 245) and homeschooled students (n = 162) completed a survey about sleep patterns and sleep hygiene. Significant school group differences were found for weekday bedtime, wake time, and total sleep time, with homeschooled students waking later and obtaining more sleep. Homeschooled students had later school start times, waking at the same time that public/private school students were starting school. Public/private school students had poorer sleep hygiene practices, reporting more homework and use of technology in the hour before bed. Regardless of school type, technology in the bedroom was associated with shorter sleep duration. Later school start times may be a potential countermeasure for insufficient sleep in adolescents. Future studies should further examine the relationship between school start times and daytime outcomes, including academic performance, mood, and health.

  6. Maintaining religious values in a nonreligious counseling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B A

    1978-10-01

    Both Christianity and HE therapy may be viewed as dealing with searching questions for those of us who dare to pursue the quest. A sense of mission is to be found in both humanistic existentialism and Christianity when we query: Who am I? What is my relationship to the world and those in it? What do I truly believe and how do I want to act upon my beliefs?Thus, both Christianity and HE therapy explore searching questions for those who dare to pursue the answers, to reveal their individuality, their fears, their aloneness, and to explore the possibilities of existence.Finally, it is suggested that both Christianity and HE therapy are capable of creating an honest atmosphere that makes it easier for us to remove our masks, to reveal and share our doubts, resentments, and anxieties, and to do so in an atmosphere of acceptance that brings healing and wholeness, whether as a Christian or as a nonreligious humanistic existentialist. Rather than polarization or a dichotomy existing between the two positions, similarities have been found to be inherent, and integration and reconciliation are possible and feasible, allowing students to maintain their religious beliefs with integrity while at the same time incorporating university teachings.

  7. Enrollment and Completions at Private Career Schools. A Factual Look at Private Career Institutions in Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education, Lincoln.

    A survey of 53 private career institutions in Nebraska (56 percent located in the Omaha area) revealed the following statistics for the period July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991: (1) 9,275 students were enrolled; (2) business programs enrolled the largest percentage (35 percent) of the total student population, with business, trade, and technical…

  8. Primary care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z

    2013-06-01

    Despite a growing need for primary care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical school graduates pursuing primary care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical school research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing primary care. Observational study of United States medical schools. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical schools. The primary outcomes included the proportion of each school's graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were primary care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each school's graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical schools with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical schools, the 16 private medical schools produced significantly fewer practicing primary care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p private schools. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical schools produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing primary care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical schools. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical schools should play a more active role in promoting primary care careers for their students and graduates.

  9. 34 CFR 76.650 - Private schools; purpose of §§ 76.651-76.662.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Private schools; purpose of §§ 76.651-76.662. 76.650... Schools § 76.650 Private schools; purpose of §§ 76.651-76.662. (a) Under some programs, the authorizing... private schools. Sections 76.651-76.662 apply to those programs and provide rules for that participation...

  10. Engineering curriculum change at a private Midwest school of dental medicine: a faculty innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Marsha A; Goldberg, Jerold S

    2008-03-01

    The national dental educational environment has been sensitized to the changing needs of the profession and students, resulting in an agenda for curriculum change in a number of dental schools. This report discusses the impetus for change at a private Midwestern school that has begun a multiyear implementation of an innovative curriculum. The process by which the innovations have been instituted, while unique to this school, may provide insights for change at other dental schools.

  11. A private school leadership perspective on highly qualified middle school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaski, Carolyn Siniscalchi

    The purpose of this study was to determine how Florida (FL) private, middle school (MS) leaders define highly qualified (HQ) MS science teachers, and how congruent their definitions are. The study also determines how congruent these leaders' definitions are with FL, national, and National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) definitions. Lastly, the study determines the major challenges these private MS leaders have in hiring MS science teachers who meet the NSTA definition of HQ. A convergent mixed methods survey design (Creswell, 2014) was used, in which qualitative and quantitative data were collected in parallel, analyzed separately, and then merged. Participants in the survey consisted of 119 leaders. A congruency rubric separated responses by religious affiliation and socioeconomic status (SES) level and matched responses with the percentage of congruency with the existing FL, national, and NSTA definitions of HQ. Descriptive statistics, paired samples t-test, and chi-squared test were used to analyze the quantitative and qualitative data. Qualitative data were coded into preliminary and final codes. Final codes were converted into magnitude codes, which allowed the researcher to analyze further the qualitative data statistically. Survey responses received were definitely congruent, except in ranking the importance of a candidate having an out-of-field degree with state certification, and in ranking the importance of a candidate being fully qualified to teach science in their state with a strong knowledge of science content. Segregating the survey responses into registered religious affiliations and SES levels found that the definition of a HQ MS science teacher was mostly congruent among all demographics, with only a couple of exceptions. The study found that these private school leaders' common definition of a HQ MS science teacher is one with adequate science content knowledge, pedagogy including engagement in laboratory activities, ability to relate to

  12. School Culture in a Private Secondary Institution in Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaheb-Jahangeer, Shamim; Jahangeer, Abdul Cayum

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the school culture in a secondary school in Mauritius. It analyses how the school culture has an impact on the effectiveness of an educational organisation. The literature on school culture is reviewed and discussed. The education system in the Mauritian context is described; and its advantages and drawbacks…

  13. Effectiveness of prevention-oriented school oral health program in a private school in Pimpri, Pune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Programs oriented toward prevention have proven to be highly rewarding in reducing the dental disease burden in western populations. Some developing countries have also reported studies of school health programs with varying effectiveness. However, reports regarding improved effectiveness due to mobile dental unit are scarce. Thus, the present study aims at assessment of effectiveness of prevention-oriented school health program in a private school in Pimpri, Pune. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted from May 2015 to June 2016 in Dr. D.Y. Patil school among 449 students aged 5 and 10 years using census sampling. Ethical clearance was obtained from Institutional Ethics Committee of Dr. D. Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital and permission was obtained from the school principal. The study was conducted in 3 phases. SPSS version 18 was used for analyzing the data. Results: There was significant reduction in decayed component and a significant increase in filled component in primary and permanent dentition. There was a significant reduction in treatment needs, i.e., one surface, two surface fillings, and pulp care and restoration. Conclusion: It can be concluded that this prevention-oriented 1-year program was helpful in improving the oral health of the children.

  14. Factors Contributing to the Current Academic Performance of Both Private Primary Schools and Public Primary Schools: A Case of Kitale Municipality, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine, Ochenje

    2015-01-01

    There have been current controversial discussions concerning the performance of private primary schools versus public primary schools in the Kenya Certificate of Primary Examination (K.C.P.E.). Lately, the private primary schools appear to be performing better than public primary schools. For example; in the 2003 K.C.P.E. results, more than 31% of…

  15. The Relationship between Public and Private Schooling and Anti-Semitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jay P.; Kingsbury, Ian

    2017-01-01

    No previous research has directly examined the relationship between attending a public or private school as a child and people's attitudes toward Jews when they become adults. This article sheds new light on this issue by using a large, nationally representative survey of over 1,500 adults in the United States to see how childhood schooling is…

  16. Organizational Rhetoric in the Prospectuses of Elite Private Schools: Unpacking Strategies of Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Paula; Pini, Barbara; Mayes, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The way in which private schools use rhetoric in their communications offers important insights into how these organizational sites persuade audiences and leverage marketplace advantage in the context of contemporary educational platforms. Through systemic analysis of rhetorical strategies employed in 65 "elite" school prospectuses in…

  17. Climate Profile and OCBs of Teachers in Public and Private Schools of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pooja; Rastogi, Renu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to assess the significant differences in the climate profile and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) of teachers working in public and private schools of India. Design/methodology/approach: The sample comprised of 100 teachers, out of which 50 teachers were from public school and 50 teachers were from private…

  18. Classroom Interaction in Private Schools Serving Low-Income Families in Hyderabad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Hardman, Frank; Tooley, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of classroom interaction and discourse in privately-funded schools serving low-income families in Hyderabad, India. In common with other developing countries, India has seen a proliferation of such schools and yet little systematic study has been made of them. One hundred and thirty eight lessons were analysed using a…

  19. Analysis of International Data on the Impact of Private Schooling--Hyderabad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schagen, Ian; Shamsan, Yarim

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of a growing number of private schools in the third world, several organisations and groups are endeavouring to examine the effects of such schooling systems on poor pupils. Professor James Tooley, the client, has collected data from seven regions internationally (three in India, three in Africa and one in China). For this…

  20. Pluck & Tenacity: How Five Private Schools in Ohio Have Adapted to Vouchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    State-funded voucher programs have stoked political controversy, culture clashes, and pitched court battles. Sometimes referred to as "scholarships," these vouchers enable students of limited means (or without access to a good public school) to attend a private school. Roughly 30,000 children in Ohio take advantage of a publicly funded…

  1. Comparison of students from private and public schools on the spelling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nathane Sanches Marques; Crenitte, Patrícia Abreu Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    To compare the spelling ability of schoolchildren from the fourth to sixth grades of the elementary schools in the private and public schools of Bauru, São Paulo, and to verify whether errors are overcome as studies progress and the hierarchy of errors as to how often they occur. A dictation was applied to 384 schoolchildren: 206 from the private schools: 74 were at the fourth grade, 65 at the fifth grade, and 67 at the sixth grade; and 178 from the public schools; 56 at the fourth grade, 63 at the fifth grade, and 59 at the sixth grade of elementary school. Student's t test was used. In comparison of total spelling errors score, difference was found among the fourth and sixth grades of the private and public schools. Spelling errors decreased as education progressed, and those related to language irregularities were more common. Spelling ability and performance of students from the private and public schools are not similar in the fourth and sixth grades, but it is in the fifth grade. Spelling errors are gradually overcome as education progresses; however, this overcome rate was considerable between the fourth and fifth grades in the public schools. Decrease in the types of spelling errors follows a hierarchy of categories: phoneme/grapheme conversion, simple contextual rules, complex contextual rules, and language irregularities. Finally, the most common type of spelling error found was that related to language irregularities.

  2. Teaching basic life support to students of public and private high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, José Maria Gonçalves; Leite, Amanda Lira dos Santos; Auto, Bruna de Sá Duarte; Lima, José Elson Gama de; Rivera, Ivan Romero; Mendonça, Maria Alayde

    2014-06-01

    Despite being recommended as a compulsory part of the school curriculum, the teaching of basic life support (BLS) has yet to be implemented in high schools in most countries. To compare prior knowledge and degree of immediate and delayed learning between students of one public and one private high school after these students received BLS training. Thirty students from each school initially answered a questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of the automated external defibrillator (AED). They then received theoretical-practical BLS training, after which they were given two theory assessments: one immediately after the course and the other six months later. The overall success rates in the prior, immediate, and delayed assessments were significantly different between groups, with better performance shown overall by private school students than by public school students: 42% ± 14% vs. 30.2% ± 12.2%, p = 0.001; 86% ± 7.8% vs. 62.4% ± 19.6%, p private school students performed the best on all three assessments, respectively: 1.66 (CI95% 1.26-2.18), p private school students.

  3. The Relationship between Public and Private Schooling and Anti-Semitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jay P.; Kingsbury, Ian

    2017-01-01

    No previous research has directly examined the relationship between attending a public or private school as a child and people's attitudes toward Jews when they become adults. This article sheds new light on this issue by using a large, nationally representative survey of over 1,500 adults in the United States to see how childhood schooling is…

  4. Critical Small Schools: Beyond Privatization in New York City Urban Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantzopoulos, Maria, Ed.; Tyner-Mullings, Alia R., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Critical Small Schools: Beyond Privatization in New York City Urban Educational Reform features the most current empirical research about the successes and challenges of the small schools movement and the implications of such for urban public educational policy. Situated in a climate of hierarchical reform, many of the principles of the original…

  5. Environmental Education in Ecuador: Conceptions and Currents in Quito's Private Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, Fátima; Clarebout, Geraldine; Crauwels, Marion

    2013-01-01

    While key conceptions and the status of environmental education (EE) have been reported at various international, regional, national and local levels, those in play in the schools of Quito (Ecuador) are still relatively unknown. Of particular interest to this study are private schools: they are considerable in number in Ecuador and elsewhere, yet…

  6. Environmental Education in Ecuador: Conceptions and Currents in Quito's Private Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, Fátima; Clarebout, Geraldine; Crauwels, Marion

    2013-01-01

    While key conceptions and the status of environmental education (EE) have been reported at various international, regional, national and local levels, those in play in the schools of Quito (Ecuador) are still relatively unknown. Of particular interest to this study are private schools: they are considerable in number in Ecuador and elsewhere, yet…

  7. Can After-School Programs and Private Tutoring Help Improve Students' Achievement? Revisiting the Effects in Korean Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yeojin; Park, Hyun-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the causal effects of after-school programs (ASPs) and private tutoring on Korean secondary school students' academic achievement. The students' data from the Gyeonggi Education Panel Study were used in this study for the actual data analysis. The study attempted to adjust for possible selection bias toward…

  8. Turkish children's Bender-Gestalt test performance: differences in public and private school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Serap

    2011-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide data on the Bender-Gestalt test for children aged 5 to 11 in Turkey. Although it is well documented that sociocultural factors are important in cognitive evaluations, the effects of type of school and differing educational opportunities provided by these schools on the Bender-Gestalt test have not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of age, sex, and school type on Bender-Gestalt performance. The test was individually administered to 484 children between the ages of 5 and 11 years. The children were enrolled in either public or private schools. Koppitz's Developmental Scoring System was utilized. The results indicated that older children performed with fewer errors. Girls performed with fewer errors than boys. Finally, as expected, private school children outperformed their public school peers. The results are discussed with respect to the importance of taking into account various educational factors in utilizing commonly used tests.

  9. Comparison of neuropsychological performance between students from public and private Brazilian schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarin, Fabíola Schwengber; Wong, Cristina Elizabeth Izábal; Parente, Maria Alice de Mattos Pimenta; de Salles, Jerusa Fumagalli; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2012-11-01

    Neuropsychological assessment reveals that certain cognitive changes that take place during the neural development process may be associated with biopsychosocial issues. A substantial body of research has focused on cognitive development in children and adults, but few such studies have been carried out on adolescents. Therefore, research into the processing of neuropsychological functions in adolescents, taking into account the role of major socio-cultural factors such as school type (public vs. private), is highly relevant. The present study sought to assess whether differences in neuropsychological development exist between adolescent students of public (government-funded) and private schools. A total of 373 grade-matched students between the ages of 12 and 18, 190 from public schools and 183 from private schools, took part in the study. All subjects had no self-reported neurologic or psychiatric conditions and sensory disorders. The NEUPSILIN Brazilian Brief Neuropsychological Assessment Battery was administered to this sample. Comparison of mean scores (one-way ANCOVA with socioeconomic score and age as covariates) showed that adolescents attending private schools generally outperformed their public-school peers in tasks involving sustained attention, memory (working and visual), dictated writing, and constructional and reflective abilities. We conclude that school type should be taken into account during standardization of neuropsychological assessment instruments for adolescent and, probably, child populations.

  10. Private schooling and admission to medicine: a case study using matched samples and causal mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Muir; Osborne, Michael; Rimmer, Russell

    2015-08-20

    Are applicants from private schools advantaged in gaining entry to degrees in medicine? This is of international significance and there is continuing research in a range of nations including the USA, the UK, other English-speaking nations and EU countries. Our purpose is to seek causal explanations using a quantitative approach. We took as a case study admission to medicine in the UK and drew samples of those who attended private schools and those who did not, with sample members matched on background characteristics. Unlike other studies in the area, causal mediation analysis was applied to resolve private-school influence into direct and indirect effects. In so doing, we sought a benchmark, using data for 2004, against which the effectiveness of policies adopted over the past decade can be assessed. Private schooling improved admission likelihood. This did not occur indirectly via the effect of school type on academic performance; but arose directly from attending private schools. A sensitivity analysis suggests this finding is unlikely to be eliminated by the influence of an unobserved variable. Academic excellence is not a certain pathway into medicine at university; yet applying with good grades after attending private school is more certain. The results of our paper differ from those in an earlier observational study and find support in a later study. Consideration of sources of difference from the earlier observational study suggest the causal approach offers substantial benefits and the consequences in the causal study for gender, ethnicity, socio-economic classification and region of residence provide a benchmark for assessing policy in future research.

  11. Religiosity Gap Reversed: How Religious Counsellors' Belief System Presents When Working with Clients in a Non-Religious Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motalová, Katarína; Rihácek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Most studies exploring the religiosity gap are concerned with non-religious counsellors and religious clients. Approaching this phenomenon from a reversed perspective, this study explores how counsellors' religiosity presents when working with clients in a predominantly non-religious environment. Semi-structured interviews with 11 Czech…

  12. An Investigation of the Dayton Regional STEM School Public-Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kimberly S.

    This dissertation study documents in-depth the exploration of the Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) between the Dayton Regional STEM School (DRSS) and their industry partners as well as the establishment of a framework for evaluating and assessing PPPs. The public-private partnership agreements were studied in order to answer the over-arching research question: How is an effective public-private partnership established, assessed, and evaluated in education? A descriptive case study methodology was used to study DRSS' public-private partnership agreements to determine if goals and objectives were established and whether or not the partnerships met those goals and objectives. This case study also included the development and testing of a proposed evaluation framework that will allow for consistent, systematic inquiry that can produce defensible assertions regarding the assessment and evaluation of public-private partnerships in education. Results of the case study support the findings that utilization of an evaluation framework can serve to make public-private partnerships more successful. Results also indicated that establishment of goals and objectives enable effective evaluation for informal partnerships but could not be definitively stated for formal partnerships due to the lack of data points. The data from this case study revealed many emergent themes that should be considered in the development of future public-private partnerships. Overall this study contributes to the growing body of knowledge for public-private partnerships in education.

  13. Modeling school choice: A comparison of public, private-independent, private-religious and home-schooled students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive R. Belfield

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available U.S. students now have four choices of schooling: public schooling, private–religious schooling, private–independent schooling, and home-schooling. Of these, home-schooling is the most novel: since legalization across the states in the last few decades, it has grown in importance and legitimacy as an alternative choice. Thus, it is now possible to investigate the motivation for home-schooling, relative to the other schooling options. Here, we use two recent large-scale datasets to assess the school enrollment decision: the first is the National Household Expenditure Survey (1999, and the second is micro-data on SAT test-takers in 2001. We find that, generally, families with home-schoolers have similar characteristics to those with children at other types of school, but mother’s characteristics – specifically, her employment status – have a strong influence on the decision to home-school. Plausibly, religious belief has an important influence on the schooling decision, not only for Catholic students, but also those of other faiths.

  14. A comparative study of nutritional status between government and private primary school children of Mysore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N C Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: School health has been acknowledged as important since the beginning of 20 th century. Nutritional status is a major component of school health services. This study was undertaken to assess the nutritional status of government and private primary school children of Mysore city. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study design was adopted. One private and one government school were selected using multistage stratified random sampling method. A total of 1566 school children aged 6-12 years were measured for height and weight. Data on demographic details, dietary habits, and physical activity of child and education status, occupation, monthly income of their parents were collected. Results: Of 1566 children, 385 (24.5% were underweight, 132 (8.4% were overweight, and 65 (4.1% were obese. Majority of underweight children 226 (32.5% were found in government school. Except for two overweight children in government school, all overweight and obese children were found in private schools. Socioeconomic status, dietary habits, and physical activity of the child were found to be the determinants of their nutritional status. Conclusion: This study attempt to highlight the dual nutritional problem, under-nutrition among the lower socioeconomic class on one hand and growing epidemic of obesity among the affluent on the other.

  15. Physical activity, body mass index and blood pressure in primary school pupils attending private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoh, Wilson E; Sadoh, Ayebo E; Onyiriuka, Alphonsus N

    2016-12-01

    Lack of physical activity contributes to overweight and obesity. It is recommended that children accumulate at least one hour of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity daily. The level of physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP) were evaluated in pupils attending private primary schools. The intensity and duration of physical activity of the pupils selected by multiple stage sampling method were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The BMI and BP were measured. Analysis was by SPSS. Of the 353 pupils, 132(37.4%) pupils were adequately physically active while overweight and obesity prevalences were 54(15.3%) and 65(18.4%) respectively. Hypertension prevalence in overweight/ obese children (6.5%) was significantly higher than in children with healthy weight 1.5%, P = 0.04. Only a third of pupils met the recommended level of physical activity. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was high while the overweight and obese pupils were more likely to have hypertension compared to those with healthy weight. Physical activity programmes for primary school pupils in school and at home are therefore recommended.

  16. Privatizing Education: Free School Policy in Sweden and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate why Sweden, the epitome of social democracy, has implemented education reforms leading to an extraordinary growth in Free Schools in contrast to liberal England, where Free School policy has been met with enormous resistance. Conventional wisdom would predict the contrary, but as a matter of fact Sweden…

  17. Food and Nutrition Education in Private Indian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Neha; Riddell, Lynn; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current Indian secondary school curriculum has been criticised for its failure to deliver relevant skills-based food and nutrition education for adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the views of adolescents, their parents, teachers and school principals on the present food and nutrition curriculum and the role of…

  18. Charter, Private, and Public Schools Work Together in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana

    2014-01-01

    A public, Catholic, and charter school in Boston all work together to share their strengths and learn from each other in an effort to deliver the best education for all of their students. The arrangement is called the School Performance Partnership, and it is a grantee of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  19. Food and Nutrition Education in Private Indian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Neha; Riddell, Lynn; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current Indian secondary school curriculum has been criticised for its failure to deliver relevant skills-based food and nutrition education for adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the views of adolescents, their parents, teachers and school principals on the present food and nutrition curriculum and the role of…

  20. Charter, Private, and Public Schools Work Together in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana

    2014-01-01

    A public, Catholic, and charter school in Boston all work together to share their strengths and learn from each other in an effort to deliver the best education for all of their students. The arrangement is called the School Performance Partnership, and it is a grantee of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  1. The One Laptop School: Equipping Rural Elementary Schools in South India Through Public Private Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Jon Byker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a Public Private Partnership (PPP program in South India that provided information and communication technology (ICT to rural elementary schools. The article examined the current status of rural, government-run elementary schools in India by reviewing reports like the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER in India. Challenges like teacher absences, student drop-outs, lack of electricity, lack of separate toilets for genders, and a lack of teaching resources is discussed. To meet these challenges, the article describes the rise in popularity of India’s PPPs. Then the article reports on a case study of a PPP, called the SSA Foundation, which implemented a “one laptop per school” program in rural areas in the Indian States of Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. Using ethnographic data from field research, the case study includes a description of how the students in a rural Karnataka elementary school use their school’s laptop. The school was situated in a small village where most travel was non-motorized. Walking, usually without shoes, was the main form of transportation. A bicycle was considered a luxury. Most villagers worked in the surrounding ragi and millet fields; laboring, often with only simple tool blades. Wood fires were the main source of fuel for cooking. In this village, the school’s laptop became a prized possession. The case study offers a “thick description” (Geertz, 1973 of how the village school’s students used the laptop for learning basic computing skills and for learning English.

  2. Determinants of Parents’ Choice in Selection of Private Schools for Their Children in District Peshawar of Khyber Pakhunkhwa Province

    OpenAIRE

    Khattak, Naeem Ur Rehman Khattak; Khan, Jangraiz; TARIQ, Muhammad; Tasleem, Sajjad

    2010-01-01

    Almost all parents want to educate their children in the best possible educational environment. Their decision to invest in children depends on a number of social, economic and cultural factors. Education in Pakistan is offered by both public and private sector educational institutions. It is free of cost in public schools whereas in private schools, the parents have to bear the financial burden. For the last three decades private sector is emerging as an important source of imparting educati...

  3. The Shadow Institutional Framework: Towards a New Institutional Understanding of an Emerging Private School Sector in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prachi

    2008-01-01

    While the recent emergence of private schooling targeting socially and economically disadvantaged groups in India has been noted, the broader educational discourse in India conceptualises what have been termed here "low-fee private" (LFP) schools, as a loose collection of independent "teaching shops". Combining theoretical concepts from new…

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Social Media Usage and Academic Performance in Public and Private Senior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingle, Jeffrey; Adams, Musah; Adjei, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The study comparatively analyzed social media usage and academic performance in public and private senior high schools. The issue of social media and academic performance has been a very debatable topic with regard to its effect. This study further explores the relation between private and public schools in relation to social media use and…

  5. Donating the Voucher: An Alternative Tax Treatment of Private School Enrollment. Research Briefs in Economic Policy, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwick, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, parents send about 10 percent of elementary and secondary school-age children to private schools, which through their accreditation meet the requirement that students receive an adequate education. By paying out of pocket for their children's private education, these families relieve a financial burden on local, state, and…

  6. Religious socialization and non-religious volunteering: A Dutch panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, P.; Scheepers, P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite the fact that churches are still important sources of social capital in the Netherlands, the ongoing secularization of Dutch society has as yet not resulted in a drop of non-religious volunteering. In order to account for this apparent paradox, panel data are used to test the hypo

  7. Religious and Nonreligious Spirituality in Relation to Death Acceptance or Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Meanings of religious and nonreligious spirituality are explored, with implications for death acceptance, death rejection, and life extension. In the first of two exploratory studies, 16 elders low on intrinsic religiosity were compared with 116 elders high in religiosity; they differed both in qualitative responses and on death attitudes. In the…

  8. Routine (non-religious) neonatal circumcision and bodily integrity: a transatlantic dialogue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the current debate about the pros and cons of routine (non-religious) neonatal circumcision (RNC), the emphasis is on medical justifications for the practice. Questions of human rights also are widely discussed. However, even if the alleged medical benefits of RNC were to outweigh the harms and r

  9. The Effects of Using Educational Technology in Private Secondary Schools of Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqar-un-Nisa Faizi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the effects of using educational technology in private secondary school of Karachi. This study was done through survey. The population of this study was consisting on both students and teachers of private secondary school. One hundred respondents including 30 teachers and 70 students were randomly selected. The questionnaire was used consisting of 24 items as a research instruments. Simple percentage method and simple mean methods were used for analyzing the collected data. The survey result shows that both of students and teachers taking interest in using towards educational technology at secondary level. After the conclusion of the results it was recommended that Government and private institutions should arrange seminars and workshops to aware students about the importance of educational technology and there should be some introduction courses to aware teachers about educational technology.

  10. Teaching Basic Life Support to Students of Public and Private High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Gonçalves Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite being recommended as a compulsory part of the school curriculum, the teaching of basic life support (BLS has yet to be implemented in high schools in most countries.Objectives:To compare prior knowledge and degree of immediate and delayed learning between students of one public and one private high school after these students received BLS training.Methods:Thirty students from each school initially answered a questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and use of the automated external defibrillator (AED. They then received theoretical-practical BLS training, after which they were given two theory assessments: one immediately after the course and the other six months later.Results:The overall success rates in the prior, immediate, and delayed assessments were significantly different between groups, with better performance shown overall by private school students than by public school students: 42% ± 14% vs. 30.2% ± 12.2%, p = 0.001; 86% ± 7.8% vs. 62.4% ± 19.6%, p < 0.001; and 65% ± 12.4% vs. 45.6% ± 16%, p < 0.001, respectively. The total odds ratio of the questions showed that the private school students performed the best on all three assessments, respectively: 1.66 (CI95% 1.26-2.18, p < 0.001; 3.56 (CI95% 2.57-4.93, p < 0.001; and 2.21 (CI95% 1.69-2.89, p < 0.001.Conclusions:Before training, most students had insufficient knowledge about CPR and AED; after BLS training a significant immediate and delayed improvement in learning was observed in students, especially in private school students.

  11. Determinants of Motivation in Teachers: A Study of Private Secondary Schools Chain Networks in Bahawalpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Nosheen; Yasin, Hina

    2015-01-01

    Retaining quality employees is the dream of every organization. This research focuses on a big issue arising in the education sector. A large number of teachers are incoming and leaving the private schools of Bahawalpur. Lack of motivation is a major cause of teachers' turnover. Aspire of this research is to find the factors which can motivate…

  12. Does Homeschooling or Private Schooling Promote Political Intolerance? Evidence from a Christian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Political tolerance is the willingness to extend civil liberties to people who hold views with which one disagrees. Some have claimed that private schooling and homeschooling are institutions that propagate political intolerance by fostering separatism and an unwillingness to consider alternative viewpoints. I empirically test this claim by…

  13. Rationality or Legitimacy: Analysis of the Controversy over Reasonable Returns for China's Privately Run Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Shui

    2009-01-01

    Logical analyses of legislative texts show that the root cause for the huge controversy elicited by the issue of reasonable returns for China's privately run schools lies in the fact that legislators have confused public benefit versus non-public benefit and profit making versus non-profit making, concepts that pertain, respectively, to two…

  14. Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment. NBER Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Joshua D.; Bettinger, Eric; Bloom, Erik; King, Elizabeth; Kremer, Michael

    This paper examines the impact of Colombia's Programa de Ampliacion de Cobertura de la Educacion Secundaria (PACES), which provided over 125,000 poor students with private secondary school vouchers, many of which were awarded by lottery. Researchers surveyed lottery winners and losers to compare educational and other outcomes. Results showed no…

  15. Development of a Program to Enhance Curriculum and Learning Management Competency of Private Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichpongsapak, Ratthasart; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were: (1) to study the factors and indicators to enhance curriculum and learning management competency of private primary school teachers; (2) to study current situations and desirable situations and techniques; (3) to develop a program; and (4) to study the effects of a program. The study comprised 4 phases: Phase…

  16. Private School Enrollment in an Italian Region after Implementing a Change in the Voucher Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Barbieri, Gianna; Murtinu, Samuele

    2015-01-01

    This article estimates the effect of an administrative change in a voucher policy implemented by an Italian Regional government. The voucher was initiated in 2000, and is intended to help families that want to enroll their children in private schools. In 2008, the policy was changed, making the administrative procedure required for obtaining the…

  17. Public versus Private Schools in Qatar: Is There a Literacy Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that performance-related differences between private and public schools disappear once student background characteristics are accounted for. However, given the sometimes significant variation in economic, social and cultural norms across countries these findings may not have universal relevance. The main purpose of…

  18. The Judicial Role in Attacking Racial Discrimination in Tax-exempt Private Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Law Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Examines the role of the courts in requiring the Internal Revenue Service to fulfill its statutory and constitutional obligations to identify racially discriminatory private schools and to revoke their tax exempt status as charitable organizations. Available from Harvard Law Review Association, Gannett House, Cambridge, MA 02138; sc $5.95. (Author)

  19. The Exporting and Franchising of Elite English Private Schools: The Emerging "Second Wave"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Tristan

    2008-01-01

    The past decade has seen the emergence, predominantly in Thailand and mainland China, of a form of educational institution that has had little scholarly attention or generic identification. This paper shows how the ad hoc and opportunistic franchising of elite English private schools, beginning with the hyper-capitalist exportation of the Dulwich…

  20. Supporting or Opposing Privatization in Education: Teachers' Attitudes and Positions of Power in Israeli Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addi-Raccah, Audray

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of neoliberal policies in education are controversial. Based on the micro-political approach, this study had two aims: (1) to examine teachers' attitudes toward the effect of privatization on inequality and educational improvement; and (2) to examine the link between teachers' positions of power in school and their attitudes…

  1. Commentary on Andrew Coulson's "Comparing Public, Private, and Market Schools: The International Evidence"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Gary; Coulson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors comment on Andrew Coulson's "Comparing Public, Private, and Market Schools: The International Evidence." The authors believe that Coulson's paper is a very interesting review of the literature on the ability of market-produced education to outperform government-produced education. Coulson's response on this commentary…

  2. Beyond the Consumer: Parents, Privatization, and Fundraising in US Urban Public Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey-Maddox, Linn

    2016-01-01

    Given recent budgetary gaps in public education, many civic and educational leaders have relied upon private sources of funding for US public schools, including funds raised by parents. Yet parents' role as economic actors in public education has been largely unexplored. Drawing from a qualitative study of parent engagement, fundraising, and…

  3. The Usage of Language Learning Strategies in Malaysian Private Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Bathuma; Palanisamy, Kalaimakal

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the usage of language learning strategies in private secondary Schools in Malaysia. Hypothesis was made that most of the students do not practice the language learning strategies completely and accurately. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between language learning strategies and practices of the…

  4. Children with disabilities in private inclusive schools in Mumbai: experiences and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ashima Das; Ruth Kattumuri

    2010-01-01

    'Inclusive education’ policy has been introduced in India, however the concept is in its infancy This qualitative study analyses the case of children with disabilities studying in private inclusive schools of Mumbai. It discusses the development of self concept, elucidates the benefits and challenges of children with disabilities in inclusive education. We then suggest recommendations for improvements in implementing inclusive education in India.

  5. Comparison of obesity, overweight and elevated blood pressure in children attending public and private primary schools in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoh, W E; Israel-Aina, Y T; Sadoh, A E; Uduebor, J E; Shaibu, M; Ogonor, E; Enugwuna, F C

    2017-07-01

    Overweight and obesity in children, and adolescents is on the rise globally. Affected children are prone to cardio-metabolic problems later in life, especially hypertension. The prevalence of obesity/overweight may differ depending on school type. Private schools are attended mostly by children of the affluent, while public schools are attended predominantly by those in the low and middle socio-economic classes. To compare the prevalence of overweight, obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) in pupils attending public and private primary schools in an urban community in Nigeria. In this cross sectional study, the BMI and BP of pupils in public and private primary schools, recruited by multistage sampling method, were measured. Their nutritional status was categorized using their BMI percentiles. Analysis was by SPSS. A total of 1466 pupils were recruited, 814(55.5%) were in public schools and 722(49.2%) were males. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher in private schools 11.8% and 11.7% compared to public schools 3.3% and 0.9%. The mean systolic BP of pupils in public schools 96.8 ± 12.5 mmHg was higher than that in private schools 95.5 ± 10.2 mmHg, p = 0.032. Distribution of pupils with prehypertension and hypertension between private and public schools was not significantly different. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is higher in pupils attending private schools compared to those in public school. Urgent measures are needed to stem this tide through education, weight reduction and physical activity programs, especially in pupils attending private schools.

  6. Modernism in School Reform: Promoting Private over Public Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    School reform in the past several decades has taken a "modernist" bent in that it has focused on quantitatively based accountability systems modeled after business (Ravitch, 2013; Tienken & Orlich, 2013). The author uses a model devised by a Finnish scholar to demonstrate that 1) these reforms are indeed modernist, and 2) the private…

  7. Sociopolitical Development of Private School Children Mobilising for Disadvantaged Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Darren; Lemelin, Nathalie; Bencze, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    A contemporary focus on democratic decision-making has occurred in school science through curricular developments such as socioscientific issues (SSIs) and Science, Technology, Society and Environment (STSE), creates opportunities for inclusion of activist education. However, it appears these components are often taught, if at all, as simply…

  8. Educating the future public health workforce: do schools of public health teach students about the private sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Traub, Arielle; Howard, Rachel; Frattaroli, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Recent surveys indicate that approximately 40% of graduates from schools of public health are employed within the private sector or have an employer charged with regulating the private sector. These data suggest that schools of public health should provide curricular opportunities for their students--the future public health workforce--to learn about the relationship between the private sector and the public's health. To identify opportunities for graduate students in schools of public health to select course work that educates them about the relationship between the private sector and public health. We systematically identified and analyzed data gathered from publicly available course titles and descriptions on the Web sites of accredited schools of public health. Data were collected in the United States. The sample consisted of accredited schools of public health. Descriptions of the number and types of courses that schools of public health offer about the private sector and identification of how course descriptions frame the private sector relative to public health. We identified 104 unique courses with content about the private sector's relationship to public health. More than 75% of accredited schools of public health offered at least 1 such course. Nearly 25% of identified courses focused exclusively on the health insurance industry. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed 5 frames used to describe the private sector, including its role as a stakeholder in the policy process. Schools of public health face a curricular gap, with relatively few course offerings that teach students about the relationship between the private sector and the public's health. By developing new courses or revising existing ones, schools of public health can expose the future public health workforce to the varied ways public health professionals interact with the private sector, and potentially influence students' career paths.

  9. A New Educational Marketing Mix: The 6ps for Private School Marketing in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Alipour

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present a new marketing mix for private schools based on parents' attitudes of non-public school students in Tehran. Each institution needs to survive is to provide marketing services. Educational institutions such as private schools to attract more students who are among the main goals of these institutions need to use Principles of Marketing. The type of hotels or restaurants services varies with educational services. Hence the educational sector particularly private schools need a new marketing model. This study seeks to present a model to be able thereby to increase Students enrollment. Research method of this study was the combination of exploratory, descriptive - survey and analytical. Gathering techniques of data were through both questionnaire and interview. First results obtained from factor analysis, showed that 3 factors obtained from the 6 factors, which are among the traditional marketing mix include: "Price", "promotion" and "product" and three new factors with the "Parent Teacher Communication," professor "and" privilege ". So the effect of each 6 factors on increasing the enrollment students rate were evaluated by test the hypotheses. The current study took nearly one year to be completed (Feb. 2011 to Dec. 2011. This study also was conducted in Tehran city, Iran.

  10. Comparisons between inner-city and private school adolescents' perceptions of health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D K; Cross, A W; Heyman, P W; Ruch-Ross, H; Benson, P; Tuthill, J W

    1982-09-01

    A youth health survey was administered to 247 students in an inner-city ghetto high school and 404 students in a private boarding school. Significant differences between the two socioeconomic groups were found for responses about health information, health concerns and problems, and health status and service utilization. Sex-related issues were of greater concern to the private school youth and they desired more help with depression-sadness and birth control. Inner-city youth had more health worries and indicated a desire for more help with physical problems such as toothaches, headaches, and stomach aches, and social problems such as racial discrimination and parent relations. From a list of 22 health problems, the inner-city youth ranked dental problems, acne, and health worries highest while the private school youth ranked depression-sadness, tiredness, and acne highest. Regardless of social class, most adolescents perceived large gaps in their health education. One implication of our data is that the specific self-reported needs and concerns of adolescents should be considered in planning health services and education programs.

  11. Differences in students' smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among public, factory, and private secondary schools in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaozhong; Chen, Weiqing; Qian, Zhengmin; Muscat, Joshua E; Lu, Ciyong; Ling, Wenhua

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking among Chinese adolescents has dramatically increased in recent years. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Chinese students in 3 types of secondary schools. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 3,957 students of seventh, eighth, and ninth grades and 2,870 student parents from 3 public, 1 factory, and 2 general-paid private secondary schools at Guangzhou in 2004. Participants were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires about sociodemographic characteristics, smoking-related family and school environments, smoking-related knowledge and attitudes, and smoking behaviors. The average scores of students' smoking-related knowledge and attitudes (higher score, more against smoking) were highest in the factory school, followed by public schools and private schools. The differences among them were statistically significantly (P schools: 35.4% in private schools, 17.4% in public schools, and 13.2% in the factory school. The prevalence of students' weekly smoking was also higher in private schools (6.2%) than in public schools (4.9%) or the factory school (4.0%). Similar disparity was observed in the prevalence of daily smoking (3.9% private, 3.5% public, and 2.7% factory). However, differences in weekly and daily smoking were not statistically significant (P > .05). Compared with students in public and factory schools, those in general-paid private schools had poorer smoking-related knowledge, more supportive attitudes toward smoking, and more popular smoking behaviors. Therefore, more intensive smoking prevention programs should be implemented among them.

  12. “They Just Don’t Stand for Nothing”: LGBT Christians’ Definitions of Non-Religious Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J E Sumerau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this exploratory study, I examine how a group of LGBT Christians conceptualized non-religious others. Based on over 450 hours of fieldwork in an LGBT Christian church located in the southeastern region of the United States, I demonstrate how a group of LGBT Christians defined non-religious others as (1 morally suspect and untrustworthy, (2 in need of salvation and guidance, and (3 poor representations of the LGBT community. Although these LGBT Christians used “non-religious” as a catchall term without ever specifying exactly who it captured, they used the first two definitions to apply to non-religious people in general regardless of sexuality while explicitly focusing on non-religious sexual minorities in their third definition. Moreover, I show how these definitions echoed mainstream religious rhetoric in America used to marginalize both sexual and religious minorities. In conclusion, I draw out two central implications of this work: (1 how religious depictions of non-religious people may reproduce societal patterns of inequality; and (2 the importance of analyzing how religious people define and interpret non-religious others.

  13. No One Expects a Transgender Jew: Religious, Sexual and Gendered Intersections in the Evaluation of Religious and Nonreligious Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Cragun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While a large body of research has established that there is substantial prejudice against atheists and nonreligious individuals, both in the US and in other countries where nonreligious people are minorities, to date very little research has looked beyond attitudes toward solitary identities (e.g., “atheists” vs. “gay atheists”. Given the growing recognition of the importance of intersectionality in understanding the experiences of minorities, in this article we examined attitudes toward intersected identities, combining five (nonreligious identities (i.e., Christian, Jewish, Muslim, atheist, and nonreligious with four sexual/gender identities (i.e., heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, and transgender using a 100-point thermometer scale (N = 618. We found that sexual/gender identities were more influential in ordering the results than were religious identities, with heterosexual individuals being rated most positively, followed for the most part by: homosexual, bisexual, and then transgender individuals. However, within the sexual/gender identities, (nonreligion ordered the results; Christians and Jewish individuals rated most highly among heterosexuals while nonreligious and atheist individuals rated most highly among transgender individuals. We suggest these results indicate that people believe minority sexual/gender identities “taint” or “pollute” religious identities, unless those religious identities are already perceived as tainted, as is the case for atheists and the nonreligious.

  14. Problems Faced by Beginning Teachers in Private Elementary Schools: A Comparative Study between Spain and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Yolanda Cantú Tijerina

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the problems faced by beginning teachers in private elementary schools in the Spanish city of Madrid and in the Mexican city of Monterrey, questionnaires were applied to private school teachers just starting out in both cities. The results indicate that in both contexts, as beginners, teachers face problems of an academic, organizational, social, and material and technological nature. However, it stresses the fact that Mexican teachers perceive more problems in all the categories than do their Spanish colleagues. Similarity in the results was found in the category of social problems, which was the one mentioned least by the teachers in both cities. This suggests that the cultural nature of these two countries may be a factor to be considered in connection with fostering beginning teachers’ adaptation process.

  15. The poetic nature of non-religious Spirituality: A point of view by Jean Paul Sartre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Villas Boas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes to examine some theories of non-religious spirituality in light of the growing phenomenon of those individuals who declared themselves as having "no religion" by Brazilian religious census conducted in 2010 by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE. The intention here is to identify how the poetic question presents itself as the fundamental element of these proposals about spirituality for authors, since beauty is part of the spiritual quest, as in: Viktor Frankl and existential religiosity grounded in the search for meaning in life; Marià Corbí and his non-religious or secular spirituality; Robert Solomon and his spirituality for skeptics, and André Comte-Sponville and his atheistic spirituality, or spirituality without God. From there, we then present the perception of spirituality in the poetry of the thought of Jean Paul Sartre, primarily in his work “what is Literature?”

  16. Children with disabilities in private inclusive schools in Mumbai: experiences and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Ashima; Kattumuri, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    'Inclusive education’ policy has been introduced in India, however the concept is in its infancy This qualitative study analyses the case of children with disabilities studying in private inclusive schools of Mumbai. It discusses the development of self concept, elucidates the\\ud benefits and challenges of children with disabilities in inclusive education. We then suggest recommendations for improvements in implementing inclusive education in India.

  17. The World Bank and Private Provision of Schooling: A Look through the Lens of Sociological Theories of Organizational Hypocrisy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Karen; Menashy, Francine

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we explore how the World Bank operationalizes its focus on poverty alleviation in one of the most controversial arenas of educational change: the expansion of privately provided schooling. We argue that the Bank's role in promoting private provision has been far more complicated than most critics have discerned. It has…

  18. Strengthening the Strength of Public-Private Partnership Model in Education: A Case Study of Durbar High School in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2011-01-01

    Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model in education is being importantly valuable in developing countries in enriching the strength pf public schools that government appears to be heavy and slow. PPP model however, initiate developmental program that encourage teachers motivation to teach. This further allows private and local community group…

  19. South African foundation phase teachers' perceptions of ADHD at private and public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Anwynne; Amod, Zaytoon; Seabi, Joseph; Vorster, Adri

    2015-03-11

    This study investigated foundation phase teachers' perceptions of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The teachers' views on the aetiology, appropriate interventions and incidence rates of ADHD were examined. A total of 130 foundation phase teachers from mainstream private and public schools completed a self-developed questionnaire that had been piloted by the researchers. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data, specifically to determine whether there were differences in responses between public and private school teachers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify the themes that emerged from the open-ended questions. It was found that the teachers had a limited understanding of ADHD, in terms of what it is as well as the aetiology. In addition, it emerged that medication was the preferred method of intervention despite the participants' awareness of alternative intervention methods. A comparison of the private and public school teachers' results indicated no significant difference in their perceptions regarding the aetiology, interventions or incidence rates of ADHD.

  20. South African Foundation Phase Teachers’ Perceptions of ADHD at Private and Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Anwynne; Amod, Zaytoon; Seabi, Joseph; Vorster, Adri

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated foundation phase teachers’ perceptions of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The teachers’ views on the aetiology, appropriate interventions and incidence rates of ADHD were examined. A total of 130 foundation phase teachers from mainstream private and public schools completed a self-developed questionnaire that had been piloted by the researchers. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data, specifically to determine whether there were differences in responses between public and private school teachers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify the themes that emerged from the open-ended questions. It was found that the teachers had a limited understanding of ADHD, in terms of what it is as well as the aetiology. In addition, it emerged that medication was the preferred method of intervention despite the participants’ awareness of alternative intervention methods. A comparison of the private and public school teachers’ results indicated no significant difference in their perceptions regarding the aetiology, interventions or incidence rates of ADHD. PMID:25768242

  1. Access or Quality? Why Do Families Living in Slums Choose Low-Cost Private Schools in Lagos, Nigeria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härmä, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Lagos is home to 12,098 private schools catering to 57% of the state's enrolled children, from ultra-rich to relatively poor households, with many schools targeting those of lower socio-economic status. Government schools were intended to provide a just and equitable option for all; however, they have not kept pace with demand in terms of both…

  2. In God we trust? Neural measures reveal lower social conformity among non-religious individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchselvam, Ravi; Gopi, Yashoda; Kilekwang, Leonard; Harper, Jessica; Gross, James J

    2017-02-21

    Even in predominantly religious societies, there are substantial individual differences in religious commitment. Why is this? One possibility is that differences in social conformity (i.e., the tendency to think and behave as others do) underlie inclination towards religiosity. However, the link between religiosity and conformity has not yet been directly examined. In this study, we tested the notion that non-religious individuals show dampened social conformity, using both self-reported and neural (EEG-based ERPs) measures of sensitivity to others' influence. Non-religious versus religious undergraduate subjects completed an experimental task that assessed levels of conformity in a domain unrelated to religion (i.e., in judgments of facial attractiveness). Findings showed that, although both groups yielded to conformity pressures at the self-report level, non-religious individuals did not yield to such pressures in their neural responses. These findings highlight a novel link between religiosity and social conformity, and hold implications for prominent theories about the psychological functions of religion.

  3. Nutritional composition, assessed by chemical analyses, of prepared foods available for primary-school children: a comparison of public and private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Márcia L; Morais, Tania B

    2010-11-01

    To assess the nutritional quality of prepared foods available to primary-school children. Prepared foods available in a public and private school were sampled daily for 4 weeks (a total of forty-five samples) and chemically analysed for protein, fat, carbohydrate, iron, salt and sodium. The results were compared to the nutritional standards for children aged 7-10 years. Alfenas, south-eastern Brazil. The concentration of protein, lipid, iron and sodium and the energy values of the foods at the private school were significantly higher than those at the public school. No differences were seen in the carbohydrate and salt values. The range of macronutrients was more balanced at the public school in relation to fat and protein. Foods at the private school were, in general, energy-dense. At both the public and private school, they provided the minimum energy and iron. Salt content was over twice the maximum amount, and that for sodium was over three times the amount, in both the public and private school. Overall, foods prepared at the public school were better nutritional quality than those at the private school and those offered in public schools in some developed countries. This finding can probably be explained by the fact that a nutritionist, as required by law, was responsible for planning the menus at the public school. However, corrective action is needed to adjust for the wide variability in energy and nutrient content during weekdays and in the sodium content of prepared foods available in both the public and private school.

  4. The Shifting Politics of the Private in Education: Debates and Developments in Researching Private School Outreach in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Laura Day

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the politics of researching private education with special reference to the Indian context. Due to a recent increase in privatised forms of education globally and recognition of the private sector by governments, international agencies and researchers as a policy and academic interest, this is shifting ground. The evolving…

  5. Assessment of social and economic influences on blood pressure of adolescents in public and private schools: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Konigsfeld, Henrique Pinheiro; Machado, Lígia Maria de Oliveira; Canadas, Andréa Farias; Issa, Evelyn Yuri Okumura; Giordano, Roberto Hernandes; Cadaval, Ricardo Augusto de Miranda

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of hypertension in high school students in Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil, has already been described. In this study, within a new sample of high school students from public and private schools, we evaluated if socioeconomic and lifestyle influence on blood pressure values. This is an epidemiological study, which is part of the activities of a community-based work conducted by medical students. They give speeches to high school students aiming at stimulating a healthy lifestyle and primary prevention of hypertension. In a random sample of 410 students in junior high school (209 from public schools and 201 from private schools), we determined the weight, height, and blood pressure, furthermore, a questionnaire identifying epidemiological and socioeconomic status was applied. No statistical differences were found among students from public and private schools regarding the distribution of gender, body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension (16.3%), percentage of smokers (5.9%), regular physical activity, and family history of hypertension. In public schools, there is a higher percentage of African descendents students and a higher percentage of students who also work due to low family income. Men from public and private schools have higher prevalence of hypertension, and their mean blood pressure is higher than in women. BMI has a positive correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors have an early beginning and require educational interventions for primary prevention. Socioeconomic factors do not affect blood pressure in adolescence.

  6. Exploring Teachers’ Perception of the Efficacy of ELT in Iranian Public Schools and Private Language Institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aliakbari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper intended to compare teaching English in private language institutes and public schools in Iranian Education system from the viewpoint of the English teachers who practice in both systems. It also aimed at examining teachers’ preference to teach-in either place. 15 English teachers in Ilam city participated in the study and data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire, including 60 Items through which respondents were asked to express their dis/agreement on 5 subscales. The results showed that better management, better fulfillment of the educational needs, and better teaching environment were among the reasons why the teachers preferred to teach in private language institutes. The study then, provides suggestions for improvement of ELT in the public system.

  7. Do Charter Schools Crowd out Private School Enrollment? Evidence from Michigan. Staff Report No. 472

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rajashri; Roy, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Charter schools have been one of the most important dimensions of recent school reform measures in the United States. Currently, there are more than 5,000 charter schools spread across forty U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Though there have been numerous studies on the effects of charter schools, these have mostly been confined to…

  8. School Choice: Private School Choice Programs Are Growing and Can Complicate Providing Certain Federally Funded Services to Eligible Students. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-16-712

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Government Accountability Office, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Voucher and education savings account (ESA) programs fund students' private school education expenses, such as tuition. In school year 2014-15, 22 such school choice programs were operating nationwide, all but one of which was state funded. Under two federal grant programs, one for students with disabilities and one for students from disadvantaged…

  9. Which Second Language Learning Theories Underlie Language Courses Offered by Slovene Private Language Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marša Meznarič

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with language courses offered by private language schools in Slovenia. It examines who the people in charge of the language schools are, what criteria new teachers have to meet to become an employee of a school, whether the methodology applied (if any has been carefully chosen, what the teaching techniques are and who chooses them. Second language method discoveries have been subjected to perennial criticism and scepticism over the last half of century. Teachers around the globe have been confused by the constant shifts in the popularity of different methods. The article examines the con sequences of the abovementioned circumstances. The 15 interviews conducted with private language schools’ managers have generated valuable information on the level of professionalism in this area of business. The results have shown that most of the randomly chosen schools are managed by language professionals or by economists who employ a linguist for controlling the teaching and learning processes and that the majority of schools does adopt a particular approach or method of teaching. Teacher trainees receive a lot of support and guidance prior to teaching in a school. In most cases, teachers are free to choose techniques of teaching according to their preferences, providing the techniques are not in conflict with the general schools’ principles. The criteria for employment vary considerably. Nearly all managers would employ a professional language teacher with experience only, but others demand that the teacher be a native speaker regardless of his/her education. Several stress the importance of personal characteristics and would consider employing only lighthearted and energetic teachers. Teachers’ work and students’ progress are often evaluated.

  10. Marketized Private Tutoring as a Supplement to Regular Schooling: Liberal Studies and the Shadow Sector in Hong Kong Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Claudia; Bray, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Around the world, increasing numbers of students receive after-school private supplementary tutoring. Such tutoring may be provided through informal channels or by companies, and it may be received one-to-one, in small groups or in large classes. The tutoring is commonly called shadow education since its content mimics that of regular schooling.…

  11. Revenue-Based Financial Modeling: A Sustainable Model for Medium-Size, Private, Mission-Based Schools of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbouk, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the implementation and assessment of revenue-based budgeting at a medium-size, private, mission-based graduate school of education (SOE), under the pseudonym Peter Claver University (PCU). Additionally, two other similar schools were included in the study because they used revenue-based budgeting for a period of 10 years or…

  12. 民办学校管理制度研究浅谈%Study on Private School Management System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵翠

    2014-01-01

    With the continuous reform of economic development and social system,private schools gradually increased,and private school education management is the decisive factor to decide whether the school runs well,this paper studies the advantages and disadvantages of private education in a school management system.%随着经济的发展和社会制度的不断改革,民办学校逐渐增多,而民办教育学校的管理又是决定能否将学校办好的决定性因素,从多角度研究了一下民办教育学校在管理制度方面的利弊。

  13. A multi-method exploratory study of stress, coping, and substance use among high school youth in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Noelle R; Gwadz, Marya V; Ritchie, Amanda; Linick, Jessica L; Cleland, Charles M; Elliott, Luther; Grethel, Michele

    2015-01-01

    There is growing awareness that students' experiences of stress may impede academic success, compromise mental health, and promote substance use. We examined these factors in an under-studied population, private/independent high school students, using a multi-method (qualitative and quantitative), iterative data collection and analytic process. We first conducted qualitative interviews with faculty and staff at a number of highly competitive private schools, followed by an anonymous quantitative survey with 128 11th grade students from two of these settings. We then conducted a qualitative exploration of the quantitative results with a subset of students. Next, a set of Expert Panel members participated in qualitative interviews to reflect on and interpret study findings. Overall, we found students experienced high levels of chronic stress, particularly in relation to academic performance and the college admissions process. While students described a range of effective, adaptive coping strategies, they also commonly internalized these serious pressures and turned to alcohol and drugs to cope with chronic stress, although not typically at problematic levels. We discuss study implications for both schools and families derived from the Expert Panel.

  14. Private School Chains in Chile: Do Better Schools Scale Up? Policy Analysis. No. 682

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Gregory; Contreras, Dante; Salazar, Felipe; Santos, Humberto

    2011-01-01

    There is a persistent debate over the role of scale of operations in education. Some argue that school franchises offer educational services more effectively than do small independent schools. Skeptics counter that large, centralized operations create hard-to-manage bureaucracies and foster diseconomies of scale and that small schools are more…

  15. The Relative Quality and Cost-Effectiveness of Private and Public Schools for Low-Income Families: A Case Study in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James; Dixon, Pauline; Shamsan, Yarim; Schagen, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The "mushrooming" of private schools for low-income families has been widely noted in the literature; however, very little is known about the quality of these schools. This research explored the relative quality of private unaided (recognised and unrecognised) and government schools in low-income areas of Hyderabad, India. A preliminary…

  16. The Relative Quality and Cost-Effectiveness of Private and Public Schools for Low-Income Families: A Case Study in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James; Dixon, Pauline; Shamsan, Yarim; Schagen, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The "mushrooming" of private schools for low-income families has been widely noted in the literature; however, very little is known about the quality of these schools. This research explored the relative quality of private unaided (recognised and unrecognised) and government schools in low-income areas of Hyderabad, India. A preliminary census to…

  17. The Myth of Free and Barrier-Free Access: India's Right to Education Act--Private Schooling Costs and Household Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prachi; Noronha, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We examine relative household costs and experiences of accessing private and government schooling under India's "Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009" in the early implementation phase. The Act deems that no child should incur any fee, charges, or expenses in accessing schooling. Private schools are mandated to…

  18. No "Slippery Slope"? An Empirical Case Study on the Effect of Secular Science Textbooks on Student Religiosity in a Christian Private School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    In context of legal battles over science textbooks in both public and private schools, this empirical case study examines student religiosity scores over a 3-year period following a school-wide curricular change from Christian-published to secular science textbooks in a K-12 Christian private school. The study found no statistically significant…

  19. The Effect of Private School Vouchers on Political Participation: Experimental Evidence from New York City. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Paper Series. PEPG 16-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Deven; Chingos, Matthew M.; Campbell, David E.

    2016-01-01

    In 1997, the New York School Choice Scholarships Foundation Program (SCSF) randomly offered three-year scholarships to attend private schools to approximately 1,000 low-income families in New York City. In this paper we leverage exogenous variation generated by the SCSF to estimate the causal effect of the private school voucher offer--and the…

  20. Assessing the Performance of Jordanian Educational Counselors in the Environment of Private and Government Schools toward Gifted Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed H. Ziadat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this research was to evaluate the needs of suitable environment for educational counselors to provide support and enhance the capabilities of gifted students for better education and behavior performance during their academic school years. This study emphasizes with more details on the impact of the educational counselors experience, gender and schools environment regarding the role of improving gifted students performance in the country of Jordan. Approach: Seventy three educational counselors from government and private schools in the country of Jordon participated in the survey and completed the questionnaire in the spring of 2010. The questionnaire consisted of twenty two questions regarding the interaction between educational counselors and gifted students in private and government schools. Analysis of Variance was conducted on the mean of the sample population determined by counselors experience, gender and type of schools to verify the apparent differences of the means. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS program, T-Test and the F-Test were applied to the obtained data. Results: Performance of educational counselors in the private school environment was more effective and more evident than in government schools. The results of this study revealed that gifted students in private Jordanian schools, performed better in a climate characterized by high expectations of readiness to invest effort, enjoyment of learning, with strong disciplinary climate and good teacher-student relationships. Conclusion: Educational counselors with more years of experience showed more involvement in solving and enriching gifted students performance despite the gender of the counselor. Private schools provided better programs and more suitable environment for educational counselors to help gifted students than government schools.

  1. Bullying conceptualization from the perspective of Tunja’s private schools management staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Fernando Acosta Muñoz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at getting to know the bullying conceptualization from the perspective of the management staff of ten private schools in Tunja. They were principals and coordinators. Then, it was carried out with a qualitative view based on the hermeneutic approach and the Cognitive Sociology methodology. Likewise, the data collection was done through the in-depth interview. The research population consisted of 17 members of the management staff of 10 schools in Tunja. They were 2 men and 15 women aged between 30 and 50. The categorial analysis of results showed that principals and coordinators consider bullying as reflection of the social reality. They also accept they are not quite prepared to deal with it due to their attempt to achieve comprehensive solutions.

  2. Perceptions of Teachers towards Assessment Techniques at Secondary Level Private School of Karachi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Fatemah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to explore the perceptions of teachers towards assessment techniques at a secondary level private school of Karachi. This was conjectured on the basis of the circumstances of parallel boards in the education system of Pakistan and its effectiveness within the context with respect to the curriculum. This was gauged in line with the forms and techniques of assessment corresponding with the curriculum. A qualitative research design based on interviews was chosen for this study. Purposive sampling was used to select the teachers from a school. The findings of the study revealed that the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE is best suited to assess students’ knowledge and skills and the teachers viewed that in order for students to be accomplished in this board, the ways of assessment must take a more meaningful measure of evaluating student’s progress

  3. Prevalence of dental caries in obese and normal-weight Brazilian adolescents attending state and private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Patrícia Vasconcelos Leitão; Rosenblatt, Aronita; Severo, Aquilina Maria Ribeiro

    2006-12-01

    To measure the association between dental caries and obesity in adolescents aged 12 to 15 years attending state and private schools. Cross-sectional study. State and private schools in the state of Paraiba, Brazil. 1665 obese and 1665 normal-weight adolescents. These were chosen by means of an anthropometric study using height/age and weight/height indices, adopting as baseline the National Center for Health Statistics indices. The diagnostic criteria for caries were those of the World Health Organization (1997). The average DMFT for obese adolescents from state schools was 4.27 and for those of normal weight it was 4.25 (p = 0.7802). In private schools, the corresponding figures were 1.90 and 1.91, respectively (p = 0.1151). In state schools, the caries prevalence amongst the obese group was 50.9% and amongst those of normal weight, 52.4% (p = 0.5393). In private schools, it was 9.0% amongst the obese group and 9.6% amongst those of normal weight (p 0.6790). There was no statistically significant association between dental caries and obesity. Caries levels were higher amongst adolescents attending state schools.

  4. “They Just Don’t Stand for Nothing”: LGBT Christians’ Definitions of Non-Religious Others

    OpenAIRE

    Sumerau, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    In this exploratory study, I examine how a group of LGBT Christians conceptualized non-religious others. Based on over 450 hours of fieldwork in an LGBT Christian church located in the southeastern region of the United States, I demonstrate how a group of LGBT Christians defined non-religious others as (1) morally suspect and untrustworthy, (2) in need of salvation and guidance, and (3) poor representations of the LGBT community. Although these LGBT Christians used “non-religious” as a catcha...

  5. Educational Malpractice and Academic Negligence in Private Schools: Legal Implications for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saman

    2009-01-01

    The current litigious climate in the United States has resulted in a notably high frequency of lawsuits being filed against the educational system. School administrators are routinely named in lawsuits filed by disgruntled parents and students against schools and their governing bodies. This dissertation reviewed litigious actions in both public…

  6. Extending Access to Low-Cost Private Schools through Vouchers: An Alternative Interpretation of a Two-Stage "School Choice" Experiment in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James

    2016-01-01

    Muralidharan and Sundararaman report a randomised controlled trial of a school voucher experiment in Andhra Pradesh, India. The headline findings are that there are no significant academic differences between voucher winners and losers in Telugu, mathematics, English, and science/social studies, although because the private schools appear to use…

  7. Do Low-Cost Private School Leavers in the Informal Settlement Have a Good Chance of Admission to a Government Secondary school? A Study from Kibera in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Asayo

    2013-01-01

    There are growing numbers of low-cost private schools in urban informal settlements in developing countries. It has been argued that these institutions may constitute alternatives for government schools, as they are able to meet the educational needs of children in urban informal settlements. This study explores the question of whether low-cost…

  8. Extending Access to Low-Cost Private Schools through Vouchers: An Alternative Interpretation of a Two-Stage "School Choice" Experiment in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James

    2016-01-01

    Muralidharan and Sundararaman report a randomised controlled trial of a school voucher experiment in Andhra Pradesh, India. The headline findings are that there are no significant academic differences between voucher winners and losers in Telugu, mathematics, English, and science/social studies, although because the private schools appear to use…

  9. Physical activity and sedentary lifestyle among children from private and public schools in Northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Thiara Castro de; Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura da; Santos, Cristiane de Jesus Nunes dos; Silva, Josenilde Sousa e; Conceição, Sueli Ismael Oliveira da

    2010-12-01

    To analyze factors associated with physical activity and the mean time spent in some sedentary activities among school-aged children. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a random sample of 592 schoolchildren aged nine to 16 years in 2005, in São Luís, Northern Brazil. Data were collected by means of a 24-Hour Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire, concerning demographic and socioeconomic variables, physical activities practiced and time spent in certain sedentary activities. Physical activities were classified according to their metabolic equivalents (MET), and a physical activity index was estimated for each child. Sedentary lifestyle was estimated based on time spent watching television, playing videogames and on the computer/internet. Chi square test was used to compare proportions. Linear regression analysis was used to establish associations. Estimates were adjusted for the effect of the sampling design. The mean of the physical activity index was 605.73 MET-min/day (SD = 509.45). School children that were male (coefficient=134.57; 95%CI 50.77; 218.37), from public schools (coefficient.= 94.08; 95%CI 12.54; 175.62 and in the 5th to 7th grade (coefficient.=95.01; 95%CI 8.10;181.92 presented higher indices than females, children from private schools and in the 8th to the 9th grade (p<0.05). On average, students spent 2.66 hours/day in sedentary activities. Time spent in sedentary activities was significantly lower for children aged nine to 11 years (coefficient.= -0.49 hr/day; 95%CI -0.88; -0.10) and in lower socioeconomic classes (coefficient.=-0.87; 95%CI -1.45;-0.30). Domestic chores (59.43%) and walking to school (58.43%) were the most common physical activities. Being female, in private schools and in the 8th to 9th grade were factors associated with lower levels of physical activity. Younger schoolchildren and those from low economic classes spent less time engaged in sedentary activities.

  10. Malocclusion and TMJ disorders in teenagers from private and public schools in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, Leonor; Irigoyen-Camacho, María-Esther; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Mendoza-Roaf, Patricia; Medina-Solís, Carlo; Acosta-Gío, Enrique; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-03-01

    To identify, among Mexican teenagers from public and private schools, the frequency, severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs, and their possible association with temporomandibular joint disorders. Fifteen-year-old students were recruited from public and private schools. Clinical findings were registered as follows: oral hygiene status with the Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified, malocclusion using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), and TMJ disorders following WHO criteria. Negative binomial and logistic regression models were constructed for data analysis. A total of 249 fifteen-year old students were included in the study (118 female 47.4%). 68% had a DAI score ≤ 25 (minor or no occlusal anomalies), 18% scored 26-30 (mild anomalies), 7% scored 31-35 (evident anomalies), and 6% scored ≥ 36 (major malocclusion). The most frequent anomalies were dental crowding in 50%, maxillary dental irregularity in 44.6%, mandible irregularity in 41.2% and excessive maxillary overjet in 37.8%. Among the students, 26.1% had clicking/muscle or TMJ pain, of these 12.3% showed pain during palpation. OHI-S > 1 was found in 34% of the participants. The negative binomial model showed an association between DAI score and TMJ disorders (P=0.041). Also the logistic regression model showed an association between malocclusion (DAI>25) and TMJ disorders (OR=2.58, p=0.002). Malocclusion was associated also with poor oral hygiene (OR=1.65, p=0.007), and with attendance to public schools (OR=1.97, p=0.039). TMJ disorders and DAI scores were significantly associated. Screening/Diagnostic programs for orthodontic and TMJ-disorders are needed, to identify and offer treatment to teenagers with major malocclusion and TMJ/muscle pain.

  11. How private vehicle use increases ambient air pollution concentrations at schools during the morning drop-off of children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Requia, Weeberb J.

    2017-09-01

    A child's exposure to environmental pollutants can have life-long health effects. Thus it is critical to understand the potential exposure pathways. In this paper, we examine the increase in ambient PM2.5 concentrations at schools from private vehicle use for dropping children off at school. In North America, students are commonly driven to school in a private vehicle. Additionally, students walk or cycle, or take a school bus. Our vehicle surveys recorded between 23 and 116 personal vehicles at 25 schools, where enrolment ranged from 160 to 765 students. We fit a linear regression model to predict the number of vehicles at schools we did not observe within our study area, which explained 57% of the variation in our surveys. A microsimulation traffic model was created for each of the 86 schools we studied. Outputs from the traffic model were used to determine the emissions generated at each school. PM2.5 emissions varied from 0.14 to 6.38 g. Lastly, we dispersed the emissions produced by private vehicles dropping off students, which are emissions generated by unnecessary trips because students further than walking distance are provided transportation by the school board. At the drop-off location in front of the school, we found ambient concentration increases of at least 5 μg/m3, 10 μg/m3, 25 μg/m3 and 50 μg/m3 during 16.8%, 7.6%, 2.0% and 0.5% of the mornings, respectively. This research was conducted in a medium-sized North American city and should allow transferability to similar cities. We conclude that the use of private vehicles can significantly increase local concentrations, regardless of background conditions.

  12. Guide for Accredited Private School Education Planning and Results Reporting. Requirements for Three-Year Education Plans for 2007/08-2009/10 and Annual Education Results Reports for November 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Submission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Guide to Accredited Private School Education Planning and Results Reporting, 2007-2010 provides the provincial requirements for: 1) Private school authority three-year education plans for 2007-2010. These plans cover the 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10 school years. 2) Private school authority annual education results report for the 2006/07…

  13. Evaluating the Physical Environment of Design Studios: A Case study in Malaysian Private Architecture Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Muniandy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the notion of learner’s experiences in the design of physical environment of an architecture design studio is a necessity as it contains certain values of influence. It is due to the unique learning experiences which are accrued particularly in design studio that is continued during professional practice as well. Most architectural campuses in Malaysian Private Higher Education Institutions (MPHEI are devoid of certain important elements and this issue needs to be looked into seriously. Apparently, most architectural design studios today have different physical settings, and have developed their own learning culture based on the typical space that they have. Reviewing the physical environment and how it contributes to the social environ-ment in MPHEI’s architectural context requires certain understanding on the learner’s psycho-logical needs, expectations and in the same time to meet the educational objective which is never an easy task. Hence, this paper reviewed the studies of the possible physical environment approaches in connecting the learner’s connections in architecture studio learning environ-ment. A questionnaire survey with Likert-scale components, and semi-structured interview on learners of five distinguished Private Architectural schools in Malaysia unveiled several signifi-cant findings that can lead entrepreneurs to upgrade the physical environment of these MPHEIs in order to cope with the demands of the stakeholders.

  14. Socio- Demographic Characteristics and Career Choice of Private Secondary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ramona S. Braza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the career choice of the high school students of the different private institutions in San Jose, Batangas as a basis for developing a career program guide to help the students in choosing their career.The descriptive method was used the study with the questionnaire and standardized test as the main data gathering instruments. Parents, students and teachers served as respondents of the study. The study revealed that most preferred career of the respondents is the academic track particularly the Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM strand. The proposed program guide formulated focused on how to help the students decide on their future career. When properly given, it will benefit the students. The researchers recommended that the proposed career program guide that has been formulated may be shown to school heads for their suggestions; the students should be provided with effective orientation on what career is really all about. This could be done by the school guidance counselor or by the teachers and parents as well and there must be a close–up tie among the guidance personnel, teachers, students, and parents to promote a better understanding of the factors which influence the career choice of the students.

  15. British Adolescents' and Young Adults' Understanding and Reasoning about the Religious and Nonreligious Rights of Asylum-Seeker Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Harriet R.; Ruck, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined British young people's understanding of the rights of asylum-seeking young people. Two hundred sixty participants (11-24 years) were read vignettes involving asylum-seeking young people's religious and nonreligious self-determination and nurturance rights. Religious rights were more likely to be endorsed than nonreligious…

  16. British Adolescents' and Young Adults' Understanding and Reasoning about the Religious and Nonreligious Rights of Asylum-Seeker Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Harriet R.; Ruck, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined British young people's understanding of the rights of asylum-seeking young people. Two hundred sixty participants (11-24 years) were read vignettes involving asylum-seeking young people's religious and nonreligious self-determination and nurturance rights. Religious rights were more likely to be endorsed than nonreligious…

  17. Identity and Intimacy in Religiously Observant and Non-Religiously Observant Adolescents and Young Adults in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisherman, Shraga

    2008-01-01

    Ego identity and intimacy are two sequential stages, according to Erikson's theory. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between ego identity and intimacy, as two continuous multidimensional variables among religious and non-religious individuals. Eight sample groups (age x gender x religious observance) comprising 308…

  18. Sport practice among private secondary-school students in Dubai in 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfi, A S; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Gurashi, E; Al Sayegh, F U

    2008-01-01

    A study was made of sport practice and of knowledge, attitude and practice towards sport among 1475 private secondary-school students in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2004. UAE students practised sport more than non-UAE students (33.9% versus 18.7% had good levels of activity) but there was no significant difference in positive attitudes towards sport practice (87.1% and 86.2% respectively). A good level of sport (vigorous exercise > or = 3 times per week for 20 min) was higher among males (26.0%) than females (14.7%). There was a significant association between overweight and obesity as well as tobacco smoking and low levels of sport practice. Health education intervention is needed to improve sport practice among young people.

  19. Causes, Treatment, and Outcome in Private School Children Admitted to Emergency Department with Eye Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın Yıldırım

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the causes, treatment, and outcome in the private school children admitted to emergency department (ED for eye injury. Material and Methods: The recordings of 57 children with eye traumas were examined retrospectively. Examination, treatment, and follow-up files of the children were recorded. Results: The age of the 57 children varied between 8 and 16 years. The trauma causes were impact during playing in 35.1% (20 of cases, hit by ball in 31.5% (18 of cases, injury by paper objects in 7.1% (4 of cases, injury by pencil in 5.3% (3 of cases, and injuries by other foreign objects (glass, rubber, branch of tree, and racket in 21.0% (12 of cases. Cornea erosion in 54.3% (31 of cases, conjunctival erosion and irritation in 19.2% (11 of cases, eyelid laceration in 8.8% (5 of cases, subconjunctival hemorrhage in 8.8% (5 of cases, eyelid edema in 5.3% (3 of cases, hyphema in 1.8% (1 of cases, and iridocyclitis in 1.8% (1 of cases were found. Repair of eyelid was performed in 3 cases. Conclusion: Eye traumas are very commonly seen in private school children. While most of the cases are simple injuries, significant problems such as lid lacerations that necessitate repair can also encountered in a few cases. A fast and efficient treatment usually minimizes the risk of sequel development. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 216-8

  20. Starry Eyes and Subservient Selves: Portraits of "Well-Rounded" Girlhood in the Prospectuses of All-Girl Elite Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardman, Natasha; Hutchesson, Rachael; Gottschall, Kristina; Drew, Christopher; Saltmarsh, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This article continues a discussion about the ways in which gender is constructed in the aesthetic presentation and impression management strategies of elite private schools. While before we focused on the construction and promotion of valorised masculinities in elite private boys school prospectuses (Gottschall, Wardman, Edgeworth, Hutchesson…

  1. Using School Scholarships to Estimate the Effect of Private Education on the Academic Achievement of Low-Income Students in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Priyanka; Mizala, Alejandra; Repetto, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    This paper estimates the impact of private education on the academic achievement of low-income students in Chile. To deal with selection bias, we use propensity score matching to compare the test scores of reduced-fee paying, low-income students in fee-charging private voucher schools to those of similar students in public schools and free private…

  2. [Prevalence of cavities among adolescents in public and private schools in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Patrícia Vasconcelos Leitão; Rosenblatt, Aronita; Passos, Isabela Albuquerque

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of cavities among adolescents in public and private schools in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil, comparing the DMFT in terms of gender and age, as well as education levels and quality among mothers in these two types of schools. The sample consisted of 3,330 adolescents between twelve and fifteen years old: 1,665 attending public schools and 1,665 attending private schools. The DMFT was evaluated by the WHO criteria (1997), using the Kappa (0.92) intra-examiner agreement for cavity diagnoses and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis statistical analyses. The prevalence of cavities in public schools was 51.6%, compared to 9.3% in private schools. The DMFT for girls was 4.79 and 3.46 for boys in public schools (pprivate schools. At the age of 12 years, the DMFT was 3.37 in public schools and 1.35 in private schools, while for the age of 15 it was 5.65 and 2.88 for each type of school. Among children whose mothers graduated from high school, the average DMFT was 4.21 in public schools and 1.81 in private schools. The prevalence of cavities was higher among girls in public schools, increasing with age and decreasing with higher education levels among mothers.

  3. Prevalence and factors associated with childhood overweight/obesity of private school children in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, M; Khatri, R B; Khanal, V; Amatya, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood overweight/obesity is a global health problem because of adverse health and nutrition consequences worldwide. Currently, there is a paucity of information on childhood overweight/obesity in Nepal. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of, and the factors associated with, childhood overweight/obesity among primary school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted in June-December, 2013. We collected data using the structured self-administered questionnaire with parents of children aged 6-13 years in grades 1-6 studying at private schools of the Lalitpur district of Nepal. Height and weight measurements of 986 children were taken, and the corresponding body mass index (BMI)-for-age was calculated. The prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity was reported in proportion. Factors associated with childhood overweight/obesity were examined using the Chi-square tests followed by multiple logistic regression analyses. Of 986 children, 144 (14.6%) were overweight and 111 (11.3%) were obese. Overall, 255 (25.9%) children were found to be overweight/obese. Children from families, having ≤2 siblings (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.958, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.163-3.296), upper class family (aOR=3.672; 95% CI: 1.154-11.690), and advantaged ethnic group (aOR=1.561; 95% CI: 1.00-2.437) and children who were of larger birth weight (>4.0kg) had a greater likelihood of being (aOR=2.557, 95% CI: 1.222-5.349) overweight/obese. A quarter of children were found to be overweight/obese in private primary schools. Preventive interventions should focus on the advantaged ethnic groups, families with fewer siblings, and upper class families. A greater emphasis ought to be placed on formulation and implementation of policies aimed at addressing the newly emerging problems of childhood overweight/obesity in Nepal. New school health programs are to be launched and strengthened including avoidance of high energy junk food, and promoting outdoor

  4. An Overview and Comparison of Turkish Public Schools and Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Isa

    2015-01-01

    Human beings are social in nature and need acquisition and possession of knowledge for self-actualisation. This need can only be fulfilled in educational institutions. Turkish educational system is composed of pre-school, elementary, secondary and higher education. It is now evident that governments alone cannot meet the high demand of information…

  5. Nutritional Status, Dietary Practices and Physical Activities of Adolescents in Public and Private Schools of Karachi, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Paracha, P.I.; Bakht, S.; Paracha, S.I.; Vriesekoop, F.; I Alam; Din, Z.; Ullah, N

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken to assess the nutritional status, dietary practices and physical\\ud activities of school going adolescents in public and private schools (PPSs) of Karachi, Pakistan.\\ud A sample of 101 boys and 100 girls from PPSs was randomly selected for their weight,height, waist and hip circumferences, percent body fat and lean body mass measurements. Adolescent boys and girls were interviewed for their dietary practices, socio-economic status,\\ud frequency and type of p...

  6. English Languaje Teaching Curriculum Design In Private General Basic Education Schools In An Urban Sector Of The Coast Of Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Espol; Avilés Zúniga, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    This study explores and describes the parameters currently being used for designing english language teaching curriculum in private general basic education schools in an urban sector of the coast of ecuador. The participants in this study were the english department coordinators or directors of twenty-one schools. The questionnaire was given to participants after a short talk on its objective and structure. An important finding of this research was that there is no homogeneous concept of w...

  7. Determinants of Participation and Expenditure Patterns of Private Tuition Received by Primary School Students in Penang, Malaysia: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Juliana; Tan, Andrew K. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the censored Tobit model is applied on primary data collected amongst parents of primary school students in Penang, Malaysia to examine the determinants of participation and expenditures on private tuition (PT). Results of the marginal effects indicate that socio-demographic characteristics--ethnicity, household income,…

  8. Determinants of Participation and Expenditure Patterns of Private Tuition Received by Primary School Students in Penang, Malaysia: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Juliana; Tan, Andrew K. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the censored Tobit model is applied on primary data collected amongst parents of primary school students in Penang, Malaysia to examine the determinants of participation and expenditures on private tuition (PT). Results of the marginal effects indicate that socio-demographic characteristics--ethnicity, household income,…

  9. The Importance of Being a "Lady": Hyper-Femininity and Heterosexuality in the Private, Single-Sex Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Alexandra Jane

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on recent ethnographic research in one single-sex, private primary school, this paper will explore what it meant for the girls in this setting to embody the discourse of the "lady". The paper will propose that classed and gendered discourses of respectability featured strongly in the girls' lives, as they were expected to behave…

  10. Racializing Discourse in Public and Private: Social Differentiation and the Question of Mexicanness at an Arizona High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brendan H.

    2016-01-01

    Using discourse analysis, this article explores how Mexican-American students at an Arizona high school exploited intersections of race, gender, and socioeconomic class to position themselves and their peers along a racial continuum from less to more Mexican. Thus, private social distinctions among students both mirrored and transformed publicly…

  11. An Analysis of Factors Influencing Students' Academic Performance in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Rivers State-Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalagbor, Levi Doe

    2016-01-01

    The study examined factors that positively influence students' academic performance in public and private secondary schools in Rivers State-Nigeria. One research question addressed the objectives and problem of the study. The instrument used for the collection of data was the "Students' Academic Performance Questionnaire" (SAPQ),…

  12. Practices of Boundary-Work in the Collaboration between Principals and Private Sponsors in England's Academy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    This article presents one of the few qualitative studies to empirically examine the collaboration between private sponsors and principals in the context of England's academy schools policy. It uses the concept of boundary-work to illuminate the multiple dynamics involved in the collaboration between principals and business sponsors. By analysing…

  13. The High School Students' Views on the Necessity of Private Courses for Accessing Higher Education (Siirt Sample)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevdet, Epcacan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine high school students' opinions regarding the necessity of private courses in the transition to higher education. For this purpose, the descriptive research method has been applied. As a data collection tool, an interview which has both quantitative and qualitative structure in other words a hybrid structure…

  14. A Comparative Assessment of Computer Literacy of Private and Public Secondary School Students in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunwusi, Adeyinka Olumuyiwa; Abifarin, Michael Segun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative assessment of computer literacy of private and public secondary school students. Although the definition of computer literacy varies widely, this study treated computer literacy in terms of access to, and use of, computers and the internet, basic knowledge and skills required to use computers and…

  15. Mandarin Chinese Immersion Program for Preschool Children in an Urban Private School in California: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    This study enlisted language immersion practitioners in highlighting and exploring the issues and challenges that accompany language immersion education. Comprehensive focused personal interviews of preschool Mandarin Chinese language immersion educators in a private school provided the basis of the study. The research literature reviewed…

  16. Practices of Boundary-Work in the Collaboration between Principals and Private Sponsors in England's Academy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    This article presents one of the few qualitative studies to empirically examine the collaboration between private sponsors and principals in the context of England's academy schools policy. It uses the concept of boundary-work to illuminate the multiple dynamics involved in the collaboration between principals and business sponsors. By analysing…

  17. Exploring the Factors That Influence Female Students' Decision to (Not) Enrol in Elective Physical Education: A Private School Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Jill; Robinson, Daniel Bruce

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results from a qualitative case study that examined the influencers upon a somewhat unique group of female students who opted out of elective physical education (PE). More specifically, this study focused upon female students attending an affluent private school, investigating why--when they transitioned from middle…

  18. Exploring the Factors That Influence Female Students' Decision to (Not) Enrol in Elective Physical Education: A Private School Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Jill; Robinson, Daniel Bruce

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results from a qualitative case study that examined the influencers upon a somewhat unique group of female students who opted out of elective physical education (PE). More specifically, this study focused upon female students attending an affluent private school, investigating why--when they transitioned from middle…

  19. The High School Students' Views on the Necessity of Private Courses for Accessing Higher Education (Siirt Sample)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevdet, Epcacan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine high school students' opinions regarding the necessity of private courses in the transition to higher education. For this purpose, the descriptive research method has been applied. As a data collection tool, an interview which has both quantitative and qualitative structure in other words a hybrid structure…

  20. Benefit Incidence Analysis of Government Spending on Public-Private Partnership Schooling under Universal Secondary Education Policy in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokadala, J.; Barungi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study establishes whether government spending on private universal secondary education (USE) schools is equitable across quintiles disaggregated by gender and by region in Uganda. The study employs benefit incidence analysis tool on the Uganda National Panel Survey (UNPS 2009/10) data to establish the welfare impact of public subsidy on…

  1. Mentoring and Succession of Administrators: Critical Issues in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Oladipo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the quality of outcome in Nigerian secondary schools is declining at an alarming rate due to shortage of required resources as well as leadership challenges. The challenges have been observed to be as a result of lack of mentoring which is not a common practice in school management in Nigeria. Consequently, this study investigated the extent to which mentoring as a strategy for administrators' succession plan impacts on the performance of their duties in public and private secondary schools in Lagos, Nigeria. The study adopted the descriptive survey design and administered a 25-item self-constructed questionnaire on participants. A total of 530 participants were randomly selected from the population of 4,350 senior teachers. The Participants were drawn from 145 secondary schools (91 public and 54 registered private in Education District IV of Lagos State. The findings showed that mentoring has significant impact on administrators' succession planning and that succession planning does not significantly differ in public and private secondary schools in Lagos State. The study concluded that leadership development is a critical factor in secondary school effectiveness and efficiency. Therefore, serving administrators as well as prospective administrators should be regularly evaluated to determine their training needs at different career stages. There should also be mentoring related policies to enhance the managerial skills, sense of competence and effectiveness of the prospective administrators.

  2. Soil transmitted helminths and associated factors among schoolchildren in government and private primary school in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debalke, Serkadis; Worku, Amare; Jahur, Nejat; Mekonnen, Zeleke

    2013-11-01

    Soil transmitted helminth infections are among the most common human infections. They are distributed throughout the world with high prevalence rates in tropical and sub-tropical countries mainly because of lack of adequate sanitary facilities, inappropriate waste disposal systems, lack of safe water supply, and low socio-economic status. A comparative cross sectional study was conducted from December 2011 to June 2012 to determine and assess the prevalence of soil transmitted helminths and their associated factors among government and private primary school children. Stool samples were collected from 369 randomly selected children and examined microscopically for eggs of soil transmitted helminth following McMaster techniques. Soil samples were collected from different parts of the school compound and microscopic examination was performed for eggs of the helminths using sodium nitrate flotation technique. The overall prevalence rate of soil transmitted helminth infections in private and government schools was 20.9% and 53.5% respectively. T. trichiura was the most common soil transmitted helminth in both schools while hookworm infections were identified in government school students only. Type of school and sex were significantly associated with soil transmitted helminth. Soil contamination rate of the school compounds was 11.25% with predominant parasites of A. lumbricoides. Higher prevalence of soil transmitted helminth infection was found among government school students. Thus, more focus, on personal hygiene and sanitary facilities, should be given to children going to government schools.

  3. Comparative Theology and Religious Studies in a Non-religious Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Scheuer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The intellectual landscape of Europe bears the marks of a long history of cultural perceptions of, and scientific approaches to, religions. The sciences of religions had to establish their autonomy from churches and theologies. However, the cultural context and the institutional set-up of ‘laïcité’ did not foster the development of comparative religion, much less comparative theology. However, this situation may have an advantage: it should discourage the exercise of comparative theology as a sectarian endeavour apart from broader anthropological perspectives and concerns. Comparative theology should not become the last refuge for religious nostalgia. In Europe, interreligious relationships (and hence comparative theologies should not be isolated from simple or more sophisticated forms of indifference, agnosticism, or atheism. The active presence of a non-religious environment as well as the growing interest in Buddhism, are challenges to comparative theology: its contents, its approach, its intended audience.

  4. Oral Health Status among 12- and 15-Year-Old Children from Government and Private Schools in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhabogi Jr; Shekar, Cbr; Hameed, Ia; Ramana, Iv; Sandhu, G

    2014-09-01

    The assessment of oral health status of children in government and private schools provide data on the oral health status of children from different socio-economic background. The aim of the following study is to assess and to compare the oral hygiene status, gingival status and caries experience between children from government and private schools in Andhra Pradesh, India. A combination of cluster and stratified random sampling was employed to select the study participants. Oral hygiene status, gingival status and caries experience was assessed and compared among 12- and 15-year-old children from three government and private schools each. The examination was carried out by three trained and calibrated investigators using a mouth mirror and explorer under natural daylight. A total of 604 children (331 government and 273 private) were examined in the study. The mean oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) was higher among government school children (2.9 [1.1]) compared private school children (0.6 [0.4]). The mean gingival score and mean decayed missing filled teeth were also higher among government school children compared with private school children. A significantly higher number of children in the government schools had poor oral hygiene status, moderate to severe gingivitis and caries experience. The prevalence of oral diseases was relatively less among children from private schools in comparison with those from government schools. Hence, the children from government schools should be given the priority compared with private school children in any school dental health programs planned on a statewide basis.

  5. Market Professionals in the Private Tutoring Industry: Balancing Profitability with the Humanistic Face of Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurini, Janice

    Based on interviews with private-tutoring-business entrepreneurs, this paper provides a qualitative analysis of some organizational and ideological transformations in the teacher profession with the advent of market professionals within the private-education sector. No longer simply a means to generate additional income, the private-tutoring…

  6. Effects of Private Tuition on the Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Subject of Mathematics in Kohat Division, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaiser Suleman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research reveals that private or home tuition after school time plays a crucial role in strengthening and improving student’s academic achievement. The purpose of the study was to explore the effects of private tuition on the academic achievement of students in subject of mathematics at secondary school level. All the students at secondary school level in Kohat Division (Pakistan constituted the population of the study. The study was delimited to the students of Government High School Ahmadi Banda Karak only. Fifty students of class 09 were selected as sample of the study. Sample students were divided into two groups i.e. control group and experimental group by equating them on the basis of their previous knowledge in subject of mathematics as determined through a pre-test. Each group was composed of 25 students. Students of the experimental group were engaged in tuition for two hours after school time. The study was experimental in nature therefore, “The pre-test-post-test Equivalent Groups Design” was used for the collection of data. Statistical tools i.e. the mean, standard deviation and differences of means were computed for each group. Significance of difference between the mean scores of both the experimental and control groups on the variable of pre-test and post test scores was tested at 0.05 levels by applying t-test. After statistical analysis of the data, the researchers concluded that there is significant positive effect of private tuition on the academic achievement of students in subject of mathematics at secondary school level. Based on the findings, it was recommended that parents should arrange private tuition for their children to move up their achievement level in subject of mathematics.

  7. Pattern and determinants of obesity among adolescent females in private and public schools in the Olorunda Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojofeitimi, Ebenezer Olubanji; Olugbenga-Bello, Adenike Iyanuoluwa; Adekanle, Daniel Adebode; Adeomi, Adeleye A

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has continued to rise at an alarming rate worldwide to such an extent that it has been described as a global epidemic. Our study aims to investigate the pattern and determinants of obesity among adolescent females in private and public schools in the Olorunda Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. Using the multistage sampling technique, 520 pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaires were administered to 257 girls from private schools and 263 girls from public schools. Most of the respondents from private schools (65.2%) had good knowledge about obesity and related matters while most of those from public schools (65.9%) had poor knowledge. The dietary practice of the majority of the girls from private schools (60.2%) was unhealthy while most of the girls from public schools (68.7%) had healthy dietary practices. Most of the respondents from private schools (64.2%) lived sedentary lifestyles while most from public schools (64.0%) lived active lifestyles. Using the BMI, the majority of the girls from private schools were underweight (52%), 10 (4.0%) were overweight and 3 (1.2%) were obese. For public schools, the majority (55.4%) fell within the normal group, 6 (2.3%) were overweight and none was obese. The prevalence of being overweight and of obesity was higher among the girls in private schools than among girls attending public schools. We concluded that awareness should be created to promote a healthy balance of food, drink and physical activity within and outside the school.

  8. Difference in Voice Problems and Noise Reports Between Teachers of Public and Private Schools in Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Hasseba, Ahmed; Waaramaa, Teija; Alku, Paavo; Geneid, Ahmed

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to assess teachers' voice symptoms and noise in schools in Upper Egypt and to study possible differences between teachers in public and private schools. A cross-sectional analysis via questionnaire was carried out. Four schools were chosen randomly to represent primary and preparatory schools as well as public and private ones. In these schools, a total of 140 teachers participated in the study. They answered a questionnaire on vocal and throat symptoms and their effects on working and social activities, as well as levels and effects of experienced noise. Of all teachers, 47.9% reported moderate or severe dysphonia within the last 6 months, and 21.4% reported daily dysphonia. All teachers reported frequent feelings of being in noise, with 82.2% feeling it sometimes or always during the working day, resulting in a need to raise their voice. Teachers in public schools experienced more noise from nearby classes. The working conditions and vocal health of teachers in Upper Egypt, especially in public schools, are alarming. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unequal Distribution of Overweight Adolescents in Immigrant-Rich Areas: Analysis of Disparities among Public and Private School Students in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwei; Tan, Duxun; Xie, Huilin; Yang, Beilei; Liu, Rui; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Mei, Bing; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2017-03-02

    Accelerated urbanization and rising immigration to the big cities in China has resulted in education policies that produce disparate treatment of immigrant and non-immigrant students. The two types of students frequently wind up in different types of junior high schools. However, there is little research on whether disparities exist between students in public and private schools with regard to overweight. This study aims to address this gap through a comparison of the overweight status of junior high school students in public and private schools in Shanghai and explore the possible reasons for the observed differences. Students from two public and two private junior high schools were measured. In order to determine what factors might shape overweight among adolescents. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations between overweight and personal characteristics, birth-related factors, levels of physical activity, diet, family socioeconomic status and school environment. Students in private schools proved more likely to be overweight (15.20%, p school students (10.18%). Similarly, gender, breastfeeding, parental care and number of classes excluding physical education per day were found to be significant factors. However, private school students were also influenced by gestational age (yes/no: OR = 4.50, p school students in the study (p schools, interventions that consider different multiple risk factors should be implemented.

  10. Caries risk assessment among 12-13 year old school-going children of government and private schools of Tirupur district, Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitha, Madhu M; Nijesh, J E; Chaly, Preetha Elizabeth; Priyadharshini, Indra; Junaid, Mohammed; Vaishnavi, S

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is as ancient as humankind and has the longest association with the dental profession, an association that is punctuated with agony and ecstasy. The agonizing fact is that despite several efforts toward total eradication, this disease is still prevalent. Nevertheless, an ecstatic success of the profession is the global decline in the incidence compared to the yesteryears' epidemics. Hence, predicting dental caries earlier is a boon. One such model to predict is cariogram developed by Bratthall in 1996. The aim of this study was to assess the caries risk among 12-13 year old school-going children of government and private schools of Tirupur district in Tamil Nadu using cariogram computer model. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 136 study subjects of 12-13 year of age, who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were collected using a predesigned questionnaire and scored according to a standardized protocol. The Chi-square test was used to find differences between caries-related factors and cariogram group. The correlation was acquired using Spearman's correlation. Government school study subjects had 56% of chance of avoiding caries whereas the private school study subjects had 66% of chance of avoiding caries in future and the differences were statistically significant (P = 0.001). A negative correlation was observed between the chance to avoid dental caries and cariogram sectors. The majority of the study subjects from government school belonged to medium-risk category and private school subjects belonged to low-risk category which inferred that private school students have high chance to avoid dental caries compared to government study subjects.

  11. Caries risk assessment among 12–13 year old school-going children of government and private schools of Tirupur district, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu M Mitha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is as ancient as humankind and has the longest association with the dental profession, an association that is punctuated with agony and ecstasy. The agonizing fact is that despite several efforts toward total eradication, this disease is still prevalent. Nevertheless, an ecstatic success of the profession is the global decline in the incidence compared to the yesteryears' epidemics. Hence, predicting dental caries earlier is a boon. One such model to predict is cariogram developed by Bratthall in 1996. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the caries risk among 12–13 year old school-going children of government and private schools of Tirupur district in Tamil Nadu using cariogram computer model. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 136 study subjects of 12–13 year of age, who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were collected using a predesigned questionnaire and scored according to a standardized protocol. The Chi-square test was used to find differences between caries-related factors and cariogram group. The correlation was acquired using Spearman's correlation. Results: Government school study subjects had 56% of chance of avoiding caries whereas the private school study subjects had 66% of chance of avoiding caries in future and the differences were statistically significant (P = 0.001. A negative correlation was observed between the chance to avoid dental caries and cariogram sectors. Conclusion: The majority of the study subjects from government school belonged to medium-risk category and private school subjects belonged to low-risk category which inferred that private school students have high chance to avoid dental caries compared to government study subjects.

  12. Academic dishonesty among undergraduates from private medical schools in India. Are we on the right track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Thirunavukkarasu Arun; Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Sharmila, Vijayan

    2011-01-01

    Though doctors are considered to be respectful role models of professionalism and ethics, medical students are no strangers to academic dishonesty. To assess the academic dishonesty practices among undergraduate students from private medical schools in India. A pre-tested and validated questionnaire containing 10 commonly done academic misconducts were administered and responses were collected. Out of 166 medical students enrolled in the study, 75% have given proxy for attendance and 49% have copied from others record book. During a theory exam, 74% of students have copied from their friends, 2% have tried to get the question paper before exam and 5% have influenced their teachers by unfair means to get more marks. During clinical/practical exam, 81% have got technical help, 45% had prior knowledge about the exam case, and 54% of them have falsely documented clinical findings. The prevalence of academic dishonesty is high. Academic integrity and ethics should be emphasized to the students which might help them in becoming professional and honest doctors.

  13. Influence of malocclusion on social perceptions of adolescents at public and private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, M M; Andrade, D; Fernandes, I; Mendes, J; Nunes, K; Michele, L; Ribeiro, A V; da Silva Coqueiro, R

    2014-02-01

    To determine whether malocclusion influences adolescents' perception when judging their colleagues from the aspects of athletics, social and health status, leadership and academic skills. Front view photographs of the smile of eight adolescent volunteers (non-ideal smile) were altered to create an image with aligned teeth (ideal smile). Two parallel groups were programmed with the subjects' photographs. When the image of an ideal smile of one of the subjects appeared in one of the groups, the image of the non-ideal appeared in the other. Two hundred adolescents were evaluators, half of the students being from private and half from public schools. They classified the group images indicating their social perception with respect to skills in sports, leadership, academic activities, popularity and the health conditions of each subject. The majority of photographs of subjects with an ideal smile were evaluated as being better when compared with photographs of the non-ideal smile. The differences in the evaluations between the ideal and non-ideal smiles were significant for the perception of popularity, intelligence, leadership capability and health, differently from the performance in sports, as this aspect did not attain statistical relevance. Malocclusion has influence on the perception of adolescents of different social levels when judging youngsters with or without malocclusion from the aspects of athletics, social and health status, leadership and academic skills.

  14. Facilities of Government & Private Secondary School Teachers of Karachi, Pakistan: A comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Abdul Karim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Education is necessary for the personality grooming of individual, so society had established separate formal institutes for that purpose. These institutes are having the triangle of three main pillars; consisted on Teachers, Students and Curriculum. Without teachers, educational process is impossible as flow of knowledge for the development of students is from teachers to student side. They have assigned by the divine duty of transmitting knowledge to the unknowns(students. Their work is too much curious and purposeful. Teachers are like the role models for students and that is why they can easily mold the new generation towards the better life. But for dedicatedly working its necessary to provide facilitated and relaxed environment to our teachers, tens or strict disciplinary environment results in the worse out put and bad heartedness by their profession. The research study is going to elaborate the difference between the facilities availed by government teachers and private school teachers and recommendation are related to unanimously application of good facilities of both sectors.

  15. Health Disparities in Nonreligious and Religious Older Adults in the United States: A Descriptive Epidemiology of 16 Common Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra C.H. Nowakowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we compute prevalence estimates for nonreligious and religious people in relation to 16 common chronic conditions in contemporary American society. Using survey data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, we speak to current debates concerning potential relationships between religion, nonreligion and health in older adult populations with two key findings. First, we show no consistent relationships between religion or nonreligion and chronic condition prevalence. Second, we demonstrate race, sex, and class variations within nonreligious people’s health outcomes consistent with patterns noted in previous analyses of religious populations. In conclusion, we draw out implications for future research concerning the importance of (1 using caution when interpreting correlations between religion (i.e., a privileged social location and health; (2 developing intersectional approaches to religion, nonreligion, and health; and (3 building a diverse base of scholarship concerning nonreligion and health.

  16. Comparison of oral hygiene status among 6-14 year old students of public and private schools of Rajbiraj, Saptari, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TK Bhagat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the oral hygiene status of 6-14 years old school children in Rajbiraj, Nepal. Materials and Methods Three hundred school children from public and private schools were examined for oral hygiene status using OHI(S. Descriptive statistics and independent sample t-tests were done. Results There was no significant difference in the oral hygiene status among gender, but the oral hygiene status of the children in private schools was better than that of the public school. Conclusion Large number of public school children had poor oral hygiene compared to private school children. Hence, oral health education programs should be conducted on a frequent basis to improve their oral hygiene status. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i1.12763 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(1; 17-21

  17. Trends in Personal Belief Exemption Rates Among Alternative Private Schools: Waldorf, Montessori, and Holistic Kindergartens in California, 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Julia M; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Richards, Jennifer L; Allen, Kristen E; Warraich, Gohar J; Omer, Saad B

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate trends in rates of personal belief exemptions (PBEs) to immunization requirements for private kindergartens in California that practice alternative educational methods. We used California Department of Public Health data on kindergarten PBE rates from 2000 to 2014 to compare annual average increases in PBE rates between schools. Alternative schools had an average PBE rate of 8.7%, compared with 2.1% among public schools. Waldorf schools had the highest average PBE rate of 45.1%, which was 19 times higher than in public schools (incidence rate ratio = 19.1; 95% confidence interval = 16.4, 22.2). Montessori and holistic schools had the highest average annual increases in PBE rates, slightly higher than Waldorf schools (Montessori: 8.8%; holistic: 7.1%; Waldorf: 3.6%). Waldorf schools had exceptionally high average PBE rates, and Montessori and holistic schools had higher annual increases in PBE rates. Children in these schools may be at higher risk for spreading vaccine-preventable diseases if trends are not reversed.

  18. A multiple case study comparison of normal private preparatory school and substance abusing/mood disordered adolescents and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, L S; Hedgespeth, J

    1995-01-01

    This multiple case study of ten families of normal private preparatory school adolescents and five families of substance abusing/mood disordered adolescents was an effort to identify factors that may suggest a relationship between the abuse of substances in adolescents who also have mood disorders and the following family factors: parental marital discord, degree of family satisfaction, and family problem-solving styles. The fifteen families completed four assessment instruments and participated in a videotaped problem-solving exercise. The results of this study showed that all members of the substance abusing/mood disordered adolescents' families rated themselves as dysfunctional in all major areas of family life. In contrast, the normal private preparatory school families reported satisfaction with most areas of family functioning. Communication styles also differed considerably between the two small groups of families. These results appear to support the importance of family evaluation and treatment when addressing the issue of adolescent substance abusers with mood disorders.

  19. The Danish Free School Tradition under Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2015-01-01

    The Danish free school tradition has entailed a large degree of associational freedom for non-governmental schools, religious as well as non-religious. Until the late 1990s, the non-governmental schools were under no strict ideological or pedagogical limitations; they could recruit teachers and students according to their own value base, and were…

  20. Is There a Private Schooling Market in Poor Neighbourhoods in Maputo, Mozambique? Exploring the Role of the Non-State Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härmä, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In some low-income countries, low-fee private schools targeting relatively poor communities have sprung up in considerable numbers meeting growing demand. This is often the case where government is not providing enough school places, but also where parents could access government schools for their children but choose not to, due to perceived low…

  1. Knowledge, attitudes, and resources of sex education among female adolescents in public and private schools in Central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquaiz, Aljoharah M; Almuneef, Maha A; Minhas, Hafsa R

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the knowledge and sources of knowledge among Saudi female adolescent students, attending public and private schools in the city of Riyadh with regard to sexuality and reproductive health. This cross sectional survey was conducted from January to April 2009. Female adolescents between 11 and 21 years of age were invited to participate in the survey. Five classes of intermediate and secondary levels were randomly selected from 2 schools in Riyadh city. A total of 417 female students were included into the sample. Students were asked to answer a self-administrated questionnaire. Forty-two percent of the participants reported that they discussed sexual matters with their friends. Only 15.8% discussed these matters with their parents (mothers). Interestingly, 17.3% discussed sexual matters with the domestic helper. Most (61%) reported that their teachers had negative attitudes toward questions related to sexual issues. Only 33.3%, 37.9% and 14.5% knew that syphilis, gonorrhea, and hepatitis B, are sexually transmitted diseases. No significant differences were found between students in private schools and public schools. Formal sexual education should be introduced in the curriculum of the schools within the context of our religion and culture. Parents and teachers should be more open to discuss sexual issues with their children and students.

  2. The End of Public Schools? The Corporate Reform Agenda to Privatize Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursh, David

    2017-01-01

    In this speech, Hursh shows how public education in the United States is undergoing profound changes. Education policy has been hijacked by the unelected and unaccountable corporate reformers who aspire to overhaul the education system through a corporate model of privatization and market competition. They aim to privatize education through…

  3. Effects of Reading Skills on Students’ Performance in Science and Mathematics in Public and Private Secondary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ombra A. Imam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Philippine education system, reading, mathematics, and science formed part of the core areas of basic education curriculum. For the last decade, the quality of Philippine education was put into a big question due to poor performance of students in mathematics and science tests both local and abroad. The initial result of current efforts of the government by adopting K-12 curriculum didn’t do much to change the status quo. The purpose of this study is to determine the reading predictors of students’ performance in Mathematics and Science and identify its effects to such performance. A total of 660 freshmen students from public and private high schools in Cotabato City, Philippines were taken as sample. A validated and reliable 150-item test in reading comprehension skills, mathematics and science was used to get primary data to perform correlation and regression analysis. Findings showed that only making inference and getting main idea were predictors of mathematics performance of students in public school and private schools, respectively.  Data analysis also revealed that two reading skills such as noting details and making inference had an influence on science performance of students in public school while skills in getting main idea and drawing conclusion influenced science performance of students in private schools.  However, there was only one skill such as vocabulary in context which was predictor of overall science performance of all students. Moreover, separate effects of making inference, identifying main idea explained only 1.8 percent and 1.3 percent of students’ math performance while their combined effects provided only .1 percent or nearly zero percent. Furthermore, the study found out that separate effects of noting details contributed 3.3 percent and its combined effects with making inference explained 4.2 percent of science performance of students in public schools. In terms of effects of reading to science

  4. Association between parent and child weight status among private school children in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene-Cramer, Blanche; Harrell, Melissa B; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Sharma, Shreela; Ranjit, Nalini; Gupta, Vinay; Nazar, Gaurang; Arora, Monika

    2016-07-28

    Over the past three decades there has been a surge in the prevalence of overweight and obesity worldwide in both adults and children. To date few studies have examined obesity in India and most have only looked at prevalence estimates. While studies in Western countries have identified parent weight status as a predictor of child weight status, there have been no studies examining this association in India. This study examined the relationship between parent weight status and child weight status using an internationally representative growth reference for children and Asian-specific action points for adults.Overall, this study found 29.6% of children and 77.7% of parents in a sample of private schools in Delhi, India were overweight/obese. Parent weight status was found to be associated with child weight status after controlling for child grade and sex. However, while maternal weight status was associated with child weight status (odds ratio=1.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.20), paternal weight status was not (odds ratio=1.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.81-1.48). The association was greatest between mothers and sons (odds ratio=2.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.39-3.27).These results provide initial evidence that parent weight status is associated with child weight status in Delhi, India. Future research should continue to explore the relationship between parent, particularly maternal, and child weight status to better understand the nature of the relationship and the differences between male and female children. Interventions to address child overweight and obesity in India should include parents as direct targets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Dyslipidemia in schoolchildren from private schools in Belém.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Simone Augusta; Silva, Luiz Carlos Santana da

    2009-06-01

    Currently, childhood dyslipidemia, associated to other non-transmissible diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity, represent a significant public health problem in Brazil. To investigate the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children and adolescents from private schools in the city of Belem, state of Para, Brazil. Transversal and prospective study that assessed 437 schoolchildren, paired by sex. The age range was established between 6 and 19 years of age and stratified in four subgroups (6 to 9 years; 10 to 12 years; 13 to 15 years and 16 to 19 years). To obtain the anthropometric variables, weight and height were measured for the calculation of the body mass index and skin folds were measured for the calculation of body fat percentage. The serum lipoprotein profile was obtained through the measurement of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol after a 12-hour fasting period, by enzymatic methods. Of the total number of schoolchildren analyzed, 126 (28.8%) were overweight and 158 (36.2%) presented a high adiposity index. The children (33.6%) presented a higher prevalence of obesity when compared to the adolescents (10.1%; p < 0.001). Regarding the biochemical characteristics, it was observed that 214 (41%) presented some alteration in the lipid profile and that children and adolescents in the age range of 10 to 15 years were the age groups that presented the highest rates of dyslipidemia (34.6% and 25.5%), respectively. These findings demonstrate the importance of establishing an early diagnosis of the lipid profile, mainly if it is already associated to another risk factor, such as obesity.

  6. Knowledge and attitude regarding euthanasia among medical students in the public and private medical schools of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Wafa; Ahmad, Farah; Malik, Aisha; Ali, Saba

    2013-02-01

    To assess the awareness about and perception of euthanasia among medical students of Karachi. The cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2011 to March 2012 among students of private-sector and one public-sector medical college in Karachi. Data was analysed using SPSS version 17, and associations were worked out using chi-square test. Out of the 493 students, 226 (46%) were from the matriculation system and 194 (39%) from the Cambridge system, while the remaining 15% were from the American High School. The male-female ratio was 1:3. There were 284 (58%) students from the private medical college. Majority of the private medical school students (n = 284; 99.6%) knew about euthanasia, compared to the public-sector facility where only 161 (77%) knew of it. Of the total, 405 (82%) students agreed that it is physician-assisted suicide; 255 (52%) agreed to the idea of palliative care, claiming it was sufficient to maintain life; 226 (54%) disagreed that a doctor should not be allowed to administer a lethal dose while only 162 (33%) agreed to the idea of it; 285 (58%) disagreed that a law regarding the practice of euthanasia should not be introduced, whereas 134 (27%) agreed to it; 70 (14%) agreed to the practice of euthanasia, while 311 (63%) disagreed, mostly for religious reasons. The awareness of euthanasia was high, but a very small proportion of students approved of it. There is need to include palliative care and euthanasia in the Behavioural Science module in the under-graduation programme of both public and private medical schools.

  7. Organizaciones que aprenden: Nivel educativo medio superior del sector privado (Learning organizations: Private high school level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafuente, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. To convert an educational institution, such as the private high school, an organization that learns, we must know the school, their strengths, opportunities, to support change, threats, weaknesses that impede it, starting from the individual learning to organizational, because both have an impact on a learner organization, involving all elements such as leadership, work in equipment, resources, culture and values that they make and provide structure, as well as the context in which this immersed; the process of internal learning which characterized them and provide scaffolding, of the new acquisition that they help you or in the future helping you to become the type of organization that not only will be able to adapt to the demands of a modern and dynamic society, but also to transform to generate meaningful learning, allowing it to be competent permanent and relevant to developing its capacities and the survival skills. Resumen. Para convertir una institución educativa, como el bachillerato privado, en una organización que aprende, debemos de conocer la escuela, sus fortalezas, las oportunidades, que apoyarán el cambio, las amenazas, las debilidades que lo impedirán, partiendo desde el aprendizaje individual hasta el organizativo, porque ambos inciden en una organización aprendiente, involucrando todos los elementos como el liderazgo, trabajo en equipo, recursos, cultura y valores, que la conforman y le proporcionan estructura, así como el contexto en el cual está inmerso; los proceso de aprendizaje internos que los caracterizan y le brindan andamiaje, a los de nueva adquisición que le ayudan o en un futuro le auxiliaran a convertirse, en el tipo de organización que no solo será capaz de adaptarse a las exigencias de una sociedad moderna y dinámica, sino también a transformarse para generar el aprendizaje significativo, permitiéndole ser competente, permanente y pertinente desarrollando sus capacidades y habilidades para

  8. Indian medical students in public and private sector medical schools: are motivations and career aspirations different? – studies from Madhya Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been a massive growth in the private medical education sector in South Asia. India’s large private medical education sector reflects the market driven growth in private medical education. Admission criteria to public medical schools are based on qualifying examination scores, while admission into private institutions is often dependent on relative academic merit, but also very much on the ability of the student to afford the education. This paper from Madhya Pradesh province in India aims to study and compare between first year medical students in public and private sector medical schools (i) motives for choosing a medical education (ii) career aspirations on completion of a medical degree (iii) willingness to work in a rural area in the short and long terms. Methods Cross sectional survey of 792 first year medical students in 5 public and 4 private medical schools in the province. Results There were no significant differences in the background characteristics of students in public and private medical schools. Reasons for entering medical education included personal ambition (23%), parental desire (23%), prestigious/secure profession (25%) or a service motive (20%). Most students wished to pursue a specialization (91%) and work in urban areas (64%) of the country. A small proportion (7%) wished to work abroad. There were no differences in motives or career aspirations between students of public or private schools. 40% were willing to work in a rural area for 2 years after graduating; public school students were more willing to do so. Conclusion There was little difference in background characteristics, motives for entering medicine or career aspirations between medical students in from public and private sector institutions. PMID:24034988

  9. Indian medical students in public and private sector medical schools: are motivations and career aspirations different? - studies from Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Vishal; Minj, Christie; Chhari, Neeraj; De Costa, Ayesha

    2013-09-15

    In recent years, there has been a massive growth in the private medical education sector in South Asia. India's large private medical education sector reflects the market driven growth in private medical education. Admission criteria to public medical schools are based on qualifying examination scores, while admission into private institutions is often dependent on relative academic merit, but also very much on the ability of the student to afford the education. This paper from Madhya Pradesh province in India aims to study and compare between first year medical students in public and private sector medical schools (i) motives for choosing a medical education (ii) career aspirations on completion of a medical degree (iii) willingness to work in a rural area in the short and long terms. Cross sectional survey of 792 first year medical students in 5 public and 4 private medical schools in the province. There were no significant differences in the background characteristics of students in public and private medical schools. Reasons for entering medical education included personal ambition (23%), parental desire (23%), prestigious/secure profession (25%) or a service motive (20%). Most students wished to pursue a specialization (91%) and work in urban areas (64%) of the country. A small proportion (7%) wished to work abroad. There were no differences in motives or career aspirations between students of public or private schools. 40% were willing to work in a rural area for 2 years after graduating; public school students were more willing to do so. There was little difference in background characteristics, motives for entering medicine or career aspirations between medical students in from public and private sector institutions.

  10. Cross sectional: perception of children from public and private schools regarding the esthetic impact of different types of face masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Ferraz, Caio Sousa; de Oliveira, Gabriel Couto; Dos Santos, Adrielle Mangabeira; Couto, Felipe Santos; da Silva Coqueiro, Raildo; Dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the esthetic perception among children from public and private schools regarding the use of different types of face masks. Six different types of orthopedic face masks made from images of the same patient were evaluated. Initially, the images were standardized with the help of Adobe Photoshop software. The variable considered was type of mask: (A) Delaire with facebow; (B) Petit; (C) Delaire; (D)Turley; (E) Hickham; and (F) Sky Hook. The images were printed on photographic paper and incorporated into a specific personalized questionnaire that was distributed to 7- to 10-year-olds attending public and private schools (n=120). The data obtained were compared via chi-square, Fisher's exact tests, Mann-Whitney and Spearman's tests. The proportion of participants who chose image A as the best was significantly higher (P.05). The mean scores between groups were not significantly correlated between private vs public schoolchildren (r=0.32) and between boys and girls (r=0.41). Delaire face mask with facebow was chosen as the most attractive, and the Petit and Sky Hook face masks were voted the least attractive.

  11. When Educators Are the Learners: Private Contracting by Public Schools. NBER Working Paper No. 18185

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Silke J.; Gordon, Nora E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate decision-making and the potential for social learning among school administrators in the market for school reform consulting services. Specifically, we estimate whether public schools are more likely to choose given Comprehensive School Reform service providers if their "peer" schools--defined by common governance or geography--have…

  12. Gender-related attitudinal differences towards science fairs of students in Christian private schools in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Glenda F.

    Science fairs afford students at all grade levels the opportunity to practice thinking as a scientist does, a valuable 21st century skill (Jacobs, 2010) and may influence students to pursue STEM-related careers. Even though science fairs have been occurring since the 1920s, literature related to science competitions, especially science fairs, is limited (Dionne et al., 2012; Terzian, 2009). The purpose of this quantitative study was to use a causal comparative research design to determine if there is a difference in overall attitudes towards science fairs, enjoyment of science fairs, and usefulness of science fairs of female and male students at private Christian middle schools. The sample included 146 fifth through eighth grade students, 72 males and 74 females from four private Christian schools in the southern United States. The researcher visited each school and administered the Students' Attitudes toward Science Fairs (SATSFS) instrument (Michael & Huddleston, 2014) to the students on the day of the local science fair. A one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the difference in attitudes between the female and male participants toward science fairs in the areas of overall attitude, student's enjoyment, and student's usefulness of science fairs. The result of the MANOVA was not significant at an alpha level of .05, where F (2, 143) = 2.52, p = .08, partial eta2 = 0.034, suggesting there are no significant differences on the dependent variables (enjoyment, usefulness, and overall attitude toward science fairs) by gender of fifth through eighth grade students in Christian private schools. The effect size as measured by partial eta squared was small. Implications for educators include the need to address gender differences in STEM education at earlier stages of development, and the importance of stressing personal meaning and relevance to science-related activities. Recommendations for further studies were made.

  13. Sedentary lifestyle and its associated factors among adolescents from public and private schools of a Brazilian state capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascente, Flávia Miquetichuc Nogueira; Jardim, Thiago Veiga; Peixoto, Maria do Rosário Gondim; Carneiro, Carolina de Souza; Mendonça, Karla Lorena; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Barroso, Weimar Kunz Sebba; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2016-11-21

    Adolescence is a transition stage between childhood and adulthood and is an important phase for the acquisition of future lifestyles, including the practice of physical activity (PA). The prevalence of sedentary lifestyle in adolescents is often high, creating the need for studies addressing the practice of PA and its associated factors for a better understanding of the phenomenon and possible interventions that would encourage positive changes. Cross-sectional study of a representative sample of students aged 14-18 years enrolled in both public and private schools of a large Brazilian city to determine the level of physical activity (PA) and its associated factors. Sedentary lifestyle was measured by applying the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The independent variables were gender, age, race, tobacco use and alcohol consumption in the past 30 days, socioeconomic status, body mass index, waist circumference and blood pressure. The crude prevalence ratio was used as a measure of association and was estimated from a Poisson regression. The sample consisted of 862 adolescents with a mean age of 15.4 ± 1.1 years. Females were predominant (52.8%), and the age between 14 and 15 years was the most frequent (52.2%). The majority of the group reported themselves as Caucasians (51.2%), belonging to socioeconomic class C (52.5%) and were attending to public schools (69.1%). The prevalence of sedentary lifestyle was 66.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 63.5-69.9), where values of 65.4% and 69.9% were observed among students from public and private schools, respectively (p = 0.196). Sedentary lifestyle was more frequent in females (78.0% vs 54.3%; p private schools and the only independent variable related to sedentarism was also female gender. The prevalence of sedentary lifestyle was extremely high in the population of adolescents studied both in public and private schools. Female sex was directly associated with sedentary lifestyle.

  14. Alberta's Pluriform School System: Beyond the "Public-Secular" versus "Private-Religious" Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, John

    2017-01-01

    The Canadian province of Alberta runs a unique school system that offers ten options for school plurality and choice, nine of which provide some form of faith-based schooling. This article argues that Alberta has created a pragmatic version of a "pluriform school system." This system breaks with the assumption, shared by many Christian…

  15. Prevalence of stress among medical students: a comparative study between public and private medical schools in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Eliza Omar; Islam, Md Zakirul; Mosaddek, Abu Syed Md; Rahman, Md Faizur; Rozario, Rini Juliet; Iftekhar, A F Md Hassan; Ahmed, Tarafder Shahniam; Jahan, Iffat; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Dali, Wan Putri Elena Wan; Razzaque, Mohammed S; Habib, Rahat Bin; Haque, Mainul

    2015-07-30

    Throughout the world all health professionals face stress because of time-pressures, workload, multiple roles and emotional issues. Stress does not only exist among the health professionals but also in medical students. Bangladesh has currently 77 medical colleges 54 of which are private. This study was designed to collect baseline data of stress-level among Bangladeshi students, which we believe will form the basis for further in depth studies. A cross-sectional study was conducted on medical students from 2 public and 6 private medical-schools in Bangladesh. All medical schools have common curriculum formulated by the Government of Bangladesh. The study population was 1,363 medical students of Year-III and IV of academic session 2013/2014. Universal sampling technique was used. The period of study was February to June 2014. Data was collected using a validated instrument, compiled and analysed using SPSS version-20. A total of 990 (73%) out 1,363 medical students participated in the study, of which 36% were male and 64% were female. The overall prevalence of stress of the study population was 54%. 53% of male and 55% of female were reported suffering from stress. 54% of Year-III students and 55% of Year-IV were noted suffering from stress. There was statistically significant (p = 0.005) differences in the level of stress between public (2.84 ± 0.59) and private (2.73 ± 0.57) medical schools student. More than half of Bangladeshi medical students are suffering from measureable academic stress. It would be pertinent if the relevant authorities could address the issue so as to provide a conducive medical learning environment.

  16. [Oral health in 12 year-old students from public and private schools in the city of Goiânia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Reis, Sandra Cristina Guimaraes Bahia; Gonçalves, Michele Martins; Balbo, Patrícia Lima; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues

    2010-08-01

    To compare 12-year-old students from public and private schools in the city of Goiânia, Brazil, in terms of the prevalence of caries, periodontal conditions, dentofacial anomalies, and fluorosis. In 2003, the 2002-2003 Oral Health Conditions in the Brazilian Population project (SB Brasil) was expanded to Goiânia as a cross-sectional study, as described in the present article. The sample included 1 947 students from urban schools: 1 790 (91.9%) attended public schools and 157 (8.1%) attended private schools. Data on the following oral conditions were collected through clinical examination: dental caries (decayed, missing, or filled teeth index, DMFT), periodontal condition (Community Periodontal Index, CPI), dentofacial anomaly (Dental Aesthetics Index, DAI), and dental fluorosis (Dean index). The groups were compared using the chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. There were differences between the public and private schools for all the variables. DMFT, CPI, and DAI indexes were higher in children from public schools (P private schools (P school was associated with the oral health condition of the children in this sample. Investments in actions and services to mitigate this inequality and its effects should be made as part of the policies to promote oral health.

  17. The Contribution of Privatization and Competition in the Education System to the Development of an Informal Management Culture in Schools: A Case Study in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Joseph; Shimoni-Hershkoviz, Lizi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Regulation and privatization of education systems has led to a "league standing" mentality regarding school achievements. The purpose of this paper is to examine how school principals deal with the pressures of competition and achievements while aspiring to imbue pupils with values and a broad education.…

  18. The Politics of School Choice in Two Countries with Large Private-Dependent Sectors (Spain and Chile): Family Strategies, Collective Action and Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambla, Xavier; Valiente, Oscar; Frias, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In many countries choice of school is an increasing concern for families and governments. In Spain and Chile, it is also associated with a long-standing political cleavage on the regulation of large sectors of private-dependent schools. This article analyses both the micro- and the macro-politics of choice in these two countries, where low-status…

  19. The Contribution of Privatization and Competition in the Education System to the Development of an Informal Management Culture in Schools: A Case Study in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Joseph; Shimoni-Hershkoviz, Lizi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Regulation and privatization of education systems has led to a "league standing" mentality regarding school achievements. The purpose of this paper is to examine how school principals deal with the pressures of competition and achievements while aspiring to imbue pupils with values and a broad education.…

  20. A Comparative Study of the Influence of Head Teachers Management Styles on Pupils Performance in KCPE in Public and Private Primary Schools in Nakuru Municipality, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibo, Margaret Nekesa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of management styles of head teacher's on pupils' performance in private and public primary schools in Nakuru municipality at Kenya Certificate of Primary Education level. The population comprised of teachers and head teachers in public primary schools. The study adopted the ex post facto…

  1. The Politics of School Choice in Two Countries with Large Private-Dependent Sectors (Spain and Chile): Family Strategies, Collective Action and Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambla, Xavier; Valiente, Oscar; Frias, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In many countries choice of school is an increasing concern for families and governments. In Spain and Chile, it is also associated with a long-standing political cleavage on the regulation of large sectors of private-dependent schools. This article analyses both the micro- and the macro-politics of choice in these two countries, where low-status…

  2. Perceived barriers to achieving a healthy weight: a qualitative study using focus groups at public and private schools in Guatemala City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Luisa; Adams, Inez; Chacon, Violeta; Barnoya, Joaquin

    2017-01-05

    Overweight prevalence among Guatemalan girls is higher in public than in private schools. Little is known about adolescent girls' perceptions of the right ways to achieve a healthy weight. This study examines public and private school adolescent girls' perceptions of a "healthy weight," and barriers and facilitators to achieving it. We conducted 4 focus groups in public and private schools in Guatemala City with girls from 13 to 15 years old. The discussion guide included open-ended questions and activities aimed at examining perceptions of "healthy weight" and barriers and motivators to achieving it within the school environment. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data analyses followed established methods of content analysis. Twenty-eight girls (private school, n = 12; public school, n = 16) of ages ranging from 13.1 to 15.9 years (median, 14, IQR, 13.6-14.9) participated in the study. Girls identified images of thin and fit women as healthy. They cited healthy eating and physical activity as ways to achieve a healthy weight. Within the school environment, barriers to maintaining a healthy weight included a lack of healthy food options and the prioritization of sports for boys over girls. In public schools, facilities were less than optimal; in private schools, girls' access to facilities was limited. Public school girls stated that their uniforms were inappropriate for exercising. Our findings support the need to provide more healthy food options in Guatemalan schools. In addition, physical activity for girls should be promoted and facilities made available for their use.

  3. Unequal Distribution of Overweight Adolescents in Immigrant-Rich Areas: Analysis of Disparities among Public and Private School Students in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Shi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated urbanization and rising immigration to the big cities in China has resulted in education policies that produce disparate treatment of immigrant and non-immigrant students. The two types of students frequently wind up in different types of junior high schools. However, there is little research on whether disparities exist between students in public and private schools with regard to overweight. This study aims to address this gap through a comparison of the overweight status of junior high school students in public and private schools in Shanghai and explore the possible reasons for the observed differences. Students from two public and two private junior high schools were measured. In order to determine what factors might shape overweight among adolescents. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations between overweight and personal characteristics, birth-related factors, levels of physical activity, diet, family socioeconomic status and school environment. Students in private schools proved more likely to be overweight (15.20%, p < 0.05 than public school students (10.18%. Similarly, gender, breastfeeding, parental care and number of classes excluding physical education per day were found to be significant factors. However, private school students were also influenced by gestational age (yes/no: OR = 4.50, p < 0.001, frequency of snacks (sometimes/often: OR = 0.53, p < 0.01 and family income (¥6001–12,000/below ¥6000: OR = 3.27, p < 0.05. Time for lunch was the sole risk factor for public school students in the study (p < 0.05. To reduce the unequal distribution of overweight students between the two types of schools, interventions that consider different multiple risk factors should be implemented.

  4. Oral health status and treatment needs among 12- and 15-year-old government and private school children in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailee, Fotedar; Girish, M Sogi; Kapil, R Sharma; Nidhi, Pruthi

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dental caries, periodontal health, and malocclusion of school children aged 12 and 15 years in Shimla city and to compare them in government and private schools. A cross-sectional study of 12- and 15-year-old children in government and private schools was conducted in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India. A sample of 1011 school children (both males and females) was selected by a two-stage cluster sampling method. Clinical recordings of dental caries and malocclusion were done according to World Health Organization diagnostic criteria 1997. Periodontal health was assessed by Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs index. The data collected was analyzed by SPSS package 13. The statistical tests used were t-test and Chi-square tests. The prevalence of dental caries was 32.6% and 42.2% at 12 and 15 years, respectively. At the12 years of age, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.62 ± 1.42 and it was 1.06 ± 2.93 at 15 years of age. Females had higher level of caries than males at both the ages. At both ages, mean of decayed teeth was statistically higher in government schools as compared with private schools. Children in government schools had significantly less number of mean filled teeth at both ages as compared with private schools. The healthy component of gingiva was present in higher percentage of children in private schools as compared with government schools at both the age groups. The prevalence of malocclusion among the 12- year-old (58.1%) was more as compared with that among the 15-year-old (53.5%). The caries experience of 12- and 15-year-old children was low but the prevalence of gingivitis and malocclusion was quite high. Effective oral health promotion strategies need to be implemented to improve the oral health of school children further in Shimla city.

  5. Coping with illness and threat: why non-religious Jews choose to consult rabbis on healthcare issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Yael; Liberman, Ido

    2014-08-01

    Whereas modern and advanced medical services are available and accessible to all citizens of Israel, the phenomenon of consulting Orthodox rabbis (Jewish clerics) on healthcare issues is gaining ground among populations that do not identify themselves as religious. The objective of the research was to enquire why non-religious Jews choose to consult rabbis on medical issues. Fifty semi-structured open-ended interviews were conducted during 2009-2011 in northern Israel. The article presents the respondents' main motives, expectations, beliefs, and modes of consulting both physicians and rabbis. This study aims to contribute to discussion about conflating modern medicine with spiritual-religious beliefs in modern-secular society.

  6. Prevalence of Malnutrition and Relationship with Scholastic Performance among Primary and Secondary School Children in Two Select Private Schools in Bangalore Rural District (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmi, M R; Shweta, B M; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Agrawal, Twinkle; Shah, Moulik; Sequeira, Randell

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a serious problem among children in developing countries. In India; a school meal program is in place to combat malnutrition, but only in government schools. This study is an attempt to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in primary and secondary school children in private schools and to also assess the relationship between malnutrition and academic performance. All 582 students from class 1-7 from two select schools in rural Bangalore, India were included in the study. Information on age of study subjects were collected from school records. Height and weight measurements were taken. BMI was calculated. Children were clinically examined for pallor. Data on height, weight and BMI was transformed into WHO 2007 Z scores and then was categorized as -2 SD, > 2 SD. Mathematics and English scores of the previous two class tests were taken, average scores were calculated. Statistical tests used were Chi square test, Odd's ratio, Chi square for trend. A total of 582 students participated in this study. Males were 54% (315) and females were 46% (267). One hundred and fifty-nine (27%) of the children had pallor, 81 (20%) had under nutrition, 38 (7%) had stunting, 197 (34%) had thinness and 5 (1%) were found to be obese. Positive relationship was found between weight for ageZscores and English as well as Maths; Height for age Z scores with English. Hence we conclude that the prevalence of malnutrition is high among children in private schools also; and the nutritional status of the children is strongly associated with their academic performance.

  7. Prevalence of Malnutrition and Relationship with Scholastic Performance among Primary and Secondary School Children in Two Select Private Schools in Bangalore Rural District (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is a serious problem among children in developing countries. In India; a school meal program is in place to combat malnutrition, but only in government schools. This study is an attempt to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in primary and secondary school children in private schools and to also assess the relationship between malnutrition and academic performance. Materials and Methods: All 582 students from class 1-7 from two select schools in rural Bangalore, India were included in the study. Information on age of study subjects were collected from school records. Height and weight measurements were taken. BMI was calculated. Children were clinically examined for pallor. Data on height, weight and BMI was transformed into WHO 2007 Z scores and then was categorized as -2 SD, > 2 SD. Mathematics and English scores of the previous two class tests were taken, average scores were calculated. Statistical tests used were Chi square test, Odd′s ratio, Chi square for trend. Results : A total of 582 students participated in this study. Males were 54% (315 and females were 46% (267. One hundred and fifty-nine (27% of the children had pallor, 81 (20% had under nutrition, 38 (7% had stunting, 197 (34% had thinness and 5 (1% were found to be obese. Positive relationship was found between weight for ageZscores and English as well as Maths; Height for age Z scores with English. Conclusion : Hence we conclude that the prevalence of malnutrition is high among children in private schools also; and the nutritional status of the children is strongly associated with their academic performance.

  8. [Comprehensive sexual education in Mexico: an analysis of coverage, comprehensiveness and continuity of contents in Mexican public and private schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Rosalba; Castro, Filipa de; Villalobos, Aremis; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Romero, Martin; Braverman-Bronstein, Ariela; Uribe, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    To analyze coverage of comprehensive sex education (CSE) in high schools in Mexico and describe whether it is comprehensive, homogeneous and has continuity based on student reports of exposure to topics in three dimensions: reproductive and sexual health, self-efficacy and rights and relations. Within a probabilistic, cross-sectional survey with stratified, cluster sampling, a nationally representative sample of 3 824 adolescents attending 45 public and private high-schools in urban and rural areas completed questionnaires on CSE. The proportion of adolescents reporting having received sex education from school personnel varies depending on topics and grade level. Topics most frequently covered are those related to sexual and reproductive health while rights and relations are least frequently dealt with. Most sex education topics are covered during junior high school and much less frequently in elementary or high school. CSE needs to be comprehensive and homogenous in terms of content, ensure inclusion of priority topics, meet national and international recommendations, ensure continuity and adapt contents to student age through all education levels.

  9. Parents' vaccine beliefs: a study of experiences and attitudes among parents of children in private pre-schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Even among highly vaccinated populations such as Rhode Island (RI), there exists a vulnerability to disease outbreaks. This is the basis for requiring proof of immunization for enrollment into school. Although RI grants medical, temporary, and religious vaccination exemptions, little is known about the beliefs of RI parents who seek exemptions for their children. The purpose of this small-scale, cross-sectional, Web-based survey is to describe the vaccine behaviors and beliefs of parents of children attending private pre-school in Providence, RI. In spite of limitations, the results provided the intended baseline assessment of the target population. While such findings should be interpreted with caution, they can be used as the foundation for future research and interventions.

  10. [Labor and health conditions of private school teachers in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcor, Núria Serre; Araújo, Tania M; Reis, Eduardo J F B; Porto, Lauro A; Carvalho, Fernando M; Oliveira e Silva, Manuela; Barbalho, Leonardo; de Andrade, Jonathan Moura

    2004-01-01

    The scientific literature on teachers' health is scarce, recent, and focuses predominantly on stress and burnout. This study describes the labor conditions of private school teachers in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia State, Brazil. Information on 250 teachers from the ten largest schools in the municipality was collected through a self-applied questionnaire. The most relevant characteristics of teachers' work, evaluated by the Job Content Questionnaire were: speed of work, creativity at work, and relations with colleagues. The most frequent complaints related to posture, mental strain, and voice problems. Prevalence of minor psychological disorders according to the Self Reporting Questionnaire-20 was 41.5%, strongly associated with long periods of intense concentration on the same job and excessive work. Results suggest an association between the prevalence of minor psychological disorders and certain characteristics of teaching work, emphasizing teachers' exposure to stress.

  11. The Effectiveness of Private School Franchises in Chile's National Voucher Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Gregory; Contreras, Dante; Salazar, Felipe; Santos, Humberto

    2011-01-01

    There is persistent debate over the role of scale of operations in education. Some argue that school franchises offer educational services more effectively than small independent schools. Skeptics counter that large centralized operations create hard-to-manage bureaucracies and foster diseconomies of scale and that small schools are more effective…

  12. When Public Acts Like Private: The Failure of Estonia's School Choice Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Kaire; Lauri, Triin

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to show the segregating effect of the market-like matching of students and schools at the basic school level. The natural experiment case is Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. The current school choice mechanism applied in this case is based on entrance tests. There are increasingly over-subscribed intra-catchment area public…

  13. Private Schools and Public Funding: A Comparison of Recent Policies in England and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tony; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examines government policies in England and Australia toward nongovernment schools, compares forms of direct and indirect support which such schools and their pupils receive from public funds, and looks at ways in which state aid for nonstate schools has been justified and condemned. (JHZ)

  14. 民办学校法人财产权与民办教育分类管理%Property Right of Legal Person of Private Schools and the Classified Management of Private Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈剑光; 钟海

    2011-01-01

    With the diversification of school-running subject and the continuous development of the property scale of private schools, the problems of policy restrict resulted from the confusion of property right of private schools have become the bottleneck of the long-term development. By analyzing the property rights of legal person of private schools, it is found out that to implement classified management on private education is a proper route. In the objective mode of classified management, the applicable policy should be different in the supportive policy as the settlement of property rights, donated encouraging system and tax preference, etc., since there are some different factors in profit-seeking schools and non-profit schools.%随着民办学校办学主体的多元化和民办学校资产规模的不断扩大,民办学校产权不明晰所产生的政策性制约问题日益成为其长远发展的瓶颈。通过辨析民办学校法人财产权可以看到,对民办教育进行分类管理是切实可行的路径。在分类管理的目标模式中,因营利性学校与非营利性学校之间有较多不同,故适用的政策应有所差别,在产权设定、捐赠激励制度和税收优惠政策等配套政策上应有所体现。

  15. Study of School Environment and Prevalence of Obesity & Its Predictors among Adolescent (10-13 Years Belonging to a Private School in an Urban Indian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehan Meenakshi, Munshi Aparna, Surabhi Somila, Bhatt Trushna, Kantharia Neha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent shift in lifestyle and behavioral patterns in population have caused an obesity epidemic during formative years. Present study evaluated existing health and nutrition policies in a private school in an urban Indian city and assessed prevalence of obesity in adolescent children & their association if any, with predictive behaviors of obesity. Methods: A private coeducational school located in an urban Indian city was selected and its existing health policies were evaluated using CDC’s School Health Index (SHI. Further, 5 teachers were assessed regarding their knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP of healthy dietary & lifestyle practices. Critical evaluation of school canteen services was also done. Total 273 adolescents (10-13 years were enrolled after taking informed consent. Prevalence of obesity & its relationship with modifiable risk factors (fast food & sweetened beverage intake, physical inactivity, low fruit & vegetable intake and increased television viewing was found by comparing behaviors amongst obese & non-obese adolescents. Their biochemical profile for assessment of anemia, dyslipidemia and high fasting blood sugar levels was also determined. Results: Current framework of school lacked clear health & nutrition policies. Canteen food service offered unhealthy food. Teachers had insufficient knowledge about healthy behaviors among children. Prevalence of overweight & obesity was 23.5%. Cumulative presence of >3 risk behaviors of obesity was significantly associated with its development (OR 2.07, 95% CI. Mean consumption of sweetened carbonated beverages by overweight and obese subjects was significantly higher (p<0.05 than non-obese. Conclusion: There is a need to sensitize school authorities and teachers about importance of a strong health and nutrition related policies and health promotion programs.

  16. 民办高中生源恶性竞争分析%Analysis of Malignant Competition on Private High School Matriculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆益强; 李宝石

    2011-01-01

    Private high school is one of the most important forces of high school education in China. With the increase demand of social education and the number of private high school, the malignant matriculate competition has begun in some places, which is in the reason of interest last. The indifference of Government departments and the education administrative deparlment besides the lack of supervision system lead to the mess environment in enrolment for private high school, It is urgent to change the school teaching principle and improve the teaching environment to have a pretty well-established supervision and evaluation mechanism in private high school.%民办高中是我国高中办学的一支重要力量。社会对教育的需求日益增加,民办高中学校不断增多,在某些地方出现了恶性生源竞争,导致民办学校招生混乱的局面。本文着力探讨为扭转这不利态势,改变学校的办学理念及改善教学环境,建立健全的民办学校办学行为的监督评价机制。

  17. Incidence and determinants of severity of unintentional injuries among students of private schools in Dubai: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altheeb, Ayesha; Hussein, Hamid; Al Faisal, Waleed; AlBehandy, Nusaiba; Alshareef, Nouf; Wasfy, Ahmed

    2017-02-21

    A cross-sectional study was performed on a student population in grades 7-12 in 10 private schools in Dubai in the academic year 2012/13. The study was in two phases. The first was used to estimate incidence rate of injuries, where the total injuries that took place in the schools in 2012 was divided by the total student population in the studied schools in the same year multiplied by 1000. The second was to study the determinants of severity through randomly selecting 1000 cases of injuries. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants after obtaining verbal consent. Sociodemographic characteristics showed that most (74.2%) of the students in this study were male and about half (57.3%) were aged 12-14 years. The incidence rate of injuries was 297.7/1000, and most of the injuries (88.9%) were mild. Poor school safety was blamed for most of the injuries, and falls were the most frequent type of injury.

  18. Homes and Frontiers: Literacy, Home Schooling, and Articulations of the Public and the Private

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluf, Phillip P.

    2009-01-01

    This interview-based study suggests that the home schooling movement represents another literacy crisis. Home-schooled students may define their commitments to the public sphere in ways that conflict with the assumptions of community literacy and other pedagogical projects. Home schoolers may adopt the values of the "literacy frontier,"…

  19. U.S. Federal Discrimination Law and Language and Culture Restrictions in K-12 Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdsley, Ralph; Cumming, Joy

    2013-01-01

    Section 1981 prohibits discrimination concerning the right to contract, and Title VI prohibits discrimination on the basis of the basis of race and national origin. The two cases that form the basis for the discussion in this article--"Silva v. St. Anne Catholic School" and "Doe v. Kamehameha Schools"--address whether culture…

  20. U.S. Federal Discrimination Law and Language and Culture Restrictions in K-12 Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdsley, Ralph; Cumming, Joy

    2013-01-01

    Section 1981 prohibits discrimination concerning the right to contract, and Title VI prohibits discrimination on the basis of the basis of race and national origin. The two cases that form the basis for the discussion in this article--"Silva v. St. Anne Catholic School" and "Doe v. Kamehameha Schools"--address whether culture…

  1. The Blended Learning Shift: New Report Shows Blended Learning Growing in U.S. Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Travis

    2015-01-01

    The technology conversation in independent schools has evolved considerably over the last five years. In particular, it has moved beyond the question of how can schools augment traditional classroom practices with hardware (laptops, interactive whiteboards, etc.) to the question of how software can improve outcomes and enable new learning models,…

  2. A Qualitative Inquiry on Teachers' Concerns about Decentralization and Privatization in One School in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael T.; Hudson, Roxanne

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a qualitative research project conducted at a public elementary school in a rural community in Guatemala. From analysis of interviews with teachers and the school administrator, we found that a key concern of participants was how they viewed the increasingly problematic relationship between their local educational…

  3. The Blended Learning Shift: New Report Shows Blended Learning Growing in U.S. Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Travis

    2015-01-01

    The technology conversation in independent schools has evolved considerably over the last five years. In particular, it has moved beyond the question of how can schools augment traditional classroom practices with hardware (laptops, interactive whiteboards, etc.) to the question of how software can improve outcomes and enable new learning models,…

  4. Leadership Support through Public-Private "Partnerships": Views of School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertkan, Sefika

    2011-01-01

    The English education system has been radically transformed over the last two decades. Throughout this period, the New Right and New Labour government policies have embraced the rhetoric of empowering schools to become self-managing institutions. In the course of this transformation, school leadership and management have become exceptionally…

  5. Technological preferences for teaching-learning a second language in Huichol communities and private high-schools in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Raúl César Romero

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research enquires about the Information and Communication Technologies preferences of students, teachers, and school principals in the teaching-learning process of a second language in 9th grade in two settings: Spanish for the Huichol people in a remote rural area and English for a private school in the city. The first case is situated in a rural Huichol community in the high mountain area of Jalisco, Mexico. The second one is located in a wealthy neighborhood in the Western Metropolitan area of Mexico City. A qualitative methodology with a heuristic and ethnographic design to investigate the reality of the daily use of technologies in both contexts for learning a second language. The instruments were the participant observation and in-depth interviews. Among the key findings are: (a the participants tend to favor the use of technology for second language learning, (b the bandwidth and the speed of the Internet is crucial to strengthen the immersion into the culture of a second language, (c Educational communities support electronic enquiring, (d there are similarities in the preferred search engines between the two populations, (e the equity of education is hindered by school desertions, and (f educational innovation requires that similar investigations take place to foster a full performance in the society of knowledge.

  6. Public and Private School Distinction, Regional Development Differences, and Other Factors Influencing the Success of Primary School Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulku, Seher Nur; Abdioglu, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing the success of students in primary schools in Turkey. TIMSS 2011 data for Turkey, measuring the success of eighth-grade students in the field of mathematics, were used in an econometric analysis, performed using classical linear regression models. Two hundred thirty-nine schools participated in the…

  7. The Policy Recommendations for Corporate Governance Structure of Private Vocational Schools%民办高职学校法人治理结构的政策建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬梅; 王义宁; 黎红艳

    2014-01-01

    Our private higher education is an important part of higher education, will inevitably be some problems in the development process, and establishing and improving the corporate governance structure of private universities is the fundamental way to solve these problems. On the basis of describing the principal policy and legal basis of the corporate governance of private vocational school, and analysing the problems of the laws and policies related to the corporate governance structure of private vocational schools, this paper put forward several policy recommendations for perfecting corporate governance structure of private vocational schools.%我国民办高等教育是高等教育的重要组成部分,在发展过程中不可避免会出现一些问题,而建立和完善民办高职学校的法人治理结构将是解决上述问题的根本途径。

  8. [Limits of self regulation of the private food sector: the case of removing of vending machines from schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Claude; Baudier, François

    2007-01-01

    Conflicts of interest between the food industry and public decision makers have increasingly multiplied over the last few years, especially within the context of implementing the French National Nutrition Programme. This paper describes the rhetoric and the strategies developed by the private sector in order to counter the law's implementation and enforcement based on a concrete example, namely, the removal of vending machines from schools. After having evoked possibilities of developing new partnerships as suggested by national and international health authorities, it reaffirms the right and the duty of the State to regulate within the framework of a health promotion policy, an approach which integrates the necessary open democratic public debate between the different sectors.

  9. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by both rotavirus and Shigella sonnei in a private school in Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutmoller, F; Azeredo, R S; Lacerda, M D; Barth, O M; Pereira, H G; Hoffer, E; Schatzmayr, H G

    1982-04-01

    In May 1980 an extensive outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in a private school in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Examination of faeces and paired sera showed that this outbreak was caused by both rotavirus and a virulent strain of Shigella sonnei. In the first 19 stool samples collected seven (37%) had rotavirus only, six (32%) had Sh. sonnei only, while four (21%) had both agents. Examination of the second and third stool collections revealed only the presence of Sh. sonnei. The 18 paired sera showed seroconversion for rotavirus in four cases (22%) and in seven cases (39%) for Sh. sonnei. The overall attack rate of the disease was approximately 75%, the nursery and kindergarten having higher attack rates. Students in all grades became sick at the same time, and the unimodal curve of the onset dates of symptoms indicates a common source outbreak. Evidence suggested a contaminated water supply.

  10. Psychological morbidity, job satisfaction and intentions to quit among teachers in private secondary schools in Edo-State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofili, A N; Usiholo, E A; Oronsaye, M O

    2009-01-01

    Teachers are an inseparable corner stone of the society and their satisfaction will affect the quality of service they render. Poor job satisfaction could result in job stress and this could affect their psychological health. This study aims to ascertain the level, causes of job dissatisfaction, intentions to quit and psychological morbidity among teachers in private secondary schools in a developing country. A cross-sectional study was conducted among teachers (392) in private secondary schools in Benin-City, Edo-State Nigeria, between June 2003 to November 2003. A total population of 400 teachers who had spent at least one year in the service were included in the study. The respondents completed a self-administered designed questionnaire and a standard instrument--The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ 28) The response rate was 98%. Fifty-eight (14.8%) of the respondents had psychological morbidity (GHQ score of 4 and above). One hundred and seventy-eight (45.4%) teachers were very satisfied or satisfied with their jobs. A significant number (45.9%) of teachers would want to quit their jobs. The proportion of teachers with GHQ score 4 and above increased with the level of dissatisfaction but this was not found to be statistically significant. Poor salary was found to be the main cause of job dissatisfaction and major reason for wanting to quit the job. This study shows a low level of job satisfaction among Nigerian teachers. Poor salary was the major cause of job dissatisfaction and intention to quit. Further work need to be done to ascertain the association of psychological morbidity and job dissatisfaction.

  11. Trends in Public and Private School Principal Demographics and Qualifications: 1987-88 to 2011-12. Stats in Brief. NCES 2016-189

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jason; Ottem, Randolph; DeRoche, John

    2016-01-01

    Using data from seven administrations of the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), this Statistics in Brief examines trends in public and private school principal demographics, experience, and compensation over 25 years, from 1987-88 through 2011-12. Data are drawn from the 1987-88, 1990-91, 1993-94, 1999-2000, 2003-04, 2007-08, and 2011-12 survey…

  12. Myths and Systems: A Response to "'He Needs to Talk!': A Chaplain's Case Study of Nonreligious Spiritual Care".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Denise

    2016-01-01

    In response to Chaplain Steve Nolan's case study, "He Needs to Talk: A Chaplain's Case Study of Nonreligious Spiritual Care," this article presents two areas for further examination: the concept of the idealized "good death" and Bowen family systems theory as a model of psychospiritual care for the family system. Chaplains are challenged to critically engage the predominant and often romanticized views of the ideal death in order to support patients and their loved ones through difficult deaths such as the one depicted in this case study. Utilizing Bowen's concept of triangles and the family genogram intervention, chaplains are encouraged to provide care encompassing their full scope of practice as psychospiritual caregivers for the entire family system.

  13. Options in Education, Transcript for December 8, 1975: Private School Desegration, Community College of Vermont, Child Abuse and Paralegal Worker Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript of the show contains discussions of the Supreme Court decision on private-school desegregation, the Community College of Vermont, child abuse, and learning how to be a paralegal worker. Participants in the program include John Merrow…

  14. 'No Mistakes in Dictation and Four Sums Right': The Political Debate Over the Compulsory Curriculum in Elementary and Private Schools, 1922-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Ron

    2002-01-01

    States that compulsory education was a politically charged subject from 1920-1930 in Great Britain. Declares the political battle centered around the Labour and Conservative parties. Points out the national curriculum movement did not effect the private schools until the 1970s. (KDR)

  15. The Level of Utilizing Blended Learning in Teaching Science from the Point of View of Science Teachers in Private Schools of Ajman Educational Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Derbashi, Khaled Y.; Abed, Osama H.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to define the level of utilizing blended learning in teaching science from the point of view of science teachers (85 male and female teachers) who are working in private schools of Ajman Educational Zone. The study also aims to find if there are significant differences according to gender, years of experience, or the fact that…

  16. Oral health status and treatment needs among 12- and 15-year-old government and private school children in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailee, Fotedar; Girish, M. Sogi; Kapil, R. Sharma; Nidhi, Pruthi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the dental caries, periodontal health, and malocclusion of school children aged 12 and 15 years in Shimla city and to compare them in government and private schools. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 12- and 15-year-old children in government and private schools was conducted in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India. A sample of 1011 school children (both males and females) was selected by a two-stage cluster sampling method. Clinical recordings of dental caries and malocclusion were done according to World Health Organization diagnostic criteria 1997. Periodontal health was assessed by Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs index. The data collected was analyzed by SPSS package 13. The statistical tests used were t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was 32.6% and 42.2% at 12 and 15 years, respectively. At the12 years of age, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.62 ± 1.42 and it was 1.06 ± 2.93 at 15 years of age. Females had higher level of caries than males at both the ages. At both ages, mean of decayed teeth was statistically higher in government schools as compared with private schools. Children in government schools had significantly less number of mean filled teeth at both ages as compared with private schools. The healthy component of gingiva was present in higher percentage of children in private schools as compared with government schools at both the age groups. The prevalence of malocclusion among the 12- year-old (58.1%) was more as compared with that among the 15-year-old (53.5%). Conclusion: The caries experience of 12- and 15-year-old children was low but the prevalence of gingivitis and malocclusion was quite high. Effective oral health promotion strategies need to be implemented to improve the oral health of school children further in Shimla city. PMID:24478980

  17. "Forest Grove School District v. T.A.": The Supreme Court and Unilateral Private Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Collins, Terri S.

    2010-01-01

    On June 22, 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in the case "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." (hereafter "Forest Grove"). In "Forest Grove," the High Court answered the question of whether the parents of students with disabilities are entitled to reimbursement for the costs associated with placing…

  18. Legitimacy through Alternate Means: Schools without Professionals in the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The new institutionalism predicts that professionalism is a key element of organizations' ability to be seen as legitimate. Emphasizing the professionalism and formal credentials of its members lends legitimacy to the organization, protecting it from scrutiny. What happens when this norm of professionalism is absent? How do schools legitimate…

  19. The Independent, Private Counselor: What Admission Officers and Secondary School Counselors Think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary K.; Fuller, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the role of the independent college counselor and reports the results of research on the perceptions of 125 college admission officers and 210 secondary school counselors toward this type of practitioner. Results showed mixed reactions to aspects of the independent counselor's role and doubts about the independent admission counselor's…

  20. Health profile of government aided private school children in urban slum of Solapur, Southern Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupali R. Rajput

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The present study shows pattern of morbidities and malnutrition among school children. Comprehensive periodic health check-up should be carried out for early diagnosis and treatment of the common morbidities. Further studies should be carried out to assess the impact of health education. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 2728-2733

  1. Private School Education in the U.S. An Annotated Bibliography, 1950-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songe, Alice H.

    This selective and annotated bibliography represents the body of literature published on nonpublic elementary and secondary education between 1950 and 1980, as well as some important titles that appeared in 1981. The work covers all aspects of independent and church-related schools--their aims and objectives, history, administration, and…

  2. Impact of Free Primary Education in Kenya: A Case Study of Private Schools in Kibera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James; Dixon, Pauline; Stanfield, James

    2008-01-01

    Free primary education (FPE) is widely assumed to be required to ensure that the poor gain enrolment. After the introduction of FPE (from January 2003) in Kenyan schools, huge increases in enrolment were officially reported. However, our research, conducted 10 months after the introduction of FPE in and around the informal settlement of Kibera,…

  3. Reconsidering the Tension between Bureaucracy and Professionalism in Publicly and Privately Funded Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honingh, M. E.; Hooge, E. H.

    2009-01-01

    This article sheds new light on the so-called "natural tension" between bureaucracy and professionalism in schools. As it is quite common in the educational field to appoint teachers, it is debatable whether the assumed tension really exists. It seems more reasonable to find hierarchical control "within" the professional group.…

  4. Measuring Spanish Orthographic Development in Private, Public and Subsidised Schools in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Lori; Delbridge, Anne; Parker, David; Arnal, Martina; Jara Mödinger, Luz

    2016-01-01

    The current study has a twofold purpose: first, to determine the reliability of a tool for assessing orthographic development in Spanish; second, to assess differences in students' performance on the measure across multiple types of primary schools in a large city in Chile. A Spanish developmental spelling inventory that contained words of…

  5. "Forest Grove School District v. T.A.": The Supreme Court and Unilateral Private Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Collins, Terri S.

    2010-01-01

    On June 22, 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in the case "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." (hereafter "Forest Grove"). In "Forest Grove," the High Court answered the question of whether the parents of students with disabilities are entitled to reimbursement for the costs associated with placing…

  6. To What Extent Does Hong Kong Primary School Students' Chinese Reading Comprehension Benefit from After-School Private Tuition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Shek Kam

    2014-01-01

    The reading attainment of the 3,875 primary 4 Hong Kong primary school students participating in the 2011 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study ranked first among 49 countries and regions surveyed worldwide. Analysis of the association between (a) participating students' reading attainment and (b) responses to questionnaires completed…

  7. 美国政府对私立学校的责任述评%A Review of Governmental Responsibilities for Private Schools in the US

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立; 刘华

    2012-01-01

      在美国教育现代化的进程中,联邦宪法立教条款在政府与私立学校之间所设置的严格壁垒开始瓦解。自20世纪初,在一系列联邦最高法院判例法的主张之下,美国政府对私立学校逐步形成了资助与管理并行的责任与立场。美国政府对私立学校的资助是在公、私学校对等的原则框架内展开,以学生资助为其基本的形式;政府对私立学校拥有管理权,但管理有合理的限度。联邦政府是私立学校的主要资助者,州政府的资助相对有限,但州政府是私立学校外部管理的主体。进入21世纪,越来越多的州通过教育券和教育费用税赋宽减等政策逐步加大对私立学校的公共资助,随之而来私立学校的政府规制将会增加%  From 1920s onward, governments have begun to render assistance to and put regulation on private schools under a series of US federal case laws. In a framework of equality, American governments provide private schools educational services and financial supports in the form of student assistance, to which students of public schools are also entitled. In the US, governments have the necessary power to regulate private schools. The Federal government is the major sponsor with the state government offering limited support but key administration. American governments’ regulation of private schools has been state-based, and exercised in a limited way. Since entering the 21st century, more states have begun to strengthen public assistance to private schools through voucher and tax credit, and thus US, private schools have to comply with a higher degree of government regulation.

  8. Land revenues, schools and literacy: a historical examination of public and private funding of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Latika

    2010-01-01

    Despite the centralised nature of the fiscal system in colonial India, public education expenditures varied dramatically across regions with the western and southern provinces spending three to four times as much as the eastern provinces. A significant portion of the inter-regional difference was due to historical differences in land taxes, an important source of provincial revenues in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. The large differences in public spending, however, did not produce comparable differences in enrollment rates or literacy in the colonial period. Nonetheless, public investments influenced the direction of school development and perhaps the long run trajectory of rural literacy.

  9. Spiritual character traits and leadership in the school workplace: An exploration of the relationship between spirituality and school leadership in some private and religiously affiliated schools in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco S. Dreyer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The South African educational system is in a crisis. This situation places huge demands on school principals and school management teams, and raises many theoretical and empirical questions. Transformational leadership is needed to deal with these challenges and complexities. Not all school leaders show the same level of transformational leadership. Some leaders conform more to other leadership styles. The aim of this article is to explore the relation between spiritual character traits and leadership styles from a theoretical and empirical perspective. The theoretical part focuses on the conceptualisation of leadership (styles and spirituality. The empirical research consists of a web-based survey conducted in some private and religiously affiliated schools in South Africa in 2011–2012. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ and Cloninger’s shortened Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-140 were used to measure leadership styles and spiritual traits respectively. Statistical procedures included confirmatory factor analysis, correlation (Pearson rho and regression analysis. Key findings are that leaders of private schools in South Africa mostly conform to a transformative leadership style, disagree with corrective leadership and strongly disagree with passive-avoidant leadership. Regarding the spiritual character traits they agree with self-transcendence and strongly agree with self-directedness. Spiritual character traits are strong predictors for transformational and passive-avoidant leadership. Higher levels of self-transcendence and self-directedness are strong predictors for transformational leadership. Our research suggests that traditional religious variables are less important as predictors of leadership style than spiritual character traits.

  10. [Prevalence of Depressive and Anxious Symptomatology in 14-18 ys-old Students from a Private School in Medellin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Carmenza Ricardo; Álvarez, Matilde; Prieto, Germán Valencia; Otálvaro, Felipe Tirado

    2012-09-01

    This study describes prevalence of depressive and anxious symptoms together with family, environmental and personal risk factors in a group of adolescents between 14 and 18 years of age in a private school of Medellín. An analytic observational cross sectional study was performed in 152 adolescents, evaluating sociodemographic aspects and prevalence of depressive and anxious symptomatology, as established through BDI-II and BAI. Average age was 15.4 ± 0.9 years old, with a 25% prevalence of anxiety symptoms and 25.7% of depressive symptoms. From the 38 (25%) students with BAI positive, 26 (68.4%) were BDI positive, and from the 39 (25.6%) students with BDI positive, 26 (66.7%) were BAI positive. the risk factors for anxiety and depressive symptomatology were: being a woman, being a victim of bullying and abuse. Having friends was the protective factors for depressive symptomatology. There was a statistical association between self-report of depressive and anxiety symptomatology; between the anxiety self-report and the depressive symptomatology; as well as between depressive and anxiety symptomatology and parents' perception of such symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. The Application of TBL Using Role Play to Introduce Vocabulary in Chi-na’s Private Language School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亭亭

    2015-01-01

    A specific application of task-based learning in teaching vocabulary to young learners and a complete task cycle using role play to present vocabulary in China’s private language school would be described in the study. The participants aged be⁃tween 7 and 9 are thought to be starters according to their language competence in Common European Framework of Reference for language. The rationale for stages in the task cycle will be fully explored with reference to Piaget and Vygotsky ’s theory in teaching young learners. The advantages of the adoption of TBL with young learners will be illustrated and some possible prob⁃lems in implementing TBL in China, a representative country of Confucian-heritage culture would also be discussed in the pa⁃per. The study indicates that young learners in China are quite welcome this new approach in their English classes, but the target⁃ed learners’age and background information need to be taken into consideration when actually implement this approach.

  12. Predicting obsessions and compulsions according to superego and ego characteristics: A comparison between scrupulosity and non-religious obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharat, Mohammad Ali; Kamali, Zeynab Sadat

    2016-02-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by intrusive images or impulses and/or ritualistic and rigid behaviors. Symptoms of OCD have different contents including contamination, harming and symmetry. Religion is one of the themes that has been observed in the context of OCD frequently. The aim of the present study was to examine the power of superego and ego characteristics in predicting scrupulosity and non-religious obsessions and compulsions, as well as comparing the two sets of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Sixty six Iranian (19 men, 47 women) participated in the study. All participants were asked to complete Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory, Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity, Perfectionism Cognitions Inventory, the Multidimensional Anger Inventory, and Ego Strength Scale. Results showed that perfectionism and anger were positively correlated with scrupulosity and non-religious obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Ego control was negatively correlated with scrupulosity, while ego resiliency was not correlated with any of these two sets of symptoms. Regression analysis indicated that among these variables, anger was the best predictor of non-religious obsessive-compulsive symptoms, while perfectionism and ego control were the best predictors of scrupulosity.

  13. The Current Situation of Students’ Participatation in Extracurricular Sports Activities of Private Middle School in Henan Province and the Analysis of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Wang

    By using the methods of document literature, questionnaire survey and mathematical statistics, this paper investigates and analyses the cuurent situation of students' participation in extrucurricular sports activities of 36 private middle schools in Henan province which have legal education procedures through the following aspects: the attitude, motivation, times, duration, selection of programs, and influential factors of participating in extracurricular sports activities. Based on the investigation and analysis, this paper points out the existing problems and puts forward suggestions

  14. Judgments about Fact and Fiction by Children from Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Chen, Eva E.; Harris, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies, 5-and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included…

  15. Judgments about Fact and Fiction by Children from Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Chen, Eva E.; Harris, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies, 5-and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included…

  16. Privatizing Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California…

  17. Privatizing Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California legislation…

  18. Prevalence of overweight among students of public and private elementary and middle schools in Sorocaba, state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Maria Pardo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in a sample of students and investigate the correlation between BMI (body mass index and family income. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted with 213 primary school students of public (PUS and private (PRS schools, aged between 10 and 14 years. This study was approved by the local Ethics Committee, and students and parents who were willing to participate could only do it by signing a consent form. Students were weighed and measured, and the BMI was calculated, the resulting data were evaluated according to the WHO BMI charts related to sex. The students answered a questionnaire on socioeconomic status according to the ‘ABEP’ charts. Data analysis was performed using SPSS, with 5% significance level. Results: The total prevalence of overweight in the sample studied was of 41.3%. Comparing the individual results, the frequency of overweight was higher for private school (47.3% than for public school (32.1% children, with statistical significance (p=0.03. The frequency of overweight among PRS boys was higher than among the PUS boys (23.3% versus 14.3%, p=0.05. In girls, the same trend was observed, but with no statistical significance (24.0% versus 17.9%, p=0.18. There was a positive correlation between BMI and family income (r=0.14, p=0.04. Conclusion: About 40% of the students who participated in the study were overweight, with higher prevalence among private school boys. It is important to establish strategies to prevent obesity at all levels of society, considering the potential health risks for those overweight children when they reach adulthood.

  19. Social factors associated to binge drinking: a cross-sectional survey among Brazilian students in private high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Zila M; Martins, Silvia S; Opaleye, Emerita S; Moura, Yone G; Locatelli, Danilo P; Noto, Ana R

    2011-03-31

    Binge drinking (BD) seems to be related to health and social complications among adolescents. Considering that knowledge about BD in developing countries is limited and that in Brazil high socioeconomic status is a risk factor for alcohol abuse, this study sheds light about this phenomenon among adolescents from a different cultural background than prior North-American and European studies. Brazilian students (n = 2691) selected through a representative, stratified and clustered sampling method were asked to answer a self-report questionnaire. The questionnaire contained questions about patterns of alcohol consumption, religious beliefs, leisure activities, family structure and relationships. Data were analyzed with basic contingency tables with Chi-square tests followed by a decision tree analysis and weighted logistic regression. Almost thirty-five percent of the students reported recent binge drinking. BD in the past month was positively associated with older age (aOR = 1.5[1.2-1.7]), male gender (aOR = 1.5[1.2-2.0]) going out with friends almost every night (aOR = 33.9[14.2-80.7]), not living with mother (aOR = 2.4[1.3-4.7]), believing in God with little conviction (aOR = 1.6[1.2-2.0]) and rarely talking to parents about anything (aOR = 1.7[1.3-2.2]) or always about drugs (aOR = 1.8[1.3-2.5]). Factors inversely associated with BD were: paying lower monthly tuition fees (aOR = 0.5[0.4-0.9]), living with people who do not get drunk (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.7]) and frequent engagement in worships (aOR = 0.7[0.5-0.9]). The habit of BD in adolescents enrolled in private high schools in Brazil is strongly linked to the frequency with which they go out with friends at night. Factors such as religiosity, expressed by trust in God and participation in worship, and being enrolled in a school with cheaper tuition fees were associated with avoidance of BD in this population.

  20. Sintomas depressivos em adolescentes de um colégio particular Depressive symptoms in adolescents of a private school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Humberto Rodrigues Rocha

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o índice de sintomas depressivos, bem como sua distribuição por gênero e série, dos alunos de um colégio particular, da cidade de Uberaba-MG, no final do segundo e do terceiro ano do Ensino Médio e no 'cursinho pré-vestibular', próximo ao concurso vestibular. Foram avaliados 791 estudantes, utilizando o questionário SRQ-20 - Self Reporting Questionnaire, um instrumento desenvolvido pela Organização Mundial da Saúde com 20 questões, que serve para rastrear e avaliar a ocorrência de transtornos mentais comuns, dentre eles a depressão, na população geral. Foram encontradas duas vezes mais sintomatologia depressiva no sexo feminino e um aumento do indicativo de depressão de acordo com o progresso acadêmico dos sujeitos. Conclui-se que existe a presença de sintomas depressivos em 45,7% da amostra, com maior prevalência de casos no sexo feminino. Foi sugerido acompanhamento psicológico aos alunos.This research has the main objective of evaluating the psychological condition of students at a private high school in the city of Uberaba-MG, Brazil. Evaluations were performed in the end of the second and third grades in high school and prior to doing the exams required to enter college/university. 791 students were evaluated using the SRQ-20 - Self Reporting Questionnaire. This test was devised by the World Health Organization and consists of 20 questions about symptoms and problems commonly seen in people with neurotic disorders. There were twice as many females in the group with symptoms of depression, with an increase of depression as the female students were approaching the university entrance exams. The manifestation of depression symptoms was noticed in 45,7% of the samples with a bigger prevalence of cases among women. The students have been advised to undergo psychological follow-up treatment.

  1. What hearing children think regarding the inclusion of deaf children in the regular classroom: a comparative study with Brazilian children in a public and a private school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vargas Dorneles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how hearing children relate to the presence of a deaf child in a classroom group. An analysis is made of the influence of social class in relation to the acceptance of the deaf child by the hearing children. The 144 children from the 3rd to 5th series that participated in the study were distributed thus: 76 from a private school and 68 from a public school, both from Porto Alegre, RS. The public school largely attended lower level socioeconomic classes, while the private school attended pupils from predominantly middle to upper social classes. All received the same task: Complete a story that describes the reaction of hearing students to the insertion of a new deaf colleague in the classroom group. The study demonstrates that pupils wish to attempt to communicate with the deaf child and would socialize with the child outside the classroom. They demonstrate a somewhat protective discourse in relation to the subject who they consider disabled but not incapable of communicating. Understanding how hearing children relate to, and include a deaf child within the classroom, raises the possibility of new forms of thinking regarding the preparation of hearing children to possible inclusion processes. Recognizing their ideas, feelings and forms of communication aids educational institutions to invest in inclusion policies.

  2. Correlação entre WISC e rendimento escolar na escola pública e na escola particular Correlation between WISC and school performance in public and private schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álida Dal Vesco

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho compara resultados do WISC com rendimento escolar , no sentido de correlacionar medidas psicométricas de inteligência com critérios de rendimento escolar, a fim de aperfeiçoar a capacidade diagnóstica e preditiva do teste. Participaram 20 alunos (10 de escola pública e 10 de escola particular, de 5ª a 8ª séries, com idade entre 8,7 a 13,2 anos, do grupo considerado com um bom desempenho. Não houve correlação significativa entre resultados do WISC e rendimento escolar. Comparando escolas, os alunos da rede particular tiveram pontuações significativamente melhores em Compreensão [t(2,18= 2,78; pThis study compared performance on the WISC with school grades in na attempt to improve the diagnostic and predictive capacity of the test in Brazil. Twenty students (10 from a public school and 10 from a private school, attending the fifth through the eighth grade, 8.7 to 13.2 years old, from a group classified as having high performance participated in the study. There was no significant correlation between the WISC results and school performance. Comparing the schools, the students from the private school network obtained scores significantly higher in Comprehension, Vocabulary, and Coding. However, no significant difference was found with respect to grades. This finding was explained based on the peculiarities of school programs.

  3. Private Moments

    OpenAIRE

    Paul R. Reed; Carol J. Cumber

    2000-01-01

    In October, 1996 Private Moments, an adult novelty store, opened for business in Huntsville, Texas. Huntsville had no ordinances in place to prevent the opening of this type of business. In fact, the local Small Business Development Center provided guidance and assistance to Edward Delagarza, the founder and owner of Private Moments. Many of the Huntsville citizens, unhappy with the opening of Private Moments, approached the City Council requesting that it be closed immediately and asked for ...

  4. Private prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimovski Darko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The author, based on the circumstances that contributed to the creation of private prisons, has explained the historical development of private prisons in the United States and Great Britain. After that, the author has analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of the prison run by private companies. Namely, the author has, stating the benefits of private prisons (reduced overcrowding penitencijarnih institution, cheaper accommodation cost per prisoner, provide better services, the possibility of applying a new philosophy in the manner of execution of sentence, with modern Penitentiary program, with the aim of re-socialization and the reduction of recidivism and weaknesses of the private prisons (the question of legitimac, a chronic lack of space in the Penitentiary system is not solved, business-oriented policies of private prisons, less salaries, poor performance of the security service, worst food, weak enforcement of parole, lack of appropriate penitentiary program, wanted to draw attention to the professional public about controversy of the introduction private companies in the management structure of penitentiary institutions . As the Republic of Serbia is, constantly in the last twenty years, faced with the increasing number of inmates, as well as the chronic shortage of money, which affects on the situation in industrial areas of prisons, there are options to give licenses to private companies to manage prisons. Therefore, the author has paid special attention to potential problems of introducing private prisons in the penitentiary system in Serbia.

  5. From Scratch to Notch: Understanding Private Tutoring Metamorphosis in the Philippines from the Perspectives of Cram School and Formal School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Belinda V.; de Guzman, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    Although there is considerable anecdotal evidence that the scale of private tutoring is substantial in the Philippines, attempts to document its existence is limited. Using phenomenological inquiry, this study aimed to provide a more eidetic portrait of private tutoring transformation in the Philippines from the perspectives and collective…

  6. Impact of influenza vaccination on respiratory illness rates in children attending private boarding schools in England, 2013-2014: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, N; Green, H K; Andrews, N; Pryse, R; Baguelin, M; Sunderland, A; Ellis, J; Pebody, R

    2015-12-01

    Several private boarding schools in England have established universal influenza vaccination programmes for their pupils. We evaluated the impact of these programmes on the burden of respiratory illnesses in boarders. Between November 2013 and May 2014, age-specific respiratory disease incidence rates in boarders were compared between schools offering and not offering influenza vaccine to healthy boarders. We adjusted for age, sex, school size and week using negative binomial regression. Forty-three schools comprising 14 776 boarders participated. Almost all boarders (99%) were aged 11-17 years. Nineteen (44%) schools vaccinated healthy boarders against influenza, with a mean uptake of 48·5% (range 14·2-88·5%). Over the study period, 1468 respiratory illnesses were reported in boarders (5·66/1000 boarder-weeks); of these, 33 were influenza-like illnesses (ILIs, 0·26/1000 boarder-weeks) in vaccinating schools and 95 were ILIs (0·74/1000 boarder-weeks) in non-vaccinating schools. The impact of vaccinating healthy boarders was a 54% reduction in ILI in all boarders [rate ratio (RR) 0·46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·28-0·76]. Disease rates were also reduced for upper respiratory tract infections (RR 0·72, 95% CI 0·61-0·85) and chest infections (RR 0·18, 95% CI 0·09-0·36). These findings demonstrate a significant impact of influenza vaccination on ILI and other clinical endpoints in secondary-school boarders. Additional research is needed to investigate the impact of influenza vaccination in non-boarding secondary-school settings.

  7. Candidates Profile in FUVEST Exams from 2004 to 2013: Private and Public School Distribution, FUVEST Average Performance and Chemical Equilibrium Tasks Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S.A.P. Oliveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Chemical equilibrium is recognized as a topic of several misconceptions. Its origins must be tracked from previous scholarship. Its impact on biochemistry learning is not fully described. A possible bulk of data is the FUVEST exam. OBJECTIVES: Identify students’ errors profile on chemical equilibrium tasks using public data from FUVEST exam. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data analysis from FUVEST were: i Private and Public school distribution in Elementary and Middle School, and High School candidates of Pharmacy-Biochemistry course and total USP careers until the last call for enrollment (2004-2013; ii Average performance in 1st and 2nd parts of FUVEST exam of Pharmacy-Biochemistry, Chemistry, Engineering, Biological Sciences, Languages and Medicine courses and total enrolled candidates until 1st call for enrollment (2008- 2013; iii Performance of candidates of Pharmacy-Biochemistry, Chemistry, Engineering, Biological Sciences, Languages and Medicine courses and total USP careers in chemical equilibrium issues from 1st part of FUVEST (2011-2013. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: i 66.2% of candidates came from private Elementary-Middle School courses and 71.8%, came from High School courses; ii Average grade over the period for 1st and 2nd FUVEST parts are respectively (in 100 points: Pharmacy-Biochemistry 66.7 and 61.2, Chemistry 65.9 and 58.9, Engineering 75.9 and 71.9, Biological Sciences 65.6 and 54.6, Languages 49.9 and 43.3, Medicine 83.5 and 79.5, total enrolled candidates 51,5 and 48.9; iii Four chemical equilibrium issues were found during 2011-2013 and the analysis of multiplechoice percentage distribution over the courses showed that there was a similar performance of students among them, except for Engineering and Medicine with higher grades, but the same proportional distribution among choices. CONCLUSION: Approved students came majorly from private schools. There was a different average performance among courses and similar on

  8. Orthodontic treatment need in Dubai school adolescents: a study of 20,000 school-age adolescents in 66 public and private schools comparing orthodontic treatment need by gender and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jeshi, Ameena; Al-Mulla, Anas; Ferguson, Donald J

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare and contrast the orthodontic treatment needs of Dubai school-age school age children as a function of gender and ethnicity. A total of 20,880 subjects were screened in 66 public and private school located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The study sample was grouped according to seven geographic regions. The total sample included 9,765 females and 11,115 males. Ages ranged from 9.08 years to 24.4 years with an overall mean age of 14.5 years. Calibrated dentists examined school age children using Peer Assessment Rating Index (PAR). PAR scores were translated to Index for Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) scores based upon the description of each of the 31 IOTN line item descriptions that constitute IOTN grades from 1 to 5. Upon completion, statistical comparison of the study variables by gender and ethnicity was applied. Evaluation of IOTN grade by gender demonstrated significantly higher male (2.52) than female (2.47, p=0.002) grade; comparison of IOTN grade by region showed South Asia (2.58) significantly higher than Middle East (2.43). IOTN grade was highest for South Asia males (2.62) which was significantly higher than South Asia females (2.55, p=0.023) and higher than both Middle East males and females (2.45 and 2.41, p=.000). Moreover, average South Asia female IOTN grade was significantly higher (p=0.000) than for both Middle East males and females. Conclusions 1. In Dubai school-aged adolescents, 53.2% of the study sample would benefit from orthodontic treatment and 14.4% were profiled as "treatment require". 2. Within the Middle East region, UAE subjects had higher mean IOTN grade than subjects from Iran, Syria and Yemen. 3. India males had significantly higher mean IOTN grades than Middle East male and female subjects from UAE, Iran, Syria, and Yemen. 4. India females had significantly higher mean IOTN grades than Middle East female subjects from UAE, Iran, Syria, and Yemen. It may be concluded that males and females

  9. Private Education Provision and Public Finance: The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, Harry Anthony

    2013-01-01

    One of the key features of the Dutch education system is freedom of education--freedom to establish schools and organize teaching. Almost 70% of schools in the Netherlands are administered by private school boards, and all schools are government funded equally. This allows school choice. Using an instrument to identify private school attendance,…

  10. 论民办学校营利性规定的法律问题%Legal Issues on the Profit Provisions in Private Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小锋; 吕淼淼

    2011-01-01

    In the Private Education Promotion Law,"reasonable return" is considered to be the highlight in private education legislation,however there are some legal issues which greatly reduce the effectiveness in the real world.Among them,the concept of profit lacks its legislation definition,the argument between profit and public welfare never stops,"reasonable return" has been misinterpreted and it lacks its supporting systems and related provisions of the law.So the regulations for the profit on private schools should be perfected.%《民办教育促进法》中"合理回报"的规定被认为是民办教育立法中的最大亮点,然而这一规定存在着一定的法律问题,使其在现实中的效用并不理想。其中,"营利性"概念的立法界定的缺失,营利性与公益性的争论不休,"合理回报"被曲解及其在现实中缺乏配套制度,以及与相关法律的规定存在冲突等较为突出,需要我们对民办学校营利性规定加以完善。

  11. The Impact of Public Private Partnerships on Education: A Case Study of Sewell Group Plc and Victoria Dock Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Helen; Davies, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the implications of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) for education delivery, attainment, attitude, behaviour and attendance. Partnership success factors are identified, and transferable lessons extracted. Barriers to the success of the partnership are explored and suggestions for improvement are…

  12. Hard Lines and Soft Scenes: Constituting Masculinities in the Prospectuses of All-Boys Elite Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Kristina; Wardman, Natasha; Edgeworth, Kathryn; Hutchesson, Rachael; Saltmarsh, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, education researchers have been concerned with the "impression management" activities of schools in the current climate of school corporatisation. Among these activities is the dissemination of school prospectuses that, far from being merely arbitrary sources of information, are seen as strategic texts that…

  13. The Role of Religion in 21st-Century Public Schools: Historic Perspectives on God and Goodness in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven P.; Sheffield, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    No other educational issue hits a more sensitive nerve with the American public than the role of religion in the public schools. While the intentions and actions of the religious and non-religious parents and community members overlap a great deal as they conceive of the good people they want their children to become, there is no apparent…

  14. The atmospheric pollution in the context of the environmental education: experiences and challenges in the interdisciplinary work at a private school in Contagem-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Ângelo Silva Costa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims, as its general objective, to raise, by means of interviews with the teachers involved, issues on the obstacles of the application of the interdisciplinary project of environmental education with emphasis on atmospheric pollution, at a private school in Contagem, in Minas Gerais State. The development was based on methodological procedures performed by means of a bibliographical research and case study, having as subject of the research high school teachers and the pedagogic coordinator who work in the morning at a downtown school in the municipal district of Contagem. The techniques used for the collection of data were the semi-structuralized interviews and reports derived from the interdisciplinary project developed. The results have demonstrated that the development of projects that have the interdisciplinary as their goal, even being a theme of the teachers' general knowledge, still faces a series of challenges that go from the absence of schools infrastructure and the directors' general support, to issues related to the absence of a more complete pedagogic political project which, in fact, contemplates subjects of the students' real interest. Keywords: Environment; Pollution; Interdisciplinary; Projects; Environmental Education

  15. Non-religious Christians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Day

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholars who recently rejected secularisation theses on the grounds that they were insufficiently defined or contextualised now seem to be accepting with unseemly, uncritical haste, the new, in vogue notion of the post-secular. Scholars seem tempted to drop the term ‘post-secular’ into their papers and presentations as if it is a generally accepted and understood term. It is not and nor, as this paper will argue, is it plausible unless applied to a limited and specific range of phenomena. Far from disappearing, religion is often used publicly as a marker of group identity. This is not a return to religion, or a resurgence in spirituality, but a fluctuating form of contextualised religious identity. Christian nominalists may not believe in God or Jesus, at least if belief is understood as ‘faith’. It would be incorrect, however, to dismiss them as ‘unbelievers’, or their nominalist beliefs as not having essential or substantive reality. They believe in many things, usually related to ‘belonging’. By closely examining people’s sense of Christian ‘belonging’, we find other more subtle, interwoven ‘belongings’ related to, for example, history, nation, morality, gender, and ‘culture’.

  16. Prevalence and factors associated with overweight and obesity among private kindergarten school children in Bahirdar Town, Northwest Ethiopia: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Yoseph; Derso, Terefe; Alene, Kefyalew Addis; Wassie, Molla Mesele

    2017-01-04

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, most nutrition efforts have concentrated on under-nutrition in children. However, national surveys rarely report the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among children. Likewise, in Ethiopia there is growing recognition of the emergence of a "double-burden" of malnutrition, with under and over nutrition occurring simultaneously among children, especially allied with improvements in socio-economic conditions. Hence, the study aimed to assess the prevalence and factors associated with overweight and obesity among private kindergarten school children aged 3-6 years in Bahirdar town, Northwest Ethiopia. A school-based cross sectional study was conducted in Bahirdar Town, northwest Ethiopia from August to September, 2015. Anthropometric measurements such as weight and height were taken from 462 private Kindergarten preschool children aged 3-6 years; socio-economic and demographic factors and feeding practices were collected by interviewing the, mothers or caregivers of the children. The z-score values for BMI-for-age of children were generated using Emergency Nutrition Assessment (ENA) for Standardized Monitoring and Assessment of Relief Transitions (SMART) 2011. Binary logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with overweight and obesity in children. Odds ratio with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated to show the strength of association. The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity was 6.9% [95% CI 2.4, 11.4]. The prevalence of overweight and obesity were 4.1 and 2.8%, respectively. The odds of overweight and obesity was higher among children with high dietary diversity score (DDS) [AOR = 5.12, 95% CI 1.42, 18.47], family size of less than five [AOR = 4.76, 95% CI 1.84, 12.31] and a family having a private car [AOR = 3.43, 95% CI 1.02, 11.49]. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among private kindergarten preschool children in the study area was high. Interventions on improving feeding

  17. Let's move salad bars to schools: a public-private partnership to increase student fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Diane M; Seymour, Jennifer; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence; Cooper, Ann; Collins, Beth; DiSogra, Lorelei; Marshall, Andrew; Evans, Nona

    2012-08-01

    Few school-age youth consume the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, and increasing fruit and vegetable intake in children and adolescents is an important public health goal to maintain long-term good health and to decrease risk of chronic disease and obesity. School salad bars are an important tool to promote fruit and vegetable consumption among schoolchildren. Studies show that introduction of school salad bars increases the amount and variety of fruits and vegetables consumed by children in schools. However, many schools cannot afford the capital investment in the salad bar equipment. In 2010, the National Fruit & Vegetable Alliance (NFVA), United Fresh Produce Association Foundation, the Food Family Farming Foundation, and Whole Foods Market launched Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools (LMSB2S) in support of First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! initiative. The goal of LMSB2S is to place 6000 salad bars in schools over 3 years. As of June, 2012, over 1400 new salad bar units have been delivered to schools across the United States, increasing access to fruits and vegetables for over 700,000 students. Any K through 12 school district participating in the National School Lunch Program is eligible to submit an application at www.saladbars2schools. org/. Requests for salad bar units ($2625 each unit) are fulfilled through grassroots fund raising in the school community and through funds raised by the LMSB2S partners from corporate and foundation sources. LMSB2S is a model for coalition-building across many government, nonprofit, and industry partners to address a major public health challenge.

  18. Horizons at Brooklyn Friends School: How a Public-Private Partnership Creates Equity and Opportunity in Downtown Brooklyn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kamauru

    2016-01-01

    The building that houses Brooklyn Friends School's (New York) preschool, lower, and middle divisions stands on a quiet one-way street in an otherwise bustling downtown Brooklyn business district. After most students head home for the day, others come to the school to participate in the Horizons Program. The Horizons Program at Brooklyn Friends…

  19. Socio-Economic Segregation of Disadvantaged Children between Schools in Pakistan: Comparing the State and Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of children in different school-types and regions in Pakistan suggests that access and opportunities in education are not evenly accessible for many children. Segregation at school level is an important concern for equity and social justice because the adverse effects of segregation increase the pre-existing gap in opportunities…

  20. 清末东北地区私塾改良述论%Study on the Private School Reform in the Northeast Region during the Late Qing Dynasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高月

    2011-01-01

    Private school reform is the important content of education reform during the late Qing Dynasty.The unsuccessful situation of new school development is the important reason for which the Qing Dynasty reforms the private school.The local government in the northeast region reformed the private school by setting up management organization,improving the private school teacher,reforming the content and paying attention to the connecting between the new learning and old learning.Although the reform did not transform the private school to the new school and did not realize the transformation of education model from traditional one to modern one,the central government infiltrated state power to the traditional education area and brought the traditional education model into the education system controlled by the central government.%私塾改良是清末教育改革的重要内容,新式学堂发展的乏力是清政府进行私塾改良的重要原因。东北地方当局通过设立私塾管理机构、改良塾师、改良教授内容和注重新学与旧学的衔接等手段对私塾进行了改良。东北私塾改良并未达到将私塾转换为小学的预期目标,在形式上并未实现教育模式由传统向现代的转变。但清政府通过私塾改良将国家权力渗透入传统教育领域,将传统教育模式纳入了由政府主导的教育体系中。

  1. Consumo de energia e macronutrientes por adolescentes de escolas públicas e privadas Energy and macronutrients consumption by adolescents from public private schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Mourão KAZAPI

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a adequação do consumo de energia e macronutrientes em adolescentes de escolas públicas (EPU e privadas (EPR do município de Florianópolis, SC. A amostra constou de 797 estudantes: 466 (228 meninas e 238 meninos de EPU e 331 (175 meninas e 156 meninos de EPR. Os dados foram obtidos através do método recordatório de 24 horas. Observou-se que aproximadamente 50% dos adolescentes apresentaram consumo energético insuficiente e mais da metade tiveram um consumo adequado de carboidratos. Entre os adolescentes do sexo masculino que apresentaram alto consumo de carboidratos, houve maior prevalência na rede pública (12,6% EPU e 3,8% EPR. Mais da metade dos estudantes apresentaram alto consumo de proteínas (54,3% EPU e 58,9% EPR, havendo maior prevalência entre os de sexo masculino (61,7% masculino e 50,6% feminino. Apenas 30,5% dos estudantes das EPU e 36,5% das EPR apresentaram consumo adequado de lipídios; ressalta-se o elevado percentual de adolescentes com alto consumo deste nutriente (33,9% EPU e 39,0% EPR. Entre os estudantes que apresentaram baixo consumo de lipídios, houve maior prevalência dos adolescentes do sexo masculino (35,3% masculino e 26,8% feminino, estudantes da EPU (41,6% EPU e 25,6% EPR. Pode-se concluir que o padrão alimentar apresentado por estes adolescentes pode estar associado a riscos para a saúde na vida adulta.The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of energy and macronutrients consumption in adolescent students from public (EPU and private schools (EPR of Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina. The sample consisted of 797 students: 466 (228 female and 238 male from public schools and 331 (175 female and 156 male from private schools. The informations were obtained using the 24-hour recall method. It was observed that around 50% of the adolescents presented insufficient energy intake and more than 50% of them had adequate consumption of carbohydrates. The

  2. The Impact of Organizational Climate on Burnout among Homeroom Teachers and Special Education Teachers (Full Classes/Individual Pupils) in Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavian, Rivka Hillel

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a quantitative research study designed to examine the impact of organizational climate on burnout among homeroom and special education teachers working in Israeli state (non-religious) schools. The research literature identifies various causes for teacher burnout, offering evidence that special education teachers experience…

  3. The Impact of Organizational Climate on Burnout among Homeroom Teachers and Special Education Teachers (Full Classes/Individual Pupils) in Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavian, Rivka Hillel

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a quantitative research study designed to examine the impact of organizational climate on burnout among homeroom and special education teachers working in Israeli state (non-religious) schools. The research literature identifies various causes for teacher burnout, offering evidence that special education teachers experience…

  4. "When he's around his brothers … he's not so quiet": the private and public worlds of school-aged children with speech sound disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Daniel, Graham; Barr, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Children interact with people in context: including home, school, and in the community. Understanding children's relationships within context is important for supporting children's development. Using child-friendly methodologies, the purpose of this research was to understand the lives of children with speech sound disorder (SSD) in context. Thirty-four interviews were undertaken with six school-aged children identified with SSD, and their siblings, friends, parents, grandparents, and teachers. Interview transcripts, questionnaires, and children's drawings were analyzed to reveal that these children experienced the world in context dependent ways (private vs. public worlds). Family and close friends typically provided a safe, supportive environment where children could be themselves and participate in typical childhoods. In contrast, when out of these familiar contexts, the children often were frustrated, embarrassed, and withdrawn, their relationships changed, and they were unable to get their message across in public contexts. Speech-language pathology assessment and intervention could be enhanced by interweaving the valuable insights of children, siblings, friends, parents, teachers, and other adults within children's worlds to more effectively support these children in context. 1. Recognize that children with SSD experience the world in different ways, depending on whether they are in private or public contexts. 2. Describe the changes in the roles of family and friends when children with SSD are in public contexts. 3. Discover the position of the child as central in Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model. 4. Identify principles of child-friendly research. 5. Recognize the importance of considering the child in context during speech-language pathology assessment and intervention. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ready-to-eat cereals are key sources of selected micronutrients among schoolchildren from public and private elementary schools in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Bethancourt, Gabriela; Vossenaar, Marieke; Kuijper, Lothar D; Doak, Colleen M; Solomons, Noel W

    2009-05-01

    This cross-sectional dietary survey aimed to assess the consumption and relative nutrient contribution of ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) among schoolchildren from 2 social classes in an urban center in the Guatemalan province of Quetzaltenango. A total of 449 24-hour dietary records were collected using a pictorial workbook registry method among third- and fourth-grade schoolchildren. The sample population was divided between low-income, public school attendants (n = 219) and students from higher-income private institutions (n = 230). We described the contribution of RTEC to estimated total energy; carbohydrates; protein; fat; vitamins A, C, and D; thiamin; riboflavin; folate; calcium; iron; and zinc over the 24-hour interval of registry. Approximately 41% of the subjects mentioned RTEC at least once in their 24-hour record; 93% of these at breakfast time. From the 7 RTEC varieties reported, 4 were presweetened. Estimated cereal consumption was significantly higher among private school participants (P < .001). The RTEC contributed 2.4% of estimated total energy across the whole sample and 3.6% of total carbohydrate; iron intake from RTEC was 21% of total, whereas less than 1% of calcium intake came from this source. Among the subgroup of cereal consumers, RTEC accounted for more than 40% of their daily recommendation intake for iron, vitamin C, thiamin, and riboflavin. The RTEC consumers had significantly higher intakes for all nutrients except carbohydrate and riboflavin as compared with nonconsumers. This study demonstrates the importance of RTEC as a key source of several selected micronutrients to schoolchildren's diet in this setting.

  6. Private Challenges to Public Dominance: The Resurgence of Private Education in the Pearl River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ka-Ho

    1997-01-01

    Examines the policy context in which private education has emerged in post-Mao China. Uses three case studies of private schools/colleges to explore how intellectuals and educators in the Pearl River Delta (Guangdong province) have persevered to assert their academic independence, offer a new agenda for education, and redefine the private-public…

  7. Depressão e ansiedade em adolescentes de escolas públicas e privadas Depression and anxiety in adolescents from public and private schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana D’Arc Vila Nova Jatobá

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar prevalência de depressão e de ansiedade em adolescentes matriculados e freqüentando escolas públicas e privadas da cidade do Recife - Pernambuco. MÉTODOS: Por meio de estudo de prevalência, de base populacional, admitindo população de 10.414 alunos das redes pública e privada, prevalência de depressão e transtornos depressivos de 20,3%, precisão de 5% e nível de significância de 0,05, a amostragem aleatória e estratificada incluiu 243 alunos, do ensino fundamental e médio de 11 escolas, com idade de 14 a 16 anos. As variáveis foram: idade, religião, tipo, adscrição e porte da escola, escolaridade, tempo de estudo, condição estudantil e laboral, características do núcleo familiar, sexo, estado civil, tipo de pele segundo escala de Fitzpatrick (investigadas por questionário demográfico e grau de depressão e de ansiedade pelas escalas de Hamilton. Para análise estatística, empregou-se programa Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULTADOS: As prevalências de sintomas depressivos expressivos e de ansiedade igualaram-se a 59,9% e 19,9%, respectivamente. Foram significativas as associações de sintomas depressivos de intensidade grave com o sexo feminino e a crença religiosa diferentes da corrente do cristianismo. A ideação suicida/tentativa de suicídio foi referida por 34,3% dos estudantes. Houve associação significativa de ideação suicida com grau leve ou moderado de sintomas depressivos e moderado de ansiedade, assim como de tentativa de suicídio com sintomas depressivos graves, estudo em escola privada e ansiedade severa. CONCLUSÕES: A gravidade das características psicopatológicas em uma idade tão jovem está a merecer uma intervenção psicossocial para reduzir suas repercussões para o futuro.OBJETIVE: To identify depression and anxiety prevalences within adolescents registered and frequenting public and private schools in the city of Recife - Pernambuco. METHODS: According

  8. Desigualdades educativas estruturais no Brasil: entre estado, privatização e descentralização Structural schooling inequalities in Brazil: between state, privatization and descentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. AKKARI

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, mais que em outros países do Sul, a escola constitui um produto social desigualmente distribuído. Seu acesso é modulado não apenas por múltiplos padrões distintivos (categoria socioeconômica, sexo, etnicidade, local de residência…, como também pelo tipo de rede escolar freqüentado (pública, particular. Este artigo analisa a constituição histórica e progressiva de uma escolarização em várias velocidades. O discurso político republicano, que insiste sobre a função homogeneizadora e igualitária da escola que socializa em comum e fabrica cidadãos iguais, foi se esvaziando progressivamente de sua substância. A heterogeneidade provocada pela atual fragmentação do sistema escolar brasileiro em várias redes reproduz, acentuando-as, as desigualdades sociais e compromete de modo durável o desenvolvimento econômico e social desse país.In Brazil, more than in any other Southern country, school is an unequally distributed social product. Access to it depends not only on such distinctive standards as socioeconomic position, sex, ethnicity, location of residence etc., but also on the type of network attended (public, private. This paper analyses the historical and progressive constitution of a multispeed schooling network. The republican political speech, which highlights the egalitarian and homogenizing function of school, has been gradually losing its substance. The heterogeneity resulting from the current fragmentation of the Brazilian schooling system into various networks reproduces, magnifying them, all social inequities and lastingly endangers the social and economical development of this country.

  9. Multiple Intelligences and ESL Teaching and Learning: An Investigation in KG II Classrooms in One Private School in Beirut, Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2014-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of the Multiple Intelligences Theory on vocabulary acquisition by preschoolers during English as a second language (ESL) classes in a K-12 school in Lebanon. Eighty kindergartners (KG II, aged 5 years) and eight teachers constituted the sample. The study used mixed methods, including observations of…

  10. Differences in Students' Smoking-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Public, Factory, and Private Secondary Schools in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaozhong; Chen, Weiqing; Qian, Zhengmin; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lu, Ciyong; Ling, Wenhua

    2008-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of smoking among Chinese adolescents has dramatically increased in recent years. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Chinese students in 3 types of secondary schools. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 3957 students of…

  11. Multiple Intelligences and ESL Teaching and Learning: An Investigation in KG II Classrooms in One Private School in Beirut, Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2014-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of the Multiple Intelligences Theory on vocabulary acquisition by preschoolers during English as a second language (ESL) classes in a K-12 school in Lebanon. Eighty kindergartners (KG II, aged 5 years) and eight teachers constituted the sample. The study used mixed methods, including observations of videotaped…

  12. Examining Teacher Job Satisfaction and Principals' Instructional Supervision Behaviours: A Comparative Study of Turkish Private and Public School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungu, Hilmi; Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Parylo, Oksana; Erdem, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In spite of a strong body of research examining teacher job satisfaction and teachers' assessment of their principals' behaviours, most studies focus on the educational systems in the first world countries. This quantitative study focuses on a lesser-examined educational context by comparing school teachers' job satisfaction levels and principals'…

  13. Differences in Students' Smoking-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Public, Factory, and Private Secondary Schools in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaozhong; Chen, Weiqing; Qian, Zhengmin; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lu, Ciyong; Ling, Wenhua

    2008-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of smoking among Chinese adolescents has dramatically increased in recent years. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Chinese students in 3 types of secondary schools. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 3957 students of…

  14. Multiple Intelligences and ESL Teaching and Learning: An Investigation in KG II Classrooms in One Private School in Beirut, Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2014-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of the Multiple Intelligences Theory on vocabulary acquisition by preschoolers during English as a second language (ESL) classes in a K-12 school in Lebanon. Eighty kindergartners (KG II, aged 5 years) and eight teachers constituted the sample. The study used mixed methods, including observations of videotaped…

  15. A study of prevalence of obesity and its correlates among government and private school children in Hyderabad: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Katkuri

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: It can be concluded that the prevalence of obesity in schools of Hyderabad is very high and it is positively associated with inappropriate exercise and improper dietary practices. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3032-3036

  16. Examining Teacher Job Satisfaction and Principals' Instructional Supervision Behaviours: A Comparative Study of Turkish Private and Public School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungu, Hilmi; Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Parylo, Oksana; Erdem, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In spite of a strong body of research examining teacher job satisfaction and teachers' assessment of their principals' behaviours, most studies focus on the educational systems in the first world countries. This quantitative study focuses on a lesser-examined educational context by comparing school teachers' job satisfaction levels and principals'…

  17. Public Funding for Private Schools: The Current Landscape. "A Reflection on the 2013 Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference on Catholic School Financing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaney, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    On September 22-24, 2013, the University of Notre Dame's Institute for Catholic Education hosted a conference on Catholic school financing on the Notre Dame campus, which drew experts on the subject from across the United States. This author, because of her roles as a Board Member of the Board of Catholic Schools of the Archdiocese of…

  18. Bullets in their (heads CV: The construction of the ‘subject’ by English language examination boards and Greek private language schools Bullets in their (heads CV: The constructiBullets in their (heads CV: The construction of the ‘subject’ by English language examination boards and Greek private language schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Papafilippou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the ways that the subjectivity of the Greek test-taker is constructed through the discourses employed by examination boards and private language schools. By employing Critical Discourse Analysis I examine the online texts uploaded on the websites of the examination boards that administer exams in Greece recognised by ASEP and advertising material of these examination boards and private language schools. The analysis illuminates that the dominant discourse operating is this of knowledge economy and English language tests appear to be dressed with neoliberal ideology. Therefore, these tests form and promote certain subject positions not only regarding ourselves as learners but also as citizens. The subjects seem to be constituted by their ‘achievements’ and their main aspiration appears to become successful employees, who have all the skills and qualifications employers need. Hence, this paper is an attempt to encourage all stake-holders to develop a critical view of tests as well as to question and critique the values that are inherent in them.

  19. 陕西民办高校与公办高校学校体育比较研究%Comparative Study of School Sports between Shaanxi Private Colleges and Public Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宗杰

    2012-01-01

    From aspects of Shaanxi private colleges and public universities, such as the teaching of physical education, school sports team training, school sports and school physical education teacher training etc, this article made a comprehensive comparison and analysis, and based on the different school system between private colleges and public universities, conducted in-depth analysis on their characteristics of school sports, and in its, draw a few proposals of the reform of private colleges' physical education for reference.%本文主要从陕西民办高校和公办高校的体育课教学、学校运动代表队训练和师资培养等方面进行了全面的比较和分析,并依据民办高校和公办高校不同的办学体制,对其学校体育工作的特点进行了深入的探析,从中得出几点对陕西民办高校体育工作改革的建议,以供参考.

  20. Séries no ensino privado, ciclos no público: um estudo em Belo Horizonte Grades in private schools, learning cycles in public schools: a study carried out in Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Vidal de Negreiros

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é entender o fenômeno que tem ocorrido nas esferas de ensino público e privado no Brasil no que diz respeito à aplicação do art. 23 da Lei de Diretrizes e Bases da Educação Nacional - LDB -, Lei n. 9.394/96, que trata da organização dos tempos escolares. Ao flexibilizar e delegar a autonomia aos estabelecimentos de ensino na escolha da organização dos tempos escolares esta lei acabou provocando uma situação diversificada. Os dados revelam que a rede pública movimenta-se mais rapidamente para uma organização em ciclos enquanto que a rede privada de ensino mostra-se mais propensa à continuidade da organização seriada. Dados estatísticos recentes, fornecidos pelo Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisas Educacionais Anísio Teixeira - Inep - comprovam isso. As razões pelas quais os estabelecimentos de ensino público adotam o sistema de ciclos têm sido objeto de muitas publicações. No entanto, quando a escola particular é o foco dessa questão, não se sabe ao certo quais as razões da não adesão à proposta dos ciclos e nem os motivos da continuidade do sistema seriado.The objective of this study is to understand what has been occurring in the spheres of public and private education in Brazil, concerning the application of art. 23 of the Guidelines and Bases Act of Education - LDB -, Law n. 9.394/96, which deals with the organization of school times. This law has caused a diversified situation by allowing flexibility and delegating autonomy to teaching institutions to decide on school time's organization. The data indicate that the public schools are moving more quickly towards an organization based on cycles, whereas the private ones are more inclined to keep grades. Recent statistic data, supplied by the National Institute of Pedagogical Studies and Research Anísio Teixeira - Inep -, prove it. The reasons why public teaching institutions adopt the learning cycle have been discussed in many

  1. PREVALENCE OF OVERWEIGHT, OBESITY, PAEDIATRIC METABOLIC SYNDROME AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS AMONG CHILDREN IN THE AGE GROUP OF 10-16 YEARS IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS OF SHIMLA CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anmol Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Paediatric obesity is a complex and growing global problem which is escalating much more rapidly in developing countries like India and considered an important predecessor to NCD multi-morbidity due to changing life style as a result of rapid urbanisation and mechanisation. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, paediatric metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors among children in the age group of 10-16 years in private schools of Shimla city. MATERIALS AND METHODS At total of 2100 adolescents attending school (aged 10-16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. All the anthropometric, clinical and biochemical assessment was done after proper consent. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was assessed by using IOTF guidelines and the metabolic syndrome was determined by the Paediatric International Diabetic Federation definition modified for age group. RESULTS The prevalence of overweight, obesity and paediatric metabolic syndrome was 14.5%, 4.1% & 4.3% respectively. In the groups with PMS, hypertension, waist circumference, and TG were significantly higher, and HDL-C was significantly lower. Significant difference was observed in gender, physical activity level, metabolic equivalent, consumption of junk food & time spent on TV in the distribution of overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION Our study highlights the possible role of change in the dietary pattern and physical activity pattern in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in early stage of life. Collective efforts of parents and schools are required to institute early preventive measures to reduce progression towards obesity and its future complications.

  2. Gender role stereotype and poor working condition pose obstacles for female doctors to stay in full-time employment: alumnae survey from two private medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Miki; Nomura, Kyoko; Higaki, Yuko; Akaishi, Yu; Seki, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Komoda, Takayuki; Otaki, Junji

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of physicians has become a serious problem in Japan. It has been pointed out that an increase in the number of female doctors may contribute to the aggravation of this shortage because it is known that women work fewer hours than male doctors. Here, we investigated how many female doctors had ever resigned from a full-time position, and elucidated the reasons why female doctors find it difficult to stay in full-time employment. An alumnae survey of 2 private medical schools was conducted in 2007. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 1423 graduates and 711 responded with informed consent (response rate, 50%; mean age, 39 years). Overall, 55% of the respondents had previously resigned from full-time employment, of which 90% resigned within 10 years of graduating from medical school. The difficulty in balancing work, childbirth and child rearing (45%) were the top 2 reasons for resignation, followed by physical problems (12%) and long working hours (8%). Among those who resigned, only 33% returned to full-time employment. Women who had at least 1 child were only 30% of those who had never resigned and 84% of those who had previously resigned. The majority of study subjects, regardless of experience of resignation (88%), agreed that women should continue to work even after childbirth. In conclusion, the results of this study suggested that many female doctors resigned from a full-time position within 10 years of graduating from medical school, largely because of the gender role stereotype and poor working conditions.

  3. The Future of the Private Education in China Prospecting the Future of the Private Education in China by Comparing with That in the Netherlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭美玲

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a major reform in education has been the development of private schools. Its influence on Chinese education will be extremely profound. More and more private individuals have been opening schools in China. Private schools have currently become a hot topic in Chinese educational circles and have aroused the public’s interest. In this article, the prospect of the private education of China is forecasted by comparing it to the private education in the Netherlands.

  4. Overweight and obesity prevalence in children from private schools Prevalência de sobrepeso e obesidade em pré-escolares e escolares de escolas particulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Raguza Pazin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the nutritional status of preschool and school children from private schools served by a specialized infant feeding company. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study with children aged 2 to 8 years, which attended 3 different private schools. All schools have a specialized company that offers food for the students. Weight and height were measured and the Body Mass Index was calculated. Data were analyzed by the WHO’s Child Growth Standards (2007, using the indices weight/height (WHZ, height/age (HAZ, weight/age (WAZ and BMI/age (BAZ. Results: 571 children were evaluated, from both genders, in which 396 children were aged between 2 and 4 years, with an average age of 4.1 years (±1.35. We have demonstrated that, although most (99.3% have presented appropriate height for age, the WHZ and BAZ ratios showed 32.1 and 29.4%, respectively, of children with an overweight risk. Conclusion: The results show the absence of nutritional deficiencies in the sample studied, but it’s possible to note that the overweight is present. So, it’s very important to implement actions of nutritional education in both home and school, aiming to prevent health problems in adulthood.Objetivo: Avaliar o estado nutricional de pré-escolares e escolares de escolas particulares atendidas por uma empresa especializada em alimentação infantil. Materiais e Métodos: Estudo transversal, com crianças de 2 a 8 anos de idade, matriculadas em três escolas particulares, atendidas por uma empresa especializada em alimentação infantil. Foram aferidos peso e altura e a partir disso, foi calculado o Índice de Massa Corporal (IMC. Os dados foram analisados por meio das Curvas de Crescimento da Organização Mundial da Saúde (2007, utilizando os indicadores Peso/Estatura (P/E, Altura/Idade (A/I, Peso/Idade (P/I e IMC/Idade (IMC/I. Resultados: Foram avaliadas 571 crianças de ambos os sexos, sendo que a faixa etária entre 2 a 4 anos foi composta por

  5. Information literacy: uma análise nas bibliotecas escolares da rede privada em Natal/RN Information literacy: an analysis of the school library of the private schools network in Natal/RN p. 110-133

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Farias

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta a information literacy, como competência em informação, relata, de forma geral, seu surgimento, desenvolvimento e importância de sua prática na biblioteca escolar. Aborda-se os principais focos da competência em informação: tecnologia da informação, processos cognitivos, e aprendizado ao longo da vida. Relata-se a análise dos dados dos questionários aplicados nas bibliotecas escolares da rede de escolas privadas da cidade de Natal RN com fins de identificar e analisar a competência em informação neste ambiente. Apresenta-se a necessidade de integração entre escola-biblioteca, e a inserção do bibliotecário na comunidade educacional para criação de programas educacionais voltados para a competência em informação. Palavras-chave Competência em informação; Habilidades informativas; Biblioteca escolar; Educação e aprendizagem Abstract It presents information literacy as information competence, as well as reporting, in a general way its appearance, development and the importance of its practice in the school library. Focuses on the main information competences: information technology, cognitive processes and life long learning. It reports on the analysis of data obtained from the questionnaire applied in school libraries of the private schools network in the city of Natal RN, as a means to identify and analyze information competence in this environment. The need for school-library integration is presented, as is the need for the insertion of the librarian in the educational community for the creation of educational programs directed towards information competence. Key words Information competence; Informative skills; School library; Education and learning

  6. Principals' Perceptions of Teacher Attrition in Indiana Catholic Schools, Checking for Agreement with Ingersoll's Theoretical Framework on Teacher Attrition in Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettnacher, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Problem. Some Catholic schools report high teacher attrition rates. Understanding reasons for teacher attrition and responding to those issues is one of the many responsibilities of principals. However, it is unclear what Catholic principals understand about teacher attrition. Ingersoll's extensive research on teacher attrition has provided a…

  7. Effect of the School Facilities Factor and Sport Activities Factor on Parents in Terms of Private and Public School Choice at Riyadh City Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsauidi, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    There are several, primarily carried out in the Western World, that have explored the reasons why parents' choice a school, which they consider best meets their children's needs and parental aspirations for their children. In order to contribute to the established knowledge it was essential to conduct an explore into parents' reasons for their…

  8. The Effects of Using Multimodal Approaches in Meaning-Making of 21st Century Literacy Texts Among ESL Students in a Private School in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Ganapathy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In today’s globalised digital era, students are inevitably engaged in various multimodal texts due to their active participation in social media and frequent usage of mobile devices on a daily basis. Such daily activities advocate the need for a transformation in the teaching and learning of ESL lessons in order to promote students’ capabilities in making meaning of different literacy texts which students come across in their ESL learning activities. This paper puts forth the framework of Multimodality in the restructuring of the teaching and learning of ESL with the aim of investigating its effects and students perspectives on the use of multimodal approaches underlying the Multiliteracies theory. Using focus group interviews, this qualitative case study examines the effectiveness of ESL teaching and learning using the Multimodal approaches on literacy in meaning-making among 15 students in a private school in Penang, Malaysia. The results confirm the need to reorientate the teaching and learning of ESL with the focus on multimodal pedagogical practices as it promotes positive learning outcomes among students. The implications of this study suggest that the multimodal approaches integrated in the teaching and learning of ESL have the capacity to promote students’ autonomy in learning, improve motivation to learn and facilitate various learning styles. Keywords: Multimodal Approaches; Multiliteracies; Monomodal; Flipped Classroom; Literacy; Multimodal texts; Ipad

  9. Research on Lives of Migrant Teachers of Beijing Private School from Gender Perspective%性别视角下北京民办学校外来女教师的生活状况研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    改革开放后,民办教育的兴起与发展,为教师的流动提供了一个空间和平台,民办学校教师逐渐形成为一个新的社会群体。由于性别的差异和社会角色的不同,民办学校女教师成为这个新的社会群体中的一个特殊群体。基于性别的视角,对北京民办学校30名外来女教师生活状况的研究显示:民办学校外来女教师普遍的自我身份认同是外来打工者,她们的压力感、挫折感、“家”的缺失感比男教师更为强烈,她们的性别利益没有得到很好的保护。国家应该担当起保护民办学校外来女教师性别利益的责任,妇联组织应该把她们纳入自己的组织视野中。%After the reform and opening up, the rise and development of private education provided a flow of teachers with spaces and platforms, and private school teachers gradually formed a new social group. Because of differences in gender and social roles, woman teachers in private schools have become a special group among the new social group. Based on a gender perspective, the living conditions of 30 migrant women teaching at private schools in Beijing were studied. There are certain differences between the women and men teachers in private schools in family relations, interpersonal relationships, work motivation, living pressures, and flow paths. Women teachers’living and working pressures are greater, their legitimate rights and interests are more susceptible to exploitation and being damaged. Administrators of the Education Department and women’s organizations should focus on women teachers in private schools.

  10. Achievement in Public and Private Secondary Education in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, Peter; Bakker, Bart; Dronkers, Jaap; Schijf, Hubert

    1987-01-01

    Recent research has claimed that American private high schools are more effective than public high schools. Two critical aspects of this research are at the center of this article: a) whether the short-term benefits of private schools which were found to exist persist over an extended period of

  11. Achievement in Public and Private Secondary Education in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, Peter; Bakker, Bart; Dronkers, Jaap; Schijf, Hubert

    1987-01-01

    Recent research has claimed that American private high schools are more effective than public high schools. Two critical aspects of this research are at the center of this article: a) whether the short-term benefits of private schools which were found to exist persist over an extended period of time

  12. Education for Nursery School and Kindergarten Teachers at 4-Year Universities : A Survey of Public and Private Nursery Schools and Kindergartens in Miyazaki Prefecture

    OpenAIRE

    松原, 由美; マツバラ, ユミ; Yumi, MATSUBARA

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing need for nursery school as well as kindergarten teachers to receive training on how to the changes in the environments that surround children and families as well as to the diversification of work situations of guardians. From November 2011 to March 2012, at the Review Conference of Nursing Education Curriculums, upon receiving the sudden changes in modern society along with revisions of nursing guidelines and in order to educate nursery teachers ...

  13. Promoção da alimentação saudável em escolas particulares | Promotion of healthy eating in private schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Marisa Ruwer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A escola é ambiente indicado para promover hábitos alimentares saudáveis. A portaria do MEC/MS 1.010/06 instituiu várias diretrizes com esse fim. Objetivando verificar as condições de implantação dessa portaria, fizemos um estudo qualitativo em quatro escolas particulares de Manaus, licenciadas pela Vigilância Sanitária, com descrição de práticas alimentares e práticas pedagógicas. Realizamos observações, entrevistas e grupos focais. As práticas alimentares observadas foram quanto aos alimentos disponíveis para consumo na escola. Três das quatro escolas apresentaram proporção maior de alimentos não saudáveis do que de saudáveis. Das entrevistas com diretores ou coordenadores pedagógicos e com responsáveis pela cantina e dos grupos focais com professores, pudemos perceber que a portaria em questão era desconhecida nessas escolas, mas que algumas atividades, no sentido de atendê-la, eram realizadas em sala de aula ou nos momentos de refeição; e que havia um bom conhecimento acerca das práticas alimentares dos alunos. Porém, existe necessidade de capacitação destes profissionais das escolas e inserção de nutricionista para as atividades de educação nutricional. A necessidade de envolvimento dos pais e a questão financeira foram outros desafios citados. A efetivação da promoção da alimentação saudável precisa ser estimulada e cobrada pelo setor público com medidas educativas e regulatórias. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The school environment is favorable for promoting healthy eating habits. The ordinance of the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Health nº. 1.010/06 has established several guidelines for this purpose. To check the conditions of implementation of this ordinance, we conducted a qualitative study in four private schools of Manaus, licensed by the health surveillance, with descriptions of feeding and pedagogical practices

  14. Building Partnerships Between Research Institutions, University Academic Departments, Local School Districts, and Private Enterprise to Advance K-12 Science Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Ganey-Curry, P.; Fennell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) is engaged in six K-12 education and outreach programs, including two NSF-sponsored projects--GK-12: Linking Graduate Fellows with K-12 Students and Teachers and Cataclysms and Catastrophes--Texas Teachers in the Field, Adopt-a-School, Geoscience in the Classroom, and UT's Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program. The GK-12 Program is central to UTIG's effort and links the six education projects together. While the specific objectives of each project differ, the broad goals of UTIG's education and outreach are to provide high-quality professional development for teachers, develop curriculum resources aligned with state and national education standards, and promote interaction between teachers, scientists, graduate students, and science educators. To achieve these goals, UTIG has forged funded partnerships with scientific colleagues at UT's Bureau of Economic Geology, Marine Science Institute and Department of Geological Sciences; science educators at UT's Charles A. Dana Center and in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education; teachers in six Texas independent school districts; and 4empowerment.com, a private education company that established the "Cyberways and Waterways" Web site to integrate technology and education through an environmentally-based curriculum. These partnerships have allowed UTIG to achieve far more than would have been possible through individual projects alone. Examples include the development of more than 30 inquiry-based activities, hosting workshops and a summer institute, and participation in local science fairs. UTIG has expanded the impact of its education and outreach and achieved broader dissemination of learning activities through 4empowerment's web-based programs, which reach ethnically diverse students in schools across Texas. These partnerships have also helped UTIG and 4empowerment to secure additional funding for other education

  15. Rorschach Comprehensive System norms in Brazilian children from public and private schools Normas do Rorschach Sistema Compreensivo para crianças Brasileiras de escolas públicas e escolares particulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Kátia Sanches Mazzorana Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to construct normative tables for the Rorschach Comprehensive System for Brazilian children from public and private schools. The sample was selected using the Child Behavior Checklist and the Raven Test. The Rorschach was administered to children from 7 to 10 years old, both genders, from public schools (N=110 and private schools (N=101 in the city of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso State. Normative tables were created from the 113 variables of the Rorschach Comprehensive System, taking into consideration school type and age group. A comparison of the results demonstrated higher results in the R, Sum Y and Blend variables and in the Intellectualization Index among private school children, and higher Lambda scores among public school children.O objetivo foi construir tabelas normativas do Rorschach Sistema Compreensivo para crianças brasileiras alunas de escolas particulares e públicas. A amostra foi selecionada por meio da Child Behavior Checklist e do teste de Raven. O Rorschach foi aplicado em crianças de 7 a 10 anos, de ambos os gêneros, de escolas públicas (N=110 e particulares (N=101, da cidade de Cuiabá, MT. Foram construídas tabelas normativas das 113 variáveis do Rorschach SC considerando origem escolar e faixa etária. A comparação dos resultados demonstrou resultados mais elevados nas variáveis R, Sum Y, Mistos e Índice de Intelectualização nas crianças de escola particulares e na variável Lambda nas crianças de escolas públicas.

  16. Políticas Públicas De Privatización Privatization Public Policy: A Look At The Experience of managing schools from San Luis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Feldfeber

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available La reforma educativa que se implementó en Argentina en la década de los ´90 no puede entenderse al margen del proceso de Reforma del Estado y las políticas de desregulación, descentralización y privatización de los servicios sociales. En este proceso se pone en cuestión el papel histórico desempeñado por el Estado en materia educativa a la vez que comienza a trasladarse la responsabilidad por la garantía del derecho a la educación a las instituciones y a las familias. Estas transformaciones ponen en cuestión el carácter público de la educación pública, instaurando nuevos sentidos e impulsando la conformación de un espacio público no estatal “localizado” entre el Estado y el mercado. El presente trabajo analiza el proyecto de Escuelas Autogestionadas (“Escuelas 2001” de la Provincia de San Luis (Argentina teniendo en cuenta tanto la lógica que orienta el desarrollo e implementación de esta política como las representaciones de los actores involucrados sobre la educación, el Estado y lo público. The educational reform that took place in Argentina during the ´90s should be analyzed in the context of a broader reform process implemented in the whole of Latin America during that period, aimed at reforming the State and introducing deregulation, decentralization and privatization policies. During this process, the role that the Sate traditionally held in education is redefined, and the responsibility of guaranteeing the right to education is transferred form the State to the families and the schools. These transformations redefine the public character of public education, introduce new meanings in the debates and views about when something should be considered public or not in the field of education and foster the creation of a non- state public space which could be placed between the State and the market. This paper aims at analyzing the project “Escuelas 2001” which seeks to implement charter schools in San Luis

  17. Channel One: When Private Interests and the Public Interest Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis, Jason C.

    2008-01-01

    If the notion of public and private spheres seems somehow quaint or old-fashioned, the distinction between public and private corporations will be that much more obscure. Yet Channel One broadcasts in a public school classroom are indisputably the result of a contract between a private corporation (Alloy Media + Marketing) and a public corporation…

  18. 《醒世姻缘传》塾师的生存处境%Living Condition of Teachers in Private Schools in The Marriage Stories to Awaken Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏光灿

    2012-01-01

    明清时期因科举的需要,私塾教育十分兴盏。塾师作为明清小说中的特殊群体,还没有受到研究者的重视。以清西周生《醒世姻缘传》为例,通过对塾师形象及其生存处境的分析,探究从事塾师这一职业的社会底层文人的悲剧性命运及其与科举制度的关系,以期成为明清时期塾师、教育乃至社会研究的一个窗口。%Because of the needs of imperial examination in Ming and Qing Dynasty, private schools are very prosperous. Private teachers as a special group in the novels of Ming and Qing Dynasty have not drawn much attention of the researcher. Taking The Marriage Stories to Awaken Men written by XI Zhousheng in Qing Dynasty as an example, the tragic fate of private teachers-people with low social status and their relationship with imperial examination are studied, in the hope of opening a door for the research of private teachers, education and society in Ming and Qing Dynasty.

  19. The Future of the Private Education in China Prospecting the Future of the Private Education in China by Comparing with That in the Netherlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭美玲

    2008-01-01

    In recent years,a major reform in education has been the development ofprivate schools.Its influence on Chinese education will be extremely profound.More and more private individuals have been opening schools in China.Private schools have currently become a hot topic in Chinese educational circles and have aroused the public's interest.In this article,the prospect of the private education of China is forecasted by comparing it to the private education in the Netherlands.

  20. Policy Analysis of Wenzhou and Shaanxi Private School Classification Management%浙江温州和陕西民办学校分类管理的政策分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾建国

    2014-01-01

    通过政策分析发现,浙江温州和陕西的民办学校分类管理政策的实施基础较为成熟,改革战略强调整体性和全局性,政策文本突破了传统框架,配套制度重视互补性。不过,两地的政策依然存在分类标准和依据不清晰、缺乏法律支撑、营利性民办学校制度体系缺失以及经营范围不明确等问题。为此,政府需要进一步明确民办学校分类管理政策制定的价值导向,完善政策制定的制度基础,丰富政策制定的知识基础,选择恰当的制度变迁方式,以及在制度设计上保持民办教育结构的整体均衡。%Through policy analysis,implementation of Wenzhou and Shaanxi private school classification management policy is relatively mature ,the reform ideas emphasis on holistic and global strategy ,policy text breaks through the traditional framework of private school classification ,supporting institutions emphasis complementary. However,the policy remain classified standard is not clear,the lack of legal support,profit private school institution is lack,and the private schools scope is not clear and definite. Therefore,government needs to further clarify the value orientation of classification management policy ,improve the institutional basis ,enrich knowledge of policy,choose appropriate way of institutional change,and to maintain the overall balance of private education structure in the design of the institution.

  1. Excesso de peso de escolares em região do Nordeste Brasileiro: contraste entre as redes de ensino pública e privada Excess weight in children from Brazilian Northeast: difference between public and private schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana do Monte Paula Brasil

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: estimar a prevalência de excesso de peso em escolares na cidade de Natal. Métodos estudo transversal com 1927 crianças, de 6 a 11 anos de idade, de escolas públicas e privadas nas diferentes zonas da cidade de Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Foram analisadas as variáveis: sexo, faixa etária, tipo de escola e zonas da cidade. Foram considerados com excesso de peso os escolares com índice de massa corporal para sexo e idade igual ou superior ao percentil 85. RESULTADOS: o excesso de peso foi encontrado em 33,6% das crianças. Não houve diferenças significantes entre os sexos e faixas etárias. Nas escolas privadas, a prevalência de excesso de peso foi 54,5%; nas públicas, 15,6% (pOBJECTIVES: to determine the prevalence of excess weight in schoolchildren from the city of Natal. METHODS: transversal study with 1927 children aged 6-11 from public and private schools in different zones in the city of Natal, in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, and analyze related variables, such as gender, age-group, type of school and city zones. All scholars with a body mass index equal to or greater than the 85th percentile were considered as having excess weight. RESULTS: the prevalence of excess weight among the studied scholars was 33.6%. There were no significant differences between genders and age-groups. In the private schools, the prevalence of excess weight was 54.5%, while in the public schools, 15.6% (p<0.01; OR=6.49. The prevalence of excess weight was greater in schools located in the zones with the best quality of life, east-south zone (41.3%, if compared with schools in the north-west zone (28.4% (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of excess weight in scholars was found high, demonstrating the importance of programs of treatment and prevention. The biggest prevalence in children studying in private schools and in children studying in schools located in the best zone of the city reflects the importance of association

  2. Private Education in Poland: Breaking the Mould?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus-Stanska, Dorota; Olek, Hilary

    1998-03-01

    The burgeoning private sector is perhaps the most tangible of the changes in education which followed the upheavals of 1989/90 in Central and Eastern Europe. This article sets out to analyse the growth of private education in Poland and its contribution to the ongoing processes of democratisation and educational development. The authors argue that the euphoria of the period immediately following the overthrow of one-party communism encouraged unrealistic expectations of educational reform. Their analysis of private sector schooling in Poland suggests that its development has occurred in a haphazard fashion, reflecting the uncertainties of a society undergoing a painful process of transition. Symptomatic of this has been the failure to establish a clear regulatory framework for the private sector - an omission which has undermined the credibility of private schools. Nevertheless, the authors argue that the development of private sector schooling in Poland has brought diversity and a degree of innovation to a system previously almost devoid of either. There is now an urgent need for the evaluation and dissemination of private sector initiatives, which can serve as examples for future educational decision-making in Poland.

  3. Comparison of Parent and Student Responses to Asthma Surveys: Students Grades 3 12 and Their Parents from a Suburban Private School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P.; Wollan, Peter; Kurland, Marge; Bertram, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Schools are being called upon to help address asthma, a common problem in school- aged children. School-based asthma programs need information about asthma diagnoses, asthma symptoms, and asthma's impact on school attendance. Parent or student surveys are the most common method of collecting these data. However, medical literature offers little…

  4. School Imformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Beijing Huijia Private School Foreign Students Department As the world is paying increasing attention to China, more and more foreign students begin to study Chinese. As a K-12 boarding private school, our school has a good bilingual environment in Chinese and English with more than 2,200 students, and qualified Chinese and foreign teachers. We combine Chinese teaching with Western teaching, and implement internationalized education in an all-around way. Since November 2000, our school has admitted more ...

  5. Private Water Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Private Water District boundaries are areas where private contracts provide water to the district in California. This database is designed as a regions polygon...

  6. Quantitative analysis of privatization

    CERN Document Server

    Vahabi, M

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the economic policy of privatization, which is defined as the transfer of property or responsibility from public sector to private sector, is one of the global phenomenon that increases use of markets to allocate resources. One important motivation for privatization is to help develop factor and product markets, as well as security markets. Progress in privatization is correlated with improvements in perceived political and investment risk. Many emerging countries have gradually reduced their political risks during the course of sustained privatization. In fact, most risk resolution seems to take place as privatization proceeds to its later stage. Alternative benefits of privatization are improved risk sharing and increased liquidity and activity of the market. One of the main methods to develop privatization is entering a new stock to the markets for arising competition. However, attention to the capability of the markets to accept a new stock is substantial. Without considering the above st...

  7. Private opportunity, public benefit?

    OpenAIRE

    John Hall

    1998-01-01

    The newly elected Labour government has pledged to ‘reinvigorate the Private Finance Initiative’, as part of the new emphasis on ‘public/private partnerships’ in the delivery of core public services. This article assesses the merits of using private finance to deliver public services against three criteria: whether it will lead to additional investment in social infrastructure, whether it represents good value for the taxpayer’s money and whether the use of private finance will reduce the pub...

  8. Private opportunity, public benefit?

    OpenAIRE

    John Hall

    1998-01-01

    The newly elected Labour government has pledged to ‘reinvigorate the Private Finance Initiative’, as part of the new emphasis on ‘public/private partnerships’ in the delivery of core public services. This article assesses the merits of using private finance to deliver public services against three criteria: whether it will lead to additional investment in social infrastructure, whether it represents good value for the taxpayer’s money and whether the use of private finance will reduce the pub...

  9. The Politics of Privatization and Decentralization in Global School Reform: The Value of Equity Claims for Neoliberalism at the World Bank and in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Cheryl

    This paper focuses on the role of the World Bank and its subsidiaries in promoting the neoliberal educational reforms of privatization and decentralization globally and in El Salvador. Neoliberalism is first defined as a sociopolitical philosophy that supports concepts such as the free market, market-driven education, and the use of a voucher…

  10. Holy Grail or Poisoned Chalice? A Case Study of Partnership Collaboration between a University School of Education and a Private Sector Education Services Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Bill; Brown, Marie

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a case study of the set up and first year operations of the public-private partnership between the University of Manchester (UK) and Nord Anglia that delivered training for the National Professional Qualification for Headship. Reviews the partnership according to four factors and discusses the areas of conflict (time and language). (CMK)

  11. Oral health care for children in countries using dental therapists in public, school-based programs, contrasted with that of the United States, using dentists in a private practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita R; Friedman, Jay W; Nash, David A

    2013-09-01

    The United States faces a significant problem with access to oral health care, particularly for children. More than 50 countries have developed an alternative dental provider, a dental therapist, practicing in public, school-based programs, to address children's access to care. This delivery model has been demonstrated to improve access to care and oral health outcomes while providing quality care economically. We summarize elements of a recent major review of the global literature on the use of dental therapists, "A Review of the Global Literature on Dental Therapists: In the Context of the Movement to Add Dental Therapists to the Oral Health Workforce in the United States." We contrast the success of a school-based model of caring for children by dental therapists with that of the US model of dentists providing care for children in private practices.

  12. Private Money's New Frontier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN XINZHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Nuclear power,oil exploration and exploitation,railways,telecommunications and other sectors that used to be monopolized by state-owned capital may be new arenas for private capital.Opinions on Encouraging and Guiding Sound Development of Private Investment,issued by the State Council on May 13,opened a new range of government-run industries to the private sector.

  13. Bringing up Private Investment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Chinese Government promises private investors a bigger role in the country’s booming industry sector Encouraging and guiding healthy development of private investment was at the forefront of the State Council’s latest measures to invigorate the private sector.

  14. 民办小学体育教学条件现状探究——以惠城区小学为例%The Investigation of the Status Quo of the PE Teaching in Private Primary Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪浩; 李让代

    2012-01-01

    By using the methods of documentary, questionnaire investigation, on - the - spot investigation, interview and mathematical statistics,the basic situation of sports teaching condition, general development situation and teaching status of 5 private elementary schools in Huizhou. The results show that, the sources of students of the civilian - run elementary schools are different from those of the public elementary schools in Huicheng District , the teachers strength is in relative shortage, the sports funds is in lack, the sports equip- ments are not complete enough, the sports curriculum settings are not comparatively reasonable, and the status quo of the PE teaching is not optimistic. And 4 suggestions are proposed. This research has practical significance to the promotion of the development of the PE teaching of the private elementary schools in Huizhou.%运用文献资料法、问卷调查法、实地考察及访谈法、数理统计法,以城区5所民办小学为对象,对其体育教学条件的基本情况、发展概况、教学现状等方面进行调查探究,结果表明:惠城区民办小学的生源与公办小学不同;体育师资力量相对不足;体育专项经费欠缺;场地器材设备不齐全;体育课周课时数不足且常被挪用;体育教学现状不容乐观,对此提出4条建议。本研究对促进惠州市民办小学体育教学的发展有重要的现实意义。

  15. Guangzhou’s New Student ID Policy and Private Schools in the Baiyun District%广州学籍新政的影响--对白云区私立学校的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白雪松; 袁征

    2016-01-01

    对白云区8所私立学校历时五个月的调查表明,广州市学籍新政的颁布,增加了市内私立学校的负担,阻碍了私立学校的发展,并给外来工子女入学制造了障碍、政策制定者应该遵守国际法和国内法的规定,保护私立学校发展已经取得的成果,营造公平合理的发展环境,并切实保障外来工子女的受教育权,允许以身份证号登记入学,制定真正有利于所有适龄儿童正常接受义务教育的政策、%The research we conducted at 8 private schools in the Baiyun District suggests that the new policy of students’ID management in Guangzhou has placed a heavy burden on private schools, hampering their development, and made it difficult for many children of migrant workers to obtain education. Policy makers should obey related international and domestic laws, protecting private schools’development and migrant worker chil-dren’s right to education. It would be a much better choice to use the resident identity card instead of a special student ID number.

  16. 拉丁美洲基础教育公校民营现象探析*%A Probe into the Phenomenon of Private Management of Public Schools in Basic Education of Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原青林

    2013-01-01

    In the case of the state’s inability to provide basic education for all due to shortage of ifnancial fund to education, the state governments of Latin America is active in carrying out public-private partnerships (PPP) like private management of public schools, using private resources to broaden the scope of basic education provision to the population and promote the quality of schooling, with noticeable effectiveness. The speciifc practices include Management contracts-Professional services or curriculum design, Operational Contracts, Education Service Contracts, Provision of Infrastructure Services Contracts, and Provision of Infrastructure Contract with Education Services Contracts, which are worth learning.%在教育投入不足,难以保证全民基础教育供给量的情况下,拉丁美洲各国政府在基础教育领域积极推行公办民营等公私合作办学模式,利用民间资源,扩大基础教育的惠民范围,优化教学质量,其成效十分明显。具体做法包括管理承包-专业服务或课程设计、经营承包、教育服务承包、学校建筑服务承包、学校建筑与教育服务承包等,值得借鉴。

  17. On Governments Responsibility in Running Schools for Privately- run Higher Education Institution%民办高等教育机构办学中的政府责任

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏冰玲

    2012-01-01

    民办高等教育机构在办学中会遇到各种风险,为有效保障利益相关者的权益,应从风险与监管问题出发,着重解决民办高校办学中面临的风险。政府在解决这一问题的过程中,扮演着重要的领导者和监督者责任。政府应从风险评估、风险预测和构建风险预防系统的途径着手,通过科学的引导办法和系统的监督体系,来实现民办高等教育机构的安全健康发展。政府可以从国外办学和民办教育历史改革中吸取经验和教训,从而减少规划成本和降低风险成本,实现资源的最优化配置。%The privately- run colleges encounter in a variety of risks in running schools. To effectively safe- guard the interests of stakeholders, we should start from risk and supervision and focus on solving the risks they face. The construction of the risk prevention system for privately - run colleges becomes the actual demand of pro- moting the sustainable and hee.lthy development of privately - run higher education at present. Government has an inescapable responsibility about it. It is the most important and most compelling content to implement scientific and optimize the environment of running schools, perfect regulations and policies, increase financial support and stand- ardize the way they operate.

  18. The demand for private tutoring in Turkey: unintended consequences of curriculum reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altinyelken, H.K.; Bray, M.; Mazawi, A.E.; Sultana, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the private tutoring phenomenon in Turkey. It seeks to analyse the impact of the revision of primary school curriculum on the demand for private tutoring. It also outlines various academic, economic and social implications of private tutoring. Based on interviews with school

  19. Socialization and the Symbolic Order of the School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapferer, Judith L.

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes two private, secondary school rituals to determine why private schools are more effective than state schools in socializing students into acceptance of and support for the culture of the school. (Author/MW)

  20. 34 CFR 299.7 - What are the factors for determining equitable participation of children and teachers in private...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... participation of children and teachers in private schools? 299.7 Section 299.7 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION GENERAL PROVISIONS Services to Private School Students and Teachers § 299.7 What are the factors for determining equitable participation of children and teachers in private schools? (a)...