WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonradiative recombination centers

  1. Calcium as a nonradiative recombination center in InGaN

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Jimmy-Xuan

    2017-01-13

    Calcium can be unintentionally incorporated during the growth of semiconductor devices. Using hybrid functional first-principles calculations, we assess the role of Ca impurities in GaN. Ca substituted on the cation site acts as a deep acceptor with a level ~1 eV above the GaN valence-band maximum. We find that for Ca concentrations of 1017 cm−3, the Shockley–Read–Hall recombination coefficient, A, of InGaN exceeds 106 s−1 for band gaps less than 2.5 eV. A values of this magnitude can lead to significant reductions in the efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  2. Aging mathematical model of InGaN/GaN LEDs based on non-radiative recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linwang; Qian, Keyuan

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a new aging mathematical model for InGaN/GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on non-radiative recombination. Light attenuation is an important index of the performance of LEDs, Arrhenius model as the main aging mathematical model of light attenuation is poorly targeted and cannot reflect the physical significance. Based on the physical theory of deep level defects and non-radiation recombination centers, we analyze the aging mechanism of LED chips and then establish the aging mathematical model. Meanwhile, a batch of GaN-based blue LED chips are selected to conduct accelerated life tests with constant current stresses, and the experimental data is obtained to verify the new model. The result shows that compared with the traditional Arrhenius model, the new model has many advantages such as more accurate, strong pertinence and obvious physical meaning.

  3. Effect of Molecular Packing and Charge Delocalization on the Nonradiative Recombination of Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xian Kai

    2016-09-05

    In organic solar cells, a major source of energy loss is attributed to nonradiative recombination from the interfacial charge transfer states to the ground state. By taking pentacene–C60 complexes as model donor–acceptor systems, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of how molecular packing and charge delocalization impact these nonradiative recombination rates at donor–acceptor interfaces is provided.

  4. A micro-scale hot-surface device based on non-radiative carrier recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Holleman, J.; Iordache, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work employs the idea of making micro-scale hot-surface devices (e.g. sensors, flow meters, micro reactors, etc) based on generation of heat due to nonradiative recombination of carriers in a thin (13 nm) poly silicon surface layer. An important part of the device is a nano-scale (10-100 nm)

  5. Radiative and nonradiative pathways in multiexciton recombination in giant nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malko, Anton; Sampat, Siddharth; Htoon, Han; Vela-Becerra, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Klimov, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Recently,footnotetextY. Chen et al., JACS 130, 5026 (2008) we developed ``giant'' nanocrystal quantum dots (g-NQDs), in which a small emitting core of CdSe is overcoated with a thick shell of a wider-gap CdS. We conduct room-temp measurements of photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes in such g-NQDs as a function of excitation power and a number of shell monolayers. At low pump levels, corresponding to excitation of less than 1 exciton per dot on average (>1, fast (˜1ns) PL component appeared, accompanied by a transition to a sub-linear scaling of PL intensity with . Our findings indicate that while g-NQDs indeed produce suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination,footnotetextF. Garcia-Santamaria et al., Nanoletters 9, 3482 (2009) this suppression is incomplete. We conduct systematic studies of relative efficiencies of nonradiative and radiative processes in these nanostructures.

  6. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgilio, M., E-mail: virgilio@df.unipi.it [Dip. di Fisica “E. Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, P.za San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Capellini, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Dip. di scienze, Università Roma Tre, viale G. Marconi 446, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  7. Nonradiative recombination due to Ar implantation induced point defects in GaInN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Torsten; Pietscher, Hans-Georg; Joenen, Holger; Rossow, Uwe; Bremers, Heiko; Hangleiter, Andreas [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany); Menzel, Dirk [Institut fuer Physik der Kondensierten Materie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We quantitatively investigate nonradiative recombination at point defects via temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy on argon implanted MOVPE-grown GaInN/GaN single quantum wells (QW). An implantation dose dependent (doses: 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) reduction of nonradiative lifetimes from several nanoseconds (unimplanted sample) to less than 100 ps at room temperature is observed. This shortening of nonradiative lifetimes is attributed to nonradiative recombination due to increased implantation induced defect densities. An effective hole capture coefficient can be estimated to about 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} via the measured nonradiative lifetimes and simulated (SRIM) defect densities. The thermal stability of the defects is analyzed using rapid thermal annealing at 800 {sup circle} C in order to recover the crystal from implantation damage. At high temperatures, nonradiative recombination in the barriers becomes dominant: defect density dependent losses with an activation energy equal to half the difference between the GaN band gap and the peak position of the QW luminescence are observed.

  8. Photoacoustic Determination of Non-radiative Relaxation Time of Absorbing Centers in Maize Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2017-07-01

    Using non-destructive photothermal techniques, it is possible to characterize non-homogenous materials to obtain its optical and thermal properties through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). In photoacoustic (PA) phenomena, there are transient states of thermal excitation, when samples absorb the incident light; these states manifest an excitation process that generates the PA signal, being in direct relation with the non-radiative relaxation times with the sample absorbent centers. The objective of this study was to determine the non-radiative relaxation times associated with different absorbent centers of corn seeds ( Zea mays L.), by using PAS. A frequency scan was done at different wavelengths (350 nm, 470 nm and 650 nm) in order to obtain the non-radiative relaxation times with different types of maize seeds.

  9. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Fabio; Giorgioni, Anna; Gallacher, Kevin; Isa, Fabio; Biagioni, Paolo; Millar, Ross W.; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Miglio, Leo

    2016-06-01

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO2 in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  10. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzoli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pezzoli@unimib.it; Giorgioni, Anna; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Miglio, Leo [LNESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, via Cozzi 55, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Gallacher, Kevin; Millar, Ross W.; Paul, Douglas J. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Isa, Fabio [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Biagioni, Paolo [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Isella, Giovanni [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2016-06-27

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO{sub 2} in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  11. Nonradiative Electron--Hole Recombination Rate Is Greatly Reduced by Defects in Monolayer Black Phosphorus: Ab Initio Time Domain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Fang, Weihai; Akimov, Alexey V

    2016-02-18

    We report ab initio time-domain simulations of nonradiative electron-hole recombination and electronic dephasing in ideal and defect-containing monolayer black phosphorus (MBP). Our calculations predict that the presence of phosphorus divacancy in MBP (MBP-DV) substantially reduces the nonradiative recombination rate, with time scales on the order of 1.57 ns. The luminescence line width in ideal MBP of 150 meV is 2.5 times larger than MBP-DV at room temperature, and is in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that the electron-hole recombination in ideal MBP is driven by the 450 cm(-1) vibrational mode, whereas the recombination in the MBP-DV system is driven by a broad range of vibrational modes. The reduced electron-phonon coupling and increased bandgap in MBP-DV rationalize slower recombination in this material, suggesting that electron-phonon energy losses in MBP can be minimized by creating suitable defects in semiconductor device material.

  12. Trap and nonradiative centers in Ba₃Si₆O₁₂N₂:Eu²⁺ phosphors observed by thermoluminescence and two-wavelength excited photoluminescence methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Kamata, Norihiko; Kotsuka, Yosuke; Fukuda, Takeshi; Honda, Zentaro; Kurushima, Tomoyuki

    2015-06-29

    We have studied trap centers and nonradiative (NRR) recombination centers in a Ba3Si6O12N2:Eu2+ (BSON), one of promising materials for efficient and stable phosphors in white LED lamp applications. The energy distribution of four trap centers was obtained by thermo-luminescence (TL) with the excitation energy of 5.59eV. By superposing a below-gap excitation light of 1.77eV and observing the intensity change of the 5d-4f emission of Eu2+ centered at 2.36eV in our two-wavelength excited photoluminescence (TWEPL) measurement, both transient and steady state enhancement were observed. Such peculiar behavior of photo-stimulation is attributed to the coexistence of trap centers and NRR centers: the photoexcitation of electrons from trap centers generates the transient component, while that from NRR centers maintains the steady state component. An optical detection of relatively faint contribution of defects became possible in order to improve further the reliability and efficiency of phosphor materials.

  13. Non-radiative recombination centres in catalyst-free ZnO nanorods grown by atmospheric-metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, D. N.; Hortelano, V.; Martínez, O.; Martínez-Tomas, M. C.; Sallet, V.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.; Jiménez, J.

    2013-06-01

    We have investigated the cathodoluminescence (CL) emission and the Raman spectra along individual ZnO nanorods grown by a catalyst-free method. The spatial correlation between the CL emission and the defect related Raman modes permits establishing a correspondence between the non-radiative recombination centres (NRRCs) and the defects responsible for the 275 cm-1 Raman band. According to this relation, the NRRCs in these nanorods are tentatively associated with complexes of zinc interstitials.

  14. Do grain boundaries dominate non-radiative recombination in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite thin films?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengjin; Zeng, Yining; Li, Zhen; Kim, Dong Hoe; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Zhu, Kai

    2017-01-13

    Here, we examine GBs with respect to non-GB regions (grain surfaces (GSs) and grain interiors (GIs)) in high-quality micrometer-sized perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (or MAPbI3) thin films using high-resolution confocal fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy in conjunction with kinetic modeling of charge-transport and recombination processes. We show that, contrary to previous studies, GBs in our perovskite MAPbI3 thin films do not lead to increased recombination but that recombination in these films happens primarily in the non-GB regions (i.e., GSs or GIs). We also find that GBs in these films are not transparent to photogenerated carriers, which is likely associated with a potential barrier at GBs. Even though GBs generally display lower luminescence intensities than GSs/GIs, the lifetimes at GBs are no worse than those at GSs/GIs, further suggesting that GBs do not dominate non-radiative recombination in MAPbI3 thin films.

  15. Effect of number of stack on the thermal escape and non-radiative and radiative recombinations of photoexcited carriers in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum-well-inserted solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, Taketo; Fukuyama, Atsuhiko; Ikari, Tetsuo [Faculty of Engineering, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-Kibanadai-Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Suzuki, Hidetoshi [Interdisciplinary Research Organization, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-Kibanadai-Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Fujii, Hiromasa; Nakano, Yoshiaki [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sugiyama, Masakazu [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-02-28

    Three non-destructive methodologies, namely, surface photovoltage (SPV), photoluminescence, and piezoelectric photothermal (PPT) spectroscopies, were adopted to detect the thermal carrier escape from quantum well (QW) and radiative and non-radiative carrier recombinations, respectively, in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-inserted GaAs p-i-n solar cell structure samples. Although the optical absorbance signal intensity was proportional to the number of QW stack, the signal intensities of the SPV and PPT methods decreased at high number of stack. To explain the temperature dependency of these signal intensities, we proposed a model that considers the three carrier dynamics: the thermal escape from the QW, and the non-radiative and radiative carrier recombinations within the QW. From the fitting procedures, it was estimated that the activation energies of the thermal escape ΔE{sub barr} and non-radiative recombination ΔE{sub NR} were 68 and 29 meV, respectively, for a 30-stacked MQW sample. The estimated ΔE{sub barr} value agreed well with the difference between the first electron subband and the top of the potential barrier in the conduction band. We found that ΔE{sub barr} remained constant at approximately 70 meV even with increasing QW stack number. However, the ΔE{sub NR} value monotonically increased with the increase in the number of stack. Since this implies that non-radiative recombination becomes improbable as the number of stack increases, we found that the radiative recombination probability for electrons photoexcited within the QW increased at a large number of QW stack. Additional processes of escaping and recapturing of carriers at neighboring QW were discussed. As a result, the combination of the three non-destructive methodologies provided us new insights for optimizing the MQW components to further improve the cell performance.

  16. Screw dislocation-induced growth spirals as emissive exciton localization centers in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funato, Mitsuru, E-mail: funato@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Banal, Ryan G.; Kawakami, Yoichi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Screw dislocations in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells cause growth spirals with an enhanced Ga incorporation, which create potential minima. Although screw dislocations and their surrounding potential minima suggest non-radiative recombination processes within growth spirals, in reality, screw dislocations are not major non-radiative sinks for carriers. Consequently, carriers localized within growth spirals recombine radiatively without being captured by non-radiative recombination centers, resulting in intense emissions from growth spirals.

  17. Radiative and nonradiative recombination of photoexcited excitons in multi-shell-coated CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Ågren, H.; Kowalewski, J. M.; Brismar, H.; Wu, J.; Yue, Y.; Dai, N.; Thylén, L.

    2009-05-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have been widely studied for nanophotonics and bioimaging applications for which the lifetime of their fluorescence is of critical importance. We report experimental and theoretical characterizations of dynamic optical properties of multi-shell-coated CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs. Quantum-mechanical studies of fundamental optical excitations and Monte Carlo simulations of energy relaxation mechanisms indicate that the excitonic states are densely compacted in the QDs and are easily photoexcited by the laser pulse in the presence of nonradiative electron-phonon interactions. For spherical QDs, the decay time of spontaneous radiative emission of individual photoexcited excitonic states with zero angular momenta is found to be only tens of picoseconds. In our multi-shell QDs, high-energy excitonic states of nonzero angular momenta have to go through a number of nonradiative electron-phonon interaction steps in order to relax to zero-angular-momentum excitonic states for radiative emission, resulting in an effective fluorescence peak at about 2 ns in the photoncount-time relationship. This explains the measured long average fluorescence lifetime of 3.6 ns. Such a long lifetime facilitates the applications of colloidal QDs in areas such as QD-based solar cells, bioimaging and metamaterials.

  18. Radiative and non-radiative recombination in GaInN/GaN quantum wells; Strahlende und nichtstrahlende Rekombination in GaInN/GaN-Quantenfilmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzel, C.

    2007-02-08

    The studies presented in this thesis deal with the occurence of V defectsin GaInN/GaN quantum film structures grown by means of organometallic gas phase epitaxy, and the effects, which have the V defects respectively the GaInN quantum films on the V-defect facets on the emission and recombination properties of the whole GaInN/GaN quantum film structure. The V-defects themselves, inverse pyramidal vacancies with hexagonal base in the semiconductor layers, arise under suitable growth conditions around the percussion violations, which extend in lattice-mismatched growth of GaN on the heterosubstrates sapphire or silicon carbide starting in growth direction through the crystal. If GaInN layers are grown over V-defect dispersed layers on the (1-101) facets of the V defects and the (0001) facets, the growth front of the structure, different growth velocities are present, which lead to differently wide GaInN quantum films on each facets.

  19. Calcium impurity as a source of non-radiative recombination in (In,Ga)N layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. C.; Grandjean, N.; Mates, T. E.; Speck, J. S.

    2016-11-01

    Ca as an unintentional impurity has been investigated in III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that Ca originates from the substrate surface, even if careful cleaning and rinsing procedures are applied. The initial Ca surface coverage is ˜1012 cm-2, which is consistent with previous reports on GaAs and silicon wafers. At the onset of growth, the Ca species segregates at the growth front while incorporating at low levels. The incorporation rate is strongly temperature dependent. It is about 0.03% at 820 °C and increases by two orders of magnitude when the temperature is reduced to 600 °C, which is the typical growth temperature for InGaN alloy. Consequently, [Ca] is as high as 1018 cm-3 in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. Such a huge concentration might be detrimental for the efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) if one considers that Ca is potentially a source of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. We thus developed a specific growth strategy to reduce [Ca] in the MBE grown LEDs, which consisted of burying Ca in a low temperature InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) before the growth of the active region. Finally, two LED samples with and without an SL were fabricated. An increase in the output power by one order of magnitude was achieved when Ca was reduced in the LED active region, providing evidence for the role of Ca in the SRH recombination.

  20. Calcium impurity as a source of non-radiative recombination in (In,Ga)N layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Young, E. C.

    2016-11-23

    Ca as an unintentional impurity has been investigated in III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that Ca originates from the substrate surface, even if careful cleaning and rinsing procedures are applied. The initial Ca surface coverage is ∼1012 cm−2, which is consistent with previous reports on GaAs and silicon wafers. At the onset of growth, the Ca species segregates at the growth front while incorporating at low levels. The incorporation rate is strongly temperature dependent. It is about 0.03% at 820 °C and increases by two orders of magnitude when the temperature is reduced to 600 °C, which is the typical growth temperature for InGaN alloy. Consequently, [Ca] is as high as 1018 cm−3 in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. Such a huge concentration might be detrimental for the efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) if one considers that Ca is potentially a source of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. We thus developed a specific growth strategy to reduce [Ca] in the MBE grown LEDs, which consisted of burying Ca in a low temperature InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) before the growth of the active region. Finally, two LED samples with and without an SL were fabricated. An increase in the output power by one order of magnitude was achieved when Ca was reduced in the LED active region, providing evidence for the role of Ca in the SRH recombination.

  1. Diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent recombination rate in blue InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksiejūnas, R.; Gelžinytė, K.; Nargelas, S., E-mail: saulius.nargelas@ff.vu.lt; Jarašiūnas, K. [Department of Semiconductor Optoelectronics, Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9–III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vengris, M. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 10, 10223 Vilnius (Lithuania); Armour, E. A.; Byrnes, D. P.; Arif, R. A.; Lee, S. M.; Papasouliotis, G. D. [Veeco Instruments, Turbodisc Operations, 394 Elizabeth Avenue, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    We report on diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent carrier recombination rate in multiple InGaN/GaN quantum wells by using photoluminescence, light-induced absorption, and diffraction techniques. We demonstrate gradually increasing with excitation carrier diffusivity and its correlation with the recombination rate. At low carrier densities, an increase in radiative emission and carrier lifetime was observed due to partial saturation of non-radiative recombination centers. However, at carrier densities above ∼5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, a typical value of photoluminescence efficiency droop, a further increase of diffusivity forces the delocalized carriers to face higher number of fast non-radiative recombination centers leading to an increase of non-radiative losses.

  2. Nonradial Pulsations in ɛ Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kambe, Eiji; Lee, Umin

    2000-11-01

    We consider the question of whether all the modes detected in the line profile variations of ɛ Persei are consistent with nonradial pulsations excited by the kappa mechanism at the opacity Z-bump. We have computed massive (12.5-14 Msolar) main-sequence models, adjusting the parameters such that the evolutionary tracks pass around the approximate position of ɛ Per on the H-R diagram. A linear nonadiabatic, nonradial pulsation analysis is applied to these models. The periods in the frame corotating with the stellar surface for the observed 2.3-4.5 hr modes are found to be consistent with the Z-bump kappa mechanism. We have found, however, that the longest-period mode (8.48 hr in the observer's frame) cannot be explained by the kappa mechanism. We have examined the effect of rotation on the stability of oscillations and found that the stabilizing effect is weak, so that only a few of the shortest-period modes are stabilized for the rotation speed of ɛ Per. No significant difference is found between prograde and retrograde modes in the stability. It is a puzzle why no retrograde mode has been detected in ɛ Per, which should equally be excited by the kappa mechanism. We also discuss the observed and theoretical line profile variations of ɛ Per in the Appendix.

  3. Recombination by grain-boundary type in CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, John, E-mail: john.moseley@nrel.gov; Ahrenkiel, Richard K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Metzger, Wyatt K.; Moutinho, Helio R.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2015-07-14

    We conducted cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging and electron backscatter diffraction on the same microscopic areas of CdTe thin films to correlate grain-boundary (GB) recombination by GB “type.” We examined misorientation-based GB types, including coincident site lattice (CSL) Σ = 3, other-CSL (Σ = 5–49), and general GBs (Σ > 49), which make up ∼47%–48%, ∼6%–8%, and ∼44%–47%, respectively, of the GB length at the film back surfaces. Statistically averaged CL total intensities were calculated for each GB type from sample sizes of ≥97 GBs per type and were compared to the average grain-interior CL intensity. We find that only ∼16%–18% of Σ = 3 GBs are active non-radiative recombination centers. In contrast, all other-CSL and general GBs are observed to be strong non-radiative centers and, interestingly, these GB types have about the same CL intensity. Both as-deposited and CdCl{sub 2}-treated films were studied. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment reduces non-radiative recombination at both other-CSL and general GBs, but GBs are still recombination centers after the CdCl{sub 2} treatment.

  4. Dynamics of carrier recombination in a semiconductor laser structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhioev, R. I., E-mail: dzhioev@orient.ioffe.ru; Kavokin, K. V.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Poletaev, N. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Carrier-recombination dynamics is studied by the method of optical orientation at room temperature in the active layer of a laser diode structure. The dependence of the degree of electron-spin orientation on the excitation density is attributed to saturation of the nonradiative-recombination channel. The time of electron capture at recombination centers is determined to be τ{sub e} = 5 × 10{sup –9} s. The temperature of nonequilibrium electrons heated by a He–Ne laser is estimated.

  5. Discovery of the recombining plasma in the south of the Galactic center; a relic of the past Galactic center activity?

    CERN Document Server

    Nakashima, S; Uchida, H; Tanaka, T; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Murakami, H; Uchiyama, H

    2013-01-01

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter "GC South") has an angular size of ~42' x 16' centered at (l, b) ~ (0.0, -1.4), and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at ~2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density x elapsed time) of 5.3 x 10^11 s cm^-3. The absorption column densi...

  6. DISCOVERY OF THE RECOMBINING PLASMA IN THE SOUTH OF THE GALACTIC CENTER: A RELIC OF THE PAST GALACTIC CENTER ACTIVITY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, S.; Nobukawa, M.; Uchida, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuru, T. G.; Koyama, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Murakami, H. [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Tohoku Gakuin University 2-1-1 Tenjinzawa, Izumi-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 981-3193 (Japan); Uchiyama, H., E-mail: shinya@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Science Education, Faculty of Education, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2013-08-10

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter {sup G}C South{sup )} has an angular size of {approx}42' Multiplication-Sign 16' centered at (l, b) {approx} (0. Degree-Sign 0, - 1. Degree-Sign 4) and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at {approx}2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density Multiplication-Sign elapsed time) of 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} s cm{sup -3}. The absorption column density of GC South is consistent with that toward the GC region. Thus, GC South is likely to be located in the GC region ({approx}8 kpc distance). The size of the plasma, the mean density, and the thermal energy are estimated to be {approx}97 pc Multiplication-Sign 37 pc, 0.16 cm{sup -3}, and 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, respectively. We discuss possible origins of the recombination-dominant plasma as a relic of past activity in the GC region.

  7. Defect creation via dissociative recombination of ionic centers in solid Ne matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchenko, E.V.; Khyzhniy, I.V.; Uyutnov, S.A.; Bludov, M.A. [Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering NASU, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gumenchuk, G.B.; Bondybey, V.E. [Lehrstuhl für Physikalische Chemie II TUM, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Recombination of the intrinsic ionic centers Ne{sub 2}{sup +} (self-trapped holes) with the detrapped electrons in solid Ne matrices and relaxation channels have been studied. The experiments were performed employing combination of the cathodoluminescence (CL) with current and optical activation spectroscopy techniques. CL spectra were recorded simultaneously in the VUV and visible range. Yields of spectrally resolved thermally and photon-stimulated luminescence (TSL, PSL) and thermally and photon-stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE, PSEE) were measured in the time-correlated manner. It was found that the recombination reaction proceeds with irreversible dissociation of the transient Ne{sub 2}{sup ∗∗} centers and the dissociative recombination (DR) products exit the matrix cage. Products of the DR reaction are found to be in 3s and 3p states. The detection of “defect” components in the TSL and PSL points to the defect formation via DR in Ne matrices. The temperature range of the electron traps stability is elucidated. A long-lasting “afteremission” of electrons and afterglow of VUV photons observed on switching off the irradiation suggest the accumulation of the uncompensated negative charge.

  8. Defect creation via dissociative recombination of ionic centers in solid Ne matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, E. V.; Khyzhniy, I. V.; Uyutnov, S. A.; Bludov, M. A.; Gumenchuk, G. B.; Bondybey, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Recombination of the intrinsic ionic centers Ne2+ (self-trapped holes) with the detrapped electrons in solid Ne matrices and relaxation channels have been studied. The experiments were performed employing combination of the cathodoluminescence (CL) with current and optical activation spectroscopy techniques. CL spectra were recorded simultaneously in the VUV and visible range. Yields of spectrally resolved thermally and photon-stimulated luminescence (TSL, PSL) and thermally and photon-stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE, PSEE) were measured in the time-correlated manner. It was found that the recombination reaction proceeds with irreversible dissociation of the transient Ne2∗∗ centers and the dissociative recombination (DR) products exit the matrix cage. Products of the DR reaction are found to be in 3s and 3p states. The detection of ;defect; components in the TSL and PSL points to the defect formation via DR in Ne matrices. The temperature range of the electron traps stability is elucidated. A long-lasting ;afteremission; of electrons and afterglow of VUV photons observed on switching off the irradiation suggest the accumulation of the uncompensated negative charge.

  9. Characteristics of the photelectromagnetic effect and properties of recombination centers in germanium single crystals irradiated with. cap alpha. particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial distribution of defects created in Ge crystals by irradiation with 40-MeV ..cap alpha.. particles was investigated. The distribution of the defects acting as recombination centers had a decisive influence on the diffusion-recombination processes in this semiconductor. The carrier-capture cross section of the recombination centers (sigmaapprox.10/sup -15/ cm/sup 2/) was determined. A concept of a recombination wall, which appeared in the region of a maximum of the radiation defect concentration, was introduced. The experimental data were compared with theoretical representations. This comparison demonstrated that an investigation of the photoelectromagnetic effect could give information both on the nature of the spatial distribution of radiation defects and on the recombination parameters of an irradiated semiconductor.

  10. Intrinsic non-radiative voltage losses in fullerene-based organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Fan, Yeli; Tropiano, Manuel; McGarry, Kathryn A.; Zeika, Olaf; Riede, Moritz K.; Douglas, Christopher J.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Organic solar cells demonstrate external quantum efficiencies and fill factors approaching those of conventional photovoltaic technologies. However, as compared with the optical gap of the absorber materials, their open-circuit voltage is much lower, largely due to the presence of significant non-radiative recombination. Here, we study a large data set of published and new material combinations and find that non-radiative voltage losses decrease with increasing charge-transfer-state energies. This observation is explained by considering non-radiative charge-transfer-state decay as electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime, being facilitated by a common skeletal molecular vibrational mode. Our results suggest an intrinsic link between non-radiative voltage losses and electron-vibration coupling, indicating that these losses are unavoidable. Accordingly, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of single-junction organic solar cells would be reduced to about 25.5% and the optimal optical gap increases to 1.45-1.65 eV, that is, 0.2-0.3 eV higher than for technologies with minimized non-radiative voltage losses.

  11. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  12. A generation/recombination model assisted with two trap centers in wide band-gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Kuwabara, Takuhito; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    A generation/recombination (GR) model assisted with two trap centers has been proposed for studying reverse current on pn junctions in wide band-gap semiconductors. A level (Et1) has been assumed to be located near the bottom of the conduction band and the other (Et2) to be near the top of the valence band. The GR model has been developed by assuming (1) a high-electric field; F, (2) a short distance; d, between trap centers, (3) reduction in an energy-difference; Δeff = |Et1 - Et2| - eFd, and (4) hopping or tunneling conductions between trap centers with the same energy-level (Δeff ≈ 0). The GR rate has been modeled by trap levels, capture cross-sections, trap densities, and transition rate between trap centers. The GR rate, about 1010 greater than that estimated from the single-level model, has been predicted on pn junctions in a material with band-gap of 3.1 eV. Device simulations using the proposed GR model have been demonstrated for SiC diodes with and without a guard ring. A reasonable range for reverse current at room temperature has been simulated and stable convergence has been obtained in a numerical scheme for analyzing diodes with an electrically floating region.

  13. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-03-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus.

  14. Non-Radiative Step Facets in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana M; Zhang, Yunyan; Tait, Edward W; Hine, Nicholas D M; Liu, Huiyun; Beanland, Richard

    2017-03-24

    One of the main advantages of nanowires for functional applications is their high perfection, which results from surface image forces that act on line defects such as dislocations, rendering them unstable and driving them out of the crystal. Here we show that there is a class of linear defects that are stable in nanowires, with no long-range strain field or dislocation character. In zinc-blende semiconductors, they take the form of Ʃ3 (112) facets with heights constrained to be a multiple of three {111} monolayers. Density functional theory calculations show that they act as non-radiative recombination centres and have deleterious effects on nanowire properties. We present experimental observations of these defects on twin boundaries and twins that terminate inside GaAsP nanowires and find that they are indeed always multiples of three monolayers in height. Strategies to use the three-monolayer rule during growth to prevent their formation are discussed.

  15. Applications of Low Density Flow Techniques and Catalytic Recombination at the Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    The talk presents a brief background on defInitions of catalysis and effects associated with chemically nonequilibrium and low-density flows of aerospace interest. Applications of catalytic recombination on surfaces in dissociated flow are given, including aero heating on reentry spacecraft thermal protection surfaces and reflection of plume flow on pressure distributions associated with the space station. Examples include aero heating predictions for the X-38 test vehicle, the inlet of a proposed gas-sampling probe used in high enthalpy test facilities, and a parabolic body at angle of attack. The effect of accommodation coefficients on thruster induced pressure distributions is also included. Examples of tools used include simple aero heating formulas based on boundary layer solutions, an engineering approximation that uses axisymmetric viscous shock layer flow to simulate full three dimensional flow, full computational fluid dynamics, and direct simulation Monte-Carlo calculations. Methods of determining catalytic recombination rates in arc jet flow are discus ed. An area of catalysis not fully understood is the formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with gas phase or nano-size metal particles. The Johnson Space Center is making SWNTs using both a laser ablation technique and an electric arc vaporization technique.

  16. Trap and recombination centers study in sprayed Cu₂ZnSnS₄ thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courel, Maykel, E-mail: maykelcourel@gmail.com; Vigil-Galán, O.; Jiménez-Olarte, D. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas-Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN), C.P. 07738, México DF (Mexico); Espíndola-Rodríguez, M. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas-Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN), C.P. 07738, México DF (Mexico); Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Jardins de les Dones de Negre 1, 08930 Sant Adrià de Besòs, Barcelona (Spain); Saucedo, E. [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Jardins de les Dones de Negre 1, 08930 Sant Adrià de Besòs, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    In this work, a study of trap and recombination center properties in polycrystalline Cu₂ZnSnS₄ thin films is carried out in order to understand the poor performance in Cu₂ZnSnS₄ thin film solar cells. Thermally stimulated current has been studied in Cu₂ZnSnS₄ deposited by pneumatic spray pyrolysis method using various heating rates, in order to gain information about trap centers and/or deep levels present within the band-gap of this material. A set of temperature-dependent current curves revealed three levels with activation energy of 126±10, 476±25, and 1100±100 meV. The possible nature of the three levels found is presented, in which the first one is likely to be related to Cu{sub Zn} antisites, while second and third to Sn vacancies and Sn{sub Cu} antisites, respectively. The values of frequency factor, capture cross section, and trap concentration have been determined for each center.

  17. Trap and recombination centers study in sprayed Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courel, Maykel; Vigil-Galán, O.; Jiménez-Olarte, D.; Espíndola-Rodríguez, M.; Saucedo, E.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a study of trap and recombination center properties in polycrystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films is carried out in order to understand the poor performance in Cu2ZnSnS4 thin film solar cells. Thermally stimulated current has been studied in Cu2ZnSnS4 deposited by pneumatic spray pyrolysis method using various heating rates, in order to gain information about trap centers and/or deep levels present within the band-gap of this material. A set of temperature-dependent current curves revealed three levels with activation energy of 126 ± 10, 476 ± 25, and 1100 ± 100 meV. The possible nature of the three levels found is presented, in which the first one is likely to be related to CuZn antisites, while second and third to Sn vacancies and SnCu antisites, respectively. The values of frequency factor, capture cross section, and trap concentration have been determined for each center.

  18. Nonradiative and Radiative Recombination in CdS Polycrystalline Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gaubas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of polycrystalline CdS layers, employed in formation of the CdS-Cu2S heterostructures, have been studied by combining contactless techniques of the time and spectrally resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL spectroscopy and microwave-probed photoconductivity (MW-PC transients. The confocal microscopy has been employed to correlate the homogeneity of photoluminescence and grain size in CdS layers. Three types of samples with crystallite grain size of <1 μm (the I-type and of 2–10 μm of homogeneous (II-type and inhomogeneous (III-type grain distribution have been separated. The simultaneous record of MW-PC and TR-PL responses ensures the same sampling area on the layer under investigation, as both (MW-PC and TR-PL signals are generated by the same UV laser excitation beam. Two PL bands peaked at 500 and 700 nm were revealed. It has been demonstrated that photoluminescence intensity strongly depends on the properties of the polycrystalline 15–26 μm thick CdS layers with equilibrium carrier density of about 1.5×1013 cm−3, which serve as the substrates to form CdS-Cu2S junctions. The different carrier decay components were ascribed to different microareas with characteristic MW-PC and PL decay lifetimes of 2–10 ns, ascribed to microcrystallites with PL instantaneous decay lifetimes of 40–200 ns, and MW-PC decay lifetimes in the range of 100–1000 μs attributed to the inter-crystallite areas of CdS polycrystalline material.

  19. Effects of the impurity-host interactions on the nonradiative processes in ZnS:Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablero, C.

    2010-11-01

    There is a great deal of controversy about whether the behavior of an intermediate band in the gap of semiconductors is similar or not to the deep-gap levels. It can have significant consequences, for example, on the nonradiative recombination. In order to analyze the behavior of an intermediate band, we have considered the effect of the inward and outward displacements corresponding to breathing and longitudinal modes of Cr-doped ZnS and on the charge density for different processes involved in the nonradiative recombination using first-principles. This metal-doped zinc chalcogenide has a partially filled band within the host semiconductor gap. In contrast to the properties exhibited by deep-gap levels in other systems, we find small variations in the equilibrium configurations, forces, and electronic density around the Cr when the nonradiative recombination mechanisms modify the intermediate band charge. The charge density around the impurity is equilibrated in response to the perturbations in the equilibrium nuclear configuration and the charge of the intermediate band. The equilibration follows a Le Chatelier principle through the modification of the contribution from the impurity to the intermediate band and to the valence band. The intermediate band introduced by Cr in ZnS for the concentrations analyzed makes the electronic capture difficult and later multiphonon emission in the charge-transfer processes, in accordance with experimental results.

  20. PP4 is essential for germinal center formation and class switch recombination in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yu Chen

    Full Text Available PP4 is a serine/threonine phosphatase required for immunoglobulin (Ig VDJ recombination and pro-B/pre-B cell development in mice. To elucidate the role of PP4 in mature B cells, we ablated the catalytic subunit of murine PP4 in vivo utilizing the CD23 promoter and cre-loxP recombination and generated CD23(crePP4(F/F mice. The development of follicular and marginal zone B cells was unaffected in these mutants, but the proliferation of mature PP4-deficient B cells stimulated by in vitro treatment with either anti-IgM antibody (Ab or LPS was partially impaired. Interestingly, the induction of CD80 and CD86 expression on these stimulated B cells was normal. Basal levels of serum Igs of all isotypes were strongly reduced in CD23(crePP4(F/F mice, and their B cells showed a reduced efficiency of class switch recombination (CSR in vitro upon stimulation by LPS or LPS plus IL-4. When CD23(crePP4(F/F mice were challenged with either the T cell-dependent antigen TNP-KLH or the T cell-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, or by H1N1 virus infection, the mutant animals failed to form germinal centers (GCs in the spleen and the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, and did not efficiently mount antigen-specific humoral responses. In the resting state, PP4-deficient B cells exhibited pre-existing DNA fragmentation. Upon stimulation by DNA-damaging drug etoposide in vitro, mutant B cells showed increased cleavage of caspase 3. In addition, the mutant B cells displayed impaired CD40-mediated MAPK activation, abnormal IgM-mediated NF-κB activation, and reduced S phase entry upon IgM/CD40-stimulation. Taken together, our results establish a novel role for PP4 in CSR, and reveal crucial functions for PP4 in the maintenance of genomic stability, GC formation, and B cell-mediated immune responses.

  1. Photoexcited carrier trapping and recombination at Fe centers in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uždavinys, T. K. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 16440 Kista (Sweden); Marcinkevičius, S., E-mail: sm@kth.se [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 16440 Kista (Sweden); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Leach, J. H.; Evans, K. R. [Kyma Technologies Inc., 8829 Midway West Road, Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Look, D. C. [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Wyle Laboratories, Inc., 2601 Mission Point Blvd., Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Fe doped GaN was studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The shape of PL transients at different temperatures and excitation powers allowed discrimination between electron and hole capture to Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} centers, respectively. Analysis of the internal structure of Fe ions and intra-ion relaxation rates suggests that for high repetition rates of photoexciting laser pulses the electron and hole trapping takes place in the excited state rather than the ground state of Fe ions. Hence, the estimated electron and hole capture coefficients of 5.5 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup 3}/s and 1.8 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup 3}/s should be attributed to excited Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} states. The difference in electron capture rates determined for high (MHz) and low (Hz) (Fang et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 051901 (2015)) pulse repetition rates may be assigned to the different Fe states participating in the carrier capture. A weak temperature dependence of the electron trapping rate shows that the potential barrier for the multiphonon electron capture is small. A spectral feature observed at ∼420 nm is assigned to the radiative recombination of an electron in the ground Fe{sup 2+} state and a bound hole.

  2. Photoexcited carrier trapping and recombination at Fe centers in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uždavinys, T. K.; Marcinkevičius, S.; Leach, J. H.; Evans, K. R.; Look, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    Fe doped GaN was studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The shape of PL transients at different temperatures and excitation powers allowed discrimination between electron and hole capture to Fe3+ and Fe2+ centers, respectively. Analysis of the internal structure of Fe ions and intra-ion relaxation rates suggests that for high repetition rates of photoexciting laser pulses the electron and hole trapping takes place in the excited state rather than the ground state of Fe ions. Hence, the estimated electron and hole capture coefficients of 5.5 × 10-8 cm3/s and 1.8 × 10-8 cm3/s should be attributed to excited Fe3+ and Fe2+ states. The difference in electron capture rates determined for high (MHz) and low (Hz) (Fang et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 051901 (2015)) pulse repetition rates may be assigned to the different Fe states participating in the carrier capture. A weak temperature dependence of the electron trapping rate shows that the potential barrier for the multiphonon electron capture is small. A spectral feature observed at ˜420 nm is assigned to the radiative recombination of an electron in the ground Fe2+ state and a bound hole.

  3. Evaluation of recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis at a tertiary academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anger KE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kevin E Anger,1 Jeremy R DeGrado,1 Bonnie C Greenwood,1 Steven A Cohen,2 Paul M Szumita1 1Department of Pharmacy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Division of Epidemiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Purpose: Early clinical trials of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC for severe sepsis excluded patients at high risk of bleeding. Recent literature suggests bleeding rates are higher in clinical practice and may be associated with worsened outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate baseline demographics; incidence, and risk factors for major bleeding; and mortality of patients receiving rhAPC for severe sepsis at our institution. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for all patients receiving rhAPC for treatment of severe sepsis at a tertiary academic medical center from January 2002 to June 2009. Demographic information, clinical variables, intensive care unit, and hospital outcomes were recorded. Results: Of the 156 patients that received rhAPC, 54 (34.6% did not meet institutional criteria for safe use at baseline due to bleeding precaution or contraindication. Twenty-three (14.7% patients experienced a major bleeding event. Multivariate analysis demonstrated baseline International Normalized Ratio ≥2.5 (odds ratio [OR] 3.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–10.56; P = 0.03 and platelet count ≤100 × 103/mm3 (OR 2.86, 95% CI: 1.07–7.67; P = 0.01 as significant predictors of a major bleed. Overall hospital mortality was 57.7%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the presence of ≥3 organ dysfunctions (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.19–5.09; P < 0.05 and medical intensive care unit admission (OR 1.99, 95% CI: 1.00–3.98; P = 0.05 were independent variables associated with hospital mortality. Conclusion: Patients receiving rhAPC at our institution had higher APACHE II scores, mortality, and major bleeding events than published

  4. Rad52 forms DMA repair and recombination centers during S phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Rothstein, R.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2001-01-01

    fluorescent protein (GFP) is fully functional in DNA repair and recombination. After induction of DNA double-strand breaks by gamma -irradiation, meiosis, or the HO endonuclease, Rad52-GFP relocalizes from a diffuse nuclear distribution to distinct foci. Interestingly, Rad52 foci are formed almost exclusively...

  5. Tuning nonradiative lifetimes via molecular aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Celestino, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that molecular aggregation can strongly influence the nonradiative decay (NRD) lifetime of an electronic excitation. As a demonstrative example, we consider a transition-dipole-dipole-interacting dimer whose monomers have harmonic potential energy surfaces (PESs). Depending on the position of the NRD channel ($q_{\\rm nr}$), we find that the NRD lifetime ($\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$) can exhibit a completely different dependence on the intermolecular-interaction strength. We observe that (i) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the Franck-Condon region, $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$ increases with the interaction strength; (ii) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the minimum of the monomer excited PES, the intermolecular interaction has little influence on $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$; (iii) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the classical turning point of the monomer nuclear dynamics, on the other side of the minimum, $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$ decreases with the interaction strength. Our findings suggest design principles for molecular systems where a...

  6. Nonradial Pulsations in Classical Cepheids of the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalik, P; Moskalik, Pawel; Mizerski, Zbigniew Kolaczkowski & Tomasz

    2003-01-01

    We have performed systematic frequency analysis of the LMC Cepheids observed by OGLE project. Several new types of pulsation behaviour are identified, including triple-mode and amplitude-modulated double-mode pulsations. In ~10% of the first overtone Cepheids we find low amplitude secondary periodicities corresponding to nonradial modes. This is the first evidence for excitation of nonradial oscillations in Classical Cepheid variables.

  7. Full-band structure modeling of the radiative and non-radiative properties of semiconductor materials and devices (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, Enrico; Wen, Hanqing; Pinkie, Benjamin; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bertazzi, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the radiative and non-radiative properties of semiconductor materials is a prerequisite for optimizing the performance of existing light emitters and detectors and for developing new device architectures based on novel materials. Due to the ever increasing complexity of novel semiconductor systems and their relative technological immaturity, it is essential to have design tools and simulation strategies that include the details of the microscopic physics and their dependence on the macroscopic (continuum) variables in the macroscopic device models. Towards this end, we have developed a robust full-band structure based approach that can be used to study the intrinsic material radiative and non-radiative properties and evaluate the same characteristics of low-dimensional device structures. A parallel effort is being carried out to model the effect of substrate driven stress/strain and material quality (dislocations and defects) on microscopic quantities such as non-radiative recombination rate. Using this modeling approach, we have extensively studied the radiative and non-radiative properties of both elemental (Si and Ge) and compound semiconductors (HgCdTe, InGaAs, InAsSb and InGaN). In this work we outline the details of the modelling approach, specifically the challenges and advantages related to the use of the full-band description of the material electronic structure. We will present a detailed comparison of the radiative and Auger recombination rates as a function of temperature and doping for HgCdTe and InAsSb that are two important materials for infrared detectors and emitters. Furthermore we will discuss the role of non-radiatiave Auger recombination processes in explaining the performance of light emitter diodes. Finally we will present the extension of the model to low dimensional structures employed in a number of light emitter and detector structures.

  8. Charge recombination kinetics and protein dynamics in wild type and carotenoid-less bacterial reaction centers: studies in trehalose glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Malferrari, Marco; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2009-07-30

    The coupling between electron transfer and protein dynamics has been investigated in reaction centers (RCs) from the wild type (wt) and the carotenoid-less strain R26 of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Recombination kinetics between the primary photoreduced quinone acceptor (QA-) and photoxidized donor (P+) have been analyzed at room temperature in RCs incorporated into glassy trehalose matrices of different water/sugar ratios. As previously found in R26 RCs, also in the wt RC, upon matrix dehydration, P+QA- recombination accelerates and becomes broadly distributed, reflecting the inhibition of protein relaxation from the dark-adapted to the light-adapted conformation and the hindrance of interconversion between conformational substates. While in wet trehalose matrices (down to approximately one water per trehalose molecule) P+QA- recombination kinetics are essentially coincident in wt and R26 RCs, more extensive dehydration leads to two-times faster and more distributed kinetics in the carotenoid-containing RC, indicating a stronger inhibition of the internal protein dynamics in the wt RC. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations performed on the two RC structures reveal a markedly larger flexibility of the R26 RC, showing that a rigid core of residues, close to the quinone acceptors, is specifically softened in the absence of the carotenoid. These experimental and computational results concur to indicate that removal of the carotenoid molecule has long-range effects on protein dynamics and that the structural/dynamical coupling between the protein and the glassy matrix depends strongly upon the local mechanical properties of the protein interior. The data also suggest that the conformational change stabilizing P+QA- is localized around the QA binding pocket.

  9. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel;

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...

  10. Nonradiative charge transfer in collisions of protons with rubidium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ling-Ling; Qu Yi-Zhi; Liu Chun-Hua; Zhang Yu; Wang Jian-Guo; Buenker Robert J

    2012-01-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer cross sections for protons colliding with Rb(5s) atoms are calculated by using the quantum-mechanical molecularorbital close-coupling method in an energy range of 10-3 keV 10 keV.The total and state-selective charge-transfer cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental data in the relatively low energy region.The importance of rotational coupling for chargetransfer process is stressed.Compared with the radiative charge-transfer process,nonradiative charge transfer is a dominant mechanism at energies above 15 eV.The resonance structures of state-selective charge-transfer cross sections arising from the competition among channels are analysed in detail.The radiative and nonradiative charge-transfer rate coefficients from low to high temperature are presented.

  11. Latitude distribution of nonradial pulsations in rapidly rotating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Aerts, C.

    2004-05-01

    We present a method for the analysis of latitude distribution associated with temperature and/or velocity perturbations of the stellar surface due to non-radial pulsation (NRP) modes in rapidly rotating B stars. The technique is applied together with Fourier Doppler Imaging (FDI) to high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of ɛ Per. The main advantage of this approach is that it decomposed complex multi-periodic line profile variations into single components, allowing the detailed analysis of each mode seperately. We study the 10.6-d-1 frequency that is particularly important for modal analysis of non-radial pulsations in the star.

  12. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  13. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  14. Lasing in organic semiconductors - time-resolved studies of non-radiative decay processes

    CERN Document Server

    Zenz, C R

    2000-01-01

    Based on the demonstration of optical gain in an organic single crystal of a soluble oligo-phenylene-vinylene with gain values higher than 60 cm-1 and optically pumped lasing in a longitudinal adjustable microcavity based on laddertype polyparaphenylene, the realization of an organic laserdiode is discussed. The output characteristics of the microcavity can be modeled using classical rate equations, however the obtained threshold values are limited by the short excited state lifetime. A comparison with the lifetime measured on isolated molecules shows, that non-radiative decay processes in the solid state are determining the excited state lifetime. Using conventional and a novel field-assisted differential transmission spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution, two main decay mechanism could be identified. (i) Triplet exciton in para-hexaphenyl is formed by non-geminate recombination of photo-generated polarons. (ii) Dissociation of the luminescent singlet excitons into polarons is important for two reaso...

  15. Method for determining effective nonradiative lifetime and leakage losses in double-heterostructure lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Opdorp, C.; ' t Hooft, G.W.

    1981-06-01

    Carrier losses in double-heterostructure lasers are twofold: (i) nonradiative recombination through killers in the bulk of the active region and at all its boundaries (interfaces and surfaces), and (ii) leakage out of the active region. A simple theory shows the following. In the high-injection regime (papprox. =n) all processes under (i) are directly proportional to n. Consequently their contributions can be lumped together in a single effective nonradiative carrier lifetime tau/sub nr/ ; this tau/sub nr/ is constant (i.e., independent of n) owing to the constant degree of occupation of all killers in the mentioned regime. On the other hand, the leakage losses (ii) are superlinear in n. This provides a well-grounded basis for disentangling the contributions of (i) and (ii) in a given sample. Further, a simple method is presented for accurately determining tau/sub nr/ from data of the external quantum efficiency eta/sub ext/ measured as a function of current I in the spontaneous high-injection regime below the laser threshold. Knowledge of the light-extraction factor (i.e., the ratio of external and internal quantum efficiencies) is essentially unnecessary with this method. However, optionally it can be determined easily from a slight extension of the method. For illustration the method of determining tau/sub nr/, which is also applicable to double-hetero LED's, has been applied to some thirty LPE and metal-organic VPE GaAs-(Ga,Al)As lasers of widely varying qualities. The values found vary between 0.8 and 55 ns. From the measured values of tau/sub nr/ it follows that the upper limit for the interface recombination velocity in the best samples is 270 cm/s. For most samples tau/sub nr/ cannot account for all electrical losses at laser threshold. The superlinear excess losses are ascribable to leakage.

  16. Understanding and eliminating non-radiative decay in organic-inorganic perovskites (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; de Quilettes, Dane

    2016-09-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are highly promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21% and promising applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors also emerging. A key enabling property of the perovskites is their high photoluminescence quantum efficiency, suggesting that these materials could in principle approach the thermodynamic device efficiency limits in which all recombination is radiative. However, non-radiative recombination sites are present which vary heterogeneously from grain to grain and limit device performance. Here, I will present results where we probe the local photophysics of neat CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films using confocal photoluminescence (PL) measurements and correlate the observations with the local chemistry of the grains using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). We investigate the connection between grains that are bright or dark in emission and the local Pb:I ratios at the surface and through the grains. We also examine how the photophysics, local chemistry and non-radiative decay pathways change slowly over time under illumination. Our results reveal a "photo-induced cleaning" arising from a redistribution of iodide content in the films, giving strong evidence for photo-induced ion migration. These slow transient effects appear to be related to anomalous hysteresis phenomena observed in full solar cells. I will discuss how immobilizing ions, reducing trap densities and achieving homogenous stoichiometries could suppress hysteresis effects and lead to devices approaching the efficiency limits.

  17. Suppressed Auger Recombination in “Giant” Nanocrystals Boosts Optical Gain Performance

    OpenAIRE

    García-Santamaría, Florencio; Chen, Yongfen; Vela, Javier; Schaller, Richard D.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron–hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency (“blinking”) of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructur...

  18. Strong covalency-induced recombination centers in perovskite solar cell material CH3NH3PbI3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiorgousis, Michael L; Sun, Yi-Yang; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Shengbai

    2014-10-15

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskites are a new family of solar cell materials, which have recently been used to make solar cells with efficiency approaching 20%. Here, we report the unique defect chemistry of the prototype material, CH3NH3PbI3, based on first-principles calculation. We found that both the Pb cations and I anions in this material exhibit strong covalency as characterized by the formation of Pb dimers and I trimers with strong covalent bonds at some of the intrinsic defects. The Pb dimers and I trimers are only stabilized in a particular charge state with significantly lowered energy, which leads to deep charge-state transition levels within the band gap, in contradiction to a recent proposal that this system has only shallow intrinsic defects. Our results show that, in order to prevent the deep-level defects from being effective recombination centers, the equilibrium carrier concentrations should be controlled so that the Fermi energy is about 0.3 eV away from the band edges. Beyond this range, according to a Shockley-Read-Hall analysis, the non-equilibrium carrier lifetime will be strongly affected by the concentration of I vacancies and the anti-site defects with I occupying a CH3NH3 site.

  19. Double carriers pulse DLTS for the characterization of electron-hole recombination process in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi, E-mail: sd08503@toyota-ti.ac.j [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    A nitrogen-related electron trap (E1), located approximately 0.33 eV from the conduction band minimum of GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy, was confirmed by investigating the dependence of its density with N concentration. This level exhibits a high capture cross section compared with that of native defects in GaAs. Its density increases significantly with N concentration, persists following post-thermal annealing, and was found to be quasi-uniformly distributed. These results indicate that E1 is a stable defect that is formed during growth to compensate for the tensile strain caused by N. Furthermore, E1 was confirmed to act as a recombination center by comparing its activation energy with that of the recombination current in the depletion region of the alloy. However, this technique cannot characterize the electron-hole (e-h) recombination process. For that, double carrier pulse deep level transient spectroscopy is used to confirm the non-radiative e-h recombination process through E1, to estimate the capture cross section of holes, and to evaluate the energy of multi-phonon emission. Furthermore, a configuration coordinate diagram is modeled based on the physical parameters of E1. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Double carrier pulse DLTS method confirms the existence of SRH center. {yields} The recombination center in GaAsN depends on nitrogen concentration. {yields} Minority carrier lifetime in GaAsN is less than 1 ns. {yields} A non-radiative recombination center exits in GaAsN.

  20. Modulation of the fluorescence yield in heliobacterial cells by induction of charge recombination in the photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Kevin E; Sarrou, Iosifina; Rappaport, Fabrice; Santabarbara, Stefano; Lin, Su; Reifschneider, Kiera T

    2014-05-01

    Heliobacteria contain a very simple photosynthetic apparatus, consisting of a homodimeric type I reaction center (RC) without a peripheral antenna system and using the unique pigment bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) g. They are thought to use a light-driven cyclic electron transport pathway to pump protons, and thereby phosphorylate ADP, although some of the details of this cycle are yet to be worked out. We previously reported that the fluorescence emission from the heliobacterial RC in vivo was increased by exposure to actinic light, although this variable fluorescence phenomenon exhibited very different characteristics to that in oxygenic phototrophs (Collins et al. 2010). Here, we describe the underlying mechanism behind the variable fluorescence in heliobacterial cells. We find that the ability to stably photobleach P800, the primary donor of the RC, using brief flashes is inversely correlated to the variable fluorescence. Using pump-probe spectroscopy in the nanosecond timescale, we found that illumination of cells with bright light for a few seconds put them in a state in which a significant fraction of the RCs underwent charge recombination from P800 (+)A0 (-) with a time constant of ~20 ns. The fraction of RCs in the rapidly back-reacting state correlated very well with the variable fluorescence, indicating that nearly all of the increase in fluorescence could be explained by charge recombination of P800 (+)A0 (-), some of which regenerated the singlet excited state. This hypothesis was tested directly by time-resolved fluorescence studies in the ps and ns timescales. The major decay component in whole cells had a 20-ps decay time, representing trapping by the RC. Treatment of cells with dithionite resulted in the appearance of a ~18-ns decay component, which accounted for ~0.6 % of the decay, but was almost undetectable in the untreated cells. We conclude that strong illumination of heliobacterial cells can result in saturation of the electron acceptor pool

  1. Non-Radial Oscillations in an Axisymmetric MHD Incompressible Fluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Satya Narayanan

    2000-09-01

    It is well known from Helioseismology that the Sun exhibits oscillations on a global scale, most of which are non-radial in nature. These oscillations help us to get a clear picture of the internal structure of the Sun as has been demonstrated by the theoretical and observational (such as GONG) studies. In this study we formulate the linearised equations of motion for non-radial oscillations by perturbing the MHD equilibrium solution for an axisymmetric incompressible fluid. The fluid motion and the magnetic field are expressed as scalars , , and , respectively. In deriving the exact solution for the equilibrium state, we neglect the contribution due to meridional circulation. The perturbed quantities *, *, *, * are written in terms of orthogonal polynomials. A special case of the above formulation and its stability is discussed.

  2. Nonradiative limitations to plasmon propagation in chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Brandstetter-Kunc, Adam; Downing, Charles A; Weinmann, Dietmar; Jalabert, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collective plasmonic modes in a chain of metallic nanoparticles that are coupled by near-field interactions. The size- and momentum-dependent nonradiative Landau damping and radiative decay rates are calculated analytically within an open quantum system approach. These decay rates determine the excitation propagation along the chain. In particular, the behavior of the radiative decay rate as a function of the plasmon wavelength leads to a transition from an exponential decay of the collective excitation for short distances to an algebraic decay for large distances. Importantly, we show that the exponential decay is of a purely nonradiative origin. Our transparent model enables us to provide analytical expressions for the polarization-dependent plasmon excitation profile along the chain and for the associated propagation length. Our theoretical analysis constitutes an important step in the quest for the optimal conditions for plasmonic propagation in nanoparticle chains.

  3. Special features of photoelectromagnetic effect and properties of recombination centers in germanium single crystals irradiated by. cap alpha. particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of studies on a spatial distribution of defects arising in Ge crystals following ..cap alpha..-particle (40 MeV) irradiation are given. The distribution of defects playing the role of recombination centres is shown to produce the definite effect on diffusion-recombination processes in semiconductors. The carrier capture cross section on recombination centres is determined to be sigma approximately 10/sup -15/ cm/sup -2/. A representation of recombination wall appearing in the vicinity of radiation defect concentration peak is introduced. The experimental data are compared with the developed theoretical representations. It is shown that studies on the photoelectromagnetic effect can give information both on the pattern of radiation defect spatial distribution and recombination parameters of irradiated semiconductors.

  4. Increase in the Shockley–Read–Hall recombination rate in InGaN/GaN QWs as the main mechanism of the efficiency droop in LEDs at high injection levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochkareva, N. I.; Rebane, Yu. T.; Shreter, Yu. G., E-mail: y.shreter@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that the efficiency droop observed as the current through a GaN-based light-emitting diode increases is due to a decrease in the Shockley–Read–Hall nonradiative lifetime. The lifetime decreases with increasing current because a steadily growing number of traps in the density-of-states tails of InGaN/GaN quantum wells become nonradiative recombination centers upon the approach of quasi-Fermi levels to the band edges. This follows from the correlation between the efficiency droop and the appearance of negative differential capacitance, observed in the study. The correlation appears due to slow trap recharging via the trap-assisted tunneling of electrons through the n-type barrier of the quantum well and to the inductive nature of the diode-current variation with forward bias.

  5. Gallium vacancy complexes as a cause of Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in III-nitride light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Cyrus E.; Alkauskas, Audrius; Lyons, John L.; Speck, James S.; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a mechanism by which complexes between gallium vacancies and oxygen and/or hydrogen act as efficient channels for nonradiative recombination in InGaN alloys. Our identification is based on first-principles calculations of defect formation energies, charge-state transition levels, and nonradiative capture coefficients for electrons and holes. The dependence of these quantities on alloy composition is analyzed. We find that modest concentrations of the proposed defect complexes (˜1016 cm-3) can give rise to Shockley-Read-Hall coefficients A =(107-109) s-1. The resulting nonradiative recombination would significantly reduce the internal quantum efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  6. Non-radial Pulsations in the Open Cluster NGC 3766

    CERN Document Server

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M; McSwain, M Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Non-radial pulsations (NRPs) are a proposed mechanism for the formation of decretion disks around Be stars and are important tools to study the internal structure of stars. NGC 3766 has an unusually large fraction of transient Be stars, so it is an excellent location to study the formation mechanism of Be star disks. High resolution spectroscopy can reveal line profile variations from NRPs, allowing measurements of both the degree, l, and azimuthal order, m. However, spectroscopic studies require large amounts of time with large telescopes to achieve the necessary high S/N and time domain coverage. On the other hand, multi-color photometry can be performed more easily with small telescopes to measure l only. Here, we present representative light curves of Be stars and non-emitting B stars in NGC 3766 from the CTIO 0.9m telescope in an effort to study NRPs in this cluster.

  7. General Relativistic Non-radial Oscillations of Compact Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zack, II; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2017-01-01

    Currently, we lack a means of identifying the type of matter at the core of compact stars, but in the future, we may be able to use gravitational wave signals produced by fluid oscillations inside compact stars to discover new phases of dense matter. To this end, we study the fluid perturbations inside compact stars such as Neutron Stars and Strange Quark Stars, focusing on modes that couple to gravitational waves. Using a modern equation of state for quark matter that incorporates interactions at moderately high densities, we implement an efficient computational scheme to solve the oscillation equations in the framework of General Relativity, and determine the complex eigenfrequencies that describe the oscillation and damping of the non-radial fluid modes. We discuss the significance of our results for future detection of these modes through gravitational waves. This work is supported in part by the CSULB Graduate Research Fellowship and by the National Science Foundation NSF PHY-1608959.

  8. Effect of relative hypoparathyroidism on the responsiveness to recombinant human erythropoietin in chronic hemodialysis patients: A single Saudi center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al Saran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common concomitant disorder in dialysis patients. The responsiveness to recombinant human erythropoietin in hemodialysis (HD patients with relative hypoparathyroidism [4 ≤ intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH ≤16.5 pmol/L] remains undetermined. We retrospectively studied 70 chronic hemodialysis patients who were divided into two groups: Group A (32 patients had 16.5 ≤ iPTH levels <33.5 pmol/L and Group B (38 patients had 4 ≥ iPTH≤16.5 pmol/L during the preceding six months without 1- (OH Vitamin D3 administration. The percentage of female gender was significantly higher in Group B compared with Group A (P = 0.018. In Groups A and B, the mean weekly recombinant human erythropoietin dose (U/kg/ week was 227.96 ± 95.24 vs. 154.1 ± 84.9 (P = 0.001 and the mean hemoglobin level was 11.15 ± 0.63 g/dL versus 11.62 ± 0.63 g/dL (P = 0.008. There was no significant statistical difference regarding the other biochemical markers (serum ferritin, iron saturation, serum Ca, serum alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, serum B12, serum folate levels, residual renal function and Kt/v between the groups. If other factors related to anemia are excluded in chronic HD patients, the lower the iPTH level (relative hypoparathyroidism the better the responsiveness to recombinant human erythropoietin.

  9. FUSE Observations of the Cygnus Loop OVI Emission from a Nonradiative Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Sankrit, R; Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.

    2001-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of a Balmer filament in the northeast region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. The data consist of one spectrum obtained through the 30"x30" (LWRS) aperture and three spectra at adjacent positions obtained through the 4"x20" (MDRS) aperture. The nonradiative shocks in the region giving rise to these faint optical filaments produce strong OVI 1032,1038 emission, which is detected in all the spectra. The OVI emission is resolved by FUSE into a strong component centered at 0 km/s, and weaker components centered at +/- 140 km/s. The MDRS spectra allow us to study the variation of OVI emission in the post-shock structure. We find that the zero velocity emission is associated directly with the Balmer filament shock, while the high velocity emission comes from a more uniformly distributed component elsewhere along the line of sight. We also find that the shocks producing the emission at +/- 140 km/s have velocities between 180 km/s and 220 km/...

  10. Copper selenide nanowires and nanocrystallites in alumina: Carrier relaxation, recombination, and trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statkutė, G.; Tomašiùnas, R.; Jagminas, A.

    2007-06-01

    Nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in copper selenide (Cu2-δSe δ=0.15, Cu3Se2) nanowires (diameter ≈18 nm, height ≈2 μm) and nanocrystallites (diameter≈18 nm) in femto- and picosecond time domains by the means of a transient dynamic grating technique were investigated. Bulk and quantum confinement approaches were used to fit the experimental results using nonequilibrium carrier fast relaxation, recombination, and trapping mechanisms. A nonradiative Auger recombination was concluded to be the main mechanism of nonequilibrium carrier recombination. The Auger coefficient for copper selenide was estimated of the order of 10-30-10-29 cm6 s-1. Hole trapping at shallow impurity centers in nanowires was interpreted. From calculating the experimental results the trapping parameters and high concentration of centers >1020 cm-3 were evaluated. Finally, direct measurement of carrier lifetime in copper selenide nanostructures showed values of the order of ≈10-10 s. Samples were characterized by the means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and optical spectroscopy.

  11. Validation and ease of use of a new pen device for self-administration of recombinant human growth hormone: results from a two-center usability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, Robert; Saenger, Paul; Schmidt, Heinrich; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Colle, Michel; Loche, Sandro; Marcantonio, Sandra; Bonfig, Walter; Zabransky, Markus; Lifshitz, Fima

    2013-01-01

    Close adherence to the recommended treatment regimen is important for the success of recombinant human growth hormone therapy, although nonadherence can be common. Ease of use and safety during use/storage are among several important factors in the design of a growth hormone injection device intended for long-term use. This study was performed to validate the usability and assess the ease of use of a new pen device (SurePal™) that has been developed to support daily administration of the recombinant human growth hormone product, Omnitrope® (somatropin). The primary objectives of the study were to assess if study participants, representing intended users of the pen in clinical practice, were able to perform an injection procedure into an injection pad effectively and safely and disassemble the pen without receiving a needlestick injury. A total of 106 participants (61 adults and 45 children/adolescents) were enrolled at two study centers (one in the US, one in Germany). Results for both primary usability tasks met the predefined acceptance criteria, with >85% of participants successfully performing each task. All of the other tasks/handling steps assessed were also successfully performed by most participants, with high success rates reflected in the high proportion of participants who classified each task as "very easy" or "easy". After a second use of the device, 87%-97% of participants rated it as "very easy" or "easy" to use. In summary, the new pen device is safe and easy to use for both adults and children, and will help to support effective, long-term daily administration of the recombinant human growth hormone product, Omnitrope®.

  12. Validation and ease of use of a new pen device for self-administration of recombinant human growth hormone: results from a two-center usability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapaport R

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Robert Rapaport,1 Paul Saenger,2 Heinrich Schmidt,3 Yukihiro Hasegawa,4 Michel Colle,5 Sandro Loche,6 Sandra Marcantonio,7 Walter Bonfig,8 Markus Zabransky,9 Fima Lifshitz10 1Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 2Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA; 3University Children's Hospital, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Munich, Germany; 4Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan; 525 rue Boudet, Bordeaux, France; 6Servizio di Endocrinologia Pediatrica, Ospedale Microcitemico ASL Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy; 7Clinica de Endocrinologia Pediátrica, Londrina, Brazil; 8Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Technical University München, Munich, Germany; 9Sandoz International GmbH, Holzkirchen, Germany; 10Pediatric Sunshine Academics, Inc, Santa Barbara, CA, USA Abstract: Close adherence to the recommended treatment regimen is important for the success of recombinant human growth hormone therapy, although nonadherence can be common. Ease of use and safety during use/storage are among several important factors in the design of a growth hormone injection device intended for long-term use. This study was performed to validate the usability and assess the ease of use of a new pen device (SurePal™ that has been developed to support daily administration of the recombinant human growth hormone product, Omnitrope® (somatropin. The primary objectives of the study were to assess if study participants, representing intended users of the pen in clinical practice, were able to perform an injection procedure into an injection pad effectively and safely and disassemble the pen without receiving a needlestick injury. A total of 106 participants (61 adults and 45 children/adolescents were enrolled at two study centers (one in the US, one in Germany. Results for both primary usability tasks met the predefined acceptance criteria, with >85% of

  13. Picosecond nonradiative processes in neodymium-doped crystals and glasses: mechansim for the energy gap law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibeau, C.; Payne, S.A.

    1997-09-29

    We present measurements of the 4G7/2 emission lifetime for 26 Nd-doped materials. A model of nonradiative decay based on dipole-dipole energy transfer is developed and found to be supported by our data.

  14. Model of two-stream non-radial accretion for binary X-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipunov, V.M. (Sternberg Astronomical Inst., Moscow (USSR))

    1982-03-01

    The general case of non-radial accretion is assumed to occur in real binary systems containing X-ray pulsars. The structure and the stability of the magnetosphere, the interaction between the magnetosphere and accreted matter, as well as evolution of neutron star in close binary system are examined within the framework of the two-stream model of nonradial accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Observable parameters of X-ray pulsars are explained in terms of the model considered.

  15. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yongfen [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  16. Optical DLTS for the study of recombination centers in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowaki, Hiroyuki; Lee, Kan-Hua; Kojima, Takuto; Inagaki, Makoto; Ikeda, Kazuma; Bouzazi, Boussairi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.

    2013-09-01

    New broad DLTS peak signals in GaAsN solar cell, grown by chemical beam epitaxy, were obtained using the combination of optical-irradiation and conventional Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Those broad peak signals cannot be detected by conventional DLTS method in the dark. The broad peak signals were overlapped with three deep level states at least and showed the increase of DLTS peak intensity. However, the other deep level state (EV+0.60eV) showed no significant change of DLTS peak signals in the dark and optical excitation. The condition of minority carrier injection by optical irradiation indicated that the mechanism of carrier capture and emission at some deep centers had been changed.

  17. Recombination centers in 4H-SiC investigated by electrically detected magnetic resonance and ab initio modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, J.; Gruber, G.; Hadley, P.; Koch, M.; Pobegen, G.; Aichinger, T.; Shluger, A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful technique for the observation and categorization of paramagnetic defects within semiconductors. The interpretation of the recorded EDMR spectra has long proved to be challenging. Here, defect spectra are identified by comparing EDMR measurements with extensive ab initio calculations. The defect identification is based upon the defect symmetry and the form of the hyperfine (HF) structure. A full description is given of how an accurate spectrum can be generated from the theoretical data by considering some thousand individual HF contributions out of some billion possibilities. This approach is illustrated with a defect observed in nitrogen implanted silicon carbide (SiC). Nitrogen implantation is a high energy process that gives rise to a high defect concentration. The majority of these defects are removed during the dopant activation anneal, shifting the interstitial nitrogen to the desired substitutional lattice sites, where they act as shallow donors. EDMR shows that a deep-level defect persists after the dopant activation anneal. This defect is characterized as having a g c ∥ B = 2.0054 ( 4 ) and g c ⊥ B = 2.0006 ( 4 ) , with pronounced hyperfine shoulder peaks with a 13 G peak to peak separation. The nitrogen at a carbon site next to a silicon vacancy ( N C V Si ) center is identified as the persistent deep-level defect responsible for the observed EDMR signal and the associated dopant deactivation.

  18. Murine germinal center B cells require functional Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 signaling for IgG1 class-switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Mattias N D; Andersson, Karin M E; Wasén, Caroline; Erlandsson, Malin C; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Brisslert, Mikael; Bemark, Mats; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Switched antibody classes are important for efficient immune responses. Aberrant antibody production to otherwise harmless antigens may result in autoimmunity. The protein kinase fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor (Flt3) has an important role during early B-cell development, but the role of Flt3 in peripheral B cells has not been assessed before. Herein we describe a previously unappreciated role for Flt3 in IgG1 class-switch recombination (CSR) and production. We show that Flt3 is reexpressed on B-cell lymphoma 6(+) germinal center B cells in vivo and following LPS activation of peripheral B cells in vitro. Absence of Flt3 signaling in Flt3 ligand-deficient mice results in impaired IgG1 CSR and accumulation of IgM-secreting plasma cells. On activated B cells, Flt3 is coexpressed and functions in synergy with the common-gamma chain receptor family. B cells from Flt3 ligand-deficient mice have impaired IL-4R signaling, with reduced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 6, and demonstrate a failure to initiate CSR to IgG1 with low expression of γ1 germ-line transcripts, resulting in impaired IgG1 production. Thus, functional synergy between Flt3 and IL-4R signaling is critical for Stat-mediated regulation of sterile γ1 germ-line transcripts and CSR to IgG1.

  19. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, Thomas S., E-mail: t.blacker@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Marsh, Richard J., E-mail: richard.marsh@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Duchen, Michael R., E-mail: m.duchen@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bain, Angus J., E-mail: a.bain@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► NADH and NADPH have a high rate of non-radiative excited state decay. ► Conformational relaxation is shown to be a significant non-radiative pathway. ► The Kramers equation describes the barrier crossing dynamics of the relaxation. ► Conformational restriction upon enzyme binding will alter NAD(P)H lifetimes. - Abstract: In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water–glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers–Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  20. Observation of a nonradiative flat band for spoof surface plasmons in a metallic Lieb lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kajiwara, Sho; Nakata, Yosuke; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kitano, Masao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonradiative flat band for spoof surface plasmon polaritons bounded on a structured surface with Lieb lattice symmetry in the terahertz regime. First, we theoretically derive the dispersion relation of spoof plasmons in a metallic Lieb lattice based on the electrical circuit model. We obtain three bands, one of which is independent of wave vector. To confirm the theoretical result, we numerically and experimentally observe the flat band in transmission and attenuated total reflection configurations. We reveal that the quality factor of the nonradiative flat-band mode decoupled from the propagating wave is higher than that of the radiative flat-band mode. This indicates that the nonradiative flat-band mode is three-dimensionally confined in the lattice.

  1. Coupling of radial and nonradial oscillations of relativistic stars: Gauge-invariant formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Bruni, Marco; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2005-01-01

    Linear perturbation theory is appropriate to describe small oscillations of stars, while a mild nonlinearity is still tractable perturbatively but requires one to consider mode coupling, i.e., to take into account second order effects. It is natural to start to look at this problem by considering the coupling between linear radial and nonradial modes. A radial pulsation may be thought of as an important component of an overall mildly nonlinear oscillation, e.g., of a protoneutron star. Radial pulsations of spherical compact objects do not per se emit gravitational waves but, if the coupling between the existing first order radial and nonradial modes is efficient in driving and possibly amplifying the nonradial oscillations, one may expect the appearance of nonlinear harmonics, and gravitational radiation could then be produced to a significant level. More in general, mode coupling typically leads to an interesting phenomenology, thus it is worth investigating in the context of star perturbations. In this paper we develop the relativistic formalism to study the coupling of radial and nonradial first order perturbations of a compact spherical star. From a mathematical point of view, it is convenient to treat the two sets of perturbations as separately parametrized, using a 2-parameter perturbative expansion of the metric, the energy-momentum tensor and Einstein equations in which λ is associated with the radial modes, ɛ with the nonradial perturbations, and the λɛ terms describe the coupling. This approach provides a well-defined framework to consider the gauge dependence of perturbations, allowing us to use ɛ order gauge-invariant nonradial variables on the static background and to define new second order λɛ gauge-invariant variables representing the result of the nonlinear coupling. We present the evolution and constraint equations for our variables outlining the setup for numerical computations, and briefly discuss the surface boundary conditions in terms

  2. T cell-independent IgA class switch recombination is restricted to the GALT and occurs prior to manifest germinal center formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Peter; Stensson, Anneli; Lycke, Nils Y; Bemark, Mats

    2010-04-01

    Recently, we reported that CD40(-/-) mice, exhibiting exclusively T cell-independent IgA class switch recombination (CSR), demonstrated near normal levels of IgA plasma cells in the gut lamina propria (LP), despite the complete lack of germinal centers (GCs). In this study, we have extended our analysis focusing on how to reconcile these findings using flow cytometry and molecular markers for IgA CSR. In agreement with our previous results with small intestinal LP, the colon LP was found to host IgA CSR only when lymphoid follicles were present. Thus, no IgA CSR was observed in the nonorganized colon LP. By contrast, the Peyer's patch (PP) was the dominant IgA CSR site in both CD40(-/-) and wild type (WT) mice, and they both hosted similar levels of mRNA expression for B cell activating factor of the TNF family, a proliferation inducing ligand, and inducible NO synthase, potential switch-factors for IgA. Unexpectedly, we found that PP B cells undergoing IgA CSR were GL7-intermediate. These cells had not undergone somatic hypermutations (SHMs), whereas GL7-high cells in WT PP, which exhibited GCs, were heavily mutated. Moreover, IgA plasma cells in the LP of CD40(-/-) mice demonstrated few mutations in their Ig V regions, whereas WT LP B cells from different sites showed extensive SHMs, which were also clonally related. Therefore, IgA CSR can occur in PP at a stage preceding manifest GC (GL7-intermediate), whereas SHM require GC formations (GL7-high). These findings reconcile that IgA CSR can occur in PP in the absence of GC with the fact that CD40(-/-) mice host near normal levels of IgA plasma cells in the LP.

  3. Double carriers pulse DLTS for the characterization of electron-hole recombination process in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2011-03-01

    A nitrogen-related electron trap (E1), located approximately 0.33 eV from the conduction band minimum of GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy, was confirmed by investigating the dependence of its density with N concentration. This level exhibits a high capture cross section compared with that of native defects in GaAs. Its density increases significantly with N concentration, persists following post-thermal annealing, and was found to be quasi-uniformly distributed. These results indicate that E1 is a stable defect that is formed during growth to compensate for the tensile strain caused by N. Furthermore, E1 was confirmed to act as a recombination center by comparing its activation energy with that of the recombination current in the depletion region of the alloy. However, this technique cannot characterize the electron-hole (e-h) recombination process. For that, double carrier pulse deep level transient spectroscopy is used to confirm the non-radiative e -h recombination process through E1, to estimate the capture cross section of holes, and to evaluate the energy of multi-phonon emission. Furthermore, a configuration coordinate diagram is modeled based on the physical parameters of E1.

  4. Research on Non-radial Oscillations of the Sun and Stars in the Early 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I describe some historical background of helio- and astero-seismology research in the early 1970s from my personal recollection, particularly on how our Tokyo research group on non-radial oscillations of stars got started. I also describe my recent research on the super-outburst mechanism of SU UMa-type dwarf novae.

  5. Modeling non-radial oscillations on components of close binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latković, Olivera; Cséki, Attila

    2014-02-01

    We developed an advanced binary system model that includes stellar oscillations on one or both stars, with the goal of mode identification by fitting of the photometric light curves. The oscillations are modeled as perturbations of the local surface temperature and the local gravitational potential. In the case of tidally distorted stars, it is assumed that the pulsation axis coincides with the direction connecting the centers of the components rather than with the rotation axis. The mode identification method, originally devised by B. Bíró, is similar to eclipse mapping in that it utilizes the amplitude, phase and frequency modulation of oscillations during the eclipse; but the identification is achieved by grid-fitting of the observed light curve rather than by image reconstruction. The proposed model and the mode identification method have so far been tested on synthetic data with encouraging results.

  6. Nonradiating and radiating modes excited by quantum emitters in open epsilon-near-zero cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the emission and interaction properties of quantum emitters (QEs) embedded within an optical cavity is a key technique in engineering light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, as well as in the development of quantum information processing. State-of-the-art optical cavities are based on high Q photonics crystals and dielectric resonators. However, wealthier responses might be attainable with cavities carved in more exotic materials. Here, we theoretically investigate the emission and interaction properties of QEs embedded in open epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) cavities. Using analytical methods and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that open ENZ cavities present the unique property of supporting nonradiating modes independently of the geometry of the external boundary of the cavity (shape, size, topology...). Moreover, the possibility of switching between radiating and nonradiating modes enables a dynamic control of both the emission by, and the interaction between, QEs. These phenomena provide...

  7. Non-Radial Instabilities and Progenitor Asphericities in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B

    2014-01-01

    Since core-collapse supernova simulations still struggle to produce robust neutrino-driven explosions in 3D, it has been proposed that asphericities caused by convection in the progenitor might facilitate shock revival by boosting the activity of non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region. We investigate this scenario in depth using 42 relativistic 2D simulations with multi-group neutrino transport to examine the effects of velocity and density perturbations in the progenitor for different perturbation geometries that obey fundamental physical constraints (like the anelastic condition). As a framework for analysing our results, we introduce semi-empirical scaling laws relating neutrino heating, average turbulent velocities in the gain region, and the shock deformation in the saturation limit of non-radial instabilities. The squared turbulent Mach number, , reflects the violence of aspherical motions in the gain layer, and explosive runaway occurs for ~0.3, corresponding to a reduction of t...

  8. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations I: dark matter & non-radiative models

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Pearce, Frazer R; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T; Power, Chris; Cui, Weiguang; Beck, Alexander M; Borgani, Stefano; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Davé, Romeel; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Hobbs, Alex; Katz, Neal; Lau, Erwin; McCarthy, Ian G; Murante, Giuseppe; Nagai, Daisuke; Nelson, Kaylea; Newton, Richard D A; Puchwein, Ewald; Read, Justin I; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Thacker, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of a galaxy cluster in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe using twelve different codes modeling only gravity and non-radiative hydrodynamics (\\art, \\arepo, \\hydra\\ and 9 incarnations of GADGET). This range of codes includes particle based, moving and fixed mesh codes as well as both Eulerian and Lagrangian fluid schemes. The various GADGET implementations span traditional and advanced smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) schemes. The goal of this comparison is to assess the reliability of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of clusters in the simplest astrophysically relevant case, that in which the gas is assumed to be non-radiative. We compare images of the cluster at $z=0$, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. The underlying gravitational framework can be aligned very accurately for all the codes allowing a detailed investigation of the differences that develop due to the various gas physics implementations employ...

  9. Nonradial modes in RR Lyrae stars from the OGLE Collection of Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Netzel, Henryka; Moskalik, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) is a great source of top-quality photometry of classical pulsators. Collection of variable stars from the fourth part of the project contains more than 38 000 RR Lyrae stars. These stars pulsate mostly in the radial fundamental mode (RRab), in radial first overtone (RRc) or in both modes simultaneously (RRd). Analysis of the OGLE data allowed to detect additional non-radial modes in RRc and in RRd stars. We have found more than 260 double-mode stars with characteristic period ratio of the additional (shorter) period to first overtone period around 0.61, increasing the number of known stars of this type by factor of 10. Stars from the OGLE sample form three nearly parallel sequences in the Petersen diagram. Some stars show more than one non-radial mode simultaneously. These modes belong to different sequences.

  10. Observation of non-radiative de-excitation processes in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, J.N.; Wojcik, J.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics, Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Crowe, I.; Sherliker, B.; Halsall, M.P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R.M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Knights, A.P.

    2009-05-15

    We describe the impact of non-radiative de-excitation mechanisms on the optical emission from silicon nanocrystals formed in SiO{sub 2}. Auger excitation via free carriers deliberately introduced through phosphorus ion implantation, shows a monotonic increase with increasing phosphorus concentration which can be modelled adequately using a simple statistical approach. We also report a reduction in nanocrystal luminescence intensity with increasing exposure to UV radiation and suggest this phenomenon results from the introduction of non-radiative defects in the Si/SiO{sub 2} network. The effect of UV radiation varies significantly depending on the sample preparation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Non-radial, non-adiabatic solar-like oscillations in RGB and HB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Grosjean, M; Belkacem, K; Montalban, J; Noels, A; Samadi, R

    2013-01-01

    CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. We compare the theoretical spectrum of two red giants in the same region of the HR diagram but in different evolutionary phases. We present here our first results on the inertia, lifetimes and amplitudes of the oscillations and discuss the differences between the two stars.

  12. Recombination instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1967-01-01

    A recombination instability is considered which may arise in a plasma if the temperature dependence of the volume recombination coefficient, alpha, is sufficiently strong. Two cases are analyzed: (a) a steady-state plasma produced in a neutral gas by X-rays or high energy electrons; and (b) an af...

  13. The effect of non-radial motions on the CDM model predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Popolo, A D

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show how non-radial motions, originating from the tidal interaction of the irregular mass distribution within and around protoclusters, can solve some of the problems of the CDM model. Firstly the discrepancy between the CDM predicted two-points correlation function of clusters and the observed one. We compare the two-points correlation function, that we obtain taking account of non-radial motions, with that obtained by Sutherland & Efstathiou (1991) from the analysis of Geller & Hucra's (1988) deep redshift survey and with the data points for the APM clusters obtained by Efstathiou et al. (1992). Secondly the problem of the X-ray clusters abundance over-production predicted by the CDM model. In this case we compare the X-ray temperature distribution function, calculated using Press-Schechter theory and Evrard's (1990) prescriptions for the mass-temperature relation, taking also account of the non-radial motions, with Henry & Arnaud (1991) and Edge et al. (1990) X-ray temperature ...

  14. Non-radial solar wind flows induced by the motion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Owens

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the non-radial flows (NRFs during nearly five years of interplanetary observations revealed the average non-radial speed of the solar wind flows to be ~30km/s, with approximately one-half of the large (>100km/s NRFs associated with ICMEs. Conversely, the average non-radial flow speed upstream of all ICMEs is ~100km/s, with just over one-third preceded by large NRFs. These upstream flow deflections are analysed in the context of the large-scale structure of the driving ICME. We chose 5 magnetic clouds with relatively uncomplicated upstream flow deflections. Using variance analysis it was possible to infer the local axis orientation, and to qualitatively estimate the point of interception of the spacecraft with the ICME. For all 5 events the observed upstream flows were in agreement with the point of interception predicted by variance analysis. Thus we conclude that the upstream flow deflections in these events are in accord with the current concept of the large-scale structure of an ICME: a curved axial loop connected to the Sun, bounded by a curved (though not necessarily circular cross section.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (flare and stream dynamics; interplanetary magnetic fields; interplanetary shocks

  15. Moving nonradiating kinks in nonlocal φ4 and φ4-φ6 models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimov, G L; Medvedeva, E V

    2011-11-01

    We explore the existence of moving nonradiating kinks in nonlocal generalizations of φ(4) and φ(4)-φ(6) models. These models are described by nonlocal nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation, u(tt)-Lu+F(u)=0, where L is a Fourier multiplier operator of a specific form and F(u) includes either just a cubic term (φ(4) case) or cubic and quintic (φ(4)-φ(6) case) terms. The general mechanism responsible for the discretization of kink velocities in the nonlocal model is discussed. We report numerical results obtained for these models. It is shown that, contrary to the traditional φ(4) model, the nonlocal φ(4) model does not admit moving nonradiating kinks but admits solitary waves that do not exist in the local model. At the same time the nonlocal φ(4)-φ(6) model describes moving nonradiating kinks. The set of velocities allowed for these kinks is discrete with the highest possible velocity c(1). This set of velocities is unambiguously determined by the parameters of the model. Numerical simulations show that a kink launched at the velocity c higher than c(1) starts to decelerate, and its velocity settles down to the highest value of the discrete spectrum c(1).

  16. Non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in dogs: 14 cases (1996 - 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago ePeralta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaws is an entity of major clinical impact characterized by chronically exposed necrotic mandibular or maxillary bone. Its clinicopathological characteristics and possible inciting or risk factors are well described in humans but only anecdotally reported in dogs. Treatment modalities and outcome vary depending on the inciting factors involved and the extent and severity of the lesions. The objectives of this study were to retrospectively describe the clinicopathological features of non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in a series of 14 dogs, identify possible inciting or risk factors, and report on the surgical treatment and outcome. For all patients, the medical records were used to collect information regarding signalment, clinical signs, characteristics of the oral, jaw and dental lesions, diagnostic imaging findings, histopathological and microbiological analysis, treatment performed and outcome. The data collected showed that non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws appears to be an infrequent clinical entity but of significant impact in dogs; that a history of systemic antibiotics and dental disease is common among affected dogs; that previous dental extractions are commonly associated with ONJ sites; that using a systematic diagnostic approach is essential for diagnosis; and that thorough surgical débridement combined with a course of oral antibiotics was effective in the described dogs affected by advanced non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

  17. Recombination monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-03

    This is a brief report on LEReC recombination monitor design considerations. The recombination produced Au78+ ion rate is reviewed. Based on this two designs are discussed. One is to use the large dispersion lattice. It is shown that even with the large separation of the Au78+ beam from the Au79+ beam, the continued monitoring of the recombination is not possible. Accumulation of Au78+ ions is needed, plus collimation of the Au79+ beam. In another design, it is shown that the recombination monitor can be built based on the proposed scheme with the nominal lattice. From machine operation point of view, this design is preferable. Finally, possible studies and the alternative strategies with the basic goal of the monitor are discussed.

  18. Non-radiation hardened microprocessors in space-based remote sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, R.; Melton, Ryan; Estes, Robert R., Jr.

    2006-09-01

    The CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) mission is a comprehensive suite of active and passive sensors including a 20Hz 230mj Nd:YAG lidar, a visible wavelength Earth-looking camera and an imaging infrared radiometer. CALIPSO flies in formation with the Earth Observing System Post-Meridian (EOS PM) train, provides continuous, near-simultaneous measurements and is a planned 3 year mission. CALIPSO was launched into a 98 degree sun synchronous Earth orbit in April of 2006 to study clouds and aerosols and acquires over 5 gigabytes of data every 24 hours. Figure 1 shows the ground track of one CALIPSO orbit as well as high and low intensity South Atlantic Anomaly outlines. CALIPSO passes through the SAA several times each day. Spaced based remote sensing systems that include multiple instruments and/or instruments such as lidar generate large volumes of data and require robust real-time hardware and software mechanisms and high throughput processors. Due to onboard storage restrictions and telemetry downlink limitations these systems must pre-process and reduce the data before sending it to the ground. This onboard processing and realtime requirement load may mean that newer more powerful processors are needed even though acceptable radiation-hardened versions have not yet been released. CALIPSO's single board computer payload controller processor is actually a set of four (4) voting non-radiation hardened COTS Power PC 603r's built on a single width VME card by General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems (GDAIS). Significant radiation concerns for CALIPSO and other Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites include the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the north and south poles and strong solar events. Over much of South America and extending into the South Atlantic Ocean (see figure 1) the Van Allen radiation belts dip to just 200-800km and spacecraft entering this area are subjected to high energy protons and experience higher than

  19. Excitation correlation photoluminescence in the presence of Shockley-Read-Hall recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgwardt, M., E-mail: mario.borgwardt@helmholtz-berlin.de [Joint Laboratory for Ultrafast Dynamics in Solutions and at Interfaces (JULiq), Institute of Methods for Material Development, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Sippel, P.; Eichberger, R. [Institute of Solar Fuels, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, Berlin D-12489 (Germany); Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T. [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität of Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Schwarzburg, K., E-mail: schwarzburg@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institute Nano-architectures for Energy Conversion, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    Excitation correlation photoluminescence (ECPL) measurements are often analyzed in the approximation of a cross correlation of charge carrier populations generated by the two delayed pulses. In semiconductors, this approach is valid for a linear non-radiative recombination path, but not for a non-linear recombination rate as in the general Shockley-Read-Hall recombination scenario. Here, the evolution of the ECPL signal was studied for deep trap recombination following Shockley-Read-Hall statistics. Analytic solutions can be obtained for a fast minority trapping regime and steady state recombination. For the steady state case, our results show that the quadratic radiative term plays only a minor role, and that the shape of the measured signal is mostly determined by the non-linearity of the recombination itself. We find that measurements with unbalanced intense pump and probe pulses can directly provide information about the dominant non-radiative recombination mechanism. The signal traces follow the charge carrier concentrations, despite the complex origins of the signal, thus showing that ECPL can be applied to study charge carrier dynamics in semiconductors without requiring elaborate calculations. The model is compared with measurements on a reference sample with alternating layers of InGaAs/InAlAs that were additionally cross-checked with time resolved optical pump terahertz probe measurements and found to be in excellent agreement.

  20. Nonradiative transfer of excitation in coherent decay from a Gaussian atomic distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Richard, E-mail: rfriedberg1@nyc.rr.com [Physics Department, Columbia University, NY (United States)

    2011-09-14

    Coherent decay of a spherically symmetric ensemble of initially resonantly phased two-level atoms is studied in the scalar photon model, in the continuum and Markov approximations. Emphasis is on the Gaussian distribution, where nonradiative transfer of excitation to excited states orthogonal to the initial one is found to be nonzero even in the limit of short wavelength, whether or not the scalar kernel exp(ik{sub 0}R)/ik{sub 0}R is replaced by its real part. Numerical results are compared to known values for the uniform distribution.

  1. Nonradiative resonant energy transfer between PbS QDs in porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Aleksandr P.; Parfenov, Peter S.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    Nonradiative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes embedded in porous matrix is observed by a fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of decays of photoluminescence from QD mixture shows that energy transfer in studied systems is determined by static quenching, specific for direct contact between QD-donor and QD-acceptor in the QDs close-packed ensembles. From steady-state spectral analysis it was found that efficiency of energy transfer depends on the molar ratio QD-donor/QD-acceptor and energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor passes by several channels.

  2. Correlation of Electrical Noise with Non-radiative Current for High Power QWLs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of low-frequency electrical noise, voltage-current (V-I) and electrical derivation for 980nm InGaAsP/InGaAs/GaAs high power double quantum well lasers(DQWLs) are measured under different conditions. The correlation of the low-frequency electrical noise with surface non-radiative current of devices is discussed. The results indicate the low-frequency electrical noise of 980nm DQWLs with high power is mainly 1/f noise and has good relation with the device surface current at low injection.

  3. A Non-radial Eruption in a Quadrupolar Magnetic Configuration with a Coronal Null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Chen, Qingrong; Hayashi, Keiji

    2012-10-01

    We report one of the several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory. A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated ~2 × 1031 erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60° with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y-shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reconnection signatures appeared near the inferred null. Part of the magnetic setting resembles that of a blowout-type jet; the observed inverted-Y structure likely outlines the open field lines along the separatrix surface. Owing to the asymmetrical photospheric flux distribution, the confining magnetic pressure decreases much faster horizontally than upward. This special field geometry likely guided the non-radial eruption during its initial stage.

  4. A NON-RADIAL ERUPTION IN A QUADRUPOLAR MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION WITH A CORONAL NULL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu Yang; Hayashi, Keiji [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chen Qingrong, E-mail: xudong@sun.stanford.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We report one of the several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory. A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60 Degree-Sign with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y-shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reconnection signatures appeared near the inferred null. Part of the magnetic setting resembles that of a blowout-type jet; the observed inverted-Y structure likely outlines the open field lines along the separatrix surface. Owing to the asymmetrical photospheric flux distribution, the confining magnetic pressure decreases much faster horizontally than upward. This special field geometry likely guided the non-radial eruption during its initial stage.

  5. Fluorescence and Nonradiative Properties of Nd3+ in Novel Heavy Metal Contained Fluorophosphate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju H. Choi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate new series of heavy metal containing fluorophosphate glass system. The fluorescence and nonradiative properties of Nd3+ ions are investigated as a function of Nd2O3 concentration. The variation of intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, and Ω6 is determined from absorption spectra. The spontaneous probability (A and branching ratio (β are determined using intensity parameters. The emission cross sections for the 4F3/2→4I13/2 transition, which is calculated by Fuchtbabauer-Ladenburg method, decrease from 6.1×10−21 to 3.0×10−21(pm2 and those for the 4F3/2→4I11/2 transition decrease from 3.51×10−20 to 1.7×10−20 as Nd2O3 concentration increase up to 3 wt%. The nonradiative relaxation is analyzed in terms of multiphonon relaxation and concentration quenching due to energy transfer among Nd3+ ions. Finally, the above results obtained at 1 wt %Nd2O3 are compared with some of reported laser host glasses which indicated the potentials for broadband-amplifiers and high-power laser applications.

  6. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - I. Dark matter and non-radiative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; Pearce, Frazer R.; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Power, Chris; Cui, Weiguang; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Davé, Romeel; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Hobbs, Alex; Katz, Neal; Lau, Erwin; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Guiseppe; Nagai, Daisuke; Nelson, Kaylea; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Read, Justin I.; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain; Thacker, Robert J.

    2016-04-01

    We have simulated the formation of a galaxy cluster in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 13 different codes modelling only gravity and non-radiative hydrodynamics (RAMSES, ART, AREPO, HYDRA and nine incarnations of GADGET). This range of codes includes particle-based, moving and fixed mesh codes as well as both Eulerian and Lagrangian fluid schemes. The various GADGET implementations span classic and modern smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) schemes. The goal of this comparison is to assess the reliability of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of clusters in the simplest astrophysically relevant case, that in which the gas is assumed to be non-radiative. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. The underlying gravitational framework can be aligned very accurately for all the codes allowing a detailed investigation of the differences that develop due to the various gas physics implementations employed. As expected, the mesh-based codes RAMSES, ART and AREPO form extended entropy cores in the gas with rising central gas temperatures. Those codes employing classic SPH schemes show falling entropy profiles all the way into the very centre with correspondingly rising density profiles and central temperature inversions. We show that methods with modern SPH schemes that allow entropy mixing span the range between these two extremes and the latest SPH variants produce gas entropy profiles that are essentially indistinguishable from those obtained with grid-based methods.

  7. Nonradiating and radiating modes excited by quantum emitters in open epsilon-near-zero cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the emission and interaction properties of quantum emitters (QEs) embedded within an optical cavity is a key technique in engineering light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, as well as in the development of quantum information processing. State-of-the-art optical cavities are based on high quality factor photonic crystals and dielectric resonators. However, wealthier responses might be attainable with cavities carved in more exotic materials. We theoretically investigate the emission and interaction properties of QEs embedded in open epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) cavities. Using analytical methods and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that open ENZ cavities present the unique property of supporting nonradiating modes independently of the geometry of the external boundary of the cavity (shape, size, topology, etc.). Moreover, the possibility of switching between radiating and nonradiating modes enables a dynamic control of the emission by, and the interaction between, QEs. These phenomena provide unprecedented degrees of freedom in controlling and trapping fields within optical cavities, as well as in the design of cavity opto- and acoustomechanical systems.

  8. Nonradial g-mode oscillations in X-ray bursting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermott, P. N.; Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The oscillation spectrum of nonradial g-modes in X-ray bursting neutron stars has been studied. The pulsation periods are found to be sensitive to the envelope temperature and range from about 15 ms to about 50 ms for the l = 1 g(1) mode during the X-ray burst. From a quasi-adiabatic stability analysis it is likely that a spectrum of l-pole g-modes is unstable due to the epsilon-mechanism associated with rapid alpha captures. As the thermal structure of the envelope of the neutron star changes on time scales less than 0.2 s during the rise of the X-ray burst, the oscillations are expected to be quasi-coherent during this phase. The calculated period derivatives are large during the burst and are about 1 ms/s. The pulsations are short-lived and are most likely to be seen in the immediate vicinity of the burst peak. Finally, the possible relevance of nonradial g-mode pulsations to the recently discovered quasi-periodic oscillations observed in a number of X-ray sources is discussed.

  9. Green Development Performance in China: A Metafrontier Non-Radial Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a green development growth index (GDGI for measuring the changes in sustainable development over time. This index considers a wide range of pollutants, and allows for the incorporation of group heterogeneity and non-radial slack in the conventional green development index. The GDGI is calculated based on a non-radial directional distance function derived by several data envelopment analysis (DEA models, and was decomposed into an efficiency change (EC index, a best-practice gap change (BPC index and a technology gap change (TGC index. The proposed indices are employed to measure green development performance in 30 provinces in China from 2000 to 2012. The empirical results show that China has a low level of green development, with a 2.58% increase per year driven by an innovation effect. China’s green development is mainly led by the eastern region, and the technology gaps between the eastern region and the other two regions (the central and western regions have become wider over the years. The group innovative provinces have set a target for resource utilization of non-innovative provinces in order to catch-up with the corresponding groups, while the metafrontier innovative provinces provide targets for the technology levels of other provinces to improve their green development performance.

  10. Radiative and interfacial recombination in CdTe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, C. H., E-mail: craig.swartz@txstate.edu; Edirisooriya, M.; LeBlanc, E. G.; Noriega, O. C.; Jayathilaka, P. A. R. D.; Ogedengbe, O. S.; Hancock, B. L.; Holtz, M.; Myers, T. H. [Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States); Zaunbrecher, K. N. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Mississippi RSF200, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Double heterostructures (DH) were produced consisting of a CdTe film between two wide band gap barriers of CdMgTe alloy. A combined method was developed to quantify radiative and non-radiative recombination rates by examining the dependence of photoluminescence (PL) on both excitation intensity and time. The measured PL characteristics, and the interface state density extracted by modeling, indicate that the radiative efficiency of CdMgTe/CdTe DHs is comparable to that of AlGaAs/GaAs DHs, with interface state densities in the low 10{sup 10 }cm{sup −2} and carrier lifetimes as long as 240 ns. The radiative recombination coefficient of CdTe is found to be near 10{sup −10} cm{sup 3}s{sup −1}. CdTe film growth on bulk CdTe substrates resulted in a homoepitaxial interface layer with a high non-radiative recombination rate.

  11. Exciton recombination dynamics in single ZnO tetrapods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes-Silva, Lígia C. [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Martín, Maria D.; Meulen, Herko P. van der; Calleja, José M.; Viña, Luis [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, Spain and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Klopotowski, Lukasz [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-04

    We present the optical properties of individual ZnO tetrapods as a function of excitation power and temperature by time-integrated and time-resolved spectroscopy. At 10K, we identify the different excitonic transitions by both their characteristic energy and their excitation power dependence. When we increase the tetrapod temperature we observe that the emission intensity decrease and occur a red shift of the emission energies. Our time-resolved studies confirm the predominance of the radiative recombination at low temperatures (< 45 K). Increasing the temperature opens up the non-radiative channels, which are evidenced by a much faster decay time.

  12. Exciton recombination dynamics in single ZnO tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Silva, Lígia C.; Martín, Maria D.; van der Meulen, Herko P.; Klopotowski, Lukasz; Calleja, José M.; Viña, Luis

    2013-12-01

    We present the optical properties of individual ZnO tetrapods as a function of excitation power and temperature by time-integrated and time-resolved spectroscopy. At 10K, we identify the different excitonic transitions by both their characteristic energy and their excitation power dependence. When we increase the tetrapod temperature we observe that the emission intensity decrease and occur a red shift of the emission energies. Our time-resolved studies confirm the predominance of the radiative recombination at low temperatures (< 45 K). Increasing the temperature opens up the non-radiative channels, which are evidenced by a much faster decay time.

  13. Carrier density dependence of plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer in a hybrid quantum well-quantum dot structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, L J; Karanikolas, V D; Marocico, C A; Bell, A P; Sadler, T C; Parbrook, P J; Bradley, A L

    2015-01-26

    An array of Ag nanoboxes fabricated by helium-ion lithography is used to demonstrate plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer in a hybrid quantum well-quantum dot structure. The nonradiative energy transfer, from an InGaN/GaN quantum well to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal quantum dots embedded in an ~80 nm layer of PMMA, is investigated over a range of carrier densities within the quantum well. The plasmon-enhanced energy transfer efficiency is found to be independent of the carrier density, with an efficiency of 25% reported. The dependence on carrier density is observed to be the same as for conventional nonradiative energy transfer. The plasmon-coupled energy transfer enhances the QD emission by 58%. However, due to photoluminescence quenching effects an overall increase in the QD emission of 16% is observed.

  14. Global well-posedness and scattering for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the nonradial case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigong Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy-critical, focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the nonradial case reads as follows: \\[i\\partial_t u = -\\Delta u -|u|^{\\frac{4}{N-2}}u,\\quad (x,0=u_0 \\in H^1 (\\mathbb{R}^N,\\quad N\\geq 3.\\] Under a suitable assumption on the maximal strong solution, using a compactness argument and a virial identity, we establish the global well-posedness and scattering in the nonradial case, which gives a positive answer to one open problem proposed by Kenig and Merle [Invent. Math. 166 (2006, 645–675].

  15. Spectroscopy of cyanine dyes in fluid solution at atmospheric and high pressure: The effect of viscosity on nonradiative processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, S.; Sauerwein, B.; Drickamer, H.G.; Schuster, G.B. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1994-12-22

    The spectroscopy of cyanine dyes was examined at atmospheric pressure and at high pressure in a series of alcohols and other solvents. Variation of external pressure provides the means to control viscosity over a wide range in one solvent at constant temperature. The findings reveal that the nonradiative relaxation of cyanines in fluid solution can occur when the motion leading to the formation of the cis isomer is stopped completely. Analysis of the viscosity dependence of the nonradiative relaxation rate constant reveals consistent deviation from the Kramers-DSE relation. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Recombinant Activated Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) Treatment in Very-Low-Birth-Weight (VLBW) Premature Infants with Acute Pulmonary Hemorrhage: A Single-Center, Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosar, Hese; Isik, Halil; Cakır, Salih Cagrı; Yar, Nese; Goksen, Bulent; Tokbay, Hakan; Kertmen, Hasan; Erdoğan, Nihal; Durak, Ikbal

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous administration of recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) for acute pulmonary hemorrhage treatment in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) premature infants. This study was carried out retrospectively in premature infants with pulmonary hemorrhage that were ≤30 weeks gestational age or premature infants with pulmonary hemorrhage who were hospitalized in our neonatal intensive care unit between 01 January 2013 and 31 December 2015 were evaluated. Group 1 (n = 21) received rFVIIa support within the first 30 min of pulmonary hemorrhage plus conventional treatment, while Group 2 (n = 21) received conventional treatment only. The number of patients whose pulmonary hemorrhage was stopped within the first 2 h was significantly higher in Group 1 than Group 2 (n = 14 vs n = 4; p = 0.002). After pulmonary hemorrhage, hemoglobin values of Group 1 were higher than Group 2 (11.12 ± 1.06 vs 10.14 ± 1.59 g/dL; p = 0.024). Erythrocyte suspension (1.43 ± 4.51 vs 5.71 ± 7.46 mL/kg; p = 0.030) and fresh frozen plasma use (5.71 ± 8.10 vs 19.52 ± 12.44 mL/kg; p premature infants.

  17. Study of carrier recombination transient characteristics in MOCVD grown GaN dependent on layer thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gaubas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The MOCVD grown GaN epi-layers of different thickness have been examined in order to clarify a role of surface recombination, to separate an impact of radiative and non-radiative recombination and disorder factors. The microwave probed –photoconductivity (MW-PC and spectrally resolved photo-luminescence (PL transients were simultaneously recorded under ultraviolet (UV light 354 nm pulsed 500 ps excitation. The MW-PC transients exhibited the carrier decay components associated with carrier decay within micro-crystals and the disordered structure on the periphery areas surrounding crystalline columns. Three PL bands were resolved within PL spectrum, namely, the exciton ascribed UV-PL band edge for hν>3.3 eV, blue B-PL band for 2.5 < hν < 3.0 eV and yellow Y-PL band with hν < 2.4 eV. It has been obtained that intensity of UV-PL band increases with excitation density, while intensity of B-PL band is nearly invariant. However, intensity of the Y-PL increases with reduction of the excitation density. The Y-PL can be associated with trapping centers. A reduction of UV excitation density leads to a decrease of the relative amplitude of the asymptotic component within the MW-PC transients and to an increase of the amplitude as well as duration of the yellow spectral band (Y-PL asymptotic component. Fractional index α with values 0.5 < α < 0.8 was evaluated for the stretched-exponent component which fits the experimental transients determined by the disordered structure ascribed to the periphery areas surrounding the crystalline columns.

  18. A Non-radial Eruption in a Quadrupolar Magnetic Configuration with a Coronal Null

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Qingrong; Hayashi, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    We report one of several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated ~2e31 erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60 degrees with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reco...

  19. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: SPH versus AMR

    CERN Document Server

    Power, C; Hobbs, A

    2013-01-01

    Abridged: We simulate a massive galaxy cluster in a LCDM Universe using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics: `classic' Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH); a novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS); and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We find that SPHS and AMR are in excellent agreement, with both forming a well-defined entropy core that rapidly converges with increasing mass and force resolution. By contrast, SPH exhibits rather different behaviour. At low redshift, entropy decreases systematically with decreasing cluster-centric radius, converging on ever lower central values with increasing resolution. At higher redshift, SPH is in better agreement with SPHS and AMR but shows much poorer numerical convergence. We trace these discrepancies to artificial surface tension in SPH at phase boundaries. At early times, the passage of massive substructures close to the cluster centre stirs and shocks gas to build an entropy core. At later times, artif...

  20. Discovery of non-radial pulsations in the spectroscopic binary Herbig Ae star RS Cha

    CERN Document Server

    Böhm, T; Catala, C; Alecian, E; Pollard, K; Wright, D

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present a first discovery of non radial pulsations in both components of the Herbig Ae spectroscopic binary star RS Cha. The binary was monitored in quasi-continuous observations during 14 observing nights (Jan 2006) at the 1m Mt John (New Zealand) telescope with the Hercules high-resolution echelle spectrograph. The cumulated exposure time on the star was 44 hrs, corresponding to 255 individual high-resolution echelle spectra with $R = 45000$. Least square deconvolved spectra (LSD) were obtained for each spectrum representing the effective photospheric absorption profile modified by pulsations. Difference spectra were calculated by subtracting rotationally broadened artificial profiles; these residual spectra were analysed and non-radial pulsations were detected. A subsequent analysis with two complementary methods, namely Fourier Parameter Fit (FPF) and Fourier 2D (F2D) has been performed and first constraints on the pulsation modes have been derived. In fact, both components of the spect...

  1. Indirect imaging of nonradial pulsations in a rapidly oscillating Ap star

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O P

    2004-01-01

    Many types of stars show periodic variations of radius and brightness, which are commonly referred to as `stellar pulsations'. Observed pulsational characteristics are determined by fundamental stellar parameters. Consequently, investigations of stellar pulsations provide a unique opportunity to verify and refine our understanding of the evolution and internal structure of stars. However, a key boundary condition for this analysis -- precise information about the geometry of pulsations in the outer stellar envelopes -- has been notoriously difficult to secure. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to solve this problem by constructing an `image' of the pulsation velocity field from time series observations of stellar spectra. This technique is applied to study the geometry of nonradial pulsations in a prototype magnetic oscillating (roAp) star HR 3831. Our velocity map directly demonstrates an alignment of pulsations with the axis of the global magnetic field and reveals a significant magnetically induced d...

  2. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  3. Treatment of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A with the proper administration of recombinant activated factor VII: single-center study of 7 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makoto; Kanaya, Minoru; Izumiyama, Koh; Mori, Akio; Irie, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Masanori; Morioka, Masanobu; Ieko, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is the bypassing agent used in the first-line hemostatic therapy for acquired hemophilia A (AHA); however, the occurrence of thrombotic complications in rFVIIa-treated AHA patients was recently reported to be 2.9–6.5%. Therefore, the investigation of the proper administration of rFVIIa for AHA is needed. In the present study, we retrospectively investigated the clinical features of AHA with regards to the use of rFVIIa (presence or absence of use and total amount) in 7 AHA patients encountered in our department for 7 years between January 2008 and December 2014. Ages were 63–89 years old (median: 79 years old), and there were 5 male and 2 female patients. The coexistence of cardiovascular risk factors and arteriosclerotic diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cerebral infarction were present in 6 patients. Anemia progressed to less than 7 g/dL of hemoglobin and required red blood cell transfusion in 5 patients, showing “severe” hemorrhage. Factor VIII inhibitors were removed by immunological treatments in 6 patients. As a hemostatic therapy, rFVIIa was used in 4 patients. rFVIIa was not administered or was administered at a very low dose (20 mg) to 3 and 1 patient, respectively, and bleeding stopped as inhibitor titers decreased and disappeared in these patients. Inhibitors did not disappear in 1 patient and the control of hemostasis became poor and was accompanied by intestinal hemorrhage. Although a large amount of rFVIIa (265 mg in total) was administered, the patient bled to death. Therefore, bleeding may be stopped without the administration of rFVIIa in some AHA cases, while the dose of rFVIIa is not necessarily related to hemostatic effects in other cases. Since the main aim of AHA treatments is the removal of inhibitors, caution is needed to ensure that more than the necessary amount of rFVIIa is not administered. PMID:27843336

  4. Non-radial pulsations in the γ Doradus star HD 195068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Chapellier, E.; Le Contel, J.-M.; Sareyan, J.-P.

    2006-07-01

    We present high resolution spectroscopic observations of the γ Doradus star HD 195068. About 230 spectra were collected over 2 years. Time series analysis performed on radial velocity data shows a main peak at 1.61 d-1 , a frequency not yet detected in photometry. The Hipparcos photometric 1.25 d-1 frequency is easily recovered as is 1.30 d-1 while the third photometric frequency, 0.97 d-1 , is only marginally present. The good quality of our data, which includes 196 spectra collected over seven consecutive nights, shows that both the 1.61 d-1 and intermediate 1.27 d-1 (mixture of 1.25 and 1.30 d-1 ) frequencies are present in the line profile variations. Using the Fourier-Doppler Imaging (FDI) method, the variability associated with 1.61 d-1 can be successfully modeled by a non-radial pulsation mode ℓ=5± 1, |m|=4± 1. For the intermediate frequency 1.27 d-1 we deduce ℓ=4± 1, |m|=3± 1. Evidence that the star is not pulsating in the radial mode (ℓ=0) rules out a previous classification as an RR Lyrae type star. We investigate the time variability of FDI power spectra concluding that the observed temporal variability of modes can be explained by a beating phenomenon between closely spaced frequencies of two non-radial modes. The distribution of the oscillation power within the line profile indicates that there is a significant tangential velocity component of oscillations characteristic of high radial order gravity modes which are predicted to be observed in γ Doradus type stars.

  5. Excitation of a nonradial mode in a millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1751-305

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Umin

    2014-01-01

    We discuss candidates for non-radial modes excited in a mass accreting and rapidly rotating neutron star to explain the coherent frequency identified in the light curves of a millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1751-305. The spin frequency of the pulsar is $\

  6. Non-radiative decay of a dipole emitter close to a metallic nanoparticle: Importance of higher-order multipole contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of higher-order multipoles to radiative and non-radiative decay of a single dipole emitter close to a spherical metallic nanoparticle is re-examined. Taking a Ag spherical nanoparticle (AgNP) with the radius of 5 nm as an example, a significant contribution (between 50% and 101% of the total value) of higher-order multipoles to non-radiative rates is found even at the emitter distance of 5 nm from the AgNP surface. On the other hand, the higher-order multipole contribution to radiative rates is negligible. Consequently, a dipole-dipole approximation can yield only an upper bound on the apparent quantum yield. In contrast, the non-radiative rates calculated with the quasistatic Gersten and Nitzan method are found to be in much better agreement with exact electrodynamic results. Finally, the size corrected metal dielectric function is shown to decrease the non-radiative rates near the dipolar surface plasmon resonance.

  7. The role of N-H complexes in the control of localized center recombination in hydrogenated GaInNAs (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Vincent R.; Fukuda, Miwa; Estes, Nicholas J.; Wang, Bin; Brown, Collin R.; Hossain, Khalid; Golding, Terry D.; Leroux, Mathieu; Al Khalfioui, Mohamed; Tischler, Joseph G.; Ellis, Chase T.; Glaser, Evan R.; Sellers, Ian R.

    2017-04-01

    A significant improvement in the quality of dilute nitrides has recently led to the ability to reveal depletion widths in excess of 1 μm at 1 eV [1]. The real viability of dilute nitrides for PV has been recently demonstrated with the reporting of a record efficiency of 43.5% from a 4J MJSC including GaInNAs(Sb) [2]. Despite the progress made, these materials remain poorly understood and work continues to improve their lifetime and reproducibility. We have investigated the possibility of improving the functionality of GaInNAs using hydrogenation to selectively passivate mid-gap defects, while preserving the substitutional nitrogen. Temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements of the intrinsic region of a GaInNAs p-i-n solar cell show a classic "s-shape" associated with localization prior to hydrogenation. No sign of this "s-shape" is evident after hydrogenation, despite the retention of substitutional nitrogen as evidenced by the band absorption of 1 eV. The absence of an "s-shape" at low-temperature in hydrogenated GaInNAs is rather curious since, even in high quality nitrides this behavior is due to the emission of isoelectronic centers created via N-As substitution [3]. The potential origins of this behavior will be discussed. The promise of this process for GaInNAs solar cells was demonstrated by a three-fold improvement in the performance of a hydrogenated device with respect to an as-grown reference [4]. [1] "Wide-depletion width GaInNAs solar cells by thermal annealing," I. R. Sellers, W-S. Tan, K. Smith, S. Hooper, S. Day and M. Kauer, Applied Physics Letters 99, 151111 (2011) [2] "43.5% efficient lattice matched solar cells," M. Wiemer, V. Sabnis, and H. Yuen, Proc. SPIE 8108, 810804 (2011) [3]"Probing the nature of carrier localization in GaInNAs, epilayers using optical methods," T. Ysai, B. Barman, T. Scarce, G. Lindberg, M. Fukuda, V. R. Whiteside, J. C. Keay, M. B. Johnson, I. R. Sellers, M. Al Khalfioui, M. Leroux, B. A. Weinstein and A

  8. Excited-state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled 5-fluorocytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Trachsel, Maria A; Den, Takuya; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-03-20

    The S0 → S1 vibronic spectrum and S1 state nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled keto-amino 5-fluorocytosine (5FCyt) are investigated by two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm(–1) resolution. The 0(0)(0) rotational band contour is polarized in-plane, implying that the electronic transition is (1)ππ*. The electronic transition dipole moment orientation and the changes of rotational constants agree closely with the SCS-CC2 calculated values for the (1)ππ* (S1) transition of 5FCyt. The spectral region from 0 to 300 cm(–1) is dominated by overtone and combination bands of the out-of-plane ν1′ (boat), ν2′ (butterfly), and ν3′ (HN–C6H twist) vibrations, implying that the pyrimidinone frame is distorted out-of-plane by the (1)ππ* excitation, in agreement with SCS-CC2 calculations. The number of vibronic bands rises strongly around +350 cm(–1); this is attributed to the (1)ππ* state barrier to planarity that corresponds to the central maximum of the double-minimum out-of-plane vibrational potentials along the ν1′, ν2′, and ν3′ coordinates, which gives rise to a high density of vibronic excitations. At +1200 cm(–1), rapid nonradiative relaxation (k(nr) ≥ 10(12) s(–1)) sets in, which we interpret as the height of the (1)ππ* state barrier in front of the lowest S1/S0 conical intersection. This barrier in 5FCyt is 3 times higher than that in cytosine. The lifetimes of the ν′ = 0, 2ν1′, 2ν2′, 2ν1′ + 2ν2′, 4ν2′, and 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ levels are determined from Lorentzian widths fitted to the rotational band contours and are τ ≥ 75 ps for ν′ = 0, decreasing to τ ≥ 55 ps at the 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ level at +234 cm(–1). These gas-phase lifetimes are twice those of S1 state cytosine and 10–100 times those of the other canonical nucleobases in the gas phase. On the other hand, the 5FCyt gas-phase lifetime is close to the 73 ps lifetime in room-temperature solvents. This lack of

  9. 3D Lifetime Tomography Reveals How CdCl 2 Improves Recombination Throughout CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Edward S. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; PLANT PV, Inc, Alameda CA 94501 USA; Ursprung, Benedikt [PLANT PV, Inc, Alameda CA 94501 USA; Colegrove, Eric [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Moutinho, Helio R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Borys, Nicholas J. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Hardin, Brian E. [PLANT PV, Inc, Alameda CA 94501 USA; Peters, Craig H. [PLANT PV, Inc, Alameda CA 94501 USA; Metzger, Wyatt K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Schuck, P. James [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA

    2016-11-15

    Using two-photon tomography, carrier lifetimes are mapped in polycrystalline CdTe photovoltaic devices. These 3D maps probe subsurface carrier dynamics that are inaccessible with traditional optical techniques. They reveal that CdCl2 treatment of CdTe solar cells suppresses nonradiative recombination and enhances carrier lifetimes throughout the film with substantial improvements particularly near subsurface grain boundaries and the critical buried p-n junction.

  10. Non-radiative relaxation of photoexcited chlorophylls: theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, William P.; Shenai, Prathamesh M.; Ghosh, Avishek; Liu, Zhengtang; Enriquez, Miriam Grace M.; Lambrev, Petar H.; Tan, Howe-Siang; Lo, Cynthia S.; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Zhao, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Nonradiative relaxation of high-energy excited states to the lowest excited state in chlorophylls marks the first step in the process of photosynthesis. We perform ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, that reveal this internal conversion dynamics to be slightly slower in chlorophyll B than in chlorophyll A. Modeling this process with non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics simulations uncovers a critical role played by the different side groups in the two molecules in governing the intramolecular redistribution of excited state wavefunction, leading, in turn, to different time-scales. Even given smaller electron-vibrational couplings compared to common organic conjugated chromophores, these molecules are able to efficiently dissipate about 1 eV of electronic energy into heat on the timescale of around 200 fs. This is achieved via selective participation of specific atomic groups and complex global migration of the wavefunction from the outer to inner ring, which may have important implications for biological light-harvesting function.

  11. Non-radiation endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of choledocholithiasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenming; Faigel, Douglas O; Sun, Gang; Yang, Yunsheng

    2014-11-01

    Gallstone diseases are common during pregnancy. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic and do not require any treatment. However, choledocholithiasis, cholangitis, and gallstone pancreatitis may potentially become life-threatening for both mother and fetus and often require urgent intervention. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the standard technique for removing common bile duct stones, it is associated with ionizing radiation that could carry teratogenic risk. Non-radiation ERCP (NR-ERCP) is reported to be effective without incurring this risk. Two techniques have been described to confirm bile duct cannulation: bile aspiration and image guidance. With bile aspiration, biliary cannulation is confirmed by applying suction to the cannula to yield bile, thus confirming an intrabiliary position. Image guidance involves using ultrasound or direct visualization (choledochoscopy) to confirm selective biliary cannulation or duct clearance. Once cannulation is achieved, the stones are removed using standard ERCP techniques and tools. Case series and retrospective studies have reported success rates of up to 90% for NR-ERCP with complication rates similar to standard ERCP. Pregnancy outcomes are not adversely affected by NR-ERCP, but whether the avoidance of radiation carries benefit for the baby is unknown. Prospective comparative trials are lacking. NR-ERCP is technically demanding and should be attempted only by skilled biliary endoscopists in properly equipped and staffed health-care institutions, in a multidisciplinary setting. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  12. Resonant Transparency and Non-Trivial Non-Radiating Excitations in Toroidal Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, V. A.; Rogacheva, A. V.; Savinov, V.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Engaging strongly resonant interactions allows dramatic enhancement of functionalities of many electromagnetic devices. However, resonances can be dampened by Joule and radiation losses. While in many cases Joule losses may be minimized by the choice of constituting materials, controlling radiation losses is often a bigger problem. Recent solutions include the use of coupled radiant and sub-radiant modes yielding narrow asymmetric Fano resonances in a wide range of systems, from defect states in photonic crystals and optical waveguides with mesoscopic ring resonators to nanoscale plasmonic and metamaterial systems exhibiting interference effects akin to electromagnetically-induced transparency. Here we demonstrate theoretically and confirm experimentally a new mechanism of resonant electromagnetic transparency, which yields very narrow isolated symmetric Lorentzian transmission lines in toroidal metamaterials. It exploits the long sought non-trivial non-radiating charge-current excitation based on interfering electric and toroidal dipoles that was first proposed by Afanasiev and Stepanovsky in [J. Phys. A Math. Gen. 28, 4565 (1995)]. PMID:24132231

  13. Non-radiative relaxation of photoexcited chlorophylls: theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, William P; Shenai, Prathamesh M; Ghosh, Avishek; Liu, Zhengtang; Enriquez, Miriam Grace M; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang; Lo, Cynthia S; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Zhao, Yang

    2015-09-08

    Nonradiative relaxation of high-energy excited states to the lowest excited state in chlorophylls marks the first step in the process of photosynthesis. We perform ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, that reveal this internal conversion dynamics to be slightly slower in chlorophyll B than in chlorophyll A. Modeling this process with non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics simulations uncovers a critical role played by the different side groups in the two molecules in governing the intramolecular redistribution of excited state wavefunction, leading, in turn, to different time-scales. Even given smaller electron-vibrational couplings compared to common organic conjugated chromophores, these molecules are able to efficiently dissipate about 1 eV of electronic energy into heat on the timescale of around 200 fs. This is achieved via selective participation of specific atomic groups and complex global migration of the wavefunction from the outer to inner ring, which may have important implications for biological light-harvesting function.

  14. Energy efficiency in Spanish wastewater treatment plants: a non-radial DEA approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Sancho, F; Molinos-Senante, M; Sala-Garrido, R

    2011-06-15

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are energy-intensive facilities. Thus, reducing their carbon footprint is particularly important, both economically and environmentally. Knowing the real operating energy efficiency of WWTPs is the starting point for any energy-saving initiative. In this article, we applied a non-radial Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) methodology to calculate energy efficiency indices for sampling of WWTPs located in Spain. In a second stage analysis, we examined the operating variables contributing to differences in energy efficiency among plants. It is verified that energy efficiencies of the analyzed WWTPs were quite low, with only 10% of them being efficient. We found that plant size, quantity of organic matter removed, and type of bioreactor aeration were significant variables in explaining energy efficiency differences. In contrast, age of the plant was not a determining factor in energy consumption. Lastly, we quantified the potential savings, both in economic terms and in terms of CO(2) emissions, that could be expected from an improvement in energy efficiency of WWTPs.

  15. A New Code for Nonradial Stellar Pulsations and its Application to Low - Mass, Helium White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Corsico, A H

    2002-01-01

    We present a finite difference code intended for computing linear, adiabatic, nonradial pulsations of spherical stars. This code is based on a general Newton - Raphson technique in order to handle the relaxation of the eigenvalue (square of the eigenfrequency) of the modes and their corresponding eigenfunctions. This code has been tested computing the pulsation spectra of polytropic spheres finding a good agreement with previous work. Then, we have coupled this code to our evolutionary code and applied it to the computation of the pulsation spectrum of a low mass, pure - helium white dwarf of 0.3 M_{sun} for a wide range of effective temperatures. In making this calculation we have taken an evolutionary time step short enough such that eigenmodes corresponding to a given model are used as initial approximation to those of the next one. Specifically, we have computed periods, period spacing, eigenfunctions, weight functions, kinetic energies and variational periods for a wide range of modes. To our notice this...

  16. Origin and implications of non-radial Imbrium Sculpture on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Crawford, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Rimmed grooves, lineations and elongate craters around Mare Imbrium shape much of the nearside Moon. This pattern was coined the Imbrium Sculpture, and it was originally argued that it must have been formed by a giant oblique (~30°) impact, a conclusion echoed by later studies. Some investigators, however, noticed that many elements of the Imbrium Sculpture are not radial to Imbrium, thereby implicating an endogenic or structural origin. Here we use these non-radial trends to conclude that the Imbrium impactor was a proto-planet (half the diameter of Vesta), once part of a population of large proto-planets in the asteroid belt. Such independent constraints on the sizes of the Imbrium and other basin-forming impactors markedly increase estimates for the mass in the asteroid belt before depletion caused by the orbital migration of Jupiter and Saturn. Moreover, laboratory impact experiments, shock physics codes and the groove widths indicate that multiple fragments (up to 2% of the initial diameter) from each oblique basin-forming impactor, such as the one that formed Imbrium, should have survived planetary collisions and contributed to the heavy impact bombardment between 4.3 and 3.8 billion years ago.

  17. Full wave analysis of non-radiative dielectric waveguide modulator for the determination of electrical equivalent circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Pathak; A Basu; S K Koul

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the determination of electrical equivalent circuit of ON/OFF modulator in non-radiative dielectric (NRD) guide configurations at Ka-band. Schottky barrier mixer diode is used to realize this modulator and its characteristics are determined experimentally using vector network analyzer. Full wave FEM simulator HFSS is used to determine an equivalent circuit for the mounted diode and modulator in ON and OFF states. This equivalent circuit is used to qualitatively explain the experimental characteristics of modulator.

  18. Coupling of Radial and Axial non-Radial Oscillations of Compact Stars: Gravitational Waves from first-order Differential Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Passamonti, A; Gualtieri, L; Nagar, A; Sopuerta, C F

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear coupling between radial and non-radial oscillations of static spherically symmetric neutron stars as a possible mechanism for the generation of gravitational waves that may lead to observable signatures. In this paper we concentrate on the axial sector of the non-radial perturbations. By using a multi-parameter perturbative framework we introduce a complete description of the non-linear coupling between radial and axial non-radial oscillations; we study the gauge invariant character of the associated perturbative variables and develop a computational scheme to evolve the non-linear coupling perturbations in the time domain. We present results of simulations corresponding to different physical situations and discuss the dynamical behaviour of this non-linear coupling. Of particular interest is the occurrence of signal amplifications in the form of resonance phenomena when a frequency associated with the radial pulsations is close to a frequency associated with one of the axial w-m...

  19. Structural defects and recombination behavior of excited carriers in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Du, H. W.; Li, Y.; Gao, M.; Wan, Y. Z.; Xu, F.; Ma, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    The carriers' behavior in neutral region (NTR) and space charged region (SCR) of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film based solar cells has been investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL-T), electroluminescence (EL-T) and current-voltage (IV-T) from 10 to 300 K. PL-T spectra show that three kinds of defects, namely VSe, InCu and (InCu+VCu), are localized within the band gap of NTR and SCR of CIGS layer, corresponding to the energy levels of EC-0.08, EC-0.20 and EC-0.25 eV, respectively. The InCu and (InCu+VCu) deep level defects are non-radiative recombination centers at room temperature. The IV-T and EL-T analysis reveals that the injection modes of electrons from ZnO conduction band into Cu(In,Ga)Se2 layer are tunneling, thermally-excited tunneling and thermionic emission under 10-40, 60-160, and 180-300 K, respectively. At 10-160 K, the electrons tunnel into (InCu+VCu) and Vse defect levels in band gap of SCR and the drifting is involved in the emission bands at 0.96 and 1.07 eV, which is the direct evidence for a tunneling assisted recombination. At 180-300 K, the electrons are directly injected into the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 conduction band, and the emission of 1.13 eV are ascribed to the transitions from the conduction band to the valence band.

  20. Recombinant Technology and Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icy D’Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant technology has led the way to monumental advances in the development of useful molecules, including the development of safe probiotics. The development of novel approaches using recombinant technology and probiotics that allow accurate targeting of therapeutics to the mucosa is an interesting area of research. The creation and use of recombinant probiotics expressing recombinantovalbumin, recombinant ovalbumin mutants and yet-to-be-designed recombinant hypo/non-allergenic molecules offer the opportunity to further investigate their effects for food, nutrition, environment andhealth. This review highlights advances in native probiotics and recombinant probiotics expressing native and recombinant molecules for food, nutrition, environment and health.

  1. Recombinant Technology and Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Icy D’Silva

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant technology has led the way to monumental advances in the development of useful molecules, including the development of safe probiotics. The development of novel approaches using recombinant technology and probiotics that allow accurate targeting of therapeutics to the mucosa is an interesting area of research. The creation and use of recombinant probiotics expressing recombinantovalbumin, recombinant ovalbumin mutants and yet-to-be-designed recombinant hypo/non-allergenic molecule...

  2. Conformational unfolding in the N-terminal region of ribonuclease A detected by nonradiative energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWherter, C A; Haas, E; Leed, A R; Scheraga, H A

    1986-04-22

    Unfolding in the N-terminal region of RNase A was studied by the nonradiative energy-transfer technique. RNase A was labeled with a nonfluorescent acceptor (2,4-dinitrophenyl) on the alpha-amino group and a fluorescent donor (ethylenediamine monoamide of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid) on a carboxyl group in the vicinity of residue 50 (75% at Glu-49 and 25% at Asp-53). The distribution of donor labeling sites does not affect the results of this study since they are close in both the sequence and the three-dimensional structure. The sites of labeling were determined by peptide mapping. The derivatives possessed full enzymatic activity and underwent reversible thermal transitions. However, there were some quantitative differences in the thermodynamic parameters. When the carboxyl groups were masked, there was a 5 degrees C lowering of the melting temperature at pH 2 and 4, and no significant change in delta H(Tm). Labeling of the alpha-amino group had no effect on the melting temperature or delta H(Tm) at pH 2 but did result in a dramatic decrease in delta H(Tm) of the unfolding reaction at pH 4. The melting temperature did not change appreciably at pH 4, indicating that an enthalpy/entropy compensation had occurred. The efficiencies of energy transfer determined with both fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements were in reasonably good agreement. The transfer efficiency dropped from about 60% under folding conditions to roughly 20% when the derivatives were unfolded with disulfide bonds intact and was further reduced to 5% when the disulfide bonds were reduced. The interprobe separation distance was estimated to be 35 +/- 2 A under folding conditions. The contribution to the interprobe distance resulting from the finite size of the probes was treated by using simple geometric considerations and a rotational isomeric state model of the donor probe linkage. With this model, the estimated average interprobe distance of 36 A is in excellent agreement with the

  3. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  4. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  5. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  6. Gray-Tone Lithography Implementation of Drexhage's Method for Calibrating Radiative and Nonradiative Decay Constants of Fluorophores

    CERN Document Server

    Kwadrin, Andrej; 10.1021/jp3048423

    2013-01-01

    We present a straightforward method to realize non-planar dielectric structures with a controlled height profile for use in calibration of fluorophores. Calibration of fluorescence quantum efficiency and intrinsic radiative and nonradiative decay rates of emitters is possible by using changes in the local density of optical states, provided one can control the emitter-surface distance with nanometer accuracy. We realize a method that is accurate yet fast to implement. We fabricate PMMA wedges (4 mm x 4 mm x 2 \\mu m) by gray-tone UV-lithography of Shipley S1813G2. Its applicability as dielectric spacer is demonstrated in Drexhage experiments for three different emitters in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The decay-rate dependence of the fluorescent state of emitters on the distance to a silver mirror is observed and compared to calculations based on the local density of states. Quantitative values for (non)radiative decay rates and quantum efficiencies are extracted. Furthermore, we discuss ho...

  7. Chlorine doping reduces electron-hole recombination in lead iodide perovskites: time-domain ab initio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-11-19

    Rapid development in lead halide perovskites has led to solution-processable thin film solar cells with power conversion efficiencies close to 20%. Nonradiative electron-hole recombination within perovskites has been identified as the main pathway of energy losses, competing with charge transport and limiting the efficiency. Using nonadiabatic (NA) molecular dynamics, combined with time-domain density functional theory, we show that nonradiative recombination happens faster than radiative recombination and long-range charge transfer to an acceptor material. Doping of lead iodide perovskites with chlorine atoms reduces charge recombination. On the one hand, chlorines decrease the NA coupling because they contribute little to the wave functions of the valence and conduction band edges. On the other hand, chlorines shorten coherence time because they are lighter than iodines and introduce high-frequency modes. Both factors favor longer excited-state lifetimes. The simulation shows good agreement with the available experimental data and contributes to the comprehensive understanding of electronic and vibrational dynamics in perovskites. The generated insights into design of higher-efficiency solar cells range from fundamental scientific principles, such as the role of electron-vibrational coupling and quantum coherence, to practical guidelines, such as specific suggestions for chemical doping.

  8. Development of ADA Against Recombinant Human Interferon Beta in Immune Tolerant Mice Requires Rapid Recruitment of CD4(+) T Cells, Induces Formation of Germinal Centers but Lacks Susceptibility for (Most) Adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijanka, Grzegorz; Sauerborn, Melody; Boon, Louis; Schellekens, Huub; Brinks, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Immunological processes leading to formation of antidrug antibodies (Abs) against recombinant human proteins remain poorly understood. Animal and clinical studies revealed that immunogenicity shares both T-cell-dependent (requirement of CD4(+) T cells, isotype switching) and T-cell-independent (invo

  9. Damping rates of surface plasmons for particles of size from nano- to micrometers; reduction of the nonradiative decay

    CERN Document Server

    Kolwas, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    Damping rates of multipolar, localized surface plasmons (SP) of gold and silver nanospheres of radii up to $1000nm$ were found with the tools of classical electrodynamics. The significant increase in damping rates followed by noteworthy decrease for larger particles takes place along with substantial red-shift of plasmon resonance frequencies as a function of particle size. We also introduced interface damping into our modeling, which substantially modifies the plasmon damping rates of smaller particles. We demonstrate unexpected reduction of the multipolar SP damping rates in certain size ranges. This effect can be explained by the suppression of the nonradiative decay channel as a result of the lost competition with the radiative channel. We show that experimental dipole damping rates [H. Baida, et al., Nano Lett. 9(10) (2009) 3463, and C. S\\"onnichsen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 077402], and the resulting resonance quality factors can be described in a consistent and straightforward way within our ...

  10. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  11. Non-radiative relaxation dynamics of pyrrole following excitation in the range 249.5-200 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Oliver M.; Parkes, Michael A.; Neville, Simon P.; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2017-09-01

    The non-radiative relaxation dynamics of pyrrole have been investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics simulations. Following excitation of the A2 (11 πσ∗) state, we observe population flow out of the Franck-Condon region on a ≲ 50 fs timescale. Following excitation of the B2 (21 ππ∗) state, we observe population being transferred to the A2 (11 πσ∗) state on a <50 fs timescale and subsequently out of the Franck-Condon region, also on a <50 fs timescale. Quantum dynamics calculations suggest that population is transferred from the B2 (21 ππ∗) state through the A2 (1 π 3pz) state to the B1 (21 πσ∗) state before being transferred to the A2 (11 πσ∗) state.

  12. A multi-center open-labeled study of recombinant erythropoietin-beta in the treatment of anemic patients with multiple myeloma, low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen; Jun, Ma; Hong-Li, Zhu; Jian-Min, Wang; Chun, Wang; Lu-Gui, Qiu; Yong-Qiang, Zhao; Jun, Zhu; Jian, Hou; Zhi-Xiang, Shen

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant erythropoietin-beta in the treatment of anemic patients with multiple myeloma (MM), low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). From December 2005 to November 2006, the patients with MM, low-grade NHL, and CLL were enrolled in this study, male or female, aged > or = 18 years, transfusion-dependant, and receiving anti-neoplasia chemotherapy. Recombinant human erythropoietin-beta was used in this study with the dose initiated at 150 IU/kg, thrice a week, subcutaneously. The total treatment duration was 12 weeks. The primary endpoint of the study is response rate (RR), which is defined as hemoglobin increasing > or = 2 g/dL comparing to baseline level, or returning to normal range, without any transfusion within 6 weeks of evaluation. Fifty out of 82 (64.6%) patients enrolled in this study responded to the treatment and 29 patients had no response. Hypertension (12.2%) is the most common adverse effect; however, all the adverse events were mild, categorized in NCI grade I or II. We conclude that recombinant erythropoietin-beta was effective in the treatment of anemia of the patients with MM, NHL, and CLL, as well as it is well-tolerated.

  13. Safety of Recombinant Fusion Protein ESAT6-CFP10 as a Skin Test Reagent for Tuberculosis Diagnosis: an Open-Label, Randomized, Single-Center Phase I Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Xu, Miao; Zhou, Lijun; Xiong, Yanqing; Xia, Lu; Fan, Xiaoyong; Gu, Jun; Pu, Jiang; Lu, Shuihua; Wang, Guozhi

    2016-09-01

    This trial was conducted to explore the safety of recombinant fusion protein ESAT6-CFP10 as a skin test reagent for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers were recruited and randomized into four groups (groups A to D) to study four increasing doses of ESAT6-CFP10. All subjects in each dose group received an intradermal injection of reagent (0.1 ml) via the Mantoux technique. Then, the vital signs of all subjects were monitored, and skin reactions around injection sites and adverse events were recorded at different detection time points after the skin test. No serious adverse events were observed in this study. A total of 3 subjects had unexpected events. One subject in group A developed subcutaneous hemorrhage 24 h after the skin test, one subject in group B was found with red spots 15 min after the skin test, and another subject in group A showed abnormity during a chest X-ray after the skin test without affecting her health. One of three adverse events (red spots) was probably related to the recombinant ESAT6-CFP10 reagent. A single dose of 1, 5, 10, or 20 μg/ml of recombinant ESAT6-CFP10 as a skin test reagent for M. tuberculosis infection diagnosis is well tolerated and safe in China. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01999231.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Evidence for the TICT mediated nonradiative deexcitation process for the excited coumarin-1 dye in high polarity protic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Atanu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumbhakar, Manoj [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pal, Haridas [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: hpal@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-08-29

    Photophysical properties of coumarin-1 (C1) dye in different protic solvents have been investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Correlation of the Stokes' shifts ({delta}{nu}-bar ) with the solvent polarity ({delta}f) suggests the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character for the dye fluorescent state. Fluorescence quantum yields ({phi}{sub f}) and lifetimes ({tau}{sub f}) of the dye show an abrupt reduction in high polarity solvents having {delta}f >{approx}0.28. In these solvents {tau}{sub f} is seen to be strongly temperature dependent, though it is temperature independent in solvents with {delta}f <{approx}0.28. It is inferred that in high polarity protic solvents there is a participation of an additional nonradiative decay process via the involvement of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. Unlike present results, no involvement of TICT state was observed even in strongly polar aprotic solvent like acetonitrile. It is indicated that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the dye with protic solvents in addition with the solvent polarity helps in the stabilization of the TICT state for C1 dye. Unlike most TICT molecules, the activation barrier ({delta}E{sub a}) for the TICT mediated nonradiative process for C1 dye is seen to increase with solvent polarity. This is rationalized on the basis of the assumption that the TICT to ground state conversion is the activation-controlled rate-determining step for the present system than the usual ICT to TICT conversion as encountered for most other TICT molecules.

  15. Ga-Polar (In ,Ga )N /GaN Quantum Wells Versus N-Polar (In,Ga)N Quantum Disks in GaN Nanowires: A Comparative Analysis of Carrier Recombination, Diffusion, and Radiative Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feix, F.; Flissikowski, T.; Sabelfeld, K. K.; Kaganer, V. M.; Wölz, M.; Geelhaar, L.; Grahn, H. T.; Brandt, O.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the radiative and nonradiative recombination processes in planar (In ,Ga )N /GaN (0001 ) quantum wells and (In,Ga)N quantum disks embedded in GaN (000 1 ¯ ) nanowires using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy under both continuous-wave and pulsed excitation. The PL intensities of these two samples quench only slightly between 10 and 300 K, which is commonly taken as evidence for high internal quantum efficiencies. However, a side-by-side comparison shows that the absolute intensity of the Ga-polar quantum wells is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the N-polar quantum disks. A similar difference is observed for the initial decay time of PL transients obtained by time-resolved measurements, indicating the presence of a highly efficient nonradiative decay channel for the quantum disks. In apparent contradiction to this conjecture, the decay of both samples is observed to slow down dramatically after the initial rapid decay. Independent of temperature, the transients approach a power law for longer decay times, reflecting the fact that recombination occurs between individual electrons and holes with varying spatial separation. Employing a coupled system of stochastic integro-differential equations taking into account both radiative and nonradiative Shockley-Read-Hall recombination of spatially separate electrons and holes as well as their diffusion, we obtain simulated transients matching the experimentally obtained ones. The results reveal that even dominant nonradiative recombination conserves the power-law decay for (In ,Ga )N /GaN {0001 } quantum wells and disks.

  16. Novel Recombinant Sapovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiko; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Uchino, Kiyoko; Oka, Tomoichiro; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Takeda, Naokazu

    2004-01-01

    We determined the complete genome sequences of two sapovirus strains isolated in Thailand and Japan. One of these strains represented a novel, naturally occurring recombinant sapovirus. Evidence suggested the recombination site was at the polymerase-capsid junction within open reading frame one. PMID:15504283

  17. De mogelijkheden van het verbeteren van brouwgerst door recombinant DNA-onderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rörsch, A.; Duijnhouwer, I.D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Het recombinant DNA-onderzoek startte omstreeks 1960. Een belangrijk deel van dit onderzoek op het gebied van gerst wordt uitgevoerd door het Carlsberg Research Center in Kopenhagen. In dit artikel worden diverse mogelijkheden van recombinant DNA-technieken belicht. Aangezien recombinant DNA-technie

  18. Efficient Carrier Injection, Transport, Relaxation, and Recombination Associated with a Stronger Carrier Localization and a Low Polarization Effect of Nonpolar m-plane InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fann-Wei; You, Yu-Siang; Feng, Shih-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Based on time-resolved electroluminescence (TREL) measurement, more efficient carrier injection, transport, relaxation, and recombination associated with a stronger carrier localization and a low polarization effect in a nonpolar m-plane InGaN/GaN light emitting diode ( m-LED), compared with those in a polar c-LED, are reported. With a higher applied voltage in the c-LED, decreasing response time and rising time improve device performance, but a longer recombination time degrades luminescence efficiency. By using an m-LED with a stronger carrier localization and a low polarization effect, shorter response, rising, and recombination times provide more efficient carrier injection, transport, relaxation, and recombination. These advantages can be realized for high-power and high-speed flash LEDs. In addition, with a weaker carrier localization and a polarization effect in the c-LED, the slower radiative and faster nonradiative decay rates at a larger applied voltage result in the slower total decay rate and the lower luminescence efficiency. For the m-LED at a higher applied voltage, a slow decreasing nonradiative decay rate is beneficial to device performance, while the more slowly decreasing and overall faster radiative decay rate of the m-LED than that of the c-LED demonstrates that a stronger carrier localization and a reduced polarization effect are efficient for carrier recombination. The resulting recombination dynamics are correlated with the device characteristics and performance of the c- and m-LEDs.

  19. Recombinant methods and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roizman, B.; Post, L.E.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a method for stably effecting the insertion or deletion of a selected DNA sequence at a specific site in a viral genome. The method consists of: (1) isolating from the genome a linear DNA fragment comprising both (a) the specific site determined for insertion or deletion of selected DNA sequence and (b) flanking DNA sequences normally preceding and following the site; (2) preparing first and second altered genome fragments from the fragment isolated in step (1). (a) the first altered fragment comprising the fragment comprising a thymidine kinase gene in a position intermediate the ends of the fragment, and (b) the second altered fragment comprising the fragment having the selected DNA sequence inserted therein or deleted therefrom; (3) contacting the genome with the first altered fragment under conditions permitting recombination at sites of DNA sequence homology, selecting for a recombinant genome comprising the thymidine kinase gene, and isolating the recombinant genome; and (4) contacting the recombinant genome isolated in step (3) with the second altered fragment under conditions permitting recombination at sites of DNA sequence homology, selecting for a recombinant genome lacking the thymidine kinase gene, and isolating the recombinant genome product.

  20. Computational studies on the excited states of luminescent platinum(II) alkynyl systems of tridentate pincer ligands in radiative and nonradiative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Han; Lam, Elizabeth Suk-Hang; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2013-10-09

    Platinum(II) alkynyl complexes of various tridentate pincer ligands, [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) (trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) (R'-bzimpy = 2,6-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)pyridine and R' = alkyl), [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] (R'-bzimb = 1,3-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)benzene and R' = C4H9), have been found to possess rich photophysical properties. The emission in dilute solutions of [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) originated from a triplet alkynyl-to-tridentate pincer ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) excited state, with mixing of a platinum-to-tridentate pincer ligand metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, while that of [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] originated from a triplet excited state of intraligand (IL) character of the tridentate ligand mixed with a platinum-to-tridentate ligand MLCT character. Interestingly, both emissions were observed in [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) in some cases. In addition, [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] displayed a photoluminescence quantum yield higher than that of [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+). Computational studies have been performed on the representative complexes [Pt(trpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (1), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (2), and [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CPh)] (3), where R' = CH3 and Ph = C6H5, to provide an in-depth understanding of the nature of their emissive origin as well as the radiative and nonradiative processes. In particular, the factors governing the ordering of the triplet excited states and radiative decay rate constants of the emissive state ((3)ES) have been examined. The potential energy profiles for the deactivation process from the (3)ES via triplet metal-centered ((3)MC) states have also been explored. This work reveals for the first time the potential energy profiles for the thermal deactivation pathway of square planar platinum(II) complexes.

  1. Mediation of surface recombination in a II-VI powder by palladium microislands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1987-04-01

    The recombination mechanisms in a Zn(Cd)S:Ag phosphor powder have been probed by luminescence and flash-photolysis time-resolved dielectric loss techniques. The influence of Pd-microislands chemically deposited thereon, alone, and in conjunction with recombination mediators phenylhydrazine and phenylacetic acid (in xylene solution) on the recombination pathways was studied. The Pd deposit affects recombination by increasing the fraction of the particle volume dominated by the surface processes, by providing a pathway for photoelectrons to reach the (negative) surface to participate in surface recombination, and by providing recombination centers per se. The implications of these results for heterogeneous photocatalysis are discussed.

  2. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  3. Anticrossing double Fano resonances generated in metallic/dielectric hybrid nanostructures using nonradiative anapole modes for enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wu-Chao; Qiao, Tie-Zhu; Cai, Dong-Jin; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Jing-Dong; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Shao-Ding

    2016-11-28

    Third-harmonic generation with metallic or dielectric nanoparticles often suffer from, respectively, small modal volumes and weak near-field enhancements. This study propose and demonstrate that a metallic/dielectric hybrid nanostructure composed of a silver double rectangular nanoring and a silicon square nanoplate can be used to overcome these obstacles for enhanced third-harmonic generation. It is shown that the nonradiative anapole mode of the Si plate can be used as a localized source to excite the dark subradiant octupole mode of the Ag ring, and the mode hybridization leads to the formation of an antibonding and a bonding subradiant collective mode, thereby forming anticrossing double Fano resonances. With the strong coupling between individual particles and the effectively suppressed radiative losses of the Fano resonances, several strong hot spots are generated around the Ag ring due to the excitation of the octupole mode, and electromagnetic fields within the Si plate are also strongly amplified, making it possible to confine more incident energy inside the dielectric nanoparticle. Calculation results reveal that the confined energy inside the Si plate and the Ag ring for the hybrid structures can be about, respectively, more than three times and four orders stronger than that of the corresponding isolated nanoparticles, which makes the designed hybrid nanostructure a promising platform for enhanced third-harmonic generation.

  4. Ag colloids and arrays for plasmonic non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to a quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Graham P; Higgins, Luke J; Karanikolas, Vasilios D; Wilson, Keith M; Coindreau, Jorge A Garcia; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z; Parbrook, Peter J; Bradley, A Louise

    2016-01-01

    Ag nanoparticles in the form of colloids and ordered arrays are used to demonstrate plasmon-mediated non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to quantum wells with varying top barrier thicknesses. Plasmon-mediated energy transfer efficiencies of up to ~25% are observed with the Ag colloids. The distance dependence of the plasmon-mediated energy transfer is found to follow the same d^{-4} dependence as the direct quantum dot to quantum well energy transfer. There is also evidence for an increase in the characteristic distance of the interaction, thus indicating that it follows a F\\"orster-like model with the Ag nanoparticle-quantum dot acting as an enhanced donor dipole. Ordered Ag nanoparticle arrays display plasmon-mediated energy transfer efficiencies up to ~21%. To explore the tunability of the array system, two arrays with different geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that changing the geometry of the array allows a transition from overall quenching of the acceptor quantum well emission to...

  5. Ag colloids and arrays for plasmonic non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to a quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Graham P.; Gough, John J.; Higgins, Luke J.; Karanikolas, Vasilios D.; Wilson, Keith M.; Garcia Coindreau, Jorge A.; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Parbrook, Peter J.; Bradley, A. Louise

    2017-03-01

    Non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) can be an efficient process of benefit to many applications including photovoltaics, sensors, light emitting diodes and photodetectors. Combining the remarkable optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) with the electrical properties of quantum wells (QWs) allows for the formation of hybrid devices which can utilize NRET as a means of transferring absorbed optical energy from the QDs to the QW. Here we report on plasmon-enhanced NRET from semiconductor nanocrystal QDs to a QW. Ag nanoparticles in the form of colloids and ordered arrays are used to demonstrate plasmon-mediated NRET from QDs to QWs with varying top barrier thicknesses. Plasmon-mediated energy transfer (ET) efficiencies of up to ∼25% are observed with the Ag colloids. The distance dependence of the plasmon-mediated ET is found to follow the same d ‑4 dependence as the direct QD to QW ET. There is also evidence for an increase in the characteristic distance of the interaction, thus indicating that it follows a Förster-like model with the Ag nanoparticle-QD acting as an enhanced donor dipole. Ordered Ag nanoparticle arrays display plasmon-mediated ET efficiencies up to ∼21%. To explore the tunability of the array system, two arrays with different geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that changing the geometry of the array allows a transition from overall quenching of the acceptor QW emission to enhancement, as well as control of the competition between the QD donor quenching and ET rates.

  6. The mass of the neutron star in Vela X-1 and tidally induced non-radial oscillations in GP Vel

    CERN Document Server

    Quaintrell, H; Ash, T D C; Roche, P; Willems, B; Bedding, T R; Baldry, I K; Fender, R P

    2003-01-01

    We report new radial velocity observations of GP Vel/HD77581, the optical companion to the eclipsing X-ray pulsar Vela X-1. Using data spanning more than two complete orbits of the system, we detect evidence for tidally induced non-radial oscillations on the surface of GP Vel, apparent as peaks in the power spectrum of the residuals to the radial velocity curve fit. By removing the effect of these oscillations (to first order) and binning the radial velocities, we have determined the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity curve of GP Vel to be K_o=22.6+/-1.5 km/s. Given the accurately measured semi-amplitude of the pulsar's orbit, the mass ratio of the system is 0.081+/-0.005. We are able to set upper and lower limits on the masses of the component stars as follows. Assuming GP Vel fills its Roche lobe then the inclination angle of the system, i=70.1+/-2.6 deg. In this case we obtain the masses of the two stars as M_x=2.27 +/-0.17 M_sun for the neutron star and M_o=27.9+/-1.3 M_sun for GP Vel. Conversely, assu...

  7. Spectroscopic monitoring of the Herbig Ae star HD 104237. II. Non-radial pulsations, mode analysis and fundamental stellar parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Fumel, Aurelie

    2011-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars showing signs of intense activity and strong stellar winds, whose origin is not yet understood in the frame of current theoretical models of stellar evolution for young stars. The evolutionary tracks of the earlier Herbig Ae stars cross a recently discovered PMS instability strip. Many of these stars exhibit pulsations of delta Scuti type. HD 104237 is a well-known pulsating Herbig Ae star. In this article, we reinvestigated an extensive high-resolution quasi-continuous spectroscopic data set in order to search for very faint indications of non-radial pulsations in the line profile. To do this, we worked on dynamical spectra of equivalent photospheric (LSD) profiles of HD 104237. A 2D Fourier analysis (F2D) was performed of the entire profile and the temporal variation of the central depth of the line was studied with the time-series analysis tools Period04 and SigSpec. We present a mode identification corresponding to the detected dominan...

  8. Non-radial Oscillations in Rotating Giant Planets with Solid Cores: Application to Saturn and its Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Storch, Natalia I

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed evidence for the global oscillations of Jupiter and Saturn, which can potentially provide a new window into the interior structure of giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we study the non-radial oscillation modes of giant planets containing a solid core. Our calculations include the elastic response of the core and consider a wide range of possible values of the core shear modulus. While the elasticity of the core only slightly changes the frequencies of acoustic modes, which reside mostly in the fluid envelope, it adds two new classes of shear modes that are largely confined to the core. We also calculate the effects of the Coriolis force on the planetary oscillation modes. In addition to changing the mode frequencies, the Coriolis force can cause the shear modes to mix with the f-modes. Such mixing occurs when the frequencies of the shear mode and the f-mode are close to each other, and results in "mixed modes" with similar properties that are slightly split in f...

  9. Specific complex of non-radiation risk factors for socially significant pathologies could affect the liquidators of Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koterov A.N.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the complex of non-radiation factors that could affect the liquidators of the Chernobyl accident: the demographic, social and professional group heterogeneity to warrant differentiation of risk, the effects of heavy metals, 'hot particles', chemicals, psychogenic stress, social dislocation in the post-perestroika period, alcohol abuse, smoking, and the effect of screening. All these factors tend to have a significant intensity, unlike the radiation exposure for the majority of subjects. It is concluded that the increased frequency and severity of some large socially significant pathologies in contingent liquidators may be due to a unique set of predominantly non-radiation factors associated, however, with a particular radiation accident.

  10. Novel intragenotype recombination in sapovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung Gia; Yan, Hainian; Khamrin, Pattara; Quang, Trinh Duy; Dey, Shuvra Kanti; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Okitsu, Shoko; Müller, Werner E G; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Based on the genetic analysis, a novel, naturally occurring recombination between two distinct sapovirus subtypes (subtype a and subtype b) within genogroup I genotype 1 was identified. Breakpoint analysis of recombinant sapovirus showed that the recombination site was at the polymerase-capsid junction. This is the first report of the existence of acute gastroenteritis caused by intragenotype recombinant sapovirus. The results also provided evidence that the natural recombination occurs not only in sapovirus genogroup II but also in sapovirus genogroup I.

  11. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  12. Extent and distribution of in-stent intimal hyperplasia and edge effect in a non-radiation stent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, N J; Wilensky, R L; Tanguay, J F; Bartorelli, A L; Moses, J; Williams, D O; Bailey, S; Martin, J L; Canos, M R; Rudra, H; Popma, J J; Leon, M B; Kaplan, A V; Mintz, G S

    2001-08-01

    Intimal hyperplasia within the body of the stent is the primary mechanism for in-stent restenosis; however, stent edge restenosis has been described after brachytherapy. Our current understanding about the magnitude of in vivo intimal hyperplasia and edge restenosis is limited to data obtained primarily from select, symptomatic patients requiring repeat angiography. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and distribution of intimal hyperplasia both within the stent and along the stent edge in relatively nonselect, asymptomatic patients scheduled for 6-month intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as part of a multicenter trial: Heparin Infusion Prior to Stenting. Planar IVUS measurements 1 mm apart were obtained throughout the stent and over a length of 10 mm proximal and distal to the stent at index and follow-up. Of the 179 patients enrolled, 140 returned for repeat angiography and IVUS at 6.4 +/- 1.9 months and had IVUS images adequate for analysis. Patients had 1.2 +/- 0.6 Palmaz-Schatz stents per vessel. There was a wide individual variation of intimal hyperplasia distribution within the stent and no mean predilection for any location. At 6 months, intimal hyperplasia occupied 29.3 +/- 16.2% of the stent volume on average. Lumen loss within 2 mm of the stent edge was due primarily to intimal proliferation. Beyond 2 mm, negative remodeling contributed more to lumen loss. Gender, age, vessel location, index plaque burden, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and tobacco did not predict luminal narrowing at the stent edges, but diabetes, unstable angina at presentation, and lesion length were predictive of in-stent intimal hyperplasia. In a non-radiation stent population, 29% of the stent volume is filled with intimal hyperplasia at 6 months. Lumen loss at the stent edge is due primarily to intimal proliferation.

  13. Nonradial and radial period changes of the δ Scuti star 4 CVn. II. Systematic behavior over 40 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H.; Lenz, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Radial and nonradial pulsators on and near the main sequence show period and amplitude changes that are too large to be the product of stellar evolution. The multiperiodic δ Sct stars are well suited to study this, as the period changes of different modes excited in the same star can be compared. This requires a very large amount of photometric data covering years and decades as well as mode identifications. Methods: We have examined over 800 nights of high-precision photometry of the multiperiodic pulsator 4 CVn obtained from 1966 through 2012. Because most of the data were obtained in adjacent observing seasons, it is possible to derive very accurate period values for a number of the excited pulsation modes and to study their systematic changes from 1974 to 2012. Results: Most pulsation modes show systematic significant period and amplitude changes on a timescale of decades. For the well-studied modes, around 1986 a general reversal of the directions of both the positive and negative period changes occurred. Furthermore, the period changes between the different modes are strongly correlated, although they differ in size and sign. For the modes with known values of the spherical degree and azimuthal order, we find a correlation between the direction of the period changes and the identified azimuthal order, m. The associated amplitude changes generally have similar timescales of years or decades, but show little systematic or correlated behavior from mode to mode. Conclusions: A natural explanation for the opposite behavior of the prograde and retrograde modes is that their period changes are driven by a changing rotation profile. The changes in the rotation profile could in turn be driven by processes, perhaps the pulsations themselves, that redistribute angular momentum within the star. In general, different modes have different rotation kernels, so this will produce period shifts of varying magnitude for different modes.

  14. Intergenogroup Recombination in Sapoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Grant S.; Takeda, Naokazu; Oka, Tomoichiro; Oseto, Mitsukai; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof

    2005-01-01

    Sapovirus, a member of the family Caliciviridae, is an etiologic agent of gastroenteritis in humans and pigs. Analyses of the complete genome sequences led us to identify the first sapovirus intergenogroup recombinant strain. Phylogenetic analysis of the nonstructural region (i.e., genome start to capsid start) grouped this strain into genogroup II, whereas the structural region (i.e., capsid start to genome end) grouped this strain into genogroup IV. We found that a recombination event occurred at the polymerase and capsid junction. This is the first report of intergenogroup recombination for any calicivirus and highlights a possible route of zoonoses because sapovirus strains that infect pig species belong to genogroup III. PMID:16485479

  15. Recombination experiments at CRYRING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, W.; Glans, P.; Zong, W.; Gao, H.; Andler, G.; Justiniano, E.; Saito, M.; Schuch, R

    1998-11-15

    Recent advances in studies of electron-ion recombination processes at low relative energies with the electron cooler of the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING are shown. Through the use of an adiabatically expanded electron beam, collisions down to 10{sup -4}eV relative energies were measured with highly charged ions stored in the ring at around 15 MeV/amu energies. Examples of recombination measurements for bare ions of D{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, N{sup 7+}, Ne{sup 10+} and Si{sup 14+} are presented. Further on, results of an experiment measuring laser-induced recombination (LIR) into n=3 states of deuterium with polarized laser light are shown.

  16. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  17. Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on the prognosis of patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a prospective, multi-center, randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ai-Jie; Zang, Hong-Yun; Huang, Ru-Gang; Zheng, Xiao-Qun; Lin, Hai-Long; Wang, Wei; Hou, Ping; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhan-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) on serum enzyme data, cardiac function parameters and cardiovascular events in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction (MI). Methods A total of 421 patients with acute anterior or extensive anterior MI were collected from 20 hospitals. These patients were randomly divided into two groups: rhBNP and control groups. Both groups of patients received primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within the effective time window. In the rhBNP group, rhBNP administration (0.01 µg/kg/min, 48–72 successive hours) was performed as early as possible after hospital admission. Prior to and one or seven days after PCI, serum concentrations of cardiac troponin (cTnT), creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured. At seven days and 6 months after PCI, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd) and stroke volume (SV) were measured using 2D Doppler echocardiography. MACEs that occurred during hospitalization and within 6 months after PCI were recorded. Results At postoperative days one and seven, serum concentrations of cTnT were significantly lower in the rhBNP group than in the control group. At postoperative day one, serum concentrations of CK-MB were significantly lower in the rhBNP group than in the control group. At postoperative day seven, serum concentrations of NT-proBNP were significantly lower in the rhBNP group than in the control group, and LVEF was significantly greater in the rhBNP group than in the control group. At postoperative 6 months, LVEDd was significantly lower in the rhBNP group compared with the control group. In addition, SV and LVEF were significantly greater in the rhBNP group than in the control group. By postoperative month 6, the incidence of composite cardiovascular events (16.0% vs. 26.0%, P=0.012), cardiac death (7.0% vs.13

  18. Internal quantum efficiency and Auger recombination in green, yellow and red InGaN-based light emitters grown along the polar direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    We comparatively study the onset of photo-induced non-radiative intrinsic Auger recombination processes for red, yellow and green light emitting InGaNsbnd GaN hetero-structures grown along the polar orientation. We find a dramatic reduction of the photo excitation densities triggering the domination of Auger effect with increasing emission wavelength; that is to say in concert with the enhancement of the internal electric field in the structure. In long wavelength emitters, the internal electric field is stronger, and hence reducing the impact of the internal electric field is more critical.

  19. Recombineering linear BACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  20. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  1. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  2. Auger Recombination in Self-Assembled Quantum Dots: Quenching and Broadening of the Charged Exciton Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzmann, Annika; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Lorke, Axel; Geller, Martin

    2016-05-11

    In quantum dots (QDs), the Auger recombination is a nonradiative process in which the electron-hole recombination energy is transferred to an additional carrier. It has been studied mostly in colloidal QDs, where the Auger recombination time is in the picosecond range and efficiently quenches the light emission. In self-assembled QDs, on the other hand, the influence of Auger recombination on the optical properties is in general neglected, assuming that it is masked by other processes such as spin and charge fluctuations. Here, we use time-resolved resonance fluorescence to analyze the Auger recombination and its influence on the optical properties of a single self-assembled QD. From excitation-power-dependent measurements, we find a long Auger recombination time of about 500 ns and a quenching of the trion transition by about 80%. Furthermore, we observe a broadening of the trion transition line width by up to a factor of 2. With a model based on rate equations, we are able to identify the interplay between tunneling and Auger rate as the underlying mechanism for the reduced intensity and the broadening of the line width. This demonstrates that self-assembled QDs can serve as an ideal model system to study how the charge recapture process, given by the band-structure surrounding the confined carriers, influences the Auger process. Our findings are not only relevant for improving the emission properties of colloidal QD-based emitters and dyes, which have recently entered the consumer market, but also of interest for more visionary applications, such as quantum information technologies, based on self-assembled quantum dots.

  3. Charge separation in organic solar cells: Effects of Coulomb interaction, recombination and hole propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati Aram, Tahereh; Asgari, Asghar; Mayou, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells are analysed within a simple efficient model that includes the important physical properties of such photovoltaic systems. In this model, in contrast with most of the previous studies, we take into account the motion of both the electron and the hole in the separation process at the donor-acceptor interface. We theoretically examine the exciton dissociation yield under the influences of charge Coulomb interaction and non-radiative recombination. We find that the electron-hole local Coulomb attraction and charge carriers' coupling parameters play an important role in the system performance and in the optimal energy conversion efficiency of the BHJ photocell. We show that the fixed-hole models tend to underestimate the yield.

  4. Recombination dynamics in aerotaxy-grown Zn-doped GaAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fangfang; Messing, Maria E.; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Deppert, Knut; Samuelson, Lars; Magnusson, Martin H.; Yartsev, Arkady

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we have investigated the dynamics of photo-generated charge carriers in a series of aerotaxy-grown GaAs nanowires (NWs) with different levels of Zn doping. Time-resolved photo-induced luminescence and transient absorption have been employed to investigate radiative (band edge transition) and non-radiative charge recombination processes, respectively. We find that the photo-luminescence (PL) lifetime of intrinsic GaAs NWs is significantly increased after growing an AlGaAs shell over them, indicating that an AlGaAs shell can effectively passivate the surface of aerotaxy-grown GaAs NWs. We observe that PL decay time as well as PL intensity decrease with increasing Zn doping, which can be attributed to thermally activated electron trapping with the trap density increased due to the Zn doping level.

  5. SUMO Wrestles with Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumír Krejčí

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs comprise one of the most toxic DNA lesions, as the failure to repair a single DSB has detrimental consequences on the cell. Homologous recombination (HR constitutes an error-free repair pathway for the repair of DSBs. On the other hand, when uncontrolled, HR can lead to genome rearrangements and needs to be tightly regulated. In recent years, several proteins involved in different steps of HR have been shown to undergo modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO peptide and it has been suggested that deficient sumoylation impairs the progression of HR. This review addresses specific effects of sumoylation on the properties of various HR proteins and describes its importance for the homeostasis of DNA repetitive sequences. The article further illustrates the role of sumoylation in meiotic recombination and the interplay between SUMO and other post-translational modifications.

  6. Recombinant Human Enterovirus 71

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Two human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) isolates were identified from hand, foot and mouth disease patients with genome sequences that had high similarity to HEV71 (>93%) at 5´ UTR, P1, and P2 and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16, >85%) at P3 and 3´UTR. Intertypic recombination is likely to have occurred between HEV71 and CV-A16 or an as-yet to be described CV-A16-like virus.

  7. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  8. Recombination in converters of β-radiation energy to electrical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanin, I. E.; Amelichev, V. V.; Bulyarskii, S. V.; Lakalin, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    β-to-electric energy converters based on high-ohmic silicon, as well as processes that provide a high conversion efficiency, have been studied. It has been shown that the conversion efficiency is related to recombination in the space-charge region of converters at low levels of injection. A technique for determining the parameters of recombination centers that is built on new conversion algorithms has been developed. These algorithms make it possible to change the monotonic (and exponential as a whole) current-voltage characteristic of the device to a singular curve and find the parameters of recombination centers. These parameters have been calculated in a wide temperature range. Regions in the temperature-forward bias coordinates have been revealed in which recombination fluxes are captured by a recombination center, which influences the saturation current of the current-voltage characteristic and the conversion efficiency.

  9. Non-radial pulsations in the Be/X binaries 4U0115+63 and SAXJ2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Soto, J; Fabregat, J; Fox-Machado, L

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of non-radial pulsations (NRP) in the Be/X binaries of the Magellanic Clouds (MC, eg. Fabrycky 2005, Coe et al. 2005, Schmidtke & Cowley 2005) provided a new approach to understand these complex systems, and, at the same time, favoured the synergy between two different fields: stellar pulsations and X-ray binaries. This breakthrough was possible thanks to the MACHO and OGLE surveys. However, in our Galaxy, only two Be/X have been reported to show NRP: GROJ2058+42 (Kiziloglu et al. 2007) and LSI+61 235 (Sarty et al. 2009). Our objective is to study the short-term variability of Galactic Be/X binaries, compare them to the Be/X of the MC and to the isolated Galactic Be observed with CoRoT and Kepler. We present preliminary results of two Be/X stars, namely 4U0115+63 and SAXJ2103.5+4545 showing multiperiodicity and periodicity respectively, most probably produced by non-radial pulsations.

  10. Measuring the Total-Factor Carbon Emission Performance of Industrial Land Use in China Based on the Global Directional Distance Function and Non-Radial Luenberger Productivity Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Industry is a major contributor to carbon emissions in China, and industrial land is an important input to industrial production. Therefore, a detailed analysis of the carbon emission performance of industrial land use is necessary for making reasonable carbon reduction policies that promote the sustainable use of industrial land. This paper aims to analyze the dynamic changes in the total-factor carbon emission performance of industrial land use (TCPIL in China by applying a global directional distance function (DDF and non-radial Luenberger productivity index. The empirical results show that the eastern region enjoys better TCPIL than the central and western regions, but the regional gaps in TCPIL are narrowing. The growth in NLCPILs (non-radial Luenberger carbon emission performance of industrial land use in the eastern and central regions is mainly driven by technological progress, whereas efficiency improvements contribute more to the growth of NLCPIL in the western region. The provinces in the eastern region have the most innovative and environmentally-friendly production technologies. The results of the analysis of the influencing factors show implications for improving the NLCPIL, including more investment in industrial research and development (R&D, the implementation of carbon emission reduction policies, reduction in the use of fossil energy, especially coal, in the process of industrial production, actively learning about foreign advanced technology, properly solving the problem of surplus labor in industry and the expansion of industrial development.

  11. Second Annual Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allario, Frank (Editor); Temple, Doyle (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) held its Second Annual Forum on September 23-24, 1994. The forum consisted of two days of technical sessions with invited talks, submitted talks, and a student poster session. Participants in the technical sessions included students and researchers from CCNY/CUNY, Fisk University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Hampton University, University of Maryland, the Univeristy of Michigan, NASA Langley Research Center, North Caroline A and T University, Steven's Institute of Technology, and NAWC-Warminster. Topics included chaotic lasers, pumped optical filters, nonlinear responses in polythiophene and thiophene based thin films, crystal growth and spectroscopy, laser-induced photochromic centers, raman scattering in phorphyrin, superradiance, doped fluoride crystals, luminescence of terbium in silicate glass, and radiative and nonradiative transitions in rare-earth ions.

  12. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing.

  13. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  14. Dielectronic recombination theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections ({sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of {sigma}{sup DR} have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of {alpha}{sup DR} have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of {sigma}{sup DR}. While the measurements of {sigma}{sup DR} for {delta}n {ne} 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of {delta}n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain.

  15. Did the universe recombine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Stebbins, A. (California, University, Berkeley (USA) Toronto, University (Canada))

    1991-04-01

    The Zel'dovich-Sunyaev model-independent arguments for the existence of a neutral hydrogen phase is reviewed in light of new limits on the Compton y parameter from COBE. It is concluded that with baryon densities compatible with standard cosmological nucleosynthesis, the universe could have remained fully ionized throughout its history without producing a detectable spectral distortion. It is argued that it is unlikely that spectral observations of the cosmic microwave background will ever require the universe to have recombined for flat cosmologies. 22 refs.

  16. Novel recombinant sapovirus in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Shuvra Kanti; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Okitsu, Shoko; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Recombination of RNA viruses plays an important part in molecular epidemiological study, virus evolution, vaccine design, and viral control programs. Sapovirus, a member of the family Caliciviridae, is one of the major causative agents of viral gastroenteritis affecting all age groups. Sapovirus capsid and polymerase regions were amplified by PCR using specific primers. PCR products were sequenced directly and sequence analysis was performed using CLUSTAL X, SimPlot, and MEGA 4 software package. Based on the genetic analysis, a novel, naturally occurring recombinant sapovirus strain was identified in Bangladesh. Breakpoint analysis of the recombinant sapovirus showed that the recombination site was at the open reading frame ORF1/ORF2 overlap. We described the genetic characterization of a novel, naturally occurring recombinant sapovirus and provided the first evidence of recombination in sapovirus in Bangladesh.

  17. Cell biology of mitotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules...... of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect...... as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics...

  18. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  19. Dissociative recombination of HCl+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Åsa; Fonseca dos Santos, Samantha; E. Orel, Ann

    2017-08-01

    The dissociative recombination of HCl+, including both the direct and indirect mechanisms, is studied. For the direct process, the relevant electronic states are calculated ab initio by combining electron scattering calculations to obtain resonance positions and autoionization widths with multi-reference configuration interaction calculations of the ion and Rydberg states. The cross section for the direct dissociation along electronic resonant states is computed by solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. For the indirect process, an upper bound value for the cross section is obtained using a vibrational frame transformation of the elements of the scattering matrix at energies just above the ionization threshold. Vibrational excitations of the ionic core from the ground vibrational state, v = 0 , to the first three excited vibrational states, v = 1 , v = 2 , and v = 3 , are considered. Autoionization is neglected and the effect of the spin-orbit splitting of the ionic potential energy upon the indirect dissociative recombination cross section is considered. The calculated cross sections are compared to measurements.

  20. Great enhancement in the excitonic recombination and light extraction of highly ordered InGaN/GaN elliptic nanorod arrays on a wafer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Zhe; Guo, Xu; Liu, Bin; Hu, Fengrui; Dai, Jiangping; Zhang, Yun; Li, Yi; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Xie, Zili; Ge, Haixiong; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min; Wang, Tao; Shi, Yi; Zheng, Youdou; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A series of highly ordered c-plane InGaN/GaN elliptic nanorod (NR) arrays were fabricated by our developed soft UV-curing nanoimprint lithography on a wafer. The photoluminescence (PL) integral intensities of NR samples show a remarkable enhancement by a factor of up to two orders of magnitude compared with their corresponding as-grown samples at room temperature. The radiative recombination in NR samples is found to be greatly enhanced due to not only the suppressed non-radiative recombination but also the strain relaxation and optical waveguide effects. It is demonstrated that elliptic NR arrays improve the light extraction greatly and have polarized emission, both of which possibly result from the broken structure symmetry. Green NR light-emitting diodes have been finally realized, with good current-voltage performance and uniform luminescence.

  1. High-Efficiency Aqueous-Processed Polymer/CdTe Nanocrystals Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells with Optimized Band Alignment and Reduced Interfacial Charge Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingsen; Hu, Lu; Cui, Jian; Feng, Tanglue; Du, Xiaohang; Jin, Gan; Liu, Fangyuan; Ji, Tianjiao; Li, Fenghong; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2017-09-20

    Aqueous-processed nanocrystal solar cells have attracted increasing attention due to the advantage of its environmentally friendly nature, which provides a promising approach for large-scale production. The urgent affair is boosting the power conversion efficiency (PCE) for further commercial applications. The low PCE is mainly attributed to the imperfect device structure, which leads to abundant nonradiative recombination at the interfaces. In this work, an environmentally friendly and efficient method is developed to improve the performance of aqueous-processed CdTe nanocrystal solar cells. Polymer/CdTe planar heterojunction solar cells (PHSCs) with optimized band alignment are constructed, which results in reduced interfacial charge recombination, enhanced carrier collection efficiency and built-in field. Finally, a champion PCE of 5.9%, which is a record for aqueous-processed solar cells based on CdTe nanocrystals, is achieved after optimizing the photovoltaic device.

  2. Excel Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Citigroup,one of the World top 500 companies,has now settled in Excel Center,Financial Street. The opening ceremony of Excel Center and the entry ceremony of Citigroup in the center were held on March 31.Government leaders of Xicheng District,the Excel CEO and the heads of Asia-Pacific Region leaders of Citibank all participated in the ceremony.

  3. Recombination Origin of Retrovirus XMRV | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) was first reported in samples from a human prostate tumor in 2006, and, at that time, claims were made that XMRV infection rates ranged from 6 to 27 percent of human prostate cancers.  Later research reported XMRV in the blood of 67 percent of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). When follow-up studies failed to detect XMRV in multiple sets of specimens from people with prostate cancer or CFS and healthy controls, the original reports came under closer scrutiny.

  4. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer for Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots on Silicon Nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingley, Zachary R.

    This dissertation comprises a study aimed at understanding the competing dynamics of energy and charge transfer in quantum dot (QD) solids and from QDs to crystalline semiconductor substrates to assess a new type of hybrid solar cell that is based on non-radiative resonant energy transfer (NRET) from light absorbers such as nanocrystal QDs to high mobility charge carrier transport channels such as silicon nanopillars. As a platform to investigate a NRET solar cell we employed lead sulfide nanocrystal QDs as light absorbers and silicon as the acceptor transport channel for the NRET generated electrons and holes. Given NRET as the basic physical process at the core of the new type of solar cell the dissertation focused on examining: (1) synthesis of and surface ligand exchange for high quantum efficiency lead sulfide quantum dots, (2) studies of inter-QD NRET and competing inter-QD charge transfer as a function of inter-QD average separation and temperature, (3) structural and optical characteristics of lead sulfide quantum dots adsorbed on crystalline silicon surfaces, and (4) fabrication and examination of prototype colloidal PbS QD - silicon nanopillar array solar cell. The work in these four areas has each provided insights into and new results for the field of quantum dots, QD-based solids, and QD based opto-electronic devices that are of generic value. The need for maintaining the high quantum efficiency (QE) of the as-synthesized PbS QDs while exchanging the surface ligands with new ones better suited for the device lead us to introduce a new approach to ligand exchange that employs pre-conjugated lead cation -- ligand complexes as units that replace the lead cations bound to their as-grown ligand, thus maintaining the Pb-rich stoichiometry that suppresses defect formation while gaining the ability to control the length of the ligands. The ability to control the length of the ligands allowed control over the QD-QD separation in densely packed films referred to

  5. RECOMBINANT HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE FOR ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with prospects of using recombinant horseradish peroxidase in analytical biochemistry and biotechnology. Problems of recombinant horseradish peroxidase cloning in different expression systems, possible approaches to their solution, advantages of recombinant recombinant horseradish peroxidase and recombinant horseradish peroxidase-fusion proteins for immunoassays are considered. Possibility for development of mediatorless bienzyme biosensor for peroxide and metabolites, yield...

  6. Fluorescence quenching and photobleaching in Au/Rh6G nanoassemblies: impact of competition between radiative and non-radiative decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L.; Ye, F.; Hu, J.; Popov, S.; Friberg, A. T.; Muhammed, M.

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching from nanoassemblies formed by Rhodamine 6G and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of 2.6 nm radius has been investigated. The presence of Au NPs also induces long-term degradation of the photostability (photobleaching) of Rhodamine 6G used as gain medium in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. We found that the degradation gets profound when the Au NPs concentration is significantly increased. Calculation of the radiative rate and direct time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence decay indicates that both the decrease of radiative decay rate and increase of non-radiative decay rate are responsible for the fluorescence quenching and photostability degradation. An energy transfer from the dye molecules to gold nanoparticles is dominating within the small distance between them and suppresses the quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G drastically. In long time scale, the photobleaching rate was slowing down, and laser output intensity reached a stabilized level which depends on the gold nanoparticles concentration.

  7. Controlling non-radiative energy transfer in organic binary blends: a route towards colour tunability and white emission from single-active-layer light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisignano, Dario [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Mazzeo, Marco [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Gigli, Giuseppe [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Barbarella, Giovanna [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), ICOCEA, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Favaretto, Laura [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), ICOCEA, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Cingolani, Roberto [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2003-10-21

    We show how colour tunability (including white) can be achieved by controlling non-radiative intermolecular energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor in binary blends of oligomeric compounds. Blends of different concentrations of a novel functionalized thiophene-based oligomer and a low-molar-mass diamine derivative (N, N'-diphenyl-N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1, 1'-biphenyl-4.4'diamine) are used to tune both the photoluminescence and the electroluminescence (EL) from red to blue, including balanced white, according to the standards of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage. The single-active-layer light-emitting devices, realized by spin-coating, exhibit good EL performance. In particular, the white-emitting device shows an EL efficiency of 5 x 10{sup -1} cd A{sup -1} and a luminance of more than 180 cd m{sup -2}.

  8. Modeling of the Dynamics of Non-radiative Energy Transfer in Tm3+, Tb3+: LiYF4-Based Electronic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Miranda, A.; Castaño, V. M.

    2017-08-01

    The fluorescent decay of the levels 3H4 and 3F4 of Tm3+ in LiYF4 crystals doped with Tb3+ and Eu3+ was mathematically modeled to estimate the optimal doping levels to maximize the laser emission at 1.5 μm of the transition 3H4 → 3F4. The analysis is carried out both through the solution of the master energy transfer equations that govern the non-radiative processes of energy and Monte Carlo simulations. The analysis is improved with the experimental data of the fluorescence decay to include quadrupole and dipole interactions simultaneously. The importance of considering these interactions is that the optimal concentrations of impurities predicted for these luminescent systems are lower than those reported with the use of traditional models.

  9. Bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Girish; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The recombination of electrons and holes is a major loss mechanism in photovoltaic devices that controls their performance. We review scientific literature on bimolecular recombination (BR) in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices to bring forward existing ideas on the origin and nature of BR and highlight both experimental and theoretical work done to quantify its extent. For these systems, Langevin theory fails to explain BR, and recombination dynamics turns out to be dependent on mobility, temperature, electric field, charge carrier concentration, and trapped charges. Relationships among the photocurrent, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and morphology are discussed. Finally, we highlight the recent emergence of a molecular-level picture of recombination, taking into account the spin and delocalization of charges. Together with the macroscopic picture of recombination, these new insights allow for a comprehensive understanding of BR and provide design principles for future materials and devices.

  10. Wurtzite-Phased InP Micropillars Grown on Silicon with Low Surface Recombination Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Sun, Hao; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-11-11

    The direct growth of III-V nanostructures on silicon has shown great promise in the integration of optoelectronics with silicon-based technologies. Our previous work showed that scaling up nanostructures to microsize while maintaining high quality heterogeneous integration opens a pathway toward a complete photonic integrated circuit and high-efficiency cost-effective solar cells. In this paper, we present a thorough material study of novel metastable InP micropillars monolithically grown on silicon, focusing on two enabling aspects of this technology-the stress relaxation mechanism at the heterogeneous interface and the microstructure surface quality. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy studies show that InP grows directly on silicon without any amorphous layer in between. A set of periodic dislocations was found at the heterointerface, relaxing the 8% lattice mismatch between InP and Si. Single crystalline InP therefore can grow on top of the fully relaxed template, yielding high-quality micropillars with diameters expanding beyond 1 μm. An interesting power-dependence trend of carrier recombination lifetimes was captured for these InP micropillars at room temperature, for the first time for micro/nanostructures. By simply combining internal quantum efficiency with carrier lifetime, we revealed the recombination dynamics of nonradiative and radiative portions separately. A very low surface recombination velocity of 1.1 × 10(3) cm/sec was obtained. In addition, we experimentally estimated the radiative recombination B coefficient of 2.0 × 10(-10) cm(3)/sec for pure wurtzite-phased InP. These values are comparable with those obtained from InP bulk. Exceeding the limits of conventional nanowires, our InP micropillars combine the strengths of both nanostructures and bulk materials and will provide an avenue in heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductor materials onto silicon platforms.

  11. The methyl- and aza-substituent effects on nonradiative decay mechanisms of uracil in water: a transient absorption study in the UV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, XinZhong; Hua, LinQiang; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-05-18

    The nonradiative decay dynamics of photo-excited uracil (Ura) and its derivatives, i.e., thymine (5-methyluracil, Thy), 6-methyluracil (6-MU) and 6-azauracil (6-AU) in water, has been studied using a femtosecond transient absorption method. The molecules are populated in the lowest (1)ππ* state by a pump pulse at 266 nm, and a broadband continuum in the deep UV region is then employed as the probe. The extension of the continuous UV probe down to 250 nm enables us to investigate comprehensively the population dynamics of the ground states for those molecules and to uncover the substituent effects on nonradiative decay dynamics of uracil. Vibrational cooling in the ground states of Ura, Thy and 6-MU has been directly observed for the first time, providing solid evidence of the ultrafast (1)ππ* → S0 decay. In combination with the ground state bleaching signals, it is consolidated that their lowest (1)ππ* state decays via two parallel pathways, i.e., (1)ππ* → S0 and (1)ππ* → (1)nπ*. Moreover, the contribution of the (1)ππ* → (1)nπ* channel is found to be much smaller for Thy or 6-MU than for Ura. Different from methyl-substitution, the initial (1)ππ* state of the aza-substituent 6-AU decays primarily to the (1)nπ* state, while the (1)ππ* → S0 channel can be negligible. Our study provides a comprehensive understanding of the substituent effects on the excited-state dynamics of uracil in water.

  12. Nanoantenna enhanced emission of light-harvesting complex 2: the role of resonance, polarization, and radiative and non-radiative rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-12-01

    Nanoantennae show potential for photosynthesis research for two reasons; first by spatially confining light for experiments which require high spatial resolution, and second by enhancing the photon emission of single light-harvesting complexes. For effective use of nanoantennae a detailed understanding of the interaction between the nanoantenna and the light-harvesting complex is required. Here we report how the excitation and emission of multiple purple bacterial LH2s (light-harvesting complex 2) are controlled by single gold nanorod antennae. LH2 complexes were chemically attached to such antennae, and the antenna length was systematically varied to tune the resonance with respect to the LH2 absorption and emission. There are three main findings. (i) The polarization of the LH2 emission is fully controlled by the resonant nanoantenna. (ii) The largest fluorescence enhancement, of 23 times, is reached for excitation with light at λ = 850 nm, polarized along the long antenna-axis of the resonant antenna. The excitation enhancement is found to be 6 times, while the emission efficiency is increased 3.6 times. (iii) The fluorescence lifetime of LH2 depends strongly on the antenna length, with shortest lifetimes of ∼40 ps for the resonant antenna. The lifetime shortening arises from an 11 times resonant enhancement of the radiative rate, together with a 2-3 times increase of the non-radiative rate, compared to the off-resonant antenna. The observed length dependence of radiative and non-radiative rate enhancement is in good agreement with simulations. Overall this work gives a complete picture of how the excitation and emission of multi-pigment light-harvesting complexes are influenced by a dipole nanoantenna.

  13. Analysis of interchromosomal mitotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, C B; Shafer, B K; Higgins, D R; Strathern, J N

    1990-07-01

    A novel synthetic locus is described that provides a simple assay system for characterizing mitotic recombinants. The locus consists of the TRP1 and HIS3 genes inserted into chromosome III of S. cerevisiae between the CRY1 and MAT loci. Defined trp1 and his3 alleles have been generated that allow the selection of interchromosomal recombinants in this interval. Trp+ or His+ recombinants can be divided into several classes based on coupling of the other alleles in the interval. The tight linkage of the CRY1 and MAT loci, combined with the drug resistance and cell type phenotypes that they respectively control, facilitates the classification of the recombinants without resorting to tetrad dissection. We present the distribution of spontaneous recombinants among the classes defined by this analysis. The data suggest that the recombination intermediate can have regions of symmetric strand exchange and that co-conversion tracts can extend over 1-3 kb. Continuous conversion tracts are favored over discontinuous tracts. The distribution among the classes defined by this analysis is altered in recombinants induced by UV irradiation.

  14. Luminescence and excited state dynamics of Bi{sup 3+} centers in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babin, V. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Chernenko, K., E-mail: nuclearphys@yandex.ru [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, Polytekhnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lipińska, L. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01919 Warsaw (Poland); Mihokova, E.; Nikl, M. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Schulman, L.S. [Physics Department, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States); Shalapska, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Suchocki, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Bydgoszcz, Weyssenhoffa 11, 85072 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Zazubovich, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Zhydachevskii, Ya. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Lviv Polytechnic National University, Bandera 12, 79646 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-11-15

    Photoluminescence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi nanopowder synthesized by the modified sol–gel method is studied using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the 4.2–300 K temperature range. Bi{sup 3+} ions are substituted for Y{sup 3+} ions in two different crystal lattice sites, one having S{sub 6} symmetry (Bi(S{sub 6})) and the other C{sub 2} symmetry (Bi(C{sub 2})). The luminescence characteristics of these two centers are found to have strongly different electron–phonon interactions. The luminescence of Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers peak at 3.04 eV and 2.41 eV, respectively, and arise from the radiative decay of the triplet relaxed excited state (RES) of Bi{sup 3+} ions. The model and structure of the RES, responsible for the luminescence of Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi, as well as radiative and nonradiative processes, taking place in the excited states of these centers, are investigated. The parameters of the triplet RES (the separation between the metastable and radiative levels and probabilities of radiative and nonradiative transitions from these levels) are determined. Low-temperature quenching of the triplet luminescence of these centers is explained by nonradiative quantum tunneling transitions from the metastable minima of their triplet RES to closely located defect- or exciton-related levels. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence of Bi{sup 3+} centers of two types in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi is investigated. • Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers reveal strongly different electron–phonon interaction. • Radiative and nonradiative processes in their triplet excited states are clarified. • Low-temperature luminescence quenching in Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers is studied. • New fast weak ≈2.9 eV emission is suggested to arise from Bi(C{sub 2}) centers.

  15. Testing for recombinant erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanghe, Joris R; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique

    2008-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a glycoprotein hormone that promotes the production of red blood cells. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) is illicitly used to improve performance in endurance sports. Doping in sports is discouraged by the screening of athletes for rhEpo. Both direct tests (indicating the presence of exogeneous Epo isoforms) and indirect tests (indicating hematological changes induced by exogenous Epo administration) can be used for Epo detection. At present, the test adopted by the World Anti Doping Agency is based on a combination of isoelectric focusing and double immunoblotting, and distinguishes between endogenous and rhEpo. However, the adopted monoclonal anti-Epo antibodies are not monospecific. Therefore, the test can occasionally lead to the false-positive detection of rhEpo (epoetin-beta) in post-exercise, protein-rich urine, or in case of contamination of the sample with microorganisms. An improved preanalytical care may counteract a lot of these problems. Adaptation of the criteria may be helpful to further refine direct Epo testing. Indirect tests have the disadvantage that they require blood instead of urine samples, but they can be applied to detect a broader range of performance improving techniques which are illicitly used in sports.

  16. Luminescence and recombine centre in ZnO/Si films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cihui LIU; Ran YAO; Jianfeng SU; Zeyu MA; Zhuxi FU

    2009-01-01

    The D0h luminescence of ZnO films deposited on p-type Si substrates is produced by metal-organic chem-ical vapor deposition (MOCVD).After annealing in the air at 700℃ for an hour,the photoluminescence (PL) spectra,the Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristics and the deep level transient spectro-scopy (DLTS) of the samples are measured.All the samples have a rectification characteristic.DLTS signals show two deep levels of E1 and E2.The Gaussian fit curves of the PL spectra at room temperature show three luminescence lines b,c and d,of which b is attributed to the exciton emission.The donor level E1 measured by DLTS and the location state donor ionization energy Ed of the closely neighboring emission lines c and d are correlated.E1 is judged as neutral donor bound to hole emission (D0h).Moreover,the inten-sity of the PL spectra decreases while the relative density of E2 increases,showing that E2 has the property of a non-radiative center.

  17. Distribution center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Distribution center is a logistics link fulfill physical distribution as its main functionGenerally speaking, it's a large and hiahly automated center destined to receive goods from various plants and suppliers,take orders,fill them efficiently,and deliver goods to customers as quickly as possible.

  18. Radiative recombination mechanisms in polar and non-polar InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, T. J.; Ali, M.; Zhu, T.; Pristovsek, M.; Oliver, R. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    We study the photoluminescence internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and recombination dynamics in a pair of polar and non-polar InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) light-emitting diode (LED) structures as a function of excess carrier density and temperature. In the polar LED at 293 K, the variation of radiative and non-radiative lifetimes is well described by a modified ABC type model which accounts for the background carrier concentration in the QWs due to unintentional doping. As the temperature is reduced, the sensitivity of the radiative lifetime to excess carrier density becomes progressively weaker. We attribute this behaviour to the reduced mobility of the localised electrons and holes at low temperatures, resulting in a more monomolecular like radiative process. Thus we propose that in polar QWs, the degree of carrier localisation determines the sensitivity of the radiative lifetime to the excess carrier density. In the non-polar LED, the radiative lifetime is independent of excitation density at room temperature, consistent with a wholly excitonic recombination mechanism. These findings have significance for the interpretation of LED efficiency data within the context of the ABC recombination model.

  19. Origin of the high open circuit voltage in planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells: Role of the reduced bimolecular recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenchao; Yao, Yao; Wu, Chang-Qin

    2015-03-01

    The high open circuit voltage is an attractive feature for the currently popular organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells. In this paper, by employing the macroscopic device model simulation, we investigate its origin for the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Based on the calculated current density-voltage characteristics, it is revealed that compared to the excitonic solar cells, the fast thermal-activated exciton dissociation in the bulk due to the small exciton binding energy may improve the short circuit current and the fill factor, but its beneficial role on the open circuit voltage is marginal. The most significant contribution for the open circuit voltage comes from the reduced bimolecular recombination. In the perovskites, with the recombination prefactor many orders of magnitude smaller than that based on the Langevin's theory, the internal charge density level is significantly enhanced and the density gradient is removed, leading to the high quasi-Fermi level splitting and thus the small open circuit voltage loss. For the nonradiative recombination pathway due to the deep trap states, it may induce significant loss of open circuit voltage as the trap density is high, while for the moderately low density its effect on the open circuit voltage is small and negligible.

  20. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  1. Cell encoding recombinant human erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A.K.; Withy, R.M.; Zabrecky, J.R.; Masiello, N.C.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes a C127 cell transformed with a recombinant DNA vector. It comprises: a DNA sequence encoding human erythropoietin, the transformed cell being capable of producing N-linked and O-linked glycosylated human erythropoietin.

  2. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  3. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  4. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  5. Inhomogeneous recombinations during cosmic reionization

    OpenAIRE

    Sobacchi, Emanuele; Mesinger, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    By depleting the ionizing photon budget available to expand cosmic HII regions, recombining systems (or Lyman limit systems) can have a large impact during (and following) cosmic reionization. Unfortunately, directly resolving such structures in large-scale reionization simulations is computationally impractical. Instead, here we implement a sub-grid prescription for tracking inhomogeneous recombinations in the intergalactic medium. Building on previous work parameterizing photo-heating feedb...

  6. Plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.

    1982-01-01

    DNA recombination in exponential phase and competent Haemophilus influenzae was measured by an electron microscopic assay that relies on the conversion of plasmid RSF0885 monomers into multimeric forms. Dimer circles were present at a frequency of 2% in plasmid preparations from competent Rd (wild-type) cells; multimers were present at a frequency of 0.2% in preparations from exponential phase cells. Thus, plasmid recombination was stimulated in competent cells. Multimer formation occurred efficiently in cells of the transformation defective mutant rec2, implying that the rec2 gene product is not required for plasmid recombination. However, the absence of multimer plasmids in preparations from competent cells of the transformation defective mutant rec1 suggests that the rec1 gene product is required. Digestion of purified plasmids with restriction endonuclease PvuII, which makes a single cut in the monomer, revealed the presence of recombination intermediates composed of two linear plasmids joined to form two pairs of arms resembling the Greek letter chi. Length measurements of these arms taken from a population of recombination intermediates gave evidence that the plasmids were joined at sites of homology. The distributions of individual DNA strands, at the intersections of the four arms, could be resolved in some recombination intermediates and were of two types. The first type of junction appeared as a single-stranded arm appended to each corner. The second type of junction consisted of a single strand of DNA linking the two linear plasmids at a site of homology. The single-stranded linker was frequently situated at the edge of a short gap on one of the plasmids in the pair. The fine structures of the recombinational joints have been interpreted in terms of previously proposed models of recombination.

  7. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa;

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  8. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  9. RECOMBINANT HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE FOR ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.M. Egorov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with prospects of using recombinant horseradish peroxidase in analytical biochemistry and biotechnology. Problems of recombinant horseradish peroxidase cloning in different expression systems, possible approaches to their solution, advantages of recombinant recombinant horseradish peroxidase and recombinant horseradish peroxidase-fusion proteins for immunoassays are considered. Possibility for development of mediatorless bienzyme biosensor for peroxide and metabolites, yielding hydrogen peroxide during their transformations, based on co-adsorption of recombinant horseradish peroxidase and the appropriate oxidase was demonstrated. The possibility to produce a fully active recombinant conjugate of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with human heart-type fatty acid binding protein, which may be used in competitive immunoassay for clinical diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, and recombinant conjugates (N- and C-terminus of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with Fab-fragments of the antibody against atrazine, which may be applied for atrazine pesticides detection, are demonstra ted for the first time.

  10. Recombination drives vertebrate genome contraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwoong Nam

    Full Text Available Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process.

  11. Conservation of recombination hotspots in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Isheng J.; Burt, Austin; Koufopanou, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Meiotic recombination does not occur randomly along a chromosome, but instead tends to be concentrated in small regions, known as “recombination hotspots.” Recombination hotspots are thought to be short-lived in evolutionary time due to their self-destructive nature, as gene conversion favors recombination-suppressing alleles over recombination-promoting alleles during double-strand repair. Consistent with this expectation, hotspots in humans are highly dynamic, with little correspondence in ...

  12. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  13. Recombinant allergens for pollen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Michael; Pichler, Ulrike; Ferreira, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Specific immunotherapy (IT) represents the only potentially curative therapeutic intervention of allergic diseases capable of suppressing allergy-associated symptoms not only during treatment, but also after its cessation. Presently, IT is performed with allergen extracts, which represent a heterogeneous mixture of allergenic, as well as nonallergenic, compounds of a given allergen source. To overcome many of the problems associated with extract-based IT, strategies based on the use of recombinant allergens or derivatives thereof have been developed. This review focuses on recombinant technologies to produce allergy therapeuticals, especially for allergies caused by tree, grass and weed pollen, as they are among the most prevalent allergic disorders affecting the population of industrialized societies. The reduction of IgE-binding of recombinant allergen derivatives appears to be mandatory to increase the safety profile of vaccine candidates. Moreover, increased immunogenicity is expected to reduce the dosage regimes of the presently cumbersome treatment. In this regard, it has been convincingly demonstrated in animal models that hypoallergenic molecules can be engineered to harbor inherent antiallergenic immunologic properties. Thus, strategies to modulate the allergenic and immunogenic properties of recombinant allergens will be discussed in detail. In recent years, several successful clinical studies using recombinant wild-type or hypoallergens as active ingredients have been published and, currently, novel treatment forms with higher safety and efficacy profiles are under investigation in clinical trials. These recent developments are summarized and discussed.

  14. Non-radial motion in the TeV blazar S5 0716+714 The pc-scale kinematics of a BL Lac Object

    CERN Document Server

    Britzen, S; Witzel, A; Agudo, I; Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Karouzos, M; Eckart, A; Zensus, J A; 10.1051/0004-6361/200810875

    2010-01-01

    For the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 conflicting apparent velocities of jet component motion have been reported in the literature. This object is an intra-day variable source and suited to investigate a possible correlation between kinematic properties and flux-density variability on different timescales. We (re-)analyze 50 VLBI observations obtained with the VLBA at 5 different frequencies (5 to 43 GHz) between 1992.73 and 2006.32. We analyze the jet component motion in detail taking care not only to account for motion in the radial but also in the orthogonal direction. We study the evolution of the jet ridge line and search for correlations between radio band light curves and the kinematic properties of the jet components. We present an alternative kinematic scenario for jet component motion in S5 0716+714 with apparent stationarity of jet components (with regard to their core separation) with time. Jet components, however, do seem to move significantly non-radially with regard to their position angle and in a...

  15. ICP-MS Analysis of Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles as a Non-Radiative, Multiplex Approach to Quantify Biodistribution and Blood Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crayton, Samuel H.; Elias, Andrew; Al-Zaki, Ajlan; Cheng, Zhiliang; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in material science and chemistry have led to the development of nanoparticles with diverse physicochemical properties, e.g. size, charge, shape, and surface chemistry. Evaluating which physicochemical properties are best for imaging and therapeutic studies is challenging not only because of the multitude of samples to evaluate, but also because of the large experimental variability associated with in vivo studies (e.g. differences in tumor size, injected dose, subject weight, etc.). To address this issue, we have developed a lanthanide-doped nanoparticle system and analytical method that allows for the quantitative comparison of multiple nanoparticle compositions simultaneously. Specifically, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) with a range of different sizes and charges were synthesized, each with a unique lanthanide dopant. Following the simultaneous injection of the various SPIO compositions into tumor-bearing mice, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was used to quantitatively and orthogonally assess the concentration of each SPIO composition in serial blood samples and the resected tumor and organs. The method proved generalizable to other nanoparticle platforms, including dendrimers, liposomes, and polymersomes. This approach provides a simple, cost-effective, and non-radiative method to quantitatively compare tumor localization, biodistribution, and blood clearance of more than 10 nanoparticle compositions simultaneously, removing subject-to-subject variability. PMID:22100983

  16. Overlapping $B^{3}_{0u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ and $^{1}_{1u} ← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ non-radiative characteristic of Br2 vapour in the wavelength region 505–541 nm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramesh C Sharma; S N Thakur

    2001-01-01

    The vibronic vapour phase photoacoustic spectrum of Br2 in the wavelength region 505–541 nm (19796–18480 cm-1) has been recorded using microphone as well as pump-probe method. Discrete vibronic bands superimposed on a monotonically increasing continuum background towards the dissociation limit results from the overlapping $B^{3}^{+}_{0u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ and $^{1}_{1u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ electronic transitions. Vibronic bands originating from '' = 0 have been used to estimate the relative rate of non-radiative relaxation as a function of the excited state $^{3}_{0u}$ vibrational quantum number '. A comparison with the optical absorption spectroscopy of Br2 leads to the identification of three broad spectral regions between 505 and 541 nm (19796 and 18480 cm-1) on the basis of different non-radiative relaxation processes.

  17. The effect of a single recombination event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Jensen, Thomas Mailund; Wiuf, Carsten

    We investigate the variance in how visible a single recombination event is in a SNP data set as a function of the type of recombination event and its age. Data is simulated under the coalescent with recombination and inference is by the popular composite likelihood methods. The major determinant...... of the effect of a recombination event is the genealogical type of the event and whether SNP variation is present that can reveal the genealogical consequences of the recombination event. Recombination events that only change some branch lengths in the genealogy have a very small, but detectable, effect....... The more lineages left when the recombination event occurs, the larger effect it has, implying that it is mainly young recombination events that we detect when estimating the rate. If the population is growing, though, more lineages are present back in time and relatively more ancient recombination events...

  18. Femtosecond-pulse laser-ablation-induced synthesis and improved emission properties of ultrafine Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles with reduced nonradiative relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Changbin, E-mail: zhengchangbin@ciomp.ac.cn; Yang, Guilong; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Chunrui; Wang, Hualong; Chen, Fei; He, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Nanomaterials with effective visible upconversion emission have received special attention due to the potential application in the fields including biological labeling, imaging, and photodynamic therapy. The main focus of this work is the improvement of the upconversion emission properties, which is enhanced emission intensity and prolonged decay time, by reducing nonradiative relaxation assisted by high energy phonon. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles (considerably < 50 nm) were directly prepared through femtosecond-pulse laser ablation conducted on the corresponding oxide mixture. It was observed that the number of carbonate and hydroxyl groups remaining in the nanoparticles was decreased. The upconversion and infrared emission properties of the particles were investigated using 976-nm continuous-wave laser radiation, and it was found that the relative red-to-green emission intensity decreased. The samples also exhibited higher integral intensity and reduced power dependence on the excitation intensity, which indicates a more effective upconversion process. The decay time for upconversion emission was lengthened, and for the first time (to the best of our knowledge), infrared emission at 1550 nm was almost suppressed. As a result of the elimination of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups, nonradiative relaxation assisted by high-energy phonons was reduced, thereby increasing the decay time and upconversion emission and decreasing the infrared emission. - Graphical abstract: Reduced nonradiative relaxation leads to higher upconversion emission intensity and decreased relative red-to-green emission intensity. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles are prepared by laser ablation on the oxide mixture. • Number of carbonate and hydroxyl groups in the nanoparticles is decreased. • These nanoparticles present improved emission properties. • For the first time, infrared emission at 1550 nm is almost suppressed.

  19. Kinetics of color center formation in silica irradiated with swift heavy ions: Thresholding and formation efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzano-Santamaria, J. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Euratom/CIEMAT Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain); Olivares, J. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Optica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Rivera, A.; Pena-Rodriguez, O. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Agullo-Lopez, F. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-08

    We have determined the cross-section {sigma} for color center generation under single Br ion impacts on amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The evolution of the cross-sections, {sigma}(E) and {sigma}(S{sub e}), show an initial flat stage that we associate to atomic collision mechanisms. Above a certain threshold value (S{sub e} > 2 keV/nm), roughly coinciding with that reported for the onset of macroscopic disorder (compaction), {sigma} shows a marked increase due to electronic processes. In this regime, a energetic cost of around 7.5 keV is necessary to create a non bridging oxygen hole center-E Prime (NBOHC/E Prime ) pair, whatever the input energy. The data appear consistent with a non-radiative decay of self-trapped excitons.

  20. GARD: a genetic algorithm for recombination detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Posada, David; Gravenor, Michael B; Woelk, Christopher H; Frost, Simon D W

    2006-01-01

    .... We developed a likelihood-based model selection procedure that uses a genetic algorithm to search multiple sequence alignments for evidence of recombination breakpoints and identify putative recombinant sequences...

  1. Initiation of meiotic recombination in Ustilago maydis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kojic, Milorad; Sutherland, Jeanette H; Pérez-Martín, José; Holloman, William K

    2013-01-01

    .... Ustilago maydis, a biotrophic fungus that parasitizes maize, has long been utilized as an experimental system for studying recombination, but it has not been clear when in the life cycle meiotic recombination initiates. U...

  2. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards associated with recombinant DNA research are presented along with some social implications and the development of recombinant DNA research guidelines by the National Institutes of Health. (SA)

  3. Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. L.; Filippov, S.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A., E-mail: iribu@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping (Sweden); Ishikawa, Fumitaro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 790-8577 Matsuyama (Japan)

    2014-12-22

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) and μ-PL excitation (μ-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation.

  4. Temperature and doping dependent changes in surface recombination during UV illumination of (Al)GaN bulk layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzel, Carsten; Jeschke, Jörg; Brunner, Frank; Knauer, Arne; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-07

    We have studied the effect of continuous illumination with above band gap energy on the emission intensity of polar (Al)GaN bulk layers during the photoluminescence experiments. A temporal change in emission intensity on time scales from seconds to hours is based on the modification of the semiconductor surface states and the surface recombination by the incident light. The temporal behavior of the photoluminescence intensity varies with the parameters such as ambient atmosphere, pretreatment of the surface, doping density, threading dislocation density, excitation power density, and sample temperature. By means of temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements, we observed that at least two different processes at the semiconductor surface affect the non-radiative surface recombination during illumination. The first process leads to an irreversible decrease in photoluminescence intensity and is dominant around room temperature, and the second process leads to a delayed increase in intensity and becomes dominant around T = 150–200 K. Both processes become slower when the sample temperature decreases from room temperature. They cease for T < 150 K. Stable photoluminescence intensity at arbitrary sample temperature was obtained by passivating the analyzed layer with an epitaxially grown AlN cap layer.

  5. Homology requirements for recombination in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, V M; Ingles, C J; Urdea, M S; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence homology required for recombination in Escherichia coli has been determined by measuring the recombination frequency between insulin DNA in a miniplasmid pi VX and a homologous sequence in a bacteriophage lambda vector. A minimum of approximately equal to 20 base pairs in a completely homologous segment is required for significant recombination. There is an exponential increase in the frequency of recombination when the length of homologous DNA is increased from 20 base pairs...

  6. Single-crossover recombination and ancestral recombination trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, Ellen; von Wangenheim, Ute

    2014-05-01

    We consider the Wright-Fisher model for a population of [Formula: see text] individuals, each identified with a sequence of a finite number of sites, and single-crossover recombination between them. We trace back the ancestry of single individuals from the present population. In the [Formula: see text] limit without rescaling of parameters or time, this ancestral process is described by a random tree, whose branching events correspond to the splitting of the sequence due to recombination. With the help of a decomposition of the trees into subtrees, we calculate the probabilities of the topologies of the ancestral trees. At the same time, these probabilities lead to a semi-explicit solution of the deterministic single-crossover equation. The latter is a discrete-time dynamical system that emerges from the Wright-Fisher model via a law of large numbers and has been waiting for a solution for many decades.

  7. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    and collected 24 portfolios in which students reflect auto-ethnographically on their educational practices. Analyzing this qualitative material, we explore how researchers and students respectively read and write to develop and advance their thinking in those learning processes that the two groups fundamentally...... share as the common aim of both research and education. Despite some similarities, we find that how the two groups engage in and benefit from reading and writing diverges significantly. Thus we have even more reason to believe that centering practice-based teaching on these aspects of research is a good...

  8. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  9. V(D)J recombination in mature B cells: a mechanism for altering antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasiliou, F; Casellas, R; Suh, H; Qin, X F; Besmer, E; Pelanda, R; Nemazee, D; Rajewsky, K; Nussenzweig, M C

    1997-10-10

    The clonal selection theory states that B lymphocytes producing high-affinity immunoglobulins are selected from a pool of cells undergoing antibody gene mutation. Somatic hypermutation is a well-documented mechanism for achieving diversification of immune responses in mature B cells. Antibody genes were also found to be modified in such cells in germinal centers by recombination of the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments. The ability to alter immunoglobulin expression by V(D)J recombination in the selective environment of the germinal center may be an additional mechanism for inactivation or diversification of immune responses.

  10. Recombinant house dust mite allergens

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    House dust mites (HDM) are a globally important source of allergen responsible for the sensitization of more than 50% of allergic patients. Specific immunotherapy with HDM extracts is effective but allergen extracts cannot be fully standardized and severe side-effects can occur during the protracted course of treatment. The introduction of molecular biological techniques into allergy research allowed the indentification of more than 20 groups of HDM allergens. Recombinant HDM allergens can be...

  11. Recombinant Toxins for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastan, Ira; Fitzgerald, David

    1991-11-01

    Recombinant toxins target cell surface receptors and antigens on tumor cells. They kill by mechanisms different from conventional chemotherapy, so that cross resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic agents should not be a problem. Furthermore, they are not mutagens and should not induce secondary malignancies or accelerate progression of benign malignancies. They can be mass-produced cheaply in bacteria as homogeneous proteins. Either growth factor-toxin fusions or antibody-toxin fusions can be chosen, depending on the cellular target.

  12. Novel applications of recombinant erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Edward J; Thiemermann, Christoph; Yaqoob, Magdi M

    2006-04-01

    Recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) was introduced into clinical practice after the identification of EPO as the major haemopoietic growth factor determining survival and maturation of erythroid precursors. Advances in our understanding of the novel sites of action of EPO in the vasculature, brain, heart and kidney have opened new avenues of therapeutic potential for EPO, and have led to an increased understanding of the biological roles of EPO and its mechanisms of cell protection.

  13. Homologous recombination in Leishmania enriettii.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    We have used derivatives of the recently developed stable transfection vector pALT-Neo to formally demonstrate that Leishmania enriettii contains the enzymatic machinery necessary for homologous recombination. This observation has implications for gene regulation, gene amplification, genetic diversity, and the maintenance of tandemly repeated gene families in the Leishmania genome as well as in closely related organisms, including Trypanosoma brucei. Two plasmids containing nonoverlapping del...

  14. Recombinant protein production in bacterial hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Tim W

    2014-05-01

    The production of recombinant proteins is crucial for both the development of new protein drugs and the structural determination of drug targets. As such, recombinant protein production has a major role in drug development. Bacterial hosts are commonly used for the production of recombinant proteins, accounting for approximately 30% of current biopharmaceuticals on the market. In this review, I introduce fundamental concepts in recombinant protein production in bacteria, from drug development to production scales. Recombinant protein production processes can often fail, but how can this failure be minimised to rapidly deliver maximum yields of high-quality protein and so accelerate drug discovery?

  15. Workshop on Radio Recombination Lines

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    Since their first detection 15 years ago, radio recombination lines from several elements have been observed in a wide variety of objects including HII regions, planetary nebulae, molecular clouds, the diffuse interstellar medium, and recently, other galaxies. The observations span almost the entire range from 0.1 to 100 GHz, and employ both single­ djsh and aperture synthesis techniques. The theory of radio recombination lines has also advanced strongly, to the point where it is perhaps one of the best-understood in astro­ physics. In a parallel development, it has become possible over the last decade to study these same highly-excited atoms in the laboratory; this work provides further confirmation of the theoretical framework. However there has been continuing controversy over the astrophysical interpre­ tation of radio recombination line observations, especially regarding the role of stimulated emission. A workshop was held in Ottawa on 24-25 August, 1979, bringing together many of the active scientist...

  16. Ovarian response to recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; Andersen, Anders Nyboe; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the dose-response relationship of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH; FE 999049) with respect to ovarian response in patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment; and prospectively study the influence of initial antimüllerian hormone (AMH) concentrat......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the dose-response relationship of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH; FE 999049) with respect to ovarian response in patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment; and prospectively study the influence of initial antimüllerian hormone (AMH......) concentrations. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, AMH-stratified (low: 5.0-14.9 pmol/L [0.7-infertility centers in four countries. PATIENT(S): Two hundred sixty-five women aged ≤37 years. INTERVENTION(S): Controlled...

  17. Donor-acceptor pair recombination in gallium sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, A.; Gasanly, N. M.; Gökşen, K.

    2000-12-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence of GaS single crystals shows three broad emission bands below 2.4 eV. Temperature and excitation light intensity dependencies of these bands reveal that all of them originate from close donor-acceptor pair recombination processes. Temperature dependence of the peak energies of two of these bands in the visible range follow, as expected, the band gap energy shift of GaS. However, the temperature dependence of the peak energy of the third band in the near infrared shows complex behavior by blueshifting at low temperatures followed by a redshift at intermediate temperatures and a second blueshift close to room temperature, which could only be explained via a configuration coordinate model. A simple model calculation indicates that the recombination centers are most likely located at the nearest neighbor lattice or interstitial sites.

  18. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Langlois, S. (Univ. of Britisch Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  19. Mechanistic features of recombination in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetto, Román; Negroni, Matteo

    2005-01-01

    The importance of recombination in retroviral evolution has been acknowledged for several decades. Consequently, after the identification of HIV as the etiological agent of AIDS, it was suspected that recombination could also play a central role in the evolution of this virus. However, only recently, extensive epidemiologic studies of HIV infections worldwide have provided an estimate for the occurrence of recombination in vivo, unveiling recombination frequencies that dwarf those initially expected. Nowadays, recombination is regarded as an integral part of the infectious cycle of this retrovirus, which impacts on diagnosis and treatment of infections, especially when genetically distant viruses have been at the origin of the recombinant forms. Retroviral recombination is observed when two genetically divergent genomic RNA molecules are present in the same viral particle, and arises during the reverse transcription step. This review focuses on the mechanisms that have been proposed to account for the occurrence of recombination in retroviruses, from the strand displacement model, according to which recombination occurs during second DNA strand synthesis; to the description of the factors responsible for copy-choice recombination during first DNA strand synthesis, such as the presence of breaks, pause sites, or secondary structures in the genomic RNA. Most of these models have been supported by experimental data obtained from in vitro reconstituted systems or from cell infection studies using academic model sequences. The situation in vivo is expected to be more complex, since several factors come into play when recombination involves relatively distant isolates, as in the case of inter-subtype recombination. At present, it is clear that further studies are needed in order to evaluate whether a prevailing mechanism exists for in vivo recombination, and these studies will also be essential for understanding how the underlying mechanisms of recombination contribute

  20. The IACOB project. IV. New predictions for high-degree non-radial mode instability domains in massive stars and their connection with macroturbulent broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godart, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Herrero, A.; Dupret, M. A.; Grötsch-Noels, A.; Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Ventura, P.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to access the internal structure of stars. Apart from the important impact of theoretical developments, progress in this field has been commonly associated with the analysis of time-resolved observations. Recently, the so-called macroturbulent broadening has been proposed as a complementary and less expensive way - in terms of observational time - to investigate pulsations in massive stars. Aims: We assess to what extent this ubiquitous non-rotational broadening component which shapes the line profiles of O stars and B supergiants is a spectroscopic signature of pulsation modes driven by a heat mechanism. Methods: We compute stellar main-sequence and post-main-sequence models from 3 to 70 M⊙ with the ATON stellar evolution code, and determine the instability domains for heat-driven modes for degrees ℓ = 1-20 using the adiabatic and non-adiabatic codes LOSC and MAD. We use the observational material compiled in the framework of the IACOB project to investigate possible correlations between the single snapshot line-broadening properties of a sample of ≈260 O and B-type stars and their location inside or outside the various predicted instability domains. Results: We present an homogeneous prediction for the non-radial instability domains of massive stars for degree ℓ up to 20. We provide a global picture of what to expect from an observational point of view in terms of the frequency range of excited modes, and we investigate the behavior of the instabilities with respect to stellar evolution and the degree of the mode. Furthermore, our pulsational stability analysis, once compared to the empirical results, indicates that stellar oscillations originated by a heat mechanism cannot explain alone the occurrence of the large non-rotational line-broadening component commonly detected in the O star and B supergiant domain. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by NOTSA, and the Mercator

  1. Non-radial pulsation, rotation and outburst in the Be star omega Orionis from the MuSiCoS 1998 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, C.; Hubert, A.-M.; Floquet, M.; Jankov, S.; Henrichs, H. F.; Foing, B.; Oliveira, J.; Orlando, S.; Abbott, J.; Baldry, I. K.; Bedding, T. R.; Cami, J.; Cao, H.; Catala, C.; Cheng, K. P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Hao, J. X.; Kaper, L.; Kaufer, A.; Leister, N. V.; Neff, J. E.; O'Toole, S. J.; Schäfer, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Stahl, O.; Telting, J.; Tubbesing, S.; Zorec, J.

    2002-06-01

    omega Ori (HD 37490, HR 1934) is a Be star known to have presented variations. In order to investigate the nature and origin of its short-term and mid-term variability, a study is performed of several spectral lines (Hα , Hdelta , ion {He}i 4471, 4713, 4921, 5876, 6678, ion {C}{ii} 4267, 6578, 6583, ion {Mg}{ii} 4481, ion {Si}{iii} 4553 and ion {Si}{ii} 6347), based on 249 high signal-to-noise high-resolution spectra taken with 8 telescopes over 22 consecutive nights during the MuSiCoS (Multi SIte COntinuous Spectroscopy) campaign in November-December 1998. The stellar parameters are revisited and the projected rotational velocity (vsin i = 179 km s-1) is redetermined using several methods. With the MuSiCoS 98 dataset, a time series analysis of line-profile variations (LPVs) is performed using the Restricted Local Cleanest (RLC) algorithm and a least squares method. The behaviour of the velocity of the centroid of the lines, the equivalent widths and the apparent vsini for several lines, as well as Violet and Red components of photospheric lines affected by emission (red ion {He}i lines, ion {Si}{ii} 6347, ion {C}{ii} 6578, 6583) are analyzed. The non-radial pulsation (NRP) model is examined using phase diagrams and the Fourier-Doppler Imaging (FDI) method. The LPVs are consistent with a NRP mode with l = 2 or 3, |m| = 2 with frequency 1.03 c d-1. It is shown that an emission line outburst occurred in the middle of the campaign. Two scenarios are proposed to explain the behaviour of a dense cloud, temporarily orbiting around the star with a frequency 0.46 c d-1, in relation to the outburst. Based on observations taken during the MuSiCoS 98 campaign at OHP (France), La Silla (ESO, Chile, ID 62.H-0270), Mount Stromlo (Australia), Xinglong Station (China), Kitt Peak (USA), MCT/LNA (Brazil) and INT (Isaac Newton Group, La Palma Island).

  2. Bragg Reflector-Induced Increased Nonradiative Lifetime in Gallium Arsenide (GaAs)/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Double Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    is essential for the design and analysis of high- efficiency semiconductor solar cells1 and other optoelectronic devices.2 Time-resolved... solar cell uses a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with a roughly 1–2 µm GaAs active region on top of an internal distributed Bragg reflector (BR) to take advantage of...carrier lifetimes and the radiative recombination constant were determined from PL decay time and internal radiative quantum efficiency measurements on

  3. The effect of gamma radiation on recombination frequency in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J S; Rose, A M

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the effect of gamma radiation on recombination frequency for intervals across the cluster of linkage group I in Caenorhabditis elegans. Recombination frequency increased approximately twofold across the dpy-5-unc-13 interval after treatment with 2000 rads (1 rad = 10 mGy) of cobalt 60 gamma radiation. Several factors affecting the magnitude of the increase have been characterized. Recombination frequency increased more with higher doses of radiation. However, the increase in recombination frequency with increasing dose was accompanied by a reduced average number of progeny from radiation-treated individuals. The amount of the increase was affected by meiotic stage, age at the time of treatment (premeiotic), and radiation dose. The increase in recombination was detectable in the B brood and remained elevated for the remainder of egg production. X-chromosome nondisjunction was also increased by radiation treatment. A high frequency of the recombinant progeny produced with radiation treatment were sterile unlike their nonrecombinant siblings. When parameters affecting recombination frequency are held constant during treatment, chromosomal regions of high gene density on the meiotic map increased more (fourfold) than an adjacent region of low gene density (no increase). The greatest increase was across the dpy-14-unc-13 interval near the center of the gene cluster. These results may suggest that the physical length of DNA per map unit is greater within the cluster than outside.

  4. Cold white light generation through the simultaneous emission from Ce{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} in 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, W. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Alvarez, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Martinez-Martinez, R.; Yescas-Mendoza, E. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Camarillo, I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Caldino, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2012-08-15

    The photoluminescence of a CeCl{sub 3}, DyCl{sub 3} and MnCl{sub 2} doped aluminum oxide film deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis was characterized by excitation, emission and decay time spectroscopy. A nonradiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} is observed upon UV excitation at 278 nm (peak emission wavelength of AlGaN-based LEDs). Such energy transfer leads to a simultaneous emission of these ions in the blue, green, yellow and red regions, resulting in white light emission with CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, x=0.34 and y=0.23, which correspond to cold white light with a color temperature of 4900 K. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film (AOCDM) could be prepared by spray pyrolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} takes place in AOCDM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AOCDM (pumped with 278 nm-UV light) can generate 4900 K cold white light.

  5. Dopants Control Electron-Hole Recombination at Perovskite-TiO₂ Interfaces: Ab Initio Time-Domain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-11-24

    TiO2 sensitized with organohalide perovskites gives rise to solar-to-electricity conversion efficiencies reaching close to 20%. Nonradiative electron-hole recombination across the perovskite/TiO2 interface constitutes a major pathway of energy losses, limiting quantum yield of the photoinduced charge. In order to establish the fundamental mechanisms of the energy losses and to propose practical means for controlling the interfacial electron-hole recombination, we applied ab initio nonadiabatic (NA) molecular dynamics to pristine and doped CH3NH3PbI3(100)/TiO2 anatase(001) interfaces. We show that doping by substitution of iodide with chlorine or bromine reduces charge recombination, while replacing lead with tin enhances the recombination. Generally, lighter and faster atoms increase the NA coupling. Since the dopants are lighter than the atoms they replace, one expects a priori that all three dopants should accelerate the recombination. We rationalize the unexpected behavior of chlorine and bromine by three effects. First, the Pb-Cl and Pb-Br bonds are shorter than the Pb-I bond. As a result, Cl and Br atoms are farther away from the TiO2 surface, decreasing the donor-acceptor coupling. In contrast, some iodines form chemical bonds with Ti atoms, increasing the coupling. Second, chlorine and bromine reduce the NA electron-vibrational coupling, because they contribute little to the electron and hole wave functions. Tin increases the coupling, since it is lighter than lead and contributes to the hole wave function. Third, higher frequency modes introduced by chlorine and bromine shorten quantum coherence, thereby decreasing the transition rate. The recombination occurs due to coupling of the electronic subsystem to low-frequency perovskite and TiO2 modes. The simulation shows excellent agreement with the available experimental data and advances our understanding of electronic and vibrational dynamics in perovskite solar cells. The study provides design principles

  6. Current trends of HIV recombination worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Lau

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major characteristics of HIV-1 is its high genetic variability and extensive heterogeneity. This characteristic is due to its molecular traits, which in turn allows it to vary, recombine, and diversify at a high frequency. As such, it generates complex molecular forms, termed recombinants, which evade the human immune system and so survive. There is no sequence constraint to the recombination pattern as it appears to occur at inter-group (between groups M and O, as well as inter- and intra-subtype within group M. Rapid emergence and active global transmission of HIV-1 recombinants, known as circulating recombinant forms (CRFs and unique recombinant forms (URFs, requires urgent attention. To date, 55 CRFs have been reported around the world. The first CRF01_AE originated from Central Africa but spread widely in Asia. The most recent CRF; CRF55_01B is a recombinant form of CRF01_AE and subtype B, although its origin is yet to be publicly disclosed. HIV-1 recombination is an ongoing event and plays an indispensable role in HIV epidemics in different regions. Africa, Asia and South America are identified as recombination hot-spots. They are affected by continual emergence and co-circulation of newly emerging CRFs and URFs, which are now responsible for almost 20% of HIV-1 infections worldwide. Better understanding of recombinants is necessary to determine their biological and molecular attributes.

  7. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  8. Recombinant DNA technology in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes the achievements of almost 20 years of recombinant DNA technology applied to apple, grouping the research results into the sections: developing the technology, insect resistance, fungal disease resistance, self-incompatibility, herbicide resistance, fire blight resistance, fruit ripening, allergens, rooting ability, and acceptance and risk assessment. The diseases fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, and scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis, were and still are the prime targets. Shelf life improvement and rooting ability of rootstocks are also relevant research areas. The tools to create genetically modified apples of added value to producers, consumers, and the environment are now available.

  9. CRMAGE: CRISPR Optimized MAGE Recombineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A bottleneck in metabolic engineering and systems biology approaches is the lack of efficient genome engineering technologies. Here, we combine CRISPR/Cas9 and λ Red recombineering based MAGE technology (CRMAGE) to create a highly efficient and fast method for genome engineering of Escherichia coli...... that are assembled by a USER-cloning approach enabling quick and cost efficient gRNA replacement. CRMAGE furthermore utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient plasmid curing, thereby enabling multiple engineering rounds per day. To facilitate the design process, a web-based tool was developed to predict both the λ Red...

  10. Detecting the cosmological recombination signal from space

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent; Silk, Joseph; de Bernardis, Francesco; Doré, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Spectral distortions of the CMB have recently experienced an increased interest. One of the inevitable distortion signals of our cosmological concordance model is created by the cosmological recombination process, just a little before photons last scatter at redshift $z\\simeq 1100$. These cosmological recombination lines, emitted by the hydrogen and helium plasma, should still be observable as tiny deviation from the CMB blackbody spectrum in the cm--dm spectral bands. In this paper, we present a forecast for the detectability of the recombination signal with future satellite experiments. We argue that serious consideration for future CMB experiments in space should be given to probing spectral distortions and, in particular, the recombination line signals. The cosmological recombination radiation not only allows determination of standard cosmological parameters, but also provides a direct observational confirmation for one of the key ingredients of our cosmological model: the cosmological recombination histo...

  11. Atomic excitation and recombination in external fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Clark, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This volume offers a timely look at Rydberg states of atoms in external fields and dielectronic recombination. Each topic provides authoritative coverage, presents a fresh account of a flourishing field of current atomic physics and introduces new opportunities for discovery and development. Topics considered include electron-atom scattering in external fields; observations of regular and irregular motion as exemplified by the quadratic zeeman effect and other systems; Rydberg atoms in external fields and the Coulomb geometry; crossed-field effects in the absorption spectrum of lithium in a magnetic field; precise studies of static electric field ionization; widths and shapes of stark resonances in sodium above the saddle point; studies of electric field effects and barium autoionizing resonances; autoionization and dielectronic recombination in plasma electric microfields; dielectronic recombination measurements on multicharged ions; merged beam studies of dielectronic recombination; Rydberg atoms and dielectronic recombination in astrophysics; and observations on dielectronic recombination.

  12. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W;

    1997-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer (Emu) not only stimulates transcription but also V(D)J recombination of chromosomally integrated recombination substrates. We aimed at reproducing this effect in recombination competent cells by transient transfection of extrachromosomal substrates. ...

  13. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks. PMID:24119078

  14. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we...

  15. Role of ubiquitination in meiotic recombination repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Programmed and unprogrammed double-strand breaks (DSBs) often arise from such physiological requirements as meiotic recombination, and exogenous insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR). Due to deleterious impacts on genome stability, DSBs must be appropriately processed and repaired in a regulatory manner. Recent investigations have indicated that ubiquitination is a critical factor in DNA damage response and meiotic recombination repair. This review summarizes the effects of proteins and complexes associated with ubiquitination with regard to homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DSB repair.

  16. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-11-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks.

  17. Impact of recombination on bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Genetic exchange plays a defining role in the evolution of many bacteria. The recent accumulation of nucleotide sequence data from multiple members of diverse bacterial genera has facilitated comparative studies that have revealed many features of this process. Here we focus on genetic exchange that has involved homologous recombination and illustrate how nucleotide sequence data have furthered our understanding of: (i) the frequency of recombination; (ii) the impact of recombination in diffe...

  18. RNA recombination in animal and plant viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    An increasing number of animal and plant viruses have been shown to undergo RNA-RNA recombination, which is defined as the exchange of genetic information between nonsegmented RNAs. Only some of these viruses have been shown to undergo recombination in experimental infection of tissue culture, animals, and plants. However, a survey of viral RNA structure and sequences suggests that many RNA viruses were derived form homologous or nonhomologous recombination between viruses or between viruses ...

  19. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Klinker

    Full Text Available The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  20. Molecular analysis of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 strains from Uruguay: evidence for natural occurring recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Natalia; Mirazo, Santiago; Castro, Gustavo; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) is a worldwide distributed virus and is considered an important emerging pathogen related to several distinct disease syndromes in pigs. Genomic structure consists of three major open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 (rep gene) encodes replication-related proteins, ORF2 (cap gene) encodes the capsid protein and ORF3 encodes a protein putatively involved in virus-induced apoptosis. Based on cap gene sequences, PCV2 strains are classified into two main genotypes, PCV2a with five clusters (2A-2E) and PCV2b with three clusters (1A-1C). According to previous theoretical studies, PCV2 strains can eventually undergo intra and inter-genotype recombination, mainly within the rep gene. Ever since, several evidences of recombination in the field have been reported and confirmed this hypothesis. In South America, data regarding molecular characterization of PCV2 strains is still scant. Genotyping studies in the region have concluded that PCV2b is the predominant circulating genotype in the region and till now, no recombinant strains have ever been reported. In this work we thoroughly characterized at the molecular level Uruguayan PCV2 strains by extensive sequence data analysis. Moreover, recombination software tools were applied to explore and characterize eventual occurrence of natural recombination events. Two recombinant PCV2 strains were detected in this study, as a consequence of an inter-genotype recombination event between PCV2b-1A and PCV2a-2D, as the major and minor parent, respectively. According to recombination software analysis, in both cases the event occurred within the ORF1. Herein, extensive viral sequence dataset is provided, including the characterization of the first PCV2 recombinant strains ever reported in South America. Additionally, our results suggested a multi-centered source of PCV2 infection in Uruguay, which probably involved Brazilian and European origins.

  1. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  2. Experimental recombination rates for highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold Schuch [Dept. of Atomic Physics, Stockholm Univ., Frescativ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies of recombination between free electrons and highly charged ions using electron coolers of heavy-ion storage rings have produced accurate rate coefficients of interest for plasma modeling and diagnostics. Some surprises were discovered which can lead to revisions of recombination models. With bare ions one finds at low energy a strong and puzzling deviation from radiative recombination theory. Dielectronic recombination with C3+, N4+ show that jj coupling gives essential contributions to the cross section also for light ions. (author)

  3. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  4. Polarization transfer kinetics in a binary system of molecular luminescense centers in nanopores with a liquid crystal filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, M. G.; Palem, A. A.

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the anisotropic activated luminescence of molecular centers introduced into spherical nanopores filled with a nematic liquid crystal possessing a homeotropic texture. The kinetics of the anisotropy of emission from these centers is traced during selective pulsed activation of the donor subsystem by a linearly polarized light in the case where the long-range nonradiative transfer of the electron excitation energy to the acceptor molecules takes place in a radially aligned two-component luminescent system. A theoretical model is proposed that takes into account the migration of excitations over the system of donor centers. Dependences of the kinetics of the anisotropy of acceptor luminescence on the nanopore radius, the Förster transfer rate, and some other parameters have been determined. A change in the sign of polarization of the activated luminescence signal has been observed.

  5. Non-radial motion in the TeV blazar S5 0716+714. The pc-scale kinematics of a BL Lacertae object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzen, S.; Kam, V. A.; Witzel, A.; Agudo, I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Karouzos, M.; Eckart, A.; Zensus, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Flat-spectrum radio sources often show a core-jet structure on pc-scales. Individual jet components reveal predominantly outward directed motion. For the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 conflicting apparent velocities have been reported in the literature. This object is an intra-day variable source and suited to investigate a possible correlation between kinematic properties and flux-density variability on different timescales. Aims: We study the kinematics in the pc-scale jet of S5 0716+714 to determine the apparent speeds of the jet components based on a much improved data set. In addition, we search for correlations between the radio flux-density light curves and the morphological changes detected along the VLBI jet. Methods: We (re-)analyze 50 VLBI observations obtained with the VLBA at 5 different frequencies (5-43 GHz) between 1992.73 and 2006.32. The data have been parameterized using circular Gaussian components. We analyze the jet component motion in detail taking care not only to account for motion in the radial but also in the orthogonal direction. We study the evolution of the jet ridge line and investigate the spectral properties of the individual components. We search for correlations between radio band light curves and the kinematic properties of the jet components. Results: We present an alternative kinematic scenario for jet component motion in S5 0716+714. We present evidence for the apparent stationarity of jet components (with regard to their core separation) with time. Jet components, however, do seem to move significantly non-radially with regard to their position angle and in a direction perpendicular to the major axis of the jet. We discuss a possible correlation between the long-term radio flux-density variability and apparent jet component motions. Conclusions: In S5 0716+714 an alternative motion scenario is proposed. With regard to the core separation, rather stationary components can fit the VLBI observations well. A new model to

  6. White light generation by resonant nonradiative energy transfer from epitaxial InGaN/GaN quantum wells to colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Sari, Emre; Baek, Jong-Hyeob; Lee, In-Hwan; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2008-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate white-light-generating nonradiative energy transfer (ET) from epitaxial quantum wells (QWs) to colloidal quantum dots (QDs) in their close proximity. This proof-of-concept hybrid color-converting system consists of chemically synthesized red-emitting CdSe/ZnS core/shell heteronanocrystals intimately integrated on epitaxially grown cyan-emitting InGaN/GaN QWs. The white light is generated by the collective luminescence of QWs and QDs, for which the dot emission is further increased by 63% with nonradiative ET, setting the operating point in the white region of CIE chromaticity diagram. Using cyan emission at 490 nm from the QWs and red emission at 650 nm from the nanocrystal (NC) luminophors, we obtain warm white light generation with a correlated color temperature of Tc = 3135 K and tristimulus coordinates of (x,y) = (0.42, 0.39) in the white region. By analyzing the time-resolved radiative decay of these NC emitters in our hybrid system with a 16 ps time resolution, the luminescence kinetics reveals a fast ET with a rate of (2 ns)-1 using a multiexponential fit with χ 2 = 1.0171.

  7. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  8. Radio Recombination Lines of Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Peach

    2015-12-01

    The impact theory of spectral line broadening is used to obtain complete profiles for radio recombination lines perturbed by electron and proton impact. The collisions can be divided into two types: inelastic, where transitions take place between hydrogen levels with different principal quantum number and elastic, where the transitions are only between degenerate levels for a particular value of . The widths of the radio lines are essentially determined by inelastic electron collisions and elastic proton collisions with the emitting hydrogen atom occupying either the upper or lower levels of the line. Here, earlier work is extended to examine the contribution from proton collisions to the line width in more detail, and it is shown that the trends in the behaviour of the widths again confirm previous results.

  9. Homologous recombination and its regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Lumir; Altmannova, Veronika; Spirek, Mario; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is critical both for repairing DNA lesions in mitosis and for chromosomal pairing and exchange during meiosis. However, some forms of HR can also lead to undesirable DNA rearrangements. Multiple regulatory mechanisms have evolved to ensure that HR takes place at the right time, place and manner. Several of these impinge on the control of Rad51 nucleofilaments that play a central role in HR. Some factors promote the formation of these structures while others lead to their disassembly or the use of alternative repair pathways. In this article, we review these mechanisms in both mitotic and meiotic environments and in different eukaryotic taxa, with an emphasis on yeast and mammal systems. Since mutations in several proteins that regulate Rad51 nucleofilaments are associated with cancer and cancer-prone syndromes, we discuss how understanding their functions can lead to the development of better tools for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22467216

  10. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  11. Titania Photocatalysis beyond Recombination: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunsho Ohtani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This short review paper shows the significance of recombination of a photoexcited electron and a hole in conduction and valence bands, respectively, of a titania photocatalyst, since recombination has not yet been fully understood and has not been evaluated adequately during the past several decades of research on heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  12. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina

    2010-01-01

    to genetic disabilities, including birth defects. The basis by which centromeric meiotic recombination is repressed has been largely unknown. We report here that, in fission yeast, RNAi functions and Clr4-Rik1 (histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase) are required for repression of centromeric recombination...

  13. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations...

  14. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  15. Consequences of recombination on traditional phylogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Hein, J

    2000-01-01

    not be immediately detectable in a data set. The phylogenies when recombination is present superficially resemble phylogenies for sequences from an exponentially growing population. However, exponential growth has a different effect on statistics such as Tajima's D. Furthermore, ignoring recombination leads...

  16. Theoretic Study of CⅡ Recombination Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭永伦; 王民盛; 韩小英; 李家明

    2004-01-01

    Using the R-matrix method, we carry out theoretical calculations for recombination line λ 8794 A(3d'-3p') of CⅡ, which is important to estimate the abundances of carbon in planetary nebulae. Our calculations are based on three sets of target orbital basis, through which we elucidate the electron correlation and static polarization effects in the dielectronic recombination processes.

  17. Gated rotation mechanism of site-specific recombination by ϕC31 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunniji, Femi J; Buck, Dorothy E; Colloms, Sean D; McEwan, Andrew R; Smith, Margaret C M; Stark, W Marshall; Rosser, Susan J

    2012-11-27

    Integrases, such as that of the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage ϕC31, promote site-specific recombination between DNA sequences in the bacteriophage and bacterial genomes to integrate or excise the phage DNA. ϕC31 integrase belongs to the serine recombinase family, a large group of structurally related enzymes with diverse biological functions. It has been proposed that serine integrases use a "subunit rotation" mechanism to exchange DNA strands after double-strand DNA cleavage at the two recombining att sites, and that many rounds of subunit rotation can occur before the strands are religated. We have analyzed the mechanism of ϕC31 integrase-mediated recombination in a topologically constrained experimental system using hybrid "phes" recombination sites, each of which comprises a ϕC31 att site positioned adjacent to a regulatory sequence recognized by Tn3 resolvase. The topologies of reaction products from circular substrates containing two phes sites support a right-handed subunit rotation mechanism for catalysis of both integrative and excisive recombination. Strand exchange usually terminates after a single round of 180° rotation. However, multiple processive "360° rotation" rounds of strand exchange can be observed, if the recombining sites have nonidentical base pairs at their centers. We propose that a regulatory "gating" mechanism normally blocks multiple rounds of strand exchange and triggers product release after a single round.

  18. Recombinant vaccines: experimental and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Development of vaccines for aquaculture fish represent an important applied functional aspect of fish immunology research. Particularly in the case of recombinant vaccines, where a single antigen is usually expected to induce immunity to a specific pathogen, knowledge of mechanisms involved in in......, these fields will open up a number of interesting research objectives of mutual benefit. Recent aspects of recombinant protein vaccines, live recombinant vaccines and DNA vaccines are discussed.......Development of vaccines for aquaculture fish represent an important applied functional aspect of fish immunology research. Particularly in the case of recombinant vaccines, where a single antigen is usually expected to induce immunity to a specific pathogen, knowledge of mechanisms involved...... in induction of a protective immune response may become vital. The few recombinant vaccines licensd so far, despite much research during the last decade, illustrate that this is not a straightforward matter. However, as vaccine technology as well as our knowledge of the fish immune system is steadily improved...

  19. The recombinational anatomy of a mouse chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Paigen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Among mammals, genetic recombination occurs at highly delimited sites known as recombination hotspots. They are typically 1-2 kb long and vary as much as a 1,000-fold or more in recombination activity. Although much is known about the molecular details of the recombination process itself, the factors determining the location and relative activity of hotspots are poorly understood. To further our understanding, we have collected and mapped the locations of 5,472 crossover events along mouse Chromosome 1 arising in 6,028 meioses of male and female reciprocal F1 hybrids of C57BL/6J and CAST/EiJ mice. Crossovers were mapped to a minimum resolution of 225 kb, and those in the telomere-proximal 24.7 Mb were further mapped to resolve individual hotspots. Recombination rates were evolutionarily conserved on a regional scale, but not at the local level. There was a clear negative-exponential relationship between the relative activity and abundance of hotspot activity classes, such that a small number of the most active hotspots account for the majority of recombination. Females had 1.2x higher overall recombination than males did, although the sex ratio showed considerable regional variation. Locally, entirely sex-specific hotspots were rare. The initiation of recombination at the most active hotspot was regulated independently on the two parental chromatids, and analysis of reciprocal crosses indicated that parental imprinting has subtle effects on recombination rates. It appears that the regulation of mammalian recombination is a complex, dynamic process involving multiple factors reflecting species, sex, individual variation within species, and the properties of individual hotspots.

  20. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  1. Establishment of a recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing hVEGF165

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianghui Huang; Zhibin Shi; Xiaoqian Dang; Chen Zhang; Pengbo Yu; Kunzheng Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because certain gene vectors could have deleterious effects in the central nervous system, the choice of a safe and effective vector system has become more important for gene therapy of nerve regeneration. OBJECTIVE: To construct a non-pathogenic, recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) simultaneously expressing human vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (hVEGF165) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized controlled experiment was performed at the Virology Laboratory of Shaanxi Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention between March and September 2007. MATERIALS: AAV helper-free system, AAV-293 packaging cell line, and AAV HT-1080 cells were purchased from Stratagene, USA. E. Coli DH5α was a stocked strain from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Shaanxi, China. Plasmid pUC18-hHVEGF165 was a gift from Zhibin Shi. METHODS: The hVEGF165 gene was amplified by PCR from pUC18-hHVEGF165 and inserted into plasmid pAAV-IRES-hrGFP to construct recombinant plasmid pAAV-hVEGF165-IRES-hrGFP. Subsequently pAAV-hVEGF165-IRES-hrGFP, pAAV-RC (the rep/cap-gene containing plasmid), and pHelper were co-transfected into AAV-293 cells to complete rAAV-hVEGF165-IRES-hrGFP packaging through homologous recombination. The efficiency of AAV packaging was monitored under a fluorescent microscope, and the recombinant viral particles were harvested from infected AAV-293 cells, and further concentrated and purified. AAV HT-1080 cells were infected with the recombinant virus AAV-hVEGF165-IRES-hrGFP. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Recombinant virus titer was measured by fluorescent cell counting, and infection efficiency was detected by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) upon infecting AAV-HT1080 cells. The recombination with the exogenous gene was verified by PCR. RESULTS: The PCR amplified products were verified as hVEGF165 gene by DNA sequencing, and the recombinant pAAV-hVEGF165-IRES-GFP was confirmed by double digestion

  2. The unconventional xer recombination machinery of Streptococci/Lactococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Bugarel, Marie; Campo, Nathalie; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line; Labonte, Jessica; Lanfranchi, Daniel; Lautier, Thomas; Pages, Carine; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    Homologous recombination between circular sister chromosomes during DNA replication in bacteria can generate chromosome dimers that must be resolved into monomers prior to cell division. In Escherichia coli, dimer resolution is achieved by site-specific recombination, Xer recombination, involving

  3. Impurity Deionization Effects on Surface Recombination DC Current-Voltage Characteristics in MOS Transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zuhui [Lee-Kuan-Yew Postdoctoral Fellow, 2007-2010, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Jie Binbin; Sah Chihtang, E-mail: bb_jie@msn.com [Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Impurity deionization on the direct-current current-voltage characteristics from electron-hole recombination (R-DCIV) at SiO{sub 2}/Si interface traps in MOS transistors is analyzed using the steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall recombination kinetics and the Fermi distributions for electrons and holes. Insignificant distortion is observed over 90% of the bell-shaped R-DCIV curves centered at their peaks when impurity deionization is excluded in the theory. This is due to negligible impurity deionization because of the much lower electron and hole concentrations at the interface than the impurity concentration in the 90% range. (invited papers)

  4. Identifying the important HIV-1 recombination breakpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Archer

    Full Text Available Recombinant HIV-1 genomes contribute significantly to the diversity of variants within the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is assumed that some of these mosaic genomes may have novel properties that have led to their prevalence, particularly in the case of the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs. In regions of the HIV-1 genome where recombination has a tendency to convey a selective advantage to the virus, we predict that the distribution of breakpoints--the identifiable boundaries that delimit the mosaic structure--will deviate from the underlying null distribution. To test this hypothesis, we generate a probabilistic model of HIV-1 copy-choice recombination and compare the predicted breakpoint distribution to the distribution from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Across much of the HIV-1 genome, we find that the observed frequencies of inter-subtype recombination are predicted accurately by our model. This observation strongly indicates that in these regions a probabilistic model, dependent on local sequence identity, is sufficient to explain breakpoint locations. In regions where there is a significant over- (either side of the env gene or under- (short regions within gag, pol, and most of env representation of breakpoints, we infer natural selection to be influencing the recombination pattern. The paucity of recombination breakpoints within most of the envelope gene indicates that recombinants generated in this region are less likely to be successful. The breakpoints at a higher frequency than predicted by our model are approximately at either side of env, indicating increased selection for these recombinants as a consequence of this region, or at least part of it, having a tendency to be recombined as an entire unit. Our findings thus provide the first clear indication of the existence of a specific portion of the genome that deviates from a probabilistic null model for recombination. This suggests that, despite the wide diversity of recombinant forms seen in

  5. Identifying the Important HIV-1 Recombination Breakpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo; Robertson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant HIV-1 genomes contribute significantly to the diversity of variants within the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is assumed that some of these mosaic genomes may have novel properties that have led to their prevalence, particularly in the case of the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). In regions of the HIV-1 genome where recombination has a tendency to convey a selective advantage to the virus, we predict that the distribution of breakpoints—the identifiable boundaries that delimit the mosaic structure—will deviate from the underlying null distribution. To test this hypothesis, we generate a probabilistic model of HIV-1 copy-choice recombination and compare the predicted breakpoint distribution to the distribution from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Across much of the HIV-1 genome, we find that the observed frequencies of inter-subtype recombination are predicted accurately by our model. This observation strongly indicates that in these regions a probabilistic model, dependent on local sequence identity, is sufficient to explain breakpoint locations. In regions where there is a significant over- (either side of the env gene) or under- (short regions within gag, pol, and most of env) representation of breakpoints, we infer natural selection to be influencing the recombination pattern. The paucity of recombination breakpoints within most of the envelope gene indicates that recombinants generated in this region are less likely to be successful. The breakpoints at a higher frequency than predicted by our model are approximately at either side of env, indicating increased selection for these recombinants as a consequence of this region, or at least part of it, having a tendency to be recombined as an entire unit. Our findings thus provide the first clear indication of the existence of a specific portion of the genome that deviates from a probabilistic null model for recombination. This suggests that, despite the wide diversity of recombinant forms seen in the viral

  6. Thermal characterization and determination of recombination parameters in CdTe films on glass substrates by using open photoacoustic cell technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-T, M.A. [Depto. de C. Basicas, ESCOM-IPN, Av. Miguel Othon de Mendizabal S/N, Col. Lindavista, CP 07738, Mexico DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: mgonzalezt@ipn.mx; Cruz-Orea, A. [Depto. de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN No.2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, CP. 07360, Mexico DF (Mexico); Albor-A, M.L. de [Depto. de Fisica, ESFM-IPN, Edif. 9, U.P. ' Adolfo Lopez Mateos' , CP 07738, Mexico DF (Mexico); Castillo-A, F. de L [Depto. de Fisica, ESFM-IPN, Edif. 9, U.P. ' Adolfo Lopez Mateos' , CP 07738, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    CdTe is a semiconductor with a wide variety of applications and perspectives for electronic industry (high-efficiency photoelectric cells, infrared radiation detectors, etc.). In the present work, we used photoacoustic (PA) technique to study the thermal properties and the surface recombination velocity in CdTe/glass samples. Experimental PA phase signal as a function of modulation frequency in a heat transmission configuration was fitted to the theoretical expression for PA signal, which takes into account the heat sources resulting from the absorption of light in semiconductors and the nonradiative processes involved, which depend on their thermal, optical and electronic transport properties. By this procedure, it was possible to determine the thermal diffusivity and the surface recombination velocity in these samples. The studied samples were thin polycrystalline CdTe film deposited on glass slides. CdTe layers were deposited by a hot-wall closed-spaced vapor transport method, known as gradient recrystallization and growth. The values for the deposition parameters used in this study were the following: 700 deg. C for the source temperature and 450 and 550 deg. C for the substrate temperatures with three different deposition times from 5 to 20 min (then three different film thicknesses were obtained). A clear increment in the surface velocity and surface roughness is observed as the film thickness is increased.

  7. Time-resolved correlative optical microscopy of charge-carrier transport, recombination, and space-charge fields in CdTe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Myers, Thomas H.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Jensen, Søren A.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.

    2017-02-20

    From time- and spatially resolved optical measurements, we show that extended defects can have a large effect on the charge-carrier recombination in II-VI semiconductors. In CdTe double heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the InSb (100)-orientation substrates, we characterized the extended defects and found that near stacking faults the space-charge field extends by 2-5 um. Charge carriers drift (with the space-charge field strength of 730-1,360 V cm-1) and diffuse (with the mobility of 260 +/- 30 cm2 V-1 s-1) toward the extended defects, where the minority-carrier lifetime is reduced from 560 ns to 0.25 ns. Therefore, the extended defects are nonradiative recombination sinks that affect areas significantly larger than the typical crystalline grains in II-VI solar cells. From the correlative time-resolved photoluminescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy data, we developed a band-diagram model that can be used to analyze the impact of extended defects on solar cells and other electronic devices.

  8. The effects of temperature dependent recombination rates on performance of InGaN/GaN blue superluminescent light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi Milani, N.; Mohadesi, V.; Asgari, A.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of temperature dependent radiative and nonradiative recombination (Shockley-Read-Hall, spontaneous radiative, and Auger coefficients) on the spectral and power characteristics of a blue multiple quantum well (MQW) superluminescent light emitting diode (SLD or SLED) have been studied. The study is based on the rate equations model, where three rate equations corresponding to MQW active region, separate confinement heterostructure (SCH) layer, and spectral density of optical power are solved self-consistently with no k-selection energy dependent gain and quasi-Fermi level functions at steady state. We have taken into account the temperature effects on Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH), spontaneous radiative, and Auger recombination in the rate equations and have investigated the effects of temperature rising from 300 K to 375 K at a fixed current density. We examine this procedure for a moderate current density and interpret the spectral radiation power and light output power diagrams. The investigation reveals that the main loss due to temperature is related to Auger coefficient.

  9. Initiation of meiotic recombination in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, Milorad; Sutherland, Jeanette H; Pérez-Martín, José; Holloman, William K

    2013-12-01

    A central feature of meiosis is the pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes. Ustilago maydis, a biotrophic fungus that parasitizes maize, has long been utilized as an experimental system for studying recombination, but it has not been clear when in the life cycle meiotic recombination initiates. U. maydis forms dormant diploid teliospores as the end product of the infection process. Upon germination, teliospores complete meiosis to produce four haploid basidiospores. Here we asked whether the meiotic process begins when teliospores germinate or at an earlier stage in development. When teliospores homozygous for a cdc45 mutation temperature sensitive for DNA synthesis were germinated at the restrictive temperature, four nuclei became visible. This implies that teliospores have already undergone premeiotic DNA synthesis and suggests that meiotic recombination initiates at a stage of infection before teliospores mature. Determination of homologous recombination in plant tissue infected with U. maydis strains heteroallelic for the nar1 gene revealed that Nar(+) recombinants were produced at a stage before teliospore maturation. Teliospores obtained from a spo11Δ cross were still able to germinate but the process was highly disturbed and the meiotic products were imbalanced in chromosomal complement. These results show that in U. maydis, homologous recombination initiates during the infection process and that meiosis can proceed even in the absence of Spo11, but with loss of genomic integrity.

  10. Implications of recombination for HIV diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Bertha Cecilia; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Negroni, Matteo

    2008-06-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population is characterised by extensive genetic variability that results from high error and recombination rates of the reverse transcription process, and from the fast turnover of virions in HIV-infected individuals. Among the viral variants encountered at the global scale, recombinant forms are extremely abundant. Some of these recombinants (known as circulating recombinant forms) become fixed and undergo rapid expansion in the population. The reasons underlying their epidemiological success remain at present poorly understood and constitute a fascinating area for future research to improve our understanding of immune escape, pathogenicity and transmission. Recombinant viruses are generated during reverse transcription as a consequence of template switching between the two genetically different genomic RNAs present in a heterozygous virus. Recombination can thereby generate shortcuts in evolution by producing mosaic reverse transcription products of parental genomes. Therefore, in a single infectious cycle multiple mutations that are positively selected can be combined or, conversely, negatively selected mutations can be removed. Recombination is therefore involved in different aspects of HIV evolution, adaptation to its host, and escape from antiviral treatments.

  11. Optimal Expression Condition of Recombinant RAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Hong; BI Hao; LIU Zhiguo; GUO Jianli; QU Shen

    2007-01-01

    In order to construct the expression recombinant of human receptor associated protein (RAP), optimize its expression condition and obtain the recombinant protein after expression with high efficiency, two prokaryotic expression vectors-pT7-PL and pET-28a(+) were used to construct the expression recombinant containing RAP cDNA, and the expression efficiency of two kinds of expression E. coli of BL21 strains was compared. The effect of different induction conditions on the expression of recombinant RAP was observed. After recombinant protein was purified with Ni+-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni+-NTA) affinity chromatogram, its binding ability with microphage was observed. The results showed that two recombinant plasmids both obtained high expression of RAP. The expression levels of RAP in plasmid pT7-PL-RAP in BL21 (DE3, plysS) strain were significantly higher than in BL21 (DE3) strain. The expression of pT7-PL-RAP in the presence of chloramphenicol was higher than in the absence of chloramphenicol, and most of the inducible expressed RAP was soluble. The RAP which was purified by Ni+-NTA resin could strongly bind with the RAW264.7 cells rich in low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family receptors. It was concluded that the expression condition of recombinant RAP was optimized and functional RAP was obtained, which offered a good foundation for the further production of RAP as research tool.

  12. Production of recombinant proteins by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Owen P

    2012-01-01

    The initial focus of recombinant protein production by filamentous fungi related to exploiting the extraordinary extracellular enzyme synthesis and secretion machinery of industrial strains, including Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Penicillium and Rhizopus species, was to produce single recombinant protein products. An early recognized disadvantage of filamentous fungi as hosts of recombinant proteins was their common ability to produce homologous proteases which could degrade the heterologous protein product and strategies to prevent proteolysis have met with some limited success. It was also recognized that the protein glycosylation patterns in filamentous fungi and in mammals were quite different, such that filamentous fungi are likely not to be the most suitable microbial hosts for production of recombinant human glycoproteins for therapeutic use. By combining the experience gained from production of single recombinant proteins with new scientific information being generated through genomics and proteomics research, biotechnologists are now poised to extend the biomanufacturing capabilities of recombinant filamentous fungi by enabling them to express genes encoding multiple proteins, including, for example, new biosynthetic pathways for production of new primary or secondary metabolites. It is recognized that filamentous fungi, most species of which have not yet been isolated, represent an enormously diverse source of novel biosynthetic pathways, and that the natural fungal host harboring a valuable biosynthesis pathway may often not be the most suitable organism for biomanufacture purposes. Hence it is expected that substantial effort will be directed to transforming other fungal hosts, non-fungal microbial hosts and indeed non microbial hosts to express some of these novel biosynthetic pathways. But future applications of recombinant expression of proteins will not be confined to biomanufacturing. Opportunities to exploit recombinant technology to unravel the

  13. Recombination analysis of Soybean mosaic virus sequences reveals evidence of RNA recombination between distinct pathotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Mohan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA recombination is one of the two major factors that create RNA genome variability. Assessing its incidence in plant RNA viruses helps understand the formation of new isolates and evaluate the effectiveness of crop protection strategies. To search for recombination in Soybean mosaic virus (SMV, the causal agent of a worldwide seed-borne, aphid-transmitted viral soybean disease, we obtained all full-length genome sequences of SMV as well as partial sequences encoding the N-terminal most (P1 protease and the C-terminal most (capsid protein; CP viral protein. The sequences were analyzed for possible recombination events using a variety of automatic and manual recombination detection and verification approaches. Automatic scanning identified 3, 10, and 17 recombination sites in the P1, CP, and full-length sequences, respectively. Manual analyses confirmed 10 recombination sites in three full-length SMV sequences. To our knowledge, this is the first report of recombination between distinct SMV pathotypes. These data imply that different SMV pathotypes can simultaneously infect a host cell and exchange genetic materials through recombination. The high incidence of SMV recombination suggests that recombination plays an important role in SMV evolution. Obtaining additional full-length sequences will help elucidate this role.

  14. Recombination every day: abundant recombination in a virus during a single multi-cellular host infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remy Froissart

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Viral recombination can dramatically impact evolution and epidemiology. In viruses, the recombination rate depends on the frequency of genetic exchange between different viral genomes within an infected host cell and on the frequency at which such co-infections occur. While the recombination rate has been recently evaluated in experimentally co-infected cell cultures for several viruses, direct quantification at the most biologically significant level, that of a host infection, is still lacking. This study fills this gap using the cauliflower mosaic virus as a model. We distributed four neutral markers along the viral genome, and co-inoculated host plants with marker-containing and wild-type viruses. The frequency of recombinant genomes was evaluated 21 d post-inoculation. On average, over 50% of viral genomes recovered after a single host infection were recombinants, clearly indicating that recombination is very frequent in this virus. Estimates of the recombination rate show that all regions of the genome are equally affected by this process. Assuming that ten viral replication cycles occurred during our experiment-based on data on the timing of coat protein detection-the per base and replication cycle recombination rate was on the order of 2 x 10(-5 to 4 x 10(-5. This first determination of a virus recombination rate during a single multi-cellular host infection indicates that recombination is very frequent in the everyday life of this virus.

  15. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  16. Homologous recombination in Leishmania enriettii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, J F; Laban, A; Wirth, D F

    1991-02-01

    We have used derivatives of the recently developed stable transfection vector pALT-Neo to formally demonstrate that Leishmania enriettii contains the enzymatic machinery necessary for homologous recombination. This observation has implications for gene regulation, gene amplification, genetic diversity, and the maintenance of tandemly repeated gene families in the Leishmania genome as well as in closely related organisms, including Trypanosoma brucei. Two plasmids containing nonoverlapping deletions of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, as well as the neomycin-resistance gene, were cotransfected into L. enriettii. Analysis of the DNA from these cells by Southern blotting and plasmid rescue revealed that a full-length or doubly deleted CAT gene could be reconstructed by homologous crossing-over and/or gene conversion between the two deletion plasmids. Additionally, parasites cotransfected with pALT-Neo and pALT-CAT-S, a plasmid containing two copies of the chimeric alpha-tubulin-CAT gene, resulted in G418-resistant parasites expressing high levels of CAT activity. The structure of the DNA within these cells, as shown by Southern blot analysis and the polymerase chain reaction, is that which would be expected from a homologous exchange event occurring between the two plasmids.

  17. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  18. Transplant Center Search Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Your Story Give Us Feedback - A + A Transplant Center Search Form Welcome to the Blood & Marrow ... transplant centers for patients with a particular disease. Transplant Center login Username: * Password: * Request new password Join ...

  19. The Watergate Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  20. Recombination and its impact on the genome of the haplodiploid parasitoid wasp Nasonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Niehuis

    Full Text Available Homologous meiotic recombination occurs in most sexually reproducing organisms, yet its evolutionary advantages are elusive. Previous research explored recombination in the honeybee, a eusocial hymenopteran with an exceptionally high genome-wide recombination rate. A comparable study in a non-social member of the Hymenoptera that would disentangle the impact of sociality from Hymenoptera-specific features such as haplodiploidy on the evolution of the high genome-wide recombination rate in social Hymenoptera is missing. Utilizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between two Nasonia parasitoid wasp genomes, we developed a SNP genotyping microarray to infer a high-density linkage map for Nasonia. The map comprises 1,255 markers with an average distance of 0.3 cM. The mapped markers enabled us to arrange 265 scaffolds of the Nasonia genome assembly 1.0 on the linkage map, representing 63.6% of the assembled N. vitripennis genome. We estimated a genome-wide recombination rate of 1.4-1.5 cM/Mb for Nasonia, which is less than one tenth of the rate reported for the honeybee. The local recombination rate in Nasonia is positively correlated with the distance to the center of the linkage groups, GC content, and the proportion of simple repeats. In contrast to the honeybee genome, gene density in the parasitoid wasp genome is positively associated with the recombination rate; regions of low recombination are characterized by fewer genes with larger introns and by a greater distance between genes. Finally, we found that genes in regions of the genome with a low recombination frequency tend to have a higher ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, likely due to the accumulation of slightly deleterious non-synonymous substitutions. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that recombination reduces interference between linked sites and thereby facilitates adaptive evolution and the purging of deleterious mutations. Our results imply

  1. [Enzymatic regulatory processes in gene recombination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarskiĭ, V A; Profir, A V

    1988-01-01

    Recombination bistability in the system of genetic regulation in pro- and eucaryots is analysed on the basis of sigmoid kinetics of regulatory enzymes. It is shown that under an increase of either exogenic factors (temperature) or endogenic factors (concentration of molecules, which activate the enzymes) of crucial values, bistability solutions for recombination frequencies are possible. Histeresic character of the dependence of this value on the external parameters is pointed out. The role of fluctuation processes in distortion of the memory effects is discussed. On the basis of monostable solutions molecular account for the empiric Plau law is given for U-shaped dependence of recombination frequency on temperature.

  2. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase: production and analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, V G; Andreeva, I P; Rubtsova, M Yu; Egorov, A M

    2015-04-01

    Horseradish peroxidase is a key enzyme in bio- and immunochemical analysis. New approaches in functional expression of the peroxidase gene in E. coli cells and the subsequent refolding of the resulting protein yield a recombinant enzyme that is comparable in its spectral and catalytic characteristics to the native plant peroxidase. Genetic engineering approaches allow production of recombinant peroxidase conjugates with both protein antigens and Fab antibody fragments. The present article reviews the use of recombinant horseradish peroxidase as the marker enzyme in ELISA procedures as well as in amperometric sensors based on direct electron transfer.

  3. DSMC modeling of flows with recombination reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelshein, Sergey; Wysong, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    An empirical microscopic recombination model is developed for the direct simulation Monte Carlo method that complements the extended weak vibrational bias model of dissociation. The model maintains the correct equilibrium reaction constant in a wide range of temperatures by using the collision theory to enforce the number of recombination events. It also strictly follows the detailed balance requirement for equilibrium gas. The model and its implementation are verified with oxygen and nitrogen heat bath relaxation and compared with available experimental data on atomic oxygen recombination in argon and molecular nitrogen.

  4. Polynomial identities for ternary intermolecular recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Bremner, Murray R

    2010-01-01

    The operation of binary intermolecular recombination, originating in the theory of DNA computing, permits a natural generalization to n-ary operations which perform simultaneous recombination of n molecules. In the case n = 3, we use computer algebra to determine the polynomial identities of degree <= 9 satisfied by this trilinear nonassociative operation. Our approach requires computing a basis for the nullspace of a large integer matrix, and for this we compare two methods: (i) the row canonical form, and (ii) the Hermite normal form with lattice basis reduction. In the conclusion, we formulate some conjectures for the general case of n-ary intermolecular recombination.

  5. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  6. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  7. Analysis of IR transmission spectra and hypothesis of bond-centered H diffusion in a-Si: H thin films during light-induced thermal annealing%氢化非晶硅薄膜的红外光谱分析和桥键氢扩散假设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周怀恩; 朱秀红; 胡跃辉; 马占杰; 张文理; 李瀛; 陈光华

    2005-01-01

    通过红外透射光谱研究了在光诱导退火中退火条件对氢化非晶硅薄膜的结构和光电特性的影响,实验所用样品采用热丝辅助微波电子回旋共振化学气相沉积方法制备.我们用桥键氢扩散模型来解释退火中的不同现象.样品的红外光谱在630和2000cm-1处的吸收系数有所增加,说明了原先的成键氢发生了移动和溢出,我们认为通过光诱导产生载流子的非辐射复合以及桥键氢和深俘获氢原子的交换,产生了大量的桥键氢原子,它们相互结合形成分子氢,氢溢出要优于氢团聚.%The effect of light-induced thermal annealing at low temperature on the structure and electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H ) as a function of annealing conditions was studied by FTIR spectra method. The deposition of a-Si: H films was performed by using microwave electron cyclotron resonance (MW ECR) plasma with the assistance of tungsten filament. In this study, the infrared spectroscopy results show the interesting changes under the different annealing condition. The increase in the transmission coefficient at both 630 and 2000cm-1 indicates that bonded hydrogen moved and effused from the amorphous network. The bond-centered (BC) H diffusion model is used to explain the H elimination phenomenon, we argue that the BC H atoms formed by the nonradiative recombination of photo-induced carriers and the exchange between BC H and deeply trapped H produce more and more BC H atoms, the BC H atoms will recombine each other and form molecular hydrogen, the process of H elimination is prior to monohydride clustering and/or bonds switching.

  8. The stability of recombined milk fat globules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melsen, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of the fat globules in recombined milk products against creaming, flocculation, clustering, partial coalescence and real coalescence, with the emphasis on partial coalescence, was studied. (partial) Coalescence was characterized by determining changes in globule size

  9. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  10. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  11. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  12. Recombination Effects on Supernovae Light-Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Sari, Re'em

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae of type IIP are marked by the long plateau seen in their optical light curves. The plateau is believed to be the result of a recombination wave that propagates through the outflowing massive hydrogen envelope. Here, we analytically investigate the transition from a fully ionized envelope to a partially recombined one and its effects on the SN light curve. The motivation is to establish the underlying processes which dominate the evolution at late times when recombination takes place in the envelope, yet early enough so that $^{56}$Ni decay is a negligible source of energy. We assume a simple, yet adequate, hydrodynamic profile of the envelope and study the mechanisms which dominate the energy emission and the observed temperature. We consider the diffusion of photons through the envelope while analyzing the ionization fraction and the coupling between radiation and gas. We find that once recombination starts, the observed temperature decreases slowly in time. However, in a typical red supergiant (R...

  13. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  14. The stability of recombined milk fat globules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melsen, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of the fat globules in recombined milk products against creaming, flocculation, clustering, partial coalescence and real coalescence, with the emphasis on partial coalescence, was studied. (partial) Coalescence was characterized by determining changes in globule size distribution and f

  15. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-08-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of U. maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins.

  16. Genetic Analyses of Meiotic Recombination in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Meiosis is essential for sexual reproduction and recombination is a critical step required for normal meiosis. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate recombination ie important for medical, agricultural and ecological reasons. Readily available molecular and cytological tools make Arabidopsis an excellent system to study meiosis. Here we review recent developments in molecular genetic analyses on meiotic recombination. These Include studies on plant homologs of yeast and animal genes, as well as novel genes that were first identified in plants. The characterizations of these genes have demonstrated essential functions from the initiation of recombination by double-strand breaks to repair of such breaks, from the formation of double-Holliday junctions to possible resolution of these junctions, both of which are critical for crossover formation. The recent advances have ushered a new era in plant meiosis, in which the combination of genetics, genomics, and molecular cytology can uncover important gene functions.

  17. Recombinant allergens: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Rudolf; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Marth, Katharina; Huber, Hans; Neubauer, Angela; Niederberger, Verena

    2011-04-01

    This year we are celebrating not only the centenary of allergen-specific immunotherapy but also the 10-year anniversary of the first administration of recombinant allergen-based vaccines to allergic patients. By using recombinant DNA technology, defined and safe allergy vaccines can be produced that allow us to overcome many, if not all, of the problems associated with the use of natural allergen extracts, such as insufficient quality, allergenic activity, and poor immunogenicity. Here we provide an update of clinical studies with recombinant allergen-based vaccines, showing that some of these vaccines have undergone successful clinical evaluation up to phase III studies. Furthermore, we introduce a strategy for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant fusion proteins consisting of viral carrier proteins and allergen-derived peptides without allergenic activity, which holds the promise of being free of side effects and eventually being useful for prophylactic vaccination.

  18. Affinity purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop processes for effective isolation and purification of recombinant human plasminogen ... three hybridoma strains were superior for producing PR-mAbs (C1, C4, C8). ..... characterization of a polyol- responsive monoclonal.

  19. Complexity through Recombination: From Chemistry to Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Díaz Arenas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recombination is a common event in nature, with examples in physics, chemistry, and biology. This process is characterized by the spontaneous reorganization of structural units to form new entities. Upon reorganization, the complexity of the overall system can change. In particular the components of the system can now experience a new response to externally applied selection criteria, such that the evolutionary trajectory of the system is altered. In this work we explore the link between chemical and biological forms of recombination. We estimate how the net system complexity changes, through analysis of RNA-RNA recombination and by mathematical modeling. Our results underscore the importance of recombination in the origins of life on the Earth and its subsequent evolutionary divergence.

  20. Recombinant bispecific antibodies for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland E KONTERMANN

    2005-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies can serve as mediators to retarget effector mechanisms to disease-associated sites. Studies over the past two decades have revealed the potentials but also the limitations of conventional bispecific antibodies. The development of recombinant antibody formats has opened up the possibility of generating bispecific molecules with improved properties. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of recombinant bispecific antibodies and discusses further requirements for clinical development.

  1. Hadron Correlations from Recombination and Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fries, R J

    2005-01-01

    We review the formalism of quark recombination applied to the hadronization of a quark gluon plasma. Evidence in favor of the quark recombination model is outlined. Recent work on parton correlations, leading to detectable correlations between hadrons, is discussed. Hot spots from completely quenched jets are a likely source of such correlations which appear to be jet-like. It will be discussed how such a picture compares with measurement of associated hadron yields at RHIC.

  2. Rapid host adaptation by extensive recombination

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations into virus recombination can provide valuable insights into the biochemical mechanisms and the evolutionary value of this fundamental biological process. Here, we describe an experimental scheme for studying recombination that should be applicable to any recombinogenic viruses amenable to the production of synthetic infectious genomes. Our approach is based on differences in fitness that generally exist between synthetic chimaeric genomes and the wild-type viruses ...

  3. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-09-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination.

  4. Dissociation of recombinant prion autocatalysis from infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Geoffrey P; Supattapone, Surachai

    2015-01-01

    Within the mammalian prion field, the existence of recombinant prion protein (PrP) conformers with self-replicating (ie. autocatalytic) activity in vitro but little to no infectious activity in vivo challenges a key prediction of the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication--that autocatalytic PrP conformers should be infectious. To understand this dissociation of autocatalysis from infectivity, we recently performed a structural and functional comparison between a highly infectious and non-infectious pair of autocatalytic recombinant PrP conformers derived from the same initial prion strain. (1) We identified restricted, C-terminal structural differences between these 2 conformers and provided evidence that these relatively subtle differences prevent the non-infectious conformer from templating the conversion of native PrP(C) substrates containing a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. (1) In this article we discuss a model, consistent with these findings, in which recombinant PrP, lacking post-translational modifications and associated folding constraints, is capable of adopting a wide variety of autocatalytic conformations. Only a subset of these recombinant conformers can be adopted by post-translationally modified native PrP(C), and this subset represents the recombinant conformers with high specific infectivity. We examine this model's implications for the generation of highly infectious recombinant prions and the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication.

  5. Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    There are three major space launch bases in China, the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center,the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center and the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. All the three launch centers are located in sparsely populated areas where the terrain is even and the field of vision is broad. Security, transport conditions and the influence of the axial rotation

  6. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  7. Phylogenetic study of recombinant strains of Potato virus Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato virus Y (PVY) exists as a complex of strains, including a growing number of recombinants. Evolution of PVY proceeds through accumulation of mutations and more rapidly through recombination. Here, the role of recombination in PVY evolution and the origin of common PVY recombinants were studied...

  8. Constructing recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 through in vitro ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangcheng Li; Junliang Li; Ranyi Liu; Xinke Xu; Kaichang Yuan; Zhonghua Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We constructed a homologous recombination bacterial method based on the pAdEasy system, a widely used system, for generating recombinant adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) in rats.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of generating recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express GLUT1 in rats by in vitro ligation based on the Adeno-XTM system. DESIGN: An in vitro cell-based experiment. SETTING: This study was performed at the Linbaixin Medical Research Center of the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and Central Laboratory for Prevention and Treatment of Tumor, Sun Yat-sen University between January and August 2004. MATERIALS: Male, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were used to extract total RNA from brain tissue. E. coli DH5?and human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293 cells) used in the present study were cryo-preserved by the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University. Rabbit anti-rat GLUT1 polyclonal antibody (Chemicon, U.S.A.) and primers (Shanghai Boya Bioengineering Co., Ltd) were also used. METHODS: E1/E3-deleted replication-defective adenoviral vectors were used. Using in vitro ligation, the target gene was first sub-cloned into a shuttle vector plasmid to obtain the fragment containing target gene expression cassettes by enzyme digestion. Subsequently, the fragment was co-transformed with linearized adenoviral backbone vector into the E. coli strain. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid was transfected into HEK293 cells to assembly recombinant adenoviral vectors with replication capabilities. The procedure was repeated several times for recombinant adenoviral vectors amplification. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficiency of recombinant adenoviral vectors to express the target gene was measured by gene and protein expression through polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot assays, respectively.RESULTS: Results demonstrated that recombinant adenoviral

  9. Recombination analysis based on the complete genome of bocavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shengxia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bocavirus include bovine parvovirus, minute virus of canine, porcine bocavirus, gorilla bocavirus, and Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoVs. Although recent reports showed that recombination happened in bocavirus, no systematical study investigated the recombination of bocavirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of bocavirus over the complete genomes available in GenBank. Results confirmed that recombination existed among bocavirus, including the likely inter-genotype recombination between HBoV1 and HBoV4, and intra-genotype recombination among HBoV2 variants. Moreover, it is the first report revealing the recombination that occurred between minute viruses of canine.

  10. Recombination hotspots and host susceptibility modulate the adaptive value of recombination during maize streak virus evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monjane Adérito L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maize streak virus -strain A (MSV-A; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae, the maize-adapted strain of MSV that causes maize streak disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa, probably arose between 100 and 200 years ago via homologous recombination between two MSV strains adapted to wild grasses. MSV recombination experiments and analyses of natural MSV recombination patterns have revealed that this recombination event entailed the exchange of the movement protein - coat protein gene cassette, bounded by the two genomic regions most prone to recombination in mastrevirus genomes; the first surrounding the virion-strand origin of replication, and the second around the interface between the coat protein gene and the short intergenic region. Therefore, aside from the likely adaptive advantages presented by a modular exchange of this cassette, these specific breakpoints may have been largely predetermined by the underlying mechanisms of mastrevirus recombination. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed artificial, low-fitness, reciprocal chimaeric MSV genomes using alternating genomic segments from two MSV strains; a grass-adapted MSV-B, and a maize-adapted MSV-A. Between them, each pair of reciprocal chimaeric genomes represented all of the genetic material required to reconstruct - via recombination - the highly maize-adapted MSV-A genotype, MSV-MatA. We then co-infected a selection of differentially MSV-resistant maize genotypes with pairs of reciprocal chimaeras to determine the efficiency with which recombination would give rise to high-fitness progeny genomes resembling MSV-MatA. Results Recombinants resembling MSV-MatA invariably arose in all of our experiments. However, the accuracy and efficiency with which the MSV-MatA genotype was recovered across all replicates of each experiment depended on the MSV susceptibility of the maize genotypes used and the precise positions - in relation to known recombination hotspots

  11. Recombinant human antithrombin III: rhATIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    GTC Biotherapeutics (formerly Genzyme Transgenics Corporation) is developing a transgenic form of antithrombin III known as recombinant human antithrombin III [rhATIII]. It is produced by inserting human DNA into the cells of goats so that the targeted protein is excreted in the milk of the female offspring. The transgenic goats have been cloned in collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agriculture Center. GTC Biotherapeutics is conducting clinical trials of rhATIII in coagulation disorders. rhATIII is believed to be both safer and more cost-effective than the currently available plasma-derived product. rhATIII is also being investigated in cancer and acute lung injury. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, originally a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation, changed its name to GTC Biotherapeutics in June 2002; it is no longer a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation. GTC Biotherapeutics is seeking partners for the commercialisation of rhATIII. Restructuring of GTC Biotherapeutics to support its commercialisation programmes was announced in February 2004. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation was developing rhATIII in association with Genzyme General (Genzyme Corporation) in the ATIII LLC joint venture, but in November 2000 a letter of intent was signed for the reacquisition of the rights by Genzyme Transgenics Corporation. It was announced in February 2001 that this reacquisition was not going to be completed and that the development of rhATIII was to continue with ATIII LLC. However, in July 2001, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired all the rights in the transgenic antithrombin III programme. SMI Genzyme Ltd, a joint venture between Sumitomo Metal Industries, Japan, and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, USA, was set up to fund development of transgenic antithrombin III in Asia. However, in October 2000, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired, from Sumitomo Metal Industries, the rights to its technology for production of medicines from milk in 18 Asian countries

  12. Somatic recombination, gene amplification and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, C; Cederberg, H; Magnusson, J; Vogel, E; Natarajan, A T; Mullender, L H; Nivard, J M; Parry, J M; Leyson, A; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Ferreiro, J A; Consuegra, S

    1996-06-12

    The principle objective of this research programme, to analyse chemical induction of somatic recombination and related endpoints, i.e., mobilization of transposing elements and gene amplification, has been approached by means of several assay systems. These have included Drosophila, Saccharomyces and mammalian cell cultures. 6.1. Screening assays for mitotic recombination. A large number of chemicals have been investigated in the three Drosophila assay systems employed--the multiple wing hair/flare wing spot system developed by Graf et al., 1984, the white-ivory system developed by Green et al., 1986 and the white/white+ eye spot assay developed by Vogel (Vogel and Nivard, 1993). Particularly the screening of 181 chemicals, covering a wide array of chemical classes, by the last mentioned assay has shown that measurement of somatic recombination in Drosophila constitutes a sensitive and efficient short-term test which shows a remarkably good correlation with the agent score of 83 short-term tests analysed by ICPEMC (Mendelsohn et al., 1992; Table 2) as well as the assay performance in international collaborative programmes measuring carcinogen/non-carcinogens (de Serres and Ashby, 1981; Ashby et al., 1985, 1988). Also the wing spot assay has gained wide international recognition as a similarly sensitive test. These two assay systems in Drosophila measure both intrachromosomal events and interchromosomal recombination. The white-ivory system on the other hand is based on the loss of a tandem duplication in the white locus, the mechanism of which is less known, but probably involves intrachromosomal recombination. The difference in the mechanism between this assay and the former two was indicated by the lack of response to methotrexate in the white-ivory assay, while this compound was strongly recombinogenic in both the wing spot and white/white+ assays. The use of different strains of Drosophila with the white/white+ assay demonstrated the importance of the

  13. Performance testing of passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, T. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malliakos, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) have been under consideration in the U.S. as a combustible gas control system in advanced light water reactor (ALWR) containments for design basis and severe accidents. PARs do not require a source of power. Instead they use palladium or platinum as a catalyst to recombine hydrogen and oxygen gases into water vapor upon contact with the catalyst. Energy from the recombination of hydrogen with oxygen is released at a relatively slow but continuous rate into the containment which prevents the pressure from becoming too high. The heat produced creates strong buoyancy effects which increases the influx of the surrounding gases to the recombiner. These natural convective flow currents promote mixing of combustible gases in the containment. PARs are self-starting and self-feeding under a very wide range of conditions. The recombination rate of the PAR system needs to be great enough to keep the concentration of hydrogen (or oxygen) below acceptable limits. There are several catalytic recombiner concepts under development worldwide. The USNRC is evaluating a specific design of a PAR which is in an advanced stage of engineering development and has been proposed for ALWR designs. Sandia National laboratories (SNL), under the sponsorship and the direction of the USNRC, is conducting an experimental program to evaluate the performance of PARs. The PAR will be tested at the SURTSEY facility at SNL. The test plan currently includes the following experiments: experiments will be conducted to define the startup characteristics of PARs (i.e., to define what is the lowest hydrogen concentration that the PAR starts recombining the hydrogen with oxygen); experiments will be used to define the hydrogen depletion rate of PARs as a function of hydrogen concentration; and experiments will be used to define the PAR performance in the presence of high concentrations of steam. (author)

  14. Scintillation, Afterglow and Thermoluminescence of CsI:Tl,Sm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappers, L. A.; Bartram, R. H.; Hamilton, D. S.; Lempicki, A.; Brecher, C.; Gaysinskiy, V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Nagarkar, V. V.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments on co-doped CsI:Tl,Sm suggest that samarium electron traps scavenge electrons from thallium traps and that electrons subsequently released by samarium recombine non-radiatively with trapped holes, thus suppressing afterglow. These experiments support the inference that electrons tunnel freely between samarium ions and are trapped preferentially as substitutional Sm+ near VKA(Tl+) centers where non-radiative recombination is the rate-limiting step. Combined radioluminescence, afterglow and thermoluminescence on single-crystal samples of CsI:Tl and CsI:Tl,Sm, recorded sequentially at adjusted gain settings following low-temperature irradiation, reveal reversible radiation damage as well.

  15. Graded Recombination Layers for Multijunction Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Koleilat, Ghada I.

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehmsmeier Marc

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence.

  17. Molecular hydrogen in the cosmic recombination epoch

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar

    2010-01-01

    The advent of precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies has motivated correspondingly precise calculations of the cosmic recombination history. Cosmic recombination proceeds far out of equilibrium because of a "bottleneck" at the $n=2$ level of hydrogen: atoms can only reach the ground state via slow processes: two-photon decay or Lyman-$\\alpha$ resonance escape. However, even a small primordial abundance of molecules could have a large effect on the interline opacity in the recombination epoch and lead to an additional route for hydrogen recombination. Therefore, this paper computes the abundance of the H$_2$ molecule during the cosmic recombination epoch. Hydrogen molecules in the ground electronic levels X$^1\\Sigma^+_g$ can either form from the excited H$_2$ electronic levels B$^1\\Sigma^+_u$ and C$^1\\Pi_u$ or through the charged particles H$_2^+$, HeH$^+$ and H$^-$. We follow the transitions among all of these species, resolving the rotational and vibrational sub-levels. Si...

  18. Recombinant expression systems for allergen vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2006-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy of future is likely to be based on allergy vaccines that contain engineered allergens modified to abolish or substantially reduce their IgE-binding activity in order to remove the risk of unwanted anaphylactic responses. The development of efficient systems for the production of recombinant allergens in sufficient quantities is requirement for establishing use of engineered allergens as components of allergy vaccines. This review outlines relative advantages and disadvantages of various heterologous systems for production of recombinant allergens. Microbial systems are most convenient and cost effective platforms for the production of recombinant allergens. However, lack of post-translational processing implies that some allergens have to be expressed in eukaryotic systems for proper folding and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation. Yeast systems can yield high levels of recombinant allergens but often are associated with hyper- glycosylation problems. Mammalian cell culture systems offer suitable post -translational modifications but are nearly hundred fold more expensive than microbial systems. The use of plants as bio-factories for production of recombinant allergens is emerging as a very attractive option as plants-based production system offer several advantages over other expression systems such as post translational processing of proteins, low production costs, scale up ability and enhanced safety due to absence of animal or human pathogens.

  19. Prevalence of lipodystrophy associated with human recombinant insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Akbarzadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Lipodystrophy is potentially a clinical adverse effect, associated with insulin therapy and is believed that usage of human recombinant insulin’s is associated with decreasing prevalence of Lipodystrophy. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of insulin induced Lipodystrophy, among diabetic out-patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Sari during 2007.Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study, 220 diabetic patients referred to the Diabetes Center at Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Sari, who under treatment by insulin at least three months prior to referral was evaluated.First, the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded in a questionnaire; then all patients were examined clinically to evaluate lipodystrophy. In all subjects, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C was measured to assess the range of blood glucose level control. Recorded data were analyzed by statistical methods, such as descriptive T-test and X².Results: Of 220 diabetic patients studied, thirty-five (15.9% showed clinical evidences of insulin induced Lipodystrophy; 32 out of 35 cases of Lipodystrophic patients (14.5% had Lipohypertrophy, while 3 cases (1.4% had Lipoatrophy.The factors included Age, Sex, Education, BMI (Body mass index, type of Diabetes, The duration of insulin consumption and injection site had statistically significant effects on development of insulin induced Lipodystrophy (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that despite using human recombinant insulin’s, the prevalence of insulin induced lipodystrophy, especially Lipohypertrophy, has remained high up to present. Therefore, regular examination of patients for this side effect is necessary, especially in subjects without good control of blood glucose level.Prevalence of lipodystrophy associated with human recombinant insulinZ. Kashi, M.D. + Z. Hajheydari, M.D.* O. Akha, M.D. * S

  20. FIRST SYNOPTIC MAPS OF PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM SOLIS/VSM: NON-RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS AND HEMISPHERIC PATTERN OF HELICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosain, S.; Pevtsov, A. A. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rudenko, G. V.; Anfinogentov, S. A. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP), Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-20

    We use daily full-disk vector magnetograms from Vector Spectromagnetograph on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun system to synthesize the first Carrington maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field. We describe these maps and make a comparison of the observed radial field with the radial field estimate from line-of-sight magnetograms. Furthermore, we employ these maps to study the hemispheric pattern of current helicity density, H{sub c} , during the rising phase of solar cycle 24. The longitudinal average over the 23 consecutive solar rotations shows a clear signature of the hemispheric helicity rule, i.e., H{sub c} is predominantly negative in the north and positive in the south. Although our data include the early phase of cycle 24, there appears to be no evidence for a possible (systematic) reversal of the hemispheric helicity rule at the beginning of the cycle as predicted by some dynamo models. Furthermore, we compute the hemispheric pattern in active region latitudes (-30 Degree-Sign {<=} {theta} {<=} 30 Degree-Sign ) separately for weak (100 G < |B{sub r} | < 500 G) and strong (|B{sub r} | > 1000 G) radial magnetic fields. We find that while the current helicity of strong fields follows the well-known hemispheric rule (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} < 0), H{sub c} of weak fields exhibits an inverse hemispheric behavior (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} > 0), albeit with large statistical scatter. We discuss two plausible scenarios to explain the opposite hemispheric trend of helicity in weak and strong field regions.

  1. Genetics of meiosis and recombination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Schimenti, John C

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is one of the most critical developmental processes in sexually reproducing organisms. One round of DNA replication followed by two rounds of cell divisions results in generation of haploid gametes (sperm and eggs in mammals). Meiotic failure typically leads to infertility in mammals. In the process of meiotic recombination, maternal and paternal genomes are shuffled, creating new allelic combinations and thus genetic variety. However, in order to achieve this, meiotic cells must self-inflict DNA damage in the form of programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Complex processes evolved to ensure proper DSB repair, and to do so in a way that favors interhomolog reciprocal recombination and crossovers. The hallmark of meiosis, a structurally conserved proteinaceous structure called the synaptonemal complex, is found only in meiotic cells. Conversely, meiotic homologous recombination is an adaptation of the mitotic DNA repair process but involving specialized proteins. In this chapter, we summarize current developments in mammalian meiosis enabled by genetically modified mice.

  2. Recombinant human erythropoietin in sports: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Maia de Almeida Bento

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin is an endogenous hormone of glicoproteic nature secreted by the kidneys and is the main regulator of the erythropoiesis. An alteration in its production generates a disturbance in the plasmatic concentration giving rise to several types of pathologies related to the hematopoietic system. The recombinant forms of erythropoietin have indiscriminately been used by athletes, mainly in endurance sports, by increasing the erythrocytes concentration, generating a better delivery of oxygen to the muscle tissue. The administration of recombinant erythropoietin was prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and its use considered as doping. This review has the intention to describe the physical, biological and pharmacokinetic properties of the endogenous erythropoietin, as well as its recombinant form, describing also its use in sports and the process of searching methodologies for its detection in doping control.

  3. Recombination Processes and Nonlinear Markov Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogov, Sergey; Rybko, Alexander; Kalinina, Anastasia; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are known to exchange genetic information by horizontal gene transfer. Since the frequency of homologous recombination depends on the similarity between the recombining segments, several studies examined whether this could lead to the emergence of subspecies. Most of them simulated fixed-size Wright-Fisher populations, in which the genetic drift should be taken into account. Here, we use nonlinear Markov processes to describe a bacterial population evolving under mutation and recombination. We consider a population structure as a probability measure on the space of genomes. This approach implies the infinite population size limit, and thus, the genetic drift is not assumed. We prove that under these conditions, the emergence of subspecies is impossible.

  4. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions challenging genome integrity. The DNA damage response (DDR) promotes fast and effective detection and repair of the damaged DNA, leading to cell cycle arrest through checkpoint activation and the recruitment of repair...... factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations....... In this study I present new insights for the role of SUMOylation in regulating HR by dissecting the role of SUMO in the interaction between the central HR-mediator protein Rad52 and its paralogue Rad59 and the outcome of recombination. This data provides evidence for the importance of SUMO in promoting protein...

  5. Generation of Modified Pestiviruses by Targeted Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Friis, Martin Barfred; Risager, Peter Christian

    involves targeted modification of viral cDNA genomes, cloned within BACs, by Red/ET recombination-mediated mutagenesis in E.coli DH10B cells. Using recombination-mediated mutagenesis for the targeted design, the work can be expedited and focused in principal on any sequence within the viral genome......Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of pestivirus RNA genomes. We have developed a novel strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of modified pestiviruses from infectious cDNA clones based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The strategy...... and hence is not limited to the use of internal restriction sites. Rescue of modified pestiviruses can be obtained by electroporation of cell cultures with full-length RNA transcripts in vitro transcribed from the recombined BAC clones. We have used this approach to generate a series of new pestivirus BACs...

  6. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  7. RSW Cell Centered Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New cell centered grids are generated to complement the node-centered ones uploaded. Six tarballs containing the coarse, medium, and fine mixed-element and pure tet....

  8. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external) within the A. James Clark School...

  9. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  10. Automating the Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  11. National Rehabilitation Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including News and Notes) Welcome to the National Rehabilitation Information Center! We are conducting improvements to the ... experience. We apologize for any inconvenience The National Rehabilitation Information Center ( NARIC ) is the library of the ...

  12. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  13. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  14. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  15. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  16. BKG Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  17. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  18. Center of Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, J. Steven; Wood-Steed, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how college and university student centers are becoming the institution's marketing tools. Explores how the Millennium Center at the University of Missouri in St. Louis exemplifies this new trend. (GR)

  19. The Comprehensive Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gary T.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study of community college learning resource centers as they exist today and examines some emerging functions which point toward the role of the center in the future. (DC)

  20. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid & Attendance & Housebound Caregivers Community Living Centers (CLC) Community Nursing Homes Domiciliaries (Please contact your local VA Medical Center) Homemaker & Home Health Aid Care Hospice and Palliative Care State Veterans ...

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  2. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  3. Exposing the Data Center

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejev, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid growth in the importance of the Internet, data centers - the buildings that store information on the web - are quickly becoming the most critical infrastructural objects in the world. However, so far they have received very little, if any, architectural attention. This thesis proclaims data centers to be the 'churches' of the digital society and proposes a new type of a publicly accessible data center. The thesis starts with a brief overview of the history of data centers ...

  4. Quantum Electrodynamics Theory of Laser Assisted Recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敖淑艳; 程太旺; 李晓峰; 潘守甫; 傅盘铭

    2003-01-01

    Using a formal scattering theoretical approach, we develop a nonperturbative quantum electrodynamics theory to describe laser assisted recombination (LAR), in which an electron initially in the quantized Volkov state recombines with an ion and emits a high-energy photon with frequency defined by energy conservation laws.The transition probability is expressed as an analytic closed form and the spectrum of LAR reflects mainly the properties of general Bessel functions. For the case of a fast electron the LAR spectrum is confined in a well-defined range, while for a slow electron, the LAR spectrum exhibits a double-plateau structure.

  5. Thermal Recombination: Beyond the Valence Quark Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, B; Bass, S A

    2005-01-01

    Quark counting rules derived from recombination models agree well with data on hadron production at intermediate transverse momenta in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. They convey a simple picture of hadrons consisting only of valence quarks. We discuss the inclusion of higher Fock states that add sea quarks and gluons to the hadron structure. We show that, when recombination occurs from a thermal medium, hadron spectra remain unaffected by the inclusion of higher Fock states. However, the quark number scaling for elliptic flow is somewhat affected. We discuss the implications for our understanding of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  6. Breaking the sound barrier in recombination fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, R J R

    1995-01-01

    We exploit a generic instability in the integration of steady, sonic near-isothermal flows to find the complete transition diagram for recombination fronts (for a model system of equations). The instability requires the integration of the flow equations for speeds between the isothermal and adiabatic sound speeds to be performed with particular care. As a result of this, the previous work of Newman & Axford on the structure of recombination fronts neglected an important class of solution, that of transonic fronts; our method is readily extensible to a more complete treatment of the ionization structure. Future papers will apply these results in models of the structure of ultracompact HII regions.

  7. Data center cooling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  8. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  9. T cell receptor gene recombinations in human tumor specimen exome files: detection of T cell receptor-β VDJ recombinations associates with a favorable oncologic outcome for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Mohammad D; Tong, Wei Lue; Yavorski, John M; Sexton, Wade J; Blanck, George

    2017-03-01

    Understanding tumor-resident T cells is important for cancer prognosis and treatment options. Conventional, solid tumor specimen exome files can be searched directly for recombined T cell receptor (TcR)-α segments; RNASeq files can include TcR-β VDJ recombinations. To learn whether there are medically relevant uses of exome-based detection of TcR V(D)J recombinations in the tumor microenvironment, we searched cancer genome atlas and Moffitt Cancer Center, tumor specimen exome files for TcR-β, TcR-γ, and TcR-δ recombinations, for bladder and stomach cancer. We found that bladder cancer exomes with productive TcR-β recombinations had a significant association with No Subsequent Tumors and a positive response to drug treatments, with p < 0.004, p < 0.05, and p < 0.004, depending on the sample sets examined. We also discovered the opportunity to detect productive TcR-γ and TcR-δ recombinations in the tumor microenvironment, via the tumor specimen exome files.

  10. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W

    1997-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer (Emu) not only stimulates transcription but also V(D)J recombination of chromosomally integrated recombination substrates. We aimed at reproducing this effect in recombination competent cells by transient transfection of extrachromosomal substrates...... respectively, can markedly affect the frequency of V(D)J recombination. We report that the entire Emu, the Emu core as well as its flanking 5' and 3' matrix associated regions (5' and 3' MARs) upregulate V(D)J recombination while the downstream section of the 3' MAR of Emu does not. Also, prokaryotic sequences...

  11. A call center primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  12. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  13. Recombinant CBM-fusion technology - Applications overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Carvalho, Vera; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are small components of several enzymes, which present an independent fold and function, and specific carbohydrate-binding activity. Their major function is to bind the enzyme to the substrate enhancing its catalytic activity, especially in the case of insoluble substrates. The immense diversity of CBMs, together with their unique properties, has long raised their attention for many biotechnological applications. Recombinant DNA technology has been used for cloning and characterizing new CBMs. In addition, it has been employed to improve the purity and availability of many CBMs, but mainly, to construct bi-functional CBM-fused proteins for specific applications. This review presents a comprehensive summary of the uses of CBMs recombinantly produced from heterologous organisms, or by the original host, along with the latest advances. Emphasis is given particularly to the applications of recombinant CBM-fusions in: (a) modification of fibers, (b) production, purification and immobilization of recombinant proteins, (c) functionalization of biomaterials and (d) development of microarrays and probes.

  14. Expression and characterization of recombinant ecarin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonebring, A.; Lange, U.; Bucha, E.; Deinum, J.; Elg, M.; Lovgren, A.

    2012-01-01

    The snake venom protease ecarin from Echis carinatus was expressed in stable transfected CHO-S cells grown in animal component free cell culture medium. Recombinant ecarin (r-ecarin) was secreted from the suspension adapted Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO-S) host cells as a pro-protein and activation to

  15. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  16. Recombinant MVA vaccines: dispelling the myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Matthew G; Carroll, Miles W

    2013-09-06

    Diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and cancer are prime targets for prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination, but have proven partially or wholly resistant to traditional approaches to vaccine design. New vaccines based on recombinant viral vectors expressing a foreign antigen are under intense development for these and other indications. One of the most advanced and most promising vectors is the attenuated, non-replicating poxvirus MVA (modified vaccinia virus Ankara), a safer derivative of the uniquely successful smallpox vaccine. Despite the ability of recombinant MVA to induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses against transgenic antigen in humans, especially when used as the latter element of a heterologous prime-boost regimen, doubts are occasionally expressed about the ultimate feasibility of this approach. In this review, five common misconceptions over recombinant MVA are discussed, and evidence is cited to show that recombinant MVA is at least sufficiently genetically stable, manufacturable, safe, and immunogenic (even in the face of prior anti-vector immunity) to warrant reasonable hope over the feasibility of large-scale deployment, should useful levels of protection against target pathogens, or therapeutic benefit for cancer, be demonstrated in efficacy trials.

  17. Recombinant protein blends: silk beyond natural design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjaski, Nina; Kaplan, David L

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant DNA technology and new material concepts are shaping future directions in biomaterial science for the design and production of the next-generation biomaterial platforms. Aside from conventionally used synthetic polymers, numerous natural biopolymers (e.g., silk, elastin, collagen, gelatin, alginate, cellulose, keratin, chitin, polyhydroxyalkanoates) have been investigated for properties and manipulation via bioengineering. Genetic engineering provides a path to increase structural and functional complexity of these biopolymers, and thereby expand the catalog of available biomaterials beyond that which exists in nature. In addition, the integration of experimental approaches with computational modeling to analyze sequence-structure-function relationships is starting to have an impact in the field by establishing predictive frameworks for determining material properties. Herein, we review advances in recombinant DNA-mediated protein production and functionalization approaches, with a focus on hybrids or combinations of proteins; recombinant protein blends or 'recombinamers'. We highlight the potential biomedical applications of fibrous protein recombinamers, such as Silk-Elastin Like Polypeptides (SELPs) and Silk-Bacterial Collagens (SBCs). We also discuss the possibility for the rationale design of fibrous proteins to build smart, stimuli-responsive biomaterials for diverse applications. We underline current limitations with production systems for these proteins and discuss the main trends in systems/synthetic biology that may improve recombinant fibrous protein design and production.

  18. Evidence for homologous recombination in Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Pablo E; Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Perez, Germán R; Stella, Emma J; Giri, Adriana A

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, causes acute fever and joint pain in humans. Recently, endemic CHIKV infection outbreaks have jeopardized public health in wider geographical regions. Here, we analyze the phylogenetic associations of CHIKV and explore the potential recombination events on 152 genomic isolates deposited in GenBank database. The CHIKV genotypes [West African, Asian, East/Central/South African (ECSA)], and a clear division of ECSA clade into three sub-groups (I-II-III), were defined by Bayesian analysis; similar results were obtained using E1 gene sequences. A nucleotide identity-based approach is provided to facilitate CHIKV classification within ECSA clade. Using seven methods to detect recombination, we found a statistically significant event (p-values range: 1.14×10(-7)-4.45×10(-24)) located within the nsP3 coding region. This finding was further confirmed by phylogenetic networks (PHI Test, p=0.004) and phylogenetic tree incongruence analysis. The recombinant strain, KJ679578/India/2011 (ECSA III), derives from viruses of ECSA III and ECSA I. Our study demonstrates that recombination is an additional mechanism of genetic diversity in CHIKV that might assist in the cross-species transmission process.

  19. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  20. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion

  1. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  2. Expression and characterization of recombinant ecarin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonebring, A.; Lange, U.; Bucha, E.; Deinum, J.; Elg, M.; Lovgren, A.

    2012-01-01

    The snake venom protease ecarin from Echis carinatus was expressed in stable transfected CHO-S cells grown in animal component free cell culture medium. Recombinant ecarin (r-ecarin) was secreted from the suspension adapted Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO-S) host cells as a pro-protein and activation to

  3. Haemostatic effects of recombinant coagulation factor VIIa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, Johannes Antonius

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant coagulation factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has recently become available for treatment of patients with inhibitor-complicated haemophilia. It has been postulated that rFVIIa could become a universal haemostatic agent. Case reports and small studies confirm efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in a

  4. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  5. Recombinant Supercharged Polypeptides Restore and Improve Biolubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeregowda, Deepak H.; Kolbe, Anke; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Herrmann, Andreas; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant supercharged polypeptides (SUPs) with low cytotoxicity are developed and applied to rejuvenate the lubrication of naturally occurring salivary conditioning films (SCFs). SUPs with 72 positive charges adsorbed and rigidified the SCFs and recruited mucins to form a hydrated layer. These SC

  6. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion art

  7. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Faculty Technology, B-41, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-04-15

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments.

  8. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  9. Science: The Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Susan

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the status of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and attempts to rationalize Suburban Highway Policy. Effective communication among members of the RAC is a current problem facing the committee. A federal transportation priority spending policy is suggested during these times of money and fuel shortages. (MA)

  10. Recombinant DNA: Scientific and Social Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegrift, Vaughn

    1979-01-01

    This article is designed to inform chemical educators not engaged in this technology as to the nature and methods used in the technology, the reasons for scientific and social concern, and the attempts made to assuage concerns involving recombinant DNA research. (author/BB)

  11. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... 1The Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi ... might play a role in a broad range of molecular and ... The resulting recombinant expression vector pPIC9K/ HSA-CP was.

  12. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus recombinant vaccine associated lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojaimi, Samar; Buttery, Jim P; Korman, Tony M

    2009-08-06

    Involutional lipoatrophy, a loss of subcutaneous fat, may be idiopathic, associated with inflammatory skin conditions, or trauma, and has also been reported following injections of medications including insulin, corticosteroids and penicillin. There have also been reports in association with Diptheria Pertussis Tetanus (DPT) vaccine. We report on two cases of lipoatrophy associated with the new Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) recombinant vaccine (Gardasil).

  13. Oxygen Atom Recombination in Carbon Dioxide Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Corey; Garcia, R. M.; Pejakovic, D. A.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding processes involving atomic oxygen is crucial for the study and modeling of composition, energy transfer, airglow, and transport dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Significant gaps and uncertainties exist in our understanding of the above processes, and often the relevant input from laboratory measurements is missing or outdated. We are conducting experiments to measure the rate coefficients for O + O + CO2 and O + O2 + CO2 recombination and investigate the O2 excited states produced following O-atom recombination. These laboratory measurements are key input for a quantitative understanding and reliable modeling of the atmospheres of the CO2 planets and their airglow. An ArF excimer laser with 193-nm pulsed output radiation is employed to partially photodissociate carbon dioxide. In an ambient-pressure (760 Torr) background of CO2, the O atoms produced recombine in a time scale of a few milliseconds. Detection of laser-induced fluorescence at 845 nm following two-photon excitation near 226 nm monitors the decay of the oxygen atom population. From the temporal evolution of the signal we can extract the rate coefficients for recombination of O + O and O + O2 in the presence of CO2. We also use fluorescence and resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization techniques to detect the products of the O-atom recombination and subsequent relaxation in CO2. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation's (NSF) Planetary Astronomy Program. Rosanne Garcia's participation was funded by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program.

  14. A molecular recombination map of Antirrhinum majus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Andrew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic recombination maps provide important frameworks for comparative genomics, identifying gene functions, assembling genome sequences and for breeding. The molecular recombination map currently available for the model eudicot Antirrhinum majus is the result of a cross with Antirrhinum molle, limiting its usefulness within A. majus. Results We created a molecular linkage map of A. majus based on segregation of markers in the F2 population of two inbred lab strains of A. majus. The resulting map consisted of over 300 markers in eight linkage groups, which could be aligned with a classical recombination map and the A. majus karyotype. The distribution of recombination frequencies and distorted transmission of parental alleles differed from those of a previous inter-species hybrid. The differences varied in magnitude and direction between chromosomes, suggesting that they had multiple causes. The map, which covered an estimated of 95% of the genome with an average interval of 2 cM, was used to analyze the distribution of a newly discovered family of MITE transposons and tested for its utility in positioning seven mutations that affect aspects of plant size. Conclusions The current map has an estimated interval of 1.28 Mb between markers. It shows a lower level of transmission ratio distortion and a longer length than the previous inter-species map, making it potentially more useful. The molecular recombination map further indicates that the IDLE MITE transposons are distributed throughout the genome and are relatively stable. The map proved effective in mapping classical morphological mutations of A. majus.

  15. Regulation of V(D)J recombination by nucleosome positioning at recombination signal sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Matthias; Mamais, Adamantios; McBlane, Fraser; Xiao, Hua; Boyes, Joan

    2003-10-01

    A key component in the regulation of V(D)J recombination is control of the accessibility of RAG proteins to recombination signal sequences (RSS). Nucleosomes are known to inhibit this accessibility. We show here that the signal sequence itself represses accessibility by causing nucleosome positioning over the RSS. This positioning is mediated, in vitro and in vivo, by the conserved nonamer of the RSS. Consistent with this strong positioning, nucleosomes at RSSs are resistant to remodelling by nucleosome sliding. In vivo we find that consensus RSSs are preferentially protected, whereas those that lack a consensus nonamer, including some cryptic RSSs, fail to position nucleosomes. Decreased protection of these non-consensus RSSs correlates with their increased use in recombination assays. We therefore suggest that nucleosome positioning by RSSs provides a previously unanticipated level of protection and regulation of V(D)J recombination.

  16. Detecting and Analyzing Genetic Recombination Using RDP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Darren P; Murrell, Ben; Khoosal, Arjun; Muhire, Brejnev

    2017-01-01

    Recombination between nucleotide sequences is a major process influencing the evolution of most species on Earth. The evolutionary value of recombination has been widely debated and so too has its influence on evolutionary analysis methods that assume nucleotide sequences replicate without recombining. When nucleic acids recombine, the evolution of the daughter or recombinant molecule cannot be accurately described by a single phylogeny. This simple fact can seriously undermine the accuracy of any phylogenetics-based analytical approach which assumes that the evolutionary history of a set of recombining sequences can be adequately described by a single phylogenetic tree. There are presently a large number of available methods and associated computer programs for analyzing and characterizing recombination in various classes of nucleotide sequence datasets. Here we examine the use of some of these methods to derive and test recombination hypotheses using multiple sequence alignments.

  17. The $\\Lambda_0$ Polarization and the Recombination Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Corral, G; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Simão, F R A; Montaño, Luis M.

    1997-01-01

    We use the recombination and the Thomas Precession Model to obtain a prediction for the $\\Lambda _0$ polarization in the $p+p \\to \\Lambda_0+X$ reaction. We study the effect of the recombination function on the

  18. Caenorhabditis briggsae recombinant inbred line genotypes reveal inter-strain incompatibility and the evolution of recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Ross

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae is an emerging model organism that allows evolutionary comparisons with C. elegans and exploration of its own unique biological attributes. To produce a high-resolution C. briggsae recombination map, recombinant inbred lines were generated from reciprocal crosses between two strains and genotyped at over 1,000 loci. A second set of recombinant inbred lines involving a third strain was also genotyped at lower resolution. The resulting recombination maps exhibit discrete domains of high and low recombination, as in C. elegans, indicating these are a general feature of Caenorhabditis species. The proportion of a chromosome's physical size occupied by the central, low-recombination domain is highly correlated between species. However, the C. briggsae intra-species comparison reveals striking variation in the distribution of recombination between domains. Hybrid lines made with the more divergent pair of strains also exhibit pervasive marker transmission ratio distortion, evidence of selection acting on hybrid genotypes. The strongest effect, on chromosome III, is explained by a developmental delay phenotype exhibited by some hybrid F2 animals. In addition, on chromosomes IV and V, cross direction-specific biases towards one parental genotype suggest the existence of cytonuclear epistatic interactions. These interactions are discussed in relation to surprising mitochondrial genome polymorphism in C. briggsae, evidence that the two strains diverged in allopatry, the potential for local adaptation, and the evolution of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities. The genetic and genomic resources resulting from this work will support future efforts to understand inter-strain divergence as well as facilitate studies of gene function, natural variation, and the evolution of recombination in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  19. Regulation of V(D)J recombination by nucleosome positioning at recombination signal sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Matthias; Mamais, Adamantios; McBlane, Fraser; Xiao, Hua; Boyes, Joan

    2003-01-01

    A key component in the regulation of V(D)J recombination is control of the accessibility of RAG proteins to recombination signal sequences (RSS). Nucleosomes are known to inhibit this accessibility. We show here that the signal sequence itself represses accessibility by causing nucleosome positioning over the RSS. This positioning is mediated, in vitro and in vivo, by the conserved nonamer of the RSS. Consistent with this strong positioning, nucleosomes at RSSs are resistant to remodelling by...

  20. Photocarrier dynamics near V-shaped pits in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Taeho; Li, Xiang-Shu; Ko, Dong-Su; Won, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Seong-Heon [Analytical Science Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Joosung; Tak, Youngjo; Kim, Jun-Youn [GaN Device Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gyeong-Su [Analytical Science Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eunha, E-mail: eunhayo.lee@samsung.com [Analytical Science Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-03

    Highlights: • Correlations between carrier dynamics and structural defects of InGaN MQWs exist. • PL intensity is much weaker in the V-shaped pits than in the regular c-plane. • Blue-shifted photoluminescence spectrum is not observed at the V-pits. • A kinetic model including carriers recombination and diffusion is presented. • The model estimates the nonradiative recombination time as 10 ps at the V-pits. - Abstract: Space- and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) has been employed to investigate correlations between the carrier dynamics and structural defects known as V-shaped pits in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The pits exhibit much lower PL intensity compared to MQWs of the normal c-plane indicating a high density of nonradiative recombination centers in the pits. However, the PL peak wavelength, which is expected to experience a blueshift at the pits due to the stronger confinement effect and reduced quantum-confined Stark effect, do not show any spatial dependence that is correlated with the defects. This is ascribed to dominant ultrafast (<10 ps) nonradiative recombination at the pits and additional diffusion into the c-plane leading to radiative recombination. By contrast, weak but clear correlations between the pits and PL decay time were observed on nanosecond timescales. This can be explained by a kinetic model that includes the nonradiative recombination and diffusion of carriers at the pits.

  1. Orientation-dependent perimeter recombination in GaAs diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, T.B.; Melloch, M.R.; Lundstrom, M.S.; Carpenter, M.S.; Pierret, R.F. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA))

    1990-04-23

    Perimeter recombination currents affect the performance of GaAs-based devices such as solar cells, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and injection lasers. We report that the {ital n}{congruent}2 perimeter recombination current has a strong orientation dependence. More than a factor of five variation in the surface recombination current at mesa-etched edges has been observed. These results suggest that with proper device design, perimeter recombination currents could be substantially reduced.

  2. Orientation-dependent perimeter recombination in GaAs diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellwag, T. B.; Melloch, M. R.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Carpenter, M. S.; Pierret, R. F.

    1990-04-01

    Perimeter recombination currents affect the performance of GaAs-based devices such as solar cells, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and injection lasers. We report that the n≂2 perimeter recombination current has a strong orientation dependence. More than a factor of five variation in the surface recombination current at mesa-etched edges has been observed. These results suggest that with proper device design, perimeter recombination currents could be substantially reduced.

  3. Mechanisms and factors that influence high frequency retroviral recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga;

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse t......, and vaccine development....... transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity...

  4. Mechanisms and factors that influence high frequency retroviral recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga;

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse...... transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity......, and vaccine development....

  5. Population-specific recombination sites within the human MHC region

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Genetic rearrangement by recombination is one of the major driving forces for genome evolution, and recombination is known to occur in non-random, discreet recombination sites within the genome. Mapping of recombination sites has proved to be difficult, particularly, in the human MHC region that is complicated by both population variation and highly polymorphic HLA genes. To overcome these problems, HLA-typed individuals from three representative populations: Asian, European an...

  6. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B. [PPPL; Gobbin, M. [Euratom-ENEA Association

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  7. Test Control Center exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  8. An enhanced surface passivation effect in InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire light emitting diodes for mitigating Shockley–Read–Hall recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2015-07-24

    We present a detailed study on the effects of dangling bond passivation and the comparison of different sulfides passivation process on the properties of InGaN/GaN quantum-disk (Qdisk)-in-nanowire based light emitting diodes (NW-LEDs). Our results demonstrated the first organic sulfide passivation process for nitride nanowires (NWs). The results from Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed octadecylthiol (ODT) effectively passivated the surface states, and altered the surface dynamic charge, thereby recovered the band-edge emission. The effectiveness of the process with passivation duration was also studied. Moreover, we also compared the electro-optical performance of NW-LEDs emitting at green wavelength before and after ODT passivation. We have shown that the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) non-radiative recombination of NW-LEDs can be greatly reduced after passivation by ODT, which led to a much faster increasing trend of quantum efficiency, and higher peak efficiency. Our results highlighted the research opportunity in employing this technique for further design and realization of high performance NW-LEDs and NW-lasers.

  9. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  10. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  11. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  12. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  13. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  14. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  15. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  16. Data Center at NICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  17. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  18. Surgery center joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  19. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  20. Airline Operation Center Workstation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airline Operation Center Workstation (AOC Workstation) represents equipment available to users of the National Airspace system, outside of the FAA, that enables...

  1. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  2. Replication, recombination, and repair: going for the gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hannah L; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2002-03-01

    DNA recombination is now appreciated to be integral to DNA replication and cell survival. Recombination allows replication to successfully maneuver through the roadblocks of damaged or collapsed replication forks. The signals and controls that permit cells to transition between replication and recombination modes are now being identified.

  3. Plasmid-to-plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    No recombination between plasmids was observed after conjugal transfer of a plasmid into a cell carrying another plasmid. Two types of such recombination took place after transformation, one type being Rec/sup +/ dependent and suggesting a preferred site of recombination. The other much rarer type was at least partially Rec/sup +/ independent.

  4. The Use of Low-Dose Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Treat a Preterm Infant with an Intrauterine Spontaneous Arterial Thromboembolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Demirelli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal thromboembolic events are rare, and only a few cases of intrauterine spontaneous arterial thromboembolisms have been reported in the literature. Thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is usually the preferred treatment because it has a short half-life, fewer systemic side effects, and a strong, specific affinity for fibrin. Protocols vary from center to center, but there is still no consensus regarding the proper dosage or treatment duration. Herein, we present the case of an intrauterine spontaneous arterial thromboembolism in a preterm infant that completely resolved after being treated with low-dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (0.02 mg/kg/h.

  5. The unconventional Xer recombination machinery of Streptococci/Lactococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Le Bourgeois

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination between circular sister chromosomes during DNA replication in bacteria can generate chromosome dimers that must be resolved into monomers prior to cell division. In Escherichia coli, dimer resolution is achieved by site-specific recombination, Xer recombination, involving two paralogous tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, and a 28-bp recombination site (dif located at the junction of the two replication arms. Xer recombination is tightly controlled by the septal protein FtsK. XerCD recombinases and FtsK are found on most sequenced eubacterial genomes, suggesting that the Xer recombination system as described in E. coli is highly conserved among prokaryotes. We show here that Streptococci and Lactococci carry an alternative Xer recombination machinery, organized in a single recombination module. This corresponds to an atypical 31-bp recombination site (dif(SL associated with a dedicated tyrosine recombinase (XerS. In contrast to the E. coli Xer system, only a single recombinase is required to recombine dif(SL, suggesting a different mechanism in the recombination process. Despite this important difference, XerS can only perform efficient recombination when dif(SL sites are located on chromosome dimers. Moreover, the XerS/dif(SL recombination requires the streptococcal protein FtsK(SL, probably without the need for direct protein-protein interaction, which we demonstrated to be located at the division septum of Lactococcus lactis. Acquisition of the XerS recombination module can be considered as a landmark of the separation of Streptococci/Lactococci from other firmicutes and support the view that Xer recombination is a conserved cellular function in bacteria, but that can be achieved by functional analogs.

  6. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-alpha line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, the impact of some previously ignored radiative transfer effects is calculated. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-alpha line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-alpha line blueward of the hydrogen ...

  7. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  8. CFD Analysis of Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of hydrogen could be produced following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA along with nonavailability of emergency core cooling system (ECCS. Passive autocatalytic recombiners (PAR are implemented in the containment of water-cooled power reactors to mitigate the risk of hydrogen combustion. In the presence of hydrogen with available oxygen, a catalytic reaction occurs spontaneously at the catalyst surfaces below conventional ignition concentration limits and temperature and even in presence of steam. Heat of reaction produces natural convection flow through the enclosure and promotes mixing in the containment. For the assessment of the PAR performance in terms of maximum temperature of catalyst surface and outlet hydrogen concentration an in-house 3D CFD model has been developed. The code has been used to study the mechanism of catalytic recombination and has been tested for two literature-quoted experiments.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  10. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  11. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  12. Information Centers at NAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Robyn C.

    1989-01-01

    Descriptions of the 12 specialized information centers of the National Agricultural Library (NAL) include subject coverage, information services provided, information technologies used, and staffing. The development of the Rural Information Center, a joint venture between the Extension Service and NAL to provide information services to local…

  13. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  14. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Search Enter your ... Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact Us FAQs ...

  16. Auger recombination via defects in tellurium. [Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Yu.I.; Rubo, Yu.G.; Snitko, O.V.; Strikha, M.V. (Inst. of Semiconductors, Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR))

    1990-12-01

    Auger process including a bound electron and two free holes proved to be the dominant recombination path in tellurium at low temperatures (T < 50 K). The experimental value of the Auger constant is C = 1.6x10{sup -28} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The theoretical model considering the tellurium band structure explains the experimental data qualitatively and gives an order of magnitude value for the lifetimes of excess carriers. (orig.).

  17. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches.

  18. Dielectronic recombination rate in statistical model

    OpenAIRE

    Demura A.V.; Leontyev D.S.; Lisitsa V.S.; Shurigyn V.A.

    2017-01-01

    The dielectronic recombination rate of multielectron ions was calculated by means of the statistical approach. It is based on an idea of collective excitations of atomic electrons with the local plasma frequencies. These frequencies are expressed via the Thomas-Fermi model electron density distribution. The statistical approach provides fast computation of DR rates that are compared with the modern quantum mechanical calculations. The results are important for current studies of thermonuclear...

  19. Dielectronic recombination rate in statistical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demura A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dielectronic recombination rate of multielectron ions was calculated by means of the statistical approach. It is based on an idea of collective excitations of atomic electrons with the local plasma frequencies. These frequencies are expressed via the Thomas-Fermi model electron density distribution. The statistical approach provides fast computation of DR rates that are compared with the modern quantum mechanical calculations. The results are important for current studies of thermonuclear plasmas with the tungsten impurities.

  20. Dielectronic recombination rate in statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, A. V.; Leontyev, D. S.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurigyn, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    The dielectronic recombination rate of multielectron ions was calculated by means of the statistical approach. It is based on an idea of collective excitations of atomic electrons with the local plasma frequencies. These frequencies are expressed via the Thomas-Fermi model electron density distribution. The statistical approach provides fast computation of DR rates that are compared with the modern quantum mechanical calculations. The results are important for current studies of thermonuclear plasmas with the tungsten impurities.

  1. DSMC Modeling of Flows with Recombination Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    rarefied gas dynamics community has seen the development of efficient algorithms for modern computer architectures16–19 which dramatically expand the area of...that participate in recombination. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The work was supported by the Air Force Office of Sci - entific Research (Program Officer Dr. Ivett...flow,” Prog. Aerosp. Sci . 72, 66–79 (2015). 14R. D. Levine,Molecular Reaction Dynamics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2005). 15A. Alexeenko and

  2. Size effects on generation recombination noise

    OpenAIRE

    Gomila, G.; Reggiani, L.

    2002-01-01

    We carry out an analytical theory of generation-recombination noise for a two level resistor model which goes beyond those presently available by including the effects of both space charge fluctuations and diffusion current. Finite size effects are found responsible for the saturation of the low frequency current spectral density at high enough applied voltages. The saturation behaviour is controlled essentially by the correlations coming from the long range Coulomb interaction. It is suggest...

  3. Recombination and the nature of bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Genetic surveys are uncovering the diversity of bacteria, and are causing the species concepts used to categorize these to be questioned. One difficulty in defining bacterial species arises from the high rates of recombination that results in the transfer of DNA between relatively distantly related bacteria. Barriers to this process, which could be used to define species naturally, are not apparent. Here, we have reviewed conceptual models of bacterial speciation and simulate speciation in si...

  4. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  5. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  6. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  7. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W; Kuenzle, C C

    1997-06-15

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer (Emu) not only stimulates transcription but also V(D)J recombination of chromosomally integrated recombination substrates. We aimed at reproducing this effect in recombination competent cells by transient transfection of extrachromosomal substrates. These we prepared by interposing between the recombination signal sequences (RSS) of the plasmid pBlueRec various fragments, including Emu, possibly affecting V(D)J recombination. Our work shows that sequences inserted between RSS 23 and RSS 12, with distances from their proximal ends of 26 and 284 bp respectively, can markedly affect the frequency of V(D)J recombination. We report that the entire Emu, the Emu core as well as its flanking 5' and 3' matrix associated regions (5' and 3' MARs) upregulate V(D)J recombination while the downstream section of the 3' MAR of Emu does not. Also, prokaryotic sequences markedly suppress V(D)J recombination. This confirms previous results obtained with chromosomally integrated substrates, except for the finding that the full length 3' MAR of Emu stimulates V(D)J recombination in an episomal but not in a chromosomal context. The fact that other MARs do not share this activity suggests that the effect is no mediated through attachment of the recombination substrate to a nuclear matrix-associated recombination complex but through cis-activation. The presence of a 26 bp A-T-rich sequence motif in the 5' and 3' MARs of Emu and in all of the other upregulating fragments investigated, leads us to propose that the motif represents a novel recombinational enhancer element distinct from those constituting the Emu core.

  8. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Localization of recombination proteins and Srs2 reveals anti-recombinase function in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Lisby, Michael; Altmannova, Veronika

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), although an important DNA repair mechanism, is dangerous to the cell if improperly regulated. The Srs2 "anti-recombinase" restricts HR by disassembling the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament, an intermediate preceding the exchange of homologous DNA strands. Here, we...... cytologically characterize Srs2 function in vivo and describe a novel mechanism for regulating the initiation of HR. We find that Srs2 is recruited separately to replication and repair centers and identify the genetic requirements for recruitment. In the absence of Srs2 activity, Rad51 foci accumulate......, and surprisingly, can form in the absence of Rad52 mediation. However, these Rad51 foci do not represent repair-proficient filaments, as determined by recombination assays. Antagonistic roles for Rad52 and Srs2 in Rad51 filament formation are also observed in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Srs2...

  10. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhuanying; Tang Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Li Meiru [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen Lei; Xu Jie [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Goujiang [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li Hongqing, E-mail: hqli@scnu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10{sup -5} recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  11. Relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in transfected DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D B; Wilson, J H

    1985-05-01

    Both homologous and nonhomologous recombination events occur at high efficiency in DNA molecules transfected into mammalian cells. Both types of recombination occur with similar overall efficiencies, as measured by an endpoint assay, but their relative rates are unknown. In this communication, we measure the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in DNA transfected into monkey cells. This measurement is made by using a linear simian virus 40 genome that contains a 131-base-pair duplication at its termini. Once inside the cell, this molecule must circularize to initiate lytic infection. Circularization can occur either by direct, nonhomologous end-joining or by homologous recombination within the duplicated region. Although the products of the two recombination pathways are different, they are equally infectious. Since homologous and nonhomologous recombination processes are competing for the same substrate, the relative amounts of the products of each pathway should reflect the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination. Analysis of individual recombinant genomes from 164 plaques indicates that the rate of circularization by nonhomologous recombination is 2- to 3-fold higher than the rate of homologous recombination. The assay system described here may prove to be useful for testing procedures designed to influence the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination.

  12. Antagonistic experimental coevolution with a parasite increases host recombination frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstes Niels AG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the big remaining challenges in evolutionary biology is to understand the evolution and maintenance of meiotic recombination. As recombination breaks down successful genotypes, it should be selected for only under very limited conditions. Yet, recombination is very common and phylogenetically widespread. The Red Queen Hypothesis is one of the most prominent hypotheses for the adaptive value of recombination and sexual reproduction. The Red Queen Hypothesis predicts an advantage of recombination for hosts that are coevolving with their parasites. We tested predictions of the hypothesis with experimental coevolution using the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its microsporidian parasite, Nosema whitei. Results By measuring recombination directly in the individuals under selection, we found that recombination in the host population was increased after 11 generations of coevolution. Detailed insights into genotypic and phenotypic changes occurring during the coevolution experiment furthermore helped us to reconstruct the coevolutionary dynamics that were associated with this increase in recombination frequency. As coevolved lines maintained higher genetic diversity than control lines, and because there was no evidence for heterozygote advantage or for a plastic response of recombination to infection, the observed increase in recombination most likely represented an adaptive host response under Red Queen dynamics. Conclusions This study provides direct, experimental evidence for an increase in recombination frequency under host-parasite coevolution in an obligatory outcrossing species. Combined with earlier results, the Red Queen process is the most likely explanation for this observation.

  13. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  14. Somatic homologous recombination in planta: the recombination frequency is dependent on the allelic state of recombining sequences and may be influenced by genomic position effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, P; Hohn, B; Gal, S

    1993-02-01

    We have previously described a non-selective method for scoring somatic recombination in the genome of whole plants. The recombination substrate consists of a defective partial dimer of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) sequences, which can code for production of viable virus only upon homologous recombination; this leads to disease symptoms on leaves. Brassica napus plants (rapeseed) harbouring the recombination substrate as a transgene were used to examine the time in plant development at which recombination takes place. The analysis of three transgene loci revealed recombination frequencies specific for each locus. Recombination frequencies were increased if more than one transgene locus was present per genome, either in allelic (homozygosity of the transgene locus) or in non-allelic positions. In both cases, the overall recombination frequency was found to be elevated to approximately the sum of the frequencies for the individual transgene loci or slightly higher, suggesting that the respective transgene loci behave largely independently of each other. For all plants tested (single locus, two or multiple loci) maximal recombination frequencies were of the order of 10(-6) events per cell division.

  15. Mechanisms and Factors that Influence High Frequency Retroviral Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Delviks-Frankenberry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment, and vaccine development.

  16. Classification of Recombinant Biologics in the EU: Divergence between National Pharmacovigilance Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Kevin; De Bruin, Marie L.; Broekmans, Andre W.; Stolk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Biological medicinal products (biologics) are subject to specific pharmacovigilance requirements to ensure that biologics are identifiable by brand name and batch number in adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports. Since Member States collect ADR data at the national level befor

  17. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  18. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-11-22

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution.

  19. 无接触电能传输实验系统的开发与实践%The Development and Implementation of a Wireless Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Experimental System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白亚男; 李兴根; 卢慧芬; 杨西同

    2015-01-01

    Synchronizing with the state of the art of wireless power transfers,this paper reports the development and implementation of a wireless non-radiative energy transfer experimental system. The experiment covers not only the theory and technology of wireless power transfers,but also converges to the power electronics,single chip micro-computer,and stepping motor disciplines. It is expected that,through the development and practice of the experi-mental system,it will promote students comprehensive ability to innovate,and thus stimulate their interest and en-thusiasm for learning advanced technologies and innovation work.%本文同步于无接触电能传输理论和技术的发展进程,进行了基于磁耦合谐振式无线电能传输实验系统的开发与实践。实验内容不仅涵盖了磁耦合谐振式无线电能传输技术的基本内涵,更综合应用了电力电子、单片机和步进电机等理论和知识。通过本实验系统的开发与实践,希望能够促进学生综合创新能力的培养,进而激发学生的学习兴趣和进行科研创新工作的热情。

  20. Recombination in quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Seró, Iván; Giménez, Sixto; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Gómez, Roberto; Shen, Qing; Toyoda, Taro; Bisquert, Juan

    2009-11-17

    Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) have attracted significant attention as promising third-generation photovoltaic devices. In the form of quantum dots (QDs), the semiconductor sensitizers have very useful and often tunable properties; moreover, their theoretical thermodynamic efficiency might be as high as 44%, better than the original 31% calculated ceiling. Unfortunately, the practical performance of these devices still lags behind that of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this Account, we summarize the strategies for depositing CdSe quantum dots on nanostructured mesoporous TiO(2) electrodes and discuss the methods that facilitate improvement in the performance and stability of QDSCs. One particularly significant factor for solar cells that use polysulfide electrolyte as the redox couple, which provides the best performance among QDSCs, is the passivation of the photoanode surface with a ZnS coating, which leads to a dramatic increase of photocurrents and efficiencies. However, these solar cells usually show a poor current-potential characteristic, so a general investigation of the recombination mechanisms is required for improvements. A physical model based on recombination through a monoenergetic TiO(2) surface state that takes into account the effect of the surface coverage has been developed to better understand the recombination mechanisms of QDSCs. The three main methods of QD adsorption on TiO(2) are (i) in situ growth of QDs by chemical bath deposition (CBD), (ii) deposition of presynthesized colloidal QDs by direct adsorption (DA), and (iii) deposition of presynthesized colloidal QDs by linker-assisted adsorption (LA). A systematic investigation by impedance spectroscopy of QDSCs prepared by these methods showed a decrease in the charge-transfer resistance and increased electron lifetimes for CBD samples; the same result was found after ZnS coating because of the covering of the TiO(2) surface. The increase of the lifetime with the ZnS treatment

  1. Single-stranded heteroduplex intermediates in λ Red homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red proteins of lambda phage mediate probably the simplest and most efficient homologous recombination reactions yet described. However the mechanism of dsDNA recombination remains undefined. Results Here we show that the Red proteins can act via full length single stranded intermediates to establish single stranded heteroduplexes at the replication fork. We created asymmetrically digestible dsDNA substrates by exploiting the fact that Redα exonuclease activity requires a 5' phosphorylated end, or is blocked by phosphothioates. Using these substrates, we found that the most efficient configuration for dsDNA recombination occurred when the strand that can prime Okazaki-like synthesis contained both homology regions on the same ssDNA molecule. Furthermore, we show that Red recombination requires replication of the target molecule. Conclusions Hence we propose a new model for dsDNA recombination, termed 'beta' recombination, based on the formation of ssDNA heteroduplexes at the replication fork. Implications of the model were tested using (i an in situ assay for recombination, which showed that recombination generated mixed wild type and recombinant colonies; and (ii the predicted asymmetries of the homology arms, which showed that recombination is more sensitive to non-homologies attached to 5' than 3' ends. Whereas beta recombination can generate deletions in target BACs of at least 50 kb at about the same efficiency as small deletions, the converse event of insertion is very sensitive to increasing size. Insertions up to 3 kb are most efficiently achieved using beta recombination, however at greater sizes, an alternative Red-mediated mechanism(s appears to be equally efficient. These findings define a new intermediate in homologous recombination, which also has practical implications for recombineering with the Red proteins.

  2. Mobility dependent recombination models for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenpfahl, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Modern solar cell technologies are driven by the effort to enhance power conversion efficiencies. A main mechanism limiting power conversion efficiencies is charge carrier recombination which is a direct function of the encounter probability of both recombination partners. In inorganic solar cells with rather high charge carrier mobilities, charge carrier recombination is often dominated by energetic states which subsequently trap both recombination partners for recombination. Free charge carriers move fast enough for Coulomb attraction to be irrelevant for the encounter probability. Thus, charge carrier recombination is independent of charge carrier mobilities. In organic semiconductors charge carrier mobilities are much lower. Therefore, electrons and holes have more time react to mutual Coulomb-forces. This results in the strong charge carrier mobility dependencies of the observed charge carrier recombination rates. In 1903 Paul Langevin published a fundamental model to describe the recombination of ions in gas-phase or aqueous solutions, known today as Langevin recombination. During the last decades this model was used to interpret and model recombination in organic semiconductors. However, certain experiments especially with bulk-heterojunction solar cells reveal much lower recombination rates than predicted by Langevin. In search of an explanation, many material and device properties such as morphology and energetic properties have been examined in order to extend the validity of the Langevin model. A key argument for most of these extended models is, that electron and hole must find each other at a mutual spatial location. This encounter may be limited for instance by trapping of charges in trap states, by selective electrodes separating electrons and holes, or simply by the morphology of the involved semiconductors, making it impossible for electrons and holes to recombine at high rates. In this review, we discuss the development of mobility limited

  3. Allele-dependent recombination frequency: homology requirement in meiotic recombination at the hot spot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, M; Sagai, T; Lindahl, K F; Toyoda, Y; Moriwaki, K; Shiroishi, T

    1995-05-20

    Meiotic recombination break joints in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are clustered within short segments known as hot spots. We systematically investigated the requirement for sequence homology between two chromosomes for recombination activity at the hot spot next to the Lmp2 gene. The results indicated that a high rate of recombination required a high degree of similarity of overall genome structure at the hot spot. In particular, the same copy number of repetitive sequences within the hot spot was essential for a high frequency of recombination, suggesting that recombination in mouse meiosis is more sensitive to heterozygous deletion or insertion of DNA than to mismatches of single-base substitutions.

  4. Multiple barriers to recombination between divergent HIV-1 variants revealed by a dual-marker recombination assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Moore, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is a major force for generating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity and produces numerous recombinants circulating in the human population. We previously established a cell-based system using green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as a reporter to study the mechanisms...... of HIV-1 recombination. We now report an improved system capable of detecting recombination using authentic viral sequences. Frameshift mutations were introduced into the gag gene so that parental viruses do not express full-length Gag; however, recombination can generate a progeny virus that expresses...... a functional Gag. We demonstrate that this Gag reconstitution assay can be used to detect recombination between two group M HIV-1 variants of the same or of different subtypes. Using both gfp and gag assays, we found that, similar to group M viruses, group O viruses also recombine frequently. When...

  5. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Norman G. (Pullman, WA); Davin, Laurence B. (Pullman, WA); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T. (Baltimore, MD); Fujita, Masayuki (Kagawa, JP); Gang, David R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Sarkanen, Simo (S. Minneapolis, MN); Ford, Joshua D. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  6. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Areas Applied Sciences Biomedical Informatics Clinical Research Epidemiology Farm Medicine Human Genetics Oral-Systemic Health Clinical ... Consulting Agritourism Farm MAPPER Lyme Disease ROPS Rebate Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm ...

  7. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  9. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  10. Global Hydrology Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GHRC is the data management and user services arm of the Global Hydrology and Climate Center. It encompasses the data and information management, supporting...

  11. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  12. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  13. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four Homeownership...

  14. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A full-service research and evaluation center equipped with safety equipment, a high-bay pilot studies area, and a large-scale pilot studies facility The U.S. Army...

  15. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  16. Health Center Controlled Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Center Controlled Network (HCCN) tool is a locator tool designed to make data and information concerning HCCN resources more easily available to our...

  17. The ORFEUS Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dost

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 1993 the ORFEUS Data Center (ODC; Dost, 1991 changed hosting organisation. It moved within the Netherlands from the University of Utrecht to the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNM1 in de Bilt. This change in hosting organisation was necessary to ensure a longer term stability in the operation of the ODC. Key issues for the ODC are the rapid on-line data access and quality controlled, complete and efficient off-line data access. During 1992 the ODC became the European node in the international SPYDER system which provides near real-time access to digital broadband data from selected high quality stations. Electronic messages trigger soveral centers well distributed over the globe. These centers then collect the data by modem from selected stations in their region. Finally, data are distributed between data centers over internet.

  18. Advanced data center economy

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhov, R.; Amzarakov, M.; E. Isaev

    2013-01-01

    The article addresses basic Data Centers (DC) drivers of price and engineering, which specify rules and price evaluation for creation and further operation. DC energy efficiency concept, its influence on DC initial price, operation costs and Total Cost of Ownership.

  19. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...