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Sample records for nonradiative decay pathways

  1. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, Thomas S., E-mail: t.blacker@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Marsh, Richard J., E-mail: richard.marsh@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Duchen, Michael R., E-mail: m.duchen@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bain, Angus J., E-mail: a.bain@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► NADH and NADPH have a high rate of non-radiative excited state decay. ► Conformational relaxation is shown to be a significant non-radiative pathway. ► The Kramers equation describes the barrier crossing dynamics of the relaxation. ► Conformational restriction upon enzyme binding will alter NAD(P)H lifetimes. - Abstract: In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water–glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers–Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  2. Understanding and eliminating non-radiative decay in organic-inorganic perovskites (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; de Quilettes, Dane

    2016-09-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are highly promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21% and promising applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors also emerging. A key enabling property of the perovskites is their high photoluminescence quantum efficiency, suggesting that these materials could in principle approach the thermodynamic device efficiency limits in which all recombination is radiative. However, non-radiative recombination sites are present which vary heterogeneously from grain to grain and limit device performance. Here, I will present results where we probe the local photophysics of neat CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films using confocal photoluminescence (PL) measurements and correlate the observations with the local chemistry of the grains using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). We investigate the connection between grains that are bright or dark in emission and the local Pb:I ratios at the surface and through the grains. We also examine how the photophysics, local chemistry and non-radiative decay pathways change slowly over time under illumination. Our results reveal a "photo-induced cleaning" arising from a redistribution of iodide content in the films, giving strong evidence for photo-induced ion migration. These slow transient effects appear to be related to anomalous hysteresis phenomena observed in full solar cells. I will discuss how immobilizing ions, reducing trap densities and achieving homogenous stoichiometries could suppress hysteresis effects and lead to devices approaching the efficiency limits.

  3. Non-radiative and radiative decays in nanogap emitting devices

    CERN Document Server

    Faggiani, Remi; Lalanne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    By placing a quantum emitter in the mouths of nanogaps consisting of two metal nanoparticles nearly into contact, significant increases in emission rate are obtained. This mechanism is central in the design of modern plasmonic nanoantennas. However, due to the lack of general knowledge on the balance between the different decay rates in nanogaps (emission, quenching, and metal absorption), nanoantenna design is performed in a rather haphazard fashion and relies on repeated numerical calculations; general intuitive design recipes do not presently exist. With accurate and simple closed-form expressions for the quenching rate and the decay rate into gap plasmons, we provide a comprehensive analysis of nanogap light emitting devices in the limit of small gap thickness. We disclose that the total spontaneous emission rate of quantum emitters in nanometer-thin gaps can largely overcome quenching, for specifically selected metallic and insulator materials, regardless of the gap size. Furthermore, to help further des...

  4. Nonradiative transfer of excitation in coherent decay from a Gaussian atomic distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Richard, E-mail: rfriedberg1@nyc.rr.com [Physics Department, Columbia University, NY (United States)

    2011-09-14

    Coherent decay of a spherically symmetric ensemble of initially resonantly phased two-level atoms is studied in the scalar photon model, in the continuum and Markov approximations. Emphasis is on the Gaussian distribution, where nonradiative transfer of excitation to excited states orthogonal to the initial one is found to be nonzero even in the limit of short wavelength, whether or not the scalar kernel exp(ik{sub 0}R)/ik{sub 0}R is replaced by its real part. Numerical results are compared to known values for the uniform distribution.

  5. Lasing in organic semiconductors - time-resolved studies of non-radiative decay processes

    CERN Document Server

    Zenz, C R

    2000-01-01

    Based on the demonstration of optical gain in an organic single crystal of a soluble oligo-phenylene-vinylene with gain values higher than 60 cm-1 and optically pumped lasing in a longitudinal adjustable microcavity based on laddertype polyparaphenylene, the realization of an organic laserdiode is discussed. The output characteristics of the microcavity can be modeled using classical rate equations, however the obtained threshold values are limited by the short excited state lifetime. A comparison with the lifetime measured on isolated molecules shows, that non-radiative decay processes in the solid state are determining the excited state lifetime. Using conventional and a novel field-assisted differential transmission spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution, two main decay mechanism could be identified. (i) Triplet exciton in para-hexaphenyl is formed by non-geminate recombination of photo-generated polarons. (ii) Dissociation of the luminescent singlet excitons into polarons is important for two reaso...

  6. Non-radiative decay of a dipole emitter close to a metallic nanoparticle: Importance of higher-order multipole contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of higher-order multipoles to radiative and non-radiative decay of a single dipole emitter close to a spherical metallic nanoparticle is re-examined. Taking a Ag spherical nanoparticle (AgNP) with the radius of 5 nm as an example, a significant contribution (between 50% and 101% of the total value) of higher-order multipoles to non-radiative rates is found even at the emitter distance of 5 nm from the AgNP surface. On the other hand, the higher-order multipole contribution to radiative rates is negligible. Consequently, a dipole-dipole approximation can yield only an upper bound on the apparent quantum yield. In contrast, the non-radiative rates calculated with the quasistatic Gersten and Nitzan method are found to be in much better agreement with exact electrodynamic results. Finally, the size corrected metal dielectric function is shown to decrease the non-radiative rates near the dipolar surface plasmon resonance.

  7. The methyl- and aza-substituent effects on nonradiative decay mechanisms of uracil in water: a transient absorption study in the UV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, XinZhong; Hua, LinQiang; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-05-18

    The nonradiative decay dynamics of photo-excited uracil (Ura) and its derivatives, i.e., thymine (5-methyluracil, Thy), 6-methyluracil (6-MU) and 6-azauracil (6-AU) in water, has been studied using a femtosecond transient absorption method. The molecules are populated in the lowest (1)ππ* state by a pump pulse at 266 nm, and a broadband continuum in the deep UV region is then employed as the probe. The extension of the continuous UV probe down to 250 nm enables us to investigate comprehensively the population dynamics of the ground states for those molecules and to uncover the substituent effects on nonradiative decay dynamics of uracil. Vibrational cooling in the ground states of Ura, Thy and 6-MU has been directly observed for the first time, providing solid evidence of the ultrafast (1)ππ* → S0 decay. In combination with the ground state bleaching signals, it is consolidated that their lowest (1)ππ* state decays via two parallel pathways, i.e., (1)ππ* → S0 and (1)ππ* → (1)nπ*. Moreover, the contribution of the (1)ππ* → (1)nπ* channel is found to be much smaller for Thy or 6-MU than for Ura. Different from methyl-substitution, the initial (1)ππ* state of the aza-substituent 6-AU decays primarily to the (1)nπ* state, while the (1)ππ* → S0 channel can be negligible. Our study provides a comprehensive understanding of the substituent effects on the excited-state dynamics of uracil in water.

  8. Gray-Tone Lithography Implementation of Drexhage's Method for Calibrating Radiative and Nonradiative Decay Constants of Fluorophores

    CERN Document Server

    Kwadrin, Andrej; 10.1021/jp3048423

    2013-01-01

    We present a straightforward method to realize non-planar dielectric structures with a controlled height profile for use in calibration of fluorophores. Calibration of fluorescence quantum efficiency and intrinsic radiative and nonradiative decay rates of emitters is possible by using changes in the local density of optical states, provided one can control the emitter-surface distance with nanometer accuracy. We realize a method that is accurate yet fast to implement. We fabricate PMMA wedges (4 mm x 4 mm x 2 \\mu m) by gray-tone UV-lithography of Shipley S1813G2. Its applicability as dielectric spacer is demonstrated in Drexhage experiments for three different emitters in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The decay-rate dependence of the fluorescent state of emitters on the distance to a silver mirror is observed and compared to calculations based on the local density of states. Quantitative values for (non)radiative decay rates and quantum efficiencies are extracted. Furthermore, we discuss ho...

  9. Damping rates of surface plasmons for particles of size from nano- to micrometers; reduction of the nonradiative decay

    CERN Document Server

    Kolwas, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    Damping rates of multipolar, localized surface plasmons (SP) of gold and silver nanospheres of radii up to $1000nm$ were found with the tools of classical electrodynamics. The significant increase in damping rates followed by noteworthy decrease for larger particles takes place along with substantial red-shift of plasmon resonance frequencies as a function of particle size. We also introduced interface damping into our modeling, which substantially modifies the plasmon damping rates of smaller particles. We demonstrate unexpected reduction of the multipolar SP damping rates in certain size ranges. This effect can be explained by the suppression of the nonradiative decay channel as a result of the lost competition with the radiative channel. We show that experimental dipole damping rates [H. Baida, et al., Nano Lett. 9(10) (2009) 3463, and C. S\\"onnichsen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 077402], and the resulting resonance quality factors can be described in a consistent and straightforward way within our ...

  10. Radiative and nonradiative pathways in multiexciton recombination in giant nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malko, Anton; Sampat, Siddharth; Htoon, Han; Vela-Becerra, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Klimov, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Recently,footnotetextY. Chen et al., JACS 130, 5026 (2008) we developed ``giant'' nanocrystal quantum dots (g-NQDs), in which a small emitting core of CdSe is overcoated with a thick shell of a wider-gap CdS. We conduct room-temp measurements of photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes in such g-NQDs as a function of excitation power and a number of shell monolayers. At low pump levels, corresponding to excitation of less than 1 exciton per dot on average (>1, fast (˜1ns) PL component appeared, accompanied by a transition to a sub-linear scaling of PL intensity with . Our findings indicate that while g-NQDs indeed produce suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination,footnotetextF. Garcia-Santamaria et al., Nanoletters 9, 3482 (2009) this suppression is incomplete. We conduct systematic studies of relative efficiencies of nonradiative and radiative processes in these nanostructures.

  11. Fluorescence quenching and photobleaching in Au/Rh6G nanoassemblies: impact of competition between radiative and non-radiative decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L.; Ye, F.; Hu, J.; Popov, S.; Friberg, A. T.; Muhammed, M.

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching from nanoassemblies formed by Rhodamine 6G and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of 2.6 nm radius has been investigated. The presence of Au NPs also induces long-term degradation of the photostability (photobleaching) of Rhodamine 6G used as gain medium in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. We found that the degradation gets profound when the Au NPs concentration is significantly increased. Calculation of the radiative rate and direct time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence decay indicates that both the decrease of radiative decay rate and increase of non-radiative decay rate are responsible for the fluorescence quenching and photostability degradation. An energy transfer from the dye molecules to gold nanoparticles is dominating within the small distance between them and suppresses the quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G drastically. In long time scale, the photobleaching rate was slowing down, and laser output intensity reached a stabilized level which depends on the gold nanoparticles concentration.

  12. Pathways to Rare Baryonic B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Hou Wei Shu; Hou, Wei-Shu

    2001-01-01

    We point out new ways to search for charmless baryonic B decays: baryon pair production in association with $\\eta^\\prime$ is very likely as large as or even a bit larger than two body $K\\pi/\\pi\\pi$ modes. We extend our argument, in weaker form, to $B\\to \\gamma + X_s$ and $\\ell\

  13. Nonradiative limitations to plasmon propagation in chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Brandstetter-Kunc, Adam; Downing, Charles A; Weinmann, Dietmar; Jalabert, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collective plasmonic modes in a chain of metallic nanoparticles that are coupled by near-field interactions. The size- and momentum-dependent nonradiative Landau damping and radiative decay rates are calculated analytically within an open quantum system approach. These decay rates determine the excitation propagation along the chain. In particular, the behavior of the radiative decay rate as a function of the plasmon wavelength leads to a transition from an exponential decay of the collective excitation for short distances to an algebraic decay for large distances. Importantly, we show that the exponential decay is of a purely nonradiative origin. Our transparent model enables us to provide analytical expressions for the polarization-dependent plasmon excitation profile along the chain and for the associated propagation length. Our theoretical analysis constitutes an important step in the quest for the optimal conditions for plasmonic propagation in nanoparticle chains.

  14. Decay pathways for excitations in a conjugated oligofluorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesely, Elizabeth Jane

    Oligofluorenes are promising candidates for light emitting applications due to their efficient blue emission, solubility, and chemical purity. The decay routes for some excitations in the fluorescent oligofluorene F(MB)10F(EH)2 are investigated. Geminate recombination of photogenerated charge pairs to form luminescent singlet excitons represents a significant contribution (> 10%) to the overall fluorescence quantum yield. This suggests a substantial yield of charge pair generation in spite of a large exciton binding energy. I propose that the unusual decay dynamics of the delayed fluorescence is the result of the interconversion between singlet and triplet polaron pairs on the submicrosecond timescale (˜500 ns). A model that includes activated recombination from singlet polaron pairs with a distribution of barriers centered 0.2 eV below the excited state produces a fit to the decay of the delayed fluorescence. Results from the model suggest that a large (90% at 296 K) fraction of photoexcited polaron pairs return to form singlet excitons so that this pathway cannot account for the dramatic reduction of fluorescence yields in thin films relative to those in dilute solution. The model also predicts that the ratio of singlet to triplet excitons formed from the recombination of spin randomized charge pairs is greater than that predicted by spin statistics at 296 K, and increases with temperature. The quenching of photoluminescence in F(MB)10F(EH)2 by fluorenone-like defects is also studied through deliberate incorporation of the defects into a solid sample. The results are consistent with a mechanism responsible for part of the quenching of the fluorescence in the oligofluorene samples being exciton migration to defects followed by the trapping of a charge from the exciton on the defect. The defects emit weak, delayed luminescence. The mechanism for the excitation of the defects is similar to that of delayed fluorescence in a pristine sample, which includes the

  15. Picosecond nonradiative processes in neodymium-doped crystals and glasses: mechansim for the energy gap law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibeau, C.; Payne, S.A.

    1997-09-29

    We present measurements of the 4G7/2 emission lifetime for 26 Nd-doped materials. A model of nonradiative decay based on dipole-dipole energy transfer is developed and found to be supported by our data.

  16. Diverse Strategies Used by Picornaviruses to Escape Host RNA Decay Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Ullmer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To successfully replicate, viruses protect their genomic material from degradation by the host cell. RNA viruses must contend with numerous destabilizing host cell processes including mRNA decay pathways and viral RNA (vRNA degradation resulting from the antiviral response. Members of the Picornaviridae family of small RNA viruses have evolved numerous diverse strategies to evade RNA decay, including incorporation of stabilizing elements into vRNA and re-purposing host stability factors. Viral proteins are deployed to disrupt and inhibit components of the decay machinery and to redirect decay machinery to the advantage of the virus. This review summarizes documented interactions of picornaviruses with cellular RNA decay pathways and processes.

  17. TMV induces RNA decay pathways to modulate gene silencing and disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Gabriela; Zavallo, Diego; Venturuzzi, Andrea L; Rodriguez, Maria C; Crespi, Martin; Asurmendi, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    RNA decay pathways comprise a combination of RNA degradation mechanisms that are implicated in gene expression, development and defense responses in eukaryotes. These mechanisms are known as the RNA Quality Control or RQC pathways. In plants, another important RNA degradation mechanism is the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mediated by small RNAs (siRNAs). Notably, the RQC pathway antagonizes PTGS by preventing the entry of dysfunctional mRNAs into the silencing pathway to avoid global degradation of mRNA by siRNAs. Viral transcripts must evade RNA degrading mechanisms, thus viruses encode PTGS suppressor proteins to counteract viral RNA silencing. Here, we demonstrate that tobacco plants infected with TMV and transgenic lines expressing TMV MP and CP (coat protein) proteins (which are not linked to the suppression of silencing) display increased transcriptional levels of RNA decay genes. These plants also showed accumulation of cytoplasmic RNA granules with altered structure, increased rates of RNA decay for transgenes and defective transgene PTGS amplification. Furthermore, knockdown of RRP41 or RRP43 RNA exosome components led to lower levels of TMV accumulation with milder symptoms after infection, several developmental defects and miRNA deregulation. Thus, we propose that TMV proteins induce RNA decay pathways (in particular exosome components) to impair antiviral PTGS and this defensive mechanism would constitute an additional counter-defense strategy that lead to disease symptoms. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Fabio; Giorgioni, Anna; Gallacher, Kevin; Isa, Fabio; Biagioni, Paolo; Millar, Ross W.; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Miglio, Leo

    2016-06-01

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO2 in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  19. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzoli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pezzoli@unimib.it; Giorgioni, Anna; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Miglio, Leo [LNESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, via Cozzi 55, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Gallacher, Kevin; Millar, Ross W.; Paul, Douglas J. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Isa, Fabio [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Biagioni, Paolo [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Isella, Giovanni [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2016-06-27

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO{sub 2} in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  20. Nonradial Pulsations in ɛ Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kambe, Eiji; Lee, Umin

    2000-11-01

    We consider the question of whether all the modes detected in the line profile variations of ɛ Persei are consistent with nonradial pulsations excited by the kappa mechanism at the opacity Z-bump. We have computed massive (12.5-14 Msolar) main-sequence models, adjusting the parameters such that the evolutionary tracks pass around the approximate position of ɛ Per on the H-R diagram. A linear nonadiabatic, nonradial pulsation analysis is applied to these models. The periods in the frame corotating with the stellar surface for the observed 2.3-4.5 hr modes are found to be consistent with the Z-bump kappa mechanism. We have found, however, that the longest-period mode (8.48 hr in the observer's frame) cannot be explained by the kappa mechanism. We have examined the effect of rotation on the stability of oscillations and found that the stabilizing effect is weak, so that only a few of the shortest-period modes are stabilized for the rotation speed of ɛ Per. No significant difference is found between prograde and retrograde modes in the stability. It is a puzzle why no retrograde mode has been detected in ɛ Per, which should equally be excited by the kappa mechanism. We also discuss the observed and theoretical line profile variations of ɛ Per in the Appendix.

  1. Tuning nonradiative lifetimes via molecular aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Celestino, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that molecular aggregation can strongly influence the nonradiative decay (NRD) lifetime of an electronic excitation. As a demonstrative example, we consider a transition-dipole-dipole-interacting dimer whose monomers have harmonic potential energy surfaces (PESs). Depending on the position of the NRD channel ($q_{\\rm nr}$), we find that the NRD lifetime ($\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$) can exhibit a completely different dependence on the intermolecular-interaction strength. We observe that (i) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the Franck-Condon region, $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$ increases with the interaction strength; (ii) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the minimum of the monomer excited PES, the intermolecular interaction has little influence on $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$; (iii) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the classical turning point of the monomer nuclear dynamics, on the other side of the minimum, $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$ decreases with the interaction strength. Our findings suggest design principles for molecular systems where a...

  2. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor F.; Neal, Erin M.; Leone, Sarah G.; Cali, Brian J.; Peel, Michael T.; Grannas, Amanda M.; Wykoff, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  3. The nonsense-mediated RNA decay pathway is disrupted in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, JingWei; Plank, Terra-Dawn; Su, Fang; Shi, XiuJuan; Liu, Chen; Ji, Yuan; Li, ShuaiJun; Huynh, Andrew; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Bo; Yang, Guang; Wu, YanMing; Wilkinson, Miles F; Lu, YanJun

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are characterized by myofibroblast proliferation and an inflammatory cell infiltrate. Little is known about the molecular pathways that precipitate IMT formation. Here, we report the identification of somatic mutations in UPF1, a gene that encodes an essential component of the nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) pathway, in 13 of 15 pulmonary IMT samples. The majority of mutations occurred in a specific region of UPF1 and triggered UPF1 alternative splicing. Several mRNA targets of the NMD pathway were upregulated in IMT samples, indicating that the UPF1 mutations led to reduced NMD magnitude. These upregulated NMD targets included NIK mRNA, which encodes a potent activator of NF-κB. In human lung cells, UPF1 depletion increased expression of chemokine-encoding genes in a NIK-dependent manner. Elevated chemokines and IgE class switching events were observed in IMT samples, consistent with NIK upregulation in these tumors. Together, these results support a model in which UPF1 mutations downregulate NMD, leading to NIK-dependent NF-κB induction, which contributes to the immune infiltration that is characteristic of IMTs. The molecular link between the NMD pathway and IMTs has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of these tumors.

  4. Intrinsic non-radiative voltage losses in fullerene-based organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Fan, Yeli; Tropiano, Manuel; McGarry, Kathryn A.; Zeika, Olaf; Riede, Moritz K.; Douglas, Christopher J.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Organic solar cells demonstrate external quantum efficiencies and fill factors approaching those of conventional photovoltaic technologies. However, as compared with the optical gap of the absorber materials, their open-circuit voltage is much lower, largely due to the presence of significant non-radiative recombination. Here, we study a large data set of published and new material combinations and find that non-radiative voltage losses decrease with increasing charge-transfer-state energies. This observation is explained by considering non-radiative charge-transfer-state decay as electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime, being facilitated by a common skeletal molecular vibrational mode. Our results suggest an intrinsic link between non-radiative voltage losses and electron-vibration coupling, indicating that these losses are unavoidable. Accordingly, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of single-junction organic solar cells would be reduced to about 25.5% and the optimal optical gap increases to 1.45-1.65 eV, that is, 0.2-0.3 eV higher than for technologies with minimized non-radiative voltage losses.

  5. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  6. Nonradiative resonant energy transfer between PbS QDs in porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Aleksandr P.; Parfenov, Peter S.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    Nonradiative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes embedded in porous matrix is observed by a fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of decays of photoluminescence from QD mixture shows that energy transfer in studied systems is determined by static quenching, specific for direct contact between QD-donor and QD-acceptor in the QDs close-packed ensembles. From steady-state spectral analysis it was found that efficiency of energy transfer depends on the molar ratio QD-donor/QD-acceptor and energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor passes by several channels.

  7. Decay pathways after Xe 3d inner shell ionization using a multi-electron coincidence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, I H; Nakano, M; Ito, K [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hikosaka, Y; Soejima, K [Department of Environmental Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Shigemasa, E [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); Lablanquie, P; Penent, F [UPMC, Universite Paris 06, LCPMR, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Kouchi, N, E-mail: suzukii@post.kek.jp [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2011-04-14

    Cascade Auger electron emission following Xe 3d photoionization has been investigated using a multi-electron coincidence technique, which utilizes an electron spectrometer of magnetic bottle type. It has been found that the Xe{sup 2+} states of the 4p{sup -1}4d{sup -1} configuration, formed by the Auger decay of the Xe{sup +} 3d{sub 3/2,5/2}{sup -1} states, dominantly turn into triply charged states of the 4d{sup -2}5p{sup -1}/4d{sup -2}5s{sup -1} configurations. The Xe{sup 2+} 4s{sup -1}4d{sup -1} states, formed by the 3d Auger decay, yield the 4p{sup -1}4d{sup -1}5p{sup -1} states as well as the 4d{sup -3} states. From the coincidence spectrum among three Auger electrons, it is suggested that the Xe{sup 2+} 4p{sup -1}4d{sup -1} states give rise to the following cascade processes: 4p{sup -1}4d{sup -1} {yields} 4d{sup -2}5p{sup -1} {yields} 4d{sup -1}5p{sup -3}.

  8. Nonradial Pulsations in Classical Cepheids of the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalik, P; Moskalik, Pawel; Mizerski, Zbigniew Kolaczkowski & Tomasz

    2003-01-01

    We have performed systematic frequency analysis of the LMC Cepheids observed by OGLE project. Several new types of pulsation behaviour are identified, including triple-mode and amplitude-modulated double-mode pulsations. In ~10% of the first overtone Cepheids we find low amplitude secondary periodicities corresponding to nonradial modes. This is the first evidence for excitation of nonradial oscillations in Classical Cepheid variables.

  9. Theoretical studies on the reaction pathways of electronically excited DAAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quenneville, Jason M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of temporally and spectrally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to initiate, as well as detect, high explosives is being explored at Los Alamos. High level ab initio calculations, presented here, are employed to help guide and interpret the experiments. The ground and first excited electronic states of 3,3{prime}-diamino-4,4{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) are investigated using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The geometrical and energetic character of the excited state minima, conical intersections and reaction pathways of DAAF are described. Two radiative and two non-radiative excited state population quenching mechanisms are outlined, and possible pathways for photochemical and spectroscopic control are discussed. The use of laser light to control chemical reactions has many applications. The initiation and the detection of explosives are two such applications currently under development at Los Alamos. Though inherently experimental, the project can be aided by theory through both prediction and interpretation. When the laser light is in the UV/visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorbing molecule is excited electronically and excitation decay may occur either radiatively (fluorescence or phosphorescence) or non-radiatively (through internal conversion). In many cases decay of the excitation occurs through a mixture of processes, and maximizing the desired result requires sophisticated laser pulses whose amplitude has been optimally modulated in time and/or frequency space. Control of cis-stilbene photochemistry was recently demonstrated in our group, and we aim to extend this work to high explosive compounds. Maximizing radiative decay leads to increased fluorescence quantum yields and enhances the possibility of spectral detection of the absorbing molecule. Maximizing non-radiative decay can lead to chemistry, heating of the sample and possibly detonation initiation in

  10. Nonradiative charge transfer in collisions of protons with rubidium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ling-Ling; Qu Yi-Zhi; Liu Chun-Hua; Zhang Yu; Wang Jian-Guo; Buenker Robert J

    2012-01-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer cross sections for protons colliding with Rb(5s) atoms are calculated by using the quantum-mechanical molecularorbital close-coupling method in an energy range of 10-3 keV 10 keV.The total and state-selective charge-transfer cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental data in the relatively low energy region.The importance of rotational coupling for chargetransfer process is stressed.Compared with the radiative charge-transfer process,nonradiative charge transfer is a dominant mechanism at energies above 15 eV.The resonance structures of state-selective charge-transfer cross sections arising from the competition among channels are analysed in detail.The radiative and nonradiative charge-transfer rate coefficients from low to high temperature are presented.

  11. A stress-activated, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-ATF/CREB pathway regulates posttranscriptional, sequence-dependent decay of target RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Wagnon, Jacy L; Protacio, Reine M; Glazko, Galina V; Beggs, Marjorie; Raj, Vinay; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2013-08-01

    Broadly conserved, mitogen-activated/stress-activated protein kinases (MAPK/SAPK) of the p38 family regulate multiple cellular processes. They transduce signals via dimeric, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors of the ATF/CREB family (such as Atf2, Fos, and Jun) to regulate the transcription of target genes. We report additional mechanisms for gene regulation by such pathways exerted through RNA stability controls. The Spc1 (Sty1/Phh1) kinase-regulated Atf1-Pcr1 (Mts1-Mts2) heterodimer of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe controls the stress-induced, posttranscriptional stability and decay of sets of target RNAs. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing data revealed that decay is associated nonrandomly with transcripts that contain an M26 sequence motif. Moreover, the ablation of an M26 sequence motif in a target mRNA is sufficient to block its stress-induced loss. Conversely, engineered M26 motifs can render a stable mRNA into one that is targeted for decay. This stress-activated RNA decay (SARD) provides a mechanism for reducing the expression of target genes without shutting off transcription itself. Thus, a single p38-ATF/CREB signal transduction pathway can coordinately induce (promote transcription and RNA stability) and repress (promote RNA decay) transcript levels for distinct sets of genes, as is required for developmental decisions in response to stress and other stimuli.

  12. Aspects of radiative K^+_e3 decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, B; Müller, E H; Schmid, M; Kubis, Bastian; Müller, Eike H; Schmid, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We re-investigate the radiative charged kaon decay K+- --> pi0 e+- nu_e gamma in chiral perturbation theory, merging the chiral expansion with Low's theorem. We thoroughly analyze the precision of the predicted branching ratio relative to the non-radiative decay channel. Structure dependent terms and their impact on differential decay distributions are investigated in detail, and the possibility to see effects of the chiral anomaly in this decay channel is emphasized.

  13. Latitude distribution of nonradial pulsations in rapidly rotating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Aerts, C.

    2004-05-01

    We present a method for the analysis of latitude distribution associated with temperature and/or velocity perturbations of the stellar surface due to non-radial pulsation (NRP) modes in rapidly rotating B stars. The technique is applied together with Fourier Doppler Imaging (FDI) to high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of ɛ Per. The main advantage of this approach is that it decomposed complex multi-periodic line profile variations into single components, allowing the detailed analysis of each mode seperately. We study the 10.6-d-1 frequency that is particularly important for modal analysis of non-radial pulsations in the star.

  14. Genetics of the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway using a transgene-based selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidder, P; Johnson, M A; Sullivan, M L; Thompson, D M; Pérez-Amador, M A; Howard, C J; Green, P J

    2004-08-01

    mRNA sequences that control abundance, localization and translation initiation have been identified, yet the factors that recognize these sequences are largely unknown. In this report, a transgene-based strategy designed to isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that fail to recognize these sequences is described. In this strategy, a selectable gene and a screenable marker gene are put under the control of the sequence element being analysed and mutants are selected with altered abundance of the corresponding marker RNAs. The selection of mutants deficient in recognition of the DST (downstream) mRNA degradation signal is used as a test-case to illustrate some of the technical aspects that have facilitated success. Using this strategy, we report the isolation of a new mutant, dst3, deficient in the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway. The targeted genetic strategy described circumvents certain technical limitations of biochemical approaches. Hence, it provides a means to investigate a variety of other mechanisms responsible for post-transcriptional regulation.

  15. Non-Radial Oscillations in an Axisymmetric MHD Incompressible Fluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Satya Narayanan

    2000-09-01

    It is well known from Helioseismology that the Sun exhibits oscillations on a global scale, most of which are non-radial in nature. These oscillations help us to get a clear picture of the internal structure of the Sun as has been demonstrated by the theoretical and observational (such as GONG) studies. In this study we formulate the linearised equations of motion for non-radial oscillations by perturbing the MHD equilibrium solution for an axisymmetric incompressible fluid. The fluid motion and the magnetic field are expressed as scalars , , and , respectively. In deriving the exact solution for the equilibrium state, we neglect the contribution due to meridional circulation. The perturbed quantities *, *, *, * are written in terms of orthogonal polynomials. A special case of the above formulation and its stability is discussed.

  16. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonement (UMR7614), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Trcera, Nicolas [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  17. Non-Radiative Step Facets in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana M; Zhang, Yunyan; Tait, Edward W; Hine, Nicholas D M; Liu, Huiyun; Beanland, Richard

    2017-03-24

    One of the main advantages of nanowires for functional applications is their high perfection, which results from surface image forces that act on line defects such as dislocations, rendering them unstable and driving them out of the crystal. Here we show that there is a class of linear defects that are stable in nanowires, with no long-range strain field or dislocation character. In zinc-blende semiconductors, they take the form of Ʃ3 (112) facets with heights constrained to be a multiple of three {111} monolayers. Density functional theory calculations show that they act as non-radiative recombination centres and have deleterious effects on nanowire properties. We present experimental observations of these defects on twin boundaries and twins that terminate inside GaAsP nanowires and find that they are indeed always multiples of three monolayers in height. Strategies to use the three-monolayer rule during growth to prevent their formation are discussed.

  18. Non-radial Pulsations in the Open Cluster NGC 3766

    CERN Document Server

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M; McSwain, M Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Non-radial pulsations (NRPs) are a proposed mechanism for the formation of decretion disks around Be stars and are important tools to study the internal structure of stars. NGC 3766 has an unusually large fraction of transient Be stars, so it is an excellent location to study the formation mechanism of Be star disks. High resolution spectroscopy can reveal line profile variations from NRPs, allowing measurements of both the degree, l, and azimuthal order, m. However, spectroscopic studies require large amounts of time with large telescopes to achieve the necessary high S/N and time domain coverage. On the other hand, multi-color photometry can be performed more easily with small telescopes to measure l only. Here, we present representative light curves of Be stars and non-emitting B stars in NGC 3766 from the CTIO 0.9m telescope in an effort to study NRPs in this cluster.

  19. General Relativistic Non-radial Oscillations of Compact Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zack, II; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2017-01-01

    Currently, we lack a means of identifying the type of matter at the core of compact stars, but in the future, we may be able to use gravitational wave signals produced by fluid oscillations inside compact stars to discover new phases of dense matter. To this end, we study the fluid perturbations inside compact stars such as Neutron Stars and Strange Quark Stars, focusing on modes that couple to gravitational waves. Using a modern equation of state for quark matter that incorporates interactions at moderately high densities, we implement an efficient computational scheme to solve the oscillation equations in the framework of General Relativity, and determine the complex eigenfrequencies that describe the oscillation and damping of the non-radial fluid modes. We discuss the significance of our results for future detection of these modes through gravitational waves. This work is supported in part by the CSULB Graduate Research Fellowship and by the National Science Foundation NSF PHY-1608959.

  20. Model of two-stream non-radial accretion for binary X-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipunov, V.M. (Sternberg Astronomical Inst., Moscow (USSR))

    1982-03-01

    The general case of non-radial accretion is assumed to occur in real binary systems containing X-ray pulsars. The structure and the stability of the magnetosphere, the interaction between the magnetosphere and accreted matter, as well as evolution of neutron star in close binary system are examined within the framework of the two-stream model of nonradial accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Observable parameters of X-ray pulsars are explained in terms of the model considered.

  1. Evidence for the TICT mediated nonradiative deexcitation process for the excited coumarin-1 dye in high polarity protic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Atanu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumbhakar, Manoj [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pal, Haridas [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: hpal@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-08-29

    Photophysical properties of coumarin-1 (C1) dye in different protic solvents have been investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Correlation of the Stokes' shifts ({delta}{nu}-bar ) with the solvent polarity ({delta}f) suggests the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character for the dye fluorescent state. Fluorescence quantum yields ({phi}{sub f}) and lifetimes ({tau}{sub f}) of the dye show an abrupt reduction in high polarity solvents having {delta}f >{approx}0.28. In these solvents {tau}{sub f} is seen to be strongly temperature dependent, though it is temperature independent in solvents with {delta}f <{approx}0.28. It is inferred that in high polarity protic solvents there is a participation of an additional nonradiative decay process via the involvement of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. Unlike present results, no involvement of TICT state was observed even in strongly polar aprotic solvent like acetonitrile. It is indicated that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the dye with protic solvents in addition with the solvent polarity helps in the stabilization of the TICT state for C1 dye. Unlike most TICT molecules, the activation barrier ({delta}E{sub a}) for the TICT mediated nonradiative process for C1 dye is seen to increase with solvent polarity. This is rationalized on the basis of the assumption that the TICT to ground state conversion is the activation-controlled rate-determining step for the present system than the usual ICT to TICT conversion as encountered for most other TICT molecules.

  2. Modeling of the Dynamics of Non-radiative Energy Transfer in Tm3+, Tb3+: LiYF4-Based Electronic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Miranda, A.; Castaño, V. M.

    2017-08-01

    The fluorescent decay of the levels 3H4 and 3F4 of Tm3+ in LiYF4 crystals doped with Tb3+ and Eu3+ was mathematically modeled to estimate the optimal doping levels to maximize the laser emission at 1.5 μm of the transition 3H4 → 3F4. The analysis is carried out both through the solution of the master energy transfer equations that govern the non-radiative processes of energy and Monte Carlo simulations. The analysis is improved with the experimental data of the fluorescence decay to include quadrupole and dipole interactions simultaneously. The importance of considering these interactions is that the optimal concentrations of impurities predicted for these luminescent systems are lower than those reported with the use of traditional models.

  3. Femtosecond-pulse laser-ablation-induced synthesis and improved emission properties of ultrafine Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles with reduced nonradiative relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Changbin, E-mail: zhengchangbin@ciomp.ac.cn; Yang, Guilong; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Chunrui; Wang, Hualong; Chen, Fei; He, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Nanomaterials with effective visible upconversion emission have received special attention due to the potential application in the fields including biological labeling, imaging, and photodynamic therapy. The main focus of this work is the improvement of the upconversion emission properties, which is enhanced emission intensity and prolonged decay time, by reducing nonradiative relaxation assisted by high energy phonon. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles (considerably < 50 nm) were directly prepared through femtosecond-pulse laser ablation conducted on the corresponding oxide mixture. It was observed that the number of carbonate and hydroxyl groups remaining in the nanoparticles was decreased. The upconversion and infrared emission properties of the particles were investigated using 976-nm continuous-wave laser radiation, and it was found that the relative red-to-green emission intensity decreased. The samples also exhibited higher integral intensity and reduced power dependence on the excitation intensity, which indicates a more effective upconversion process. The decay time for upconversion emission was lengthened, and for the first time (to the best of our knowledge), infrared emission at 1550 nm was almost suppressed. As a result of the elimination of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups, nonradiative relaxation assisted by high-energy phonons was reduced, thereby increasing the decay time and upconversion emission and decreasing the infrared emission. - Graphical abstract: Reduced nonradiative relaxation leads to higher upconversion emission intensity and decreased relative red-to-green emission intensity. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles are prepared by laser ablation on the oxide mixture. • Number of carbonate and hydroxyl groups in the nanoparticles is decreased. • These nanoparticles present improved emission properties. • For the first time, infrared emission at 1550 nm is almost suppressed.

  4. Nonradiative and Radiative Recombination in CdS Polycrystalline Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gaubas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of polycrystalline CdS layers, employed in formation of the CdS-Cu2S heterostructures, have been studied by combining contactless techniques of the time and spectrally resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL spectroscopy and microwave-probed photoconductivity (MW-PC transients. The confocal microscopy has been employed to correlate the homogeneity of photoluminescence and grain size in CdS layers. Three types of samples with crystallite grain size of <1 μm (the I-type and of 2–10 μm of homogeneous (II-type and inhomogeneous (III-type grain distribution have been separated. The simultaneous record of MW-PC and TR-PL responses ensures the same sampling area on the layer under investigation, as both (MW-PC and TR-PL signals are generated by the same UV laser excitation beam. Two PL bands peaked at 500 and 700 nm were revealed. It has been demonstrated that photoluminescence intensity strongly depends on the properties of the polycrystalline 15–26 μm thick CdS layers with equilibrium carrier density of about 1.5×1013 cm−3, which serve as the substrates to form CdS-Cu2S junctions. The different carrier decay components were ascribed to different microareas with characteristic MW-PC and PL decay lifetimes of 2–10 ns, ascribed to microcrystallites with PL instantaneous decay lifetimes of 40–200 ns, and MW-PC decay lifetimes in the range of 100–1000 μs attributed to the inter-crystallite areas of CdS polycrystalline material.

  5. Computational studies on the excited states of luminescent platinum(II) alkynyl systems of tridentate pincer ligands in radiative and nonradiative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Han; Lam, Elizabeth Suk-Hang; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2013-10-09

    Platinum(II) alkynyl complexes of various tridentate pincer ligands, [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) (trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) (R'-bzimpy = 2,6-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)pyridine and R' = alkyl), [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] (R'-bzimb = 1,3-bis(N-alkylbenzimidazol-2'-yl)benzene and R' = C4H9), have been found to possess rich photophysical properties. The emission in dilute solutions of [Pt(trpy)(C≡CR)](+) originated from a triplet alkynyl-to-tridentate pincer ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) excited state, with mixing of a platinum-to-tridentate pincer ligand metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, while that of [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] originated from a triplet excited state of intraligand (IL) character of the tridentate ligand mixed with a platinum-to-tridentate ligand MLCT character. Interestingly, both emissions were observed in [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+) in some cases. In addition, [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CR)] displayed a photoluminescence quantum yield higher than that of [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CR)](+). Computational studies have been performed on the representative complexes [Pt(trpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (1), [Pt(R'-bzimpy)(C≡CPh)](+) (2), and [Pt(R'-bzimb)(C≡CPh)] (3), where R' = CH3 and Ph = C6H5, to provide an in-depth understanding of the nature of their emissive origin as well as the radiative and nonradiative processes. In particular, the factors governing the ordering of the triplet excited states and radiative decay rate constants of the emissive state ((3)ES) have been examined. The potential energy profiles for the deactivation process from the (3)ES via triplet metal-centered ((3)MC) states have also been explored. This work reveals for the first time the potential energy profiles for the thermal deactivation pathway of square planar platinum(II) complexes.

  6. Stationarity of asymptotically flat non-radiating electrovacuum spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Enríquez, Rosemberg Toalá

    2016-01-01

    It is proven that a solution to the Einstein-Maxwell equations whose gravitational and electromagnetic radiation fields vanish is in fact stationary in a neighbourhood of spatial infinity. That is, if the Weyl and Faraday tensors decay suitably fast, then there exists a time-like Killing vector field in the region outside the bifurcate horizon of a sphere of sufficiently large radius. In particular, truly dynamical time-periodic electrovacuum spacetimes do not exist. This is an extension of earlier work by Alexakis and Schlue and Bi\\v{c}\\'{a}k, Sholtz and Tod to include electromagnetism.

  7. Observation of a nonradiative flat band for spoof surface plasmons in a metallic Lieb lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kajiwara, Sho; Nakata, Yosuke; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kitano, Masao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonradiative flat band for spoof surface plasmon polaritons bounded on a structured surface with Lieb lattice symmetry in the terahertz regime. First, we theoretically derive the dispersion relation of spoof plasmons in a metallic Lieb lattice based on the electrical circuit model. We obtain three bands, one of which is independent of wave vector. To confirm the theoretical result, we numerically and experimentally observe the flat band in transmission and attenuated total reflection configurations. We reveal that the quality factor of the nonradiative flat-band mode decoupled from the propagating wave is higher than that of the radiative flat-band mode. This indicates that the nonradiative flat-band mode is three-dimensionally confined in the lattice.

  8. Photoacoustic Determination of Non-radiative Relaxation Time of Absorbing Centers in Maize Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2017-07-01

    Using non-destructive photothermal techniques, it is possible to characterize non-homogenous materials to obtain its optical and thermal properties through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). In photoacoustic (PA) phenomena, there are transient states of thermal excitation, when samples absorb the incident light; these states manifest an excitation process that generates the PA signal, being in direct relation with the non-radiative relaxation times with the sample absorbent centers. The objective of this study was to determine the non-radiative relaxation times associated with different absorbent centers of corn seeds ( Zea mays L.), by using PAS. A frequency scan was done at different wavelengths (350 nm, 470 nm and 650 nm) in order to obtain the non-radiative relaxation times with different types of maize seeds.

  9. Coupling of radial and nonradial oscillations of relativistic stars: Gauge-invariant formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Bruni, Marco; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2005-01-01

    Linear perturbation theory is appropriate to describe small oscillations of stars, while a mild nonlinearity is still tractable perturbatively but requires one to consider mode coupling, i.e., to take into account second order effects. It is natural to start to look at this problem by considering the coupling between linear radial and nonradial modes. A radial pulsation may be thought of as an important component of an overall mildly nonlinear oscillation, e.g., of a protoneutron star. Radial pulsations of spherical compact objects do not per se emit gravitational waves but, if the coupling between the existing first order radial and nonradial modes is efficient in driving and possibly amplifying the nonradial oscillations, one may expect the appearance of nonlinear harmonics, and gravitational radiation could then be produced to a significant level. More in general, mode coupling typically leads to an interesting phenomenology, thus it is worth investigating in the context of star perturbations. In this paper we develop the relativistic formalism to study the coupling of radial and nonradial first order perturbations of a compact spherical star. From a mathematical point of view, it is convenient to treat the two sets of perturbations as separately parametrized, using a 2-parameter perturbative expansion of the metric, the energy-momentum tensor and Einstein equations in which λ is associated with the radial modes, ɛ with the nonradial perturbations, and the λɛ terms describe the coupling. This approach provides a well-defined framework to consider the gauge dependence of perturbations, allowing us to use ɛ order gauge-invariant nonradial variables on the static background and to define new second order λɛ gauge-invariant variables representing the result of the nonlinear coupling. We present the evolution and constraint equations for our variables outlining the setup for numerical computations, and briefly discuss the surface boundary conditions in terms

  10. Radiative and nonradiative recombination of photoexcited excitons in multi-shell-coated CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Ågren, H.; Kowalewski, J. M.; Brismar, H.; Wu, J.; Yue, Y.; Dai, N.; Thylén, L.

    2009-05-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have been widely studied for nanophotonics and bioimaging applications for which the lifetime of their fluorescence is of critical importance. We report experimental and theoretical characterizations of dynamic optical properties of multi-shell-coated CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs. Quantum-mechanical studies of fundamental optical excitations and Monte Carlo simulations of energy relaxation mechanisms indicate that the excitonic states are densely compacted in the QDs and are easily photoexcited by the laser pulse in the presence of nonradiative electron-phonon interactions. For spherical QDs, the decay time of spontaneous radiative emission of individual photoexcited excitonic states with zero angular momenta is found to be only tens of picoseconds. In our multi-shell QDs, high-energy excitonic states of nonzero angular momenta have to go through a number of nonradiative electron-phonon interaction steps in order to relax to zero-angular-momentum excitonic states for radiative emission, resulting in an effective fluorescence peak at about 2 ns in the photoncount-time relationship. This explains the measured long average fluorescence lifetime of 3.6 ns. Such a long lifetime facilitates the applications of colloidal QDs in areas such as QD-based solar cells, bioimaging and metamaterials.

  11. Excited state decay of cyclometalated polypyridine ruthenium complexes: insight from theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitner, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2016-09-21

    Deactivation pathways of the triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) excited state of cyclometalated polypyridine ruthenium complexes with [RuN5C](+) coordination are discussed on the basis of the available experimental data and a series of density functional theory calculations. Three different complex classes are considered, namely with [Ru(N^N)2(N^C)](+), [Ru(N^N^N)(N^C^N)](+) and [Ru(N^N^N)(N^N^C)](+) coordination modes. Excited state deactivation in these complex types proceeds via five distinct decay channels. Vibronic coupling of the (3)MLCT state to high-energy oscillators of the singlet ground state ((1)GS) allows tunneling to the ground state followed by vibrational relaxation (path A). A ligand field excited state ((3)MC) is thermally accessible via a (3)MLCT →(3)MC transition state with the (3)MC state being strongly coupled to the (1)GS surface via a low-energy minimum energy crossing point (path B). Furthermore, a (3)MLCT →(1)GS surface crossing point directly couples the triplet and singlet potential energy surfaces (path C). Charge transfer states either with higher singlet character or with different orbital parentage and intrinsic symmetry restrictions are thermally populated which promote non-radiative decay via tunneling to the (1)GS state (path D). Finally, the excited state can decay via phosphorescence (path E). The dominant deactivation pathways differ for the three individual complex classes. The implications of these findings for isoelectronic iridium(iii) or iron(ii) complexes are discussed. Ultimately, strategies for optimizing the emission efficiencies of cyclometalated polypyridine complexes of d(6)-metal ions, especially Ru(II), are suggested.

  12. Constraints on decay plus oscillation solutions of the solar neutrino problem

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Mohanty, S; Joshipura, Anjan S.; Masso, Eduard; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2002-01-01

    We examine the constraints on non-radiative decay of neutrinos from the observations of solar neutrino experiments. The standard oscillation hypothesis among three neutrinos solves the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems. Decay of a massive neutrino mixed with the electron neutrino results in the depletion of the solar neutrino flux. We introduce neutrino decay in the oscillation hypothesis and demand that decay does not spoil the successful explanation of solar and atmospheric observations. We obtain a lower bound on the ratio of the lifetime over the mass of $\

  13. Effect of Molecular Packing and Charge Delocalization on the Nonradiative Recombination of Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xian Kai

    2016-09-05

    In organic solar cells, a major source of energy loss is attributed to nonradiative recombination from the interfacial charge transfer states to the ground state. By taking pentacene–C60 complexes as model donor–acceptor systems, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of how molecular packing and charge delocalization impact these nonradiative recombination rates at donor–acceptor interfaces is provided.

  14. Research on Non-radial Oscillations of the Sun and Stars in the Early 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I describe some historical background of helio- and astero-seismology research in the early 1970s from my personal recollection, particularly on how our Tokyo research group on non-radial oscillations of stars got started. I also describe my recent research on the super-outburst mechanism of SU UMa-type dwarf novae.

  15. A micro-scale hot-surface device based on non-radiative carrier recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Holleman, J.; Iordache, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work employs the idea of making micro-scale hot-surface devices (e.g. sensors, flow meters, micro reactors, etc) based on generation of heat due to nonradiative recombination of carriers in a thin (13 nm) poly silicon surface layer. An important part of the device is a nano-scale (10-100 nm)

  16. Convivial Decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    in the life of infrastructure we can observe common issues associated with aging infrastructures – hardware’s material decay, programming languages and software tools reaching end of support, obsolete managerial methodologies, etc. Such a case of infrastructural decay reveals how work of infrastructure...... maintenance may reach the limits of repair and shift from repair-as-sustaining into a mode of repair- into-decay, actively working towards the end-of-life. What this reveals is that, rather than infrastructural decay being a natural by-product of time’s passing, there is active work that goes into producing......This paper discusses the empirical case of an aging and obsolescent infrastructure supporting a space science mission that is currently approaching a known end. Such a case contributes to our understanding of the degrading path at the end-of-life of an infrastructure. During this later stage...

  17. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Hikosaka, Koki

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  18. Nonradiating and radiating modes excited by quantum emitters in open epsilon-near-zero cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the emission and interaction properties of quantum emitters (QEs) embedded within an optical cavity is a key technique in engineering light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, as well as in the development of quantum information processing. State-of-the-art optical cavities are based on high Q photonics crystals and dielectric resonators. However, wealthier responses might be attainable with cavities carved in more exotic materials. Here, we theoretically investigate the emission and interaction properties of QEs embedded in open epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) cavities. Using analytical methods and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that open ENZ cavities present the unique property of supporting nonradiating modes independently of the geometry of the external boundary of the cavity (shape, size, topology...). Moreover, the possibility of switching between radiating and nonradiating modes enables a dynamic control of both the emission by, and the interaction between, QEs. These phenomena provide...

  19. Non-Radial Instabilities and Progenitor Asphericities in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B

    2014-01-01

    Since core-collapse supernova simulations still struggle to produce robust neutrino-driven explosions in 3D, it has been proposed that asphericities caused by convection in the progenitor might facilitate shock revival by boosting the activity of non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region. We investigate this scenario in depth using 42 relativistic 2D simulations with multi-group neutrino transport to examine the effects of velocity and density perturbations in the progenitor for different perturbation geometries that obey fundamental physical constraints (like the anelastic condition). As a framework for analysing our results, we introduce semi-empirical scaling laws relating neutrino heating, average turbulent velocities in the gain region, and the shock deformation in the saturation limit of non-radial instabilities. The squared turbulent Mach number, , reflects the violence of aspherical motions in the gain layer, and explosive runaway occurs for ~0.3, corresponding to a reduction of t...

  20. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations I: dark matter & non-radiative models

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Pearce, Frazer R; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T; Power, Chris; Cui, Weiguang; Beck, Alexander M; Borgani, Stefano; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Davé, Romeel; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Hobbs, Alex; Katz, Neal; Lau, Erwin; McCarthy, Ian G; Murante, Giuseppe; Nagai, Daisuke; Nelson, Kaylea; Newton, Richard D A; Puchwein, Ewald; Read, Justin I; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Thacker, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of a galaxy cluster in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe using twelve different codes modeling only gravity and non-radiative hydrodynamics (\\art, \\arepo, \\hydra\\ and 9 incarnations of GADGET). This range of codes includes particle based, moving and fixed mesh codes as well as both Eulerian and Lagrangian fluid schemes. The various GADGET implementations span traditional and advanced smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) schemes. The goal of this comparison is to assess the reliability of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of clusters in the simplest astrophysically relevant case, that in which the gas is assumed to be non-radiative. We compare images of the cluster at $z=0$, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. The underlying gravitational framework can be aligned very accurately for all the codes allowing a detailed investigation of the differences that develop due to the various gas physics implementations employ...

  1. Nonradial modes in RR Lyrae stars from the OGLE Collection of Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Netzel, Henryka; Moskalik, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) is a great source of top-quality photometry of classical pulsators. Collection of variable stars from the fourth part of the project contains more than 38 000 RR Lyrae stars. These stars pulsate mostly in the radial fundamental mode (RRab), in radial first overtone (RRc) or in both modes simultaneously (RRd). Analysis of the OGLE data allowed to detect additional non-radial modes in RRc and in RRd stars. We have found more than 260 double-mode stars with characteristic period ratio of the additional (shorter) period to first overtone period around 0.61, increasing the number of known stars of this type by factor of 10. Stars from the OGLE sample form three nearly parallel sequences in the Petersen diagram. Some stars show more than one non-radial mode simultaneously. These modes belong to different sequences.

  2. Observation of non-radiative de-excitation processes in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, J.N.; Wojcik, J.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics, Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Crowe, I.; Sherliker, B.; Halsall, M.P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R.M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Knights, A.P.

    2009-05-15

    We describe the impact of non-radiative de-excitation mechanisms on the optical emission from silicon nanocrystals formed in SiO{sub 2}. Auger excitation via free carriers deliberately introduced through phosphorus ion implantation, shows a monotonic increase with increasing phosphorus concentration which can be modelled adequately using a simple statistical approach. We also report a reduction in nanocrystal luminescence intensity with increasing exposure to UV radiation and suggest this phenomenon results from the introduction of non-radiative defects in the Si/SiO{sub 2} network. The effect of UV radiation varies significantly depending on the sample preparation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Non-radial, non-adiabatic solar-like oscillations in RGB and HB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Grosjean, M; Belkacem, K; Montalban, J; Noels, A; Samadi, R

    2013-01-01

    CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. We compare the theoretical spectrum of two red giants in the same region of the HR diagram but in different evolutionary phases. We present here our first results on the inertia, lifetimes and amplitudes of the oscillations and discuss the differences between the two stars.

  4. The effect of non-radial motions on the CDM model predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Popolo, A D

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show how non-radial motions, originating from the tidal interaction of the irregular mass distribution within and around protoclusters, can solve some of the problems of the CDM model. Firstly the discrepancy between the CDM predicted two-points correlation function of clusters and the observed one. We compare the two-points correlation function, that we obtain taking account of non-radial motions, with that obtained by Sutherland & Efstathiou (1991) from the analysis of Geller & Hucra's (1988) deep redshift survey and with the data points for the APM clusters obtained by Efstathiou et al. (1992). Secondly the problem of the X-ray clusters abundance over-production predicted by the CDM model. In this case we compare the X-ray temperature distribution function, calculated using Press-Schechter theory and Evrard's (1990) prescriptions for the mass-temperature relation, taking also account of the non-radial motions, with Henry & Arnaud (1991) and Edge et al. (1990) X-ray temperature ...

  5. Non-radial solar wind flows induced by the motion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Owens

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the non-radial flows (NRFs during nearly five years of interplanetary observations revealed the average non-radial speed of the solar wind flows to be ~30km/s, with approximately one-half of the large (>100km/s NRFs associated with ICMEs. Conversely, the average non-radial flow speed upstream of all ICMEs is ~100km/s, with just over one-third preceded by large NRFs. These upstream flow deflections are analysed in the context of the large-scale structure of the driving ICME. We chose 5 magnetic clouds with relatively uncomplicated upstream flow deflections. Using variance analysis it was possible to infer the local axis orientation, and to qualitatively estimate the point of interception of the spacecraft with the ICME. For all 5 events the observed upstream flows were in agreement with the point of interception predicted by variance analysis. Thus we conclude that the upstream flow deflections in these events are in accord with the current concept of the large-scale structure of an ICME: a curved axial loop connected to the Sun, bounded by a curved (though not necessarily circular cross section.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (flare and stream dynamics; interplanetary magnetic fields; interplanetary shocks

  6. Effects of the impurity-host interactions on the nonradiative processes in ZnS:Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablero, C.

    2010-11-01

    There is a great deal of controversy about whether the behavior of an intermediate band in the gap of semiconductors is similar or not to the deep-gap levels. It can have significant consequences, for example, on the nonradiative recombination. In order to analyze the behavior of an intermediate band, we have considered the effect of the inward and outward displacements corresponding to breathing and longitudinal modes of Cr-doped ZnS and on the charge density for different processes involved in the nonradiative recombination using first-principles. This metal-doped zinc chalcogenide has a partially filled band within the host semiconductor gap. In contrast to the properties exhibited by deep-gap levels in other systems, we find small variations in the equilibrium configurations, forces, and electronic density around the Cr when the nonradiative recombination mechanisms modify the intermediate band charge. The charge density around the impurity is equilibrated in response to the perturbations in the equilibrium nuclear configuration and the charge of the intermediate band. The equilibration follows a Le Chatelier principle through the modification of the contribution from the impurity to the intermediate band and to the valence band. The intermediate band introduced by Cr in ZnS for the concentrations analyzed makes the electronic capture difficult and later multiphonon emission in the charge-transfer processes, in accordance with experimental results.

  7. Moving nonradiating kinks in nonlocal φ4 and φ4-φ6 models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimov, G L; Medvedeva, E V

    2011-11-01

    We explore the existence of moving nonradiating kinks in nonlocal generalizations of φ(4) and φ(4)-φ(6) models. These models are described by nonlocal nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation, u(tt)-Lu+F(u)=0, where L is a Fourier multiplier operator of a specific form and F(u) includes either just a cubic term (φ(4) case) or cubic and quintic (φ(4)-φ(6) case) terms. The general mechanism responsible for the discretization of kink velocities in the nonlocal model is discussed. We report numerical results obtained for these models. It is shown that, contrary to the traditional φ(4) model, the nonlocal φ(4) model does not admit moving nonradiating kinks but admits solitary waves that do not exist in the local model. At the same time the nonlocal φ(4)-φ(6) model describes moving nonradiating kinks. The set of velocities allowed for these kinks is discrete with the highest possible velocity c(1). This set of velocities is unambiguously determined by the parameters of the model. Numerical simulations show that a kink launched at the velocity c higher than c(1) starts to decelerate, and its velocity settles down to the highest value of the discrete spectrum c(1).

  8. Non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in dogs: 14 cases (1996 - 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago ePeralta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaws is an entity of major clinical impact characterized by chronically exposed necrotic mandibular or maxillary bone. Its clinicopathological characteristics and possible inciting or risk factors are well described in humans but only anecdotally reported in dogs. Treatment modalities and outcome vary depending on the inciting factors involved and the extent and severity of the lesions. The objectives of this study were to retrospectively describe the clinicopathological features of non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in a series of 14 dogs, identify possible inciting or risk factors, and report on the surgical treatment and outcome. For all patients, the medical records were used to collect information regarding signalment, clinical signs, characteristics of the oral, jaw and dental lesions, diagnostic imaging findings, histopathological and microbiological analysis, treatment performed and outcome. The data collected showed that non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws appears to be an infrequent clinical entity but of significant impact in dogs; that a history of systemic antibiotics and dental disease is common among affected dogs; that previous dental extractions are commonly associated with ONJ sites; that using a systematic diagnostic approach is essential for diagnosis; and that thorough surgical débridement combined with a course of oral antibiotics was effective in the described dogs affected by advanced non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

  9. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental sealants? How are ... fix decayed teeth. Back to Top What causes tooth decay? Germs in the mouth use the sugar in ...

  10. Nonradiative recombination due to Ar implantation induced point defects in GaInN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Torsten; Pietscher, Hans-Georg; Joenen, Holger; Rossow, Uwe; Bremers, Heiko; Hangleiter, Andreas [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany); Menzel, Dirk [Institut fuer Physik der Kondensierten Materie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We quantitatively investigate nonradiative recombination at point defects via temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy on argon implanted MOVPE-grown GaInN/GaN single quantum wells (QW). An implantation dose dependent (doses: 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) reduction of nonradiative lifetimes from several nanoseconds (unimplanted sample) to less than 100 ps at room temperature is observed. This shortening of nonradiative lifetimes is attributed to nonradiative recombination due to increased implantation induced defect densities. An effective hole capture coefficient can be estimated to about 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} via the measured nonradiative lifetimes and simulated (SRIM) defect densities. The thermal stability of the defects is analyzed using rapid thermal annealing at 800 {sup circle} C in order to recover the crystal from implantation damage. At high temperatures, nonradiative recombination in the barriers becomes dominant: defect density dependent losses with an activation energy equal to half the difference between the GaN band gap and the peak position of the QW luminescence are observed.

  11. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  12. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  13. Specific solvent effects of linear alcohols on the emission spectrum and the excited state decay of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Paul; Leiner, Marc J. P.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-06-01

    This study aims at a quantitative extraction of specific solvent effects of hydroxylic solvents on the non-radiative decay of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II). For this purpose the emission spectra, quantum yields and excited state lifetimes of the dye were measured in a series of monovalent linear alcohols. Separation of the non-radiative decay via the energy gap was achieved by evaluating the temperature dependence of quantum yields to account for temperature-activated transitions. The parameters determining the shapes of the emission spectra were calculated by a modified Franck-Condon analysis including the anharmonic Morse potential, and correlated with the non-radiative rate with the help of the energy gap law. The specific effects of hydroxylic solvents were finally obtained by comparison with the well-known behavior in non-hydroxylic solvents, and interpreted with the help of the energy gap law theory.

  14. Correlation of Electrical Noise with Non-radiative Current for High Power QWLs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of low-frequency electrical noise, voltage-current (V-I) and electrical derivation for 980nm InGaAsP/InGaAs/GaAs high power double quantum well lasers(DQWLs) are measured under different conditions. The correlation of the low-frequency electrical noise with surface non-radiative current of devices is discussed. The results indicate the low-frequency electrical noise of 980nm DQWLs with high power is mainly 1/f noise and has good relation with the device surface current at low injection.

  15. A Non-radial Eruption in a Quadrupolar Magnetic Configuration with a Coronal Null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Chen, Qingrong; Hayashi, Keiji

    2012-10-01

    We report one of the several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory. A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated ~2 × 1031 erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60° with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y-shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reconnection signatures appeared near the inferred null. Part of the magnetic setting resembles that of a blowout-type jet; the observed inverted-Y structure likely outlines the open field lines along the separatrix surface. Owing to the asymmetrical photospheric flux distribution, the confining magnetic pressure decreases much faster horizontally than upward. This special field geometry likely guided the non-radial eruption during its initial stage.

  16. A NON-RADIAL ERUPTION IN A QUADRUPOLAR MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION WITH A CORONAL NULL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu Yang; Hayashi, Keiji [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chen Qingrong, E-mail: xudong@sun.stanford.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We report one of the several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory. A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60 Degree-Sign with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y-shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reconnection signatures appeared near the inferred null. Part of the magnetic setting resembles that of a blowout-type jet; the observed inverted-Y structure likely outlines the open field lines along the separatrix surface. Owing to the asymmetrical photospheric flux distribution, the confining magnetic pressure decreases much faster horizontally than upward. This special field geometry likely guided the non-radial eruption during its initial stage.

  17. Fluorescence and Nonradiative Properties of Nd3+ in Novel Heavy Metal Contained Fluorophosphate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju H. Choi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate new series of heavy metal containing fluorophosphate glass system. The fluorescence and nonradiative properties of Nd3+ ions are investigated as a function of Nd2O3 concentration. The variation of intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, and Ω6 is determined from absorption spectra. The spontaneous probability (A and branching ratio (β are determined using intensity parameters. The emission cross sections for the 4F3/2→4I13/2 transition, which is calculated by Fuchtbabauer-Ladenburg method, decrease from 6.1×10−21 to 3.0×10−21(pm2 and those for the 4F3/2→4I11/2 transition decrease from 3.51×10−20 to 1.7×10−20 as Nd2O3 concentration increase up to 3 wt%. The nonradiative relaxation is analyzed in terms of multiphonon relaxation and concentration quenching due to energy transfer among Nd3+ ions. Finally, the above results obtained at 1 wt %Nd2O3 are compared with some of reported laser host glasses which indicated the potentials for broadband-amplifiers and high-power laser applications.

  18. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - I. Dark matter and non-radiative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; Pearce, Frazer R.; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Power, Chris; Cui, Weiguang; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Davé, Romeel; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Hobbs, Alex; Katz, Neal; Lau, Erwin; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Guiseppe; Nagai, Daisuke; Nelson, Kaylea; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Read, Justin I.; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain; Thacker, Robert J.

    2016-04-01

    We have simulated the formation of a galaxy cluster in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 13 different codes modelling only gravity and non-radiative hydrodynamics (RAMSES, ART, AREPO, HYDRA and nine incarnations of GADGET). This range of codes includes particle-based, moving and fixed mesh codes as well as both Eulerian and Lagrangian fluid schemes. The various GADGET implementations span classic and modern smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) schemes. The goal of this comparison is to assess the reliability of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of clusters in the simplest astrophysically relevant case, that in which the gas is assumed to be non-radiative. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. The underlying gravitational framework can be aligned very accurately for all the codes allowing a detailed investigation of the differences that develop due to the various gas physics implementations employed. As expected, the mesh-based codes RAMSES, ART and AREPO form extended entropy cores in the gas with rising central gas temperatures. Those codes employing classic SPH schemes show falling entropy profiles all the way into the very centre with correspondingly rising density profiles and central temperature inversions. We show that methods with modern SPH schemes that allow entropy mixing span the range between these two extremes and the latest SPH variants produce gas entropy profiles that are essentially indistinguishable from those obtained with grid-based methods.

  19. Nonradiating and radiating modes excited by quantum emitters in open epsilon-near-zero cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the emission and interaction properties of quantum emitters (QEs) embedded within an optical cavity is a key technique in engineering light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, as well as in the development of quantum information processing. State-of-the-art optical cavities are based on high quality factor photonic crystals and dielectric resonators. However, wealthier responses might be attainable with cavities carved in more exotic materials. We theoretically investigate the emission and interaction properties of QEs embedded in open epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) cavities. Using analytical methods and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that open ENZ cavities present the unique property of supporting nonradiating modes independently of the geometry of the external boundary of the cavity (shape, size, topology, etc.). Moreover, the possibility of switching between radiating and nonradiating modes enables a dynamic control of the emission by, and the interaction between, QEs. These phenomena provide unprecedented degrees of freedom in controlling and trapping fields within optical cavities, as well as in the design of cavity opto- and acoustomechanical systems.

  20. Nonradial g-mode oscillations in X-ray bursting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermott, P. N.; Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The oscillation spectrum of nonradial g-modes in X-ray bursting neutron stars has been studied. The pulsation periods are found to be sensitive to the envelope temperature and range from about 15 ms to about 50 ms for the l = 1 g(1) mode during the X-ray burst. From a quasi-adiabatic stability analysis it is likely that a spectrum of l-pole g-modes is unstable due to the epsilon-mechanism associated with rapid alpha captures. As the thermal structure of the envelope of the neutron star changes on time scales less than 0.2 s during the rise of the X-ray burst, the oscillations are expected to be quasi-coherent during this phase. The calculated period derivatives are large during the burst and are about 1 ms/s. The pulsations are short-lived and are most likely to be seen in the immediate vicinity of the burst peak. Finally, the possible relevance of nonradial g-mode pulsations to the recently discovered quasi-periodic oscillations observed in a number of X-ray sources is discussed.

  1. Green Development Performance in China: A Metafrontier Non-Radial Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a green development growth index (GDGI for measuring the changes in sustainable development over time. This index considers a wide range of pollutants, and allows for the incorporation of group heterogeneity and non-radial slack in the conventional green development index. The GDGI is calculated based on a non-radial directional distance function derived by several data envelopment analysis (DEA models, and was decomposed into an efficiency change (EC index, a best-practice gap change (BPC index and a technology gap change (TGC index. The proposed indices are employed to measure green development performance in 30 provinces in China from 2000 to 2012. The empirical results show that China has a low level of green development, with a 2.58% increase per year driven by an innovation effect. China’s green development is mainly led by the eastern region, and the technology gaps between the eastern region and the other two regions (the central and western regions have become wider over the years. The group innovative provinces have set a target for resource utilization of non-innovative provinces in order to catch-up with the corresponding groups, while the metafrontier innovative provinces provide targets for the technology levels of other provinces to improve their green development performance.

  2. Carrier density dependence of plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer in a hybrid quantum well-quantum dot structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, L J; Karanikolas, V D; Marocico, C A; Bell, A P; Sadler, T C; Parbrook, P J; Bradley, A L

    2015-01-26

    An array of Ag nanoboxes fabricated by helium-ion lithography is used to demonstrate plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer in a hybrid quantum well-quantum dot structure. The nonradiative energy transfer, from an InGaN/GaN quantum well to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal quantum dots embedded in an ~80 nm layer of PMMA, is investigated over a range of carrier densities within the quantum well. The plasmon-enhanced energy transfer efficiency is found to be independent of the carrier density, with an efficiency of 25% reported. The dependence on carrier density is observed to be the same as for conventional nonradiative energy transfer. The plasmon-coupled energy transfer enhances the QD emission by 58%. However, due to photoluminescence quenching effects an overall increase in the QD emission of 16% is observed.

  3. Global well-posedness and scattering for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the nonradial case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigong Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy-critical, focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the nonradial case reads as follows: \\[i\\partial_t u = -\\Delta u -|u|^{\\frac{4}{N-2}}u,\\quad (x,0=u_0 \\in H^1 (\\mathbb{R}^N,\\quad N\\geq 3.\\] Under a suitable assumption on the maximal strong solution, using a compactness argument and a virial identity, we establish the global well-posedness and scattering in the nonradial case, which gives a positive answer to one open problem proposed by Kenig and Merle [Invent. Math. 166 (2006, 645–675].

  4. Spectroscopy of cyanine dyes in fluid solution at atmospheric and high pressure: The effect of viscosity on nonradiative processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, S.; Sauerwein, B.; Drickamer, H.G.; Schuster, G.B. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1994-12-22

    The spectroscopy of cyanine dyes was examined at atmospheric pressure and at high pressure in a series of alcohols and other solvents. Variation of external pressure provides the means to control viscosity over a wide range in one solvent at constant temperature. The findings reveal that the nonradiative relaxation of cyanines in fluid solution can occur when the motion leading to the formation of the cis isomer is stopped completely. Analysis of the viscosity dependence of the nonradiative relaxation rate constant reveals consistent deviation from the Kramers-DSE relation. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. White light generation by resonant nonradiative energy transfer from epitaxial InGaN/GaN quantum wells to colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Sari, Emre; Baek, Jong-Hyeob; Lee, In-Hwan; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2008-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate white-light-generating nonradiative energy transfer (ET) from epitaxial quantum wells (QWs) to colloidal quantum dots (QDs) in their close proximity. This proof-of-concept hybrid color-converting system consists of chemically synthesized red-emitting CdSe/ZnS core/shell heteronanocrystals intimately integrated on epitaxially grown cyan-emitting InGaN/GaN QWs. The white light is generated by the collective luminescence of QWs and QDs, for which the dot emission is further increased by 63% with nonradiative ET, setting the operating point in the white region of CIE chromaticity diagram. Using cyan emission at 490 nm from the QWs and red emission at 650 nm from the nanocrystal (NC) luminophors, we obtain warm white light generation with a correlated color temperature of Tc = 3135 K and tristimulus coordinates of (x,y) = (0.42, 0.39) in the white region. By analyzing the time-resolved radiative decay of these NC emitters in our hybrid system with a 16 ps time resolution, the luminescence kinetics reveals a fast ET with a rate of (2 ns)-1 using a multiexponential fit with χ 2 = 1.0171.

  6. A Non-radial Eruption in a Quadrupolar Magnetic Configuration with a Coronal Null

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Qingrong; Hayashi, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    We report one of several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated ~2e31 erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60 degrees with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reco...

  7. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  8. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces.

  9. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgilio, M., E-mail: virgilio@df.unipi.it [Dip. di Fisica “E. Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, P.za San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Capellini, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Dip. di scienze, Università Roma Tre, viale G. Marconi 446, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  10. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: SPH versus AMR

    CERN Document Server

    Power, C; Hobbs, A

    2013-01-01

    Abridged: We simulate a massive galaxy cluster in a LCDM Universe using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics: `classic' Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH); a novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS); and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We find that SPHS and AMR are in excellent agreement, with both forming a well-defined entropy core that rapidly converges with increasing mass and force resolution. By contrast, SPH exhibits rather different behaviour. At low redshift, entropy decreases systematically with decreasing cluster-centric radius, converging on ever lower central values with increasing resolution. At higher redshift, SPH is in better agreement with SPHS and AMR but shows much poorer numerical convergence. We trace these discrepancies to artificial surface tension in SPH at phase boundaries. At early times, the passage of massive substructures close to the cluster centre stirs and shocks gas to build an entropy core. At later times, artif...

  11. Discovery of non-radial pulsations in the spectroscopic binary Herbig Ae star RS Cha

    CERN Document Server

    Böhm, T; Catala, C; Alecian, E; Pollard, K; Wright, D

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present a first discovery of non radial pulsations in both components of the Herbig Ae spectroscopic binary star RS Cha. The binary was monitored in quasi-continuous observations during 14 observing nights (Jan 2006) at the 1m Mt John (New Zealand) telescope with the Hercules high-resolution echelle spectrograph. The cumulated exposure time on the star was 44 hrs, corresponding to 255 individual high-resolution echelle spectra with $R = 45000$. Least square deconvolved spectra (LSD) were obtained for each spectrum representing the effective photospheric absorption profile modified by pulsations. Difference spectra were calculated by subtracting rotationally broadened artificial profiles; these residual spectra were analysed and non-radial pulsations were detected. A subsequent analysis with two complementary methods, namely Fourier Parameter Fit (FPF) and Fourier 2D (F2D) has been performed and first constraints on the pulsation modes have been derived. In fact, both components of the spect...

  12. Indirect imaging of nonradial pulsations in a rapidly oscillating Ap star

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O P

    2004-01-01

    Many types of stars show periodic variations of radius and brightness, which are commonly referred to as `stellar pulsations'. Observed pulsational characteristics are determined by fundamental stellar parameters. Consequently, investigations of stellar pulsations provide a unique opportunity to verify and refine our understanding of the evolution and internal structure of stars. However, a key boundary condition for this analysis -- precise information about the geometry of pulsations in the outer stellar envelopes -- has been notoriously difficult to secure. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to solve this problem by constructing an `image' of the pulsation velocity field from time series observations of stellar spectra. This technique is applied to study the geometry of nonradial pulsations in a prototype magnetic oscillating (roAp) star HR 3831. Our velocity map directly demonstrates an alignment of pulsations with the axis of the global magnetic field and reveals a significant magnetically induced d...

  13. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  14. Method for determining effective nonradiative lifetime and leakage losses in double-heterostructure lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Opdorp, C.; ' t Hooft, G.W.

    1981-06-01

    Carrier losses in double-heterostructure lasers are twofold: (i) nonradiative recombination through killers in the bulk of the active region and at all its boundaries (interfaces and surfaces), and (ii) leakage out of the active region. A simple theory shows the following. In the high-injection regime (papprox. =n) all processes under (i) are directly proportional to n. Consequently their contributions can be lumped together in a single effective nonradiative carrier lifetime tau/sub nr/ ; this tau/sub nr/ is constant (i.e., independent of n) owing to the constant degree of occupation of all killers in the mentioned regime. On the other hand, the leakage losses (ii) are superlinear in n. This provides a well-grounded basis for disentangling the contributions of (i) and (ii) in a given sample. Further, a simple method is presented for accurately determining tau/sub nr/ from data of the external quantum efficiency eta/sub ext/ measured as a function of current I in the spontaneous high-injection regime below the laser threshold. Knowledge of the light-extraction factor (i.e., the ratio of external and internal quantum efficiencies) is essentially unnecessary with this method. However, optionally it can be determined easily from a slight extension of the method. For illustration the method of determining tau/sub nr/, which is also applicable to double-hetero LED's, has been applied to some thirty LPE and metal-organic VPE GaAs-(Ga,Al)As lasers of widely varying qualities. The values found vary between 0.8 and 55 ns. From the measured values of tau/sub nr/ it follows that the upper limit for the interface recombination velocity in the best samples is 270 cm/s. For most samples tau/sub nr/ cannot account for all electrical losses at laser threshold. The superlinear excess losses are ascribable to leakage.

  15. Non-radial pulsations in the γ Doradus star HD 195068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Chapellier, E.; Le Contel, J.-M.; Sareyan, J.-P.

    2006-07-01

    We present high resolution spectroscopic observations of the γ Doradus star HD 195068. About 230 spectra were collected over 2 years. Time series analysis performed on radial velocity data shows a main peak at 1.61 d-1 , a frequency not yet detected in photometry. The Hipparcos photometric 1.25 d-1 frequency is easily recovered as is 1.30 d-1 while the third photometric frequency, 0.97 d-1 , is only marginally present. The good quality of our data, which includes 196 spectra collected over seven consecutive nights, shows that both the 1.61 d-1 and intermediate 1.27 d-1 (mixture of 1.25 and 1.30 d-1 ) frequencies are present in the line profile variations. Using the Fourier-Doppler Imaging (FDI) method, the variability associated with 1.61 d-1 can be successfully modeled by a non-radial pulsation mode ℓ=5± 1, |m|=4± 1. For the intermediate frequency 1.27 d-1 we deduce ℓ=4± 1, |m|=3± 1. Evidence that the star is not pulsating in the radial mode (ℓ=0) rules out a previous classification as an RR Lyrae type star. We investigate the time variability of FDI power spectra concluding that the observed temporal variability of modes can be explained by a beating phenomenon between closely spaced frequencies of two non-radial modes. The distribution of the oscillation power within the line profile indicates that there is a significant tangential velocity component of oscillations characteristic of high radial order gravity modes which are predicted to be observed in γ Doradus type stars.

  16. Excitation of a nonradial mode in a millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1751-305

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Umin

    2014-01-01

    We discuss candidates for non-radial modes excited in a mass accreting and rapidly rotating neutron star to explain the coherent frequency identified in the light curves of a millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1751-305. The spin frequency of the pulsar is $\

  17. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  18. Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  19. Excited-state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled 5-fluorocytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Trachsel, Maria A; Den, Takuya; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-03-20

    The S0 → S1 vibronic spectrum and S1 state nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled keto-amino 5-fluorocytosine (5FCyt) are investigated by two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm(–1) resolution. The 0(0)(0) rotational band contour is polarized in-plane, implying that the electronic transition is (1)ππ*. The electronic transition dipole moment orientation and the changes of rotational constants agree closely with the SCS-CC2 calculated values for the (1)ππ* (S1) transition of 5FCyt. The spectral region from 0 to 300 cm(–1) is dominated by overtone and combination bands of the out-of-plane ν1′ (boat), ν2′ (butterfly), and ν3′ (HN–C6H twist) vibrations, implying that the pyrimidinone frame is distorted out-of-plane by the (1)ππ* excitation, in agreement with SCS-CC2 calculations. The number of vibronic bands rises strongly around +350 cm(–1); this is attributed to the (1)ππ* state barrier to planarity that corresponds to the central maximum of the double-minimum out-of-plane vibrational potentials along the ν1′, ν2′, and ν3′ coordinates, which gives rise to a high density of vibronic excitations. At +1200 cm(–1), rapid nonradiative relaxation (k(nr) ≥ 10(12) s(–1)) sets in, which we interpret as the height of the (1)ππ* state barrier in front of the lowest S1/S0 conical intersection. This barrier in 5FCyt is 3 times higher than that in cytosine. The lifetimes of the ν′ = 0, 2ν1′, 2ν2′, 2ν1′ + 2ν2′, 4ν2′, and 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ levels are determined from Lorentzian widths fitted to the rotational band contours and are τ ≥ 75 ps for ν′ = 0, decreasing to τ ≥ 55 ps at the 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ level at +234 cm(–1). These gas-phase lifetimes are twice those of S1 state cytosine and 10–100 times those of the other canonical nucleobases in the gas phase. On the other hand, the 5FCyt gas-phase lifetime is close to the 73 ps lifetime in room-temperature solvents. This lack of

  20. Non-radiative relaxation of photoexcited chlorophylls: theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, William P.; Shenai, Prathamesh M.; Ghosh, Avishek; Liu, Zhengtang; Enriquez, Miriam Grace M.; Lambrev, Petar H.; Tan, Howe-Siang; Lo, Cynthia S.; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Zhao, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Nonradiative relaxation of high-energy excited states to the lowest excited state in chlorophylls marks the first step in the process of photosynthesis. We perform ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, that reveal this internal conversion dynamics to be slightly slower in chlorophyll B than in chlorophyll A. Modeling this process with non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics simulations uncovers a critical role played by the different side groups in the two molecules in governing the intramolecular redistribution of excited state wavefunction, leading, in turn, to different time-scales. Even given smaller electron-vibrational couplings compared to common organic conjugated chromophores, these molecules are able to efficiently dissipate about 1 eV of electronic energy into heat on the timescale of around 200 fs. This is achieved via selective participation of specific atomic groups and complex global migration of the wavefunction from the outer to inner ring, which may have important implications for biological light-harvesting function.

  1. Non-radiation endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of choledocholithiasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenming; Faigel, Douglas O; Sun, Gang; Yang, Yunsheng

    2014-11-01

    Gallstone diseases are common during pregnancy. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic and do not require any treatment. However, choledocholithiasis, cholangitis, and gallstone pancreatitis may potentially become life-threatening for both mother and fetus and often require urgent intervention. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the standard technique for removing common bile duct stones, it is associated with ionizing radiation that could carry teratogenic risk. Non-radiation ERCP (NR-ERCP) is reported to be effective without incurring this risk. Two techniques have been described to confirm bile duct cannulation: bile aspiration and image guidance. With bile aspiration, biliary cannulation is confirmed by applying suction to the cannula to yield bile, thus confirming an intrabiliary position. Image guidance involves using ultrasound or direct visualization (choledochoscopy) to confirm selective biliary cannulation or duct clearance. Once cannulation is achieved, the stones are removed using standard ERCP techniques and tools. Case series and retrospective studies have reported success rates of up to 90% for NR-ERCP with complication rates similar to standard ERCP. Pregnancy outcomes are not adversely affected by NR-ERCP, but whether the avoidance of radiation carries benefit for the baby is unknown. Prospective comparative trials are lacking. NR-ERCP is technically demanding and should be attempted only by skilled biliary endoscopists in properly equipped and staffed health-care institutions, in a multidisciplinary setting. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  2. Resonant Transparency and Non-Trivial Non-Radiating Excitations in Toroidal Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, V. A.; Rogacheva, A. V.; Savinov, V.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Engaging strongly resonant interactions allows dramatic enhancement of functionalities of many electromagnetic devices. However, resonances can be dampened by Joule and radiation losses. While in many cases Joule losses may be minimized by the choice of constituting materials, controlling radiation losses is often a bigger problem. Recent solutions include the use of coupled radiant and sub-radiant modes yielding narrow asymmetric Fano resonances in a wide range of systems, from defect states in photonic crystals and optical waveguides with mesoscopic ring resonators to nanoscale plasmonic and metamaterial systems exhibiting interference effects akin to electromagnetically-induced transparency. Here we demonstrate theoretically and confirm experimentally a new mechanism of resonant electromagnetic transparency, which yields very narrow isolated symmetric Lorentzian transmission lines in toroidal metamaterials. It exploits the long sought non-trivial non-radiating charge-current excitation based on interfering electric and toroidal dipoles that was first proposed by Afanasiev and Stepanovsky in [J. Phys. A Math. Gen. 28, 4565 (1995)]. PMID:24132231

  3. FUSE Observations of the Cygnus Loop OVI Emission from a Nonradiative Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Sankrit, R; Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.

    2001-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of a Balmer filament in the northeast region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. The data consist of one spectrum obtained through the 30"x30" (LWRS) aperture and three spectra at adjacent positions obtained through the 4"x20" (MDRS) aperture. The nonradiative shocks in the region giving rise to these faint optical filaments produce strong OVI 1032,1038 emission, which is detected in all the spectra. The OVI emission is resolved by FUSE into a strong component centered at 0 km/s, and weaker components centered at +/- 140 km/s. The MDRS spectra allow us to study the variation of OVI emission in the post-shock structure. We find that the zero velocity emission is associated directly with the Balmer filament shock, while the high velocity emission comes from a more uniformly distributed component elsewhere along the line of sight. We also find that the shocks producing the emission at +/- 140 km/s have velocities between 180 km/s and 220 km/...

  4. Non-radiative relaxation of photoexcited chlorophylls: theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, William P; Shenai, Prathamesh M; Ghosh, Avishek; Liu, Zhengtang; Enriquez, Miriam Grace M; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang; Lo, Cynthia S; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Zhao, Yang

    2015-09-08

    Nonradiative relaxation of high-energy excited states to the lowest excited state in chlorophylls marks the first step in the process of photosynthesis. We perform ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, that reveal this internal conversion dynamics to be slightly slower in chlorophyll B than in chlorophyll A. Modeling this process with non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics simulations uncovers a critical role played by the different side groups in the two molecules in governing the intramolecular redistribution of excited state wavefunction, leading, in turn, to different time-scales. Even given smaller electron-vibrational couplings compared to common organic conjugated chromophores, these molecules are able to efficiently dissipate about 1 eV of electronic energy into heat on the timescale of around 200 fs. This is achieved via selective participation of specific atomic groups and complex global migration of the wavefunction from the outer to inner ring, which may have important implications for biological light-harvesting function.

  5. Energy efficiency in Spanish wastewater treatment plants: a non-radial DEA approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Sancho, F; Molinos-Senante, M; Sala-Garrido, R

    2011-06-15

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are energy-intensive facilities. Thus, reducing their carbon footprint is particularly important, both economically and environmentally. Knowing the real operating energy efficiency of WWTPs is the starting point for any energy-saving initiative. In this article, we applied a non-radial Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) methodology to calculate energy efficiency indices for sampling of WWTPs located in Spain. In a second stage analysis, we examined the operating variables contributing to differences in energy efficiency among plants. It is verified that energy efficiencies of the analyzed WWTPs were quite low, with only 10% of them being efficient. We found that plant size, quantity of organic matter removed, and type of bioreactor aeration were significant variables in explaining energy efficiency differences. In contrast, age of the plant was not a determining factor in energy consumption. Lastly, we quantified the potential savings, both in economic terms and in terms of CO(2) emissions, that could be expected from an improvement in energy efficiency of WWTPs.

  6. A New Code for Nonradial Stellar Pulsations and its Application to Low - Mass, Helium White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Corsico, A H

    2002-01-01

    We present a finite difference code intended for computing linear, adiabatic, nonradial pulsations of spherical stars. This code is based on a general Newton - Raphson technique in order to handle the relaxation of the eigenvalue (square of the eigenfrequency) of the modes and their corresponding eigenfunctions. This code has been tested computing the pulsation spectra of polytropic spheres finding a good agreement with previous work. Then, we have coupled this code to our evolutionary code and applied it to the computation of the pulsation spectrum of a low mass, pure - helium white dwarf of 0.3 M_{sun} for a wide range of effective temperatures. In making this calculation we have taken an evolutionary time step short enough such that eigenmodes corresponding to a given model are used as initial approximation to those of the next one. Specifically, we have computed periods, period spacing, eigenfunctions, weight functions, kinetic energies and variational periods for a wide range of modes. To our notice this...

  7. Origin and implications of non-radial Imbrium Sculpture on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Crawford, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Rimmed grooves, lineations and elongate craters around Mare Imbrium shape much of the nearside Moon. This pattern was coined the Imbrium Sculpture, and it was originally argued that it must have been formed by a giant oblique (~30°) impact, a conclusion echoed by later studies. Some investigators, however, noticed that many elements of the Imbrium Sculpture are not radial to Imbrium, thereby implicating an endogenic or structural origin. Here we use these non-radial trends to conclude that the Imbrium impactor was a proto-planet (half the diameter of Vesta), once part of a population of large proto-planets in the asteroid belt. Such independent constraints on the sizes of the Imbrium and other basin-forming impactors markedly increase estimates for the mass in the asteroid belt before depletion caused by the orbital migration of Jupiter and Saturn. Moreover, laboratory impact experiments, shock physics codes and the groove widths indicate that multiple fragments (up to 2% of the initial diameter) from each oblique basin-forming impactor, such as the one that formed Imbrium, should have survived planetary collisions and contributed to the heavy impact bombardment between 4.3 and 3.8 billion years ago.

  8. Aging mathematical model of InGaN/GaN LEDs based on non-radiative recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linwang; Qian, Keyuan

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a new aging mathematical model for InGaN/GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on non-radiative recombination. Light attenuation is an important index of the performance of LEDs, Arrhenius model as the main aging mathematical model of light attenuation is poorly targeted and cannot reflect the physical significance. Based on the physical theory of deep level defects and non-radiation recombination centers, we analyze the aging mechanism of LED chips and then establish the aging mathematical model. Meanwhile, a batch of GaN-based blue LED chips are selected to conduct accelerated life tests with constant current stresses, and the experimental data is obtained to verify the new model. The result shows that compared with the traditional Arrhenius model, the new model has many advantages such as more accurate, strong pertinence and obvious physical meaning.

  9. Full wave analysis of non-radiative dielectric waveguide modulator for the determination of electrical equivalent circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Pathak; A Basu; S K Koul

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the determination of electrical equivalent circuit of ON/OFF modulator in non-radiative dielectric (NRD) guide configurations at Ka-band. Schottky barrier mixer diode is used to realize this modulator and its characteristics are determined experimentally using vector network analyzer. Full wave FEM simulator HFSS is used to determine an equivalent circuit for the mounted diode and modulator in ON and OFF states. This equivalent circuit is used to qualitatively explain the experimental characteristics of modulator.

  10. Full-band structure modeling of the radiative and non-radiative properties of semiconductor materials and devices (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, Enrico; Wen, Hanqing; Pinkie, Benjamin; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bertazzi, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the radiative and non-radiative properties of semiconductor materials is a prerequisite for optimizing the performance of existing light emitters and detectors and for developing new device architectures based on novel materials. Due to the ever increasing complexity of novel semiconductor systems and their relative technological immaturity, it is essential to have design tools and simulation strategies that include the details of the microscopic physics and their dependence on the macroscopic (continuum) variables in the macroscopic device models. Towards this end, we have developed a robust full-band structure based approach that can be used to study the intrinsic material radiative and non-radiative properties and evaluate the same characteristics of low-dimensional device structures. A parallel effort is being carried out to model the effect of substrate driven stress/strain and material quality (dislocations and defects) on microscopic quantities such as non-radiative recombination rate. Using this modeling approach, we have extensively studied the radiative and non-radiative properties of both elemental (Si and Ge) and compound semiconductors (HgCdTe, InGaAs, InAsSb and InGaN). In this work we outline the details of the modelling approach, specifically the challenges and advantages related to the use of the full-band description of the material electronic structure. We will present a detailed comparison of the radiative and Auger recombination rates as a function of temperature and doping for HgCdTe and InAsSb that are two important materials for infrared detectors and emitters. Furthermore we will discuss the role of non-radiatiave Auger recombination processes in explaining the performance of light emitter diodes. Finally we will present the extension of the model to low dimensional structures employed in a number of light emitter and detector structures.

  11. Coupling of Radial and Axial non-Radial Oscillations of Compact Stars: Gravitational Waves from first-order Differential Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Passamonti, A; Gualtieri, L; Nagar, A; Sopuerta, C F

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear coupling between radial and non-radial oscillations of static spherically symmetric neutron stars as a possible mechanism for the generation of gravitational waves that may lead to observable signatures. In this paper we concentrate on the axial sector of the non-radial perturbations. By using a multi-parameter perturbative framework we introduce a complete description of the non-linear coupling between radial and axial non-radial oscillations; we study the gauge invariant character of the associated perturbative variables and develop a computational scheme to evolve the non-linear coupling perturbations in the time domain. We present results of simulations corresponding to different physical situations and discuss the dynamical behaviour of this non-linear coupling. Of particular interest is the occurrence of signal amplifications in the form of resonance phenomena when a frequency associated with the radial pulsations is close to a frequency associated with one of the axial w-m...

  12. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavities/tooth decay Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of ...

  13. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer for Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots on Silicon Nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingley, Zachary R.

    This dissertation comprises a study aimed at understanding the competing dynamics of energy and charge transfer in quantum dot (QD) solids and from QDs to crystalline semiconductor substrates to assess a new type of hybrid solar cell that is based on non-radiative resonant energy transfer (NRET) from light absorbers such as nanocrystal QDs to high mobility charge carrier transport channels such as silicon nanopillars. As a platform to investigate a NRET solar cell we employed lead sulfide nanocrystal QDs as light absorbers and silicon as the acceptor transport channel for the NRET generated electrons and holes. Given NRET as the basic physical process at the core of the new type of solar cell the dissertation focused on examining: (1) synthesis of and surface ligand exchange for high quantum efficiency lead sulfide quantum dots, (2) studies of inter-QD NRET and competing inter-QD charge transfer as a function of inter-QD average separation and temperature, (3) structural and optical characteristics of lead sulfide quantum dots adsorbed on crystalline silicon surfaces, and (4) fabrication and examination of prototype colloidal PbS QD - silicon nanopillar array solar cell. The work in these four areas has each provided insights into and new results for the field of quantum dots, QD-based solids, and QD based opto-electronic devices that are of generic value. The need for maintaining the high quantum efficiency (QE) of the as-synthesized PbS QDs while exchanging the surface ligands with new ones better suited for the device lead us to introduce a new approach to ligand exchange that employs pre-conjugated lead cation -- ligand complexes as units that replace the lead cations bound to their as-grown ligand, thus maintaining the Pb-rich stoichiometry that suppresses defect formation while gaining the ability to control the length of the ligands. The ability to control the length of the ligands allowed control over the QD-QD separation in densely packed films referred to

  14. Promoting-mode free formalism for excited state radiationless decay process with Duschinsky rotation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, through the path integral of Gaussian type correlation function, a new formalism based on Fermi-Golden Rule for calculating the rate constant of nonradiative decay process with Duschinsky rotation effect in polyatomic molecules is developed. The advantage of the present path-integral formalism is promoting-mode free. In order to get the rate constant, a "transition rate matrix" needs to be calculated. The rate constant calculated previously is only an approximation of diagonal elements of our "transition rate matrix " . The total rate should be the summation over all the matrix elements.

  15. Weak decays. [Lectures, phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  16. decays to baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Torsten Leddig

    2012-11-01

    From inclusive measurements, it is known that about 7% of all mesons decay into final states with baryons. In these decays, some striking features become visible compared to mesonic decays. The largest branching fractions come with quite moderate multiplicities of 3–4 hadrons. We note that two-body decays to baryons are suppressed relative to three- and four-body decays. In most of these analyses, the invariant baryon–antibaryon mass shows an enhancement near the threshold. We propose a phenomenological interpretation of this quite common feature of hadronization to baryons.

  17. Conformational unfolding in the N-terminal region of ribonuclease A detected by nonradiative energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWherter, C A; Haas, E; Leed, A R; Scheraga, H A

    1986-04-22

    Unfolding in the N-terminal region of RNase A was studied by the nonradiative energy-transfer technique. RNase A was labeled with a nonfluorescent acceptor (2,4-dinitrophenyl) on the alpha-amino group and a fluorescent donor (ethylenediamine monoamide of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid) on a carboxyl group in the vicinity of residue 50 (75% at Glu-49 and 25% at Asp-53). The distribution of donor labeling sites does not affect the results of this study since they are close in both the sequence and the three-dimensional structure. The sites of labeling were determined by peptide mapping. The derivatives possessed full enzymatic activity and underwent reversible thermal transitions. However, there were some quantitative differences in the thermodynamic parameters. When the carboxyl groups were masked, there was a 5 degrees C lowering of the melting temperature at pH 2 and 4, and no significant change in delta H(Tm). Labeling of the alpha-amino group had no effect on the melting temperature or delta H(Tm) at pH 2 but did result in a dramatic decrease in delta H(Tm) of the unfolding reaction at pH 4. The melting temperature did not change appreciably at pH 4, indicating that an enthalpy/entropy compensation had occurred. The efficiencies of energy transfer determined with both fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements were in reasonably good agreement. The transfer efficiency dropped from about 60% under folding conditions to roughly 20% when the derivatives were unfolded with disulfide bonds intact and was further reduced to 5% when the disulfide bonds were reduced. The interprobe separation distance was estimated to be 35 +/- 2 A under folding conditions. The contribution to the interprobe distance resulting from the finite size of the probes was treated by using simple geometric considerations and a rotational isomeric state model of the donor probe linkage. With this model, the estimated average interprobe distance of 36 A is in excellent agreement with the

  18. ISOMER-SELECTED DECAY OF THE GDR IN DY-156

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSCHAGEN, JPS; HARAKEH, MN; HESSELINK, WHA; NOORMAN, RF

    1995-01-01

    The strength distribution of high-energy gamma-rays emitted in the statistical decay of the 156Dy compound nucleus, with E* = 92.5 MeV, has been measured inclusively and for selected decay pathways in which isomers in 149Dy, 151Dy and 152Dy were populated. For both spectra a deformation \\beta\\ = 0.3

  19. Testing decay of astrophysical neutrinos with incomplete information

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Murase, Kohta

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos have mass differences, so decays from one to another must occur. But how fast? The best direct limits on non-radiative decays, based on solar and atmospheric neutrinos, are weak, $\\tau \\gtrsim 10^{-3}$ s ($m$/eV) or much worse. Greatly improved sensitivity, $\\tau \\sim 10^3$ s ($m$/eV), will eventually be obtained using neutrinos from distant astrophysical sources, but large uncertainties --- in neutrino properties, source properties, and detection aspects --- do not allow this yet. However, there is a way forward now. We show that IceCube diffuse neutrino measurements, supplemented by improvements expected in the near term, can increase sensitivity to $\\tau \\sim 10$ s ($m$/eV) for all neutrino mass eigenstates. We provide a roadmap for the necessary analyses and show how to manage the many uncertainties. If limits are set, this would definitively rule out the long-considered possibility that neutrino decay affects solar, atmospheric, or terrestrial neutrino experiments.

  20. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  1. Non-radiation hardened microprocessors in space-based remote sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, R.; Melton, Ryan; Estes, Robert R., Jr.

    2006-09-01

    The CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) mission is a comprehensive suite of active and passive sensors including a 20Hz 230mj Nd:YAG lidar, a visible wavelength Earth-looking camera and an imaging infrared radiometer. CALIPSO flies in formation with the Earth Observing System Post-Meridian (EOS PM) train, provides continuous, near-simultaneous measurements and is a planned 3 year mission. CALIPSO was launched into a 98 degree sun synchronous Earth orbit in April of 2006 to study clouds and aerosols and acquires over 5 gigabytes of data every 24 hours. Figure 1 shows the ground track of one CALIPSO orbit as well as high and low intensity South Atlantic Anomaly outlines. CALIPSO passes through the SAA several times each day. Spaced based remote sensing systems that include multiple instruments and/or instruments such as lidar generate large volumes of data and require robust real-time hardware and software mechanisms and high throughput processors. Due to onboard storage restrictions and telemetry downlink limitations these systems must pre-process and reduce the data before sending it to the ground. This onboard processing and realtime requirement load may mean that newer more powerful processors are needed even though acceptable radiation-hardened versions have not yet been released. CALIPSO's single board computer payload controller processor is actually a set of four (4) voting non-radiation hardened COTS Power PC 603r's built on a single width VME card by General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems (GDAIS). Significant radiation concerns for CALIPSO and other Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites include the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the north and south poles and strong solar events. Over much of South America and extending into the South Atlantic Ocean (see figure 1) the Van Allen radiation belts dip to just 200-800km and spacecraft entering this area are subjected to high energy protons and experience higher than

  2. Nonradiative Electron--Hole Recombination Rate Is Greatly Reduced by Defects in Monolayer Black Phosphorus: Ab Initio Time Domain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Fang, Weihai; Akimov, Alexey V

    2016-02-18

    We report ab initio time-domain simulations of nonradiative electron-hole recombination and electronic dephasing in ideal and defect-containing monolayer black phosphorus (MBP). Our calculations predict that the presence of phosphorus divacancy in MBP (MBP-DV) substantially reduces the nonradiative recombination rate, with time scales on the order of 1.57 ns. The luminescence line width in ideal MBP of 150 meV is 2.5 times larger than MBP-DV at room temperature, and is in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that the electron-hole recombination in ideal MBP is driven by the 450 cm(-1) vibrational mode, whereas the recombination in the MBP-DV system is driven by a broad range of vibrational modes. The reduced electron-phonon coupling and increased bandgap in MBP-DV rationalize slower recombination in this material, suggesting that electron-phonon energy losses in MBP can be minimized by creating suitable defects in semiconductor device material.

  3. Direct observation of the excited-state proton transfer and decay kinetics of internally hydrogen-bonded photostabilizers in copolymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oconnor, D. B.; Scott, G. W.; Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.; Webb, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of a 2-hydroxyphenylbenzotriazole (HPB) photostabilizer copolymerized with polystyrene are reported. HPB fluorescence from these copolymer films is observed at approximately 630 nm, characteristic of the proton-transferred excited state of HPB, and it has a risetime of less than 10 ps and a decay time of 28 + or - 4 ps at room temperature. Measurement of the relative fluorescence quantum yield as a function of temperature gives the activation energy for nonradiative decay of this state to be E/hc = 259 + or 25/cm.

  4. Observation of semileptonic decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronström, H. I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Seidel, S. C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1993-04-01

    Observation of the semileptonic decay of the charmed baryon ? in the decay channel ? has been made using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY. The cross section times branching ratio was found to be ?.

  5. Double beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2011-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  6. Rare Semileptonic Charm Decays

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of charm mesons decaying semileptonically via Flavor Changing Neutral Currents is presented. We calculate the Wilson coefficients within the Standard Model. A window in the decay distribution, where physics beyond the Standard Model could be measured is identified. Exemplary, we study effects of leptoquark models.

  7. Interatomic Coulombic Decay: The Mechanism for Rapid Deexcitation of Hollow Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Schwestka, Janine; Kozubek, Roland; Madeira, Teresa I.; Marques, José P.; Kobus, Jacek; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2017-09-01

    The impact of a highly charged ion onto a solid gives rise to charge exchange between the ion and target atoms, so that a slow ion gets neutralized in the vicinity of the surface. Using highly charged Ar and Xe ions and the surface-only material graphene as a target, we show that the neutralization and deexcitation of the ions proceeds on a sub-10 fs time scale. We further demonstrate that a multiple Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) model can describe the observed ultrafast deexcitation. Other deexcitation mechanisms involving nonradiative decay and quasimolecular orbital formation during the impact are not important, as follows from the comparison of our experimental data with the results of first-principles calculations. Our method also enables the estimation of ICD rates directly.

  8. Weak Decay of Hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Alberico, W M

    2004-01-01

    The focus of these Lectures is on the weak decay modes of hypernuclei, with special attention to Lambda-hypernuclei. The subject involves many fields of modern theoretical and experimental physics, from nuclear structure to the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The various weak decay modes of Lambda-hypernuclei are described: the mesonic mode and the non-mesonic ones. The latter are the dominant decay channels of medium--heavy hypernuclei, where, on the contrary, the mesonic decay is disfavoured by Pauli blocking effect on the outgoing nucleon. In particular, one can distinguish between one-body and two-body induced decays. Theoretical models employed to evaluate the (partial and total) decay widths of hypernuclei are illustrated, and their results compared with existing experimental data. Open problems and recent achievements are extensively discussed, in particular the determination of the ratio Gamma_n/Gamma_p, possible tests of the Delta I=1/2 rule in non-mesonic decays and the pu...

  9. On the origin of stretched exponential (Kohlrausch) relaxation kinetics in the room temperature luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunov, E N; Antonov, Yu A; Simões Gamboa, A L

    2017-03-21

    The non-exponential room temperature luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots is often well described by a stretched exponential function. However, the physical meaning of the parameters of the function is not clear in the majority of cases reported in the literature. In this work, the room temperature stretched exponential luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots is investigated theoretically in an attempt to identify the underlying physical mechanisms associated with the parameters of the function. Three classes of non-radiative transition processes between the excited and ground states of colloidal quantum dots are discussed: long-range resonance energy transfer, multiphonon relaxation, and contact quenching without diffusion. It is shown that multiphonon relaxation cannot explain a stretched exponential functional form of the luminescence decay while such dynamics of relaxation can be understood in terms of long-range resonance energy transfer to acceptors (molecules, quantum dots, or anharmonic molecular vibrations) in the environment of the quantum dots acting as energy-donors or by contact quenching by acceptors (surface traps or molecules) distributed statistically on the surface of the quantum dots. These non-radiative transition processes are assigned to different ranges of the stretching parameter β.

  10. On the origin of stretched exponential (Kohlrausch) relaxation kinetics in the room temperature luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunov, E. N.; Antonov, Yu. A.; Simões Gamboa, A. L.

    2017-03-01

    The non-exponential room temperature luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots is often well described by a stretched exponential function. However, the physical meaning of the parameters of the function is not clear in the majority of cases reported in the literature. In this work, the room temperature stretched exponential luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots is investigated theoretically in an attempt to identify the underlying physical mechanisms associated with the parameters of the function. Three classes of non-radiative transition processes between the excited and ground states of colloidal quantum dots are discussed: long-range resonance energy transfer, multiphonon relaxation, and contact quenching without diffusion. It is shown that multiphonon relaxation cannot explain a stretched exponential functional form of the luminescence decay while such dynamics of relaxation can be understood in terms of long-range resonance energy transfer to acceptors (molecules, quantum dots, or anharmonic molecular vibrations) in the environment of the quantum dots acting as energy-donors or by contact quenching by acceptors (surface traps or molecules) distributed statistically on the surface of the quantum dots. These non-radiative transition processes are assigned to different ranges of the stretching parameter β.

  11. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  12. Non-radiative relaxation dynamics of pyrrole following excitation in the range 249.5-200 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Oliver M.; Parkes, Michael A.; Neville, Simon P.; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2017-09-01

    The non-radiative relaxation dynamics of pyrrole have been investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics simulations. Following excitation of the A2 (11 πσ∗) state, we observe population flow out of the Franck-Condon region on a ≲ 50 fs timescale. Following excitation of the B2 (21 ππ∗) state, we observe population being transferred to the A2 (11 πσ∗) state on a <50 fs timescale and subsequently out of the Franck-Condon region, also on a <50 fs timescale. Quantum dynamics calculations suggest that population is transferred from the B2 (21 ππ∗) state through the A2 (1 π 3pz) state to the B1 (21 πσ∗) state before being transferred to the A2 (11 πσ∗) state.

  13. Axions from wall decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  14. Rare decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lafferty, George

    2015-01-01

    We review recent results from the LHCb experiment on studies of particle decays that are forbidden or rare in the Standard Model. The studies include searches for lepton flavour violating decays of the $\\tau$ lepton and the $B$ and $D$ mesons, and of $B$ and $D$ meson decays that would be mediated by Majorana neutrinos. Results are also presented for the rare processes $B_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$, $b \\to s\\gamma$ transitions, and $B \\to K^{(*)}\\mu^+\\mu^-$.

  15. Non-leptonic decays of beauty decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bigi, Ikaros I; Shifman, M; Uraltsev, N; Vainshtein, A I

    1994-01-01

    "Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old" (Franz Kafka). In the last few years considerable progress has been achieved in our understanding of the decays of heavy flavour hadrons. One can now calculate inclusive transition rates in QCD proper through an expansion in inverse powers of the heavy flavour quark mass without recourse to phenomenological assumptions. The non-perturbative contributions are treated systematically in this way; they are found to produce corrections of order a few percent in beauty decays, i.e. typically somewhat smaller than the perturbative corrections. One finds, among other things: (a) The lifetime of $B^-$ mesons is predicted to be longer than that of $B^0$ mesons by several percent. (b) The QCD prediction for the semileptonic branching ratio of $B$ mesons appears to exceed present experimental values.

  16. Weak decays and double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1983-08-01

    Work to measure the ..sigma../sup +/ 0 degree differential cross section in the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. ..sigma../sup +/..pi../sup -/ at several incident K/sup -/ momenta between 600 and 800 MeV/c as well as the asymmetries in the decays of polarized ..sigma../sup +/'s into protons and neutral pions and of polarized ..sigma../sup -/'s into neutrons and negative pions in collaboration with experimenters from Yale, Brookhaven, and the University of Pittsburgh (Brookhaven experiment 702) has been completed. Data from this experiment is currently being analyzed at Yale. Work is currently underway to develop and construct an experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in thin foils of Mo/sup 100/ in collaboration with experimenters from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Development work on the solid state silicon detectors should be complete in the next six months and construction should e well underway within the next year.

  17. CLEO Results B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cassel, David G

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of many Standard Model constants are clouded by uncertainties in nonperturbative QCD parameters that relate measurable quantities to the underlying parton-level processes. Generally these QCD parameters have been obtained from model calculations with large uncertainties that are difficult to quantify. The CLEO Collaboration has taken a major step towards reducing these uncertainties in determining the CKM matrix elements Vcb and Vub using new measurements of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum of B -> s gamma decays. This report includes: the new CLEO measurements of B -> s gamma decays, Vcb, and Vub; the first results from CLEO III data -- studies of B -> K pi, pi pi, and K Kbar decays; mention of some other recent CLEO B decay results; and plans for operating CESR and CLEO in the charm threshold region.

  18. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  19. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  20. Inflaton decay in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yanagida, T.T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for the Early Universe

    2007-06-15

    We discuss inflaton decay in supergravity, taking account of the gravitational effects. It is shown that, if the inflaton has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, it generically couples to any matter fields that appear in the superpotential at the tree level, and to any gauge sectors through anomalies in the supergravity. Through these processes, the inflaton generically decays into the supersymmetry breaking sector, producing many gravitinos. The inflaton also directly decays into a pair of the gravitinos. We derive constraints on both inflation models and supersymmetry breaking scenarios for avoiding overproduction of the gravitinos. Furthermore, the inflaton naturally decays into the visible sector via the top Yukawa coupling and SU(3){sub C} gauge interactions. (orig.)

  1. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  2. Inflaton decay in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yanagida, T.T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for the Early Universe

    2007-06-15

    We discuss inflaton decay in supergravity, taking account of the gravitational effects. It is shown that, if the inflaton has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, it generically couples to any matter fields that appear in the superpotential at the tree level, and to any gauge sectors through anomalies in the supergravity. Through these processes, the inflaton generically decays into the supersymmetry breaking sector, producing many gravitinos. The inflaton also directly decays into a pair of the gravitinos. We derive constraints on both inflation models and supersymmetry breaking scenarios for avoiding overproduction of the gravitinos. Furthermore, the inflaton naturally decays into the visible sector via the top Yukawa coupling and SU(3){sub C} gauge interactions. (orig.)

  3. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  4. Open Flavor Strong Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.; Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the results of a QM calculation of the open-flavor strong decays of **** light nucleon resonances. These are the results of a recent calculation, where we used a modified ^3P_0 model for the amplitudes and the U(7) algebraic model and the hypercentral quark model to predict the baryon spectrum. The decay amplitudes are compared with the existing experimental data.

  5. Laser assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Excited or short-lived nuclei often decay by emitting alpha particles that are assumed to be preformed inside the nucleus and confined in the nuclear potential well. In this picture, {alpha} decay refers to the tunneling of the alpha particle through the potential barrier. In this thesis we investigate for the first time how strong laser fields can assist the tunneling of the alpha particle and thus influence the nuclear decay. Generally speaking, laser-assisted {alpha} decay can be described as laser-assisted tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e, a slowly decaying state. Our theoretical treatment is developed starting from the complex trajectory formulation of the well-known strong-field approximation used to describe laser-induced ionization. We extend this formulation and develop a method to treat the decay of quasistationary states. The effect of both static and optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the lifetimes and {alpha}-particle emission spectra are investigated for a number of {alpha}-emitting nuclei. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, ranging from a relative modification in the decay rate of 10{sup -3} for static fields of electric field strengths of 10{sup 15} V/m, to 10{sup -8} for strong optical fields with intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, and to 10{sup -6} for strong X-ray fields with laser intensities around 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the effect of the external field is visible in the spectrum of emitted alpha particles, leading in the case of optical fields even to rescattering phenomena for intensities approaching 6 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. The dynamics of the alpha particle in laser fields of intensities below the rescattering limit is investigated.

  6. Solar Neutrino Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Acker, A; Acker, Andy; Pakvasa, Sandip

    1994-01-01

    We re-examine the neutrino decay solution to the solar neutrino problem in light of the new data from Gallex II and Kamiokande III. We compare the experimental data with the solar models of Bahcall and Pinsonneault and Turck-Chieze and find that neutrino decay is ruled out as a solution to the solar neutrino problem at better than the 98\\% c.l. even when solar model uncertainties are taken into account.

  7. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  8. Origins of photoluminescence decay kinetics in CdTe colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Marco

    2015-03-24

    Recent experimental studies have identified at least two nonradiative components in the fluorescence decay of solutions of CdTe colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). The lifetimes reported by different groups, however, differed by orders of magnitude, raising the question of whether different types of traps were at play in the different samples and experimental conditions and even whether different types of charge carriers were involved in the different trapping processes. Considering that the use of these nanomaterials in biology, optoelectronics, photonics, and photovoltaics is becoming widespread, such a gap in our understanding of carrier dynamics in these systems needs addressing. This is what we do here. Using the state-of-the-art atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential method, we calculate trapping times and nonradiative population decay curves for different CQD sizes considering up to 268 surface traps. We show that the seemingly discrepant experimental results are consistent with the trapping of the hole at unsaturated Te bonds on the dot surface in the presence of different dielectric environments. In particular, the observed increase in the trapping times following air exposure is attributed to the formation of an oxide shell on the dot surface, which increases the dielectric constant of the dot environment. Two types of traps are identified, depending on whether the unsaturated bond is single (type I) or part of a pair of dangling bonds on the same Te atom (type II). The energy landscape relative to transitions to these traps is found to be markedly different in the two cases. As a consequence, the trapping times associated with the different types of traps exhibit a strikingly contrasting sensitivity to variations in the dot environment. Based on these characteristics, we predict the presence of a sub-nanosecond component in all photoluminescence decay curves of CdTe CQDs in the size range considered here if both trap types are present. The absence of such a

  9. Nonradiative Relaxation Mechanisms of UV Excited Phenylalanine Residues: A Comparative Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mališ, Momir; Došlić, Nađa

    2017-03-21

    The present work is directed toward understanding the mechanisms of excited state deactivation in three neutral model peptides containing the phenylalanine residue. The excited state dynamics of theγL(g+)folded form of N-acetylphenylalaninylamide (NAPA B) and its amide-N-methylated derivative (NAPMA B) is reviewed and compared to the dynamics of the monohydrated structure of NAPA (NAPAH). The goal is to unravel how the environment, and in particular solvation, impacts the photodynamics of peptides. The systems are investigated using reaction path calculations and surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics based on the coupled cluster doubles (CC2) method and time-dependent density functional theory. The work emphasizes the role that excitation transfer from the phenylππ*to amidenπ*state plays in the deactivation of the three systems and shows how the ease of out-of-plane distortions of the amide group determines the rate of population transfer between the two electronic states. The subsequent dynamics on thenπ*state is barrierless along several pathways and leads to fast deactivation to the ground electronic state.

  10. Nonradiative Relaxation Mechanisms of UV Excited Phenylalanine Residues: A Comparative Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momir Mališ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work is directed toward understanding the mechanisms of excited state deactivation in three neutral model peptides containing the phenylalanine residue. The excited state dynamics of theγL(g+folded form of N-acetylphenylalaninylamide (NAPA B and its amide-N-methylated derivative (NAPMA B is reviewed and compared to the dynamics of the monohydrated structure of NAPA (NAPAH. The goal is to unravel how the environment, and in particular solvation, impacts the photodynamics of peptides. The systems are investigated using reaction path calculations and surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics based on the coupled cluster doubles (CC2 method and time-dependent density functional theory. The work emphasizes the role that excitation transfer from the phenylππ*to amidenπ*state plays in the deactivation of the three systems and shows how the ease of out-of-plane distortions of the amide group determines the rate of population transfer between the two electronic states. The subsequent dynamics on thenπ*state is barrierless along several pathways and leads to fast deactivation to the ground electronic state.

  11. The excited-state structure, vibrations, lifetimes, and nonradiative dynamics of jet-cooled 1-methylcytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachsel, Maria A.; Wiedmer, Timo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Li, Quansong; Ruiz-Barragan, Sergi; Blancafort, Lluís; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    V. Compared to cytosine, methyl substitution at N1 lowers the adiabatic ionization energy by ≥0.32 eV and leads to a much higher density of vibronic bands in the S0 → S1 spectrum. The effect of methylation on the radiationless decay to S0 and ISC to T1 is small, as shown by the similar break-off of the spectrum and the similar computed mechanisms.

  12. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  13. Holographic Glueball Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Brünner, Frederic; Rebhan, Anton

    2014-01-01

    We announce new results on glueball decay rates in the Sakai-Sugimoto model, a realization of holographic QCD from first principles that has only one coupling constant and an overall mass scale as free parameters. We extend a previous investigation by Hashimoto, Tan, and Terashima who have considered the lowest scalar glueball which arises from a somewhat exotic polarization of supergravity modes and whose mass is uncomfortably small in comparison with lattice results. On the other hand, the scalar glueball dual to the dilaton turns out to have a mass of about twice the mass of the rho meson (1487 MeV), very close to the scalar meson $f_0(1500)$ that is frequently interpreted as predominantly glue. Calculating the decay rate into two pions we find a surprisingly good agreement with experimental data for the $f_0(1500)$. We have also obtained decay widths for tensor and excited scalar glueballs, indicating universal narrowness.

  14. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  15. Flavor changing nucleon decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Muramatsu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Recent discovery of neutrino large mixings implies the large mixings in the diagonalizing matrices of 5 bar fields in SU (5) grand unified theory (GUT), while the diagonalizing matrices of 10 fields of SU (5) are expected to have small mixings like Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. We calculate the predictions of flavor changing nucleon decays (FCND) in SU (5), SO (10), and E6 GUT models which have the above features for mixings. We found that FCND can be the main decay mode and play an important role to test GUT models.

  16. Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    At least one neutrino has a mass of about 50 meV or larger. However, the absolute mass scale for the neutrino remains unknown. Furthermore, the critical question: Is the neutrino its own antiparticle? is unanswered. Studies of double beta decay offer hope for determining the absolute mass scale. In particular, zero-neutrino double beta decay (\\BBz) can address the issues of lepton number conservation, the particle-antiparticle nature of the neutrino, and its mass. A summary of the recent results in \\BBz, and the related technologies will be discussed in the context of the future \\BBz\\ program.

  17. Anticrossing double Fano resonances generated in metallic/dielectric hybrid nanostructures using nonradiative anapole modes for enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wu-Chao; Qiao, Tie-Zhu; Cai, Dong-Jin; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Jing-Dong; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Shao-Ding

    2016-11-28

    Third-harmonic generation with metallic or dielectric nanoparticles often suffer from, respectively, small modal volumes and weak near-field enhancements. This study propose and demonstrate that a metallic/dielectric hybrid nanostructure composed of a silver double rectangular nanoring and a silicon square nanoplate can be used to overcome these obstacles for enhanced third-harmonic generation. It is shown that the nonradiative anapole mode of the Si plate can be used as a localized source to excite the dark subradiant octupole mode of the Ag ring, and the mode hybridization leads to the formation of an antibonding and a bonding subradiant collective mode, thereby forming anticrossing double Fano resonances. With the strong coupling between individual particles and the effectively suppressed radiative losses of the Fano resonances, several strong hot spots are generated around the Ag ring due to the excitation of the octupole mode, and electromagnetic fields within the Si plate are also strongly amplified, making it possible to confine more incident energy inside the dielectric nanoparticle. Calculation results reveal that the confined energy inside the Si plate and the Ag ring for the hybrid structures can be about, respectively, more than three times and four orders stronger than that of the corresponding isolated nanoparticles, which makes the designed hybrid nanostructure a promising platform for enhanced third-harmonic generation.

  18. Ag colloids and arrays for plasmonic non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to a quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Graham P; Higgins, Luke J; Karanikolas, Vasilios D; Wilson, Keith M; Coindreau, Jorge A Garcia; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z; Parbrook, Peter J; Bradley, A Louise

    2016-01-01

    Ag nanoparticles in the form of colloids and ordered arrays are used to demonstrate plasmon-mediated non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to quantum wells with varying top barrier thicknesses. Plasmon-mediated energy transfer efficiencies of up to ~25% are observed with the Ag colloids. The distance dependence of the plasmon-mediated energy transfer is found to follow the same d^{-4} dependence as the direct quantum dot to quantum well energy transfer. There is also evidence for an increase in the characteristic distance of the interaction, thus indicating that it follows a F\\"orster-like model with the Ag nanoparticle-quantum dot acting as an enhanced donor dipole. Ordered Ag nanoparticle arrays display plasmon-mediated energy transfer efficiencies up to ~21%. To explore the tunability of the array system, two arrays with different geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that changing the geometry of the array allows a transition from overall quenching of the acceptor quantum well emission to...

  19. Ag colloids and arrays for plasmonic non-radiative energy transfer from quantum dots to a quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Graham P.; Gough, John J.; Higgins, Luke J.; Karanikolas, Vasilios D.; Wilson, Keith M.; Garcia Coindreau, Jorge A.; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Parbrook, Peter J.; Bradley, A. Louise

    2017-03-01

    Non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) can be an efficient process of benefit to many applications including photovoltaics, sensors, light emitting diodes and photodetectors. Combining the remarkable optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) with the electrical properties of quantum wells (QWs) allows for the formation of hybrid devices which can utilize NRET as a means of transferring absorbed optical energy from the QDs to the QW. Here we report on plasmon-enhanced NRET from semiconductor nanocrystal QDs to a QW. Ag nanoparticles in the form of colloids and ordered arrays are used to demonstrate plasmon-mediated NRET from QDs to QWs with varying top barrier thicknesses. Plasmon-mediated energy transfer (ET) efficiencies of up to ∼25% are observed with the Ag colloids. The distance dependence of the plasmon-mediated ET is found to follow the same d ‑4 dependence as the direct QD to QW ET. There is also evidence for an increase in the characteristic distance of the interaction, thus indicating that it follows a Förster-like model with the Ag nanoparticle-QD acting as an enhanced donor dipole. Ordered Ag nanoparticle arrays display plasmon-mediated ET efficiencies up to ∼21%. To explore the tunability of the array system, two arrays with different geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that changing the geometry of the array allows a transition from overall quenching of the acceptor QW emission to enhancement, as well as control of the competition between the QD donor quenching and ET rates.

  20. The mass of the neutron star in Vela X-1 and tidally induced non-radial oscillations in GP Vel

    CERN Document Server

    Quaintrell, H; Ash, T D C; Roche, P; Willems, B; Bedding, T R; Baldry, I K; Fender, R P

    2003-01-01

    We report new radial velocity observations of GP Vel/HD77581, the optical companion to the eclipsing X-ray pulsar Vela X-1. Using data spanning more than two complete orbits of the system, we detect evidence for tidally induced non-radial oscillations on the surface of GP Vel, apparent as peaks in the power spectrum of the residuals to the radial velocity curve fit. By removing the effect of these oscillations (to first order) and binning the radial velocities, we have determined the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity curve of GP Vel to be K_o=22.6+/-1.5 km/s. Given the accurately measured semi-amplitude of the pulsar's orbit, the mass ratio of the system is 0.081+/-0.005. We are able to set upper and lower limits on the masses of the component stars as follows. Assuming GP Vel fills its Roche lobe then the inclination angle of the system, i=70.1+/-2.6 deg. In this case we obtain the masses of the two stars as M_x=2.27 +/-0.17 M_sun for the neutron star and M_o=27.9+/-1.3 M_sun for GP Vel. Conversely, assu...

  1. Spectroscopic monitoring of the Herbig Ae star HD 104237. II. Non-radial pulsations, mode analysis and fundamental stellar parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Fumel, Aurelie

    2011-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars showing signs of intense activity and strong stellar winds, whose origin is not yet understood in the frame of current theoretical models of stellar evolution for young stars. The evolutionary tracks of the earlier Herbig Ae stars cross a recently discovered PMS instability strip. Many of these stars exhibit pulsations of delta Scuti type. HD 104237 is a well-known pulsating Herbig Ae star. In this article, we reinvestigated an extensive high-resolution quasi-continuous spectroscopic data set in order to search for very faint indications of non-radial pulsations in the line profile. To do this, we worked on dynamical spectra of equivalent photospheric (LSD) profiles of HD 104237. A 2D Fourier analysis (F2D) was performed of the entire profile and the temporal variation of the central depth of the line was studied with the time-series analysis tools Period04 and SigSpec. We present a mode identification corresponding to the detected dominan...

  2. Non-radial Oscillations in Rotating Giant Planets with Solid Cores: Application to Saturn and its Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Storch, Natalia I

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed evidence for the global oscillations of Jupiter and Saturn, which can potentially provide a new window into the interior structure of giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we study the non-radial oscillation modes of giant planets containing a solid core. Our calculations include the elastic response of the core and consider a wide range of possible values of the core shear modulus. While the elasticity of the core only slightly changes the frequencies of acoustic modes, which reside mostly in the fluid envelope, it adds two new classes of shear modes that are largely confined to the core. We also calculate the effects of the Coriolis force on the planetary oscillation modes. In addition to changing the mode frequencies, the Coriolis force can cause the shear modes to mix with the f-modes. Such mixing occurs when the frequencies of the shear mode and the f-mode are close to each other, and results in "mixed modes" with similar properties that are slightly split in f...

  3. Visible luminescence peculiar to sintered silica nanoparticles: Spectral and decay properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Cannas, M., E-mail: marco.cannas@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Cangialosi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université St-Etienne, St-Etienne F-42000 (France); Spallino, L.; Gelardi, F.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We report that the sintering at 1000 °C of silica nanoparticles (an average diameter of 14 nm) produces a transparent sample that exhibits a bright visible emission under UV excitation. The use of time resolved luminescence spectroscopy and a tunable laser source allows us to single out three contributions centered at 1.96 eV, 2.41 eV and 3.43 eV. The excitation spectra of these emissions evidence bell shaped bands consistent with transitions between localized defects’ states. For each emission we study the intensity and the lifetime in the temperature range from 300 K down to 10 K, thus evidencing the competition between radiative and non-radiative processes in the optical cycle of luminescent centers. The comparison with the luminescence properties of silica, both nanoparticles and bulk, points out that the observed emissions are peculiar to the sintered silica network. - Highlights: • Solid-phase sintering at 1000 °C of silica nanoparticles produces a transparent sample. • Sintered silica nanoparticles emit a bright luminescence under UV excitation. • Three emissions, centered around 2.0 V, 2.4 eV and 3.4 eV, are distinguished on the basis of the excitation and decay properties. • The observed excitation/emission bands originate from localized defect states peculiar to the sintered silica network. • The luminescence efficiency decreases with temperature due to the activation of non-radiative channels.

  4. Attention decay in science

    CERN Document Server

    Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta; Ghosh, Rumi; Huberman, Bernardo A; Kaski, Kimmo; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    The exponential growth in the number of scientific papers makes it increasingly difficult for researchers to keep track of all the publications relevant to their work. Consequently, the attention that can be devoted to individual papers, measured by their citation counts, is bound to decay rapidly. In this work we make a thorough study of the life-cycle of papers in different disciplines. Typically, the citation rate of a paper increases up to a few years after its publication, reaches a peak and then decreases rapidly. This decay can be described by an exponential or a power law behavior, as in ultradiffusive processes, with exponential fitting better than power law for the majority of cases. The decay is also becoming faster over the years, signaling that nowadays papers are forgotten more quickly. However, when time is counted in terms of the number of published papers, the rate of decay of citations is fairly independent of the period considered. This indicates that the attention of scholars depends on th...

  5. Specific complex of non-radiation risk factors for socially significant pathologies could affect the liquidators of Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koterov A.N.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the complex of non-radiation factors that could affect the liquidators of the Chernobyl accident: the demographic, social and professional group heterogeneity to warrant differentiation of risk, the effects of heavy metals, 'hot particles', chemicals, psychogenic stress, social dislocation in the post-perestroika period, alcohol abuse, smoking, and the effect of screening. All these factors tend to have a significant intensity, unlike the radiation exposure for the majority of subjects. It is concluded that the increased frequency and severity of some large socially significant pathologies in contingent liquidators may be due to a unique set of predominantly non-radiation factors associated, however, with a particular radiation accident.

  6. Non-radiative recombination centres in catalyst-free ZnO nanorods grown by atmospheric-metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, D. N.; Hortelano, V.; Martínez, O.; Martínez-Tomas, M. C.; Sallet, V.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.; Jiménez, J.

    2013-06-01

    We have investigated the cathodoluminescence (CL) emission and the Raman spectra along individual ZnO nanorods grown by a catalyst-free method. The spatial correlation between the CL emission and the defect related Raman modes permits establishing a correspondence between the non-radiative recombination centres (NRRCs) and the defects responsible for the 275 cm-1 Raman band. According to this relation, the NRRCs in these nanorods are tentatively associated with complexes of zinc interstitials.

  7. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  8. CP-violations in decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Sakai

    2006-11-01

    Recent results on CP-violation measurements in decays from energy asymmetric -factory experiments are reported. Thanks to large accumulated data samples, CP-violations in decays in mixing-decay interference and direct CP-violation are now firmly established. The measurements of three angles of the unitarity triangle from CP-violations of decays are quite consistent with the Standard Model expectations. These results strongly support the validity of the Kobayashi-Maskawa prescription of CP-violation.

  9. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  10. Rare beauty decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258140

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we review the most recent measurements of the LHCb experiment in the field of rare decays of B mesons. In particular the first observation of the $B^0_s \\to µ^+ µ^-$,­ decay, the angular analysis of $B^0_d \\to K*l^+l^-$ decays and the test of lepton universality in $B^+ \\to K^+ l^+ l^-$ decays are presented.

  11. Decay constants in geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IgorM.Villa; PaulR.Renne

    2005-01-01

    Geologic time is fundamental to the Earth Sciences, and progress in many disciplines depends critically on our ability to measure time with increasing accuracy and precision. Isotopic geochronology makes use of the decay of radioactive nuclides as a help to quantify the histories of rock, minerals, and other materials. Both accuracy and precision of radioisotopic ages are, at present, limited by those of radioactive decay constants. Modem mass spectrometers can measure isotope ratios with a precision of 10-4 or better. On the other hand, the uncertainties associated with direct half-life determinations are, in most cases, still at the percent level. The present short note briefly summarizes progress and problems that have been encountered during the Working Group's activity.

  12. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  13. Decay of Hoyle state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bhattacharya; T K Rana; C Bhattacharya; S Kundu; K Banerjee; T K Ghosh; G Mukherjee; R Pandey; P Roy

    2014-11-01

    The prediction of Hoyle state was necessitated to explain the abundance of carbon, which is crucial for the existence of life on Earth and is the stepping stone for understanding the abundance of other heavier elements. After the experimental confirmation of its existence, soon it was realized that the Hoyle state was `different’ from other excited states of carbon, which led to intense theoretical and experimental activities over the past few decades to understand its structure. In recent times, precision, high statistics experiments on the decay of Hoyle state have been performed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, to determine the quantitative contributions of various direct 3 decay mechanisms of the Hoyle state. The present results have been critically compared with those obtained in other recent experiments and their implications have been discussed.

  14. Extent and distribution of in-stent intimal hyperplasia and edge effect in a non-radiation stent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, N J; Wilensky, R L; Tanguay, J F; Bartorelli, A L; Moses, J; Williams, D O; Bailey, S; Martin, J L; Canos, M R; Rudra, H; Popma, J J; Leon, M B; Kaplan, A V; Mintz, G S

    2001-08-01

    Intimal hyperplasia within the body of the stent is the primary mechanism for in-stent restenosis; however, stent edge restenosis has been described after brachytherapy. Our current understanding about the magnitude of in vivo intimal hyperplasia and edge restenosis is limited to data obtained primarily from select, symptomatic patients requiring repeat angiography. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and distribution of intimal hyperplasia both within the stent and along the stent edge in relatively nonselect, asymptomatic patients scheduled for 6-month intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as part of a multicenter trial: Heparin Infusion Prior to Stenting. Planar IVUS measurements 1 mm apart were obtained throughout the stent and over a length of 10 mm proximal and distal to the stent at index and follow-up. Of the 179 patients enrolled, 140 returned for repeat angiography and IVUS at 6.4 +/- 1.9 months and had IVUS images adequate for analysis. Patients had 1.2 +/- 0.6 Palmaz-Schatz stents per vessel. There was a wide individual variation of intimal hyperplasia distribution within the stent and no mean predilection for any location. At 6 months, intimal hyperplasia occupied 29.3 +/- 16.2% of the stent volume on average. Lumen loss within 2 mm of the stent edge was due primarily to intimal proliferation. Beyond 2 mm, negative remodeling contributed more to lumen loss. Gender, age, vessel location, index plaque burden, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and tobacco did not predict luminal narrowing at the stent edges, but diabetes, unstable angina at presentation, and lesion length were predictive of in-stent intimal hyperplasia. In a non-radiation stent population, 29% of the stent volume is filled with intimal hyperplasia at 6 months. Lumen loss at the stent edge is due primarily to intimal proliferation.

  15. Nonradial and radial period changes of the δ Scuti star 4 CVn. II. Systematic behavior over 40 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H.; Lenz, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Radial and nonradial pulsators on and near the main sequence show period and amplitude changes that are too large to be the product of stellar evolution. The multiperiodic δ Sct stars are well suited to study this, as the period changes of different modes excited in the same star can be compared. This requires a very large amount of photometric data covering years and decades as well as mode identifications. Methods: We have examined over 800 nights of high-precision photometry of the multiperiodic pulsator 4 CVn obtained from 1966 through 2012. Because most of the data were obtained in adjacent observing seasons, it is possible to derive very accurate period values for a number of the excited pulsation modes and to study their systematic changes from 1974 to 2012. Results: Most pulsation modes show systematic significant period and amplitude changes on a timescale of decades. For the well-studied modes, around 1986 a general reversal of the directions of both the positive and negative period changes occurred. Furthermore, the period changes between the different modes are strongly correlated, although they differ in size and sign. For the modes with known values of the spherical degree and azimuthal order, we find a correlation between the direction of the period changes and the identified azimuthal order, m. The associated amplitude changes generally have similar timescales of years or decades, but show little systematic or correlated behavior from mode to mode. Conclusions: A natural explanation for the opposite behavior of the prograde and retrograde modes is that their period changes are driven by a changing rotation profile. The changes in the rotation profile could in turn be driven by processes, perhaps the pulsations themselves, that redistribute angular momentum within the star. In general, different modes have different rotation kernels, so this will produce period shifts of varying magnitude for different modes.

  16. Teleportation via decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bose; P L Knight; M B Plenio; V Vedral

    2001-02-01

    We present a rare example of a decay mechanism playing a constructive role in quantum information processing. We show how the state of an atom trapped in a cavity can be teleported to a second atom trapped in a distant cavity by the joint detection of photon leakage from the cavities. The scheme, which is probabilistic, requires only a single three level atom in a cavity. We also show how this scheme can be modified to a teleportation with insurance.

  17. Charmless B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During 2011, LHCb has collected an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb−1, giving rise to a large variety of measurements. Amongst these, measurements of CP violation in B decays play a central role. In particular CP violation measurements in charmless transitions of B mesons are of interest since they provide new or improved constraints on new physics contributions. These proceedings concentrate on LHCb results made publicin the first half of the year 2012.

  18. Decays of s neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barradas, J E

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), we discussed possible two body decay modes for the s neutrino v, one charged and other neutral: v -> l sub x sub 1 sup + sup - and v -> vx sub 1 sup 0 , respectively. Exploring a range of possible values for its mass, and for the chargino x sub i sup + sup - and neutralino x sub j sup 0 masses as well. We present the specific calculation for branching ratios, which are analyzed numerically. (Author)

  19. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  20. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamic turbulent decay

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, Turlough P

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation which occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512-cubed resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power-law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingl...

  1. Decays of heavy quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, T G

    1979-01-01

    The weak decay of heavy b and t quarks is discussed using the mixing angles obtained in Fritzsch's model (1978). The author finds that the decay b to c dominates over b to u for 7decay is found to be an insignificant source of multimuons in nu interactions and suitably small in nu interactions, consistent with the data of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay and Harvard-Pennsylvania-Wisconsin- Fermilab collaborations. Several branching ratios for exotic final states produced via b quarks in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are discussed. (23 refs).

  2. Interference in Acetylene Intersystem Crossing Acts as the Molecular Analog of Young's Double-Slit Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattijs de Groot; Robert W. Field; Wybren J. Buma; F. Fleming Crim

    2009-01-01

    ... interference between two doorway-mediated intersystem crossing pathways. This observation of an interference effect in nonradiative decay opens up possibilities for rational coherent control over molecular excited state dynamics.

  3. Charmless b decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  4. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  5. Is Radioactive Decay Really Exponential?

    CERN Document Server

    Aston, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12,550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3,000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in atmospheric levels of 14C. We note that predicted atmospheric variation (assuming exponential decay) does not agree with results from modelling, and that theoretical quantum mechanics does not predict exact exponential decay. We give mathematical arguments that non-exponential decay should be expected for slowly decaying isotopes and explore the consequences of non-exponential decay. We propose an experimental test of this prediction of non-exponential decay for 14C. If confirmed, a foundation stone of current dating meth...

  6. Hadronic Decays of Charm

    CERN Document Server

    Stenson, K

    2002-01-01

    Recent hadronic charm decay results from fixed-target experiments are presented. New measurements of the D0 to K-K+K-pi+ branching ratio are shown as are recent results from Dalitz plot fits to D+ to K-K+pi+, pi+pi-pi+, K-pi+pi+, K+pi-pi+ and D_s+ to pi+pi-pi+, K+pi-pi+. These fits include measurements of the masses and widths of several light resonances as well as strong evidence for the existence of two light scalar particles, the pipi resonance sigma and the Kpi resonance kappa.

  7. Rare B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  8. Higgs decay to fermions (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    A search for high mass Higgs boson of the MSSM decaying into two fermions using the first 2015 data at 13 TeV is presented. The four final decay channels of mu \\tau_h, e \\tau_h, \\tau_h \\tau_h and e mu is used. The limits on production cross section times branching ratio has been set.Other results from Run1 and different searches and measurements involving Higgs decays fermions will also be reviewed.

  9. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    OpenAIRE

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling $\\Gamma\\sim\\Gamma_{CDL}^{2}$, where $\\Gamma_{CDL}$ is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable i...

  10. Signatures of statistical decay

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, D; Bowman, D R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Hagberg, E; Laforest, R; Pouliot, J; Walker, R B; Horn, D; Bowman, D R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Hagberg, E; Laforest, R; Pouliot, J; Walker, R B

    1995-01-01

    The partition of decay energy between the kinetic energy of reaction products and their Q-value of formation is obtained in a statistical derivation appropriate to highly excited nuclei, and is shown to be in a constant ratio. We measure the kinetic energy fraction, R = \\Sigma E_{kin}/(\\Sigma E_{kin} + \\Sigma Q_0), over a wide range of excitation energy for well-defined systems formed in the Cl + C reaction at 35A MeV. Relationships between excitation energy, charged-particle multiplicity, and intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity, observed in this work and in recent experiments by a number of other groups, follow from the derivation of the average kinetic energies and Q-values.

  11. UA1: W particle decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    This image of the UA1 central detector shows the real tracks left by decay products of a W into a tau and a tau-neutrino. The tau decays into charged particles, as seen by the isolated pencil-jet in the central detector. The UA1 detector ran on the SPS accelerator at CERN between 1981 and 1993.

  12. Strong decays of qqq baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R; Leviatan, A

    1997-01-01

    We study strong decays of nonstrange baryons by making use of the algebraic approach to hadron structure. Within this framework we derive closed expressions for decay widths in an elementary-meson emission model and use these to analyze the experimental data for $N^* \\rightarrow N + \\pi$, $N^* + \\pi$, $\\Delta^* \\rightarrow \\Delta + \\pi$ and $\\Delta^* \\rightarrow \\Delta +

  13. CP violation in kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, G

    1996-01-01

    We review the Standard Model predictions of CP violation in kaon decays. We present an elementary introduction to Chiral Perturbation Theory, four--quark effective hamiltonians and the relation among them. Particular attention is devoted to $K\\to 3\\pi$, $K\\to 2\\pi \\gamma$ and $K\\to \\pi \\bar{f} f$ decays.

  14. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  15. Beauty hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings, I will report the recent results on properties, production and decays of beauty baryons, as well as measurements of B + c meson decays, based on data collected by the LHCb collaboration at the LHC collider in 2011–2012.

  16. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  17. Instantons and nonleptonic hyperon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvat, D.; Narancic, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zagreb, 41000 Zagreb (Croatia); Tadic, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Zagreb, 41000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    1995-06-01

    The instanton-induced term is included in an analysis of nonleptonic strangeness-changing hyperon decays. The same type of analysis has led previously to a reasonable qualitative, and to some extent quantitative, description of the decay amplitudes. The instanton contributions do not improve old results. Data favor a very small instanton influence.

  18. Non-radial pulsations in the Be/X binaries 4U0115+63 and SAXJ2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Soto, J; Fabregat, J; Fox-Machado, L

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of non-radial pulsations (NRP) in the Be/X binaries of the Magellanic Clouds (MC, eg. Fabrycky 2005, Coe et al. 2005, Schmidtke & Cowley 2005) provided a new approach to understand these complex systems, and, at the same time, favoured the synergy between two different fields: stellar pulsations and X-ray binaries. This breakthrough was possible thanks to the MACHO and OGLE surveys. However, in our Galaxy, only two Be/X have been reported to show NRP: GROJ2058+42 (Kiziloglu et al. 2007) and LSI+61 235 (Sarty et al. 2009). Our objective is to study the short-term variability of Galactic Be/X binaries, compare them to the Be/X of the MC and to the isolated Galactic Be observed with CoRoT and Kepler. We present preliminary results of two Be/X stars, namely 4U0115+63 and SAXJ2103.5+4545 showing multiperiodicity and periodicity respectively, most probably produced by non-radial pulsations.

  19. Measuring the Total-Factor Carbon Emission Performance of Industrial Land Use in China Based on the Global Directional Distance Function and Non-Radial Luenberger Productivity Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Industry is a major contributor to carbon emissions in China, and industrial land is an important input to industrial production. Therefore, a detailed analysis of the carbon emission performance of industrial land use is necessary for making reasonable carbon reduction policies that promote the sustainable use of industrial land. This paper aims to analyze the dynamic changes in the total-factor carbon emission performance of industrial land use (TCPIL in China by applying a global directional distance function (DDF and non-radial Luenberger productivity index. The empirical results show that the eastern region enjoys better TCPIL than the central and western regions, but the regional gaps in TCPIL are narrowing. The growth in NLCPILs (non-radial Luenberger carbon emission performance of industrial land use in the eastern and central regions is mainly driven by technological progress, whereas efficiency improvements contribute more to the growth of NLCPIL in the western region. The provinces in the eastern region have the most innovative and environmentally-friendly production technologies. The results of the analysis of the influencing factors show implications for improving the NLCPIL, including more investment in industrial research and development (R&D, the implementation of carbon emission reduction policies, reduction in the use of fossil energy, especially coal, in the process of industrial production, actively learning about foreign advanced technology, properly solving the problem of surplus labor in industry and the expansion of industrial development.

  20. Identification of a Nuclear Exosome Decay Pathway for Processed Transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meola, Nicola; Domanski, Michal; Karadoulama, Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    , the Zn-finger protein ZCCHC8, and the RNA-binding factor RBM7. NEXT primarily targets early and unprocessed transcripts, which demands a rationale for how the nuclear exosome recognizes processed RNAs. Here, we describe the poly(A) tail exosome targeting (PAXT) connection, which comprises the ZFC3H1 Zn...

  1. Semileptonic and leptonic $B$ decays, circa 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the status of semileptonic and leptonic $B$ decays, including $|V_{cb}|$ and $|V_{ub}|$ exclusive and inclusive determinations, decays to excited states of the charm meson spectrum and decays into $\\tau$ leptons.

  2. Nonleptonic Bc→VV decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Susmita; Dash, P. C.; Priyadarsini, M.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Barik, N.

    2013-11-01

    We study the exclusive nonleptonic Bc→VV decays, within the factorization approximation, in the framework of the relativistic independent quark model, based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The weak form factors are extracted from the overlap integral of meson wave functions derived in the relativistic independent quark model. The predicted branching ratios for different Bc-meson decays are obtained in a wide range, from a tiny value of O(10-6) for Bc→D*D(s)* to a large value of 24.32% for Bc→Bs*ρ-, in general agreement with other dynamical-quark-model predictions. The decay modes Bc→Bs*ρ- and Bc→B*ρ- with high branching ratios of 24.32% and 1.73%, respectively, obtained in this model should be detectable at the LHC and Tevatron in the near future. The b→c, u induced decays are predicted predominantly in the longitudinal mode, whereas the c¯→s¯, d¯ induced decays are obtained in a slightly higher transverse mode. The CP-odd fractions (R⊥) for different decay modes are predicted and those for color-favored Bc→D*D*, D*Ds* decays indicate significant CP violation in this sector.

  3. FIP Bias Evolution in a Decaying Active Region

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D; Démoulin, P; Yardley, S L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Long, D M; Green, L M

    2015-01-01

    Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR) 11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR from 2012 January 4-6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR's decay phase, small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing time scales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Final...

  4. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  5. Cusp effects in meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in the pi0 pi0 invariant mass distribution of K+ --> pi0 pi0 pi+ decays. As originally pointed out by Cabibbo, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths to high precision. We present the non-relativistic effective field theory framework that permits to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner, including the effects of radiative corrections. Applications of the same formalism to other decay channels, in particular eta and eta' decays, are also discussed.

  6. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  7. Inconclusive Inclusive Nonleptonic $B$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, A F; Dunietz, Isard; Falk, Adam F.; Wise, Mark B.; Dunietz, Isard

    1995-01-01

    We reconsider the conflict between recent calculations of the semileptonic branching ratio of the $B$ meson and the experimentally measured rate. Such calculations depend crucially on the application of ``local duality'' in nonleptonic decays, and we discuss the relation of this assumption to the weaker assumptions required to compute the semileptonic decay rate. We suggest that the discrepancy between theory and experiment might be due to the channel with two charm quarks in the final state, either because of a small value for $m_c$ or because of a failure of local duality. We examine the experimental consequences of such solutions for the charm multiplicity in $B$ decays.

  8. Inconclusive inclusive nonleptonic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, A F; Dunietz, Isard; Adam F Falk; Mark B Wise; Isard Dunietz

    1995-01-01

    We reconsider the conflict between recent calculations of the semileptonic branching ratio of the B meson and the experimentally measured rate. Such calculations depend crucially on the application of ``local duality'' in nonleptonic decays, and we discuss the relation of this assumption to the weaker assumptions required to compute the semileptonic decay rate. We suggest that the discrepancy between theory and experiment might be due to the channel with two charm quarks in the final state, either because of a small value for m_c or because of a failure of local duality. We examine the experimental consequences of such solutions for the charm multiplicity in B decays.

  9. Decays of the b quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  10. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  11. The human nuclear poly(a-binding protein promotes RNA hyperadenylation and decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Bresson

    Full Text Available Control of nuclear RNA stability is essential for proper gene expression, but the mechanisms governing RNA degradation in mammalian nuclei are poorly defined. In this study, we uncover a mammalian RNA decay pathway that depends on the nuclear poly(A-binding protein (PABPN1, the poly(A polymerases (PAPs, PAPα and PAPγ, and the exosome subunits RRP6 and DIS3. Using a targeted knockdown approach and nuclear RNA reporters, we show that PABPN1 and PAPα, redundantly with PAPγ, generate hyperadenylated decay substrates that are recognized by the exosome and degraded. Poly(A tail extension appears to be necessary for decay, as cordycepin treatment or point mutations in the PAP-stimulating domain of PABPN1 leads to the accumulation of stable transcripts with shorter poly(A tails than controls. Mechanistically, these data suggest that PABPN1-dependent promotion of PAP activity can stimulate nuclear RNA decay. Importantly, efficiently exported RNAs are unaffected by this decay pathway, supporting an mRNA quality control function for this pathway. Finally, analyses of both bulk poly(A tails and specific endogenous transcripts reveals that a subset of nuclear RNAs are hyperadenylated in a PABPN1-dependent fashion, and this hyperadenylation can be either uncoupled or coupled with decay. Our results highlight a complex relationship between PABPN1, PAPα/γ, and nuclear RNA decay, and we suggest that these activities may play broader roles in the regulation of human gene expression.

  12. Carrier Decay and Diffusion Dynamics in Single-Crystalline CdTe as seen via Microphotoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Angelo; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2015-03-01

    The ability to spatially resolve the degree to which extended defects impact carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes is important for determining upper limits for defect densities in semiconductor devices. We show that a new spatially and temporally resolved photoluminescence (PL) imaging technique can be used to accurately extract carrier lifetimes in the immediate vicinity of dark-line defects in CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures. A series of PL images captured during the decay process show that extended defects with a density of 1.4x10-5 cm-2 deplete photogenerated charge carriers from the surrounding semiconductor material on a nanosecond time scale. The technique makes it possible to elucidate the interplay between nonradiative carrier recombination and carrier diffusion and reveals that they both combine to degrade the PL intensity over a fractional area that is much larger than the physical size of the defects. Carrier lifetimes are correctly determined from numerical simulations of the decay behavior by taking these two effects into account. Our study demonstrates that it is crucial to measure and account for the influence of local defects in the measurement of carrier lifetime and diffusion, which are key transport parameters for the design and modeling of advanced solar-cell and light-emitting devices. We acknowledge the financial support of the Department of Energy Office of Science under Grant No. DE-AC36-08GO28308.

  13. The Search for Proton Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  14. \\tau lepton decays and CVC

    OpenAIRE

    Cherepanov, V. A.; Eidelman, S. I.

    2009-01-01

    We use experimental data on $e^+e^- \\to \\eta (\\eta^{\\prime})\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and conservation of vector current to estimate the branching fractions of $\\tau^-$ decay to $\\eta (\\eta^{\\prime})\\pi^-\\pi^0\

  15. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  16. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2013-05-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling \\Gamma \\sim \\Gamma _{CDL}^{2}, where ΓCDL is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable initial state an efficient quantum Zeno effect occurs due to thermal radiation of temperatures as low as the de Sitter temperature. This strong decoherence effect is a consequence of gravitational interactions with light external mode. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincaré recurrence in de Sitter space.

  17. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bachlechner, Thomas C

    2012-01-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between thermal de Sitter photons and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and photon interactions has the exponential scaling $\\Gamma\\sim \\Gamma_{0}^{2}$, where $\\Gamma_{0}$ is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. This strong decoherence effect is a generic consequence of gravitational interactions with light external modes. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincare recurrence in de Sitter space.

  18. Higher Order Top Squark Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Porod, Werner

    1997-01-01

    Within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model we study the three bod= y decay of the lighter top squark into a b-quark, a W-boson and the lightes= t neutralino and compare this decay with the flavour changing two body deca= y of the lighter top squark into a c-quark and the lightest neutralino. We do = this for scenarios where two body decays at tree level are forbidden for the l= ight top squark. We give the complete analysis for the three body and compare = it with the mentioned two body decay. We discuss our numerical results in vi= ew of the upgraded Tevatron, the LHC and a 500~GeV $e^+ e^-$ Linear Collider.

  19. Strange decays from strange resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum and strong decays of baryon resonances belonging to the N, Delta, Sigma, Lambda, Xi and Omega families in a collective string-like model for the nucleon. We find good overall agreement with the available data. Systematic discrepancies are found for lowlying S-wave states, in particular in the strong decays of N(1535), N(1650), Sigma(1750), Lambda(1405), Lambda(1670) and Lambda(1800).

  20. Strange decays from strange resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2001-07-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum and strong decays of baryon resonances belonging to the N, {delta}, {sigma}, {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} families in a collective string- like model for the nucleon. We find good overall agreement with the available data. Systematic discrepancies are found for low-lying S-wave states, in particular in the strong decays of N(1535), N(1650), {sigma}(1750), {lambda}{sup *}(1405), {lambda}(1670) and {lambda}(1800). (Author)

  1. $D$ leptonic and semileptonic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    Based on 2.92 fb$^{-1}$ data taken at the center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt s=3.773$ GeV with the BESIII detector, we report recent results on the decay constant $f_{D^+}$, the hadronic form factors, as well as the quark mixing matrix elements $|V_{cs(d)}|$, which are extracted from analyses of the leptonic decay $D^+ \\to \\mu^+\

  2. CP violation in sbottom decays

    CERN Document Server

    Deppisch, Frank F

    2010-01-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and tops. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable, and analyze the feasibility of their observation at the LHC. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases.

  3. CP violation in sbottom decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and top quarks. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases at the LHC.

  4. $\\Upsilon$ production in Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have searched for evidence of Upsilon production in 3.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1991-1995. No signals are observed for the decay chain Z -> Upsilon X; Upsilon -> l+l- (l= e, mu), therefore upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the following Z branching fractions: BR (Z -> Upsilon(1S) X) Upsilon(2S) X) Upsilon(3S) X) < 9.4 x 10**-5.

  5. Multiboson production in W' decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A

    2015-01-01

    In models with an extra $\\text{SU}(2)_R$ gauge group and an extended scalar sector, the cascade decays of the $W'$ boson can provide various multiboson signals. In particular, diboson decays $W' \\to WZ$ can be suppressed while $W' \\to WZX$, with $X$ one of the scalars present in the model, can reach branching ratios around 4%. We discuss these multiboson signals focusing on possible interpretations of the ATLAS excess in fat jet pair production.

  6. Controlling non-radiative energy transfer in organic binary blends: a route towards colour tunability and white emission from single-active-layer light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisignano, Dario [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Mazzeo, Marco [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Gigli, Giuseppe [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Barbarella, Giovanna [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), ICOCEA, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Favaretto, Laura [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), ICOCEA, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Cingolani, Roberto [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2003-10-21

    We show how colour tunability (including white) can be achieved by controlling non-radiative intermolecular energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor in binary blends of oligomeric compounds. Blends of different concentrations of a novel functionalized thiophene-based oligomer and a low-molar-mass diamine derivative (N, N'-diphenyl-N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1, 1'-biphenyl-4.4'diamine) are used to tune both the photoluminescence and the electroluminescence (EL) from red to blue, including balanced white, according to the standards of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage. The single-active-layer light-emitting devices, realized by spin-coating, exhibit good EL performance. In particular, the white-emitting device shows an EL efficiency of 5 x 10{sup -1} cd A{sup -1} and a luminance of more than 180 cd m{sup -2}.

  7. Nanoantenna enhanced emission of light-harvesting complex 2: the role of resonance, polarization, and radiative and non-radiative rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-12-01

    Nanoantennae show potential for photosynthesis research for two reasons; first by spatially confining light for experiments which require high spatial resolution, and second by enhancing the photon emission of single light-harvesting complexes. For effective use of nanoantennae a detailed understanding of the interaction between the nanoantenna and the light-harvesting complex is required. Here we report how the excitation and emission of multiple purple bacterial LH2s (light-harvesting complex 2) are controlled by single gold nanorod antennae. LH2 complexes were chemically attached to such antennae, and the antenna length was systematically varied to tune the resonance with respect to the LH2 absorption and emission. There are three main findings. (i) The polarization of the LH2 emission is fully controlled by the resonant nanoantenna. (ii) The largest fluorescence enhancement, of 23 times, is reached for excitation with light at λ = 850 nm, polarized along the long antenna-axis of the resonant antenna. The excitation enhancement is found to be 6 times, while the emission efficiency is increased 3.6 times. (iii) The fluorescence lifetime of LH2 depends strongly on the antenna length, with shortest lifetimes of ∼40 ps for the resonant antenna. The lifetime shortening arises from an 11 times resonant enhancement of the radiative rate, together with a 2-3 times increase of the non-radiative rate, compared to the off-resonant antenna. The observed length dependence of radiative and non-radiative rate enhancement is in good agreement with simulations. Overall this work gives a complete picture of how the excitation and emission of multi-pigment light-harvesting complexes are influenced by a dipole nanoantenna.

  8. Heavy hadron decays with conserved heavy flavour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theoretische Physik 1, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultaet, Universitaet Siegen, Walter-Flex-Strasse 3, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the decays of heavy hadrons where the heavy quark acts as a spectator and the light quark decays in a weak transition. For these s → u or d → u decays we show that the decay rates can be reliably computed.

  9. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  10. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  11. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  12. Decays of the vector glueball

    CERN Document Server

    Giacosa, Francesco; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2016-01-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons. By setting the mass of this yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by Lattice QCD, many branching ratios can be computed and represent a parameter-free prediction of our approach. We find that the decay mode $\\omega\\pi\\pi$ should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain $\\mathcal{O}\\rightarrow b_{1}\\pi\\rightarrow$ $\\omega\\pi\\pi$ and through the direct coupling $\\mathcal{O}\\rightarrow\\omega\\pi\\pi$)$.$ Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into $\\pi KK^{\\ast}(892)$ is sizable. Moreover, the decays into $\\rho\\pi$ and $K^{\\ast}(892)K$ are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the $\\rho\\pi$ puzzle of the charmonium state $\\psi(2S)$ thank to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA exper...

  13. CRBRP decay heat removal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hottel, R. E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C. E.; Kiley, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

  14. Energy level decay and excited state absorption processes in dysprosium-doped fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Laércio; Librantz, André Felipe Henriques; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2010-03-01

    The primary excited state decay processes relating to the H613/2→H615/2˜3 μm laser transition in singly Dy3+-doped fluoride (ZBLAN) glass have been investigated in detail using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Selective laser excitation of the F69/2, H67/2 energy levels at 1125 nm and F611/2, H69/2 energy levels at 1358 nm established that the energy levels above the H611/2 level, excluding the F49/2 level, are entirely quenched by multiphonon emission in ZBLAN glass. The H611/2 and H613/2 energy levels emit luminescence with peaks at ˜1700 and ˜2880 nm, respectively, but at low quantum (luminescence) efficiencies. The quantum efficiency of the H611/2 level and H613/2 level is ˜9×10-5 and ˜1.3×10-2, respectively, for [Dy3+]=0.5 mol % based on calculations of the radiative lifetimes using the Judd-Ofelt theory. Excited state absorption (ESA) was detected by monitoring the rise time of the 1700 nm luminescence after tuning the probe wavelength across the spectral range from 1100 to 1400 nm. As a result of nonradiative decay of the higher excited states, ESA contributes to the heating of ˜3 μm fiber lasers based on Dy3+-doped fluoride glass. For [Dy3+] up to 4 mol %, we found no evidence of energy transfer processes between Dy3+ ions that influence the decay characteristics of the H611/2 and H613/2 energy levels.

  15. Overview of kaon decay physics

    CERN Document Server

    Peccei, Roberto D

    1995-01-01

    After a brief history of the insights gained from Kaon physics, the potential of Kaon decays for probing lepton number violation is discussed. Present tests of CTP and of Quantum Mechanics in the neutral Kaon sector are then reviewed and the potential of the Frascati \\Phi factory for doing incisive tests in this area is emphasized. The rest of this overview focuses on CP violating effects in the Kaon system. Although present observations of CP violation are perfectly consistent with the CKM model, we emphasize the theoretical and experimental difficulties which must be faced to establish this conclusively. In so doing, theoretical predictions and experimental prospects for detecting \\Delta S=1 CP violation through measurements of \\epsilon^\\prime/\\epsilon and of rare K decays are reviewed. The importance of looking for evidence for non-CKM CP-violating phases, through a search for a non-vanishing transverse muon polarization in K_{\\mu 3} decays, is also stressed.

  16. Composite Taus and Higgs Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    In this talk, we describe the effects of extended fermion sectors, respecting custodial symmetry, on Higgs production and decay. The resulting protection for the Z->b_L b_L and Z->\\tau_R \\tau_R decays allows for potentially interesting signals in Higgs physics, while maintaining the good agreement of the Standard Model with precision tests. The setups can be motivated as the low energy effective theories of the composite Higgs models MCHM_5 and MCHM_10, where the spectra can be identified with the light custodians present in these theories. We will show that these describe the relevant physics in the fermion sectors in a simplified and transparent way. In contrast to previous studies of composite models, the impact of a realistic lepton sector on the Higgs decays is taken into account.

  17. Lepton flavor violating quarkonium decays

    CERN Document Server

    Hazard, Derek E

    2016-01-01

    We argue that lepton flavor violating (LFV) decays $M \\to \\ell_1 \\overline \\ell_2$ of quarkonium states $M$ with different quantum numbers could be used to put constraints on the Wilson coefficients of effective operators describing LFV interactions at low energy scales. We note that restricted kinematics of the two-body quarkonium decays allows us to select operators with particular quantum numbers, significantly reducing the reliance on the single operator dominance assumption that is prevalent in constraining parameters of the effective LFV Lagrangian. We shall also argue that studies of radiative lepton flavor violating $M \\to \\gamma \\ell_1 \\overline \\ell_2$ decays could provide important complementary access to those effective operators.

  18. Tensor interactions and {tau} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godina Nava, J.J.; Lopez Castro, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1995-09-01

    We study the effects of charged tensor weak currents on the strangeness-changing decays of the {tau} lepton. First, we use the available information on the {ital K}{sub {ital e}3}{sup +} form factors to obtain {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}){similar_to}10{sup {minus}4} when the {ital K}{pi} system is produced in an antisymmetric tensor configuration. Then we propose a mechanism for the direct production of the {ital K}{sub 2}{sup *}(1430) in {tau} decays. Using the current upper limit on this decay we set a bound on the symmetric tensor interactions.

  19. Homodyne monitoring of postselected decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D.; Foroozani, N.; Naghiloo, M.; Kiilerich, A. H.; Mølmer, K.; Murch, K. W.

    2017-08-01

    We use homodyne detection to monitor the radiative decay of a superconducting qubit. According to the classical theory of conditional probabilities, the excited-state population differs from an exponential decay law if it is conditioned upon a later projective qubit measurement. Quantum trajectory theory accounts for the expectation values of general observables, and we use experimental data to show how a homodyne detection signal is conditioned upon both the initial state and the finally projected state of a decaying qubit. We observe, in particular, how anomalous weak values occur in continuous weak measurement for certain pre- and postselected states. Subject to homodyne detection, the density matrix evolves in a stochastic manner, but it is restricted to a specific surface in the Bloch sphere. We show that a similar restriction applies to the information associated with the postselection, and thus bounds the predictions of the theory.

  20. Rare decay searches at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Maestro, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the CDF experiment at the Tevatron clearly demonstrated that it is possible to study extensively heavy flavour physics in hadron collisions and achieve remarkable results, competitive and complementary to $B$-factories. In this paper we report on the indirect searches for physics beyond the standard model via measurements of rare $b$-hadron decays. The final limits, based on the analysis of the full CDF data set, on the branching fraction of the $B^0_{(s)}$ decay into a pair of muons are presented and discussed. Moreover we review the latest measurements, with 6.8 fb$^{-1}$ of collected data, of the total and differential branching fractions and angular observables of rare $b$-hadron decays proceeding via the flavour-changing neutral-current process $b \\rightarrow s \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. PACS numbers: 13.20.He, 13.30.-a, 12.15.Mn

  1. Proton decay and grand unification

    CERN Document Server

    Senjanovic, Goran

    2009-01-01

    I review the theoretical and experimental status of proton decay theory and experiment. Regarding theory, I focus mostly, but not only, on grand unification. I discuss only the minimal, well established SU(5) and SO(10) models, both ordinary and supersymmetric. I show how the minimal realistic extensions of the original Georgi - Glashow model can lead to interesting LHC physics, and I demonstrate that the minimal supersymmetric SU(5) theory is in perfect accord with experiment. Since no universally accepted model has of yet emerged, I discuss the effective operator analysis of proton decay and some related predictions from a high scale underlying theory. A strong case is made for the improvement of experimental limits, or better the search of, two body neutron decay modes into charged kaons and charged leptons. Their discovery would necessarily imply a low energy physics since they practically vanish in any theory with a desert in energies between M_W and M_GUT.

  2. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  3. Charmless B decays involving baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1988-02-01

    Predictions are made for the fraction of B-meson decays involving specific final states of NN¯+nπ (n>=0), as functions of (a) decay dynamics, (b) models for multipion production, (c) the isospin of the final state, and (d) the ratio ||Vbu/Vbc|| of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements. From recent observations of B+-->pp¯π+(+c.c.) and B0-->pp¯π+π- by the ARGUS Collaboration, it is concluded that ||Vbu/Vbc||>~0.08, similar to the ARGUS Collaboration's own estimate of 0.07. However, a more likely value for this ratio is near its present experimental upper limit. Predictions are made for further final states in NN¯+nπ and in other charmless B decays. We also comment briefly on prospects for observing CP violation in B-->NN¯+nπ.

  4. Hybrid Exotic Meson Decay Width

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, M S

    2005-01-01

    We present results of a decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson(h, JPC=1-+) in the decay channel h to pi+a1. This calculation uses quenched lattice QCD and Luescher's finite box method. Operators for the h and pi+a1 states are used in a correlation matrix which was expanded by varying the smearing and fuzzing levels at source and sink points. Scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative pi+a1 momenta are determined using eigenvalues of the correlation matrix and formulae derived by Luescher. The phase shift data is very sparse, but fits to a Breit-Wigner model are made, resulting in a decay width of about 80 MeV.

  5. First prediction of inter-Coulombic decay of C60 inner vacancies through the continuum of confined atoms

    CERN Document Server

    De, Ruma; Madjet, Mohamed E; Manson, Steven T; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2015-01-01

    Considering the photoionization of Ar@C60 and Kr@C60 endofullerenes, the decay of C60 innershell excitations through the outershell continuum of the confined atom via the inter-Coulombic decay (ICD) pathway is detailed. Excitations to atom-C60 hybrid states demonstrate coherence between ICD and electron-transfer mediated decay (ETMD). This should be the dominant above-threshold decay process for a variety of confined systems, and the strength of these resonances is such that they should be amenable for study by photoelectron spectroscopy.

  6. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  7. Decay of Quantum Accelerator Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, M; Guarneri, I; Rebuzzini, L; Fishman, Shmuel; Guarneri, Italo; Rebuzzini, Laura; Sheinman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Experimentally observable Quantum Accelerator Modes are used as a test case for the study of some general aspects of quantum decay from classical stable islands immersed in a chaotic sea. The modes are shown to correspond to metastable states, analogous to the Wannier-Stark resonances. Different regimes of tunneling, marked by different quantitative dependence of the lifetimes on 1/hbar, are identified, depending on the resolution of KAM substructures that is achieved on the scale of hbar. The theory of Resonance Assisted Tunneling introduced by Brodier, Schlagheck, and Ullmo [9], is revisited, and found to well describe decay whenever applicable.

  8. Luminescence decay of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Uttamchandani, D.; Sander, D.; O'Donnell, K. P.

    1993-04-01

    The luminescence decay pattern of porous silicon samples prepared by electrochemical etching is characterised experimentally by a non-exponential profile, a strong dependence on temperature and an absence of spectral diffusion. We describe this luminescence as carrier-dopping-assisted recombination. Following the correlation function approach to non-dispersive transport developed by Scher and co-workers [Physics Today 41 (1991) 26], we suggest a simple derivation of analytical functions which accurately describes the anomalous luminescence decay of porous silicon, and show that this model includes exponential and Kohlrausch [Pogg. Ann. Phys. 119 (1863) 352] (stretched-exponential) relaxations as special cases.

  9. Higgs Decay to Two Photons

    OpenAIRE

    Marciano, William J.; Zhang, Cen; Willenbrock, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The amplitude for Higgs decay to two photons is calculated in renormalizable and unitary gauges using dimensional regularization at intermediate steps. The result is finite, gauge independent, and in agreement with previously published results. The large Higgs mass limit is examined using the Goldstone-boson equivalence theorem as a check on the use of dimensional regularization and to explain the absence of decoupling.

  10. Decay Constants of Vector Mesons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Heng-Mei; WAN Shao-Long

    2008-01-01

    @@ The light vector mesons are studied within the framework of the Bethe-Salpeter equation with the vector-vectortype flat-bottom potential The Bethe-Salpeter wavefunctions and the decay constants of the vector mesons are obtained. All the obtained results, fρ, fφ, and fΚ* , are in agreement with the experimental values, respectively.

  11. Rare B decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  12. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  13. Hadronic B Decays in PQCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mishima, S

    2006-01-01

    I review recent progress on exclusive hadronic B meson decays in the perturbative QCD approach, with focus on puzzles in the branching ratios and the CP asymmetries of the B -> pi K and B -> pi pi modes, and polarization fractions in B -> VV modes.

  14. Beta decay of Cu-56

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borcea, R; Aysto, J; Caurier, E; Dendooven, P; Doring, J; Gierlik, M; Gorska, M; Grawe, H; Hellstrom, M; Janas, Z; Jokinen, A; Karny, M; Kirchner, R; La Commara, M; Langanke, K; Martinez-Pinedo, G; Mayet, P; Nieminen, A; Nowacki, F; Penttila, H; Plochocki, A; Rejmund, M; Roeckl, E; Schlegel, C; Schmidt, K; Schwengner, R; Sawicka, M

    2001-01-01

    The proton-rich isotope Cu-56 was produced at the GSI On-Line Mass Separator by means of the Si-28(S-32, p3n) fusion-evaporation reaction. Its beta -decay properties were studied by detecting beta -delayed gamma rays and protons. A half-Life of 93 +/- 3 ms was determined for Cu-56. Compared to the p

  15. Salt decay of Morley limestone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Salt weathering is one of the main causes of decay of natural stone, and by consequence a major problem to the conservation of cultural heritage. In the present case, the performance of Morley limestone from the Département Meuse, France, as a replacement stone under saltloaded conditions is evaluat

  16. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh

    2015-09-01

    The decay properties of the isotopes of = 115, 117, 118 and 119 have been extensively investigated, focussing on the newly synthesized isotopes within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The half-lives have also been evaluated using the Viola–Seaborg systematic (VSS) and the analytical formulae of Royer and it can be seen that our calculated values match well with these theoretical values. The mode of decay of these isotopes has also been studied by calculating the spontaneous fission half-lives. Thus, we have predicted 4 chains from 287115, 3 chains from 288115, 3 chains from 293117, 4 chains from 294117 and 3 chains from 294118 and, it can be seen that our predictions on the decay chains also match well with the experimental observations. The study on = 119 has predicted six consistent chains from 292−295119, 5 chains from 296119, 4 chains from 297119 and 3 chains from 298,299119. Thus, through our study on isotopes of = 115, 117, 118 and 119 superheavy nuclei, we could predict the range of isotopes that may be detectable using decay and we hope that the findings on the isotopes of = 119 will provide a new guide for future experiments.

  17. Hadronic decays of $W$ bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, III, Richard Paul [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for hadronic W decays in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton + neutrino + ≥ 4 jet events using a 109 pb -1 data sample of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  18. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  19. Neutron Beta Decay Studies with Nab

    CERN Document Server

    Baeßler, S; Alonzi, L P; Balascuta, S; Barrón-Palos, L; Bowman, J D; Bychkov, M A; Byrne, J; Calarco, J R; Chupp, T; Vianciolo, T V; Crawford, C; Frlež, E; Gericke, M T; Glück, F; Greene, G L; Grzywacz, R K; Gudkov, V; Harrison, D; Hersman, F W; Ito, T; Makela, M; Martin, J; McGaughey, P L; McGovern, S; Page, S; Penttilä, S I; Počanić, D; Rykaczewski, K P; Salas-Bacci, A; Tompkins, Z; Wagner, D; Wilburn, W S; Young, A R

    2012-01-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  20. Gaussian Confinement in a Jkj Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Mario L. L.; Hadjimichef, Dimiter; Vasconcellos, Cesar A. Z.

    In microscopic decay models, one attempts to describe hadron strong decays in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom. We begin by assuming that strong decays are driven by the same interquark Hamiltonian which determines the spectrum, and that it incorporates gaussian confinement. An A → BC decay matrix element of the JKJ Hamiltonian involves a pair-production current matrix elements times a scatering matrix element. Diagrammatically this corresponds to an interaction between an initial line and produced pair.

  1. Search for hadronic b yields u decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, H.; Glaeser, R.; Harder, G.; Krueger, A.; Nilsson, A.W.; Nippe, A.; Oest, T.; Reidenbach, M.; Schaefer, M.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Sefkow, F.; Wurth, R. (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany, F.R.)); Appuhn, R.D.; Drescher, A.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Scheck, H.; Schweda, G.; Spaan, B.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik); Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Volland, U.; Wegener, H. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik); Ball, S.; Gabriel, J.C.; Geyer, C.; Hoelscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Khan, S.; Spengler, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.)); Charlesworth, C.E.K.; Krieger, P.; Kutschke, R.; Orr, R.S.; Parsons, J.A.; Prentice, J.D.; Seidel, S.C.; Swain, J.D.; Yoon, T.S. (; ARGUS Collaboration

    1990-05-10

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storgage ring DORIS II at DESY, we searched for b{yields}u transitions in exclusive hadronic B meson decays. A systematic analysis of B decays into pions has been performed for decay modes with 2-7 pions in the final state. In none of the decays a positive signal was observed. The upper limits obtained on various branching ratios are consistent with the current model predictions. (orig.).

  2. Search for hadronic b-->u decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Gläser, R.; Harder, G.; Krüger, A.; Nilsson, A. W.; Nippe, A.; Oest, T.; Reidenbach, M.; Schäfer, M.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Sefkow, F.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Drescher, A.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Scheck, H.; Schweda, G.; Spaan, B.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Volland, U.; Wegener, H.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ball, S.; Gabriel, J. C.; Geyer, C.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Khan, S.; Spengler, J.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Frisken, W. R.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Kutschke, R.; Macfarlene, D. B.; McLean, K. W.; Orr, R. S.; Parsons, J. A.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Swain, J. D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Yoon, T.-S.; Ruf, T.; Schael, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Boštjančič, B.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Babaev, A.; Danilo, M.; Fominykh, B.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Semenov, A.; Semenov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tchistilin, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Childers, R.; Darden, C. W.; Argus Collaboration

    1990-05-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we searched for b→u transitions in exclusive hadronic B meson decays. A systematic analysis of B decays into pions has been performed for decay modes with 2-7 pions in the final state. In none of the decays a positive signal was observed. The upper limits obtained on various branching ratios are consistent with the current model predictions.

  3. Do grain boundaries dominate non-radiative recombination in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite thin films?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengjin; Zeng, Yining; Li, Zhen; Kim, Dong Hoe; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Zhu, Kai

    2017-01-13

    Here, we examine GBs with respect to non-GB regions (grain surfaces (GSs) and grain interiors (GIs)) in high-quality micrometer-sized perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (or MAPbI3) thin films using high-resolution confocal fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy in conjunction with kinetic modeling of charge-transport and recombination processes. We show that, contrary to previous studies, GBs in our perovskite MAPbI3 thin films do not lead to increased recombination but that recombination in these films happens primarily in the non-GB regions (i.e., GSs or GIs). We also find that GBs in these films are not transparent to photogenerated carriers, which is likely associated with a potential barrier at GBs. Even though GBs generally display lower luminescence intensities than GSs/GIs, the lifetimes at GBs are no worse than those at GSs/GIs, further suggesting that GBs do not dominate non-radiative recombination in MAPbI3 thin films.

  4. Non-radial motion in the TeV blazar S5 0716+714 The pc-scale kinematics of a BL Lac Object

    CERN Document Server

    Britzen, S; Witzel, A; Agudo, I; Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Karouzos, M; Eckart, A; Zensus, J A; 10.1051/0004-6361/200810875

    2010-01-01

    For the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 conflicting apparent velocities of jet component motion have been reported in the literature. This object is an intra-day variable source and suited to investigate a possible correlation between kinematic properties and flux-density variability on different timescales. We (re-)analyze 50 VLBI observations obtained with the VLBA at 5 different frequencies (5 to 43 GHz) between 1992.73 and 2006.32. We analyze the jet component motion in detail taking care not only to account for motion in the radial but also in the orthogonal direction. We study the evolution of the jet ridge line and search for correlations between radio band light curves and the kinematic properties of the jet components. We present an alternative kinematic scenario for jet component motion in S5 0716+714 with apparent stationarity of jet components (with regard to their core separation) with time. Jet components, however, do seem to move significantly non-radially with regard to their position angle and in a...

  5. Trap and nonradiative centers in Ba₃Si₆O₁₂N₂:Eu²⁺ phosphors observed by thermoluminescence and two-wavelength excited photoluminescence methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Kamata, Norihiko; Kotsuka, Yosuke; Fukuda, Takeshi; Honda, Zentaro; Kurushima, Tomoyuki

    2015-06-29

    We have studied trap centers and nonradiative (NRR) recombination centers in a Ba3Si6O12N2:Eu2+ (BSON), one of promising materials for efficient and stable phosphors in white LED lamp applications. The energy distribution of four trap centers was obtained by thermo-luminescence (TL) with the excitation energy of 5.59eV. By superposing a below-gap excitation light of 1.77eV and observing the intensity change of the 5d-4f emission of Eu2+ centered at 2.36eV in our two-wavelength excited photoluminescence (TWEPL) measurement, both transient and steady state enhancement were observed. Such peculiar behavior of photo-stimulation is attributed to the coexistence of trap centers and NRR centers: the photoexcitation of electrons from trap centers generates the transient component, while that from NRR centers maintains the steady state component. An optical detection of relatively faint contribution of defects became possible in order to improve further the reliability and efficiency of phosphor materials.

  6. ICP-MS Analysis of Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles as a Non-Radiative, Multiplex Approach to Quantify Biodistribution and Blood Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crayton, Samuel H.; Elias, Andrew; Al-Zaki, Ajlan; Cheng, Zhiliang; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in material science and chemistry have led to the development of nanoparticles with diverse physicochemical properties, e.g. size, charge, shape, and surface chemistry. Evaluating which physicochemical properties are best for imaging and therapeutic studies is challenging not only because of the multitude of samples to evaluate, but also because of the large experimental variability associated with in vivo studies (e.g. differences in tumor size, injected dose, subject weight, etc.). To address this issue, we have developed a lanthanide-doped nanoparticle system and analytical method that allows for the quantitative comparison of multiple nanoparticle compositions simultaneously. Specifically, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) with a range of different sizes and charges were synthesized, each with a unique lanthanide dopant. Following the simultaneous injection of the various SPIO compositions into tumor-bearing mice, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was used to quantitatively and orthogonally assess the concentration of each SPIO composition in serial blood samples and the resected tumor and organs. The method proved generalizable to other nanoparticle platforms, including dendrimers, liposomes, and polymersomes. This approach provides a simple, cost-effective, and non-radiative method to quantitatively compare tumor localization, biodistribution, and blood clearance of more than 10 nanoparticle compositions simultaneously, removing subject-to-subject variability. PMID:22100983

  7. Attacked from All Sides: RNA Decay in Antiviral Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome M. Molleston

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system has evolved a number of sensors that recognize viral RNA (vRNA to restrict infection, yet the full spectrum of host-encoded RNA binding proteins that target these foreign RNAs is still unknown. The RNA decay machinery, which uses exonucleases to degrade aberrant RNAs largely from the 5′ or 3′ end, is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in antiviral defense. The 5′ degradation pathway can directly target viral messenger RNA (mRNA for degradation, as well as indirectly attenuate replication by limiting specific pools of endogenous RNAs. The 3′ degradation machinery (RNA exosome is emerging as a downstream effector of a diverse array of vRNA sensors. This review discusses our current understanding of the roles of the RNA decay machinery in controlling viral infection.

  8. Decay of superdeformed structures studied with GASP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzacco, D. [I.N.F.N. and Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    1995-02-06

    Some studies on the subject of superdeformation, performed using the {gamma} detector array GASP, are presented. The attention is focussed to the problem of the decay of the superdeformed bands. The cases of {sup 133}Nd, where the decay proceeds by discrete transitions, and of {sup 194}Pb, where the decay proceeds in a statistical way, are presented. ((orig.)).

  9. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  10. Recent results on semileptonic decays at BABAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, J.; Babar Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Some recent BABAR results on semileptonic decays are presented. They focus on the determination of the CKM matrix elements |V| and |V| in inclusive and exclusive b→uℓν and b→cℓν decays, and on form factors measurement in exclusive c→sℓν decays.

  11. Light-quark decays in heavy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. These decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays may be interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  12. Light-quark decays in heavy hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven, E-mail: faller@physik.uni-siegen.de; Mannel, Thomas, E-mail: mannel@physik.uni-siegen.de

    2015-11-12

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. These decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays may be interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  13. Light-Quark Decays in Heavy Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Faller, Sven

    2015-01-01

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. Theses decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays are interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  14. Decay of eigenfunctions of elliptic PDE's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Ira; Skibsted, Erik

    We study exponential decay of eigenfunctions of self-adjoint higher order elliptic operators on Rd. We show that the possible critical decay rates are determined algebraically. In addition we show absence of super-exponentially decaying eigenfunctions and a refined exponential upper bound....

  15. Overlapping $B^{3}_{0u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ and $^{1}_{1u} ← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ non-radiative characteristic of Br2 vapour in the wavelength region 505–541 nm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramesh C Sharma; S N Thakur

    2001-01-01

    The vibronic vapour phase photoacoustic spectrum of Br2 in the wavelength region 505–541 nm (19796–18480 cm-1) has been recorded using microphone as well as pump-probe method. Discrete vibronic bands superimposed on a monotonically increasing continuum background towards the dissociation limit results from the overlapping $B^{3}^{+}_{0u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ and $^{1}_{1u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ electronic transitions. Vibronic bands originating from '' = 0 have been used to estimate the relative rate of non-radiative relaxation as a function of the excited state $^{3}_{0u}$ vibrational quantum number '. A comparison with the optical absorption spectroscopy of Br2 leads to the identification of three broad spectral regions between 505 and 541 nm (19796 and 18480 cm-1) on the basis of different non-radiative relaxation processes.

  16. Entanglement entropy in particle decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lello, Louis; Holman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The decay of a parent particle into two or more daughter particles results in an entangled quantum state, as a consequence of conservation laws in the decay process. We use the Wigner-Weisskopf formalism to construct an approximation to this state that evolves in time in a {\\em manifestly unitary} way. We then construct the entanglement entropy for one of the daughter particles by use of the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing out the unobserved states and follow its time evolution. We find that it grows over a time scale determined by the lifetime of the parent particle to a maximum, which when the width of the parent particle is narrow, describes the phase space distribution of maximally entangled Bell-like states.

  17. Measurement of $\\psip$ Radiative Decays

    OpenAIRE

    Ablikim, M.; J.Z. Bai; Ban, Y.; Collaboration, BES

    2006-01-01

    Using 14 million psi(2S) events accumulated at the BESII detector, we report first measurements of branching fractions or upper limits for psi(2S) decays into gamma ppbar, gamma 2(pi^+pi^-), gamma K_s K^-pi^++c.c., gamma K^+ K^- pi^+pi^-, gamma K^{*0} K^- pi^+ +c.c., gamma K^{*0}\\bar K^{*0}, gamma pi^+pi^- p pbar, gamma 2(K^+K^-), gamma 3(pi^+pi^-), and gamma 2(pi^+pi^-)K^+K^- with the invariant mass of hadrons below 2.9GeV/c^2. We also report branching fractions of psi(2S) decays into 2(pi^+...

  18. Decay of Ultralight Axion Condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua; Ma, Michael; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C.R.

    2017-05-15

    Axion particles can form macroscopic condensates, whose size can be galactic in scale for models with very small axion masses $m\\sim10^{-22}$ eV, and which are sometimes referred to under the name of Fuzzy Dark Matter. Many analyses of these condensates are done in the non-interacting limit, due to the weakness of the self-interaction coupling of axions. We investigate here how certain results change upon inclusion of these interactions, finding a decreased maximum mass and a modified mass-radius relationship. Further, these condensates are, in general, unstable to decay through number-changing interactions. We analyze the stability of galaxy-sized condensates of axion-like particles, and sketch the parameter space of stable configurations as a function of a binding energy parameter. We find a strong lower bound on the size of Fuzzy Dark Matter condensates which are stable to decay, with lifetimes longer than the age of the universe.

  19. $\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  20. Rare Decays of the $\\eta^{'}$

    CERN Document Server

    Briere, R A; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Krieg, H; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Von Dombrowski, S; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lee, T; Liu, Y; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Lohner, M; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Davis, R; Kotov, S A; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lorenc, J; Schwarthoff, H; Spencer, M B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A E; Bishai, M; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Lingel, K; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Korolkov, I Ya; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Dambasuren, E; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Titov, A; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Pomianowski, P A; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Greene, R; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Chan, S; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Nelson, T K; Richman, J D; Roberts, D

    2000-01-01

    We have searched for the rare decays of the eta prime meson to e+ e- eta, e+ e- pizero, e+ e- gamma, and e mu in hadronic events at the CLEO II detector. The search is conducted on 4.80 fb^-1 of e+ e- collisions at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We find no signal in any of these modes, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on their branching fractions of 2.4 X 10^-3, 1.4 X 10^-3, 0.9 X 10^-3, and 4.7 X 10^-4, respectively. We also investigate the Dalitz plot of the common decay of the eta prime to pi+ pi- eta. We fit the matrix element with the Particle Data Group parameterization and find Re(alpha) = -0.021 +- 0.025, where alpha is a linear function of the kinetic energy of the eta.

  1. Neutrino mass from triton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinheimer, Christian

    2006-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino flavor oscillation in different fields and by many different experiments we believe that neutrinos have non-vanishing masses in contrast to their current description within the Standard Model of particle physics. However, the absolute values of the neutrino masses, which are as important for particle physics as they are for cosmology and astrophysics, cannot be determined by oscillation experiments alone. There are a few ways to determine the neutrino mass scale, but the only model-independent method is the investigation of the electron energy spectrum of a β decay near its endpoint with tritium being the ideal isotope for the classical spectrometer set-up. The tritium β decay experiments at Mainz and Troitsk have recently been finished. At Mainz all relevant systematic uncertainties have been investigated by dedicated experiments yielding an upper limit of m(ν)MAC-E-Filter type. The recent achievements in test experiments show, that this very challenging experiment is feasible.

  2. Rare B decays at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linwei

    2017-01-01

    The flavour changing neutral current decays can be interesting probes for searching for New Physics. Angular distributions of the decay $\\mathrm{B}^0 \\to \\mathrm{K}^{*0} \\mu^ +\\mu^-$ are studied using a sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $20.5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. An angular analysis is performed to determine $P_1$ and $P_5'$, where $P_5'$ is of particular interest due to recent measurements that indicate a potential discrepancy with the standard model. Based on a sample of 1397 signal events, $P_1$ and $P_5'$ angular parameters are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass squared. The measurements are in agreement with standard model predictions.

  3. Orthopositronium Decay Spectrum using NRQED

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Femenia, P D

    2006-01-01

    As noticed in Ref.[1], the Ore-Powell's classical calculation of the o-Ps -> 3 gamma decay amplitude does not fulfill Low's theorem requirements for the low energy end of the photon spectrum. We reanalyze the implications of Low's theorem applied to this decay considering the interplay between the soft photon limit and the energy scales present in the e+e- system. For energetic photons, the spectrum agrees with the Ore-Powell result, but deviates from it when the photon energy is comparable to the positronium binding energy. In this region it is found that bound states effects are essential to reach agreement with Low's theorem and can be accounted for in the framework of non-relativistic QED.

  4. Lyapunov decay in quantum irreversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mata, Ignacio; Roncaglia, Augusto J; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    The Loschmidt echo--also known as fidelity--is a very useful tool to study irreversibility in quantum mechanics due to perturbations or imperfections. Many different regimes, as a function of time and strength of the perturbation, have been identified. For chaotic systems, there is a range of perturbation strengths where the decay of the Loschmidt echo is perturbation independent, and given by the classical Lyapunov exponent. But observation of the Lyapunov decay depends strongly on the type of initial state upon which an average is carried out. This dependence can be removed by averaging the fidelity over the Haar measure, and the Lyapunov regime is recovered, as has been shown for quantum maps. In this work, we introduce an analogous quantity for systems with infinite dimensional Hilbert space, in particular the quantum stadium billiard, and we show clearly the universality of the Lyapunov regime.

  5. Effect of number of stack on the thermal escape and non-radiative and radiative recombinations of photoexcited carriers in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum-well-inserted solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, Taketo; Fukuyama, Atsuhiko; Ikari, Tetsuo [Faculty of Engineering, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-Kibanadai-Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Suzuki, Hidetoshi [Interdisciplinary Research Organization, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-Kibanadai-Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Fujii, Hiromasa; Nakano, Yoshiaki [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sugiyama, Masakazu [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-02-28

    Three non-destructive methodologies, namely, surface photovoltage (SPV), photoluminescence, and piezoelectric photothermal (PPT) spectroscopies, were adopted to detect the thermal carrier escape from quantum well (QW) and radiative and non-radiative carrier recombinations, respectively, in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-inserted GaAs p-i-n solar cell structure samples. Although the optical absorbance signal intensity was proportional to the number of QW stack, the signal intensities of the SPV and PPT methods decreased at high number of stack. To explain the temperature dependency of these signal intensities, we proposed a model that considers the three carrier dynamics: the thermal escape from the QW, and the non-radiative and radiative carrier recombinations within the QW. From the fitting procedures, it was estimated that the activation energies of the thermal escape ΔE{sub barr} and non-radiative recombination ΔE{sub NR} were 68 and 29 meV, respectively, for a 30-stacked MQW sample. The estimated ΔE{sub barr} value agreed well with the difference between the first electron subband and the top of the potential barrier in the conduction band. We found that ΔE{sub barr} remained constant at approximately 70 meV even with increasing QW stack number. However, the ΔE{sub NR} value monotonically increased with the increase in the number of stack. Since this implies that non-radiative recombination becomes improbable as the number of stack increases, we found that the radiative recombination probability for electrons photoexcited within the QW increased at a large number of QW stack. Additional processes of escaping and recapturing of carriers at neighboring QW were discussed. As a result, the combination of the three non-destructive methodologies provided us new insights for optimizing the MQW components to further improve the cell performance.

  6. Decays of the tau lepton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchat, P.R.

    1986-02-01

    Previous measurements of the branching fractions of the tau lepton result in a discrepancy between the inclusive branching fraction and the sum of the exclusive branching fractions to final states containing one charged particle. The sum of the exclusive branching fractions is significantly smaller than the inclusive branching fraction. In this analysis, the branching fractions for all the major decay modes are measured simultaneously with the sum of the branching fractions constrained to be one. The branching fractions are measured using an unbiased sample of tau decays, with little background, selected from 207 pb/sup -1/ of data accumulated with the Mark II detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The sample is selected using the decay products of one member of the ..gamma../sup +/..gamma../sup -/ pair produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to identify the event and then including the opposite member of the pair in the sample. The sample is divided into subgroups according to charged and neutral particle multiplicity, and charged particle identification. The branching fractions are simultaneously measured using an unfold technique and a maximum likelihood fit. The results of this analysis indicate that the discrepancy found in previous experiments is possibly due to two sources. First, the leptonic branching fractions measured in this analysis are about one standard deviation higher than the world average. The measured leptonic branching fractions correspond to a tau lifetime of (3.0 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -13/ s. Secondly, the total branching fraction to one charged hadron plus at least one neutral particle is measured to be (7 +- 3)% higher than the branching fraction expected from a combination of previous measurements and theoretical predictions. It is shown that decay modes involving the eta are not expected to contribute more than 3% to this excess.

  7. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  8. Future double beta decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal, F. [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, Modane (France); Centre d' Etudes Nucleaire, Bordeaux-Gradignan (France)

    2013-02-15

    The search of neutrinoless double beta decay is very challenging because of the expected half-life of the process and the backgrounds from the natural radioactivity. Many projects exist to try to reach a sensitivity of ∼50 meV on the effective neutrino mass corresponding to a mass of isotopes of ∼100 kg. In this article some of the futur projects are presented.

  9. UA1: Z particle decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    A colour treated picture of the computer reconstruction of the real particle tracks emerging from a high energy proton-antiproton collision recorded in the UA1 detector at the SPS (converted to act as a collider). This picture shows the production of a Z particle that has decayed into a high energy electron and positron flying off in opposite directions (in yellow). The UA1 detector ran on the SPS accelerator at CERN between 1981 and 1993.

  10. Proton Decay Searches with DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be comprised of a beam line and near detector complex at Fermilab, Illinois as well as a massive far detector located 1300 km away at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota. To achieve its rich physics program, DUNE plans to construct a 40kt fiducial volume Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) far detector almost a mile underground. The size, location, and technology of the proposed far detector make it an attractive tool to search for proton decay, which has yet to be observed. Observation of such a rare event requires high sensitivity to the signal and high background rejection rate. A particular background of interest arises from cosmic muons interacting with rock surrounding the detector and producing a variety of particles which can enter the detector and leave signatures similar to that of proton decay. In order to keep this background to a reasonable level without sacrificing signal acceptance efficiency, precise tracking, made possible by the LArTPC technology, is required. Precise 3D localization of proton decay events relies on the detector's ability to identify the prompt emission of scintillation light from proton decay events as the t0-defining signal. Therefore, low background rate and high detection efficiency of this light are the crucial to the search. This work examines these characteristics in a detailed Monte Carlo simulation using DUNE`s far detector reference design and demonstrates a high signal efficiency while keeping the expected number of cosmogenic background events sufficiently low.

  11. The Greatest Threat: Spiritual Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-10

    the Ouest for Meaning. New york: Harper and Row, 1981. Frankl, Viktor E. Man’s Search for Meaning. New York: Pocket Books edition, 1974. Fromm , Erich ...who take stands on Christian doctrines condemning sex outside of marriage, abortion, and homosexuality are quickly labeled and become victims of the...telling indicator of our condition was the extent of our moral decay. We scrambled to accommodate sexual promiscuity through permissive sex education

  12. Digging the CNGS decay tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Products of the collision between a proton beam and a graphite target will pass through a horn containing an electric field that will produce a focused beam. These particles will decay into muon neutrinos within the tunnel that is being constructed in these images. The neutrinos will then travel 730 km to Gran Sasso in Italy where huge detectors will observe the beam to study a process called neutrino oscillation.

  13. LHCb: Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Teodorescu, E

    2011-01-01

    The decay modes $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$ and $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ are promising laboratories for the search of New Physics effects, their properties being particularly sensitive to the presence of new heavy particles that may propagate virtually within the one-loop process involved in penguin diagrams. The penguin $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay has been observed by Belle with rather poor precision, $\\mathcal{B}$($B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$) = 57$^{+22}_{-19}$ x 10$^{-6}$, therefore, additional measurements are expected for this channel. With a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~36 pb$^{-1}$ collected in 2010, a clear and promising signal has been observed for the $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$. The mass resolution is dominated by the electromagnetic calorimeter energy resolution (ECAL is inter-calibrated at the ~2% level). A first hint of the $B_s \\to \\Phi \\gamma$  decay has also been observed. Given this preliminary results and the theory predictions, we expect that, with the data we will record in 2011, th...

  14. LHCb: Radiative Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Teodorescu, E

    2011-01-01

    The decay modes $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$ and $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ are promising laboratories for the search of New Physics effects, their properties being particularly sensitive to the presence of new heavy particles that may propagate virtually within the one-loop process involved in penguin diagrams. The penguin $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay has been observed by Belle with rather poor precision, $\\mathcal{B}$($B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$) = 57$^{+22}_{-19}$ x 10$^{-6}$, therefore, additional measurements are expected for this channel. With a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~36 pb$^{-1}$ collected in 2010, a clear and promising signal has been observed for the $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$. The mass resolution is dominated by the electromagnetic calorimeter energy resolution (ECAL is inter-calibrated at the ~2% level). A first hint of the $B_s \\to \\Phi \\gamma$  decay has also been observed. Given this preliminary results and the theory predictions, we expect that, with the data we will record in 2011, th...

  15. $\\Delta$ decay in nuclear medium

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, B K; Kundu, Bijoy

    1996-01-01

    Proton-nucleus collisions, where the beam proton gets excited to the delta resonance and then decays to p\\pi ^+, either inside or outside the nuclear medium, are studied. Cross-sections for various kinematics for the (p,p' \\pi ^+) reaction between 500 MeV and 1 GeV beam energy are calculated to see the effects of the nuclear medium on the propagation and decay of the resonance. The cross-sections studied include proton energy spectra in coincidence with the pion, four momentum transfer distributions, and the invariant p\\pi^+ mass distributions. We find that the effect of the nuclear medium on these cross-sections mainly reduces their magnitudes. Comparing these cross-sections with those considering the decay of the delta outside the nucleus only, we further find that at 500 MeV the two sets of cross-sections have large differences, while by 1 GeV the differences between them become much smaller.

  16. Decay law and time dilatation

    CERN Document Server

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay law for a moving unstable particle. The usual time-dilatation formula states that the decay width for an unstable state moving with a momentum $p$ and mass $M$ is $\\tilde{\\Gamma}_{p}=\\Gamma M/\\sqrt{p^{2}+M^{2}}$ with $\\Gamma$ being the decay width in the rest frame. In agreement with previous studies, we show that in the context of QM as well as QFT this equation is \\textit{not} correct provided that the quantum measurement is performed in a reference frame in which the unstable particle has momentum $p$ (note, a momentum eigenstate is \\textit{not} a velocity eigenstate in QM). We then give, to our knowledge for the first time, an analytic expression of an improved formula and we show that the deviation from $\\tilde{\\Gamma}_{p}$ has a maximum for $p/M=\\sqrt{2/3},$ but is typically \\textit{very} small. Then, the result can be easily generalized to a momentum wave packet. As a next step, we show that care is needed when one makes a boost of an unstable state with zero momentum/velocity: namel...

  17. Bound exciton time decay and the Auger effect in zinc telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W.; Dean, P.J. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland))

    1982-04-01

    The measured lifetimes for the decay of excitons bound to a variety of neutral acceptors in ZnTe reveal a complex trend with increase in the acceptor binding energy E/sub A/. The lifetimes increase with E/sub A/ up to approximately 0.15 eV, in a manner expected for radiative transitions because of the decrease in the giant oscillator strength of the transition with increase in localisation of the electronic particles. Although rather few well-identified acceptor species are available with E/sub A/ > 0.15 eV, it is clear that this trend of lifetime is sharply reversed in this range, as expected if the Auger (nonradiative) recombination rate overtakes the decreasing radiative rate near E/sub A/ approximately 0.15 eV. Comparisons with other available data from direct and indirect gap semiconductors support this relationship between the transition rates. Therefore, a much more significant role for Auger recombinations is found in bound exciton and other transitions involving more than two electronic particles than previously recognised for direct gap semiconductors.

  18. Leptonic decays of the Ds meson

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-02-01

    The purely leptonic decays Ds-->τν and Ds-->μν are studied in a sample of four million hadronic /Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at the LEP e+e- collider from 1991 to 1995. The branching fractions are extracted from a combination of two analyses, one optimized to select Ds-->τν decays with /τ-->eνν¯ or /μνν¯, and the other optimized for Ds-->μν decays. The results are used to evaluate the Ds decay constant, within the Standard Model: fDs=[285+/-19(stat)+/-40(syst)] MeV.

  19. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), 75 - Paris (France); Charles, J. [LPT, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  20. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tran, David [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy

    2012-05-15

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons.We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  1. Latest results in rare decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Kreps, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from the LHCb experiment on decays governed by $b \\rightarrow s\\mu^+\\mu^-$ or $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ transitions are reviewed. The updated isospin asymmetry in $B \\rightarrow K^{(*)} \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay are in good agreement with the Standard Model. Results of the angular analysis of $B \\rightarrow K\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decay help to exclude large cancellation between left- and right-handed couplings in the $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay. Finally using the decay $B^+ \\rightarrow K^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\gamma$, nonzero photon polarization is observed for the first time in $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ transitions.

  2. Examining CP Symmetry in Strange Baryon Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Luk, K B

    2000-01-01

    Non-conservation of CP symmetry can manisfest itself in non-leptonic hyperon decays as a difference in the decay parameter between the strange-baryon decay and its charge conjugate. By comparing the decay distribution in the $\\Lambda$ helicity frame for the decay sequence $\\Xi^{-} \\to \\Lambda \\pi^{-}$, $\\Lambda \\to p \\pi^{-}$ with that of $\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$ decay, E756 at Fermilab did not observe any CP-odd effect at the $10^{-2}$ level. The status of a follow-up experiment, HyperCP (FNAL E871), to search for CP violation in charged $\\Xi-\\Lambda$ decay with a sensitivity of $10^{-4}$ is also presented.

  3. Competition between radiative and strong force decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    For nuclear states unbound to neutron decay, radiative emission is often assumed to not dominate over neutron decay mediated by the far stronger strong interaction, except for very low neutron energies and high angular momentum barriers. Recent experimental investigations of 19O and 27 Mg populated in heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions have revealed predominantly gamma decays from a number of states unbound to neutron decay by up to 2 MeV. In most cases the angular momentum barrier is not sufficient to inhibit neutron decay enough to allow E-M decay with widths of up to an eV or so to win. Other inhibitions to particle decay, including low spectroscopic factors, will be discussed. Supported in part by NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  4. Ageing as developmental decay: insights from p16(INK4a.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nadine; Beach, David; Gil, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The p16(INK4a) cell cycle regulator is one of the best ageing biomarkers because it is suppressed in early embryogenesis and progressively induced during ageing. p16(INK4a) plays a crucial role in key cell fate decisions which contribute to ageing, such as cellular senescence and stem cell dynamics. Detailed examination of the pathways regulating p16(INK4a) expression has revealed an overlap with those regulating early development. We present the hypothesis that ageing might be primarily driven by gradual functional decay of developmental pathways. To support this, we summarise the role of p16(INK4a) in ageing and our current knowledge on p16(INK4a) regulation. The developmental decay hypothesis implies that the much-evidenced damage associated with all aspects of ageing might be secondary to such decay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  6. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  7. B Decay Studies at SLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Convery, Mark R

    1999-03-19

    We present three preliminary results from SLD on B decays: an inclusive search for the process b {r_arrow} s gluon, a measurement of the branching ratio for the process B {r_arrow} D{bar D}X, and measurements of the charged and neutral B lifetimes. All three measurements make use of the excellent vertexing efficiency and resolution of the CCD Vertex Detector and the first two make use of the excellent particle identification capability of the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. The b {r_arrow} sg analysis searches for an enhancement of high momentum charged kaons produced in B decays. Within the context of a simple, Jetset-inspired model of b {r_arrow} sg, a limit of B(b {r_arrow} sg) < 7.6% is obtained. The B(B {r_arrow} D{bar D}X) analysis reconstructs two secondary vertices and uses identified charged kaons to determine which of these came from charm decays. The result of the analysis is B(B {r_arrow} D{bar D}X) = (16.2 {+-} 1.9 {+-} 4.2)%. The results of the lifetime analysis are: {tau}{sub B{sup +}} = 1.686 {+-} 0.025 {+-} 0.042 ps, {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.589 {+-} 0.026 {+-} 0.055 ps and {tau}{sub B{sup +}}/{tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.061 {+-} 0.031/0.029 {+-} 0.027.

  8. HALF-LIVES OF LONG-LIVED A-DECAY, B-DECAY, BB-DECAY AND SPONTANEOUS FISSION NUCLIDES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    In his review of radionuclides for dating purposes, Roth noted that there were a large number of nuclides, normally considered ''stable'' but which are radioactive with a very long half-life. Roth suggested that I review the data on the half-life values of these long-lived nuclides for a discussion session at the next meeting. These half-life values for long-lived nuclides include those due to various decay modes, {alpha}-decay, {beta}-decay, electron capture decay, {beta}{beta}-decay and spontaneous fission decay. This report is preliminary but will provide a quick overview of the extensive table of data on the recommendations from that review.

  9. MOCVD growth and characterization of near-surface InGaN/GaN single quantum wells for non-radiative coupling of optical excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sintonen, S.

    2012-01-01

    with InGaN/GaN superlattice structures instead of a single InGaN underneath layer. Time‐resolved photoluminescence measurements of samples with different GaN capping thicknesses show that room temperature photoluminescence decay time increases with decreasing GaN capping thickness until surface states...

  10. JENDL FP decay data file 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yoshida, Tadashi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [Aichi Shukutoku Univ., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A decay data file of fission product (FP) nuclides has been developed for the use in nuclear technology field as one of special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) in the format of ENDF/B and it is called JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000. The file includes the decay data for 1229 fission product nuclides: 142 stable and 1087 unstable nuclides. The data included for a nuclide are decay modes, their Q values and branching ratios, average decay energy values of beta-rays, gamma-rays and alpha-particles and their spectral data. The primary source of the decay data is ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File), which is the internationally recognized data file of nuclear structure properties. The data in ENSDF, however, cover only measured ones. The data of the short-lived nuclides needed for the application fields such as decay heat prediction are often incomplete or not measured because of their short half-lives. For such nuclides a theoretical model calculation is applied to derive the needed data such as average decay energies and spectral data. The data in JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000 have been tested by summation calculation comparing its results with measured data of decay heat values and aggregate fission product spectra of various fissioning nuclei. The comparison showed good agreement between the calculated results and the measured values. (author)

  11. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb−1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb−1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp–collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ− and B+ → K+μ+μ− decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*μ+μ− decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ− is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  12. Determination of the Turbulent Decay Exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perot, J.; Zusi, Chris

    2011-11-01

    All theories concerning the decay of isotropic turbulence agree that the turbulent kinetic energy has a power law dependence on time. However, there is significant disagreement about what the value of the exponent should be for this power law. The primary theories, proposed by researchers such as Batchelor, Townsend, and Kolmogorov, have the decay exponent at values of 1, 6/5, 10/7, 3/2, 2, and 5/2. The debate over the decay exponent has remained unresolved for many decades because the decay exponent is an extremely sensitive quantity. Experiments have decay times which are too short to be able to accurately differentiate between the various theoretical possibilities, and all prior numerical simulations of decaying turbulence impose the decay rate a priori via the choice of initial conditions. In this work, direct numerical simulation is used to achieve very long decay times, and the initial turbulence is generated by the Navier-Stokes equations and is not imposed. The initial turbulence is created by the stirring action of the flow past 768 small randomly placed cubes. Stirring occurs at 1/30th of the simulation domain size so that the low wavenumber and large scale behavior of the turbulent spectrum which dictates the decay rate is generated by the fluid and is not imposed. It is shown that in all 16 simulations the decay exponent closely matches the theoretical predictions of Saffman at both high and low Reynolds numbers. Perot, AIP Advances 1, 022104 (2011).

  13. Semiclassical calculation of decay rates

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, A; Fraga, E S

    2008-01-01

    Several relevant aspects of quantum-field processes can be well described by semiclassical methods. In particular, the knowledge of non-trivial classical solutions of the field equations, and the thermal and quantum fluctuations around them, provide non-perturbative information about the theory. In this work, we discuss the calculation of the one-loop effective action from the semiclasssical viewpoint. We intend to use this formalism to obtain an accurate expression for the decay rate of non-static metastable states.

  14. Vacuum Decay via Lorentzian Wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, J. L.

    We speculate about the space-time description due to the presence of Lorentzian worm-holes (handles in space-time joining two distant regions or other universes) in quantum gravity. The semiclassical rate of production of these Lorentzian wormholes in Reissner-Nordström space-times is calculated as a result of the spontaneous decay of vacuum due to a real tunneling configuration. In the magnetic case it only depends on the value of the field theoretical fine structure constant. We predict that the quantum probability corresponding to the nucleation of such geodesically complete space-times should be acutally negligible in our physical Universe.

  15. Radiative Ke3 decays revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gasser, J; Paver, N; Verbeni, M

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental results and ongoing measurements, we review the chiral perturbation theory prediction for radiative Ke3 decays (neutral kaons). Special emphasis is given on the stability of the inner bremsstrahlung-dominated relative branching ratio vs. the Ke3 form factors, and on the separation of the structure dependent amplitude in differential distributions over the phase space. For the structure dependent terms, an assessment of the order p^6 corrections is given. In particular, a full next-to-leading order calculation of the axial component is performed. The experimental analysis of the photon energy spectrum is discussed, and other potentially useful distributions are introduced.

  16. Tau decays into K* mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Schechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Doutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1995-06-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the storage ring DORIS II we have measured τ decays into three charged mesons containing K * mesons. Exploiting the good particle identification capabilities of the detector we have determined the following branching ratios:Brleft( {tau ^ - to overline {K^{*0} } π ^ - v_tau } right) = left( {0.25 ± 0.10 ± 0.05} right)% , B r (τ-→ K *0 K - v τ)= (0.20±0.05±0.04)%, and B r (τ-→ K *- X 0 v τ) =(1.15±0.15-0.18 +0.13)%.

  17. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Zuber, K

    2006-01-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is of outmost importance for neutrino physics. It is considered to be the gold plated channel to probe the fundamental character of neutrinos and to determine the neutrino mass. From the experimental point about nine different isotopes are explored for the search. After a general introduction follows a short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations and supportive measurements. The current experimental status of double beta searches is presented followed by a short discussion of the ideas and proposals for large scale experiments.

  18. Gravitational effects on inflaton decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo,Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakayama, Kazunori [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo,Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-05-22

    We point out that the inflaton inevitably couples to all non-conformally coupled matters gravitationally through an oscillation in the Hubble parameter or the cosmic scale factor. It leads to particle production during the inflaton oscillation regime, which is most efficient just after inflation. Moreover, the analysis is extended to the model with non-minimal inflaton couplings to gravity, in which the Hubble parameter oscillates more violently. We apply our results to the graviton production by the inflaton: gravitons are also produced just after inflation, but the non-minimal coupling does not induce inflaton decay into the graviton pair.

  19. Gravitational Effects on Inflaton Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    We point out that the inflaton inevitably couples to all non-conformally coupled matters gravitationally through an oscillation in the Hubble parameter or the cosmic scale factor. It leads to particle production during the inflaton oscillation regime, which is most efficient just after inflation. Moreover, the analysis is extended to the model with non-minimal inflaton couplings to gravity, in which the Hubble parameter oscillates more violently. We apply our results to the graviton production by the inflaton: gravitons are also produced just after inflation, but the non-minimal coupling does not induce inflaton decay into the graviton pair.

  20. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J. [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  1. Pathway collages: personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Suzanne; O'Maille, Paul E; Weaver, Daniel; Karp, Peter D

    2016-12-13

    Metabolic pathway diagrams are a classical way of visualizing a linked cascade of biochemical reactions. However, to understand some biochemical situations, viewing a single pathway is insufficient, whereas viewing the entire metabolic network results in information overload. How do we enable scientists to rapidly construct personalized multi-pathway diagrams that depict a desired collection of interacting pathways that emphasize particular pathway interactions? We define software for constructing personalized multi-pathway diagrams called pathway-collages using a combination of manual and automatic layouts. The user specifies a set of pathways of interest for the collage from a Pathway/Genome Database. Layouts for the individual pathways are generated by the Pathway Tools software, and are sent to a Javascript Pathway Collage application implemented using Cytoscape.js. That application allows the user to re-position pathways; define connections between pathways; change visual style parameters; and paint metabolomics, gene expression, and reaction flux data onto the collage to obtain a desired multi-pathway diagram. We demonstrate the use of pathway collages in two application areas: a metabolomics study of pathogen drug response, and an Escherichia coli metabolic model. Pathway collages enable facile construction of personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

  2. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  3. LHCb: Radiative Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Orlandea, M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a measurement of the ratio of the branching fraction of the radiative decays $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ and $B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma$ using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the LHCb detector. The value obtained is \\begin{equation} \\frac{B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)}{B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)}=1.23\\pm0.06(stat.)\\pm0.04(syst.)\\pm0.10\\left(f_s/f_d\\right) \\end{equation} Using the world average value $B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)=\\left(4.33\\pm0.15\\right)\\times10^{-5}$ branching fraction is determined to be $B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)=3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{-5}$. A measurement of the direct CP asymmetry of the decay $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ is also presented. Both measurements are the most precise to date and are in agreement with the previous experimental results and theoretical expectations.

  4. Challenges in Double Beta Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years, neutrino oscillation experiments have provided the incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos mix and have finite masses. These results represent the strongest demonstration that the electroweak Standard Model is incomplete and that new Physics beyond it must exist. In this scenario, a unique role is played by the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay searches which can probe lepton number conservation and investigate the Dirac/Majorana nature of the neutrinos and their absolute mass scale (hierarchy problem with unprecedented sensitivity. Today Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay faces a new era where large-scale experiments with a sensitivity approaching the so-called degenerate-hierarchy region are nearly ready to start and where the challenge for the next future is the construction of detectors characterized by a tonne-scale size and an incredibly low background. A number of new proposed projects took up this challenge. These are based either on large expansions of the present experiments or on new ideas to improve the technical performance and/or reduce the background contributions. In this paper, a review of the most relevant ongoing experiments is given. The most relevant parameters contributing to the experimental sensitivity are discussed and a critical comparison of the future projects is proposed.

  5. Heavy neutrino decay at SHALON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinitsyna V.Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The SHALON Cherenkov telescope has recorded over 2 × 106 extensive air showers during the past 17 years. The analysis of the signal at different zenith angles has included observations from the sub-horizontal direction Θ = 97° This inclination defines an Earth skimming trajectory with 7 km of air and around 1000 km of rock in front of the telescope. During a period of 324 hours of observation, after a cut of shower-like events that may be caused by chaotic sky flashes or reflections on the snow of vertical showers, we have detected 5 air showers of TeV energies. We argue that these events may be caused by the decay of a long-lived penetrating particle entering the atmosphere from the ground and decaying in front of the telescope. We show that this particle can it not be a muon or a tau lepton. As a possible explanation, we discuss two scenarios with an unstable neutrino of mass m ≈ 0.5 GeV and cτ ≈ 30 m. Remarkably, one of these models has been recently proposed to explain an excess of electron-like neutrino events at MiniBooNE.

  6. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh; Antony Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Half life for the emission of exotic clusters like 8Be, 12C, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si are computed taking Coulomb and proximity potentials as interacting barrier and many of these are found well within the present upper limit of measurement. These results lie very close to those values reported by Shanmugam et al using their cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model (CYEM). It is found that 12C and 16O emissions from 116Ce and 16O from 118Ce are most favorable for measurement (1/2 < 1010 s). Lowest half life time for 16O emission from 116Ce stress the role of doubly magic 100Sn daughter in exotic decay. Geiger–Nuttall plots were studied for different clusters and are found to be linear. Inclusion of proximity potential will not produce much deviation to linear nature of Geiger–Nuttall plots. It is observed that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slow down the exotic decay process. These findings support the earlier observations of Gupta and collaborators using their preformed cluster model (PCM).

  7. The shock waves in decaying supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M D; Zuev, J M; Smith, Michael D.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Zuev, Julia M.

    2000-01-01

    We here analyse numerical simulations of supersonic, hypersonic andmagnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is free to decay. Our goals are tounderstand the dynamics of the decay and the characteristic properties of theshock waves produced. This will be useful for interpretation of observations ofboth motions in molecular clouds and sources of non-thermal radiation. We find that decaying hypersonic turbulence possesses an exponential tail offast shocks and an exponential decay in time, i.e. the number of shocks isproportional to t exp (-ktv) for shock velocity jump v and mean initialwavenumber k. In contrast to the velocity gradients, the velocity ProbabilityDistribution Function remains Gaussian with a more complex decay law. The energy is dissipated not by fast shocks but by a large number of low Machnumber shocks. The power loss peaks near a low-speed turn-over in anexponential distribution. An analytical extension of the mapping closuretechnique is able to predict the basic decay features. Our analytic descrip...

  8. Exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Andreas

    1991-06-01

    The recent experimental results on exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons obtained by the ARGUS collaboration are presented in the talk. The results include exclusive hadronic decays involving a b → c transition, namely B decays with a D, D ∗ plus several pions and B decays to J/ψ or ψ' mesons plus Kaons have been studied. The measurements of branching ratios for two-body B decays involving a J/ψ or ψ' meson are of wide interest in the light of proposals for the study of CP violation in future experiments. The branching ratios are compared with the predictions of the model of Bauer, Stech and Wirbel and with a model of A.V. Dobrovolskaya. Using the cleanest decay channels, the masses and mass difference of the charged and neutral B meson are obtained. This mass difference is then compared with the mass splitting in other isospinmultipletts and with theoretical models.

  9. Charmless B-decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings summarise three recent papers from the LHCb Collaboration in the area of charmless b-decays. The branching fraction for the decay $\\text{B}_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow \\phi \\phi$ is measured and a search for the highly suppressed decay $\\text{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\phi \\phi$ is performed. The decay $\\text{B}_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow {\\eta}'{\\eta}'$ is observed for the first time and the CP asymmetries in the decays $\\text{B}^{+}\\rightarrow {\\eta}'\\text{K}^{+}$ and $\\text{B}^{+}\\rightarrow \\phi \\text{K}^{+}$ are measured. Finally, the decay $\\text{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\rho^{0}\\rho^{0}$ is observed for the first time and its longitudinal polarisation is measured.

  10. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Javorsek, D; Lasenby, R N; Lasenby, A N; Buncher, J B; Fischbach, E; Gruenwald, J T; Hoft, A W; Horan, T J; Jenkins, J H; Kerford, J L; Lee, R H; Longman, A; Mattes, J J; Morreale, B L; Morris, D B; Mudry, R N; Newport, J R; O'Keefe, D; Petrelli, M A; Silver, M A; Stewart, C A; Terry, B; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2010.06.011

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are n...

  11. Measurements of Rare B Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Paul C.

    2003-03-05

    We present the results of searches for rare B meson decays. The measurements use all or part of a data sample of about 88 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study a variety of decays dominated by electromagnetic, electroweak and gluonic penguin transitions, and report measurements of branching fractions.

  12. Bs mesons: semileptonic and nonleptonic decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we compute some nonleptonic and semileptonic decay widths of Bs mesons, working in the context of constituent quark models [1, 2]. For the case of semileptonic decays we consider reactions leading to kaons or different Jπ Ds mesons. The study of nonleptonic decays has been done in the factorisation approximation and includes the final states enclosed in Table 2.

  13. Experimental study of rare charged pion decays

    CERN Document Server

    Pocanic, Dinko; van der Schaaf, Andries

    2014-01-01

    The combination of simple dynamics, small number of available decay channels, and extremely well controlled radiative and loop corrections, make charged pion decays a sensitive means for testing the underlying symmetries and the universality of weak fermion couplings, as well as for improving our understanding of pion structure and chiral dynamics. This paper reviews the current state of experimental study of the allowed rare decays of charged pions: (a) leptonic, $\\pi^+ \\to e^+\

  14. $K^{0}_{S}$ production in $\\tau$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    From a sample of about 160k $\\mbox{Z}\\!\\!\\to\\!\\!\\tau^+\\tau^-$ candidates collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1991 and 1995, $\\tau$ lepton decays involving $K^0_S\\!\\to\\!\\pi^+\\pi^-$ are studied. The $K^0_SK^0_L$ associated production in $\\tau$ decays is also investigated. The branching ratios are measured for the inclusive decay $B(\\tau^-\\!\\!\\to\\!\\!K^0_SX^-\

  15. Rare Z decays and neutrino flavor universality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durieux, Gauthier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Cornell Univ. Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. for Elementary Particle Physics; Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology; Grossman, Yuval; Kuflik, Erik [Cornell Univ. Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. for Elementary Particle Physics; Koenig, Matthias [Mainz Univ. (Germany). PRISMA Cluster of Excellence; Mainz Univ. (Germany). Mainz Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Ray, Shamayita [Cornell Univ. Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. for Elementary Particle Physics; Calcutta Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    2015-12-15

    We study rare four-body decays of the Z-boson involving at least one neutrino and one charged lepton. Large destructive interferences make these decays very sensitive to the Z couplings to neutrinos. As the identified charged leptons can determine the neutrino flavors, these decays probe the universality of the Z couplings to neutrinos. The rare four-body processes could be accurately measured at future lepton colliders, leading to percent level precision.

  16. Three lepton decay modes of the proton

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.; Sarkar, Utpal

    1993-01-01

    We consider the three lepton decay modes of the proton within the proton decay interpretation of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. We construct higher dimensional operators in the framework of the standard model. The operators which allow the particularly interesting decay mode are of dimension 10 involving $SU(2)_L$ non-singlet higgs. We show how these operators can be comparable to the dimension 9 operators. We then present a simple left-right symmetric model which can give rise to the desi...

  17. Light-quark decays in heavy hadrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Faller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. These decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays may be interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  18. Rare Z Decays and Neutrino Flavor Universality

    CERN Document Server

    Durieux, Gauthier; König, Matthias; Kuflik, Eric; Ray, Shamayita

    2015-01-01

    We study rare four-body decays of the Z-boson involving at least one neutrino and one charged lepton. Large destructive interferences make these decays very sensitive to the Z couplings to neutrinos. As the identified charged leptons can determine the neutrino flavors, these decays probe the universality of the Z couplings to neutrinos. The rare four-body processes could be accurately measured at future lepton colliders, leading to percent level precision.

  19. Holographic decays of large-spin mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Peeters, K; Zamaklar, M; Peeters, Kasper; Sonnenschein, Jacob; Zamaklar, Marija

    2006-01-01

    We study the decay process of large-spin mesons in the context of the gauge/string duality, using generic properties of confining backgrounds and systems with flavour branes. In the string picture, meson decay corresponds to the quantum-mechanical process in which a string rotating on the IR "wall" fluctuates, touches a flavour brane and splits into two smaller strings. This process automatically encodes flavour conservation as well as the Zweig rule. We show that the decay width computed in the string picture is in remarkable agreement with the decay width obtained using the phenomenological Lund model.

  20. Heavy Flavour Production and Decay at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, RWL; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is taking advantage of its large integrated luminosity band sophisticated muon and dimuon triggers to make competitive measurements of heavy flavour production and decay. Inclusive production and heavy flavour jet production is discussed before turning to charm and onium production. The production and decay of individual B hadron species is then addressed, including the current best measurement of the Λb lifetime. A much improved analysis of CP related quantities in Bs decays is presented, before turning to recent results and prospects for rare B decays.

  1. Black Hole Decay as Geodesic Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Sen-Gupta, K; Gupta, Kumar S.; Sen, Siddhartha

    2003-01-01

    We show that a formalism for analyzing the near-horizon conformal symmetry of Schwarzschild black holes using a scalar field probe is capable of describing black hole decay. The decay rate is shown to be correctly described by geodesic motion in the space of black hole masses. This provides a novel geometric interpretation for the decay of black holes. We also show that the near-horizon conformal symmetry predicts a precise correction term to the usual expression for the decay rate of black holes. The results obtained here are a consequence of the holographic nature of the system.

  2. Flow and Flow Decay of Refractory Castables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhiqiang; Bjom Myhre; Bjorn Sandberg

    2003-01-01

    Installation of refractoty castables depend not only on flow, but also on how soon the flow is lost because of setting. The loss of flow (flow decay) has always been one of the main problems of refractory castable manufacturers,a problem that has not been too well described in literature. The flow decay has been studied for a castable system based on alumina, pointing out some general trends. The flow decay was found very temperature sensitive, being strongly accelerated by termperature increases. To compensate for excessive flow loss, a retarder like citric acid may be used. Thus flow decay was measured as a function of citric acid (retarder) addition at 35 ℃ .

  3. D rare/forbidden decays at BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Ming-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In this document we present the latest result on rare/forbidden decays for D mesons at the BESIII experiment. Based on 2.92/fb data taken at the center-of-mass energy 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector, the flavor-changing neutral current process of neutral D decays into two gammas is searched using a double tag technique, while the decays of charged D decays into a charged kaon/pion plus two electrons/positrons are studied based on a single tag method. The resulting upper limits are still above the Standard Model predictions.

  4. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  5. Exploring the simplest purely baryonic decay processes

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, C Q; Rodrigues, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We propose to search for purely baryonic decay processes at the LHCb experiment. In particular, we concentrate on the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\to p\\bar pn$, which is the simplest purely baryonic decay mode, with solely spin-1/2 baryons involved. We predict its decay branching ratio to be ${\\cal B}(\\Lambda_b^0\\to p\\bar pn)=(2.0^{+0.3}_{-0.2})\\times 10^{-6}$, which is sufficiently large to make the decay mode accessible to LHCb. Though not considered in general, purely baryonic decays could shed light on the puzzle of the baryon number asymmetry in the universe by means of a better understanding of the baryonic nature of our matter world. As such, they constitute a yet unexplored class of decay processes worth investigating. Our study can be extended to the purely baryonic decays of $\\Lambda_b^0\\to p\\bar p \\Lambda$, $\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\Lambda \\bar p\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\Lambda\\bar \\Lambda\\Lambda$, as well as other similar anti-triplet $b$-baryon decays, such as $\\Xi_b^{0,-}$.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation on teaching of luminescence and excited states decay kinetics; Simulacao Monte Carlo no ensino de luminescencia e cinetica de decaimento de estado excitado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winnischofer, Herbert; Araujo, Marcio Peres de; Dias Junior, Lauro Camargo; Novo, Joao Batista Marques [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    A software based in the Monte Carlo method have been developed aiming the teaching of important cases of mechanisms found in luminescence and in excited states decay kinetics, including: multiple decays, consecutive decays and coupled systems decays. The Monte Carlo Method allows the student to easily simulate and visualize the luminescence mechanisms, focusing on the probabilities of the related steps. The software CINESTEX was written for FreeBASIC compiler; it assumes first-order kinetics and any number of excited states, where the pathways are allowed with probabilities assigned by the user. (author)

  7. Characterization of photosynthesis, photoinhibition and the activities of C4 pathway enzymes in a superhigh-yield rice,Liangyoupeijiu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Qiang(王强); LU; Congming(卢从明); ZHANG; Qide(张其德); HAO; Naibin(郝迺斌); GE; Qiaoying(戈巧英); DONG; Fengqin(董凤琴); BAI; Kezhi(白克智); KUANG; Tingyun(匡廷云)

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of photosynthetic gas exchange, photoinhibition and C4 pathway enzyme activities in both flag leaves and lemma were compared between a superhigh-yield rice (Oryza sativa L.) hybrid, Liangyoupeijiu and a traditional rice hybrid, Shanyou63. Liangyoupeijiu had a similar light saturated assimilation rate (Asat) to Shanyou63, but a much higher apparent quantum yield (AQY), carboxylation efficiency (CE) and quantum yield of CO2 fixation (φCO2). Liangyoupeijiu also showed a higher resistance to photoinhibition and higher non-radiative energy dissipation associated with the xanthophyll cycle than Shanyou63 when subjected to strong light. In addition, Liangyoupeijiu had higher activities of the C4 pathway enzymes in both flag leaves and lemmas than Shanyou63. These results indicate that higher light and CO2 use efficiency, higher resistance to photoinhibition and C4 pathway in both flag leaf and lemma may contribute to the higher yield of the superhigh-yield rice hybrid, Liangyoupeijiu.

  8. The IACOB project. IV. New predictions for high-degree non-radial mode instability domains in massive stars and their connection with macroturbulent broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godart, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Herrero, A.; Dupret, M. A.; Grötsch-Noels, A.; Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Ventura, P.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to access the internal structure of stars. Apart from the important impact of theoretical developments, progress in this field has been commonly associated with the analysis of time-resolved observations. Recently, the so-called macroturbulent broadening has been proposed as a complementary and less expensive way - in terms of observational time - to investigate pulsations in massive stars. Aims: We assess to what extent this ubiquitous non-rotational broadening component which shapes the line profiles of O stars and B supergiants is a spectroscopic signature of pulsation modes driven by a heat mechanism. Methods: We compute stellar main-sequence and post-main-sequence models from 3 to 70 M⊙ with the ATON stellar evolution code, and determine the instability domains for heat-driven modes for degrees ℓ = 1-20 using the adiabatic and non-adiabatic codes LOSC and MAD. We use the observational material compiled in the framework of the IACOB project to investigate possible correlations between the single snapshot line-broadening properties of a sample of ≈260 O and B-type stars and their location inside or outside the various predicted instability domains. Results: We present an homogeneous prediction for the non-radial instability domains of massive stars for degree ℓ up to 20. We provide a global picture of what to expect from an observational point of view in terms of the frequency range of excited modes, and we investigate the behavior of the instabilities with respect to stellar evolution and the degree of the mode. Furthermore, our pulsational stability analysis, once compared to the empirical results, indicates that stellar oscillations originated by a heat mechanism cannot explain alone the occurrence of the large non-rotational line-broadening component commonly detected in the O star and B supergiant domain. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by NOTSA, and the Mercator

  9. Non-radial pulsation, rotation and outburst in the Be star omega Orionis from the MuSiCoS 1998 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, C.; Hubert, A.-M.; Floquet, M.; Jankov, S.; Henrichs, H. F.; Foing, B.; Oliveira, J.; Orlando, S.; Abbott, J.; Baldry, I. K.; Bedding, T. R.; Cami, J.; Cao, H.; Catala, C.; Cheng, K. P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Hao, J. X.; Kaper, L.; Kaufer, A.; Leister, N. V.; Neff, J. E.; O'Toole, S. J.; Schäfer, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Stahl, O.; Telting, J.; Tubbesing, S.; Zorec, J.

    2002-06-01

    omega Ori (HD 37490, HR 1934) is a Be star known to have presented variations. In order to investigate the nature and origin of its short-term and mid-term variability, a study is performed of several spectral lines (Hα , Hdelta , ion {He}i 4471, 4713, 4921, 5876, 6678, ion {C}{ii} 4267, 6578, 6583, ion {Mg}{ii} 4481, ion {Si}{iii} 4553 and ion {Si}{ii} 6347), based on 249 high signal-to-noise high-resolution spectra taken with 8 telescopes over 22 consecutive nights during the MuSiCoS (Multi SIte COntinuous Spectroscopy) campaign in November-December 1998. The stellar parameters are revisited and the projected rotational velocity (vsin i = 179 km s-1) is redetermined using several methods. With the MuSiCoS 98 dataset, a time series analysis of line-profile variations (LPVs) is performed using the Restricted Local Cleanest (RLC) algorithm and a least squares method. The behaviour of the velocity of the centroid of the lines, the equivalent widths and the apparent vsini for several lines, as well as Violet and Red components of photospheric lines affected by emission (red ion {He}i lines, ion {Si}{ii} 6347, ion {C}{ii} 6578, 6583) are analyzed. The non-radial pulsation (NRP) model is examined using phase diagrams and the Fourier-Doppler Imaging (FDI) method. The LPVs are consistent with a NRP mode with l = 2 or 3, |m| = 2 with frequency 1.03 c d-1. It is shown that an emission line outburst occurred in the middle of the campaign. Two scenarios are proposed to explain the behaviour of a dense cloud, temporarily orbiting around the star with a frequency 0.46 c d-1, in relation to the outburst. Based on observations taken during the MuSiCoS 98 campaign at OHP (France), La Silla (ESO, Chile, ID 62.H-0270), Mount Stromlo (Australia), Xinglong Station (China), Kitt Peak (USA), MCT/LNA (Brazil) and INT (Isaac Newton Group, La Palma Island).

  10. Bragg Reflector-Induced Increased Nonradiative Lifetime in Gallium Arsenide (GaAs)/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Double Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    is essential for the design and analysis of high- efficiency semiconductor solar cells1 and other optoelectronic devices.2 Time-resolved... solar cell uses a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with a roughly 1–2 µm GaAs active region on top of an internal distributed Bragg reflector (BR) to take advantage of...carrier lifetimes and the radiative recombination constant were determined from PL decay time and internal radiative quantum efficiency measurements on

  11. Dental Decay Phenotype in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, B J; Cooper, M E; Wehby, G L; Resick, J M; Nidey, N L; Valencia-Ramirez, L C; Lopez-Palacio, A M; Rivera, D; Vieira, A R; Weinberg, S M; Marazita, M L; Moreno Uribe, L M

    2017-09-01

    Although children with oral clefts have a higher risk for dental anomalies when compared with the general population, prior studies have shown conflicting results regarding their dental decay risk. Also, few studies have assessed dental decay risk in unaffected relatives of children with clefts. Thus, the question of increased risk of dental decay in individuals with oral clefts or their unaffected relatives is still open for empirical investigation. This study characterizes dental decay in the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts and their relatives, as compared with controls, and it addresses whether families with oral clefts have a significantly increased risk for dental decay versus the general population. A total of 3,326 subjects were included: 639 case probands, 1,549 unaffected relatives, and 1,138 controls. Decay was identified from in-person dental examinations or intraoral photographs. Case-control differences were tested with regression analysis. No significant differences were shown in percentage decayed and filled teeth and decayed teeth in the primary dentition (dft, dt) and permanent dentition (DFT, DT) in cases versus controls. In the cleft region, no significant differences were seen in primary or permanent decay (dt, DT) when compared with controls. No difference was found with regard to cleft type and percentage dft, dt, DFT, and DT in case probands. Nonsignificant differences were found in unaffected siblings and parents versus controls (primary and permanent dentitions). Collectively, these findings indicate that individuals with nonsyndromic oral clefts and their families do not have a higher dental decay risk as compared with the general population. These results suggest that either genetic or environmental factors underlying a higher susceptibility for dental anomalies do not increase caries risk or that the seemingly higher risk for dental decay associated with increased dental anomalies in case

  12. Scalar Glueball Mixing and Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Burakovsky, L; Burakovsky, Leonid; Page, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    We provide the first explanation of the counter-intuitive scalar glueball couplings to pseudoscalar mesons found in lattice QCD and predict hitherto uncalculated decay modes. Significant a_1 pi and (pi pi)_S (pi pi)_S couplings are found. We demonstrate the equivalence of linear and quadratic mass matrices for glueball-quarkonium mixing. The equivalence of formalisms which deal with a glueball-quarkonium basis and only a quarkonium basis is demonstrated. We show that the f_0(1500) is not the heaviest state arising from glueball-quarkonium mixing for a glueball mass consistent with lattice QCD. The masses and couplings of scalar mesons, as well as their valence content, are calculated.

  13. Properties of a Decaying Sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Balthasar, H; Gömöry, P; Muglach, K; Puschmann, K G; Shimizu, T; Verma, M

    2013-01-01

    A small decaying sunspot was observed with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife and the Japanese Hinode satellite. We obtained full Stokes scans in several wavelengths covering different heights in the solar atmosphere. Imaging time series from Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) complete our data sets. The spot is surrounded by a moat flow, which persists also on that side of the spot where the penumbra already had disappeared. Close to the spot, we find a chromospheric location with downflows of more than 10 km/s without photospheric counterpart. The height dependence of the vertical component of the magnetic field strength is determined in two different ways that yielded different results in previous investigations. Such a difference still exists in our present data, but it is not as pronounced as in the past.

  14. Heavy Baryon Production and Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Dunietz, Isard

    1998-01-01

    The branching ratio B(Lambda_c -> p K- pi+) normalizes the production and decay of charmed and bottom baryons. At present, this crucial branching ratio is extracted dominantly from B.bar -> baryons analyses. This note questions several of the underlying assumptions and predicts sizable B.bar -> D(*) N N'.bar X transitions, which were traditionally neglected. It predicts B(Lambda_c -> p K- pi+) to be significantly larger (0.07 +/- 0.02) than the world average. Some consequences are briefly mentioned. Several techniques to measure B(Lambda_c -> p K- pi+) are outlined with existing or soon available data samples. By equating two recent CLEO results, an appendix obtains B(D0 -> K- pi+)= 0.035 +/- 0.002, which is somewhat smaller than the current world average.

  15. To decay or not to decay - or both ! quantum mechanics of spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We discuss calculations of spontaneous emission from quantum dots in photonic crystals and show how the decay depends on the intrinsic properties of the emitter as well as the position. A number of fundamentally different types of spontaneous decay dynamics are shown to be possible, including...... counter intuitive situations in which the quantum dot decays only partially....

  16. To decay or not to decay - or both ! quantum mechanics of spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We discuss calculations of spontaneous emission from quantum dots in photonic crystals and show how the decay depends on the intrinsic properties of the emitter as well as the position. A number of fundamentally different types of spontaneous decay dynamics are shown to be possible, including...... counter intuitive situations in which the quantum dot decays only partially....

  17. Decaying Neutrinos and Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Philip; Giroux, Mark

    1993-05-01

    We examine the Hogan-Rees photoionization instability (Hogan 1992, Nature 359, 40) in the context of an Omega =1 universe dominated by massive (m_nu ~ 30 eV) decaying neutrinos. In a medium with a smoothly distributed source of ionizing radiation, the photoionization and heating rates on scales larger than the photon mean free path are independent of the local gas density. Thus, underdense regions receive more energy per particle and heat up faster; this nonadiabatic temperature change produces a pressure term which drives the growth of fluctuations. Hogan (1992) showed that in a static medium this instability produces exponential growth, with growth rates which can be much larger than the expansion rate in the expanding universe. We have found that on small scales (comoving wavenumber k > k_m, where k_m corresponds to lambda ~ 10(-2) Mpc present-day), the growth remains exponential in an expanding universe. The instability growth rate is independent of scale for k > k_m, and declines rapidly with increasing scale, so the characteristic mass produced by the instability will correspond to k ~ k_m. For a neutrino energy above the Lyman limit Delta E (~ m_nu /2-13.6 eV) of a few eV and a decay lifetime T ~ 10(24) seconds, fluctuations at the Poisson level on the scale k_m can grow to non-linearity between z ~ 70 (when Compton cooling inhibits the instability) and z ~ 20 (when the intergalactic medium becomes ionized).

  18. Hadronic b decays and $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067638

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is ideally suited to the study of decays involving b quarks to fully hadronic final states. In these proceedings I summarise the status of the LHCb $\\gamma$ combination and present several recent analyses involving beauty baryon and meson decays.

  19. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, John; Harbour, John; Pavey, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  20. Strong decays of nucleon and $\\Delta$ resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1996-01-01

    We study the strong couplings of the nucleon and delta resonances in a collective model. In the ensuing algebraic treatment we derive closed expressions for decay widths which are used to analyze the experimental data for strong decays into the pion and eta channels.

  1. Enhanced tau neutrino appearance through invisible decay

    CERN Document Server

    Pagliaroli, Giulia; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The decay of neutrino mass eigenstates leads to a change of the conversion and survival probability of neutrino flavor eigenstates. Remarkably, we find that the neutrino decay provides an enhancement of the expected tau appearance signal with respect to the standard oscillation scenario for the long-baseline OPERA experiment. The increase of the $\

  2. Radioactive decays at limits of nuclear stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfützner, M.; Karny, M.; Grigorenko, L. V.

    2012-01-01

    , and their relative probabilities. When approaching limits of nuclear stability, new decay modes set in. First, beta decays are accompanied by emission of nucleons from highly excited states of daughter nuclei. Second, when the nucleon separation energy becomes negative, nucleons start being emitted from the ground...

  3. Nuclear beta decay with Lorentz violation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordmans, J.P.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the possibility of Lorentz-invariance violation in weak-decay processes. We present a general approach that entails modifying the W-boson propagator by adding a Lorentz-violating tensor to it. We describe the effects of Lorentz violation on nuclear beta decay in this scenario. In

  4. Chiral Corrections to Vector Meson Decay Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Talavera, P; Bijnens, Johan; Gosdzinsky, Peter; Talavera, Pere

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the leading quark mass corrections of order $m_q\\log(m_q)$, $m_q$ and $m_q^{3/2}$ to the vector meson decay constants within Heavy Vector Meson Chiral Perturbation Theory. We discuss the issue of electromagnetic gauge invariance and the heavy mass expansion. Reasonably good fits to the observed decay constants are obtained.

  5. Semileptonic D-decays at BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    An, Fenfen

    2015-01-01

    We present here three analyses of semileptonic $D$-meson decays based on the 2.92 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the BESIII experiment in 2010 and 2011 at the $\\psi$(3770) peak. For the decay $D^{+}\\to K^{-}\\pi^{+}e^{+}\

  6. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  7. Rare B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, M

    2005-03-14

    The authors present recent results on rare B meson decays based on data taken by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Included in this report are measurements of branching fractions and other quantities of interest for several hadronic, radiative, electroweak, and purely leptonic decays of B mesons.

  8. Neutrino decay confronts the SNO data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2003-02-27

    We investigate the status of the neutrino decay solution to the solar neutrino problem in the context of the recent results from Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). We present the results of global {chi}{sup 2}-analysis for both two and three generation cases with one of the mass states being allowed to decay and include the effect of both decay and mixing. We find that the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) region which is the currently favoured solution of the solar neutrino problem is affected significantly by decay. We present the allowed areas in the {delta}m{sup 2}-tan{sup 2}{theta} plane for different allowed values of {alpha} and examine how these areas change with the inclusion of decay. We obtain bounds on the decay constant {alpha} in this region which implies a rest frame life time {tau}{sub 0}/m{sub 2}>8.7x10{sup -5} s/eV for the unstable neutrino state. We conclude that the arrival of the neutral current results from SNO further disfavors the neutrino decay solution to the solar neutrino problem leaving a very small window for the decay constant {alpha} which could still be allowed.

  9. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiss, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  10. Testing Lorentz invariance in β decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytema, Auke

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate violation of Lorentz invariance in the weak interaction, specifically in β decay. For this purpose an experiment is performed with nuclear-spin-polarized 20Na that decays by emitting a β particle. Lorentz invariance is the property that the laws of nature do not depend

  11. Question of Lorentz violation in muon decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordmans, J. P.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2016-01-01

    Possibilities to test the Lorentz invariance of the weak interaction in muon decay are considered. We derive the direction-dependent muon-decay rate with a general Lorentz-violating addition to the W-boson propagator. We discuss measurements of the directional and boost dependence of the Michel para

  12. Decay constants from twisted mass QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, P; Michael, C; Simula, S; Urbach, C

    2008-01-01

    We present results for chiral extrapolations of the mass and decay constants of the rho meson. The data sets used are the nf=2 unquenched gauge configurations generated with twisted mass fermions by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration. We describe a calculation of three decay constants in charmonium and explain why they are required.

  13. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  14. Nucleon-decay like signatures of Hylogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Demidov, S V

    2015-01-01

    We consider nucleon-decay like signatures of the hylogenesis, a variant of antibaryonic dark matter model. For the interaction between visible and dark matter sectors through the neutron portal, we calculate rates of dark matter scatterings off neutron which mimic neutron-decay processes $n\\to \

  15. Unified approach to alpha decay calculations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Shastry; S M Mahadevan; K Aditya

    2014-05-01

    With the discovery of a large number of superheavy nuclei undergoing decay through emissions, there has been a revival of interest in decay in recent years. In the theoretical study of decay the -nucleus potential, which is the basic input in the study of -nucleus systems, is also being studied using advanced theoretical methods. In the light of these, theWentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximation method often used for the study of decay is critically examined and its limitations are pointed out. At a given energy, the WKB expression uses barrier penetration formula for the determination of the transmission coefficient. This approach utilizes the -nucleus potential only at the barrier region and ignores it elsewhere. In the present era, when one has more precise experimental information on decay parameters and better understanding of -nucleus potential, it is desirable to use a more precise method for the calculation of decay parameters. We describe the analytic -matrix (SM) method which gives a procedure for the calculation of decay energy and mean life in an integrated way by evaluating the resonance pole of the -matrix in the complex momentum or energy plane. We make an illustrative comparative study of WKB and -matrix methods for the determination of decay parameters in a number of superheavy nuclei.

  16. Cusps in eta' --> eta pi pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Sebastian P

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the cusp effect in the decay K+ --> pi+ pi0 pi0 has spurred the search for other decay channels, where this phenomenon, which is generated by strong final-state interactions, should also occur. A very promising candidate is eta' --> eta pi0 pi0. The cusp effect offers an excellent opportunity to experimentally extract pi pi S-Wave scattering lengths. We adapt and generalize the non-relativistic effective field theory framework developed for K --> 3 pi decays to eta' --> eta pi pi. The cusp effect is predicted to have an effect of more than 8 % on the decay spectrum below the pi+ pi- threshold. We also show that with our current theoretical information about eta' --> eta pi pi decays, it is not possible to extract pi eta threshold parameters.

  17. Radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to stored and cooled highly-charged radionuclides offers unprecedented opportunities to perform high-precision investigations of their decays. Since the few-electron ions, e.g. hydrogen- or helium-like ions, are quantum mechanical systems with clear electronic ground state configurations, the decay studies of such ions are performed under well-defined conditions and allow for addressing fundamental aspects of the decay process. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR of GSI. A particular emphasis is given to the investigations of the two-body beta decay, namely the bound-state β-decay and its time-mirrored counterpart, orbital electron-capture.

  18. Neutron Decay with PERC: a Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, G.; Abele, H.; Beck, M.; Drescher, C.; Dubbers, D.; Erhart, J.; Fillunger, H.; Gösselsberger, C.; Heil, W.; Horvath, M.; Jericha, E.; Klauser, C.; Klenke, J.; Märkisch, B.; Maix, R. K.; Mest, H.; Nowak, S.; Rebrova, N.; Roick, C.; Sauerzopf, C.; Schmidt, U.; Soldner, T.; Wang, X.; Zimmer, O.; Perc Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    The PERC collaboration will perform high-precision measurements of angular correlations in neutron beta decay at the beam facility MEPHISTO of the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz in Munich, Germany. The new beam station PERC, a clean, bright, and versatile source of neutron decay products, is designed to improve the sensitivity of neutron decay studies by one order of magnitude. The charged decay products are collected by a strong longitudinal magnetic field directly from inside a neutron guide. This combination provides the highest phase space density of decay products. A magnetic mirror serves to perform precise cuts in phase space, reducing related systematic errors. The new instrument PERC is under development by an international collaboration. The physics motivation, sensitivity, and applications of PERC as well as the status of the design and preliminary results on uncertainties in proton spectroscopy are presented in this paper.

  19. Magnetic field decay in normal radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Igoshev, A P

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the origin of the magnetic field decay in normal radio pulsars found by us in a recent study. This decay has a typical time scale $\\sim 4 \\times 10^5$~yrs, and operates in the range $\\sim 10^5$~--~few$\\times 10^5$~yrs. We demonstrate that this field evolution may be either due to the Ohmic decay related to the scattering from phonons, or due to the Hall cascade which reaches the Hall attractor. According to our analysis the first possibility seems to be more reliable. So, we attribute the discovered field decay mainly to the Ohmic decay on phonons which is saturated at the age few$\\times 10^5$~yrs, when a NS cools down to the critical temperature below which the phonon scattering does not contribute much to the resistivity of the crust. Some role of the Hall effect and attractor is not excluded, and will be analysed in our further studies.

  20. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the {\\sc aleph} detector at {\\sc lep} . The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to b e less than $10^{-6}$. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of $\\bd$, $\\bs$ and $\\lb$ weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes , here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be $\\Br(\\btohh) = \\resultBR$. The relative branching fraction $\\rratio$, where $\\rs$ is the ratio of $\\bs$ to $\\bd$ decays in the sample, is measured to be $\\resultR$. %Branching ratio upper limits are also obtained for a variety In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  1. B, D and K Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; Asner, D.M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I.I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchalla, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Buras, A.J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D.G.; Cavanaugh, R.; /Syracuse U. /Carleton U. /Durham U., IPPP /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Karlsruhe U. /RWTH Aachen U. /Fermilab /Queen Mary, U. of London /Notre Dame U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Dortmund U. /Annecy, LAPP /ICTP, Trieste /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Hawaii U. /Bergen U. /Munich U. /CERN /Liverpool U.

    2008-03-07

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on one hand, to provide a coherent, up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high-p{sub T} and flavor data. This report is organized as follows. In Sec. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Sec. 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Sec. 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as 'benchmark channels' for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sec. 4. Finally, Sec. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  2. Polarizations in B -> VV decays

    CERN Document Server

    Li, H; Li, Hsiang-nan; Mishima, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that the polarization fractions of most tree-dominated $B\\to VV$ decays can be simply understood by means of kinematics in the heavy-quark or large-energy limit. For example, the longitudinal polarization fractions $R_L$ of the $B^0\\to (D_s^{*+}, D^{*+}, \\rho^+)D^{*-}$ and $B^+\\to (D_s^{*+}, D^{*+}, \\rho^+)\\rho^0$ modes increase as the masses of the mesons $D_s^{*+}, D^{*+}, \\rho^+$ emitted from the weak vertex decrease. The subleading finite-mass or finite-energy corrections modify these simple estimates only slightly. Our predictions for the $B\\to D_{(s)}^* D^*$ polarization fractions derived in the perturbative QCD framework, especially $R_L\\sim 1$ for $B^0\\to {\\bar D}^{*0} D^{*0}$ governed by nonfactorizable $W$-exchange amplitudes, can be confronted with future data. For penguin-dominated modes, such as $B\\to\\rho(\\omega) K^*$, the polarization fractions can be understood by the annihilation effect from the $(S-P)(S+P)$ operators, plus the interference with a small tree amplitude. At last, ...

  3. Leptonic Decays of Charged Pseudoscalar Mesons - 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Rosner, Jonathan L; Van de Water, Ruth S

    2015-01-01

    We review the physics of purely leptonic decays of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ pseudoscalar mesons. The measured decay rates are related to the product of the relevant weak-interaction-based CKM matrix element of the constituent quarks and a strong interaction parameter related to the overlap of the quark and antiquark wave-functions in the meson, called the decay constant $f_P$. The leptonic decay constants for $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ mesons can be obtained with controlled theoretical uncertainties and high precision from {\\it ab initio} lattice-QCD simulations. The combination of experimental leptonic decay-rate measurements and theoretical decay-constant calculations enables the determination of several elements of the CKM matrix within the standard model. These determinations are competitive with those obtained from semileptonic decays, and also complementary because they are sensitive to different quark flavor-changing currents. They can also be use...

  4. Decay property of Timoshenko system in thermoelasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2011-12-30

    We investigate the decay property of a Timoshenko system of thermoelasticity in the whole space for both Fourier and Cattaneo laws of heat conduction. We point out that although the paradox of infinite propagation speed inherent in the Fourier law is removed by changing to the Cattaneo law, the latter always leads to a solution with the decay property of the regularity-loss type. The main tool used to prove our results is the energy method in the Fourier space together with some integral estimates. We derive L 2 decay estimates of solutions and observe that for the Fourier law the decay structure of solutions is of the regularity-loss type if the wave speeds of the first and the second equations in the system are different. For the Cattaneo law, decay property of the regularity-loss type occurs no matter what the wave speeds are. In addition, by restricting the initial data to U 0∈H s(R)∩L 1,γ(R) with a suitably large s and γ ∈ [0,1], we can derive faster decay estimates with the decay rate improvement by a factor of t -γ/2. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Non-radial motion in the TeV blazar S5 0716+714. The pc-scale kinematics of a BL Lacertae object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzen, S.; Kam, V. A.; Witzel, A.; Agudo, I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Karouzos, M.; Eckart, A.; Zensus, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Flat-spectrum radio sources often show a core-jet structure on pc-scales. Individual jet components reveal predominantly outward directed motion. For the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 conflicting apparent velocities have been reported in the literature. This object is an intra-day variable source and suited to investigate a possible correlation between kinematic properties and flux-density variability on different timescales. Aims: We study the kinematics in the pc-scale jet of S5 0716+714 to determine the apparent speeds of the jet components based on a much improved data set. In addition, we search for correlations between the radio flux-density light curves and the morphological changes detected along the VLBI jet. Methods: We (re-)analyze 50 VLBI observations obtained with the VLBA at 5 different frequencies (5-43 GHz) between 1992.73 and 2006.32. The data have been parameterized using circular Gaussian components. We analyze the jet component motion in detail taking care not only to account for motion in the radial but also in the orthogonal direction. We study the evolution of the jet ridge line and investigate the spectral properties of the individual components. We search for correlations between radio band light curves and the kinematic properties of the jet components. Results: We present an alternative kinematic scenario for jet component motion in S5 0716+714. We present evidence for the apparent stationarity of jet components (with regard to their core separation) with time. Jet components, however, do seem to move significantly non-radially with regard to their position angle and in a direction perpendicular to the major axis of the jet. We discuss a possible correlation between the long-term radio flux-density variability and apparent jet component motions. Conclusions: In S5 0716+714 an alternative motion scenario is proposed. With regard to the core separation, rather stationary components can fit the VLBI observations well. A new model to

  6. Measurement of Prominent eta Decay Branching Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V

    2007-01-01

    The decay psi(2S) --> eta J/psi is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent eta-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for eta decays to gamma gamma, pi+pi-pi0, 3 pi0, pi+ pi- gamma, and e+ e- gamma, accounting for 99.9% of all eta decays. The precisions for several of the branching fractions and their ratios are improved. Two channels, pi+ pi- gamma and e+ e- gamma, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  7. On the h → Vℓ+ ℓ- decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorelli, Pietro

    2016-11-01

    A set of exclusive decay of the Higgs boson into a vector meson and a dilepton pair (h → Vℓ+ ℓ-, with V = ϒ, J/ψ, ϕ, and ℓ = μ, τ) are studied in the framework of the Standard Model. We have evaluated the decay rates, the dilepton mass spectra and the V longitudinal helicity fraction distributions. In the same framework, we considered the exclusive modes h → Vvv¯ and the implications of the CMS and ATLAS results for the lepton flavor-changing process h → τ+ μ- on the h → Vτ+ μ- decay modes.

  8. Invisible Decays in Higgs Pair Production

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shankha; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Observation of Higgs pair production is an important long term objective of the LHC physics program as it will shed light on the scalar potential of the Higgs field and the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. While numerous studies have examined the impact of new physics on di-Higgs production, little attention has been given to the well-motivated possibility of exotic Higgs decays in this channel. Here we investigate the consequences of exotic invisible Higgs decays in di-Higgs production. We outline a search sensitive to such invisible decays in the $b\\bar b+{\

  9. Top-down Holographic Glueball Decay Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Brünner, F; Rebhan, A

    2015-01-01

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f0(1500) and f0(1710).

  10. Heavy flavour decay properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, Ina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results on CP-violation searches in the Bs system, studied in the decay into J/psi phi, and the Bd system through the comparison of the decay time distributions in the flavour specific state J/psi K* and in the CP eigenstate J/psi KS. We additionally present new results in the search for the rare decays of Bs and Bd into mu+mu-. These searches are based on the full sample of data collected by ATLAS at 7 and 8 TeV collision energy. The consistency with the SM and with other available measurements is discussed.

  11. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  12. Positronium Decay into a Photon and Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Pokraka, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    We determine the rates and energy and angular distributions of the positronium decays into a photon and a neutrino-antineutrino pair, Ps-->gamma+nu+anti-nu. We find that both positronium spin states have access to this decay channel, contrary to a previously published result. The low-energy tails of the spectra are shown to be sensitive to the binding effects and agree with Low's theorem. Additionally, we find a connection between the behaviour of the soft photon spectrum in both o-Ps-->gamma+nu+anti-nu and o-Ps-->3gamma decays, and the Stark effect.

  13. Testing Lorentz invariance in β decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytema A.

    2014-03-01

    Experimentally we exploit the Gamow-Teller transition of polarized 20Na, where we can test the dependence of the β-decay rate on the spin orientation of 20Na. The polarization degree is measured using the β asymmetry, while the decay rate is measured by the γ yield. A change in the γ rate, when reversing the spin, implies Lorentz invariance violation. The decay rate should depend on sidereal time and the polarization direction relative to the rotation axis of the earth. The method of the measurement will be presented, together with the first results.

  14. The theory of beta-decay

    CERN Document Server

    Strachan, Charles

    1969-01-01

    The Theory of Beta-Decay covers the formulas, theories, probabilities, and spectra of beta-decay. This book is divided into 2 parts compassing 12 chapters, and starts with the introduction to the neutrino and the quantum theoretical background, explaining the basic phenomenon of beta-decay and the emission of electrons. The subsequent chapters deal with the interaction and the transition probability, as well as formulas of solutions. These topics are followed by discussions on the developments in the non-conservation of parity and helicity, the two-component theory of the neutrino, possible i

  15. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  16. Alpha decay chains from superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, C

    2008-01-01

    Magic islands for extra-stable nuclei in the midst of the sea of fission-instability were predicted to be around Z=114, 124 or, 126 with N=184, and Z=120, with N=172. Whether these fission-survived superheavy nuclei with high Z and N would live long enough for detection or, undergo alpha-decay in a very short time remains an open question. Alpha-decay half lives of nuclei with 130 118 are found to have alpha-decay half lives of the order of microseconds or, less.

  17. Exclusive B decays to charmonium final states

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; De Bonis, I; Favier, Jean; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Galeazzi, F; Jérémie, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zachariadou, K; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen Jia Chao; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Fan, Q; Gill, M S; Gowdy, S J; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kral, J F; Leclerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Strother, P; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Champion, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; O'Neale, S W; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C D; Chun, S; Branson, J G; Faccini, R; MacFarlane, D B; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N P; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kröger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Schalk, T L; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Williams, D C; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoredsky, A P; Hitlin, D G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J Y T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Aleksan, Roy; De Domenico, G; de Lesquen, A; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Devmal, S C; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J D; Sen, S; Smith, J G; Wagner, D L; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Kocian, M L; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Di Lodovico, F; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E A; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Le Peltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, Andrea; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; McMahon, S; McMahon, T R; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Dauncey, P D; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Martin, R D; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Kurup, A; McGrath, P; Scott, I; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Li, Y; Pavlovich, J; Trunov, A G; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Fullwood, J; Khan, A; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Thompson, R J; Weatherall, J H; Dallapiccola, C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Blaylock, G; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R R; Lin, C S; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Bloom, P; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R A; Reidy, J; Sanders, D; Summers, D J; Arguin, J F; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Woch, A; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Falbo, M; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F R; Leruste, P J; Lory, J; Martínez-Vidal, F; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versille, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Haire, M J; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Kelsey, M H; Lü, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Waldi, R; Jacques, P F; Kalelkar, M S; Plano, R J; Adye, T; Egede, U; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, Gian P; Copty, N K; Purohit, M V; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Baird, K G; Bloom, Elliott D; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, Michael; Dunwoodie, W M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Hewett, J L; Himel, Thomas M; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kim, P; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Morii, M; Mount, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Paolucci, P; Petrak, S; Quinn, Helen R; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Sciolla, G; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A V; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Vallazza, E; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Elmer, P; Johnson, J R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H

    2000-01-01

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/psi, psi(2S), and chi_C1. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B0 --> J/psi K* decay, and measurements of the B0 and B+ masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  18. Rare kaon, muon, and pion decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-12-01

    The author discusses the status of and prospects for the study of rare decays of kaons, muons, and pions. Studies of rare kaon decays are entering an interesting new phase wherein they can deliver important short-distance information. It should be possible to construct an alternative unitarity triangle to that determined in the B sector, and thus perform a critical check of the Standard Model by comparing the two. Rare muon decays are beginning to constrain supersymmetric models in a significant way, and future experiments should reach sensitivities which this kind of model must show effects, or become far less appealing.

  19. Decay modes of the excited pseudoscalar glueball

    CERN Document Server

    Eshraim, Walaa I

    2016-01-01

    We study three different chiral Lagrangians that describe the two- and three-body decays of an excited pseudoscalar glueball, $J^{PC}=0^{*-+}$, into light mesons and charmonium states as well as into a scalar and pseudoscalar glueball. We compute the decay channels for an excited pseudoscalar glueball with a mass of $3.7$ GeV and consider a ground state pseudoscalar glueball of mass $2.6$ GeV, following predictions from lattice QCD simulations. These states and channels are in reach of the PANDA experiments at the upcoming FAIR facility experiment. We present the resulting decay branching ratios with a parameter-free prediction.

  20. Measurement of the Muon Decay Parameter delta

    CERN Document Server

    Gaponenko, A N; Davydov, Yu I; Depommier, P; Doornbos, J; Faszer, W; Fujiwara, M C; Gagliardi, C A; Gill, D R; Green, P; Gumplinger, P; Hasinoff, M D; Henderson, R S; Hu, J; Jamieson, B; Kitching, P; Koetke, D D; Krushinsky, A A; Lachin, Yu Yu; MacDonald, J A; MacDonald, R P; Marshall, G M; Mathie, E L; Miasoedov, L V; Mischke, R E; Musser, J R; Nord, P M; Nozar, M; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Porcelli, T A; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Quraan, M A; Rodning, N L; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Sobratee, F; Stanislaus, T D S; Tacik, R; Torokhov, V D; Tribble, R E; Vasilev, M A; Wright, D H

    2004-01-01

    The muon decay parameter delta has been measured by the TWIST collaboration. We find delta = 0.74964 +- 0.00066(stat.) +- 0.00112(syst.), consistent with the Standard Model value of 3/4. This result implies that the product Pmuxi of the muon polarization in pion decay, Pmu, and the muon decay parameter xi falls within the 90% confidence interval 0.9960 < Pmuxi < xi < 1.0040. It also has implications for left-right-symmetric and other extensions of the Standard Model.

  1. Exclusive B Decays to Charmonium Final States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-10-13

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {chi}{sub c1}. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K* decay, and measurements of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  2. Trap-assisted decay spectroscopy with ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalska, M; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Beck, D.; Blank, B.; Blaum, K.; Böhm, Ch.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Fraile, L.M.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Kreim, S.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Rubio, B.; Schweikhard, L.; Stanja, J.; Zuber, K.

    Penning traps are excellent high-precision mass spectrometers for radionuclides. The high-resolving power used for cleaning isobaric and even isomeric contaminants can be exploited to improve decay-spectroscopy studies by delivering purified samples. An apparatus allowing trap-assisted decay spectroscopy has been coupled to the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. The results from studies with stable and radioactive ions show that the setup can be used to perform decay studies on purified short-lived nuclides and to assist mass measurements.

  3. The fully differential top decay distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Granada (Spain); Boudreau, J.; Mueller, J. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Escobar, C. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    We write down the four-dimensional fully differential decay distribution for the top quark decay t → Wb → lνb. We discuss how its eight physical parameters can be measured, either with a global fit or with the use of selected one-dimensional distributions and asymmetries. We give expressions for the top decay amplitudes for a general tbW interaction, and show how the untangled measurement of the two components of the fraction of longitudinal W bosons - those with b quark helicities of 1/2 and -1/2, respectively - could improve the precision of a global fit to the tbW vertex. (orig.)

  4. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  5. β -decay study of 94Kr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernik, K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Grzywacz, R.; Gross, C. J.; Madurga, M.; Miller, D.; Stracener, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cartegni, L.; Fijałkowska, A.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Królas, W.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J., II; Padgett, S. W.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Winger, J. A.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    β decay of neutron-rich nuclide 94Kr was reinvestigated by means of a high resolution on-line mass separator and β -γ spectroscopy. In total 22 γ -ray transitions were assigned to the decay of 94Kr, and a new isomeric state was identified. The new information allows us to build detailed levels systematics in a chain of odd-odd rubidium isotopes and draw conclusions on nuclear structure for some of the observed states. The discussed level structure affects the evolution of β -decay half-lives for neutron-rich selenium, krypton, and strontium isotopes.

  6. Searches for rare charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Mitzel, Dominik Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Rare and forbidden charm decays are unique probes for hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. The LHCb collaboration has made significant contributions to the field over the last years. This report presents results of the search for the lepton-flavour violating decay $D^0 \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$ and the first observations of the rare four body decays $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-, D^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ ans $D^0 \\to K^+ K^- \\mu^+ \\mu^-$.

  7. Rare B decays at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Studying flavor changing neutral current transitions provides important information that helps searches for physics beyond the standard model. In this paper we report on recent measurements of these transitions using data collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider, including world-leading limits on the branching fraction of the decay $B^0_{(s)} \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, a forward-backward asymmetry measurement in $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays which is consistent and competitive with best $B$-factories results, and the first observation of the decay $B^0_s \\to \\phi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$.

  8. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D; Forsberg, U; Golubev, P; Sarmiento, L G; Yakushev, A; Andersson, L-L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Heßberger, F P; Herzberg, R-D; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Schädel, M; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2013-09-13

    A high-resolution α, x-ray, and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z=115. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z>112. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  9. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich [Old Dominion University

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  10. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  11. χ c production in hadronic Z decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Atamanchuk, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Bao, J.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Bechtluft, J.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Behrens, J.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Bosetti, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brock, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Castello, R.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, W. Y.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Chung, S.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Contin, A.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; Dhina, M.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Easo, S.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, S. J.; Fackler, O.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fasefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Friebel, W.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gele, D.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jezequel, S.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Klöckner, R.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Krivshich, A.; Kuijten, H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kunin, A.; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leedom, I.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Li, C.; Li, H. T.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marion, F.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Neyer, C.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Qi, Z. D.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Ro, S.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schulte, S.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Scott, I.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shen, D. Z.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Starosta, R.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Terzi, G.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, C. R.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Warner, C.; Weber, A.; Weber, J.; Weill, R.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wenninger, J.; White, M.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Wysłouch, B.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, J. G.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; Yin, Z. W.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zaitsev, N.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.; L3 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    We report on inclusive xc production in Z decays reconstructed via the decay mode Xc → J + γ. This analysis is based on 1.1 million hadronic Z events. Interpreting the observed signal as Xcl, we obtain a branching ratio Br( Z→ Xcl + X) = (7.5±2.9(stat.) ±0.6(sys.)) × 10 -3. Assuming all events are produced in b decays we obtain Br( b→ Xcl + X) = (2.4 ± 0.9(stat.) ±0.2(sys.)) × 10 -2. We also present an improved measurement of the branching ratio Br(Z → J + X) = (3.6 ± 0.5 (stat.) ± 0.4 (sys.)) × 10 -3, obtained from dileptonic J decays.

  12. Curvaton scenarios with inflaton decays into curvatons

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Liddle, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possible decay of the inflaton into curvaton particles during reheating and analyse its effect on curvaton scenarios. Typical decay curvatons are initially relativistic then become non-relativistic, and change the background history of the Universe. We show that this change to the background is the only way in which observational predictions of the scenario are modified. Moreover, once the required amplitude of perturbations is fixed by observation there are no signatures of such decays in other cosmological observables. The decay curvatons can prevent the Universe from becoming dominated by the curvaton condensate, making it impossible to match observations in parts of parameter space. This constrains the branching ratio of the inflaton to curvaton to be less than of order $0.1$ typically. If the branching ratio is below about $10^{-4}$ it has negligible impact on the model parameter space and can be ignored.

  13. Selected ARGUS results on B meson decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Yuri

    1992-02-01

    Semileptonic B meson decays have been studied using the ARGUS detector at DORIS II. The branching ratio for the decay B¯0→D*+l-ν¯ has been measured. A significant rate for the decay B¯→D**l-ν¯ has been observed. From an angular analysis of the cascade B¯0→D*+(→D0π+)l+ν¯, the forward-backward asymmetry AFB and the D*+ polarization parameter α have been determined. The decay B¯0→D*+l-ν¯ have been also measured with partial reconstruction of the D*+ meson, and for the first time the inclusive primary electron spectrum in the whole momentum interval has been analyzed.

  14. Neutrino potential for neutrinoless double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoritaka

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino potential for neutrinoless double beta decay is studied with focusing on its statistical property. The statistics provide a gross view of understanding amplitude of constitutional components of the nuclear matrix element.

  15. Phenomenology of neutrinoless double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Cadenas, J J

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status and future outlook of neutrinoless double beta decay searches, which try to provide an answer to the fundamental question of whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles.

  16. Remarkable Features of Decaying Hagedorn States

    CERN Document Server

    Beitel, M; Greiner, C

    2014-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition phase between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). Their abundance is believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature $T_H$ which in our understanding equals the critical temperature $T_c$. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. To generate a whole zoo of such new states we solve the covariantly formulated bootstrap equation by regarding energy conservation and conservation of the baryon number $B$, strangeness $S$ and electric charge $Q$. To investigate their decay properties decay chain calculations of HS were conducted. One single (heavy) HS with certain quantum numbers decays by various two-body decay channels subsequently into final stable hadrons. Multiplicities of these stable hadrons, their ratios and their energy distributions are presented. Strikingly the final energy spectra of...

  17. Temperature Dependence of Atomic Decay Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Jun; CHENG Ze

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. It is found that below the critical temperature Tc, the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T. Especially, at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state, and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.%We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a BoseEinstein condensation of photons.It is found that below the critical temperature To,the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T.Especially,at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state,and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.

  18. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, D T

    2005-01-01

    Even without grand unification, proton decay can be a powerful probe of physics at the highest energy scales. Supersymmetric theories with conserved R-parity contain Planck-suppressed dimension 5 operators that give important contributions to nucleon decay. These operators are likely controlled by flavor physics, which means current and near future proton decay experiments might yield clues about the fermion mass spectrum. I present a thorough analysis of nucleon partial lifetimes in supersymmetric one-flavon Froggatt-Nielsen models with a single U(1)_X family symmetry which is responsible for the fermionic mass spectrum as well as forbidding R-parity violating interactions. Many of the models naturally lead to nucleon decay near present limits without any reference to grand unification.

  19. Threedimensional dynamics of nuclear decay modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirea, M.; Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.

    1994-03-01

    We study nondissipative fission dynamics in a wide range of mass asymmetry, covering three groups of nuclear decay modes: cluster radioactivities; alpha-decay and cold fission. The WKB action integral is calculated by using the Werner-Wheeler inertia tensor and the deformation energy within Yukawa-plus-exponential model extended to binary systems with different charge densities. The optimum dynamical trajectory in a threedimensional deformation space (elongation, necking-in and mass-asymmetry) is determined by solving a nonlinear system of differential equations. This new method is illustrated for three decay modes of234U: α-decay, Mg-radioactivity and cold fission with100Zr as a light fragment.

  20. Proton Decay in Minimal Supersymmetric SU(5)

    OpenAIRE

    Bajc, Borut; Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Senjanovic, Goran

    2002-01-01

    We systematically study proton decay in the minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory. We find that although the available parameter space of soft masses and mixings is quite constrained, the theory is still in accord with experiment.

  1. Inclusive Semileptonic B Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenegger, U

    2004-01-27

    The authors report updates on two analyses of inclusive semileptonic B decays based on a dataset of 89 million B{bar B} events recorded with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Events are selected by fully reconstructing the decay of one B meson and identifying a charged lepton from the decay of the other {bar B} meson. IN the first analysis, the measurement of the first and second moment of the hadronic mass distribution in Cabibbo-favored {bar B} {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{bar {nu}} decays allows for the determination of the nonperturbative parameters {bar {Lambda}} and {lambda}{sub 1} of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) and |V{sub cb}|. In the second analysis, the hadronic mass distribution is used to measure the inclusive charmless semileptonic branching fraction and to determine |V{sub ub}|.

  2. Probing the Planck Scale with Proton Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni; Larson, Daniel T.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-04-28

    We advocate the idea that proton decay may probe physics at the Planck scale instead of the GUT scale. This is possible because supersymmetric theories have dimension-5 operators that can induce proton decay at dangerous rates, even with R-parity conservation. These operators are expected to be suppressed by the same physics that explains the fermion masses and mixings. We present a thorough analysis of nucleon partial lifetimes in models with a string-inspired anomalous U(1)_X family symmetry which is responsible for the fermionic mass spectrum as well as forbidding R-parity violating interactions. Protons and neutrons can decay via R-parity conserving non-renormalizable superpotential terms that are suppressed by the Planck scale and powers of the Cabibbo angle. Many of the models naturally lead to nucleon decay near present limits without any reference to grand unification.

  3. The decay of highly excited open strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  4. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Mezzetto, M; Monrabal, F; Sorel, M

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has evolved from being almost a marginal activity in neutrino physics to one of the highest priorities for understanding neutrinos and the origin of mass. There are two main reasons for this paradigm shift: the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which clearly established the existence of massive neutrinos; and the existence of an unconfirmed, but not refuted, claim of evidence for neutrinoless double decay in 76Ge. As a consequence, a new generation of experiments, employing different detection techniques and {\\beta}{\\beta} isotopes, is being actively promoted by experimental groups across the world. In addition, nuclear theorists are making remarkable progress in the calculation of the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements, thus eliminating a substantial part of the theoretical uncertainties affecting the particle physics interpretation of this process. In this report, we review the main aspects of the double beta decay pro...

  5. Nuclear responses for neutrinos and neutrino studies by double beta decays and inverse beta decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Ejiri

    2001-08-01

    This is a brief report on recent studies of nuclear responses for neutrinos () by charge exchange reactions, masses by double beta () decays and of solar and supernova ’s by inverse decays. Subjects discussed include (1) studies in nuclear micro-laboratories, (2) masses studied by decays of 100Mo and nuclear responses for -, (3) solar and supernova ’s by inverse decays and responses for 71Ga and 100Mo, and (4) MOON (molybdenum observatory of neutrinos) for spectroscopic studies of Majorana masses with sensitivity of ∼ 0.03 eV by decays of 100Mo and real-time studies of low energy solar and supernova ’s by inverse decays of 100Mo.

  6. Search for pentaquarks states in Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, A; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan Yi Bin; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2004-01-01

    Exotic hadrons made of five quarks (pentaquarks) are searched for in hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. No significant signal is observed. At 95% C.L., upper limits are set on the production rates N of such particles and their charge-conjugate state per Z decay: N Theta(1535)+ . BR(Theta(1535)^+ -> pK0s xi^- pi^-) Xi^-pi^+ D*-p) D^-p) < 31 x 10^-4.

  7. An electroweak enigma: Hyperon radiative decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyov, A., (spokesperson); /St. Petersburg, INP; Jastrzembski, E.; Lach, J.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab; Golovtsov, V.; Krivshich, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; /St. Petersburg, INP; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Norbeck, E.; /Iowa U.; Cooper, P.S.; /Yale U.

    1985-04-03

    The main thrust of this experiment will be to measure the asymmetry parameter for the electroweak decay {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{gamma} and verify its branching ratio. As a secondary goal they will measure, or set new upper limits for, the branching ratio of the electroweak decay {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{gamma}. Since the {Xi}{sup -} are expected to be polarized, information on the asymmetry parameter may also be available.

  8. Exclusive nonleptonic B→VV decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2009-07-01

    The exclusive two-body nonleptonic B→VV decays are investigated, within the factorization approximation, in the relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratios and the logitudinal polarization fraction (RL) are calculated yielding the model predictions in agreement with experiment. Our predicted CP-odd fraction (R⊥) for B→D*D(s)* decays are in general agreement with other model predictions and within the existing experimental limit.

  9. Exotic spectroscopy and decays: prospects for colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech-Garret, J. L. (Juan Luis)

    2011-01-01

    In addition to well-motivated scenarios like supersymmetric particles, the so-called exotic matter (quirky matter, hidden valley models, etc.) can show up at the LHC and ILC, by exploring the spectroscopy of high mass levels and decay rates. In this paper we use QCD-inspired potential models, though without resorting to any particular one, to calculate level spacings of bound states and decay rates of the aforementioned exotic matter in order to design discovery strategies. We mainly focus on...

  10. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ruth; Perkins, W. B.; Davis, A.-C.; Brandenberger, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. The catalysis processes are reviewed both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and the implications for baryogenesis are discussed. A computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay is presented using classical physics. Also discussed are some effects which can screen catalysis processes.

  11. RARE K DECAYS: RESULTS AND PROSPECTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG,L.

    2001-09-10

    In recent years the study of the rare decays of kaons has had three primary motivations. The first is the search for physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). Virtually all attempts to redress the theoretical shortcomings of the Standard Model (SM) predict some degree of lepton flavor violation (LFV). Decays such as K{sub L} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}e{sup {-+}} have very good experimental signatures and can consequently be pursued to remarkable sensitivities. These sensitivities correspond to extremely high energy scales in models where the only suppression is that of the mass of the exchanged field. There are also theories that predict new particles created in kaon decay or the violation of symmetries other than lepton flavor. The second is the potential of decays that are allowed but that are extremely suppressed in the SM. In several of these, the leading component is a G.I.M.-suppressed one-loop process that is quite sensitive to fundamental SM parameters such as V{sub td}. These decays are also potentially very sensitive to BSM physics. Finally there are a number of long-distance-dominated decays which can test theoretical techniques such as chiral Lagrangians that purport to explain the low-energy behavior of QCD. Knowledge of some of these decays is also needed to extract more fundamental information from certain of the one-loop processes. This field is quite active as indicated by Table 1 that lists the decays for which results have been forthcoming in the last couple of years as well as those that are under analysis. Thus in a short review such as this, one must be quite selective.

  12. Higgs Decays and Brane Gravi-vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, T. E.; Liu, B. Y.; Love, S. T.; Xiong, C.; ter Veldhuis, T.

    2008-01-01

    Higgs boson decays in flexible brane world models with stable, massive gravi-vectors are considered. Such vectors couple bilinearly to the Standard Model fields through either the Standard Model energy-momentum tensor, the weak hypercharge field strength or the Higgs scalar. The role of the coupling involving the extrinsic curvature is highlighted. It is found that within the presently allowed parameter space, the decay rate of the Higgs into two gravi-vectors (which would appear as an invisi...

  13. The beta-decay of Al-22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achouri, NL; Santos, FDO; Lewitowicz, M; Blank, B; Aysto, J; Canchel, G; Czajkowski, S; Dendooven, P; Emsallem, A; Giovinazzo, J; Guillet, N; Jokinen, A; Larid, AM; Longour, C; Perajarvi, K; Smirnova, N; Stanoiu, M

    2006-01-01

    In an experiment performed at the LISE3 facility of GANIL, we studied the decay of Al-22 produced by the fragmentation of a Ar-36 primary beam. A beta-decay half-life of T-1/2 = 91.1 +/- 0.5ms was measured. The beta-delayed one- and two-proton emission as well as beta-alpha and beta-delayed gamma-de

  14. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, R.; Perkins, W.B.; Davis, A.C.; Brandenberger, R.H. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); Cambridge Univ. (UK); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. We review the catalysis processes both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and discuss the implications for baryogenesis. We present a computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay using classical physics. We also discuss some effects which can screen catalysis processes. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is taken from one of CERN's bubble chambers and shows the decay of a positive kaon in flight. The decay products of this kaon can be seen spiraling in the magnetic field of the chamber. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that has been heated to boiling point.

  16. Effects of tensor interactions in {tau} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Castro, G.; Godina Nava, J.J. [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav del IPN, Mexico DF. (MEXICO)

    1996-02-01

    Recent claims for the observation of antisymmetric weak tensor currents in {pi} and {ital K} decays are considered for the case of {tau}{r_arrow}{ital K}{pi}{nu} transitions. Assuming the existence of symmetric tensor currents, a mechanism for the direct production of the {ital K}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}}(1430) spin-2 meson in {tau} decays is proposed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Radiative/EW penguin decays at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Nanae

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results for radiative and electroweak penguin decays of $B$ me son at Belle. Measurements of differential branching fraction, isospin asymmetr y, $K^*$ polarization, and forward-backward asymmetry as functions of $q^2$ for $B \\to K^{(*)}ll$ decays are reported. For the results of the radiative process, we report measurements of branching fractions for inclusive $B\\to X_s \\gamma$ and the exclusive $B\\to K \\eta' \\gamma$ modes.

  18. Measurements of charm rare decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Vacca, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Following the intriguing hints of deviations from the Standard Model in rare B meson decays, searches for rare and forbidden decays of charm hadrons become a hot topic again. We present recent results on Flavour Changing Neutral Current $D^{0}\\rightarrow\\mu^+ \\mu^-$, $D^0 \\rightarrow\\mu^+\\mu^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, $D^{\\pm}_{(s)}\\rightarrow \\pi^{\\pm} \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and LFV $D^{\\pm}_{(s)}\\rightarrow \\pi^{\\mp}\\mu^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm}$ obtained at LHCb.

  19. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, R.; Perkins, W.B.; Davis, A.C.; Brandenberger, R.H. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); Cambridge Univ. (UK); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. We review the catalysis processes both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and discuss the implications for baryogenesis. We present a computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay using classical physics. We also discuss some effects which can screen catalysis processes. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Gluonic Hadrons and Charmless B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Close, Francis Edwin; Page, P R; Veseli, S; Yamamoto, H

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid charmonium with mass ~4 GeV could be produced via a c c.bar color-octet component in b->c c.bar s. These states could be narrow and could have a significant branching ratio to light hadrons, perhaps enhanced by glueballs. Decays to gluonic hadrons could make a sizable contribution to B->no charm decays. Experimental signatures and search strategies are discussed.

  1. Leptonic Decays of Charged Pseudoscalar Mesons - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, Jonathan L. [Chicago U., EFI; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab

    2015-09-07

    We review the physics of purely leptonic decays of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ pseudoscalar mesons. The measured decay rates are related to the product of the relevant weak-interaction-based CKM matrix element of the constituent quarks and a strong interaction parameter related to the overlap of the quark and antiquark wave-functions in the meson, called the decay constant $f_P$. The leptonic decay constants for $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ mesons can be obtained with controlled theoretical uncertainties and high precision from {\\it ab initio} lattice-QCD simulations. The combination of experimental leptonic decay-rate measurements and theoretical decay-constant calculations enables the determination of several elements of the CKM matrix within the standard model. These determinations are competitive with those obtained from semileptonic decays, and also complementary because they are sensitive to different quark flavor-changing currents. They can also be used to test the unitarity of the first and second rows of the CKM matrix. Conversely, taking the CKM elements predicted by unitarity, one can infer "experimental" values for $f_P$ that can be compared with theory. These provide tests of lattice-QCD methods, provided new-physics contributions to leptonic decays are negligible at the current level of precision. This review is the basis of the article in the Particle Data Group's 2016 edition, updating the versions in Refs. [1-3].

  2. Xenomic networks variability and adaptation traits in wood decaying fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Mélanie; Meux, Edgar; Mathieu, Yann; Thuillier, Anne; Chibani, Kamel; Harvengt, Luc; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Fungal degradation of wood is mainly restricted to basidiomycetes, these organisms having developed complex oxidative and hydrolytic enzymatic systems. Besides these systems, wood-decaying fungi possess intracellular networks allowing them to deal with the myriad of potential toxic compounds resulting at least in part from wood degradation but also more generally from recalcitrant organic matter degradation. The members of the detoxification pathways constitute the xenome. Generally, they belong to multigenic families such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and the glutathione transferases. Taking advantage of the recent release of numerous genomes of basidiomycetes, we show here that these multigenic families are extended and functionally related in wood-decaying fungi. Furthermore, we postulate that these rapidly evolving multigenic families could reflect the adaptation of these fungi to the diversity of their substrate and provide keys to understand their ecology. This is of particular importance for white biotechnology, this xenome being a putative target for improving degradation properties of these fungi in biomass valorization purposes.

  3. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay among coagulation factor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Shahbazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Haemostasis prevents blood loss following vascular injury. It depends on the unique concert of events involving platelets and specific blood proteins, known as coagulation factors. The clotting system requires precise regulation and coordinated reactions to maintain the integrity of the vasculature. Clotting insufficiency mostly occurs due to genetically inherited coagulation factor deficiencies such as hemophilia. Materials and Methods: A relevant literature search of PubMed was performed using the keywords coagulation factors, Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and premature translation termination codons. Search limitations included English language and human-based studies. Results: Mutations that cause premature translation termination codons probably account for one-third of genetically inherited diseases. Transcripts bearing aberrant termination codons are selectively identified and eliminated by an evolutionarily conserved posttranscriptional pathway known as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD. There are many pieces of evidence of decay among coagulation factor genes. However, the hemophilia gene (F8 does not seem to be subjected to NMD. Since the F8 gene is located on the X-chromosome, a connection between X-linked traits and mRNA decay could be assumed. Conclusion: Considering that not all genes go through decay, this review focuses on the basics of the mechanism in coagulation genes. It is interesting to determine whether this translation-coupled surveillance system represents a general rule for the genes encoding components of the same physiological cascade.

  4. Canonical Poly(A Polymerase Activity Promotes the Decay of a Wide Variety of Mammalian Nuclear RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Bresson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear poly(A-binding protein PABPN1 has been implicated in the decay of nuclear noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs. In addition, PABPN1 promotes hyperadenylation by stimulating poly(A-polymerases (PAPα/γ, but this activity has not previously been linked to the decay of endogenous transcripts. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying target specificity have remained elusive. Here, we inactivated PAP-dependent hyperadenylation in cells by two independent mechanisms and used an RNA-seq approach to identify endogenous targets. We observed the upregulation of various ncRNAs, including snoRNA host genes, primary miRNA transcripts, and promoter upstream antisense RNAs, confirming that hyperadenylation is broadly required for the degradation of PABPN1-targets. In addition, we found that mRNAs with retained introns are susceptible to PABPN1 and PAPα/γ-mediated decay (PPD. Transcripts are targeted for degradation due to inefficient export, which is a consequence of reduced intron number or incomplete splicing. Additional investigation showed that a genetically-encoded poly(A tail is sufficient to drive decay, suggesting that degradation occurs independently of the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation reaction. Surprisingly, treatment with transcription inhibitors uncouples polyadenylation from decay, leading to runaway hyperadenylation of nuclear decay targets. We conclude that PPD is an important mammalian nuclear RNA decay pathway for the removal of poorly spliced and nuclear-retained transcripts.

  5. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  6. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  7. Neutrino decay confronts the SNO data

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Goswami, S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the status of the neutrino decay solution to the solar neutrino problem in the context of the recent results from Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). We present the results of global $\\chi^2$-analysis for both two and three generation cases with one of the mass states being allowed to decay and include the effect of both decay and mixing. We find that the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) region which is the currently favoured solution of the solar neutrino problem is affected significantly by decay. We obtain bounds on the decay constant $\\alpha$ in this region which implies a rest frame life time $\\tau_0/m > 1.5 \\times 10^{-5}$ sec/eV for the unstable neutrino state. We present the allowed areas in the $\\Delta m^2-\\tan^2\\theta$ plane for different allowed values of $\\alpha$ and examine how these areas change with the inclusion of decay. Finally we show that the forthcoming neutral currrent data from SNO can further constrain the allowed values of $\\alpha$, $\\Delta m^2$ and $\\tan^2\\theta$.

  8. Demkov-Kunike models with decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Tchapda, A. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    Exact analytical solutions to the dissipative time-dependent Schrödinger equation are obtained for a decaying two-state system with decay rates Γ1 and Γ2 for the levels with extremal spin projections. The system is coherently driven with a pulse whose detuning is made up of two parts: a time-dependent part (chirp) of hyperbolic-tangent shape and a static part with real and imaginary terms. This gives us a wide range of possibilities to arbitrarily select the interaction terms. We considered two versions which led to decaying Demkov-Kunike (DK) models; the version in which the Rabi frequency (interaction) is a time-dependent hyperbolic-secant function (called decaying DK1 model) and the case when it is constant in time and never turns off (decaying DK2 model). Our analytical solutions account for all possible initial moments instead of only t0 = 0 or t0 = - ∞ as for non-decaying models and may be useful for the experiments on level crossings. Two complementary limits of the pulse detuning are considered and explored: the limit of fast (i) and slow rise (ii). In the case (i), the coupling between level positions in the first DK model collapses, while the second DK model reduces to a Rabi model (constant Hamiltonian), in the case (ii), both DK models reduce to the LZ model. In both cases (i) and (ii), analytical approximated solutions which conveniently approach the exact solutions are derived.

  9. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00261996

    2012-01-01

    New results are presented using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of $∼ 1 fb^{−1}$ collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. The B → $µ^+ µ^−$ and $D^0 → µ^+ µ^−$ results have been presented at a previous conference. The angular distributions and (partial) branching fractions of selected radiative penguin decays are studied using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of ∼ 1$fb^{−1}$ collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. The partial branching fraction and theoretically clean observables of the decay $B^0 → K^{∗0} µ^+ µ^−$ have been extracted as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The partial branching fraction of the decay $B^0_s$ → $φµ^+ µ^−$ has also been extracted as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The branching fraction and first observation of the decay $B^+$ → $π^+ µ^+ µ^−$ is reported. New limits were set on the decay $B → µ^+ µ^− µ^+ µ^−$. Improved limits on the decays $B → µ^+ µ^−$ and $D^0 → µ^+ µ^−$ are...

  10. Rare Higgs decays with ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Groth-Jensen, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 2012 the ATLAS and CMS collaborations discovered a new particle with a mass of approximately 125 GeV via decays to photon, $W$ and $Z$ boson pairs with rates consistent with those of the SM Higgs boson. There are three experimentally accessible channels at the LHC for detecting Higgs boson decays to fermions: $H o bar{b}$ , $H o au^{+} au^{-}$ and $H o mu^{+} mu^{-}$ . The branching ratios for these decays are proportional to the fermion masses with the $bar{b}$ and $ au^{+} au^{-}$ decay modes dominant for $m_H$ = 125 GeV. The $H o mu^{+} mu^{-}$ decay has a clean final-state signature and it is the only channel where a Higgs coupling to the second generation fermions can be measured at the LHC. This is a very challenging measurement due to a small $H o mu^{+} mu^{-}$ branching ratio and high SM backgrounds. The SM branching ratio for the H → μ+μ− decays is of the order of $(28 − 6) imes 10^{−5}$ in the Higgs boson mass range 110–150 GeV. The dominant irreducible SM background is...

  11. Private Decayed Sum Estimation under Continual Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Bolot, Jean; Muthukrishnan, S; Nikolov, Aleksandar; Taft, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by monitoring applications, recently, Dwork et al. initiated the study of differential privacy as data is continually updated over time. They abstracted the problem of running sums that is applicable widely, and proved upper and lower bounds on accuracy of \\epsilon - differentially private algorithms for this problem. We continue their study, but we are motivated by the reality that in many monitoring applications, recent data is more important than distant data. Thus, we study the sums problem for well known decay models of data, from window to exponential and polynomial decay. Such "decayed sums" are challenging because (a) while we want accuracy in analysis with respect to the window or decayed sum, we still want differential privacy; (b) sums within windows and decayed sums in general are not monotonic or even near-monotonic as studied in the work of Dwork et al. We present algorithms for decayed sum in each model which are \\epsilon-differentially private, and are accurate. For window and expone...

  12. Effective Single Photon Decay Mode of Positronium Decay via Electroweak Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    We consider the decay of positronium to a neutrino-antineutrino accompanied by a single photon. Since the neutrino pair go undetected, this appears as a single photon decay of positronium. These decay channel are mediated through the exchange of the massive $W$ and $Z$ vector bosons of the electroweak interaction. After summing over the various neutrino channels, the standard model calculation yields the rate for such a single photon decay process of $\\Gamma_{Ps \\rightarrow \\gamma}$ = 1.72 $\\times 10^{-19}$ s$^{-1}$.

  13. Decay Data Evaluation Project: Evaluation of (52)Fe nuclear decay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Aurelian

    2016-03-01

    Within the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project no. F41029, the evaluation of the nuclear decay data of (52)Fe, a radionuclide of interest in nuclear medicine, was performed. The main nuclear decay data evaluated are: the half-life, decay energy, energies and probabilities of the electron capture and β(+) transitions, internal conversion coefficients and gamma-ray energies and emission intensities. This new evaluation, made using the DDEP methodology and tools, was included in the DDEP database NUCLEIDE.

  14. Analytic Evaluation of the Decay Rate for Accelerated Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, H; Suzuki, Hisao; Yamada, Kunimasa

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the decay rate of the uniformly accelerated proton. We obtain an analytic expression for inverse beta decay process caused by the acceleration. We evaluate the decay rate both from the inertial frame and from the accelerated frame where we should consider thermal radiation by Unruh effect. We explicitly check that the decay rates obtained in both frame coincide with each other.

  15. Chapter 4: Genetic Identification of Fungi Involved in Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Kirker

    2014-01-01

    Wood decay is a complex process that involves contributions from molds, bacteria, decay fungi, and often insects. The first step in the accurate diagnosis of decay is identification of the causal agents, but wood decay in the strictest sense (white and brown rot) is caused by cryptic fungal species that are very difficult to identify using traditional methods. Genetic...

  16. Analytic Evaluation of the Decay Rate for Accelerated Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Hisao; Yamada, Kunimasa

    2002-01-01

    We evaluate the decay rate of the uniformly accelerated proton. We obtain an analytic expression for inverse beta decay process caused by the acceleration. We evaluate the decay rate both from the inertial frame and from the accelerated frame where we should consider thermal radiation by Unruh effect. We explicitly check that the decay rates obtained in both frame coincide with each other.

  17. Searches for rare and exotic Higgs decays with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Marjanovic, Marija; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Some theories predict Lepton Flavour Violating decays of the Higgs boson, while other predict enhanced decay rates into new light pseudoscalar bosons "a" or invisible particles. Also enhanced rates in rare decay modes like Phi-photon are considered. In this presentation the latest ATLAS results on searches for such non-standard and rare decays will be discussed.

  18. B-decays in the heavy-quark expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Progress in the theoretical description of B-meson decays, in particular decays to light hadrons, is reviewed. The factorization properties of such decays can be analyzed using the soft-collinear effective theory. Applications of the effective theory to both inclusive and exclusive decays are discussed.

  19. Probing the N = Z Line via {beta} Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markku Oinonen

    1999-12-31

    This contribution reports several beta-decay studies performed at ISOLDE On-Line Mass Separator at CERN recently for nuclei close to N = Z line. Beta decay of {sup 58}Zn provides a possibility to compare Gamow-Teller strength extracted from complementary beta-decay studies and charge-exchange reactions. Measurement on beta-decay half-life of {sup 70}Kr shows importance of experimental information in modeling the path of the astrophysical rp process. Decay of {sup 71}Kr is an example of a mirror beta decay and extends the systematics of these particular decays towards highly deformed region close to A = 80.

  20. Decay properties of heavier nuclei and mass formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masahiro [Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The stabilities of heavy nuclei, including super-heavy elements, are governed by alpha decay and fission. Some exotic types of decay, such as heavy cluster decay, which does not occur so frequently as to govern stability, have been also reported. The half-time estimations of various types of decay are reviewed. And the possibility of decay, mainly in case of heavy cluster decay, is discussed with Q-value obtained from mass formulae as well. Some topics concerning other types of exotic decay are presented. Recent trends in the research on mass formula are reviewed from the historical point of view, to get perspectives of future development. (Yamamoto, A.)

  1. Ultrafast Molecular Three-Electron Collective Auger Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifel, Raimund

    2016-06-01

    A new class of many-electron Auger transitions in atoms was initially proposed over 40 years ago, but the first tentative evidence for its real existence was only adduced by Lee et al. in 1993, on the basis of the resonant Auger spectrum of Kr. Using a multi-electron coincidence technique with synchrotron radiation, we unambiguously showed very recently that the transition suggested by Lee et al. in Kr really does take place, but with a rather small branching ratio. Related inter-atomic three-electron transitions in rare gas clusters were recently predicted by Averbukh and Kolorenc and demonstrated by Ouchi et al.. From consideration of the energy levels involved it seems that the basic three-electron process could occur in molecules too, wherever a double inner-valence shell vacancy lies at a higher energy than the molecular triple ionisation onset. Experiments on CH_3F reveal for the first time the existence of this new decay pathway there, and calculations show that despite its three-electron nature, its effective oscillator strength is orders of magnitudes higher than in atoms, allowing an efficient competition with both molecular dissociation and two-electron decay channels on the ultrafast time scale. The dramatic enhancement of the molecular three-electron Auger transition can be explained in terms of a partial breakdown of the molecular orbital picture of ionisation. We predict that the collective decay pathway will be significant in a wide variety of heteroatomic molecules ionised by extreme UV and soft X-rays, particularly at Free-Electron-Lasers where double inner-shell vacancies can be created efficiently by two-photon transitions. G.N. Ogurtsov et al., Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 15, 1656 (1971) and V.V. Afrosimov et al., JETP Lett. 21, 249 (1975). I. Lee, R. Wehlitz, U. Becker and M. Ya. Amusia, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 26, L41 (1993). J.H.D. Eland, R.J. Squibb, M. Mucke, S. Zagorodskikh, P. Linusson, and R. Feifel, New J. Phys. 17, 122001 (2015). V

  2. Energy Spread of the Unstable State and Proton Decay Observation

    OpenAIRE

    Salesi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Because of the extreme smallness of the energy spread of the unstable state describing the decaying proton, due in its turn to the anomalous smallness of the resonance width expected for the proton decay, the application of the Heisenberg time-energy relation predicts the measurement times for the proton decay observation to be so long as to forbid a "continuous" observation of the decay. This might account for the missing observation of the proton decay.

  3. Direct CP violation in hadronic B decays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG; Bihai

    2006-01-01

    [1]Aubert B,Barate R,Boutigny D,et al.Direct CP violating asymmetry in B0 → K+π-decays.Phys Rev Lett,2004,93,131801[2]Abe K,Adachi I,Aihara H,et al.Observation of large CP violation and evidence for direct CP violation in B0 → K+π-decays.Phys Rev Lett,2004,93:021601[3]Bauer M,Stech B,Wirbel M.Exclusive semileptonic decays of heavy mesons.Z Phys C,1985,29:637-642[4]Bauer M,Stech B,Wirbel M.Exclusive nonleptonic decays of D,DS,and B mesons.Z Phys C,1987,34:103-115[5]Ali A,Kramer G,Lu C D.Experimental tests of factorization in charmless non-leptonic two-body B decays.Phys Rev D,1998,58:094009[6]Lu C D.Charmless non-leptonic two-body B decays in factorization approach.Nucl Phys Proc Supp,1999,74:227-230[7]Cheng H Y.Nonfactorizable contributions to nonleptonic weak decays of heavy mesons.Phys Lett B,1994,335:428-435[8]Cheng H Y Z.Hadronic weak decays of heavy mesons and nonfactorization.Phys Lett C,1996,69:647-654[9]Beneke M,Buchalla G,Neubert M,Sachrajda C T.QCD factorization for B0 → K+π-decays:Strong phases and CP violation in the heavy quark limit.Phys Rev Lett,1999,83:1914-1917[10]Beneke M,Buchalla G,Neubert M,Sachrajda C T.QCD factorization for exclusive,nonleptonic B meson decays:General arguments and the case of heavy light final states.Nucl Phys B,2000,591:313-418[11]Lapage G P,Brodsky S J.Exclusive processes in quantum chromodynamics:evolution equations for hadronic wave functions and the form-factors of mesons.Phys Lett B,1979,87:359-365[12]Lapage G P,Brodsky S J.Exclusive processes in perturbative quantum chromodynamics.Phys Rev D,1980,22:2157-2198[13]Huang C S.Phys Energ Fortis Et Phys Nucl,1980,4:761[14]Cao F G,Dai Y B,Huang C S.Twist-three contribution to the pion electromagnetic form-factor.Eur Phys J C,1999,11:501-506[15]Botts J,Sterman G,Hard elastic scattering in QCD:Leading behavior.Nucl Phys B,1989,325:62-100[16]Li H N,Sterman G.The perturbative pion form-factor with Sudakov suppression.Nucl Phys B,1992,381:129-140[17]Li H N,Yu H L

  4. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh

    2014-04-01

    We present here, an overview and progress of the theoretical works on the isomeric state decay, decay fine structure of even–even, even–odd, odd–even and odd–odd nuclei, a study on the feasibility of observing decay chains from the isotopes of the superheavy nuclei = 115 in the range 271 ≤ ≤ 294 and the isotopes of = 117 in the range 270 ≤ ≤ 301, within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The computed half-lives of the favoured and unfavoured decay of nuclei in the range 67 ≤ ≤ 91 from both the ground state and isomeric state, are in good agreement with the experimental data and the standard deviation of half-life is found to be 0.44. From the fine structure studies done on various ranges of nuclei, it is evident that, for nearly all the transitions, the theoretical values show good match with the experimental values. This reveals that CPPMDN is successful in explaining the fine structure of even–even, even–odd, odd–even and odd–odd nuclei. Our studies on the decay of the superheavy nuclei 271−294115 and 270−301117 predict 4 chains consistently from 284,285,286115 nuclei and 5 chains and 3 chains consistently from 288−291117 and 292117, respectively. We thus hope that these studies on 284−286115 and 288−292117 will be a guide to future experiments.

  5. Gravitational inflaton decay and the hierarchy problem

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Yuki

    2007-01-01

    We study implications of the large-N species solution to the hierarchy problem, proposed by G. Dvali, for reheating of the universe after inflation. Dvali's proposal contains additional N~10^{32} Z_2-conserved quantum fields beyond the Standard Model particles with mass ~1 TeV, which weaken gravity by a factor of 1/N, and thus explain the hierarchy between the Plank scale and the electroweak scale. We show that, in this scenario, the decay rates of inflaton fields through gravitational decay channels are enhanced by a factor of N, and thus they decay into N species of the quantum fields very efficiently, in the limit that quantum gravity effects are unimportant for the gravitational decay rate. In order not to over-reheat the universe, inflaton mass, vacuum expectation value of inflaton, or non-minimal gravitational coupling should be tightly fine-tuned. Our conclusion holds even when the gravitational decay is prohibited by some symmetry of the theory; the universe may still be over-reheated via annihilation...

  6. Non-exponential decay of atomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ishkhanyan, A M

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of non-exponential decay of various quantum quasi-stationary systems. This effect can occur at the times which are greater than the lifetime of a considered system. The mechanism for non-exponential depletion of an initial quasi-stationary state is the cutting of the energy spectrum of final continuous states at long times. We first consider the known examples of cold emission of electrons from metal, tunneling alpha-decay of atomic nuclei, and spontaneous decay in two-level systems. The new physical situations discussed are the single-photon atomic ionization by a weak electromagnetic field and tunneling ionization of atoms by a strong low-frequency electromagnetic field. In both cases the decay obeys a power-law dependence on the (long) interaction time. We find that the most promising possibility for observing non-exponential decay at long times is the single-photon ionization of negative atomic ions near the threshold.

  7. Evaluation of decay data of 213Bi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiaolong; WANG Baosong

    2007-01-01

    213Bi disintegrates (97.91±0.03) % by β- emission to the levels in 213po, and (2.09±0.03) % through α decay to 209Tl. The evaluation of the complete decay scheme and data of 213Bi including the recent new measurements are presented in this report. The Limitation of Relative Statistical Weight Method (LWM) was applied to average numbers throughout the evaluation. The uncertainty assigned to the average value was always greater than or equal to the smallest uncertainty of the values used to calculate the average. The half-life is determined to be 45.59±0.06 minutes. All known measured gamma-ray relative emission probabilities have been examined. And the gamma-ray emission probability of the reference γ line of 440.44keV is recommended to be (26.1±0.3) %. The calculated internal conversion coefficients and their uncertainties have been used to obtain the complete decay intensity balance. The other decay characteristics are calculated using the ENSDF analysis program. Finally the new 213Bi decay scheme was re-built.

  8. Invisible decays in Higgs boson pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shankha; Batell, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Observation of Higgs pair production is an important long term objective of the LHC physics program as it will shed light on the scalar potential of the Higgs field and the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. While numerous studies have examined the impact of new physics on di-Higgs production, little attention has been given to the well-motivated possibility of exotic Higgs decays in this channel. Here we investigate the consequences of exotic invisible Higgs decays in di-Higgs production. We outline a search sensitive to such invisible decays in the b b ¯+ ET channel. We demonstrate that probing invisible branching ratios of order 10% during the LHC's high-luminosity run will be challenging, but in resonance enhanced di-Higgs production, this final state can become crucial to establish the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model at collider energies. We also briefly discuss the outlook for other exotic Higgs decay modes and the potential to observe such exotic decays in the di-Higgs channel.

  9. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements were made during the recovery phase of the moderate magnetic storm of February 24, 1972, in which a symmetric ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, which is a consequence of the dissipation of the asymmetric ring current, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5-30 keV decayed throughout the L value range of 3.5-5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn (1961). After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange is more than sufficient as a particle loss mechanism for the storm time proton ring current decay.

  10. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  11. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  12. Semi-Leptonic B Meson Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Robert Victor

    We have studied the semi-leptonic decay of B mesons with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The B meson semi-leptonic branching fraction is measured to be 0.101 +/- 0.008. We determine an upper limit of 0.009 on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi -Maskawa matrix element for b quark to u quark transitions by examining the endpoint of the charged lepton momentum spectrum in semi-leptonic B decay. From these measurements and the average lifetime of b-flavored particles, we calculate 0.043 +/- 0.007 for the CKM matrix element for transitions between b and c quarks. We search for particle anti-particle mixing of neutral B mesons using dilepton events; the leptons tag the flavor of the decaying quarks. The results of this search are inconclusive. In a separate analysis of dilepton events, no evidence for flavor-changing neutral currents in B meson decay is found, and we determine a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.0015 on the inclusive branching fraction for B decay into charged lepton pairs via flavor-changing neutral currents.

  13. A search for the rare and forbidden decays neutral D mesons decaying to V + leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitala, Eric M.

    I report the results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current, lepton-flavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the 3 and 4-body decay modes of the D0 (and its antiparticle) containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, I examine modes with two leptons and either a rho0, K*0, or φ vector meson or a non-resonant pipi, Kpi, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, branching-fraction upper limits, typically at the 10-4 level, are presented at the 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined. Of these searches, 18 are investigations of decays without previous published results; several others have significantly improved sensitivity over previous results.

  14. Asymmetric lepton-flavor violating Higgs decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, Shikma; Efrati, Aielet

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method to search for the lepton-flavor violating Higgs decays $h\\rightarrow\\tau\\mu$ and $h\\rightarrow\\tau e$ in the leptonic $\\tau$ decay channel. In particular, the Standard Model background is estimated in a fully data driven way. The method exploits the asymmetry between electrons and muons in the final state of signal events and is sensitive to differences in the rates of the two decays. Using this method, we investigate the LHC sensitivity to these processes. With 20 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of data at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV, we expect a $3\\sigma$ sensitivity for observing branching ratios of order $0.9\\%$. The method and the suggested statistical treatment are discussed in detail.

  15. Beta decay of {sup 61}Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oinonen, M.; Dendooven, P.; Jokinen, A.; Penttilae, H.; Aeystoe, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Baumann, P.; Knipper, A.; Ramdhane, M.; Walter, G. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Fujita, Y. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Hu, Z.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Liu, W.; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Postfach 110552, D-64220 Darmstadt (Germany); Janas, Z.; Plochocki, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, PL-00681 Warsaw (Poland)

    1999-06-01

    The {beta} decay of {sup 61}Ga to its mirror nucleus {sup 61}Zn has been measured for the first time by using on-line mass separation and {beta}-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy. The observed decay strength to the ground state implies superallowed character in accordance with the systematics of the mirror decays in the sd and fp shell. The {beta} feedings observed to four excited states in {sup 61}Zn are consistent with earlier spin-parity assignments based on in-beam experiments. The ground-state spin and parity for {sup 61}Ga were determined to be 3/2{sup -}. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 37 refs.

  16. Mirror decay of {sup 75}Sr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huikari, J.; Huang, W.X. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Oinonen, M. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Algora, A.; Nacher, E. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - University of Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Cederkaell, J.; Fraile, L.; Franchoo, S.; Fynbo, H.; Peraejaervi, K.; Weissman, L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Courtin, S.; Dessagne, P.; Knipper, A.; Marechal, F.; Miehe, C.; Poirier, E. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Jokinen, A.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-03-01

    The {beta}-decay of {sup 75}Sr to its mirror nucleus {sup 75}Rb was studied at the ISOLDE PSB facility at CERN by means of {beta}-delayed {gamma} and proton spectroscopy. The decay Q-value and {beta}-delayed {gamma} intensity were measured for the first time. These results, 10.60{+-}0.22 MeV and 4.5{sup +1.9}{sub -0.7}%, together with accurate measurements of the {beta}-decay half-life and {beta}-delayed proton branching ratio yielded the Gamow-Teller strength 0.35{+-}0.05 for the mirror transition. Implications of the results on studies of deformation effects and on the path of the rapid proton capture process are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Rescattering effects in eta --> 3pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Sebastian P; Ditsche, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The isospin-breaking decay eta --> 3pi is an ideal tool to extract information on light quark mass ratios from experiment. For a precise determination, however, a detailed description of the Dalitz plot distribution is necessary. In that respect, in particular the slope parameter alpha of the neutral decay channel causes some concern, since the one-loop prediction from chiral perturbation theory misses the experimental value substantially. We use the modified non-relativistic effective field-theory, a dedicated framework to analyze final-state interactions beyond one loop including isospin-breaking corrections, to extract charged and neutral Dalitz plot parameters. Matching to chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, we find alpha = -0.025 +- 0.005, in marginal agreement with experimental findings. We derive a relation between charged and neutral decay parameters that points towards a significant tension between the most recent KLOE measurements of these observables.

  18. Sensitivity to an Invisibly Decaying Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model include Higgs bosons decaying predominantly or partially to non-interacting particles such as the SUSY Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP). To set limits on the production cross-section times the branching fraction to invisible decay products of such Higgs bosons with the ATLAS detector requires an examination of specific production modes such as the associated production (ZH) or the vector boson fusion (VBF) process. The predominant Standard Model backgrounds for these processes are ZZ to nunu for the ZH channel and jets from QCD processes and W or Z bosons produced in association with jets for the VBF channel. The sensitivity to an invisibly decaying Higgs boson is investigated in this paper using fully simulated ATLAS data for both signal and background. The ATLAS potential for triggering these events is also discussed.

  19. Supersymmetric Scenarios with Dominant Radiative Neutralino Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosanio, S; Ambrosanio, Sandro; Mele, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    The radiative decay of the next-to-lightest neutralino into a lightest neutralino and a photon is analyzed in the MSSM. We find that significant regions of the supersymmetric parameter space with large radiative BR's (up to about 100%) do exist. The radiative channel turns out to be enhanced when the neutralino tree-level decays are suppressed either `kinematically' or `dynamically'. In general, in the regions allowed by LEP data and not characterized by asymptotic values of the SuSy parameters, the radiative enhancement requires tan beta ~= 1 and/or M_1 ~= M_2, and negative values of relaxing the usual relation M_1=(5/3)*tan^2(th_W)*M_2, i.e. gaugino mass unification at the GUT scale. The influence of varying the stop masses and mixing angle when the radiative decay is enhanced is also considered. Some phenomenological consequences of the above picture are discussed.

  20. Semileptonic decays of the Bc meson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2009-10-01

    We study the semileptonic transitions Bc→ηc,J/Ψ,D,D*,B,B*,Bs,Bs* in the leading order in the framework of a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in the equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. We compute relevant weak form factors as overlap integrals of the meson-wave functions obtained in the relativistic independent quark model in the whole accessible kinematical range. We predict that the semileptonic transitions of the Bc meson are mostly dominated by two Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-favored modes, Bc→Bs(Bs⋆)eν, contributing about 77% of the total decay width, and its decays to vector meson final states take place in the predominantly transverse mode. Our predicted values for the total decay rates, branching ratios, polarization ratios, the forward-backward asymmetry factor, etc., are broadly in agreement with other model predictions.

  1. Heavy flavour decay properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00235989; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results on CP-violation searches in the $B_s$ system, studied in the $B_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$ decay and the $B_d$ system through the comparison of the decay time distributions in the flavour specific state $J/\\psi\\ K^*$ and in the CP eigenstate $J/\\psi\\ K_s$. We also present new results in the search for the rare decays of $B_d$ and $B_s$ into $\\mu^+\\mu^-$. All results are based on the full sample of data collected during LHC Run 1 by ATLAS at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The consistency with the SM and with other available measurements is discussed.

  2. Alpha Decay, Shell Structure, and New Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENZhong-Zhou; TAIFei; SHENWen-Qing

    2003-01-01

    We systematically analyze the experimental data of alpha decay in even-even heavy nuclei far from stability and find that the Geiger-Nuttall law brea~s for an isotopic chain when its neutron number is across a marc number or there is a deformed subshell. This break can be used to identify new magic numbers of superheavy nuclei. It is also discovered that there is a new linear relation between the logarithm of half-life and the reciprocal of the square root of decay energy for N = 126 and N = 152 isotones. It could be a new law of alpha decay for nuclei with magic neutron numbers but the physics behind it is to be explored. The significance of these researches for the search of new elements is discussed.

  3. Decay modes of the excited pseudoscalar glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraim, Walaa I.; Schramm, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study three different chiral Lagrangians that describe the two- and three-body decays of an excited pseudoscalar glueball, JP C=0*-+ , into light mesons and charmonium states as well as into a scalar and pseudoscalar glueball. We compute the decay channels for an excited pseudoscalar glueball with a mass of 3.7 GeV and consider a ground-state pseudoscalar glueball of mass 2.6 GeV, following predictions from lattice QCD simulations. These states and channels are in reach of the ongoing BESIII experiment and the PANDA experiments at the upcoming FAIR facility experiment. We present the resulting decay branching ratios with a parameter-free prediction.

  4. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.I. McDonald

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  5. Two neutron decay of 16Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovell A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the first example of two-neutron decay from the ground state of an unbound nucleus, 16Be, was seen (A. Spyrou, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 102501 (2012. Three-body methods are ideal for exactly treating the degrees of freedom important for these decays. Using a basis expansion over hyperspherical harmonics and the hyperspherical R-matrix method, we construct a realistic model of 16Be in order to investigate its decay mode and the role of the two-neutron interaction. The neutron-14Be interaction is constrained using shell model predictions. We obtain a ground state for 16Be that is under-bound by approximately 0.7 MeV with a width of approximately 0.17 MeV. For such a system, an attractive three-body force must be included to reproduce the experimental ground state energy.

  6. Two neutron decay of 16Be

    CERN Document Server

    Lovell, A E; Thompson, I J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the first example of two-neutron decay from the ground state of an unbound nucleus, $^{16}$Be, was seen. Three-body methods are ideal for exactly treating the degrees of freedom important for these decays. Using a basis expansion over hyperspherical harmonics and the hyperspherical R-matrix method, we construct a realistic model of $^{16}$Be in order to investigate its decay mode and the role of the two-neutron interaction. The neutron-$^{14}$Be interaction is constrained using shell model predictions. We obtain a ground state for $^{16}$Be that is over-bound by approximately 1 MeV with a width of approximately 0.23 MeV. This suggests, that for such systems, the three-body force needs to be repulsive.

  7. Form factors for semileptonic D decays

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    We study the form factors for semileptonic decays of $D$-mesons. That is, we consider the matrix element of the weak left-handed quark current for the transitions $D \\rightarrow P$ and $D \\rightarrow V$, where $P$ and $V$ are light pseudoscalar or vector mesons, respectively. Our motivation to perform the present study of these form factors are future calculations of non-leptonic decay amplitudes. We consider the form factors within a class of chiral quark models. Especially, we study how the Large Energy Effective Theory (LEET) limit works for $D$-meson decays. Compared to previous work we also introduce light vector mesons $V = \\rho, K^*,...$ within chiral quark models. In order to determine some of the parameters in our model, we use existing data and results based on some other methods like lattice calculations, light-cone sum rules, and heavy-light chiral perturbation theory. We also obtain some predictions within our framework.

  8. Search for B+ ->KSKSh+ decays at Belle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Vipin; Belle Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present updated measurements of charmless decays of charged B mesons to the three-body final states of KSKSK+ and KSKSπ+ , based on a data sample containing 770 ×106 B B events. The data were recorded with the Belle detector operating near the ϒ(4 S) resonance at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B+ ->KSKSK+ and B+ ->KSKSπ+ decays proceed via the b -> s and b -> d flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) transitions, respectively, providing a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model (SM). We report the results on the branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries for both the decay channels. Supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science.

  9. Entanglement in joint Λ anti Λ decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeldt, Goeran [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    We investigate the joint Λ anti Λ decay in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} → γΛ(→ pπ{sup -}) anti Λ(→ anti pπ{sup +}). This reaction may provide information on the electromagnetic form factors of the Lambda baryon, in the time-like region. We present a conventional diagram-based calculation where production and decay steps are coherent and summations over final-state proton and anti-proton spins are performed. The resulting cross-section distribution is explicitly covariant as it is expressed in scalar products of the four-momentum vectors of the participating particles. We compare this calculation with that of the folding method which we extend and make explicitly covariant. In the folding method production and decay distributions, not amplitudes, are folded together. Of particular importance is then a correct counting of the number of possible intermediate-hyperon-spin states. (orig.)

  10. The β Decay of 21N

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Jian-Ling; KONG Zan; LV Lin-Hui; LI Chen; LU Fei; FAN Feng-Ying; LI Zhong-Yu; CAO Zhong-Xin; MA Li-Ying; Faisal; XU Hu-Shan; LI Zhi-Huan; HU Zheng-Guo; WANG Meng; LEI Xiang-Guo; DUAN Li-Min; XIAO Zhi-Gang; ZHAN Wen-Long; XIAO Guo-Qing; HUANG Tian-Heng; FU Fen; ZHANG Xue-Heng; YE Yan-Lin; ZHENG Chuan; YU Yu-Hong; TU Xiao-Lin; ZHANG Ya-Peng; YANG Yan-Yun; ZHANG Hong-Bin; TANG Bin; TIAN Yu-Lin; OU Yang-Zhen; HUANG Mei-Rong; JIANG Dong-Xing; XU Zhi-Guo; YUE Ke; GAO Qi; HUA Hui; LI Xiang-Qing; ZHANG Shuang-Quan; ZHENG Wao; GE Yu-Chen

    2008-01-01

    The β-delayed neutron and γ energy spectra taken from the decay of neutron-rich nucleus 21N were measured by using the β - γ and β - n coincidence detection method. Thirteen new neutron groups ranging from 0.28 Me V to 4.98 MeV and with a total branching ratio of 88.7±4.2% were observed and presented. One γ transition with an energy of 1222 keV emitted from the excited state of 21 O, and four γ transitions with energies of 1674, 2397, 2780, and 3175 keV emitted from the excited states of 21O were identified in the β decay chain of 21N. The β decay half-life for 21N is determined to be 82.9±1.9ms. The uncertainty of half-life is much smaller than the previous result.

  11. Inflaton dark matter from incomplete decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Cerezo, Rafael; Rosa, João G.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the decay of the inflaton field may be incomplete, while nevertheless successfully reheating the Universe and leaving a stable remnant that accounts for the present dark matter abundance. We note, in particular, that since the mass of the inflaton decay products is field dependent, one can construct models, endowed with an appropriate discrete symmetry, where inflaton decay is kinematically forbidden at late times and only occurs during the initial stages of field oscillations after inflation. We show that this is sufficient to ensure the transition to a radiation-dominated era and that inflaton particles typically thermalize in the process. They eventually decouple and freeze out, yielding a thermal dark matter relic. We discuss possible implementations of this generic mechanism within consistent cosmological and particle physics scenarios, for both single-field and hybrid inflation.

  12. Inflaton dark matter from incomplete decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Rosa, Joao G

    2015-01-01

    We show that the decay of the inflaton field may be incomplete, while nevertheless successfully reheating the universe and leaving a stable remnant that accounts for the present dark matter abundance. We note, in particular, that since the mass of the inflaton decay products is field-dependent, one can construct models, endowed with an appropriate discrete symmetry, where inflaton decay is kinematically forbidden at late times and only occurs during the initial stages of field oscillations after inflation. We show that this is sufficient to ensure the transition to a radiation-dominated era and that inflaton particles typically thermalize in the process. They eventually decouple and freeze out, yielding a thermal dark matter relic. We discuss possible implementations of this generic mechanism within consistent cosmological and particle physics scenarios, for both single-field and hybrid inflation.

  13. Testing Lorentz invariance in weak decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sytema, Auke; Dijck, Elwin; Hoekstra, Steven; Jungmann, Klaus; Mueller, Stefan; Noordmans, Jacob; Onderwater, Gerco; Pijpker, Coen; Timmermans, Rob; Vos, Keri; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans [Van Swinderen Institute, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz invariance is the invariance of physical laws under orientations and boosts. It is a key assumption in Special Relativity and the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Several theories unifying General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics allow breaking of Lorentz invariance. At the Van Swinderen Institute in Groningen a theoretical and experimental research program was started to study Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in weak interactions. The theoretical work allowed a systematic approach to LIV in weak decays. Limits could be set on parameters that quantify LIV. A novel beta decay experiment was designed which tests rotational invariance with respect to the orientation of nuclear spin. In particular, using the isotope {sup 20}Na, the decay rate dependence on the nuclear polarization direction was measured. Searching for sidereal variations, systematic errors can be suppressed. The result of the experiment is presented.

  14. $\\Upsilon$ Decays into Light Scalar Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Yeghiyan, Gagik K

    2009-01-01

    We examine decays of a spin-1 bottomonium into a pair of light scalar Dark Matter (DM) particles, assuming that Dark Matter is produced due to exchange of heavy degrees of freedom. We perform a model-independent analysis and derive formulae for the branching ratios of these decays. We confront our calculation results with the experimental data. We show that the considered branching ratios are within the reach of the present BaBaR experimental sensitivity. Thus, Dark Matter production in $\\Upsilon$ decays leads to constraints on parameters of various models containing a light spin-0 DM particle. We illustrate this for the models with a "WIMPless miracle", in particular for a Gauge Mediated SUSY breaking scenario, with a spin-0 DM particle in the hidden sector. Another example considered is the type II 2HDM with a scalar DM particle.

  15. Υ decays into light scalar dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeghiyan, Gagik K.

    2009-12-01

    We examine decays of a spin-1 bottomonium into a pair of light scalar dark matter (DM) particles, assuming that dark matter is produced due to exchange of heavy degrees of freedom. We perform a model-independent analysis and derive formulae for the branching ratios of these decays. We confront our calculation results with the experimental data. We show that the considered branching ratios are within the reach of the present BABAR experimental sensitivity. Thus, dark matter production in Υ decays leads to constraints on parameters of various models containing a light spin-0 DM particle. We illustrate this for the models with a “WIMPless miracle”, in particular, for a gauge-mediated SUSY breaking scenario, with a spin-0 DM particle in the hidden sector. Another example considered is the type II two-Higgs doublet model with a scalar DM particle.

  16. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J. I.; Shore, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  17. A molecular clock for autoionization decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medišauskas, Lukas; Bello, Roger Y.; Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Morales, Felipe; Plimak, Lev; Smirnova, Olga; Martín, Fernando; Ivanov, Misha Yu

    2017-07-01

    The ultrafast decay of highly excited electronic states is resolved with a molecular clock technique, using the vibrational motion associated to the ionic bound states as a time-reference. We demonstrate the validity of the method in the context of autoionization of the hydrogen molecule, where nearly exact full dimensional ab-initio calculations are available. The vibrationally resolved photoionization spectrum provides a time-energy mapping of the autoionization process into the bound states that is used to fully reconstruct the decay in time. A resolution of a fraction of the vibrational period is achieved. Since no assumptions are made on the underlying coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, the reconstruction procedure can be applied to describe the general problem of the decay of highly excited states in other molecular targets.

  18. Heavy Quarkonium Production in Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Gong, Z F; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Kasser, A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sakar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    We report measurements of the inclusive production of heavy quarkonium states in $\\mathrm {Z}$ decays based on the analysis of 3.6 million hadronic events collected by the L3 detector at LEP. The measurement of inclusive J production and an improved $95\\%$ confidence level upper limit on $\\Upsilon$ production are presented. In addition, two independent measurements of the ratio, $f_{\\mathrm{p}}$, of prompt J mesons to those from B decay are made using two different isolation cuts to separate prompt J mesons from J mesons produced in the decays of b hadrons. The results are: % \\begin{eqnarray} \\mathrm{Br}(\\mathrm{Z} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{J} + \\mathrm{X}) & = & (3.21 \\pm 0.21 \\; \\mathrm{(stat.)} \\; ^{+ 0.19}_{- 0.28} \\; \\mathrm{(sys.)} ) \\times 10^{-3} \\; , \

  19. Inclusive Semileptonic B Decays at BABAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenegger, U.

    2002-04-01

    We present measurements of the inclusive semileptonic branching fractions of charged and neutral B mesons using 20.6 fb-1 of data measured at the Upsilon(4S) with the BABAR detector. Events are tagged with a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of a B meson. The correlation between the flavor of the tag B meson and the electron charge allows the separation of prompt semileptonic B decays and cascade semileptonic charm decays. We obtain the preliminary inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of charged B mesons b+ = 0.103 plus or minus 0.006 plus or minus 0.005, neutral B mesons bo = 0.104 plus or minus 0.008 plus or minus 0.005, their average b = 0.104 plus or minus 0.005 plus or minus 0.004, and their ratio b+/bo = 0.99 plus or minus 0.10 plus or minus 0.03.

  20. Inclusive Semileptonic B Decays at BABAR

    CERN Document Server

    Langenegger, U

    2001-01-01

    We present measurements of the inclusive semileptonic branching fractions of charged and neutral B mesons using 20.6 fb-1 of data measured at the Upsilon(4S) with the BABAR detector. Events are tagged with a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of a B meson. The correlation between the flavor of the tag B meson and the electron charge allows the separation of prompt semileptonic B decays and cascade semileptonic charm decays. We obtain the preliminary inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of charged B mesons b+ = 0.103+/-0.006+/-0.005, neutral B mesons b0 = 0.104+/-0.008+/-0.005, their average b = 0.104+/-0.005+/-0.004, and their ratio b+/b0 = 0.99+/-0.10+/-0.03.