WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonprogrammer teressa keenan

  1. Effect of zinc supplementation on reproductive performance of Teressa goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Kundu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study evaluates the effect of dietary zinc supplementation on reproductive and productive performance of Teressa goat, an indigenous species of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Materials and Methods: Eighteen female goats were randomly divided into 3 groups of 6 animals each; (A control with basal ration without any zinc supplementation (B Treatment 1 with basal ration supplemented with 50 ppm zinc oxide (C Treatment 2 with basal ration supplemented with 100 ppm zinc oxide. Different reproductive parameters, e.g. numbers of days to oestrus, the incidence of oestrus, pregnancy rate, kidding rates and weight of kids were recorded. Results: Data indicated that the supplementation of different levels of inorganic zinc oxide significantly increased the incidence of oestrus (33%, pregnancy rate (12%, kidding rate (5% and resulted in shorter onset (8 days of oestrus as compared to the control. The mean body weight and daily weight gain of kids born to supplemented does were significantly (p<0.05 higher than the kids born to control. Conclusion: The supplementation of 50 to 100 ppm zinc oxide to the basal diet of Teressa goat significantly improved different productive and reproductive parameters.

  2. Programming by Non-Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    Non-programers were asked to organize natural English commands of a laboratory programing language into programs for solving name-sorting problems. The problems differed in the sort concept to be programed (conjunction vs. disjunction) and in the form of expression of the letter tests to be made on the names (affirmation vs. negation). (Author)

  3. Earth Science Mobile App Development for Non-Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Lewis, P.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    A number of cloud based visual development tools have emerged that provide methods for developing mobile applications quickly and without previous programming experience. The MY NASA DATA (MND) team would like to begin a discussion on how we can best leverage current mobile app technologies and available Earth science datasets. The MY NASA DATA team is developing an approach based on two main ideas. The first is to teach our constituents how to create mobile applications that interact with NASA datasets; the second is to provide web services or Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that create sources of data that educators, students and scientists can use in their own mobile app development. This framework allows data providers to foster mobile application development and interaction while not becoming a software clearing house. MY NASA DATA's research has included meetings with local data providers, educators, libraries and individuals. A high level of interest has been identified from initial discussions and interviews. This overt interest combined with the marked popularity of mobile applications in our societies has created a new channel for outreach and communications with and between the science and educational communities.

  4. Building on the Legacy of Professor Keenan. Entropy An Intrinsic Property of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2008-08-01

    In the scientific and engineering literature, entropy—the distinguishing feature of thermodynamics from other branches of physics—is viewed with skepticism, and thought to be not a physical property of matter—like mass or energy—but a measure either of disorder in a system, or of lack of information about the physics of a system in a thermodynamic equilibrium state, and a plethora of expressions are proposed for its analytical representation. In this article, I present briefly two revolutionary nonstatistical expositions of thermodynamics (revolutionary in the sense of Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, U. Chicago Press, 1970) that apply to all systems (both macroscopic and microscopic, including one spin or a single particle), to all states (thermodynamic equilibrium, and not thermodynamic equilibrium), and that disclose entropy as an intrinsic property of matter. The first theory is presented without reference to quantum mechanics even though quantum theoretic ideas are lurking behind the exposition. The second theory is a unified quantum theory of mechanics and thermodynamics without statistical probabilities, that is, I am not presenting another version of statistical quantum mechanics.

  5. A Large-Grain Parallel Programming Environment for Non-Programmers

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Ted

    1994-01-01

    1994 International Conference on Parallel Processing Banger is a parallel programming environment used by non-professional programmers to write explicitly parallel large-grain parallel programs. The goals of Banger are: 1. extreme ease of use, 2. immediate feedback, and 3. machine-independence. Banger is based on three principles: 1. separation of parallel programming-in-the-large from sequential programming-in-the-small, 2. separation of programming environment from target machine ...

  6. Learning ActionScript 30 The Non-Programmer's Guide to ActionScript 30

    CERN Document Server

    Shupe, Rich

    2008-01-01

    Learning ActionScript 3.0 gives you a solid foundation in the Flash language and demonstrates how you can use it for practical, everyday projects. The book does more than give you a handful of sample scripts, defining how ActionScript and Flash work. It gives you a clear look into essential topics such as logic, event handling, displaying content, migrating legacy projects to ActionScript 3.0, classes, and much more. Written for those new to the language, this book doesn't rely exclusively on prior knowledge of object-oriented programming (OOP). Instead, it helps you expand your skillset by fi

  7. Telefon asendab töövihikut / Madiken Kütt ; kommenteerinud Chernice Keenan, Carl Oskar Kvalųysęter, Kristiina Veevo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kütt, Madiken

    2013-01-01

    Tallinna ülikooli Haapsalu kolledži klassiõpetaja eriala õppekavast seotakse sügisest kuni kolmandik haridustehnoloogiaga ehk laste õpetamisel tehnoloogia kasutamisega. Selgitusi jagavad kolleži arendusjuht Liina Põld ja uue õppekava looja Piret Lehiste. Erasmuse intensiivprogrammist "IKT hariduses: interaktiivne õpe meediakasutuse kaudu" Haapsalu kolledžis. Koolituse läbinud tudengite kommentaarid ning intervjuu neid juhendanud õppejõu Jonathan Audainiga

  8. Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 89. Keenan RT, Nowatzky J, Pillinger MH. Etiology and pathogenesis of hyperuricemia and gout. In: Firestein ... chap 94. Keenan RT, Nowatzky J, Pillinger MH. Etiology and pathogenesis of hyperuricemia and gout. In: Firestein ...

  9. Survival of diurnally sub periodic Wuchereria bancrofti in Downsiomyia nivea (Diptera: Culicidae: a density dependent factor from Andaman & Nicobar Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Shriram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In India, diurnally sub periodic Wuchereria bancrofti transmitted by Downsiomyia nivea is prevalent only in the Nicobar district of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The ongoing LF elimination programme aims at transmission interruption by bringing down the microfilarie (mf load in the community, which has implication on the parasite load in mosquito vector. Therefore, understanding density dependent constraints on transmission assumes significance from control perspective. The present study was undertaken in Teressa Island to understand the density dependent parasite mortality and survival probability of the parasite Do. nivea. Methods: The entomological data collected from Teressa Island, endemic for the diurnally sub periodic form of W. bancrofti were used to examine the parasite loss and its survival up to infectivity. Patterns of parasite distribution in Do. nivea were examined. Results: Distribution patterns of microfilariae were found to be over dispersed in Do. nivea. The later stages of the parasite in the vector were randomly distributed. Distribution pattern of various filarial larval stages suggested that the loss of parasites occurred as development progressed and was maximal between the first and second stages. Further, both the prevalence of infection and the degree of parasite aggregation in the vector population have fallen significantly with development of parasite stage. Interpretation & conclusions: Results indicate the operation of parasite density dependent mortality of vectors or parasite loss or combination of both. The present study with Aedes transmitted filariasis conducted before launching LF elimination programme in the study area indicates a comparable level of parasite regulation in the vector which has similar implications on the transmission threshold. Thus, the consideration of Aedes with Culex in deriving the critical level of antigen positive for making decisions on cessation of mass drug

  10. Calculators and Polynomial Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. F.

    The intent of this paper is to suggest and illustrate how electronic hand-held calculators, especially non-programmable ones with limited data-storage capacity, can be used to advantage by students in one particular aspect of work with polynomial functions. The basic mathematical background upon which calculator application is built is summarized.…

  11. Generalized File Management Systems: Their Implication for a California Junior College Data Base System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrick, Robert John

    Criteria to use in evaluating data processing efficiency, factors of file and record definitions, convenience of use for non-programmers, report generating capabilities, and customer support for generalized file management systems for use by the California junior colleges are indicated by the author. The purchase of such a system at the state…

  12. Electroacoustic Evaluation of Frequency-Modulated Receivers Interfaced with Personal Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Erin C.; Thibodeau, Linda M.; Whalen, Holly S.; Overson, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the electroacoustic outputs of frequency-modulated (FM) systems coupled to hearing aids. Method: Electroacoustic performance of FM systems coupled to hearing aids was determined for 3 FM receivers: body-worn with neck loop, ear-level nonprogrammable, and ear-level programmable. Systems were…

  13. Evaluation of a Core Team Centred Professional Development Programme for Building a Whole-School Cooperative Problem Solving Approach to Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew Jonathan; Wertheim, Eleanor H.; Freeman, Elizabeth; Trinder, Margot

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a professional learning approach using a core team (CT) model to assist primary (elementary) schools to develop whole-school collaborative conflict resolution processes. Thirteen schools were matched and randomly assigned to the enhancing relationships in school communities programme ("n"?=?10) or a non-programme control group…

  14. Rousseau and the Fable: Rethinking the Fabulous Nature of Educational Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tyson E.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Tyson Lewis reevaluates Jean-Jacques Rousseau's assessment of the pedagogical value of fables in Emile's education using Giorgio Agamben's theory of poetic production and Thomas Keenan's theory of the inherent ambiguity of the fable. From this perspective, the "unreadable" nature of the fable that Rousseau exposed is not simply the…

  15. Workplace Incivility: Worker and Organizational Antecedents and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, James E., II; Bartlett, Michelle E.; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Unresolved workplace conflicts represent the largest reducible costs to an organization (Keenan & Newton, 1985). As incivility increases (Buhler, 2003; Pearson, Andersson, & Wegner, 2001; Pearson & Porath, 2005) more research is being conducted (Tepper, Duffy, Henle, & Lambert, 2006; Vickers, 2006). This review examined antecedents (variables that…

  16. Car and Motorcycle Show Brings “Gearheads” and Fans Together | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 24, the Building 549 parking lot was full of cars; however, unlike any regular work day, the spaces were filled with a variety of classic cars, street rods, motorcycles, and unique modern cars for display in the first car and motorcycle show hosted at NCI at Frederick.

  17. Need a Last-Minute Gift? Holiday Market Is Coming December 23 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer If you are still looking for the “perfect” gift, mark your calendar for the Holiday Market. The December Holiday Market is set for Tuesday, Dec. 23, in Building 549, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. (or until vendors sell out).

  18. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  19. Getting to grips with poor comprehenders: stability of group membership across test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Hanne Trebbien; Oakhill, Jane V.; Elbro, Carsten

    Reliable identification of poor comprehenders is difficult because reading comprehension tests do not measure the same thing (Keenan et al., 2014). In addition to different contents, differences in how the same test is administered may also cause instability of the definition of poor comprehenders....

  20. (Updated) Students, Teachers Share Technology Now Advantages with ATRF Staff | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Philip Evich, a senior at Middletown High School, loves talking about literature, even beyond the allotted 90 minutes of his Advanced Placement (AP) Literature class. That’s why he and his classmates embraced the opportunity to blog about books read in the class.

  1. (Updated) Students, Teachers Share Technology Now Advantages with ATRF Staff | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Philip Evich, a senior at Middletown High School, loves talking about literature, even beyond the allotted 90 minutes of his Advanced Placement (AP) Literature class. That’s why he and his classmates embraced the opportunity to blog about books read in the class.

  2. Getting to grips with poor comprehenders: stability of group membership across test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Hanne Trebbien; Oakhill, Jane V.; Elbro, Carsten

    Reliable identification of poor comprehenders is difficult because reading comprehension tests do not measure the same thing (Keenan et al., 2014). In addition to different contents, differences in how the same test is administered may also cause instability of the definition of poor comprehenders....

  3. From China to Hong Kong: A Reflection on the Impact of the Educational Reform in the Deweyan Perspective on Early Childhood Education in the Land of the Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Grace

    2012-01-01

    While Dewey's progressive philosophy did not have the wide-ranging influence over the developing republic that some of his students had wished, it did influence educators and help to shape evolving thought about education (Keenan, 1977). Because of the constraints and difficulties in realizing the child-centered curriculum in a genuine sense, a…

  4. The predictive value of the foot posture index on dynamic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.G.; Ratleff, M.; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2008-01-01

    Keenan et. al. identified the six-item version of the Foot Posture Index (FPI) as a valid, simple and clinically useful tool. The model combines measures of the standing foot posture in multiple planes and anatomical segments. It provides an alternative to existing static clinical measures when...

  5. The Predictive Value of the Foot Posture Index on Dynamic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.G.; Rathleff, M.; Kersting, Uwe G.

    Keenan et. al. identified the six-item version of the Foot Posture Index (FPI) as a valid, simple and clinically useful tool. The model combines measures of the standing foot posture in multiple planes and anatomical segments. It provides an alternative to existing static clinical measures when...

  6. 77 FR 74656 - Combined Notice of Filings #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... Renewable Energy Company, CPV Batesville, LLC. Description: Notice of Change in Facts of CPV Keenan II Renewable Energy Company, LLC and CPV Batesville, LLC. Filed Date: 12/6/12. Accession Number: 20121206-5069.... Description: Notice of Non-Material Change in Status of Rippey Wind Energy LLC. Filed Date: 12/6/12. Accession...

  7. Automated Author Aiding System Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Braby, Naval Training Equipment Center M. Friedman, UCLA R. Gmuihko Bell Laboratories R. Gorsuch Fuller Theological Seminary S. Keenan Bell...Graduate School of Education Los Angeles, CA 90024 Dr. Richard L. Gorsuch G-aduate School of Psychology fuller Theological Seminary 177 N. Madison Pasadena

  8. Procedimiento de diseño de un sistema de gestión y control de flotas heterogéneas

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Caudevilla, Miguel; Torres Lopez-Sepulveda, Javier; Pardo Martin, José Manuel; Ortega González, Francisco Javier; Benavente Peces, César

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to set up the basis needed to develop real applications designed for the control and management of heterogeneous fleets. This paper tries to present some programming patterns which will lead to the design and development of good quality applications. The premise for this purpose should be the design of scalable, platform independent, modular and user friendly programs which require very small maintenance and if possible to give the ability to nonprogrammer users th...

  9. Giant natural fluctuation models and anthropogenic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Rio Amador, L.; Hébert, R.; Lima, I.

    2016-08-01

    Explanations for the industrial epoch warming are polarized around the hypotheses of anthropogenic warming (AW) and giant natural fluctuations (GNFs). While climate sceptics have systematically attacked AW, up until now they have only invoked GNFs. This has now changed with the publication by D. Keenan of a sample of 1000 series from stochastic processes purporting to emulate the global annual temperature since 1880. While Keenan's objective was to criticize the International Panel on Climate Change's trend uncertainty analysis (their assumption that residuals are only weakly correlated), for the first time it is possible to compare a stochastic GNF model with real data. Using Haar fluctuations, probability distributions, and other techniques of time series analysis, we show that his model has unrealistically strong low-frequency variability so that even mild extrapolations imply ice ages every ≈1000 years. Helped by statistics, the GNF model can easily be scientifically rejected.

  10. Effects of Shear Stirrup Details on Ultimate Capacity and Tensile Membrane Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    anticipation of the construction of 20,000 to 40,000 of the shelters, economical design requirements are very important. Because of high labor intensity... Derecho (Reference 35) stated that no data are available for one-way slabs tested under uniformly distributed load. During the same year that Iqbal and... Derecho reported their work (1969), *- Keenan (Reference 36) tested four laced reinforced concrete one-way slabs to failure under a uniformly

  11. Farmers Market Brings Fresh Produce and Products from Local Vendors | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer Every summer, you can shop for fresh fruits, veggies, flowers, honey, and plenty of other homemade goodies at the NCI at Frederick Farmers’ Market. Buying at the Farmers’ Market means you’re supporting a local farmer, crafter, or other type of vendor. The products are brought to you, so you don’t have to drive to get freshly picked produce and handmade products.

  12. Farmers’ Market Expands to Offer Products in Winter | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The 2013 National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick Farmers’ Market regular season may have closed, but that doesn’t mean customers who want fresh produce, handmade crafts, and other homemade goodies from local vendors are out of luck. Winter Markets, which began Jan. 7, will be held every other Tuesday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in front of Building 549 or in the Café Room, depending on the weather.

  13. Gold shunt for refractory advanced low-tension glaucoma with spared central acuity

    OpenAIRE

    Le R; Gupta N

    2016-01-01

    Ryan Le,1 Neeru Gupta1–3 1Keenan Research Center, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Glaucoma Unit, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: The aim of this study is to report a case of gold shunt surgery for uncontrolled, low-tension gla...

  14. R&W Club Frederick Readies for Spring and Beyond | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer What do discounted Frederick Keys tickets, a wine tour of Frederick area vineyards, a Segway tour of Washington, DC, a summertime National Parks tour, and a special children’s Easter party have in common? All are activities that the Recreation & Welfare (R&W) Club Frederick is currently developing for spring 2013. At the first members meeting in January, Roxanne Angell, R&W Club Frederick chair, unveiled plans under development to make 2013 a successful year.

  15. R&W Club Frederick Sews for Kids | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Sewing enthusiasts of all skill levels are invited to attend a sewing party hosted by the R&W Club Frederick on Feb. 18. Stop by the Building 549 Café Room between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to sew for a cause: help the club make pillowcases for ConKerr Cancer, a nonprofit organization that supports children in hospitals across the country.

  16. R&W Club Frederick Readies for Spring and Beyond | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer What do discounted Frederick Keys tickets, a wine tour of Frederick area vineyards, a Segway tour of Washington, DC, a summertime National Parks tour, and a special children’s Easter party have in common? All are activities that the Recreation & Welfare (R&W) Club Frederick is currently developing for spring 2013. At the first members meeting in January, Roxanne Angell, R&W Club Frederick chair, unveiled plans under development to make 2013 a successful year.

  17. Green Team Readies for Spring with Plant Swap | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Those looking for a cost-effective way to spruce up their yards this spring can stop by the National Cancer Institute at Frederick Green Team’s booth during the Spring Research Festival (SRF) on May 7 and 8. Pick up a free plant, donate overgrown plants from your yard, or swap for a new plant. Everyone is invited to participate in the swap, whether you have plants to donate or not.

  18. Cortical-Cortical Interactions And Sensory Information Processing in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-30

    coactivation. J Neurosci 2004, 24:442-446. 13. Van Boven RW, Hamilton RH, Kauffman T, Keenan JP, Pascual- Leone A: Tactile spatial resolution in blind...for basal-ganglia and cerebellar involvement? Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2006, 15:256-264. 2. Takarae Y, Minshew NJ, Luna B, Sweeney JA: Atypical...6. Sanger TD, Tarsy D, Pascual- Leone A: Abnormalities of spatial and temporal sensory discrimination in writer’s cramp. Mov Disord 2001, 16:94-99. 7

  19. Remembering Joseph Mayo and His Contributions to Animal Science | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer In the 1990s, when Joseph Mayo, D.V.M, ran out of gas leading coworkers home from a meeting in Bethesda, he pulled over to the side of the road on I-270 and waited for help. He didn’t have to wait long; within a few minutes a passing motorist took pity on the group of scientists and offered them a lift back to Fort Detrick.

  20. Farmers’ Market Expands to Offer Products in Winter | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The 2013 National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick Farmers’ Market regular season may have closed, but that doesn’t mean customers who want fresh produce, handmade crafts, and other homemade goodies from local vendors are out of luck. Winter Markets, which began Jan. 7, will be held every other Tuesday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in front of Building 549 or in the Café Room, depending on the weather.

  1. Farmers Market Brings Fresh Produce and Products from Local Vendors | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer Every summer, you can shop for fresh fruits, veggies, flowers, honey, and plenty of other homemade goodies at the NCI at Frederick Farmers’ Market. Buying at the Farmers’ Market means you’re supporting a local farmer, crafter, or other type of vendor. The products are brought to you, so you don’t have to drive to get freshly picked produce and handmade products.

  2. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  3. TYCTWD Programs Strive to Make Science Educational and Fun | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Joseph Barchi, Jr, Ph.D., calls teaching “the noblest and most important profession.” So it makes sense that Barchi, senior scientist and head of the Glycoconjugate and NMR Section, Chemical Biology Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, NCI at Frederick, would encourage his lab to offer a fun, educational program at Take Your Child to Work Day (TYCTWD).

  4. R&W Club Frederick Sews for Kids | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Sewing enthusiasts of all skill levels are invited to attend a sewing party hosted by the R&W Club Frederick on Feb. 18. Stop by the Building 549 Café Room between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to sew for a cause: help the club make pillowcases for ConKerr Cancer, a nonprofit organization that supports children in hospitals across the country.

  5. Verification of business rules programs

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Bruno Berstel-Da

    2013-01-01

    Rules represent a simplified means of programming, congruent with our understanding of human brain constructs. With the advent of business rules management systems, it has been possible to introduce rule-based programming to nonprogrammers, allowing them to map expert intent into code in applications such as fraud detection, financial transactions, healthcare, retail, and marketing. However, a remaining concern is the quality, safety, and reliability of the resulting programs.  This book is on business rules programs, that is, rule programs as handled in business rules management systems. Its

  6. SBEToolbox: A Matlab Toolbox for Biological Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konganti, Kranti; Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Cai, James J

    2013-01-01

    We present SBEToolbox (Systems Biology and Evolution Toolbox), an open-source Matlab toolbox for biological network analysis. It takes a network file as input, calculates a variety of centralities and topological metrics, clusters nodes into modules, and displays the network using different graph layout algorithms. Straightforward implementation and the inclusion of high-level functions allow the functionality to be easily extended or tailored through developing custom plugins. SBEGUI, a menu-driven graphical user interface (GUI) of SBEToolbox, enables easy access to various network and graph algorithms for programmers and non-programmers alike. All source code and sample data are freely available at https://github.com/biocoder/SBEToolbox/releases.

  7. Towards tool support for spreadsheet-based domain-specific languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Marian Sorin; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Spreadsheets are commonly used by non-programmers to store data in a structured form, this data can in some cases be considered to be a program in a domain-specific language (DSL). Unlike ordinary text-based domain-specific languages, there is however currently no formalism for expressing...... the syntax of such spreadsheet-based DSLs (SDSLs), and there is no tool support for automatically generating language infrastructure such as parsers and IDE support. In this paper we define a simple notion of two-dimensional grammars for SDSLs, and show how such grammars can be used for automatically...

  8. CytoGEDEVO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malek, Maximilian; Ibragimov, Rashid; Albrecht, Mario

    2016-01-01

    with Cytoscape.Availability, Documentation & Tutorials: CytoGEDEVO is publicly available from the Cytoscape app store at http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/cytogedevo. In addition, we provide stand-alone command line executables, source code, documentation and step-by-step user instructions at http......GEDEVO, a Cytoscape app for visual and user-assisted network alignment. It extends the previous GEDEVO methodology for global pairwise network alignments with new graphical and functional features. Our main focus was on the usability, even by non-programmers and the interpretability of the network alignment results...

  9. Diversity and testing requirements of programmable automation systems; Ohjelmoitavan automaation diversiteetti- ja testausvaatimukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haapanen, P.; Maskuniitty, M.

    1993-04-01

    In the report programmable digital operation and safety automation systems for nuclear power plants are discussed. The programmable systems deviate by their properties and behaviour from the conventional non-programmable systems in such extent, that their verification and validation for safety critical applications requires new methods and practices. The safety assessment can not be based on conventional probabilistic methods due to the difficulties in the quantification of the reliability of the software and hardware. A safety critical programmable system shall include diverse redundant parts so that no residual program fault can not cause the failure of the intended function of the system. Although complete testing of a programmable system is impossible, different tests have a central role in the production and validation process of the system. Diversity is important also in confidence building measures for the implemented system. Independent analysis and testing of the system should use different methods and tools from those used in the production and validation process by the system vendor. Use of diversity and testing are concluded to be central issues in producing safe programmable system and in proving them to be safe enough. By combining functional and programming diversity in a suitable way one can produce a system that is safe enough without having a non-programmable back-up system. (48 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.).

  10. Holiday Door Decorating Contest Brings Cheer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Other than the time of year, what do the following have in common: the leg lamp from the movie “A Christmas Story,” a compilation of silly holiday jokes, a gingerbread house, and Santa on a motorcycle? All four were among the individual door winners for the Holiday Door Decorating Contest, held at NCI at Frederick in December. Employees dressed up their office doors, hallways, and even stairwells to participate. Entries for the contest included individual office doors as well as groups. Some employees even “decked the halls” of whole office buildings to participate.

  11. Former Intern: Amy Stull Returns to Her Roots | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer When Amy Stull, a 2000 graduate of Walkersville High School, began working in a laboratory at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick, she likely did not know the role NCI would play in her career. Stull started at NCI as a Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern after her junior year of high school, working in a lab as she prepared for a career in chemical engineering. The student intern program pairs rising high school seniors with laboratory scientists to encourage the students to pursue careers in both science and health care fields.

  12. United States Navy Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) Costs: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-26

    concentration in Chinese and Japanese Buddhism from Temple University. Dr. Keenan D. Yoho Graduate School of Business & Public Policy Naval Postgraduate...December 26, 2004, an undersea earthquake of 9.1 magnitude earthquake struck off the west coast of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia . Seven days after...reports) >20,000 >10,000 Displaced >1,500,000 >1,100,000 >300,000 1. In Indonesia , more than 25% of Aceh Province’s villages were destroyed 1

  13. Green Team Hosts Plant Swap to Encourage Gardening | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer What started out as a way for Howard Young, Ph.D., to thin out his garden last fall turned into the NCI at Frederick Green Team’s Plant Swap. The group held its Fall Plant Swap on October 24, encouraging all members of the Fort Detrick community to pick up a free plant or swap a plant of theirs for another. “Those who love to garden introduce others to the joy of gardening,” said Dolores Winterstein, a member of the Green Team and the coordinator of the Fall Plant Swap.

  14. Dar Sentido à Experiência do Gesto na Classe Técnica: um olhar sobre a prática de quatro professoras no Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Bienaise

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo examina o ensino da classe técnica contemporânea na formação pré-profissional no Quebec em um contexto de heterogeneidade das práticas coreográficas. Analisa-se mais especificamente o testemunho de quatro artistas professores: Kelly Keenan, Manon Levac, Sandrine Vachon e Jamie Wright. Essa análise destaca suas filosofias de ensino e as escolhas pedagógicas que conduzem essas educadoras a uma abordagem do movimento corporal ao mesmo tempo estruturada e sensível, em uma relação constantemente renovada com seus estudantes.

  15. Highly sensitive fluorescent stain for detecting lipopolysaccharides in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Ayi; Cai, Wanhui; Yu, Dongdong; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jiang, Chengxi; Jin, Litai

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and simple technique was developed for the visualization of gel-separated lipopolysaccharides by using a hydrazide derivative, UGF202. As low as 0.5-1 ng total LPS could be detected by UGF202 stain, which is 2- and 16-fold more sensitive than that of the commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and Keenan et al. developed silver stain, respectively. The results indicated that UGF202 stain could be a good choice for LPS determination in polyacrylamide gels. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Career and Technology Center Guides Students in Real-Life Careers | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Frederick County Public School students have a unique opportunity—a chance to get a real-world, hands-on experience in biomedical science and biotechnology before they even graduate from high school, thanks to the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC). Several years ago, the CTC established its biomedical sciences program with a curriculum from Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a nonprofit, nationwide developer of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in elementary, middle, and high schools.

  17. Poster Day Showcases Student Work | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer, and Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On July 31, NCI at Frederick hosted Student Poster Day, an annual event in which student interns can showcase the work they do in their various positions in NCI at Frederick labs and offices. Participating students are interns in the Student Internship Program, a program designed for undergraduate and graduate students during their summer breaks, as well as interns in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program (WHK SIP), a program for high school seniors. All the students have an opportunity to present their scientific posters.

  18. Long-Time Scientist Works to Prove Chemistry’s Place in Cancer Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer When Larry Keefer, Ph.D., first arrived at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) more than 40 years ago, he didn’t have a physical lab to call his own. Not immediately, anyway, due to a glitch in the construction schedule, he explained.                   So he spent his first few years in Bethesda doing administrative work, like reviewing proposals and serving as a project officer on contracts.

  19. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  20. OHS Encouraged Employees to “Take a Hike” Twice in April | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The chilly weather didn’t dampen the spirits of Take a Hike Day participants on Wednesday, April 2. Over 50 employees braved cool, misty weather to walk or jog around Fort Detrick during their lunch hours. “The Take a Hike Day is [a way] to encourage everyone to get up and get moving,” said Sarah Hooper, RN, manager of Occupational Health Services (OHS). “OHS and the R&W partnered to encourage employees to engage in physical activity to improve their health.”

  1. OHS Encouraged Employees to “Take a Hike” Twice in April | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The chilly weather didn’t dampen the spirits of Take a Hike Day participants on Wednesday, April 2. Over 50 employees braved cool, misty weather to walk or jog around Fort Detrick during their lunch hours. “The Take a Hike Day is [a way] to encourage everyone to get up and get moving,” said Sarah Hooper, RN, manager of Occupational Health Services (OHS). “OHS and the R&W partnered to encourage employees to engage in physical activity to improve their health.”

  2. Superconvergence and postprocessing of fluxes from lowest-order mixed methods on triangles and tetrahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, T.F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Keenan, P.T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Texas Inst. for Computational and Applied Mathematics

    1998-07-01

    Certain finite difference methods on rectangular grids for second-order elliptic equations are known to yield superconvergent flux approximations. A class of related finite difference methods recently have been defined for triangular meshes by applying special quadrature rules to an extended version of a mixed finite element method by Arbogast, Dawson, and Keenan. The usual hybrid mixed method can also be applied to meshes of triangular and tetrahedral elements. Unfortunately, the flux vectors from these methods are only first-order accurate. Empirical evidence indicates that a local postprocessing technique described by Keenan [An Efficient Postprocessor for Velocities from Mixed Methods on Triangular Elements, Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Technical report 94-22, Rice University, Houston, TX, 1994] recovers second-order accurate velocities at special points. In this paper, a class of local postprocessing techniques generalizing the one in An Efficient Postprocessor for Velocities from Mixed Methods on Triangular Elements are presented and analyzed. These postprocessors are shown to recover second-order accurate velocity fields on three lines meshes. Numerical experiments illustrate these results and investigate more general situations, including meshes of tetrahedral elements.

  3. RELATIVIZATION IN KAINGANG LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira TABOSA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper it´s about the description and analysis of relative clauses of kaingang language, which belongs to the linguistic family Ge, trunk Macro-Ge. The theoretical framework adopted to investigate the relative clauses of that language is based on authors who address their thinking under the functional perspective, such as Givón (1979, Keenan (1985, Keenan and Comrie (1997, Payne (1997 and Andrews (2007. According to these authors, the relative clause is a subordinate clause that functions as a modifier of the core of a noun phrase. The analysis and description of relative clauses aim to see how these clauses are manifested into those parameters that distinguish the relative clauses in languages . The corpus consists of data collected with indigenous informants from Apucaraninha Indigenous Land, located in the city of Tamarana-PR. The analysis indicates that the kaingang language does not present a formal relativization, in other words, with the use of any relativizing, the subordination of phrases on the main clause occurs in semantic terms. Although there are no grammatical marks in the relativized noun phrase, relative clause fulfills its role of modifier, giving communicative purposes to phrases.

  4. More library mashups exploring new ways to deliver library data

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Nicole Engard follows up her ground-breaking 2009 book Library Mashups with a fresh collection of mashup projects that virtually any library can emulate, customize, and build upon. In More Library Mashups, Engard and 24 creative library professionals describe how they are mashing up free and inexpensive digital tools and techniques to improve library services and meet everyday (and unexpected) challenges. Examples from libraries of all types are designed to help even non-programmers share and add value to digital content, update and enhance library websites and collections, mashup catalog data, connect to the library's automation system, and use emerging tools like Serendip-o-matic, Umlaut, and Libki to engage users, staff, and the community.

  5. GALE: a graphics assisted learning environment for computer-based interactive videodisc education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J H; Hazelwood, S E; Mitchell, J A; Bridges, A J; Reid, J C

    1992-08-01

    GALE, a Graphics Assisted Learning Environment, is a computer-based interactive videodisc authoring tool. GALE was created as the authoring package for AI/LEARN/Rheumatology, an independent study system for teaching rheumatology to medical trainees. GALE has potential widespread application beyond rheumatology. Interactive videodisc technology is a prime feature of GALE. Other highlights are: WordPerfect macros which simplify programming, graphics-based large text characters, tracking of user responses, hypertext-like definition capabilities, color coded screens to distinguish between hypertext branches and the mainstream of the course content and ability to overlay text on the video image. GALE runs on a PC-compatible computer with selected Pioneer LaserDisc players. GALE uses WordPerfect 5.1 for text editing and has been designed for use by non-programmers.

  6. Improvement of Wind Energy Production through HVDC Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Brenna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable and non-programmable resources, such as solar and wind, have undergone a stunning growth in recent years and are likely to gain even more importance in the future. Their strong presence in the national electricity mix has created issues in many countries regarding the secure operation of the power system. In order to guarantee the stability of the system, several TSOs have resorted to wind energy curtailment, which represents a waste of clean energy and an economic loss. In order to analyze this issue, a model of the Italian power system was developed, a program able to simulate the electricity dispatching mechanism. The model was, then, used to evaluate possible solutions to reduce wind curtailment. In particular, a proposal for the construction of an HVDC line linking Southern and Northern Italy was studied.

  7. The jABC Approach to Rigorous Collaborative Development of SCM Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörmann, Martina; Margaria, Tiziana; Mender, Thomas; Nagel, Ralf; Steffen, Bernhard; Trinh, Hong

    Our approach to the model-driven collaborative design of IKEA's P3 Delivery Management Process uses the jABC [9] for model driven mediation and choreography to complement a RUP-based (Rational Unified Process) development process. jABC is a framework for service development based on Lightweight Process Coordination. Users (product developers and system/software designers) easily develop services and applications by composing reusable building-blocks into (flow-) graph structures that can be animated, analyzed, simulated, verified, executed, and compiled. This way of handling the collaborative design of complex embedded systems has proven to be effective and adequate for the cooperation of non-programmers and non-technical people, which is the focus of this contribution, and it is now being rolled out in the operative practice.

  8. MPML3D: Scripting Agents for the 3D Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendinger, Helmut; Ullrich, Sebastian; Nakasone, Arturo; Ishizuka, Mitsuru

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, it describes a scripting language for specifying communicative behavior and interaction of computer-controlled agents ("bots") in the popular three-dimensional (3D) multiuser online world of "Second Life" and the emerging "OpenSimulator" project. While tools for designing avatars and in-world objects in Second Life exist, technology for nonprogrammer content creators of scenarios involving scripted agents is currently missing. Therefore, we have implemented new client software that controls bots based on the Multimodal Presentation Markup Language 3D (MPML3D), a highly expressive XML-based scripting language for controlling the verbal and nonverbal behavior of interacting animated agents. Second, the paper compares Second Life and OpenSimulator platforms and discusses the merits and limitations of each from the perspective of agent control. Here, we also conducted a small study that compares the network performance of both platforms.

  9. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit. PMID:28241502

  10. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-12

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies.

  11. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-02-23

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  12. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bellucci

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators. Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1 programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2 implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3 building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems, a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  13. Choice of valve type and poor ventricular catheter placement: Modifiable factors associated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, Kealeboga Josephine; Cherry, Catherine Louise; Wan, Kai Rui; Toy, Jennifer Ah; Wolfe, Rory; Danks, Robert Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion is a common neurosurgical procedure, essentially unchanged in recent years, with high revision rates. We aimed to identify potentially modifiable associations with shunt failure. One hundred and forty patients who underwent insertion of a VP shunt from 2005-2009 were followed for 5-9years. Age at shunt insertion ranged from 0 to 91years (median 44, 26% hydrocephalus were congenital (26%), tumour-related (25%), post-haemorrhagic (24%) or normal pressure hydrocephalus (19%). Fifty-eight (42%) patients required ⩾1 shunt revision. Of these, 50 (88%) were for proximal catheter blockage. The median time to first revision was 108days. Early post-operative CT scans were available in 105 patients. Using a formal grading system, catheter placement was considered excellent in 49 (47%) but poor (extraventricular) in 13 (12%). On univariate analysis, younger age, poor ventricular catheter placement and use of a non-programmable valve were associated with shunt failure. On logistic regression modelling, the independent associations with VP shunt failure were poor catheter placement (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-18.9, p=0.02) and use of a non-programmable valve (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-1.0, p=0.04). In conclusion, poor catheter placement (revision rate 77%) was found to be the strongest predictor of shunt failure, with no difference in revisions between excellent (43%) and moderate (43%) catheter placement. Avoiding poor placement in those with mild or moderate ventriculomegaly may best reduce VP shunt failures. There may also be an influence of valve choice on VP shunt survival.

  14. HOTEL INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Irish Ball underscores reputation as premiere event in Beijing’s social scene Lots of fun and frolic were had at this year’s St Patrick’s Day Irish Ball on March 15 in Beijing.The Irish Network China,the event organizer,raised 100,000 yuan from the ball—the city’s 16th-for local charities, inchiding Jinde Charities which assists deprived families and AIDS victims in Hebei Province.Members of the Irish rock band Kif flew from Galway in west Ireland to Beijing to entertain nearly 700 revelers and were supported by traditional Irish musicians from the southeastern part of the Emerald Isle.Three Riverdance-like Irish dancers from Dublin were joined by their counterparts from Beijing.Ballgners included renowned Irish writer Brian Keenan.

  15. La aventura en la finca: Aproximación múltiple a una narración oral infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Umaña Aguilar, Jeanina

    2015-01-01

    Una experiencia personal contada por una niña de nueve años de edad, se analiza desde diferentes perspectivas para lograr una comprensión cada vez más puntual del texto. Disposición sintagmática de Propp ayuda a clarificar la estructura organizativa de la narrativa; la versión Mandler y Johnson de la teoría de los esquemas explica la información o eliminación de la información; Características de Keenan del discurso no planificado y el despliegue de Chafe de conciencia facilitan un microanáli...

  16. Gold shunt for refractory advanced low-tension glaucoma with spared central acuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le R

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ryan Le,1 Neeru Gupta1–3 1Keenan Research Center, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Glaucoma Unit, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: The aim of this study is to report a case of gold shunt surgery for uncontrolled, low-tension glaucoma with good central vision, after having a previously failed trabeculectomy and tube shunt surgeries. The patient was receiving maximum medical glaucoma therapy of four different types with intraocular pressure of 17 mm Hg prior to gold shunt surgery. Five years later, intraocular pressure is well controlled in the low teens without the need for ocular medications, and glaucoma is stable following gold shunt surgery.Keywords: gold shunt, refractory glaucoma, glaucoma surgery, trabeculectomy, suprachoroidal space, tube shunt

  17. The Predictive Value of the Foot Posture Index on Dynamic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten Møller; Olesen Gammelgaard, Christian; Nielsen, R. G.;

    2008-01-01

    Keenan et. al. identified the six-item version of the Foot Posture Index (FPI) as a valid, simple and clinically useful tool. The model combines measures of the standing foot posture in multiple planes and anatomical segments. It provides an alternative to existing static clinical measures when...... dynamic measures are not feasible. Redmond et. al. found the model able to predict 41% of the variation in the complex rotation of the ankle joint, representing inversion/eversion, during midstance of walking. To our knowledge no studies have been published on the relationship between FPI and the movement...... of the midfoot during walking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of FPI classification as a predictor for dynamic midfoot kinematics during walking....

  18. The predictive value of the foot posture index on dynamic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Gottschalk N; Rathleff, M; Kersting, U G;

    2008-01-01

    Keenan et. al. identified the six-item version of the Foot Posture Index (FPI) as a valid, simple and clinically useful tool. The model combines measures of the standing foot posture in multiple planes and anatomical segments. It provides an alternative to existing static clinical measures when...... dynamic measures are not feasible. Redmond et. al. found the model able to predict 41% of the variation in the complex rotation of the ankle joint, representing inversion/eversion, during midstance of walking. To our knowledge no studies have been published on the relationship between FPI and the movement...... of the midfoot during walking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of FPI classification as a predictor for dynamic midfoot kinematics during walking....

  19. Perception of global facial geometry is modulated through experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Ramon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of personally familiar faces is highly efficient across various viewing conditions. While the presence of robust facial representations stored in memory is considered to aid this process, the mechanisms underlying invariant identification remain unclear. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that facial representations stored in memory are associated with differential perceptual processing of the overall facial geometry. Subjects who were personally familiar or unfamiliar with the identities presented discriminated between stimuli whose overall facial geometry had been manipulated to maintain or alter the original facial configuration (see Barton, Zhao & Keenan, 2003. The results demonstrate that familiarity gives rise to more efficient processing of global facial geometry, and are interpreted in terms of increased holistic processing of facial information that is maintained across viewing distances.

  20. Discussion on ``Teaching the Second Law''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbey, Robert; Beretta, Gian Paolo; Cengel, Yunus; Foley, Andrew; Gyftopoulos, Elias P.; Hatsopoulos, George N.; Keck, James C.; Lewins, Jeffery; Lior, Noam; Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus M.; Steinfeld, Jeffrey; von Spakovsky, Michael R.; Wang, Lin-Shu; Zanchini, Enzo

    2008-08-01

    This article reports an open discussion that took place during the Keenan Symposium "Meeting the Entropy Challenge" (held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 5, 2007) following the short presentations—each reported as a separate article in the present volume—by Joseph Smith Jr., Howard Butler, Andrew Foley, Kimberly Hamad-Schifferli, Bernhardt Trout, Jeffery Lewins, Enzo Zanchini, and Michael von Spakovsky. All panelists and the audience were asked to address the following questions • Why is the second law taught in so many different ways? Why so many textbooks on thermodynamics? Why so many schools of thought? • Some say that thermodynamics is limited to equilibrium, others that it extends to nonequilibrium. How is entropy defined for nonequilibrium states?

  1. Editorial: Approaching 125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Sherryl

    2012-02-01

    With this issue, beginning Volume 121, the editorial team shifts from the strong leadership of David Watson to a team under my direction. Approaching 125 years of publication, the Journal of Abnormal Psychology has earned its place as the preeminent outlet for research in psychopathology. With gratitude to the newly assembled team of associate editors (AEs), consulting editors, and ad hoc reviewers, I look forward to guiding the journal through this next term. Nine well-respected scholars have agreed to serve as AEs: Timothy Brown, Laurie Chassin, Jeff Epstein, Jutta Joormann, Pamela Keel, Kate Keenan, Scott Lilienfeld, Angus MacDonald, and Michael Young. The new team is dedicated to working tirelessly to maintain and enhance the journal's esteemed tradition of excellence. Given the well-established strengths of the journal, I will not suggest any fundamental changes.

  2. Putting the Second Law to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Thomas F.

    2008-08-01

    Thermo Electron Corporation was founded in 1956 by Dr. George Hatsopoulos with the goal of applying thermodynamics to the solution of energy problems throughout society. As the company grew from a small research laboratory to a multi-billion dollar Fortune 500 enterprise, the Second Law of thermodynamics played a pivotal role in creating a diversified portfolio of products and services. George and his staff also employed thermodynamics, particularly availability analyses of energy processes, to help guide changes in National policy arising from the 1973 oil embargo. As directors of the company, Professors Joseph Keenan and Elias Gyftopoulos made key contributions to the strategy of applying the Second Law to real-world engineering challenges.

  3. The predictive value of the foot posture index on dynamic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Gottschalk; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Kersting, U G;

    2008-01-01

    dynamic measures are not feasible. Redmond et. al. found the model able to predict 41% of the variation in the complex rotation of the ankle joint, representing inversion/eversion, during midstance of walking. To our knowledge no studies have been published on the relationship between FPI and the movement...... of the midfoot during walking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of FPI classification as a predictor for dynamic midfoot kinematics during walking.......Keenan et. al. identified the six-item version of the Foot Posture Index (FPI) as a valid, simple and clinically useful tool. The model combines measures of the standing foot posture in multiple planes and anatomical segments. It provides an alternative to existing static clinical measures when...

  4. Methods of Spectral Analysis in C++ (MOSAIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engesser, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stellar spectroscopic classification is most often still done by hand. MOSAIC is a project focused on the collection and classification of astronomical spectra using a computerized algorithm. The code itself attempts to accurately classify stellar spectra according to the broad spectral classes within the Morgan-Keenan system of spectral classification, based on estimated temperature and the relative abundances of certain notable elements (Hydrogen, Helium, etc.) in the stellar atmosphere. The methodology includes calibrating the wavelength for pixels across the image by using the wavelength dispersion of pixels inherent with the spectrograph used. It then calculates the location of the peak in the star's Planck spectrum in order to roughly classify the star. Fitting the graph to a blackbody curve is the final step for a correct classification. Future work will involve taking a closer look at emission lines and luminosity classes.

  5. Local Large-Scale Structure and the Assumption of Homogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Ryan C.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-10-01

    Our recent estimates of galaxy counts and the luminosity density in the near-infrared (Keenan et al. 2010, 2012) indicated that the local universe may be under-dense on radial scales of several hundred megaparsecs. Such a large-scale local under-density could introduce significant biases in the measurement and interpretation of cosmological observables, such as the inferred effects of dark energy on the rate of expansion. In Keenan et al. (2013), we measured the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance from us to test for such a local under-density. We made this measurement over the redshift range 0.01 0.07, we measure an increasing luminosity density that by z ~ 0.1 rises to a value of ~ 1.5 times higher than that measured locally. This implies that the stellar mass density follows a similar trend. Assuming that the underlying dark matter distribution is traced by this luminous matter, this suggests that the local mass density may be lower than the global mass density of the universe at an amplitude and on a scale that is sufficient to introduce significant biases into the measurement of basic cosmological observables. At least one study has shown that an under-density of roughly this amplitude and scale could resolve the apparent tension between direct local measurements of the Hubble constant and those inferred by Planck team. Other theoretical studies have concluded that such an under-density could account for what looks like an accelerating expansion, even when no dark energy is present.

  6. Fifteen years of dual polarimetric observations of tropical convection: The CPOL data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Scott; Protat, Alain; Jackson, Robert; Helmus, Jonathan; Giangrande, Scott; Louf, Valentin; Lang, Timothy; May, Peter; Glasson, Ken; Atkinson, Brad; Whimpey, Michael; Keenan, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The use of polarization diversity to measure properties of hydrometeors is not new and was first mentioned by Seliga and Bringi from an engineering perspective in 1976 and by Hendry et al (again in 1976) from a measurement perspective shortly thereafter. In the forty years that have passed since these accomplishments there have been several key data-sets that have guided the development of retrieval science and the use of polarimetry in understanding the nature of precipitation. One such data set has been collected using the C-Band POLarimetric radar (Keenan et al, 1998), which collected 15 years of observations of break/buildup and monsoon season phenomena when it was sited 23km from Darwin, Australia. This presentation will report on the progress of a collaboration aimed at producing a quality controlled set of polarimetric measurements and microphysical retrievals for this 15-year data set. Techniques such as calibration offset, specific differential phase and attenuation retrieval and comparison with disdrometer measurements (via scattering calculations on collected drop size distributions) will be covered including contrasting several different open source approaches. Seliga, T.A., Bringi, V.N., 1976. Potential Use of Radar Differential Reflectivity Measurements at Orthogonal Polarizations for Measuring Precipitation. J. Appl. Meteor. 15, 69-76. doi:10.1175/1520-0450(1976)0152.0.CO;2 Hendry, A., McCormick, G.C., 1976. Radar observations of the alignment of precipitation particles by electrostatic fields in thunderstorms. Journal of Geophysical Research 81, 5353-5357. doi:10.1029/JC081i030p05353 Keenan, T., Glasson, K., Cummings, F., Bird, T.S., Keeler, J., Lutz, J., 1998. The BMRC/NCAR C-Band Polarimetric (C-POL) Radar System. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 15, 871-886. doi:10.1175/1520-0426(1998)0152.0.CO;2

  7. EVA: Exome Variation Analyzer, an efficient and versatile tool for filtering strategies in medical genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutant Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole exome sequencing (WES has become the strategy of choice to identify a coding allelic variant for a rare human monogenic disorder. This approach is a revolution in medical genetics history, impacting both fundamental research, and diagnostic methods leading to personalized medicine. A plethora of efficient algorithms has been developed to ensure the variant discovery. They generally lead to ~20,000 variations that have to be narrow down to find the potential pathogenic allelic variant(s and the affected gene(s. For this purpose, commonly adopted procedures which implicate various filtering strategies have emerged: exclusion of common variations, type of the allelics variants, pathogenicity effect prediction, modes of inheritance and multiple individuals for exome comparison. To deal with the expansion of WES in medical genomics individual laboratories, new convivial and versatile software tools have to implement these filtering steps. Non-programmer biologists have to be autonomous combining themselves different filtering criteria and conduct a personal strategy depending on their assumptions and study design. Results We describe EVA (Exome Variation Analyzer, a user-friendly web-interfaced software dedicated to the filtering strategies for medical WES. Thanks to different modules, EVA (i integrates and stores annotated exome variation data as strictly confidential to the project owner, (ii allows to combine the main filters dealing with common variations, molecular types, inheritance mode and multiple samples, (iii offers the browsing of annotated data and filtered results in various interactive tables, graphical visualizations and statistical charts, (iv and finally offers export files and cross-links to external useful databases and softwares for further prioritization of the small subset of sorted candidate variations and genes. We report a demonstrative case study that allowed to identify a new candidate gene

  8. ProbCD: enrichment analysis accounting for categorization uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmulevich Ilya

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As in many other areas of science, systems biology makes extensive use of statistical association and significance estimates in contingency tables, a type of categorical data analysis known in this field as enrichment (also over-representation or enhancement analysis. In spite of efforts to create probabilistic annotations, especially in the Gene Ontology context, or to deal with uncertainty in high throughput-based datasets, current enrichment methods largely ignore this probabilistic information since they are mainly based on variants of the Fisher Exact Test. Results We developed an open-source R-based software to deal with probabilistic categorical data analysis, ProbCD, that does not require a static contingency table. The contingency table for the enrichment problem is built using the expectation of a Bernoulli Scheme stochastic process given the categorization probabilities. An on-line interface was created to allow usage by non-programmers and is available at: http://xerad.systemsbiology.net/ProbCD/. Conclusion We present an analysis framework and software tools to address the issue of uncertainty in categorical data analysis. In particular, concerning the enrichment analysis, ProbCD can accommodate: (i the stochastic nature of the high-throughput experimental techniques and (ii probabilistic gene annotation.

  9. Amira: Multi-Dimensional Scientific Visualization for the GeoSciences in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Erlebacher, G.

    2003-12-01

    amira (www.amiravis.com) is a general purpose framework for 3D scientific visualization that meets the needs of the non-programmer, the script writer, and the advanced programmer alike. Provided modules may be visually assembled in an interactive manner to create complex visual displays. These modules and their associated user interfaces are controlled either via a mouse, or via an interactive scripting mechanism based on Tcl. Finally, an advanced API is made available, which enables the development of specialized modules. Its standard configuration includes many of the current visualization algorithms that operate on curves, surfaces and volumes, over a range of grid types. Amira uses a combination of efficient data structures, fast algorithms and hardware support not only to produce stunning visualizations, but to analyze and extract features from the data. Examples of available capabilities include scalar and vector field visualizations, geometry reconstruction, image segmentation, and direct volume rendering. Amira runs on both laptop and supercomputers on most existing operating systems. The user interface has the same functionality on all platforms. One extension to Amira, of relevance to the geosciences, is the VR component, which enables Amira scripts to run unmodified on big tiled displaces, in a cave-like environment, or in a dome. Ongoing research to provide Amira with features of direct relevance to the Geosciences community includes tools for remote and collaborative visualization. In this talk, we will present an overview of the above features, with an emphasis on the Earth Sciences community.

  10. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory’s predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored “while-loops” over “for-loops” in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  11. JBioWH: an open-source Java framework for bioinformatics data integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Roberto; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Perez, Sonia; Ligeti, Balázs; Kertész-Farkas, Attila; Pongor, Sándor

    2013-01-01

    The Java BioWareHouse (JBioWH) project is an open-source platform-independent programming framework that allows a user to build his/her own integrated database from the most popular data sources. JBioWH can be used for intensive querying of multiple data sources and the creation of streamlined task-specific data sets on local PCs. JBioWH is based on a MySQL relational database scheme and includes JAVA API parser functions for retrieving data from 20 public databases (e.g. NCBI, KEGG, etc.). It also includes a client desktop application for (non-programmer) users to query data. In addition, JBioWH can be tailored for use in specific circumstances, including the handling of massive queries for high-throughput analyses or CPU intensive calculations. The framework is provided with complete documentation and application examples and it can be downloaded from the Project Web site at http://code.google.com/p/jbiowh. A MySQL server is available for demonstration purposes at hydrax.icgeb.trieste.it:3307. Database URL: http://code.google.com/p/jbiowh.

  12. iFlow: A Graphical User Interface for Flow Cytometry Tools in Bioconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyongryun Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry (FCM has become an important analysis technology in health care and medical research, but the large volume of data produced by modern high-throughput experiments has presented significant new challenges for computational analysis tools. The development of an FCM software suite in Bioconductor represents one approach to overcome these challenges. In the spirit of the R programming language (Tree Star Inc., “FlowJo”, these tools are predominantly console-driven, allowing for programmatic access and rapid development of novel algorithms. Using this software requires a solid understanding of programming concepts and of the R language. However, some of these tools|in particular the statistical graphics and novel analytical methods|are also useful for nonprogrammers. To this end, we have developed an open source, extensible graphical user interface (GUI iFlow, which sits on top of the Bioconductor backbone, enabling basic analyses by means of convenient graphical menus and wizards. We envision iFlow to be easily extensible in order to quickly integrate novel methodological developments.

  13. Give the people what they want: studying end-user needs for enhancing the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yeon Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available End-user programming (EUP is a common approach for helping ordinary people create small programs for their professional or daily tasks. Since end-users may not have programming skills or strong motivation for learning them, tools should provide what end-users want with minimal costs of learning –i.e., they must decrease the barriers to entry. However, it is often hard to address these needs, especially for fast-evolving domains such as the Web. To better understand these existing and ongoing challenges, we conducted two formative studies with Web users –a semi-structured interview study, and a Wizard-of-Oz study. The interview study identifies challenges that participants have with their daily experiences on the Web. The Wizard-of-Oz study investigates how participants would naturally explain three computational tasks to an interviewer acting as a hypothetical computer agent. These studies demonstrate a disconnect between what end-users want and what existing EUP systems support, and thus open the door for a path towards better support for end user needs. In particular, our findings include: (1 analysis of challenges that end-users experience on the Web with solutions; (2 seven core functionalities of EUP for addressing these challenges; (3 characteristics of non-programmers describing three common computation tasks; (4 design implications for future EUP systems.

  14. Developing information literacy: a key to evidence-based nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorten, A; Wallace, M C; Crookes, P A

    2001-06-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a curriculum-integrated programme designed to help students develop an awareness of the nursing literature, the skills to locate and retrieve it, and skills required in its evaluation; in other words'information literacy'. Positive changes in student performance on objective measures of information-literacy skills were revealed as well as a significant increase in the levels of confidence of the student in performing those skills. Students who had undertaken the information-literacy programme ('programme' students) performed better on a range of objective measures of information literacy, as well as reporting higher levels of confidence in these skills, than students who had not participated in the programme ('non-programme' students). Evaluation of this programme provides evidence of the potential usefulness of a curriculum-integrated approach for the development of information-literacy skills within nursing education. With these underlying skills, students will be better equipped to consolidate and extend their key information-literacy skills to include research appreciation and application. These are vital for effective lifelong learning and a prerequisite to evidence-based practice.

  15. Cooperative Strategy for Optimal Management of Smart Grids by Wavelet RNNs and Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tina, Giuseppe Marco; Tramontana, Emiliano

    2016-08-01

    Advanced smart grids have several power sources that contribute with their own irregular dynamic to the power production, while load nodes have another dynamic. Several factors have to be considered when using the owned power sources for satisfying the demand, i.e., production rate, battery charge and status, variable cost of externally bought energy, and so on. The objective of this paper is to develop appropriate neural network architectures that automatically and continuously govern power production and dispatch, in order to maximize the overall benefit over a long time. Such a control will improve the fundamental work of a smart grid. For this, status data of several components have to be gathered, and then an estimate of future power production and demand is needed. Hence, the neural network-driven forecasts are apt in this paper for renewable nonprogrammable energy sources. Then, the produced energy as well as the stored one can be supplied to consumers inside a smart grid, by means of digital technology. Among the sought benefits, reduced costs and increasing reliability and transparency are paramount.

  16. DeepBlue epigenomic data server: programmatic data retrieval and analysis of epigenome region sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Felipe; List, Markus; Bock, Christoph; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Large amounts of epigenomic data are generated under the umbrella of the International Human Epigenome Consortium, which aims to establish 1000 reference epigenomes within the next few years. These data have the potential to unravel the complexity of epigenomic regulation. However, their effective use is hindered by the lack of flexible and easy-to-use methods for data retrieval. Extracting region sets of interest is a cumbersome task that involves several manual steps: identifying the relevant experiments, downloading the corresponding data files and filtering the region sets of interest. Here we present the DeepBlue Epigenomic Data Server, which streamlines epigenomic data analysis as well as software development. DeepBlue provides a comprehensive programmatic interface for finding, selecting, filtering, summarizing and downloading region sets. It contains data from four major epigenome projects, namely ENCODE, ROADMAP, BLUEPRINT and DEEP. DeepBlue comes with a user manual, examples and a well-documented application programming interface (API). The latter is accessed via the XML-RPC protocol supported by many programming languages. To demonstrate usage of the API and to enable convenient data retrieval for non-programmers, we offer an optional web interface. DeepBlue can be openly accessed at http://deepblue.mpi-inf.mpg.de.

  17. Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Phase Change Materials on Compressed Air Expansion in CAES Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The integration of renewable energy in the electrical grid is challenging due to the intermittent and non-programmable generated electric power and to the transmission of peak power levels. Several energy storage technologies have been studied to find a solution to these issues. In particular, compressed air energy storage (CAES plants work by pumping and storing air into a vessel or in an underground cavern; then when energy is needed, the pressurized air is expanded in an expansion turbine. Several CAES configurations have been proposed: diabatic, adiabatic and isothermal. The isothermal process seems to be the most promising to improve the overall efficiency. It differs from conventional CAES approaches as it employs near-isothermal compression and expansion. Currently, there are no commercial isothermal CAES implementations worldwide, but several methods are under investigation. In this paper, the use of phase change materials (PCM for isothermal air expansion is discussed. Air expansion tests in presence of PCM were carried out in a high-pressure vessel in order to analyze the effect of PCM on the process. Results show that in presence of PCM near isothermal expansion conditions occur and therefore they affect positively the value of the obtainable expansion work.

  18. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-09-30

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development.

  19. Information aspects of actomyosin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, K; Honda, H

    1991-01-01

    Actomyosin complex as a representative case of cell motility exhibits an intricate interplay between the structure it maintains and the function it realizes. The correspondence between structure and function an actomyosin complex displays is a one-to-many type. Mechanochemical couplings underlying the energy transduction associated with the hydrolysis of ATP in the complex render the correspondence between the displacement of the medium and the force acting there a one-to-many type. Such a one-to-many correspondence between displacement and force makes the dynamic development informational in the sense that the prior indefiniteness turns into the posterior definiteness with the elapse of time. This characteristic exhibits sharp contrast to the time-honored one-to-one correspondence between displacement and force that is most common in mechanics, whether classical or quantal, in which no information is generated because of a forcible intrusion of exogenous detection of nonlocal character claiming an instantaneous bird's eye view of everything involved. Information generation is due intrinsically to the process of endogenous detection of local character, and the process has to be local because any physical signal propagates at a finite velocity. Actomyosin complex serves as a material example witnessing that detection of local character certainly generates information and leaves itself nonprogrammable.

  20. An IDE for Android Mobile Phones with Extended Functionalities Using Best Developing Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakila Banu Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Google's Android platform is a widely anticipated open source operating system for mobile phones. Themobile phone landscape changed with the introduction ofsmart phones running Android, a platformmarketed by Google. Android phones are the first credible threat to the iPhone market. Google not onlytarget the consumers of iPhone, it also aimed to win the hearts and minds of mobile application developers.Asa Result, application developers are developing new software’s everyday for Android Smart Phones andare competing with the previous in Market. But so far there is no Specific IDE developed to create mobileapplication easily by just Drag and Drop methodto make even the non-programmers to developapplication for the smart phones.This paperpresents an IDE with Extended Functionalities for Developing Mobile Applications for AndroidMobile Phones using the Best developing Methodologies.The New IDEcomeswith the ExtendedFunctionalities like Executing the created Application, Previewing the Application Created, Roll Back andCancel Functions with the newly added Iconslike Execute, Preview, Roll Back and Cancel Respectively.Another important featureof this paper is that the IDE is developed using the Best DevelopingMethodologies by presenting the possiblemethodsfor developing the IDE using JAVA SWINGGUI Builderin AndroidADT plug-in.The developed IDE is tested using the Android Runtime EmulatorinEclipseFramework.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2009-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, B. A.

    2010-11-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000 (and epoch 2000 if possible), and these serve as a secondary identifier. To the extent possible with current astrometric sources, the components of double stars and stars with composite spectra are shown as separate entries. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or spectral energy distributions. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 83. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Standards from Table I of the

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2009-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, B. A.

    2013-05-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000 (and epoch 2000 if possible), and these serve as a secondary identifier. To the extent possible with current astrometric sources, the components of double stars and stars with composite spectra are shown as separate entries. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or spectral energy distributions. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 83. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Standards from Table I of the

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, B. A.

    2009-02-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000 (and epoch 2000 if possible), and these serve as a secondary identifier. To the extent possible with current astrometric sources, the components of double stars and stars with composite spectra are shown as separate entries. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or spectral energy distributions. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 83. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Standards from Table I of the

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, A. B.

    2004-05-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000, and these serve as a secondary identifier. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or bulk spectral energy distributions. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 79. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Keenan made continual adjustments to the standards lists up to the time of his death. Thus the late-type standards comprise those marked as high-weight standards in the 1989 Perkins catalogue (1989ApJS...71

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2009-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000 (and epoch 2000 if possible), and these serve as a secondary identifier. To the extent possible with current astrometric sources, the components of double stars and stars with composite spectra are shown as separate entries. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or spectral energy distributions. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 83. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Standards from Table I of the

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2009-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000 (and epoch 2000 if possible), and these serve as a secondary identifier. To the extent possible with current astrometric sources, the components of double stars and stars with composite spectra are shown as separate entries. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or spectral energy distributions. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 83. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Standards from Table I of the

  7. ERGATIVIDAD Y RELACIONES GRAMATICALES EN KATUKINA-KANAMARI ERGATIVITY AND GRAMMATICAL RELATIONS IN KATUKINA-KANAMARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Queixalós

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El afán de encontrar un criterio único-formal-universal para la identificación del sujeto -o de cualquier otra categoría gramatical-, como se da el caso en ciertas corrientes teóricas, es una postura que nos hace correr el riesgo o «de acostar las lenguas en camas de Procustes», como dice Schachter, o de tener que introducir, iterativamente, renormalizaciones secundarias en el criterio inicial para dar cuenta de la diversidad lingüística a medida que ésta se hace más apremiante.¹ Adecuada me parece, para el sujeto, la postura cuantitativa de Keenan, expurgando, claro está, los criterios no sintácticos. Desde esta perspectiva, y a pesar de la indeterminación de sus mecanismos de control, el katukina se presenta como una lengua en la cual si cabe hablar de sujeto y objeto, sólo es lícito hacerlo identificando al primero con el conjunto complemento'PAC'-NOM y complemento único, y al segundo con el complemento'AGT'-ERG. De otra parte, es obvio que la fuerza de una argumentación contra la universalidad de las relaciones gramaticales estriba tanto en su base empírica -la realidad de las lenguas- como en una caracterización altamente restrictiva del nivel en que funciona ese tipo de mecanismo.An effort at finding a criterion that is unique, formal, and universal in the identification of subject -or any other grammatical category, as presented in certain theoretical trends, is a position that makes us take the risk of "either forcing the language into an untenable Procustes bed", as noted by Schachter, or being forced to introduce, in an iterative manner, the secondary renormalizations of the initial criterion into an account of the linguistic diversity as this becomes more imperative. I believe Keenan's quantitative analysis of subject to be adequate, provided that the non-syntactic criteria be excluded. From this perspective, and in spite of the indetermination of its mechanisms of control, it is possible to find the concept of

  8. GABAergic system in the endocrine pancreas: a new target for diabetes treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yun Wan,1 Qinghua Wang,1–3 Gerald J Prud’homme4,5 1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huashan Hospital, Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St Michael’s Hospital, 3Departments of Physiology and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, 5Department of Laboratory Medicine, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Excessive loss of functional pancreatic β-cell mass, mainly due to apoptosis, is a major factor in the development of hyperglycemia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D. In T1D, β-cells are destroyed by immunological mechanisms. In T2D, while metabolic factors are known to contribute to β-cell failure and subsequent apoptosis, mounting evidence suggests that islet inflammation also plays an important role in the loss of β-cell mass. Therefore, it is of great importance for clinical intervention to develop new therapies. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, a major neurotransmitter, is also produced by islet β-cells, where it functions as an important intraislet transmitter in regulating islet-cell secretion and function. Importantly, recent studies performed in rodents, including in vivo studies of xenotransplanted human islets, reveal that GABA exerts β-cell regenerative effects. Moreover, it protects β-cells against apoptosis induced by cytokines, drugs, and other stresses, and has anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. It ameliorates the manifestations of diabetes in preclinical models, suggesting potential applications for the treatment of diabetic patients. This review outlines the actions of GABA relevant to β-cell regeneration, including its signaling mechanisms and potential interactions with other mediators. These studies increase our

  9. Discussion on ``Frontiers of the Second Law''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Seth; Bejan, Adrian; Bennett, Charles; Beretta, Gian Paolo; Butler, Howard; Gordon, Lyndsay; Grmela, Miroslav; Gyftopoulos, Elias P.; Hatsopoulos, George N.; Jou, David; Kjelstrup, Signe; Lior, Noam; Miller, Sam; Rubi, Miguel; Schneider, Eric D.; Sekulic, Dusan P.; Zhang, Zhuomin

    2008-08-01

    This article reports an open discussion that took place during the Keenan Symposium "Meeting the Entropy Challenge" (held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 4, 2007) following the short presentations—each reported as a separate article in the present volume—by Adrian Bejan, Bjarne Andresen, Miguel Rubi, Signe Kjelstrup, David Jou, Miroslav Grmela, Lyndsay Gordon, and Eric Schneider. All panelists and the audience were asked to address the following questions • Is the second law relevant when we trap single ions, prepare, manipulate and measure single photons, excite single atoms, induce spin echoes, measure quantum entanglement? Is it possible or impossible to build Maxwell demons that beat the second law by exploiting fluctuations? • Is the maximum entropy generation principle capable of unifying nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, chemical kinetics, nonlocal and nonequilibrium rheology, biological systems, natural structures, and cosmological evolution? • Research in quantum computation and quantum information has raised many fundamental questions about the foundations of quantum theory. Are any of these questions related to the second law?

  10. W. W. Morgan and the Discovery of the Spiral Arm Structure of our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, William

    2011-01-01

    William Wilson Morgan was one of the great astronomers of the twentieth century. He considered himself a morphologist, and was preoccupied throughout his career with matters of classification. Though his early life was difficult, and his pursuit of astronomy as a career was opposed by his father, he took a position at Yerkes Observatory in 1926 and remained there for the rest of his working life. Thematically, his work was also a unified whole. Beginning with spectroscopic studies under Otto Struve at Yerkes Observatory, by the late 1930s he concentrated particularly on the young O and B stars. His work on stellar classification led to the Morgan-Keenan- Kellman [MKK] system of classification of stars, and later - as he grappled with the question of the intrinsic color and brightness of stars at great distances - to the Johnson-Morgan UBV system for measuring stellar colors. Eventually these concerns with classification and method led to his greatest single achievement - the recognition of the nearby spiral a...

  11. Thinking theologically about reproductive and genetic enhancements: the challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, George

    1999-08-01

    Current philosophical and legal bioethical reflections on reprogenetics provides little more than a rationalization of the interests of science. There are two reasons for this. First, bioethicists attempt to address ethical issues in a "language of precision" that characterizes science, and this works against analogical and narratological modes of discourse that have traditionally provided guidance for understanding human nature and purpose. Second, the current ethical and legal debate is framed by a public/private distinction that banishes robust norms to the private realm, and leaves a minimalist public discourse of harm avoidance that is insuffucient for regulating the science. In this essay, I argue that Mark Hanson's account of anxiety provides a valuable starting point for addressing deficiencies in the current philosophical and legal debate, and it highlights the need for a theological discourse on genetic enhancements. Through an assessment of Joel Shuman's criticism of the public/private distinction, I show how the needed theological discourse should be situated in the context of robust communities, and how such a communitarian inter-ethic is compatible with a variant of liberalism. Finally, I critically assess James Keenan's account of virtue and perfection, in order to outline what a sufficient discourse on reproductive and genetic enhancements requires.

  12. Development of Relative Clause Constructions in English L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how relative clause (RC constructions develop in the acquisition of English as a second language (L2. The acquisition of RC constructions has been the focus of much research in the field of language acquisition, but a majority of L2 studies in this area is experimental based on the Noun Phrase Accessibility Hierarchy (NPAH (Keenan & Comrie, 1977. In this study, the spontaneous speech production by a Japanese primary school child, learning English in a naturalistic environment, was audio-recorded regularly over two years, and the development of RC constructions was compared with the acquisition of other English morphological and syntactic structures as represented within Processability Theory (PT (Pienemann, 1998; Pienemann, Di Biase, & Kawaguchi, 2005; Pienemann & Keßler, 2011. Although PT predicts that subordinate clauses are acquired at the highest stage in processability hierarchy, the results in this longitudinal study show that some types of RC constructions emerge at earlier stages in L2 English acquisition. The results also show that RC constructions in the Japanese child’s English L2 develop in the similar way to those reported in L1 studies (e.g., Diessel, 2004.Keywords: relative clause constructions, English L2, Processability Theory, the Noun Phrase Accessibility Hierarchy, Japanese child

  13. Stellar SEDs from 0.3-2.5 Microns: Tracing the Stellar Locus and Searching for Color Outliers in SDSS and 2MASS

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, Kevin R; Schlegel, David J; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Lupton, Robert H; Agüeros, Marcel A; Bochanski, John J; Hawley, Suzanne L; West, Andrew A; Seth, Anil C; Kimball, Amy E; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Claire, Mark; Haggard, Daryl; Kaib, Nathan A; Schneider, Donald P; Sesar, Branimir

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) are rich resources for studying stellar astrophysics and the structure and formation history of the Galaxy. As new surveys and instruments adopt similar filter sets, it is increasingly important to understand the properties of the ugrizJHKs stellar locus, both to inform studies of `normal' main sequence stars as well as for robust searches for point sources with unusual colors. Using a sample of ~600,000 point sources detected by SDSS and 2MASS, we tabulate the position and width of the ugrizJHKs stellar locus as a function of g-i color, and provide accurate polynomial fits. We map the Morgan-Keenan spectral type sequence to the median stellar locus by using synthetic photometry of spectral standards and by analyzing 3000 SDSS stellar spectra with a custom spectral typing pipeline. We develop an algorithm to calculate a point source's minimum separation from the stellar locus in a seven-dimensional color space, and use it to robustly id...

  14. Discussion on ``Foundations of the Second Law''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbey, Robert; Ao, Ping; Beretta, Gian Paolo; Cengel, Yunus; Foley, Andrew; Freedman, Steven; Graeff, Roderich; Keck, James C.; Lloyd, Seth; Maroney, Owen; Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus M.; Weissman, Michael

    2008-08-01

    This article reports an open discussion that took place during the Keenan Symposium "Meeting the Entropy Challenge" (held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 4, 2007) following the short presentations—each reported as a separate article in the present volume—by Seth Lloyd, Owen Maroney, Silviu Guiasu, Ping Ao, Jochen Gemmer, Bernard Guy, Gian Paolo Beretta, Speranta Gheorghiu-Svirschevski, and Dorion Sagan. All panelists and the audience were asked to address the following questions • Why is the second law true? Is it an inviolable law of nature? If not, is it possible to develop a perpetual motion machine of the second kind? • Are second law limitations objective or subjective, real or apparent, due to the nature of physical states or the representation and manipulation of information? Is entropy a physical property in the same sense as energy is universally understood to be an intrinsic property of matter? • Does the second law conflict with quantum mechanics? Are the differences between mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions of physical phenomena reconcilable? Does the reversible law of motion of hamiltonian mechanics and quantum mechanics conflict with the empirical observation of irreversible phenomena?

  15. Understanding the centrality deficit: insight from foreign language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Amanda C; Keenan, Janice M

    2011-07-01

    This study replicated and extended a phenomenon in the text memory literature referred to as the centrality deficit Miller & Keenan (Annals of Dyslexia 59:99-113, 2009). It examined how reading in a foreign language (L2) affects one's text representation and ability to recall the most important information. Readers recalled a greater proportion of central than of peripheral ideas, regardless of whether reading in their native language (L1) or a foreign language (L2). Nonetheless, the greatest deficit in participants' L2 recalls, as compared with L1 recalls, was on the central, rather than the peripheral, information. This centrality deficit appears to stem from resources being diverted from comprehension when readers have to devote more cognitive resources to lower level processes (e.g., L2 word identification and syntactic processing), because the deficit was most evident among readers who had lower L2 proficiency. Prior knowledge (PK) of the passage topic helped compensate for the centrality deficit. Readers with less L2 proficiency who did not have PK of the topic displayed a centrality deficit, relative to their L1 recall, but this deficit dissipated when they did possess PK.

  16. Governance and Conflict in the Sahel’s ‘Ungoverned Space’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clionadh Raleigh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns governance and violence rates across the ‘ungoverned’ spaces of the African Sahel. We consider how the dominant narrative for Africa generally, and the Sahel specifically, ‘securitizes’ space, and presents poverty, underdevelopment, and ‘ungoverned’ spaces as security threats to be addressed (Abrahamsen 2005; Keenan 2008. We argue that the terms ‘failed’ and ‘ungoverned’ have become coterminous and common because they benefit various state and international powers within and across the Sahel, who avoid responsibility for the geo-political and economic processes within these spaces. Not only does the term ‘ungoverned’ obscure the actual practices of power within large states with significant under-populated spaces, but it wrongly assumes and accuses those within that space of being more likely to engage in forms of violence that are destabilizing to state structures and external interests. Actual practices of power across the Sahel reveal that large Sahelian states differ significantly in their types of governance, violence rates and trajectories, activities of opposition groups, and long-term prospects for peace.

  17. Comparative methodologies for measuring metabolizable energy of various types of resistant high amylose corn starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulley, Richard T; Appel, Marko J; Enos, Tanya G; Hegsted, Maren; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Zhou, Jun; Raggio, Anne M; Jeffcoat, Roger; Birkett, Anne; Martin, Roy J; Keenan, Michael J

    2009-09-23

    Energy values of high amylose corn starches high in resistant starch (RS) were determined in vivo by two different methodologies. In one study, energy values were determined according to growth relative to glucose-based diets in rats fed diets containing RS(2), heat-treated RS(2) (RS(2)-HT), RS(3), and amylase predigested versions to isolate the RS component. Net metabolizable energy values ranged from 2.68 to 3.06 kcal/g for the RS starches, and 1.91-2.53 kcal/g for the amylase predigested versions. In a second study, rats were fed a diet containing RS(2)-HT and the metabolizable energy value was determined by bomb calorimetry. The metabolizable energy value was 2.80 kcal/g, consistent with Study 1. Thus, high amylose corn based RS ingredients and their amylase predigested equivalents have energy values approximately 65-78% and 47-62% of available starch (Atwater factor), respectively, according to the RS type (Garcia, T. A.; McCutcheon, K. L.; Francis, A. R.; Keenan, M. J.; O'Neil, C. E.; Martin, R. J.; Hegsted, M. The effects of resistant starch on gastrointestinal organs and fecal output in rats. FASEB J. 2003, 17, A335).

  18. Where Evolutionary Psychology Meets Cognitive Neuroscience: A Précis to Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen L. Krill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive neuroscience, the study of brain-behavior relationships, has long attempted to map the brain. The discipline is flourishing, with an increasing number of functional neuroimaging studies appearing in the scientific literature daily. Unlike biology and even psychology, the cognitive neurosciences have only recently begun to apply evolutionary meta-theory and methodological guidance. Approaching cognitive neuroscience from an evolutionary perspective allows scientists to apply biologically based theoretical guidance to their investigations and can be conducted in both humans and nonhuman animals. In fact, several investigations of this sort are underway in laboratories around the world. This paper and two new volumes (Platek, Keenan, and Shackelford [Eds.], 2007; Platek and Shackelford [Eds.], under contract represent the first formal attempts to document the burgeoning field of evolutionary cognitive neuroscience. Here, we briefly review the current state of the science of evolutionary cognitive neuroscience, the methods available to the evolutionary cognitive neuroscientist, and what we foresee as the future directions of the discipline.

  19. An atlas of 2.4 to 4.1 microns ISO/SWS spectra of early-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lenorzer, A; Morris, P; De Koter, A; Geballe, T R; Waters, L B F M; Hony, S; Kaper, L

    2002-01-01

    We present an atlas of spectra of O- and B-type stars, obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) during the Post-Helium program of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This program is aimed at extending the Morgan & Keenan classification scheme into the near-infrared. Later type stars will be discussed in a seperate publication. The observations consist of 57 SWS Post-Helium spectra from 2.4 to 4.1 microns, supplemented with 10 spectra acquired during the nominal mission with a similar observational setting. For B-type stars, this sample provides ample spectral converage in terms of subtype and luminosity class. For O-type stars,the ISO sample is coarse and therefore is complemented with 8 UKIRT L'-band observations. In terms of the presence of diagnostic lines, the L'-band is likely the most promising of the near-infrared atmospheric windows for the study of the physical properties of B stars. Specifically, this wavelength interval contains the Brackett alpha, Pfund gamma, and other Pfund li...

  20. The availability of emergency obstetric care in the context of the JSY cash transfer programme in Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabde, Yogesh; Diwan, Vishal; Randive, Bharat; Chaturvedi, Sarika; Sidney, Kristi; Salazar, Mariano; De Costa, Ayesha

    2016-05-18

    Since 2005, India has implemented a national cash transfer programme, the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), which provides women a cash transfer upon giving birth in an existing public facility. This has resulted in a steep rise in facility births across the country. The early years of the programme saw efforts being made to strengthen the ability of facilities to provide obstetric care. Given that the JSY has been able to draw millions of women into facilities to give birth (there have been more than 50 million beneficiaries thus far), it is important to study the ability of these facilities to provide emergency obstetric care (EmOC), as the functionality of these facilities is critical to improved maternal and neonatal outcomes. We studied the availability and level of provision of EmOC signal functions in public facilities implementing the JSY programme in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) state, central India. These are measured against the World Health Report (WHR) 2005benchmarks. As a comparison, we also study the functionality and contribution of private sector facilities to the provision of EmOC in these districts. A cross-sectional survey of all healthcare facilities offering intrapartum care was conducted between February 2012 and April 2013. The EmOC signal functions performed in each facility were recorded, as were human resource data and birth numbers for each facility. A total of 152 facilities were surveyed of which 118 were JSY programme facilities. Eighty-six percent of childbirths occurred at programme facilities, two thirds of which occurred at facilities that did not meet standards for the provision basic emergency obstetric care. Of the 29 facilities that could perform caesareans, none could perform all the basic EmOC functions. Programme facilities provided few EmOC signal functions apart from parenteral antibiotic or oxytocic administration. Complicated EmOC provision was found predominantly in non-programme (private) facilities; only one of

  1. Progress in preliminary studies at Ottana Solar Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, V.; Camerada, M.; Cau, G.; Cocco, D.; Damiano, A.; Melis, T.; Musio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The fast increasing share of distributed generation from non-programmable renewable energy sources, such as the strong penetration of photovoltaic technology in the distribution networks, has generated several problems for the management and security of the whole power grid. In order to meet the challenge of a significant share of solar energy in the electricity mix, several actions aimed at increasing the grid flexibility and its hosting capacity, as well as at improving the generation programmability, need to be investigated. This paper focuses on the ongoing preliminary studies at the Ottana Solar Facility, a new experimental power plant located in Sardinia (Italy) currently under construction, which will offer the possibility to progress in the study of solar plants integration in the power grid. The facility integrates a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant, including a thermal energy storage system and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) unit, with a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) plant and an electrical energy storage system. The facility has the main goal to assess in real operating conditions the small scale concentrating solar power technology and to study the integration of the two technologies and the storage systems to produce programmable and controllable power profiles. A model for the CSP plant yield was developed to assess different operational strategies that significantly influence the plant yearly yield and its global economic effectiveness. In particular, precise assumptions for the ORC module start-up operation behavior, based on discussions with the manufacturers and technical datasheets, will be described. Finally, the results of the analysis of the: "solar driven", "weather forecasts" and "combined storage state of charge (SOC)/ weather forecasts" operational strategies will be presented.

  2. Design strategies and functionality of the Visual Interface for Virtual Interaction Development (VIVID) tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lac; Kenney, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    Development of interactive virtual environments (VE) has typically consisted of three primary activities: model (object) development, model relationship tree development, and environment behavior definition and coding. The model and relationship tree development activities are accomplished with a variety of well-established graphic library (GL) based programs - most utilizing graphical user interfaces (GUI) with point-and-click interactions. Because of this GUI format, little programming expertise on the part of the developer is necessary to create the 3D graphical models or to establish interrelationships between the models. However, the third VE development activity, environment behavior definition and coding, has generally required the greatest amount of time and programmer expertise. Behaviors, characteristics, and interactions between objects and the user within a VE must be defined via command line C coding prior to rendering the environment scenes. In an effort to simplify this environment behavior definition phase for non-programmers, and to provide easy access to model and tree tools, a graphical interface and development tool has been created. The principal thrust of this research is to effect rapid development and prototyping of virtual environments. This presentation will discuss the 'Visual Interface for Virtual Interaction Development' (VIVID) tool; an X-Windows based system employing drop-down menus for user selection of program access, models, and trees, behavior editing, and code generation. Examples of these selection will be highlighted in this presentation, as will the currently available program interfaces. The functionality of this tool allows non-programming users access to all facets of VE development while providing experienced programmers with a collection of pre-coded behaviors. In conjunction with its existing, interfaces and predefined suite of behaviors, future development plans for VIVID will be described. These include incorporation

  3. Mobile Phone Application Development for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    With smartphone sales currently surpassing laptop sales, it is hard not to think that these devices will have a place in the classroom. More specifically, with little to no monetary investment, classroom-centric mobile applications have the ability to suit the needs of teachers. Previously, programming such an item was a daunting task to the classroom teacher. But now, through the use of online visual tools, anyone has the ability to generate a mobile application to suit individual classroom needs. The "MY NASA DATA" (MND) project has begun work on such an application. Using online tools that are directed at the non-programmer, the team has developed two usable mobile applications ("apps") that fit right into the science classroom. The two apps generated include a cloud dichotomous key for cloud identification in the field, and an atmospheric science glossary to help with standardized testing key vocabulary and classroom assignments. Through the use of free online tools, teachers and students now have the ability to customize mobile applications to meet their individual needs. As an extension of the mobile applications, the MND team is planning web-based application programming interfaces (API's) that will be generated from data that is currently included in the MND Live Access Server. This will allow teachers and students to choose data sets that they want to include in the mobile application without having to populate the API themselves. Through the use of easy to understand online mobile app tutorials and MND data sets, teachers will have the ability to generate unit-specific mobile applications to further engage and empower students in the science classroom.

  4. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian von der Brelie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%. 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS. IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD, before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the

  5. Semantic Framework for Mapping Object-Oriented Model to Semantic Web Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr eJezek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a~Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

  6. multiplierz: an extensible API based desktop environment for proteomics data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber James T

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient analysis of results from mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments requires access to disparate data types, including native mass spectrometry files, output from algorithms that assign peptide sequence to MS/MS spectra, and annotation for proteins and pathways from various database sources. Moreover, proteomics technologies and experimental methods are not yet standardized; hence a high degree of flexibility is necessary for efficient support of high- and low-throughput data analytic tasks. Development of a desktop environment that is sufficiently robust for deployment in data analytic pipelines, and simultaneously supports customization for programmers and non-programmers alike, has proven to be a significant challenge. Results We describe multiplierz, a flexible and open-source desktop environment for comprehensive proteomics data analysis. We use this framework to expose a prototype version of our recently proposed common API (mzAPI designed for direct access to proprietary mass spectrometry files. In addition to routine data analytic tasks, multiplierz supports generation of information rich, portable spreadsheet-based reports. Moreover, multiplierz is designed around a "zero infrastructure" philosophy, meaning that it can be deployed by end users with little or no system administration support. Finally, access to multiplierz functionality is provided via high-level Python scripts, resulting in a fully extensible data analytic environment for rapid development of custom algorithms and deployment of high-throughput data pipelines. Conclusion Collectively, mzAPI and multiplierz facilitate a wide range of data analysis tasks, spanning technology development to biological annotation, for mass spectrometry-based proteomics research.

  7. Amira: Multi-Dimensional Scientific Visualization for the GeoSciences in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Erlebacher, G.

    2003-12-01

    amira (www.amiravis.com) is a general purpose framework for 3D scientific visualization that meets the needs of the non-programmer, the script writer, and the advanced programmer alike. Provided modules may be visually assembled in an interactive manner to create complex visual displays. These modules and their associated user interfaces are controlled either through a mouse, or via an interactive scripting mechanism based on Tcl. We provide interactive demonstrations of the various features of Amira and explain how these may be used to enhance the comprehension of datasets in use in the Earth Sciences community. Its features will be illustrated on scalar and vector fields on grid types ranging from Cartesian to fully unstructured. Specialized extension modules developed by some of our collaborators will be illustrated [1]. These include a module to automatically choose values for salient isosurface identification and extraction, and color maps suitable for volume rendering. During the session, we will present several demonstrations of remote networking, processing of very large spatio-temporal datasets, and various other projects that are underway. In particular, we will demonstrate WEB-IS, a java-applet interface to Amira that allows script editing via the web, and selected data analysis [2]. [1] G. Erlebacher, D. A. Yuen, F. Dubuffet, "Case Study: Visualization and Analysis of High Rayleigh Number -- 3D Convection in the Earth's Mantle", Proceedings of Visualization 2002, pp. 529--532. [2] Y. Wang, G. Erlebacher, Z. A. Garbow, D. A. Yuen, "Web-Based Service of a Visualization Package 'amira' for the Geosciences", Visual Geosciences, 2003.

  8. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  9. Subsidized sales of insecticide-treated nets in Afghan refugee camps demonstrate the feasibility of a transition from humanitarian aid towards sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolaczinski Jan H

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introducing sustainability and self-reliance is essential in chronic humanitarian emergencies before financial assistance is phased out. In Pakistan-based Afghan refugee camps, this was attempted through shifting from indoor residual spraying (IRS to the subsidized sale of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs for prevention of malaria and anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL. Here we outline the strategy and document the progress to provide guidance for replication of similar approaches in other chronic refugee situations. Methods The operational monitoring data presented were collected through: (i two surveys of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP; (ii routine sales reporting of health-care providers; (iii records completed during field visits; and (iv registers used during annual re-treatment campaigns. Results From 2000 until 2003, subsidized ITN sales expanded from 17 to 44 camps. Based on 2003 sales records, maximum coverage from subsidized sales exceeded 50% in 13 camps and 20% in an additional 14 camps. Free annual treatment campaigns showed that many refugees were in possession of non-programme nets, which were either locally-made or had leaked from an ITN programme in Afghanistan. Estimated re-treatment coverage of sold and existing nets through annual campaigns exceeded 43% in all camps and was above 70% in the majority. Conclusion Subsidized sales of ITNs have effectively introduced the components of sustainability and self-reliance to the prevention of malaria and ACL in Afghan refugee camps. Similar approaches should be investigated in other chronic refugee situations to discourage expectations of continuing humanitarian donations that cannot be fulfilled.

  10. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Lawrence

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU’s Not Unix Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics makes FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format. Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  11. Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ježek, Petr; Mouček, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

  12. Vanadium Oxide in the Spectra of Mira Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Piontek, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Over the last three years, we have made spectroscopic measurements of twenty Mira variable stars, as a function of phase, probing their stellar atmospheres and underlying pulsation mechanisms. Measurement of variations in TiO and VO with phase can be used to help determine whether these molecular species are produced in an extended region above the layers where Balmer line emission occurs or below this shocked region. Piontek & Luttermoser (1999 IAPPPC, submitted), produce synthetic spectra for three Mira variables, R Leo, V CVn, and R CVn as a function of phase. Comparison of their synthetic spectra to our observed spectra yield the fundamental astrophysical parameters of effective temperatures and surface gravities. Spectra are synthesized with LTE stellar stmospheres code ATLAS, using the 6.6--million Indiana University atomic and molecular line dataset. Piontek & Luttermoser point out that the IU dataset does not include vanadium oxide (VO). Thus, there is a noticeable difference between the synthetic spectra and observed near-IR spectra corresponding to the B-X bands of VO (Mahanti 1935, Proc. Phys. Soc., 47, 43; Keenan & Schroeder 1952,L. W., ApJ, 115, 82). In order to incorporate the VO bands in the synthetic spectra, we need to establish tables of wavenumbers, lowest energy levels, and oscillator strengths. Producing the tables is non-trivial. Laboratory measurements of wavenumbers are used in the Just-Overlapping Line Approximation (JOLA; Tsuji 1966, PASJ, 18, 127) to calculate oscillator strengths. The JOLA technique and preliminary results will be presented. MWC greatly appreciates support from the National Science Foundation grant AST-9500756. RAP acknowledges the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 1998 Summer REU program supported by the National Science Foundation and thanks DGL for being his mentor.

  13. Improved spectral descriptions of planetary nebulae central stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Méndez, R. H.; Gamen, R.

    2015-07-01

    Context. At least 492 central stars of Galactic planetary nebulae (CSPNs) have been assigned spectral types. Since many CSPNs are faint, these classification efforts are frequently made at low spectral resolution. However, the stellar Balmer absorption lines are contaminated with nebular emission; therefore in many cases a low-resolution spectrum does not enable the determination of the H abundance in the CSPN photosphere. Whether or not the photosphere is H deficient is arguably the most important fact we should expect to extract from the CSPN spectrum, and should be the basis for an adequate spectral classification system. Aims: Our purpose is to provide accurate spectral classifications and contribute to the knowledge of central stars of planetary nebulae and stellar evolution. Methods: We have obtained and studied higher quality spectra of CSPNs described in the literature as weak emission-line star (WELS). We provide descriptions of 19 CSPN spectra. These stars had been previously classified at low spectral resolution. We used medium-resolution spectra taken with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS). We provide spectral types in the Morgan-Keenan (MK) system whenever possible. Results: Twelve stars in our sample appear to have normal H rich photospheric abundances, and five stars remain unclassified. The rest (two) are most probably H deficient. Of all central stars described by other authors as WELS, we find that at least 26% of them are, in fact, H rich O stars, and at least 3% are H deficient. This supports the suggestion that the denomination WELS should not be taken as a spectral type, because, as a WELS is based on low-resolution spectra, it cannot provide enough information about the photospheric H abundance.

  14. Le passif en français et le statut référentiel du sujet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalenques Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nous proposons de reprendre l’analyse du passif en français, appelé parfois passif périphrastique. Nous réexaminerons cet objet linguistique à partir de données généralement marginalisées dans son analyse, à savoir les lacunes distributionnelles par rapport à l’actif, comme : Cécile parle couramment l’anglais / ?? L’anglais est parlé couramment par Cécile ; Marie a regardé la télé toute la soirée / ?? la télé a été regardée par Marie toute la soirée. Nous partirons de l’analyse proposée par P. Jalenques (2015 permettant de ramener ces contraintes à un principe régulier et expliquant ce dernier à partir de l’hypothèse que être n’est pas un simple auxiliaire mais correspond au verbe attributif. Nous montrerons que cette analyse est cependant incomplète et rend difficilement compte de lacunes comme les ouvriers ont cessé le travail / ?? le travail a été cessé par les ouvriers. En reprenant l’étude des contraintes sur les relations anaphoriques au passif, nous verrons qu’un second principe explicatif, tiré d’une hypothèse de E. Keenan (1976, vient compléter l’analyse de Jalenques (2015 et permet de rendre compte de la plupart des lacunes distributionnelles au passif.

  15. Tectonic stratigraphy near a metamorphic core complex: Lessons from the Castaneda-signal area of west-central Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchitta, I. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)); Suneson, N.H. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

    1993-04-01

    A sequence of latest Oligocene through Quaternary sedimentary and volcanic rocks, when analyzed tectonically and combined with lithologically distinctive source terranes, clarifies the character and timing of Neogene extension just north of the Buckskin-Rawhide metamorphic core complex (BRMCC) in west-central Arizona. The oldest strata (basal arkose of Lucchitta and Suneson) reflect regional stability and a southwesterly paleoslope. In latest Oligocene time, this drainage was ponded by an upwarp (now exposed as the BRMCC) rising to the southwest. The resulting lake beds contain a thin 26.6 MA airfall tuff that marks the beginning of volcanic activity in the region. A widespread breccia records the progressive unroofing of the still-rising CC. Mantle-driven crustal heating probably caused the upwarp and allowed the eruption of voluminous mantle-derived basalt and basaltic andesite about 19 MA (early basalts, Artillery Basalt). The overlying syntectonic conglomerate (arkose of Keenan Camp) was deposited during a period of extreme extension, low-angle detachment faulting, and block rotation, typical of highly extended terranes. The conglomerate is interlayered with widespread silicic volcanic rocks (15--10 MA) derived from the lower crust and large gravity-glide sheets lithologically identical to the breccia and similarly derived from the CC to the south. Unconformably overlying the conglomerate are locally derived fanglomerate and 13--8.5 MA (mesa-forming) basalt that accumulated in present-day basins of classic basin-range type. Untilted and nearly unfaulted 7.7--5.4 MA mantle-derived megacryst-bearing basalt marks the cessation of tectonic activity.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (Skiff, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiff, B. A.

    2007-01-01

    This file contains spectral classifications for stars collected from the literature, serving as a continuation of the compilations produced by the Jascheks, by Kennedy, and by Buscombe. The source of each spectral type is indicated by a standard 19-digit bibcode citation. These papers of course should be cited in publication, not this compilation. The stars are identified either by the name used in each publication or by a valid SIMBAD identifier. Some effort has been made to determine accurate (~1" or better) coordinates for equinox J2000 (and epoch 2000 if possible), and these serve as a secondary identifier. To the extent possible with current astrometric sources, the components of double stars and stars with composite spectra are shown as separate entries. Magnitudes are provided as an indication of brightness, but these data are not necessarily accurate, as they often derive from photographic photometry or rough estimates. The file includes only spectral types determined from spectra (viz. line and band strengths or ratios), omitting those determined from photometry (e.g. DDO, Vilnius) or inferred from broadband colors or spectral energy distributions. The classifications include MK types as well as types not strictly on the MK system (white dwarfs, Wolf-Rayet, etc), and in addition simple HD-style temperature types. Luminosity classes in the early Mount Wilson style (e.g. 'd' for dwarf, 'g' for giant) and other similar schemes have been converted to modern notation. Since a citation is provided for each entry, the source paper should be consulted for details about classification schemes, spectral dispersion, and instrumentation used. System-defining primary MK standard stars are included from the last lists by Morgan and Keenan, and are flagged by a + sign in column 79. The early-type standards comprise the 1973 "dagger standards" (1973ARA&A..11...29M) and stars from the Morgan, Abt, and Tapscott atlas (1978rmsa.book.....M). Standards from Table I of the

  17. Software Architecture to Support the Evolution of the ISRU RESOLVE Engineering Breadboard Unit 2 (EBU2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Thomas; Nurge, Mark; Perusich, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) software provides operation of the physical plant from a remote location with a high-level interface that can access and control the data from external software applications of other subsystems. This software allows autonomous control over the entire system with manual computer control of individual system/process components. It gives non-programmer operators the capability to easily modify the high-level autonomous sequencing while the software is in operation, as well as the ability to modify the low-level, file-based sequences prior to the system operation. Local automated control in a distributed system is also enabled where component control is maintained during the loss of network connectivity with the remote workstation. This innovation also minimizes network traffic. The software architecture commands and controls the latest generation of RESOLVE processes used to obtain, process, and quantify lunar regolith. The system is grouped into six sub-processes: Drill, Crush, Reactor, Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD), Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) (see example), and Regolith Oxygen Extraction (ROE). Some processes are independent, some are dependent on other processes, and some are independent but run concurrently with other processes. The first goal is to analyze the volatiles emanating from lunar regolith, such as water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen, and others. This is done by heating the soil and analyzing and capturing the volatilized product. The second goal is to produce water by reducing the soil at high temperatures with hydrogen. This is done by raising the reactor temperature in the range of 800 to 900 C, causing the reaction to progress by adding hydrogen, and then capturing the water product in a desiccant bed. The software needs to run the entire unit and all sub-processes; however

  18. SeqWare Query Engine: storing and searching sequence data in the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merriman Barry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencers the rapid increase in sequencer throughput, and associated drop in costs, has resulted in more than a dozen human genomes being resequenced over the last few years. These efforts are merely a prelude for a future in which genome resequencing will be commonplace for both biomedical research and clinical applications. The dramatic increase in sequencer output strains all facets of computational infrastructure, especially databases and query interfaces. The advent of cloud computing, and a variety of powerful tools designed to process petascale datasets, provide a compelling solution to these ever increasing demands. Results In this work, we present the SeqWare Query Engine which has been created using modern cloud computing technologies and designed to support databasing information from thousands of genomes. Our backend implementation was built using the highly scalable, NoSQL HBase database from the Hadoop project. We also created a web-based frontend that provides both a programmatic and interactive query interface and integrates with widely used genome browsers and tools. Using the query engine, users can load and query variants (SNVs, indels, translocations, etc with a rich level of annotations including coverage and functional consequences. As a proof of concept we loaded several whole genome datasets including the U87MG cell line. We also used a glioblastoma multiforme tumor/normal pair to both profile performance and provide an example of using the Hadoop MapReduce framework within the query engine. This software is open source and freely available from the SeqWare project (http://seqware.sourceforge.net. Conclusions The SeqWare Query Engine provided an easy way to make the U87MG genome accessible to programmers and non-programmers alike. This enabled a faster and more open exploration of results, quicker tuning of parameters for heuristic variant calling filters

  19. The Development of Multi-Agent System of State Estimation of Electric Power Systems Using Event Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Massel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work objective is to offer a methodological approach to the development of multiagent systems (MAS in the energy sector. The agent approach is declared as an integral part of the Smart Grid concept (intelligent energy systems, but so far there is really neither methodological development and nor implementation in this area. The problem to estimate the states of electric power systems (EPS is one of the most important in the energy sector. Decentralization of calculations, when estimating the EPS states, allows reducing the host control center load and the amount of data transferred through the network.To achieve this aim were used the theory and methods for estimating the EPS state, artificial intelligence techniques, methods of object design and programming, multi-agent technologies, and algebraic Joiner-net network.The work analyses existing agent-based solutions, reveals their weaknesses, and proposes author's approach to MAS development in the energy sector, which includes 5 steps: 1 description of the future system, 2 construction and description of the agent-based scenarios, 3 MAS architecture development 4 MAS engineering design 5 MAS implementation.A novelty of the proposed approach lies in introduction of the agent interaction scenarios and application of Joiner-networks for scripting of scenarios. Agent-based scenarios allow nonprogrammers-experts to change the programme algorithm. A Joiner-network of the scenario consists of the functioning processes of agents (nodes, and the events that trigger or end the process. Output event of one process can be the input event for another.The operation algorithm of the EPS estimation system is developed. The first step is to provide decomposition of a nodalization diagram into the areas corresponding to the levels of node voltages. Then diagrams resulting from decomposition are distributed between the agents of EPS estimation and calculated in parallel. At the next stage, all diagrams are

  20. High mortality among tuberculosis patients on treatment in Nigeria: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamu, Aishatu L; Gadanya, Muktar A; Abubakar, Isa S; Jibo, Abubakar M; Bello, Musa M; Gajida, Auwalu U; Babashani, Musa M; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2017-02-23

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of death in much of sub-Saharan Africa despite available effective treatment. Prompt initiation of TB treatment and access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains vital to the success of TB control. We assessed time to mortality after treatment onset using data from a large treatment centre in Nigeria. We analysed a retrospective cohort of TB patients that commenced treatment between January 2010 and December 2014 in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. We estimated mortality rates per person-months at risk (pm). Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine risk factors for mortality. Among 1,424 patients with a median age of 36.6 years, 237 patients (16.6%) died after commencing TB treatment giving a mortality rate of 3.68 per 100 pm of treatment in this cohort. Most deaths occurred soon after treatment onset with a mortality rate of 37.6 per 100 pm in the 1(st) week of treatment. Risk factors for death were being HIV-positive but not on anti-retroviral treatment (ART) (aHR 1.39(1 · 04-1 · 85)), residence outside the city (aHR 3 · 18(2.28-4.45)), previous TB treatment (aHR 3.48(2.54-4.77)), no microbiological confirmation (aHR 4.96(2.69-9.17)), having both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB (aHR 1.45(1.03-2.02), and referral from a non-programme linked clinic/centre (aHR 3.02(2.01-4.53)). We attribute early deaths in this relatively young cohort to delay in diagnosis and treatment of TB, inadequate treatment of drug-resistant TB, and poor ART access. Considerable expansion and improvement in quality of diagnosis and treatment services for TB and HIV are needed to achieve the sustainable development goal of reducing TB deaths by 95% by 2035.

  1. SeqWare Query Engine: storing and searching sequence data in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian D; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F

    2010-12-21

    Since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencers the rapid increase in sequencer throughput, and associated drop in costs, has resulted in more than a dozen human genomes being resequenced over the last few years. These efforts are merely a prelude for a future in which genome resequencing will be commonplace for both biomedical research and clinical applications. The dramatic increase in sequencer output strains all facets of computational infrastructure, especially databases and query interfaces. The advent of cloud computing, and a variety of powerful tools designed to process petascale datasets, provide a compelling solution to these ever increasing demands. In this work, we present the SeqWare Query Engine which has been created using modern cloud computing technologies and designed to support databasing information from thousands of genomes. Our backend implementation was built using the highly scalable, NoSQL HBase database from the Hadoop project. We also created a web-based frontend that provides both a programmatic and interactive query interface and integrates with widely used genome browsers and tools. Using the query engine, users can load and query variants (SNVs, indels, translocations, etc) with a rich level of annotations including coverage and functional consequences. As a proof of concept we loaded several whole genome datasets including the U87MG cell line. We also used a glioblastoma multiforme tumor/normal pair to both profile performance and provide an example of using the Hadoop MapReduce framework within the query engine. This software is open source and freely available from the SeqWare project (http://seqware.sourceforge.net). The SeqWare Query Engine provided an easy way to make the U87MG genome accessible to programmers and non-programmers alike. This enabled a faster and more open exploration of results, quicker tuning of parameters for heuristic variant calling filters, and a common data interface to simplify development of

  2. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Katarina Ivana; Tudor, Mario; McCleery, Jenny; Car, Josip

    2015-07-29

    -Adams triad. Exclusion criteria were obstructive causes of hydrocephalus, other significant intracranial pathology and other confirmed causes of dementia. The eligible comparators were conservative treatment or shunting using VP and VA shunts. Two review authors independently screened search results, selected eligible studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted trial authors for additional data. Only one study met the inclusion criteria: an RCT comparing effectiveness of ETV and non-programmable VP shunts in 42 patients with iNPH. The study was conducted in Brazil between 2009 and 2012. The overall study risk of bias was high. The primary outcome in the study was the proportion of patients with improved symptoms one year after surgery, determined as a change of at least two points on the Japanese NPH scale. Due to imprecision in the results, it was not possible to determine whether there was any difference between groups in the proportion of patients who improved 3 or 12 months after surgery (3 months: odds ration (OR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 4.76, n = 42; 12 months: OR 2.5, 95% CI 0.62 to 10.11, n = 38). We were unable to estimate the effect of treatment on other efficacy outcomes (cognition, balance, function, gait and mobility) because they were inadequately reported. Of the 26 patients in the VP shunting group, 5 developed subdural hematoma postoperatively, while there were no complications among the 16 patients in the ETV group (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.3, n = 42), but the estimate was too imprecise to determine whether this was likely to reflect a true difference in complication rates. This was also the case for rates of further surgical intervention (OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.31 to 6.24, n = 42). There were no deaths during the trial. We judged the quality of evidence for all outcomes to be very low because of a high risk of selection, attrition and reporting bias and serious imprecision in the results. The only randomised trial of ETV

  3. Urban greening impacts on tropospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, R.; Churkina, G.; Butler, T. M.; Morfopoulos, C.

    2013-12-01

    investigate the tradeoff between vegetation driven ozone -reduction and -formation processes in dependence on temperature, radiation, CO2 and O3 concentrations. We have parameterized suitable plant functional types for different urban greening structures, currently focusing on central European vegetation. The modified CLM model is applied in a global (CESM) and a regional climate/ air quality model (WRF-Chem) to calculate realistic ozone concentrations in the influence zones of urban conglomerations. BVOC emissions and their impacts are also calculated with the standard MEGAN2.1 approach for comparison. The simulation results are analyzed and discussed in view of the models suitability for air quality scenario estimates under simultaneously changing climate, anthropogenic emissions and plant species composition. References Morfopoulos, C., Prentice, I.C., Keenan T.F., Friedlingstein, P., Medlyn, B., Penuelas, J., Possel, M. (in press): A unifying conceptual model for the environmental responses of isoprene emission by plants. Annals of Botany

  4. Estrategias de relativización en niños pequeños: comparación de desempeños ante producción espontánea y recuperación de relatos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Silva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Una dificultad frecuente en los trabajos sobre desarrollo sintáctico infantil es la de explicar usos cuya configuración no responde a una forma canónica aunque cumplan esa función. En el caso de las Cláusulas Relativas (CR la tipología de lenguas propone el concepto de “Estrategia de relativización” (ER (Keenan & Comrie 1977 para comprender las diferentes formas con las que las lenguas articulan modificadores complejos posnominales. Este trabajo presenta los resultados de una investigación que analizó la producción espontánea y la recuperación de Cláusulas Relativas (CR en 32 niños y niñas, hablantes de español de 5 años, de Nivel Socioeconómico (NSE Medio y Bajo. Se consideró el desempeño sintáctico según variables poblacionales, pues existe una extensa tradición en la literatura sobre desarrollo sintáctico que atiende a esta incidencia. Se relevaron, describieron y clasificaron las CR siguiendo a Givón (2008 y Silva (2008. Los objetivos de la investigación son, por un lado, considerar las ER (variantes de CR y comparar su forma y frecuencia y, por otro lado, indagar cuáles son los factores (poblacionales o de tarea que inciden en las diferencias. Los resultados muestran que las formas son comparables a usos de Estrategias de relativización (ER descriptos previamente en población infantil y adulta para el español. Se releva una variación sintáctica novedosa, aducible al contexto particular de renarración. El análisis de diferencias de desempeño, según variables poblacionales, no reporta diferencias significativas, aunque sí se reportan al considerar tareas (Cláusulas Relativas Producidas (CRP y Cláusulas Relativas Recuperadas (CRREP. El análisis de incidencia de variables poblacionales según tareas reporta diferencias significativas entre NSE Medio y Bajo para las CRREP. Los resultados permiten inferir que el uso infantil de CR no es una condición unicausal, ni completamente acreditable a la

  5. Epigenetics and stroke risk – beyond the static DNA code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsden PA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Charles C Matouk,1 Paul J Turgeon,2 Philip A Marsden2,31Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 3Keenan Research Centre and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, CanadaAbstract: Advances in high-throughput genome sequencing and genome-wide association studies indicate that only a fraction of estimated variability in stroke risk can be explained by genetic variation in protein-coding genes alone. Epigenetics is defined as chromatin-based mechanisms important in the regulation of gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence per se. Epigenetics represents an alternative explanation for how traditional risk factors confer increased stroke risk, provide a newer paradigm to explain heritability not explained by genetic variation, and provide insight into the link between how the environment of a cell can interact with the static DNA code. The nuclear-based mechanisms that contribute to epigenetic gene regulation can be separated into three distinct but highly interrelated processes: DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation; histone density and posttranslational modifications; and RNA-based mechanisms. Together, they offer a newer perspective on transcriptional control paradigms in blood vessels and provide a molecular basis for understanding how the environment impacts the genome to modify stroke susceptibility. This alternative view for transcriptional regulation allows a reassessment of the cis/trans model and even helps explain some of the limitations of current approaches to genetic-based screens. For instance, how does the environment exert chronic effects on gene expression in blood vessels after weeks or years? When a vascular cell divides, how is this information transmitted to daughter cells? This review provides an introduction to epigenetic concepts and a

  6. “Brain drain” and “brain waste”: experiences of international medical graduates in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aisha Lofters,1–4 Morgan Slater,2 Nishit Fumakia,2 Naomi Thulien51Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto; 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; 3Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; 4Canadian Institutes of Health Research Strategic Training Fellowship, Transdisciplinary Understanding and Training on Research – Primary Health Care Program, London; 5Lawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: “Brain drain” is a colloquial term used to describe the migration of health care workers from low-income and middle-income countries to higher-income countries. The consequences of this migration can be significant for donor countries where physician densities are already low. In addition, a significant number of migrating physicians fall victim to “brain waste” upon arrival in higher-income countries, with their skills either underutilized or not utilized at all. In order to better understand the phenomena of brain drain and brain waste, we conducted an anonymous online survey of international medical graduates (IMGs from low-income and middle-income countries who were actively pursuing a medical residency position in Ontario, Canada.Methods: Approximately 6,000 physicians were contacted by email and asked to fill out an online survey consisting of closed-ended and open-ended questions. The data collected were analyzed using both descriptive statistics and a thematic analysis approach.Results: A total of 483 IMGs responded to our survey and 462 were eligible for participation. Many were older physicians who had spent a considerable amount of time and money trying to obtain a medical residency position. The top five reasons for respondents choosing to emigrate from their home country were: socioeconomic or political

  7. Delayed saccadic eye movements in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjee R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Raageen Kanjee,1 Yeni H Yücel,1,2 Martin J Steinbach,3,4 Esther G González,3,4 Neeru Gupta1,2,51Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, 2Keenan Research Centre at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, 3Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, 4Centre for Vision Research, York University, 5Glaucoma and Nerve Protection Unit, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, CanadaPurpose: To determine whether saccadic eye movements are altered in glaucoma patients.Patients and methods: Sixteen patients with glaucoma and 21 control subjects were prospectively studied. Patients participated in a pro-saccade step task. Saccades were recorded using a noninvasive infrared oculometric device with head-mounted target projection. Medians of saccade reaction time, duration, amplitude, and peak velocity; frequency of express saccades; and percentage of trials with direction error were recorded. t-tests were used to compare the glaucoma and age-matched control groups. A correlation analysis of saccade parameters with visual field loss was also performed.Results: Median saccade reaction times were significantly prolonged in glaucoma patients compared with controls (220.9 ± 49.02 ms vs 192.1 ± 31.24 ms; t-test: P = 0.036. Median duration, median amplitude, and median peak velocity of saccades did not show significant differences between glaucoma and control groups (P > 0.05. Frequency of express saccades was significantly decreased in glaucoma patients compared with controls (1.75 ± 2.32 vs 7.0 ± 6.99; t-test: P = 0.007. Saccade parameters in glaucoma patients showed no significant correlation with visual field loss.Conclusion: Saccadic eye movements are significantly delayed in patients with early, moderate, or advanced glaucoma. Determination of median saccade reaction time may offer a novel functional test to quantify visual function in glaucoma

  8. Obituary: Ronald Eugene Pitts, 1949-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacConnell, D. Jack

    2009-01-01

    Ronald Pitts, systems engineer in the Commanding Branch of the Space Telescope Science Institute and long-time Computer Sciences Corporation employee, died suddenly of a stroke on 4 May 2008 at his home in Laurel, Maryland. He was a dedicated scientist-engineer, husband, father, volunteer, and cherished friend to many. Ron was born on 19 January 1949 in Tucson, Arizona, and was raised, along with his sister Suzanne, on his parents' turkey farm outside Tucson. He picked up practical knowledge from his father, Vernon, and became a competent amateur electrician and plumber, skills he kept honed and used throughout his life. His mother, Ruth (Stephens), was a nurse and taught him compassion and patience and encouraged his inquisitive mind. Ron attended public schools and enrolled at the University of Arizona, graduating with a B. S. in Astronomy in 1971. Being from a family of modest means, he put himself through school working summers and part-time at a large copper mine south of town. Ron enrolled in the graduate astronomy program at the Ohio State University [OSU] in the fall of 1971 where he was a first-year fellowship student. During his second and third years, he was the Perkins Assistant, taking spectra for the very exacting but appreciative Philip Keenan who once remarked to another faculty member that Ron was the best observer he ever had. Later, in 1980, Ron was co-author with Keenan on "Revised MK Spectral Types for G, K, and M stars" and again in 1985 in a study of supergiants in open clusters. He met his future wife, Patricia Moore, also a graduate student in the department, and they were wed in 1973. Ron was also partially supported during his early OSU years by an NSF grant to Robert Wing, writing parts of Wing's photometric reduction code and observing on the program at Kitt Peak and Flagstaff in the summer of 1974. Wing remembers him as being very competent and pleasant to work with. Ron's thesis topic was "Oscillator Strengths for Neutral Iron and

  9. Novel Advancements in Internet-Based Real Time Data Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Gerry; Welch, Clara L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    be encrypted to preclude interception. EZStream was developed to make use of a host of standard platforms and protocols. Each are discussed in detail in this paper. The I3ZStream server is written as Java Servlets. This allows different platforms (i.e. Windows, Unix, Linux . Mac) to host the server portion. The EZStream client component is written in two different flavors: JavaBean and ActiveX. The JavaBean component is used to develop Java Applet displays. The ActiveX component is used for developing ActiveX-based displays. Remote user devices will be covered including web browsers on PC#s and scaled-down displays for PDA's and smart cell phones. As mentioned. the interaction between EZStream (web/data server) and TReK (data source) will be covered as related to ISS. EZStream is being enhanced to receive and parse binary data stream directly. This makes EZStream beneficial to both the ISS International Partners and non-NASA applications (i.e. factory floor monitoring). The options for developing client-side display web pages will be addressed along with the development of tools to allow creation of display web pages by non-programmers.

  10. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13

    drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  11. Enhanced photosynthetic efficiency in trees world-wide by rising atmospheric CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Ina; Wieloch, Thomas; Groenendijk, Peter; Vlam, Mart; van der Sleen, Peter; Zuidema, Pieter A.; Robertson, Iain; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    signals is a fundamental advantage of isotopomer ratios (Augusti et al., Chem. Geol 2008). These results demonstrate that increasing [CO2] has reduced the ratio of photorespiration to photosynthesis on a global scale. Photorespiration is a side reaction that decreases the C gain of plants; the suppression of photorespiration in all analyzed trees indicates that increasing atmospheric [CO2] is enhancing the photosynthetic efficiency of trees world-wide. The consensus response of the trees agrees with the response of annual plants in greenhouse experiments, with three important conclusions. First, the generality of the isotopomer shift confirms that the CO2 response reflects the ratio of photosynthesis to photorespiration, and that it creates a robust signal in tree rings. Second, the agreement between greenhouse-grown plants and trees indicates that there has not been an acclimation response of the trees during the past centuries. Third, the results show that the regulation of tree gas exchange has during past centuries been governed by the same rules as observed in manipulative experiments, in contradiction to recent reports (Keenan et al., Nature 2013).

  12. Jacquelines of all trades or masters of some? Negative implications of focusing on common factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas C

    2012-07-01

    The emphasis on common factors initially grew out of increasingly frustrating findings from randomized clinical trials that head-to-head comparison of different treatments rarely found one to be superior (Luborsky et al., 2002; Luborsky, Singer, & Luborsky, 1975). In this regard, Cameron and Keenan (2010) have done well calling attention to a fundamental problem we deal with in researching, practicing, and teaching. As an instructor, it is difficult to teach practice- minded MSW students about empirically supported treatments when, with few exceptions, most theoretically distinct treatments that have been contrasted are not so different in terms of outcomes. This beckons us to teach students to think critically and understand the limits of current research on empirically supported treatments. However, I have argued here that there are benefits to teaching students about specific ESTs. It is plausible that providing extensive training in specific ESTs could be a platform for teaching about common factors, rather than focusing on developing generalist skills and later learning specific techniques that are needed in certain practice areas. Doing so gives students some useful techniques, which are associated with clinical improvement and can be adapted to other practice settings. It is unclear if the same can be said for teaching a common factors approach, which is already the dominant training model in social work. Of course, empirical research is needed to determine whether varying degrees of training emphasis on common factors or specific ESTs affect clinical skill development or adoption of ESTs. With regard to the issue of common factors in clinical research, health services researchers are already being encouraged to propose novel techniques for how we might affect common factors. Although it is clear that such mechanisms are not always unique to particular treatments, such research is typically being done incrementally by studying in-session processes operating

  13. Ateities įžvalgos kaip e. valdžios plėtros strateginio planavimo sudedamoji dalis: siūlomas įžvalgų tyrimo proceso modelis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Grincevičius

    2013-01-01

    žvalgų metodika paremtų projektų skaičiumi (Keenan M., Popper R., 2008, todėl atsiranda šios srities informacijos tuštuma. Nedidelę jos dalį bandoma užpildyti šiuo straipsniu. Raktažodžiai – ateities įžvalgos, e. valdžia, strateginis planavimas, prognozavimo metodikos. Tyrimo tipas – požiūrio pristatymas.

  14. Breaks in gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars and transparency of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, G. I.; Troitsky, S. V.

    2014-11-01

    Energetic gamma rays scatter on soft background radiation when propagating through the Universe, producing electron-positron pairs (A.I. Nikishov, Sov. Phys. JETP 14, 393 (1962)). Gamma rays with energies between 100 GeV and a few TeV interact mostly with infrared background photons whose amount is poorly known experimentally but safely constrained from below by account of the contribution of observed light from known galaxies (R.C. Keenan, A.J. Barger, L.L. Cowie, and W.-H. Wang, Astrophys. J. 723, 40 (2010); arXiv: 1102.2428). The expected opacity of the intergalactic space limits the mean free path of TeV gamma rays to dozens of Megaparsecs. However, TeV photons from numerous more distant sources have been detected (S.P. Wakely and D. Horan, http://tevcat.uchicago.edu/). This might be interpreted, in each particular case, in terms of hardening of the emitted spectrum caused by presently unknown mechanisms at work in the sources (S. Archambault et al. (VERITAS and Fermi LAT Collaborations), Astrophys. J. 785, L16 (2014); arXiv: 1403.4308). Here we show that this interpretation is not supported by the analysis of the ensemble of all observed sources. In the frameworks of an infrared-background model with the lowest opacity (R.C. Gilmore, R.S. Somerville, J.R. Primack, and A. Dominguez, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 422, 3189 (2012); arXiv: 1104.0671), we reconstruct the emitted spectra of distant blazars and find that upward spectral breaks appear precisely at those energies where absorption effects are essential. Since these energies are very different for similar sources located at various distances, we conclude that the breaks are artefacts of the incorrect account of absorption and, therefore, the opacity of the Universe for gamma rays is overestimated even in the most conservative model. This implies that some novel physical or astrophysical phenomena should affect long-distance propagation of gamma rays. A scenario in which a part of energetic photons is

  15. TAE+ 5.1 - TRANSPORTABLE APPLICATIONS ENVIRONMENT PLUS, VERSION 5.1 (SUN3 VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAE SUPPORT OFFICE

    1994-01-01

    TAE (Transportable Applications Environment) Plus is an integrated, portable environment for developing and running interactive window, text, and graphical object-based application systems. The program allows both programmers and non-programmers to easily construct their own custom application interface and to move that interface and application to different machine environments. TAE Plus makes both the application and the machine environment transparent, with noticeable improvements in the learning curve. The main components of TAE Plus are as follows: (1) the WorkBench, a What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) tool for the design and layout of a user interface; (2) the Window Programming Tools Package (WPT), a set of callable subroutines that control an application's user interface; and (3) TAE Command Language (TCL), an easy-to-learn command language that provides an easy way to develop an executable application prototype with a run-time interpreted language. The WorkBench tool allows the application developer to interactively construct the layout of an application's display screen by manipulating a set of interaction objects including input items such as buttons, icons, and scrolling text lists. Data-driven graphical objects such as dials, thermometers, and strip charts are also included. TAE Plus updates the strip chart as the data values change. The WorkBench user specifies the windows and interaction objects that will make up the user interface, then specifies the sequence of the user interface dialogue. The description of the designed user interface is then saved into resource files. For those who desire to develop the designed user interface into an operational application, the WorkBench tool also generates source code (C, Ada, and TCL) which fully controls the application's user interface through function calls to the WPTs. The WPTs are the runtime services used by application programs to display and control the user interfaces. Since the WPTs access the

  16. TAE+ 5.1 - TRANSPORTABLE APPLICATIONS ENVIRONMENT PLUS, VERSION 5.1 (SUN3 VERSION WITH MOTIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAE SUPPORT OFFICE

    1994-01-01

    TAE (Transportable Applications Environment) Plus is an integrated, portable environment for developing and running interactive window, text, and graphical object-based application systems. The program allows both programmers and non-programmers to easily construct their own custom application interface and to move that interface and application to different machine environments. TAE Plus makes both the application and the machine environment transparent, with noticeable improvements in the learning curve. The main components of TAE Plus are as follows: (1) the WorkBench, a What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) tool for the design and layout of a user interface; (2) the Window Programming Tools Package (WPT), a set of callable subroutines that control an application's user interface; and (3) TAE Command Language (TCL), an easy-to-learn command language that provides an easy way to develop an executable application prototype with a run-time interpreted language. The WorkBench tool allows the application developer to interactively construct the layout of an application's display screen by manipulating a set of interaction objects including input items such as buttons, icons, and scrolling text lists. Data-driven graphical objects such as dials, thermometers, and strip charts are also included. TAE Plus updates the strip chart as the data values change. The WorkBench user specifies the windows and interaction objects that will make up the user interface, then specifies the sequence of the user interface dialogue. The description of the designed user interface is then saved into resource files. For those who desire to develop the designed user interface into an operational application, the WorkBench tool also generates source code (C, Ada, and TCL) which fully controls the application's user interface through function calls to the WPTs. The WPTs are the runtime services used by application programs to display and control the user interfaces. Since the WPTs access the

  17. TAE+ 5.1 - TRANSPORTABLE APPLICATIONS ENVIRONMENT PLUS, VERSION 5.1 (DEC VAX ULTRIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAE SUPPORT OFFICE

    1994-01-01

    TAE (Transportable Applications Environment) Plus is an integrated, portable environment for developing and running interactive window, text, and graphical object-based application systems. The program allows both programmers and non-programmers to easily construct their own custom application interface and to move that interface and application to different machine environments. TAE Plus makes both the application and the machine environment transparent, with noticeable improvements in the learning curve. The main components of TAE Plus are as follows: (1) the WorkBench, a What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) tool for the design and layout of a user interface; (2) the Window Programming Tools Package (WPT), a set of callable subroutines that control an application's user interface; and (3) TAE Command Language (TCL), an easy-to-learn command language that provides an easy way to develop an executable application prototype with a run-time interpreted language. The WorkBench tool allows the application developer to interactively construct the layout of an application's display screen by manipulating a set of interaction objects including input items such as buttons, icons, and scrolling text lists. Data-driven graphical objects such as dials, thermometers, and strip charts are also included. TAE Plus updates the strip chart as the data values change. The WorkBench user specifies the windows and interaction objects that will make up the user interface, then specifies the sequence of the user interface dialogue. The description of the designed user interface is then saved into resource files. For those who desire to develop the designed user interface into an operational application, the WorkBench tool also generates source code (C, Ada, and TCL) which fully controls the application's user interface through function calls to the WPTs. The WPTs are the runtime services used by application programs to display and control the user interfaces. Since the WPTs access the

  18. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-05-01

    JCE Classroom Activity: #27. How Does Your Garden Grow? Investigating the "Magic Salt Crystal Garden", edited by Nancy S. Gettys and Erica K. Jacobsen, p 624A. Some Articles of Interest photos by Jerrold J. Jacobsen and Nancy S. Gettys This month's issue covers a wide variety of topics, from historical notes to the latest software from JCE. Gas burners are such familiar items in the laboratory that little thought is given to their development. An interesting article by Kathryn Williams (pp 558-559) explains how these humble devices came into being, beginning with Robert Bunsen's invention in 1857, through their adaptation in the United States in the 1930s to burn natural gas. Bunsen, in collaboration with Gustav Kirchhoff, used his invention in constructing an emission spectrometer that could be used in chemical analysis. A drawing of the instrument appears in the Williams article. The spectrometer is described in more detail in an article titled "A Brief History of Atomic Emission Spectrochemical Analysis, 1666-1950". Author Richard Jarrell traces the history of this important and lasting method of analysis from Isaac Newton's discovery of the visible spectrum to the development of the powerful analytical instruments that were in use in the 1950s. For readers who have a deeper interest in atomic emission spectroscopy, Jarrell's article is the first of five that are based on a symposium conducted in 1999 (pp 573-607). Visualizing the structure of ionic crystals is the topic of articles by Keenan Dungey (pp 618-619), Bruce Mattson (pp 622-623), and J. Kamenícek and M. Melichárek (pp 623-624). The ionic crystal theme is also carried out in JCE Classroom Activity #27 (pp 624A-B) and a demonstration on the preparation of sodium iodide, written by Zelek Herman (pp 619-621). Together, the five articles provide an interesting combination of ideas for investigating and describing both the macroscopic and the submicroscopic views of ionic crystals. Is It the "Write" Time

  19. PENGELOLAAN PROGRAM HUTAN KEMASYARAKATAN BERBASIS KEARIFAN LOKAL : Studi Kasus Di Kawasan Hutan Lindung Sesaot Lombok Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar - -

    2012-05-01

    community on the Community Forest Programme (2 establish better understanding of Awig-Awig on Community Forest Management and (3 have better understanding of the Community Forest Programme implementation.  Some theories have been used to analyse the research including: human ecology theory and Symbolic interactional theory. The methods of the research was a qualitative design using a case study.  The responden or key informans were people who living accros the area  both as farmer being involved in the programm and  non-programme farmers as well as particular  people who has better understanding on the community forest programme. The informans were determined using a snowball sampling dan purposive method.  Data collecting was conducted by a direct observation, in-deepth interview, documentation and triangulation study.  Data analysis was done with deskriptive analyse using Miles and Huberman Models. The data and information validation was tested using triangulation method and personal confirmation via deep discussion. Results of research: First, the Community forest programm according to local farmers was`transleted as a chance to have land holding in the forest area  to be farming system.  As a results, the people tend to behave exsploitatively and economically  in maximizing the land use. In relation to conservation function, there were a discripancy understanding between community groups and Forest Institution. The conservation according to the local community was transleted from entire vegetation as economic objective, so, the use of land was dominated by the Multy Purposes Trees Species (MPTS while based on the forest institution , the tree has to be  integrated to the conservation function to support economic value.  Second, The revitalisation of Awig-awig as the local convention of implementing the community forest programme is thought to be just a symbol of local value. Thus, the local wisdom was not effective to support the integration of conservation

  20. Obituary: Grote Reber, 1911-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    2003-12-01

    Grote Reber, a pioneer of radio astronomy died in Tasmania, Australia on 20 December 2002, two days before his 91st birthday. Reber was born in Chicago on 22 December 1911 and grew up in the Chicago suburb of Wheaton, IL. His father, Schuyler Colefax Reber, who was a lawyer and part owner of a canning factory, died when Grote was only 21; his mother, Harriet Grote was an elementary school teacher in Wheaton. Among her 7th and 8th grade students at Longfellow School in Wheaton was young Edwin Hubble with whom Grote later exchanged views on cosmology. Grote graduated from the Armour Institute of Technology (now the Illinois Institute of Technology) with a degree in Electrical Engineering. He excelled in electronics courses but did less well in mathematics. After receiving his degree in 1933, Grote held a series of jobs with various Chicago companies including the Stewart-Warner and Belmont Radio Corporations. Grote had a lifelong interest in electronics. At the age of 16, he received his amateur radio license, W9GFZ, signed by then Secretary of the Interior, Herbert Hoover. After contacting over 50 countries, he was looking for new challenges. He had read about Karl Jansky's discovery of cosmic radio emission and tried to interest astronomers at Yerkes Observatory, but except for Jesse Greenstein, they showed little interest. ``So," as he later related, ``I consulted with myself and decided to build a dish." He took astronomy courses from Philip Keenan and others at the University of Chicago. Using $2,000 of his own funds (about his annual salary), he took the summer of 1937 off from his engineering job at the Stewart-Warner Corporation to erect a 32-ft parabolic transit dish in a vacant lot next to his mother's house. Using his experience and skills as an electrical engineer and radio amateur he designed, built and tested a series of sensitive radio receivers, which he placed at the focal point of his parabolic dish. Following a succession of failures, in the spring

  1. Two Types of Belief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hegarty

    2010-12-01

    , 49–79. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Hintikka, J. 1969. ‘Semantics of propositional attitudes’. In J. W. Davis, D. J. Hockney & W. K. Wilson (eds. ‘Philosophical Logic’, 21–45. Dordrecht: D. Reidel.Horn, L. 1989. A Natural History of Negation. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Katz, G. 2000. ‘Anti neo-Davidsonianism’. In C. Tenny & J. Pustejovsky (eds. ‘Events as Grammatical Objects: The Converging Perspectives of Lexical Semantics and Syntax’, 393–414. Stanford, CA: CSLI Publications.Katz, G. 2003. ‘Event arguments, adverb selection, and the Stative Adverb Gap’. In E. Lang, C. Maienbron & C. Fabricius-Hansen (eds. ‘Modifying Adjuncts. (Interface Explorations 4’, 455–474. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Katz, G. 2008. ‘Manner modification of state verbs’. In L. McNally & C. Kennedy (eds. ‘Adjective and Adverbs’, 220–248. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Kratzer, A. 1979. ‘Conditional necessity and possibility’. In R. Bäuerle, U. Egli & A. von Stechow (eds. ‘Semantics from Different Points of View’, 117–147. Berlin: SpringerVerlag.Kratzer, A. 1981. ‘The notional category of modality’. In H. Eikmeyer & H. Rieser (eds. ‘Words, Worlds, and Contexts: New Approaches in Word Semantics’, 38–74. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.Kratzer, A. 1989. ‘Stage-level and individual-level predicates’. In G. N. Carlson & F. J. Pelletier (eds. ‘The Generic Book’, 125–175. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Kratzer, A. 1991. ‘Modality’. In A. von Stechow & D. Wunderlich (eds. ‘Semantik: Ein internationales Handbuch der eitgenössischen Forschung / Semantics: An International Handbook of Contemporary Research,’, 639–650. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.Lewis, D. 1975. ‘Adverbs of quantification’. In E. L. Keenan (ed. ‘Formal Semantics of Natural Language’, 3–15. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Reprinted in Portner, P. & Partee, B. H. (eds., Formal Semantics: The Essential Readings, pp. 178

  2. Superlative Quantifiers as Modifiers of Meta-Speech Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Cohen

    2010-12-01

    . Language and Cognitive Processes 5, no. 1: 244–253.Hacohen, A., Kozlowski, D. & Cohen, A. 2011a. ‘The Truth Shall Make You Slow: Superlative Quantifiers as Illocutionary Operators’. Presented at the Experimental Pragmatics Conference, Barcelona.Hacohen, A., Kozlowski, D. & Cohen, A. 2011b. ‘Superlative Quantifiers as Speech Act Modifiers: Experimental Evidence’. Presented at a workshop on The Proper Use of Quantification in Ordinary Language, Ljubljana.Hare, R. M. 1970. ‘Meaning and speech acts’. The Philosophical Review 79: 3–24.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2184066Horn, L. R. 1972. On the Semantic Properties of Logical Operators in English. Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Los Angeles.Kadmon, N. 1987. On Unique and Non-Unique Reference and Asymmetric Quantification. Ph.D. thesis, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.Kadmon, N. & Landman, F. 1993. ‘Any’. Linguistics and Philosophy 16: 353–422.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00985272Karttunen, L. 1977. ‘Syntax and semantics of questions’. Linguistics and Philosophy 1: 3–44.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00351935Kay, P. 1992. ‘At Least’. In A. Lehrer & E. F. Kittay (eds. ‘Frames, Fields, and Contrasts: New Essays in Semantic and Lexical Organization’, 309–331. Hillsdayle, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Keenan, E. L. & Stavi, J. 1986. ‘A Semantic Characterization of Natural Language Determiners’. Linguistics and Philosophy 9, no. 3: 253–326.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00630273Krifka, M. 1991. ‘Some Remarks on Polarity Items’. In D. Zaefferer (ed. ‘Semantic Universals and Universal Semantics’, 150–189. Berlin/New York: Foris.Krifka, M. 1995. ‘The Semantics and Pragmatics of Polarity Items’. Linguistic Analysis 25: 209–257.Krifka, M. 1999a. ‘At Least Some Determiners Aren’t Determiners’. In K. Turner (ed. ‘The Semantics/Pragmatics Interface from Different Points of View’, 257–291. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Krifka, M. 1999b. ‘Quantification into Question Acts

  3. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    disease (SD, whereas 18 had progressive disease (PD. Disease control rate was 66% including CR, PR and SD. After treatment for six months, the objective responses and disease control rate were 25% and 52%, respectively. There were no adverse effects in any of these patients. [17] Conclusion: Cancer has to be tackled with a multipronged approach and combining NK cell and CTL cell based AIET with conventional modalities of treatments such as Surgery, Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy as well as other modalities like Hyperthermia, Proton Beam therapy and low dose chemotherapy is effective even in advanced cancers which are refractory to conventional therapeutic modalities. References: 1.Rosenberg SA, Rapp HJ. Intralesional immunotherapy of melanoma with BCG. Med Clin North Am. 1976 May;60(3:419-30.2.Mazumder A, Eberlein TJ, Grimm EA, Wilson DJ, Keenan AM, Aamodt R, Rosenberg SA. Phase I study of the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer with lectin activated autologous mononuclear cells. Cancer. 1984 Feb 15;53(4:896-9053.Takayama T, Sekine T, Makuuchi M, Yamasaki S, Kosuge T, Yamamoto J, Shimada K, Sakamoto M, Hirohashi S, Ohashi Y, Kakizoe T. Adoptive immunotherapy to lower postsurgical recurrence rates of hepatocellular carcinoma: a randomised trial. Lancet. 2000 ;356(9232:802-7.4.Sloan AE, Dansey R, Zamorano L, Barger G, Hamm C, Diaz F, Baynes R, Wood G. Adoptive immunotherapy in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: preliminary results of using autologous whole-tumor vaccine plus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and adoptive transfer of anti-CD3-activated lymphocytes. Neurosurg Focus. 2000; 9(6:e9.5.Recchia F, Candeloro G, Di Staso M, Necozione S, Bisegna R, Bratta M, Tombolini V, Rea S. Maintenance immunotherapy in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. J Immunother. 2008; 31(4:413-9.6.Wright SE, Rewers-Felkins KA, Quinlin IS, Phillips CA, Townsend M, Philip R, Dobrzanski MJ, Lockwood-Cooke PR, Robinson W. Cytotoxic

  4. Formal Semantics: Origins, Issues, Early Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara H. Partee

    2010-12-01

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