WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonprofit 4-year institutions

  1. 48 CFR 35.015 - Contracts for research with educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with educational institutions and nonprofit organizations. 35.015 Section 35.015 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING 35.015 Contracts for research with educational institutions and nonprofit organizations. (a... contracts with educational institutions and nonprofit organizations shall— (i) State that the...

  2. 20 CFR 416.1144 - If you live in a nonprofit retirement home or similar institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....1144 If you live in a nonprofit retirement home or similar institution. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section the following definitions apply: (1) Nonprofit retirement home or similar institution... private nonprofit organization and which does not provide you with— (i) Services which are (or could...

  3. Analyzing the Success of Student Transitions from 2- to 4-Year Institutions within a State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Smith, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple 2- and 4-year public institutions exist within many states in the United States. Our paper develops a methodology that can be used to help evaluate how each 2-year public institution in a state is doing in preparing those of its students who transfer to 4-year public institutions in the state to successfully complete 4-year programs.…

  4. ANALYSIS OF ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE OF NON-PROFIT INSTITUTIONS: THE CASE OF LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTIONS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Mihanović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the organisational performance of non-profit institutions of lifelong learning and analyses factors constituting performance of non-profit institutions and educational institutions in particular, as well as the level and structure of performance of these institutions. The verification of the research goals is based on the review of literature, which identifies the specific factors of non-profit educational institutions. On the basis of previous research, a valid research instrument, used to measure performance of institutions of lifelong learning, was created. The level and structure of organisational performance of non-profit educational institutions and the verification of research goals are empirically analysed on a random sample of Croatian institutions. It is believed that the research results can assist managers of educational institutions in creating a strategy, leading to the better organisational performance

  5. 48 CFR 915.404-4-70-5 - Special considerations-contracts with nonprofit organizations (other than educational institutions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-contracts with nonprofit organizations (other than educational institutions). 915.404-4-70-5 Section 915.404... nonprofit organizations (other than educational institutions). (a) For purposes of identification, nonprofit..., scientific, or educational purposes, of which no part of the net earnings inure to the benefit of any...

  6. Preparing the Workforce: Early Childhood Teacher Preparation at 2- and 4-year Institutions of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M.; Winton, Pamela J.

    2001-01-01

    Details investigation of characteristics of early childhood teacher preparation programs at 2- and 4-year institutions through a survey of program chairs or directors. Presents findings on faculty characteristics, including racial makeup; course and practica requirements; comparisons between early childhood programs and the institutions as whole…

  7. An Examination of Adjunct Faculty Characteristics: Comparison between Non-Profit and For-Profit Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcher, Keith; Mandernach, B. Jean

    2016-01-01

    Institutions must understand the unique characteristics and motivations of adjunct faculty teaching online to more effectively support a diverse faculty population. The current study examines faculty characteristics and motivations to explore differences in the types of adjunct faculty teaching at non-profit or for-profit institutions. A survey of…

  8. Strategic piggybacking--a self-subsidization strategy for nonprofit institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, R P

    1982-01-01

    Nonprofit institutions often find that their socially worthwhile primary missions generate deficits. The author proposes a strategy for funding these shortfalls that is a synthesis of the specialization and diversified portfolio strategies. Following the method of strategic piggybacking, an organization should acquire or develop a business that is new for the institution and that may be unrelated to the institution's primary mission. The purpose of this new activity is to subsidize, at least in part, the deficit-producing primary mission.

  9. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart L of... - Ratio Methodology for Private Non-Profit Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ratio Methodology for Private Non-Profit Institutions B Appendix B to Subpart L of Part 668 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL...

  10. Institutional and Noninstitutional Influences on Information and Communication Technology Adoption and Use among Nonprofit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Theodore E.; Flanagin, Andrew J.; Shoham, Mirit Devorah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, nonprofit organizations (NPOs) in New Zealand were surveyed to explore influences on adoption and use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). We sought to extend existing research by considering "institutional" influences alongside organizational and environmental features and by examining how institutional…

  11. Developing a Theoretical Framework of Responsiveness in Educational Institutions and Non-Profit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheda, Divya Narendra

    2013-01-01

    A number of education institutions and non-profit organizations seek to be responsive toward the stakeholders they serve. They engage in numerous organizational and evaluative processes to be perceived as responsive. They consider evaluating and improving responsiveness, important to their practice. Unfortunately, such efforts are often impeded…

  12. 48 CFR 52.249-5 - Termination for Convenience of the Government (Educational and Other Nonprofit Institutions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Convenience of the Government (Educational and Other Nonprofit Institutions). 52.249-5 Section 52.249-5... Convenience of the Government (Educational and Other Nonprofit Institutions). As prescribed in 49.502(d), insert the following clause: Termination for Convenience of the Government (Educational and...

  13. Students at Less-Than-4-Year Institutions. National Postsecondary Student Aid Study. Statistical Analysis Report. Contractor Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byce, Chuck; Schmitt, Carl M.

    This report examines the characteristics of less-than-4-year institutions and the students who attend them. Data are presented on the number and size of less-than-4-year institutions, their educational offerings, types of degrees awarded, and on student demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, attendance costs, and financial aid. Following…

  14. Organizational resilience: Sustained institutional effectiveness among smaller, private, non-profit US higher education institutions experiencing organizational decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kenneth A

    2016-06-04

    Recent changes in the United States (US) economy have radically disrupted revenue generation among many institutions within higher education within the US. Chief among these disruptions has been fallout associated with the financial crisis of 2008-2009, which triggered a change in the US higher education environment from a period of relative munificence to a prolonged period of scarcity. The hardest hit by this disruption have been smaller, less wealthy institutions which tend to lack the necessary reserves to financially weather the economic storm. Interestingly, a review of institutional effectiveness among these institutions revealed that while many are struggling, some institutions have found ways to not only successfully cope with the impact of declining revenue, but have been able to capitalize on the disruption and thrive. Organizational response is an important factor in successfully coping with conditions of organizational decline. The study examined the impacts of organizational response on institutional effectiveness among higher education institutions experiencing organizational decline. The study's research question asked why some US higher educational institutions are more resilient at coping with organizational decline than other institutions operating within the same segment of the higher education sector. More specifically, what role does organizational resilience have in helping smaller, private non-profit institutions cope and remain effective during organizational decline? A total of 141 US smaller, private non-profit higher educational institutions participated in the study; specifically, the study included responses from participant institutions' key administrators. 60-item survey evaluated administrator responses corresponding to organizational response and institutional effectiveness. Factor analysis was used to specify the underlying structures of rigidity response, resilience response, and institutional effectiveness. Multiple regression

  15. From community college to 4-year institutions: Latinas' successful completion of STEM baccalaureate degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, Rocio

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the narrative of Latina graduates who successfully navigated through community college and 4-year institutions in the STEM fields. Rather than focus on what these students lack as much of the current research does, the study explored what assets these students bring that supports their success in STEM fields. Utilizing an ethnographic interview approach, participants who attained STEM baccalaureates in California were interviewed. Qualitative findings revealed various experiences, attitudes, and cultural influences that led to successful completion of a STEM degree. First, the study found that successful community college Latina STEM graduates exhibit grit, are resilient, determined, and have positive attitudes about their underrepresentation in STEM. Second, participants sought after peer, faculty, and staff relationships that helped them be successful. Lastly, participants had the support of their families and reported a high level of connectedness to their culture. Implications, recommendations for practice, and directions for future research are discussed.

  16. THEORIZING HYBRIDITY: INSTITUTIONAL LOGICS, COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS, AND ACTOR IDENTITIES: THE CASE OF NONPROFITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelcher, Chris; Smith, Steven Rathgeb

    2015-06-01

    We propose a novel approach to theorizing hybridity in public and nonprofit organizations. The concept of hybridity is widely used to describe organizational responses to changes in governance, but the literature seldom explains how hybrids arise or what forms they take. Transaction cost and organizational design literatures offer some solutions, but lack a theory of agency. We use the institutional logics approach to theorize hybrids as entities that face a plurality of normative frames. Logics provide symbolic and material elements that structure organizational legitimacy and actor identities. Contradictions between institutional logics offer space for them to be elaborated and creatively reconstructed by situated agents. We propose five types of organizational hybridity - segmented, segregated, assimilated, blended, and blocked. Each type is theoretically derived from empirically observed variations in organizational responses to institutional plurality. We develop propositions to show how our approach to hybridity adds value to academic and policy-maker audiences.

  17. Leading Indicators: Increasing Statewide Bachelor's Degree Completion Rates at 4-Year Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jeffrey Cody

    2014-01-01

    For the United States to maintain national and global economic stability, colleges must graduate more students. Four-year completion rates have declined and less than one-third of full-time, degree-seeking students graduate in 4 years. Some researchers and policymakers have suggested "leading indicators" to track postsecondary…

  18. Examination of Factors That Predict Academic Adjustment and Success of Community College Transfer Students in STEM at 4-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos; Jones, Stephanie J.

    2017-01-01

    There are a limited number of individuals who possess the skills to fulfill the workforce demand in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) in the United States. Therefore, community colleges and 4-year institutions must be able to identify academic and social factors that impact students' participation in the areas of STEM. These…

  19. Retention and Graduation Rates as Performance Indicators in 2-Year and 4-Year Postsecondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on performance indicators--specifically, retention and graduation indicators--that impact allocation of the ever-dwindling public sources of money. Decreasing revenue trends make understanding the performance indicators that are often used to fund postsecondary institutions very important. There is a significant…

  20. Applying the prudence principle in non-profit organizations and financial institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Otavová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes in detail the accounting principle of prudence in non-profit organizations and financial institutions. It defines its application in such organizations and based on comparison it evaluates the practical use of the prudence principle and its reflection in the accounting books. The main focus is on differences in applying the prudence principle that result from differences in the purpose activities and methods of asset management in these organizations. The practical application of the prudence principle in accounting consists mainly in the creation and use of provisions and impairments. These methods are defined by the Implementing Regulation to the Accounting Act No. 563/1991. The paper also provides tables where the creation and use of impairments and provisions in the above-mentioned organizations is compared with how business companies proceed in creating impairments and provisions. The key legislation standardizing accounting in the Czech Republic is the Accounting Act No. 563/1991, as amended, which stipulates the general accounting principles, the so-called accounting philosophy. The accounting is built around the general accounting principles, which are perceived as the pillars of accounting. Even though they are not stipulated in any particular law, they are legally enforceable and their ignorance can be sanctioned. The general accounting principles represent a set of rules to be observed in keeping the accounting books, preparing the accounting reports and submitting the accounting reports to users. The keystone accounting principle is the principle of true and fair refl ection of facts the essential goal of which is to report in the fi nancial statement actual assets and the fi nancial position of the accounting unit with an essential focus on reporting events that occurred during the accounting period with respect to their content.

  1. Leasehold: An Institutional Framework for Understanding Nonprofit Governance in a Civil Society Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M. Greller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonprofit organizations play a role in the creation of a society that is civil, and it is an important one that neither the state nor for-profit organizations undertake. This raises the question of governance and accountability, which is often addressed by looking to agency-based models from the private sector. The acknowledged problem is that the agency’s notion of owners does not translate well to nonprofits. Adapting the concept of leasehold (wherein the managers and organization operate with broad autonomy, using resources supplied by supporters in exchange for the promise that specific societal value will be created, and are accountable for doing so allows for a more flexible and responsive arrangement. It also suggests a mechanism whereby many independent nonprofits taking multiple approaches help civil society evolve.

  2. The Influence of Neoliberal Consumerist Ideology on the Values and Practices of Private, Non-Profit Liberal Arts Institutions: Senior Enrollment Management Administrators' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the perspectives of senior enrollment management administrators in relation to institutional strategic planning documents in order to gain insight into the extent to which "neoliberalism" is influencing the values and practices of private, nonprofit liberal arts institutions. The researcher focused on senior…

  3. Educational and Nonprofit Institutions Receiving Prime Contract Awards, Grants, and Cooperative Agreements for RDT&E,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Fairfax Virginia 13 13 0 0 0 13 INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SCIENCE 100 100 0 0 0 100 Berkeley California 100 100 0 0 0 100 INTERNATIONAL TECHNICAL ASSOC...California 191 191 0 0 0 191 SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY 333 333 0 0 0 333 San Jose California 333 333 0 0 0 333 SANTA FE INSTITUTE OF SCEINCE 5 5 0 0 0 5

  4. Academic Transfer Shock and Social Integration: A Comparison of Outcomes for Traditional and Nontraditional Students Transferring from 2-Year to 4-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahn-Koller, Brooke Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether traditional and nontraditional students who transferred from 2-year to 4-year institutions experienced differences in transfer shock, academic integration, and social integration. A substantial body of knowledge comparing transfer students to native students on transfer shock exists, while only a…

  5. Academic Transfer Shock and Social Integration: A Comparison of Outcomes for Traditional and Nontraditional Students Transferring from 2-Year to 4-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahn-Koller, Brooke Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether traditional and nontraditional students who transferred from 2-year to 4-year institutions experienced differences in transfer shock, academic integration, and social integration. A substantial body of knowledge comparing transfer students to native students on transfer shock exists, while only a…

  6. License Compliance Issues For Biopharmaceuticals: Special Challenges For Negotiations Between Companies And Non-Profit Research Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzio, Todd A; Feindt, Hans; Ferguson, Steven

    2011-09-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are therapeutic products based on biotechnology. They are manufactured by or from living organisms and are the most complex of all commercial medicines to develop, manufacture and qualify for regulatory approval. In recent years biopharmaceuticals have rapidly increased in number and importance with over 400() already marketed in the U.S. and European markets alone. Many companies throughout the world are now ramping up investments in biopharmaceutical R&D and expanding their portfolios through licensing of early-stage biotechnologies from universities and other non-profit research institutions, and there is an increasing number of license agreements for biopharmaceutical product development relative to traditional small molecule drug compounds. This trend will only continue as large numbers of biosimilars and biogenerics enter the market.A primary goal of technology transfer offices associated with publicly-funded, non-profit research institutions is to establish patent protection for inventions deemed to have commercial potential and license them for product development. Such licenses help stimulate economic development and job creation, bring a stream of royalty revenue to the institution and, hopefully, advance the public good or public health by bringing new and useful products to market. In the course of applying for such licenses, a commercial development plan is usually put forth by the license applicant. This plan indicates the path the applicant expects to follow to bring the licensed invention to market. In the case of small molecule drug compounds, there exists a widely-recognized series of clinical development steps, dictated by regulatory requirements, that must be met to bring a new drug to market, such as completion of preclinical toxicology, Phase 1, 2 and 3 testing and product approvals. These steps often become the milestone/benchmark schedule incorporated into license agreements which technology transfer offices use to monitor

  7. Exploring the Academic and Social Experiences of Latino Engineering Community College Transfer Students at a 4-Year Institution: A Qualitative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, LaTesha R.

    As the number of historically underrepresented populations transfer from community college to university to pursue baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), little research exists about the challenges and successes Latino students experience as they transition from 2-year colleges to 4-year universities. Thus, institutions of higher education have limited insight to inform their policies, practices, and strategic planning in developing effective sources of support, services, and programs for underrepresented students in STEM disciplines. This qualitative research study explored the academic and social experiences of 14 Latino engineering community college transfer students at one university. Specifically, this study examined the lived experiences of minority community college transfer students' transition into and persistence at a 4-year institution. The conceptual framework applied to this study was Schlossberg's Transition Theory, which analyzed the participant's social and academic experiences that led to their successful transition from community college to university. Three themes emerged from the narrative data analysis: (a) Academic Experiences, (b) Social Experiences, and (c) Sources of Support. The findings indicate that engineering community college transfer students experience many challenges in their transition into and persistence at 4-year institutions. Some of the challenges include lack of academic preparedness, environmental challenges, lack of time management skills and faculty serving the role as institutional agents.

  8. 48 CFR 31.108 - Contracts with nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with nonprofit organizations. Subpart 31.7 provides principles and standards for determining costs applicable to contracts with nonprofit organizations other than educational institutions, State and local governments, and those nonprofit organizations exempted under OMB Circular No. A-122....

  9. Understanding young adult physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use in community colleges and 4-year post-secondary institutions: A cross-sectional analysis of epidemiological surveillance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lust Katherine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young adults experience many adverse health behavior changes as they transition from adolescence into adulthood. A better understanding of the relationships between health promoting and risky health behaviors may aid in the development of health promotion interventions for various types of young adult post-secondary students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine associations between alcohol and tobacco use and physical activity among 2-year and 4-year college students. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were conducted using 2007 survey data, collected as part of an on-going post-secondary health surveillance system in Minnesota. Students were randomly selected to participant from 14 Minnesota colleges and universities (six 2-year community and/or technical colleges, eight 4-year post-secondary institutions. The 2007 surveillance data included 9,931 respondents. Results The prevalence of demographic characteristics and health behaviors (e.g., physical activity, tobacco use differed between young adults attending 2-year and 4-year post-secondary institutions; in general, those attending 2-year institutions are representative of more at-risk populations. Overall, higher levels of moderate, vigorous and strengthening physical activity were associated with higher levels of alcohol consumption and lower levels of smoking. In general, despite the disparities in the prevalence of these risk behaviors, the associations between the behaviors did not differ substantially between 2-year and 4-year post-secondary populations. Conclusions These findings illustrate links between leading risk behaviors. Interventions targeting multiple risk behaviors among young adults may warrant further consideration. Overall, future research is needed to support and inform young adult health promotion efforts that may be implemented in a wide array of post-secondary institutions.

  10. Enterprising nonprofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, J G

    1998-01-01

    Faced with rising costs, more competition for fewer donations and grants, and increased rivalry from for-profit companies entering the social sector, nonprofits are turning to the commercial arena to leverage or replace their traditional sources of funding. The drive to become more businesslike, however, holds many dangers for nonprofits. In the best of circumstances, nonprofits face operational and cultural challenges in the pursuit of commercial funding. In the worst, commercial operations can undercut an organization's social mission. To explore the new possibilities of commercialization and to avoid its perils, nonprofit leaders need to craft their strategies carefully. A framework-what the author calls the social enterprise spectrum--can help such leaders understand and assess their options. Nonprofits first must identify potential sources of earned income; then they should set clear and realistic financial objectives. Commercial programs don't need to be profitable to be worthwhile. They can instead improve the efficiency and the effectiveness of organizations by reducing the need for donated funds; by providing a more reliable, diversified funding base; and by enhancing the quality of programs by instilling market discipline. In the end, commercial operations will not--and should not--drive out philanthropic initiatives. But thoughtful innovation in the social sector is essential if organizations are to leverage limited philanthropic resources.

  11. 32 CFR 37.1315 - Nonprofit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nonprofit organization. 37.1315 Section 37.1315... of the organization. (b) The term includes any nonprofit institution of higher education or nonprofit... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1315...

  12. Bank foundation – a symbiotic legal institution at the crossroad of banking system and non-profit sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena CATARGIU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the development and omnipresence, in Europe, of the non-profit sector and due to the diversification of the legal entities that are involved in the configuration of the third sector, an legal analysis of the foundation of banking origins, is very appealing. Throughout this study we aim to point out key moments in the evolution of this particular figure, mainly in the Italian legislation. Nevertheless, we intend to identify the legal nature of the foundation of banking origins in order to draw a line between banking and philanthropic activities.

  13. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Kogan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate’s coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee’s immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution. Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than

  14. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, L R; Stewart, S M; Schoenfeld-Tacher, R; Hellyer, P W

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate's coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee's immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution). Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than traditional 4-year

  15. ①浅谈公益性农业科研单位绩效管理%Performance Management in Non-profit Agricultural Research Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔伟丽; 孙慧武; 莽琦; 崔鹤; 郑志灵

    2016-01-01

    With its in-depth development in non-profit agricultural research institutions, with its in-depth development of the national science and technology system reform, performance management as the most effective modern government management, has become increasingly important to promote the comprehensive development of research institutions. In this paper, the current performance management practice of non-profit agricultural research institutions was analyzed and the pending key issues were discussed. Countermeasures for further development were put forward in order to boost the scientific management.%随着公益性农业科研单位绩效管理的深入推进,随着国家科技体制改革的深入开展,绩效管理作为当代政府管理最有效的工具,其对公益性农业科研单位的综合管理和发展日益重要,因此探讨如何有效开展已刻不容缓。本文通过分析公益性农业科研单位绩效管理的有效做法、需要着力研究解决的重点问题,有针对性提出了深入开展绩效管理的对策建议,以期更好的助推农业科技管理工作,促进农业发展。

  16. Educational and Nonprofit Institutions Receiving Prime Contract Awards for RDT&E (Research, Development, Test and Evaluation), Fiscal Year 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    SCIENCE & TECH 162 - UNITED KINGDOM MINISTRY OF DEFENCE 2,670 - UN KINGDOM 162 UN KINGDOM 2,670 INSTITUT FUER ATMOSPHAERISCHE 25 - UNIVERSITE RENE ... DESCARTES 10 - GERMANY 25 FRANCE 10 INVERESK RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL 106 - 8,602 UN KINGDOM 106 ISRAEL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 55 - ISRAEL 55 KEELE UNIVERSITY

  17. Educational and Nonprofit Institutions Receiving Prime Contract Awards for RDT&E (Research, Development, Test and Evaluation), Fiscal Year 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 185 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 13,292 * Rio Piedras PUERTO RIC 135 CHILE 277 San Juan PUERTO RIC 50 Denver Colorado 88 UasI’Engton...UNITED KIN 60 FRANCE 206 ROYAL INSTITUTION 35 CENTRO DI CULTURA SCIENTIFICA 33 * UNITED KIN 35 ITALY 33 ROYAL NORWEGIAN NAVAL MATERIAL 15,621

  18. International cooperation and non-profit organizations: re-reading the institutional role in combating neglected diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinício Chein Feres

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the juridical role of patent rights and the importance of international cooperation concerning the health system, especially those held between the countries of the South, as well as not-for-profit organizations for the prevention and combating neglected diseases. From the theoretical perspective of law as identity, and the methodological approach of qualitative content analysis, some cases of cooperation between states and public and private institutions were collected and analyzed in order to develop new drugs to combat neglected diseases and ensure equity of access to these drugs.

  19. The non-profit sector and the market: opportunities & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    By carefully examining the most important challenges and opportunities facing America's private non-profit organizations, the Non-profit Sector Strategy Group is working to stimulate a new consensus about the non-profit sector's roles and responsibilities, and offer practical recommendations to enhance policy, practice, research, and public education on this crucial set of institutions.

  20. Nonprofits: check your attention to customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, A R

    1982-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations chronically face financial difficulties. Now the situation has worsened because they are being squeezed between the uncertain economic climate and cutbacks in government support. While the managers of these institutions may think that they have already tried everything possible, more than ever they must be innovative in developing additional funding sources. As Mr. Andreasen argues, most nonprofits have failed to exploit marketing techniques which can build support from users or customers that leads to improved cash flow. The author contends that managers of nonprofit organizations focus too closely on their products or services; he admonishes them to give more attention to the needs and wants of their consumers.

  1. Are Nonprofits Obsolete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiko Gathuo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Can the nonprofit sector survive the barrage of government regulations, the fast changing environment, the changing priorities of donors and beneficiaries, the democratized nature of fundraising and a host of other internal and external factors? The nonprofit sector is threatened by its very nature, which is complex and seems to go against the established principles of successful organizations. At the same time the larger outer environment has continued to wreak havoc on a sector that is already internally weak. Can the nonprofit sector, as organized, continue to exist? This paper discusses the internal weaknesses inherent to the nonprofit sector including funding, legal organization, nature of nonprofit work, workers and clients, as well as the external threats to the sector including inter-sectoral competition, regulations and the changing global economic landscape. To stay relevant, nonprofits must adapt to the changing outer environment by evolving internally.

  2. Development Professionals at Religiously Based Nonprofit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Pinder

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of why a fundraising professional would choose to leave his or her employer is critical to the ongoing success of religiously based nonprofit organizations as they work to achieve their mission. Without continuity in the donor relationship, donors will likely leave the organization or become disenfranchised. This study focuses on development professionals at Seventh-Day Adventist institutions across North America. The results of this study are applicable to other religiously based nonprofit organizations. The present article reveals the reasons affecting employee retention and proposes approaches to mitigate the loss of valuable employees. Data were gathered using a structured online survey and analyzed for its descriptive outcomes.

  3. 32 CFR 37.690 - How are nonprofit participants to manage real property and equipment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... governmental organizations. (b) 32 CFR 32.32 and 32.33, for other nonprofit participants, with the exception of nonprofit GOCOs and FFRDCs that are exempted from the definition of “recipient” in 32 CFR part 32. Although... institution of higher education or in a nonprofit organization whose primary purpose is conducting...

  4. GAMES OF INNOVATION: THE ROLES OF NONPROFIT ORGANISATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    MARGARET DALZIEL

    2007-01-01

    Games of innovation involve four types of organisational players: firms, governments, universities, and nonprofit organisations. Of the four, nonprofit organisations are the least well understood. To capture the contributions of all types of organisational players, I adopt the perspective of a focal firm and consider the roles that other organisations play with respect to its ability to innovate. I introduce the roles of institutional enabler and institutional balancer, in which another organ...

  5. Financial Statement Analysis for Nonprofit Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Travaglini,Claudio

    2007-01-01

    A financial statement analysis framework for nonprofit organizations is proposed, based on Nonprofit Commission of Certified Public Accountants Association (Commissione Aziende Nonprofit Ordine Nazionale Dottori Commercialisti) for Italian Nonprofits.

  6. 'Nonprofits' need surplus too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D W

    1982-01-01

    By definition profit refers to the difference between revenue and expenses. In for-profit organizations profit or surplus gives a return to the owners of the company and serves as a source of financing for capital acquisitions and working capital. Nonprofit organizations, which are not allowed a surplus, don't suffer on the first count because they have no owners. But they do suffer on the second count because, if expected to grow, they need to finance asset replacement and growth. In these days when funds for long-term debt are becoming scarcer, this author asserts, the need for regulators to allow 'nonprofits' to keep a surplus is increasing. In this article, he argues for a surplus and then discusses how managers and regulators can determine how much a nonprofit organization should be allowed. He presents a combination of a modified version of the return-on-asset pricing model used in for-profit organizations and a model for assessing working capital needs associated with growth.

  7. 制度变迁视域中政府与非营利组织的关系研究——以上海市非营利组织发展为例%Relationships between the Government and the Non-profit Organizations in the Perspective of Institutional Change Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田恒

    2012-01-01

    At a time of diversification of subjects in public governance,the non-profit organization is undoubtedly one of the important participation subjects.The premise,without any doubt,is that the non-profit organizations are full developed,and that their development is affected by current institutional and environmental forces.Therefore,the institution composes one of the significant variables in analyzing the development of the non-profit organizations and the relationships between the government and the non-profit organizations.In view of this,this paper analyses the logical evolution of the relationships between the government and the non-profit organizations.It is helpful for us to comprehend the trend of the relationships between the government and the non-profit organizations macroscopically,and then provide ideas for policy making.%在强调公共治理主体多元化的今天,非营利组织无疑是重要的参与主体之一。当然,这是以非营利组织的充分发展为前提的,而非营利组织的发展又必然受到特定环境下的制度的影响。因此,制度就构成了分析非营利组织的发展及其与政府关系的一个重要变量。鉴于此,本文从制度变迁视角分析政府与非营利组织关系的逻辑演变,有助于从宏观上理解政府与非营利组织关系的走向,进而为公共政策实践提供思考。

  8. Strategic Planning at the State’s Education Institutions Serving “Open and Distance Education”, Which Are of Nonprofit Concern

    OpenAIRE

    ERDEM, Ali Riza

    2007-01-01

    In conventional education process, there have always been certain obstacles throughout the human history. From that point of view, “Open and Distance Education” are the ones which are much more sensitive to quality and to the dissemination of knowledge to society as well as having certain advantages in getting over matters rather than in-class processes. In our country, for public institutions, the vitality of “strategic planning” has recently been recognized and established as a legal s...

  9. The nonprofit sector's $100 billion opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Bill; Jansen, Paul; Silverman, Les

    2003-05-01

    Imagine what an extra $100 billion a year could do for philanthropic and other nonprofit institutions. According to a new study, the nonprofit sector could free that amount--maybe even more--by making five changes in the way it operates. The study asked two central questions: Does the sector's money flow from its source to its ultimate use as efficiently and effectively as possible? If not, where are the big opportunities to increase social benefit? According to former senator Bill Bradley and McKinsey's Paul Jansen and Les Silverman, nonprofits could save roughly $25 billion a year by changing the way they raise funds. By distributing funds more quickly, they could put an extra $30 billion to work. Organizations could generate more than $60 billion a year by streamlining and restructuring the way in which they provide services and by reducing administrative costs. And they could free up even more money--an amount impossible to estimate--by better allocating funds among service providers. The authors admit that making those changes won't be easy. The nonprofit world, historically seen as a collection of locally focused charities, has become an enormous sector, but it lacks the managerial processes and incentives that help keep the for-profit world on track. And when the baby boomers start to retire in less than a decade, public budgets will be squeezed even more than they are today. If the nonprofit sector is to help the nation cope with the stresses ahead, it must become more efficient and challenge its traditional concepts of stewardship.

  10. 25 CFR 700.83 - Nonprofit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonprofit organization. 700.83 Section 700.83 Indians THE... Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.83 Nonprofit organization. The term nonprofit organization..., professional, or instructional activity on a nonprofit basis and that has established its nonprofit...

  11. Competitive spillovers across non-profit and for-profit nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    The importance of non-profit institutions in the health care sector has generated a vast empirical literature examining quality differences between non-profit and for-profit nursing homes. Recent theoretical work has emphasized that much of this empirical literature is flawed in that previous studies rely solely on dummy variables to capture the effects of ownership rather than accounting for the share of non-profit nursing homes in the market. This analysis considers whether competitive spillovers from non-profits lead to higher quality in for-profit nursing homes. Using instrumental variables to account for the potential endogeneity of non-profit market share, this study finds that an increase in non-profit market share improves for-profit and overall nursing home quality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that non-profits serve as a quality signal for uninformed nursing home consumers.

  12. Service & non-profit marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Čedomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Services are dominantly untouchable products which cannot be physically owned. Services promotion is difficult for its untouchables. Personal sale is very powerful in service companies because customers must interact with employees. Price is very important for service's companies. It has psychological role, economic role and it creates attitude for goal achievement. Marketing goal for nonprofit organizations is to get an answer from target market Development of marketing strategies of nonprofit organizations consists of defining and analyzing target market and creating and maintaining marketing mix. In nonprofit organizations product is usually an idea or a service. Promotion in nonprofit organizations is very important. Personal sale, promotional sale, advertising and publicity are used for communicating an idea and informing people about services.

  13. The new landscape for nonprofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, W P

    1999-01-01

    For most of this century, society's caring functions have been the work of government and charities. But social services in the United States are in a period of transition. Today the U.S. government no longer considers nonprofits to be entitled--or even best qualified--to provide social services. Profit-seeking companies like Lockheed Martin are now winning contracts for such services. William Ryan describes how government outsourcing and a new business mind-set have changed the landscape of social services. The change raises fundamental questions about the mission and future of nonprofits. Ryan attributes the growth of for-profits in the social service industry to four factors: size, capital, mobility, and responsiveness. While those attributes give for-profits an advantage in acquiring new contracts, nonprofits have not yet lost their foothold. Ryan cites examples of organizations like the YWCA and Abraxas to demonstrate various ways that nonprofits are responding--from subcontracting to partnership to outright conversion to for-profit status. By playing in the new marketplace, nonprofits will be forced to reconfigure their operations and organizations in ways that could compromise their missions. Because nonprofits now find themselves sharing territory with for-profits, sometimes as collaborators and sometimes as competitors, the distinctions between these organizations will continue to blur. The point, Ryan argues, is not whether nonprofits can survive opposition from for-profits. Many have already adjusted to the new competitive environment. The real issue is whether nonprofits can adapt without compromising the qualities that distinguish them from for-profit organizations.

  14. Confucius Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Confucius Institute(simplified Chinese:孔子学院;traditional Chinese:孔子學院;pinyin:kǒngzǐ xuéyuàn)is a non-profit public institute which aims at promoting Chinese language and culture and supporting local Chinese teaching internationally through affiliated Confucius Institutes.

  15. Faculty Employment at 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiangmin

    2010-01-01

    We examine the variation in employment levels of part-time faculty, full-time teaching faculty, and full-time professorial faculty across 4-year colleges and universities in the United States. Employment structures and practices in higher education institutions are determined by a variety of economic and institutional factors. For example, a 1%…

  16. The impact of the DoH Commissioning for Quality and Innovation incentive on the success of venous thromboembolism risk assessment in hospitalised patients. A single institution experience in a quality outcome improvement over a 4-year cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlebak, Abdul; Sandhu, Polly; Ali, Vernisha; Jones, Garth; Baker, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    To i) demonstrate compliance with the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation for venous thromboembolism risk assessment ii) to undertake root cause analysis of Hospital Acquired Thrombosis and to investigate its impact on quality of care. Prospective monitoring of all admissions. Imperial College Healthcare Hospitals, London. All Hospital Provider Spells as defined on the NHS Data Model and Dictionary. i) Percentage of patients undergoing Venous Thromboembolism Risk Assessment (VTE-RA) at and 24-hours after admission ii) root cause analysis of Hospital Acquired Thrombosis up to 90 days following discharge. Over a 48-month cycle 83% were overall VTE-RA assessed with 36% in the first 12 months but with significant improvement to ≥95% between April 2013 and April 2015, achieving compliance target since April 2012 involving a massive 633, 850 Spells over the 4 year period. We undertook root cause analysis of all VTE episodes from April 2013 to March 2014, to ascertain Hospital Acquired Thrombosis (HAT), we analysed 433, 174 inpatient days and found a HAT rate of 1 per 1000 with 23% and 24% for DVTs and PEs potentially avoidable respectively. We further analysed VTE risk stratification (n = 1000) and found 37.0% at high risk, 44.4% at medium risk and 18.6 % at low risk, indicating the need of thromboprophylaxis in 81.4% (high and medium) of whom 33.6% were excluded. We achieved 95% RA compliance which has favourably impacted on our daily practice and improved the quality of the clinical care.

  17. Classifying and comparing fundraising performance for nonprofit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Cathleen O

    2013-01-01

    Charitable contributions are becoming increasingly important to nonprofit hospitals, yet fundraising can sometimes be one of the more troublesome aspects of management for nonprofit organizations. This study utilizes an organizational effectiveness and performance framework to identify groups of nonprofit organizations as a method of classifying organizations for performance evaluation and benchmarking that may be more informative than commonly used characteristics such as organizational age and size. Cluster analysis, ANOVA and chi-square analysis are used to study 401 organizations, which includes hospital foundations as well as nonprofit hospitals directly engaged in fundraising. Three distinct clusters of organizations are identified based on performance measures of productivity, efficiency, and complexity. A general profile is developed for each cluster based upon the cluster analysis variables and subsequent analysis of variance on measures of structure, maturity, and legitimacy as well as selected institutional characteristics. This is one of only a few studies to examine fundraising performance in hospitals and hospital foundations, and is the first to utilize data from an industry survey conducted by the leading general professional association for healthcare philanthropy. It has methodological implications for the study of fundraising as well as practical implications for the strategic management of fundraising for nonprofit hospital and hospital foundations.

  18. Competition and Mergers among Nonprofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Should mergers among nonprofit organizations be regulated differently than mergers among for-profit firms? The relevant empirical literature is highly controversial, the theoretical literature is scarce. We analyze the question by modeling duopoly competition with quality-differentiated goods. We co

  19. Competition and Mergers among Nonprofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Should mergers among nonprofit organizations be regulated differently than mergers among for-profit firms? The relevant empirical literature is highly controversial, the theoretical literature is scarce. I analyze the question by modeling duopoly competition with quality-differentiated goods. I comp

  20. Defining the Nonprofit Sector: Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Bjarne; Habermann, Ulla

    Arbejdspapiret, som er en del af det danske bidrag til det internationale forskningsprojekt The Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, redegør for den historiske udvikling af den frivillige sektor i Danmark. Dernæst beskrives forskellige måder af definere og afgrænse den frivillige s...

  1. Defining the Nonprofit Sector: Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Bjarne; Habermann, Ulla

    Arbejdspapiret, som er en del af det danske bidrag til det internationale forskningsprojekt The Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, redegør for den historiske udvikling af den frivillige sektor i Danmark. Dernæst beskrives forskellige måder af definere og afgrænse den frivillige...

  2. The EU Accession's Impact on the Hungarian Nonprofit Sector, The Nonprofit Organisations' Role in the Accession Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György JENEI

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the roles played by the Hungarian nonprofit organizations in the EU accession process. These roles are as follows:• To encourage and organize a dialogue and direct contacts between the “old” and “new” European citizens. • To assist people in becoming informed about and involved in European networks, to build solidarity and develop participative European citizenship. • To tackle the problems which constitute serious obstacles in the way of meeting European standards. The paper also tries to identify the very first impacts of the EU accession on the Hungarian nonprofit sector. The authors detect the implications of the regional approach for the co-operation between nonprofit organizations and analyze whether the Hungarian third sector and its governmental partner institutions are prepared for a prompt reaction to the accessibility of the EU structural funds.

  3. 22 CFR 228.32 - Nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonprofit organizations. 228.32 Section 228.32 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES ON SOURCE, ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY FOR... USAID Financing § 228.32 Nonprofit organizations. (a) Nonprofit organizations, such as...

  4. Safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor biosimilars in engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation for haematological malignancies: a 4-year, single institute experience with different conditioning regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Simona; Stroppa, Elisa M.; Moroni, Carlo F.; Arbasi, Maria C.; Trabacchi, Elena; Di Franco, Anna; Lazzaro, Antonio; Bernuzzi, Patrizia; Moretto, Mauro; Arcari, Annalisa; Bosi, Costanza; Riva, Alessandra; Cavanna, Luigi; Vallisa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Background Filgrastim biosimilars have recently been introduced into clinical practice. To date biosimilars have demonstrated comparable efficacy and safety as the originator in chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Published experience in engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is limited and concerns relatively few patients. Materials and methods With the aim of assessing the efficacy and the safety of filgrastim biosimilars in post-ASCT bone marrow recovery, we conducted a single institution, retrospective study in 56 lymphoma and myeloma patients who received filgrastim biosimilars (Tevagrastim® and Zarzio®) at standard doses from day 5. We compared our results with recently published data on the originator. A cost analysis of each biosimilar was performed. Results Neutrophil counts recovered in 55 patients. The median number of filgrastim biosimilar vials injected was seven per patient. The median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery was 10 and 12 days, respectively. Twenty-six patients had febrile neutropenia, in half of whom the agent involved was identified. In the cost analysis, the use of Tevagrastim® and Zarzio® was associated with cost reductions of 56% and of 86%, respectively. Discussion Despite differences in CD34+ cell counts and time of starting filgrastim, our results in terms of time to engraftment and median number of vials injected are similar to published data. Comparing our results by single conditioning regimen to recent literature data, the time to engraftment and duration of hospitalisation were equivalent. Significant differences were observed in the incidence of febrile neutropenia, perhaps due to different preventive and prophylactic protocols for infections. Although prospective studies should be performed to confirm our results, filgrastim biosimilars were found to be effective and safe in engraftment after ASCT. PMID:25761321

  5. Business-nonprofit partnerships as a driver of internal marketing in nonprofit organizations. Consequences for nonprofit performance and moderators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ignacio Álvarez-González

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonprofit organizations (NPOs confront competitive pressures derived from complex economic and societal challenges. Their capacity to fulfil their mission increasingly depends on developing successful alliances with key external and internal stakeholders, including cooperative interorganizational relationships. In this context, the aim of this research is to analyze: (1 to which extent business-nonprofit partnerships (BNPPs foster the development of an internal marketing approach by NPOs; (2 the impact of this approach to human resource management on nonprofit performance; and (3 the possible moderating effect of the funding strategy of the nonprofit. This empirical research, based on a survey to a representative sample of Spanish NPOs, shows that cooperative relationships between nonprofit and business organizations are closely associated with a process of knowledge transfer, resulting in improved nonprofit performance; although these positive effects depend on the capacity of NPOs to generate income from commercial sources.

  6. Defining the non-profit sector: some lessons from history

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Susannah

    2000-01-01

    This paper seeks to establish whether the structural-operational definition of the sector, used by the John Hopkins Comparative Non-profit Sector Project (JHCNSP), is universal in its applicability. Historical case studies of primary health care and social housing provision in nineteenth-century England demonstrate that the definition cannot accommodate the institutional diversity of earlier periods and does not produce meaningful sectoral distinctions. The structural-operational definition r...

  7. 24 CFR 200.195 - Removal of nonprofit organization from Nonprofit Organization Roster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of nonprofit organization from Nonprofit Organization Roster. 200.195 Section 200.195 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Placement and Removal Procedures for Participation in FHA Programs Nonprofit Organization § 200.195...

  8. 24 CFR 200.194 - Placement of nonprofit organization on Nonprofit Organization Roster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Placement of nonprofit organization on Nonprofit Organization Roster. 200.194 Section 200.194 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Placement and Removal Procedures for Participation in FHA Programs Nonprofit Organization §...

  9. Academic and Non-Profit Accessibility to Commercial Remote Sensing Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A. S.; Farr, B.

    2013-12-01

    Remote Sensing as a topic of teaching and research at the university and college level continues to increase. As more data is made freely available and software becomes easier to use, more and more academic and non-profits institutions are turning to remote sensing to solve their tough and large spatial scale problems. Exelis Visual Information Solutions (VIS) has been supporting teaching and research endeavors for over 30 years with a special emphasis over the last 5 years with scientifically proven software and accessible training materials. The Exelis VIS academic program extends to US and Canadian 2 year and 4 year colleges and universities with tools for analyzing aerial and satellite multispectral and hyperspectral imagery, airborne LiDAR and Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Exelis VIS academic programs, using the ENVI Platform, enables labs and classrooms to be outfitted with software and makes software accessible to students. The ENVI software provides students hands on experience with remote sensing software, an easy teaching platform for professors and allows researchers scientifically vetted software they can trust. Training materials are provided at no additional cost and can either serve as a basis for course curriculum development or self paced learning. Non-profit organizations like The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and CGIAR have deployed ENVI and IDL enterprise wide licensing allowing researchers all over the world to have cost effective access COTS software for their research. Exelis VIS has also contributed licenses to the NASA DEVELOP program. Exelis VIS is committed to supporting the academic and NGO community with affordable enterprise licensing, access to training materials, and technical expertise to help researchers tackle today's Earth and Planetary science big data challenges.

  10. Persistence by 2-Year College Graduates to 4-Year Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    Presents findings from a study of the relationship between the characteristics of 3,762 Connecticut 2-year college students 25 or older and their persistence to 4-year colleges. Reports that students with higher perceptions of social and institutional support and those over 35 were more likely to persist to 4-year institutions. (10 citations) (AJL)

  11. Faithful Strategies : How Religion Shapes Nonprofit Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filistrucchi, L.; Prüfer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This paper studies the strategies employed by Catholic and Protestant nonprofit hospitals in Germany and traces them back to the theological foundations of those religions, which shape managers' values. We find that Catholic nonprofit hospitals follow a strategy of horizontal diversificati

  12. CompassPoint Nonprofit Services: strengthening the capacities of nonprofits (1971-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschman, Jessica R; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    CompassPoint Nonprofit Services is a nonprofit organization that delivers cutting-edge research and support services to the nonprofit community. Over its 30-year history, CompassPoint has transitioned from a small management support agency into a nationally-recognized leader in nonprofit capacity building and nonprofit management research. Through its strong internal operations and external connections, the agency has been able to stay current on the multiple challenges facing the local and national nonprofit community. CompassPoint has been a valuable resource for the nonprofit sector as it has struggled to retain its identity over the past 30 years, in relation to political and economic changes that have altered the functioning of the sector as a whole.

  13. Ambidexterity in non-profit, voluntary organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    Artiklen forbinder organisatorisk læring med strategisk ledelse af nonprofit, frivillige organisationer. Den forklarer hvor de to forbundne strategiske udfordringer – frivilligt engagement og organisatorisk læring kan håndteres ved at anvende indsigt fra litteraturen om udforskning og udnyttelse og...... om ambidekstrale organisationer. Artiklen præsenterer tre cases om nonprofit, frivillige organisationer for at tydeliggøre forbindelserne mellem frivilligt engagement og organisatorisk læring. De strategiske implikationer er, at nonprofit frivillige organisationer bør have et ambidekstralt forhold...

  14. Taxation of Non-profit organization

    OpenAIRE

    BŘEHOVSKÝ, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays non-profit organizations are the integral parts of developed economics. They fill gap in the market, where exist market failures. Their main aim is not to reach profit but to offer services in which ``invisible hand of market{\\crqq} fail. But it doesn{\\crq}t mean, that they can{\\crq}t reach profit. Attention is on reasons why these non-profit organizations exist, potential profit or revenue are secondary aims. For these reasons there exist some differences in taxation of non-profit o...

  15. Marketing the charitable image of the non-profit hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolu, S; Parsons, R J

    1992-01-01

    Because of nonprofit hospitals' charitable contribution to communities, the great majority of these nonprofit hospitals deserve their tax-exempt status. In order for them to maintain this status, hospitals must promote their charitable image in the community. The hospital that is successful in promoting this image will benefit in several ways: 1. The citizens of the community will look on the hospital in a favorable light. 2. The local and state government officials will not feel compelled to vigorously pursue hospital tax dollars. 3. Those people in the community who need charity care will know of its availability. 4. New taxing legislation is less likely to be passed if the legislators know that their public is well educated on the benefits the hospitals provide. Over the years, the image of the hospital has become that of a business rather than that of a charitable service organization. The public has been inundated with information by the media on the business of healthcare rather than the social service role of the hospital. In order for nonprofit institutions to survive, they will need to communicate otherwise the public will remain ignorant, and the repercussions could be disastrous.

  16. Organizational capacity of nonprofit social service agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Sharon; Berner, Marueen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. social safety net is formed by governmental and nonprofit organizations, which are trying to respond to record levels of need. This is especially true for local level organizations, such as food pantries. The organizational capacity literature has not covered front-line, local, mostly volunteer and low resource organizations in the same depth as larger ones. This analysis is a consideration of whether grassroots nonprofit organizations have the ability to be a strong component of the social safety net. Based on the literature on organizational capacity, a model is developed to examine how service delivery at the local level is affected by organizational capacity. Surprisingly, we find few of the characteristics previously identified as important are statistically significant in this study. Even when so, the material effect is negligible. Current organizational capacity research may apply to larger nonprofits, but not to the tens of thousands of small community nonprofits, a significant limitation to the research to date.

  17. The use of interest rate swaps by nonprofit organizations: evidence from nonprofit health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J; Trussel, John

    2006-01-01

    Although the use of derivatives, particularly interest rate swaps, has grown explosively over the past decade, derivative financial instrument use by nonprofits has received only limited attention in the research literature. Because little is known about the risk management activities of nonprofits, the impact of these instruments on the ability of nonprofits to raise capital may have significant public policy implications. The primary motivation of this study is to determine the types of derivatives used by nonprofits and estimate the frequency of their use among these organizations. Our study also extends contemporary finance theory by an empirical examination of the motivation for interest rate swap usage among nonprofits. Our empirical data came from 193 large nonprofit health care providers that issued debt to the public between 2000 and 2003. We used a univariate analysis and a multivariate analysis relying on logistic regression models to test alternative explanations of interest rate swaps usage by nonprofits, finding that more than 45 percent of our sample, 88 organizations, used interest rate swaps with an aggregate notional value in excess of $8.3 billion. Our empirical tests indicate the primary motive for nonprofits to use interest rate derivatives is to hedge their exposure to interest rate risk. Although these derivatives are a useful risk management tool, under conditions of falling bond market interest rates these derivatives may also expose a nonprofit swap user to the risk of a material unscheduled termination payment. Finally, we found considerable diversity in the informativeness of footnote disclosure among sample organizations that used interest rate swaps. Many nonprofits did not disclose these risks in their financial statements. In conclusion, we find financial managers in large nonprofits commonly use derivative financial instruments as risk management tools, but the use of interest rate swaps by nonprofits may expose them to other risks

  18. 7 CFR 3015.205 - General provisions for grants and cooperative agreements with institutions of higher education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... agreements with institutions of higher education, other nonprofit organizations, and hospitals. 3015.205... General provisions for grants and cooperative agreements with institutions of higher education, other... higher education, other nonprofit organizations and hospitals that the recipient assure and...

  19. Economics, mangement and development of non-profit making organization

    OpenAIRE

    Piskoř, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Non-profit making organization. Management analysis of non-profit making organization and its development. Utilization of rational action theory in management of non-profit making organization acting in dance. Example of an autarchic, flourishing and competitive non-profit making organization.

  20. Economics, mangement and development of non-profit making organization

    OpenAIRE

    Piskoř, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Non-profit making organization. Management analysis of non-profit making organization and its development. Utilization of rational action theory in management of non-profit making organization acting in dance. Example of an autarchic, flourishing and competitive non-profit making organization.

  1. 7 CFR 4279.71 - Public bodies and nonprofit corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. 4279.71... § 4279.71 Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. Any public body or nonprofit corporation that... by a public body or nonprofit corporation in compliance with OMB Circulars A-128 or A-133 or...

  2. Development of Nonprofit-Sector in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xhiliola Agaraj (Shehu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide information on the development of non-profit organizations (NPOs in Albania. In Albania there were two political systems, communist system from 1945-1990 and democratic system after 1990. These systems have contributed to the development of non-profit sector in the country. Secondary sources are used to identify the development of non-profit sector in terms of number, field of activity, financial sources and primary sources are used to indicate which it is actually the situation of non-profit sector in Albania. Interviews and questionnaire distributed in the area of the north, south of Albania and Tirana (capital of Albania is used to provide information regarding the type of NPOs by location, field of ​​activity of NPOs in Albania by type and location, financial sources and sector development trends. Limitations of the paper are that in the study are taken non-profit organizations that are registered at Court of Tirana District as associations, foundations, and the center and not political parties or religious organizations. For data processing is used SPSS computer program.

  3. Describing an Academic and Nonprofit Organization Partnership to Educate At-Risk Adolescents about Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Steven J.; Skager, Cherie; Kraiger, Anneliese

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence to suggest community-based interventions can change community-wide behaviors and attitudes toward cardiovascular health. This article describes a partnership between an academic institution and a community nonprofit organization to develop and implement a cardiovascular health promotion program targeting at risk high…

  4. A New Source of Nonprofit Neurosurgical Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Amali M; Nicholas, Joyce S; O'Brien, Peter; Shabani, Hamisi; Janabi, Mohamed; Kisenge, Peter; Ellegala, Dilantha B; Bass, R Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and qualify a novel funding mechanism for international neurosurgical nonprofits. The article first identifies and explains neurosurgeons' means for practicing in the developing world through a literature review. After this examination of the current funding methods for surgical care in low-income regions, the work transitions to an explanation of the applications and limitations of a new resource: the internal wealth of a developing country. This wealth may be leveraged by way of a for-profit hospital to create sustainable and domestic funding for nonprofit neurosurgical training. The applicability of the proposed mechanism extends beyond the field of neurosurgery to nonprofits in any health-related discipline. Factors influencing the viability of this mechanism (including local disease burden, economic trajectory, and political stability) are examined to create a baseline set of conditions for success.

  5. Why most private hospitals are nonprofit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, C W

    1983-01-01

    In recent decades, restrictions that have been imposed on hospitals organized for profit have served to restructure the industry, generating a constant trend toward nonprofit organizations. Small proprietary hospitals in particular have disappeared while corporate chains have come to dominate what is left of the for-profit hospital sector. The trend toward nonprofit hospitals is not explained by the failure of the health service markets and is not the result of a desire to serve the public interest more effectively. Although a number of arguments have been advanced to explain the shift, the hypothesis that seems most consistent with the existing evidence is that the nonprofit form of organization serves most effectively to strengthen the restrictive character of the market for physicians' services and thereby to serve the individual economic interests of the physicians.

  6. A comparison of the capital structures of nonprofit and proprietary health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussel, John

    2012-01-01

    The relative amount of debt used by an organization is an important determination of the organization's likelihood of financial problems and its cost of capital. This study addresses whether or not there are any differences between proprietary and nonprofit health care organizations in terms of capital structure. Controlling for profitability, risk, growth, and size, analysis of covariance is used to determine whether or not proprietary and nonprofit health care organizations use the same amount of leverage in their capital structures. The results indicate that there is no difference in the amount of leverage between the two institutional types. Although nonprofit and proprietary organizations have unique financing mechanisms, these differences do not impact the relative amount of debt and equity in their capital structures.

  7. Antitrust and hospital mergers: does the nonprofit form affect competitive substance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaney, Thomas L

    2006-06-01

    Following a string of government losses in cases challenging hospital mergers in federal court, the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice issued their report on competition in health care seeking to set the record straight on a number of issues that underlie the judiciary's resolution of these cases. One such issue is the import of nonprofit status for applying antitrust law. This essay describes antitrust's role in addressing the consolidation in the hospital sector and the subtle influence that the social function of the nonprofit hospital has had in merger litigation. Noting that the political and social context in which these institutions operate is never far from the surface, it takes issue with the proposal to cabin merger doctrine so as to deny the significance of nonprofit status in merger analysis. Given the dynamic change in the regulatory climate and heterogeneity of local health care markets, it advises courts not to accept the FTC's preemptive standard regarding the significance of hospitals' nonprofit status and keep open the possibility of fashioning new presumptive rules tailored to more complete economic accounts of nonprofit firm behavior.

  8. Organizational resilience: Nonprofit organizations' response to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Hope; Mellinger, Marcela Sarmiento

    2016-05-24

    Organizational resilience refers to the ability to respond productively to significant disruptive change and transform challenges into opportunities. There is a gap in the literature about resilient nonprofit organizations and its application for identifying organizational conditions for successful adaption to external variables that threaten their existence. The aim of this study was to identify organizational characteristics that point to the resilience of nonprofit behavioral healthcare organizations as they successfully adapt to funding changes. A multiple case study of two behavioral health nonprofit organizations was conducted. Data was collected through interviews and focus groups, and analyzed through a qualitative content analysis. Using the framework of resilience, six themes that equipped these organizations to successfully adapt to funding changes were identified. They included: commitment to the mission, improvisation, community reciprocity, servant and transformational leadership, hope and optimism, and fiscal transparency. The findings suggest that incorporating these qualities into an organizational system equips it to systematically adapt to funding changes and other disruptive challenges. Using resilience as a process and not simply an outcome after recovery, nonprofit organizations can have the capacity to continuously respond to challenges and provide uninterrupted and valuable services to society.

  9. Student Empowerment in the Nonprofit Management Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    In summer 2011, a course titled "Nonprofit Management" was offered as an undergraduate, junior-level course for nontraditional, adult, distance students at the University of Alabama (UA) who were enrolled in the New College LifeTrack (NCLT) program. This article discusses how the course was centered around a service-learning experience…

  10. The nonprofit sector in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ary Burger; Paul Dekker

    2001-01-01

    This paper aims to provide an analytical description of the nonprofit sector in the Netherlands. We will review its historical and legal background, examine its treatment and definition, and chart the sector's contributions to the Dutch economy and society. This working paper is the first version o

  11. Nonprofit Communications from a Corporate Communications Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Ava

    2006-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations, such as social service agencies, charities, and hospitals, plan and prepare communications that are vital to their missions. Although not corporations, these organizations produce news releases, newsletters, and annual reports that are similar to those created in the corporate sector. In this research project for a course…

  12. Nonprofit Sector: Workforce Education Needs and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, David

    2009-01-01

    When some people think of nonprofit organizations, they think of small charities that are short-staffed, often struggle financially, and provide basic human needs to the most vulnerable in the society. Others think of organizations that support the civic and social infrastructure of communities, states, and nation, and serve as a vital component…

  13. Gender, occupation, and promotion to management in the nonprofit sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.; Heyse, L.; Mills, M.

    2014-01-01

    Although one can assume the work values within nonprofit organizations promote gender equality in promotion decisions, there is preliminary evidence that in the nonprofit sector women are underrepresented in higher management positions. Whereas the mechanisms resulting in underrepresentation of wome

  14. Gender, occupation, and promotion to management in the nonprofit sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.; Heyse, L.; Mills, M.

    2014-01-01

    Although one can assume the work values within nonprofit organizations promote gender equality in promotion decisions, there is preliminary evidence that in the nonprofit sector women are underrepresented in higher management positions. Whereas the mechanisms resulting in underrepresentation of

  15. Management trends: Internationalization of non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inić Branimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organizations are increasingly gaining importance in the modern economy with their development and their numbers increasing day by day. It is very important to note that non-profit organizations are often subject to various benefits that the for-profit companies are not. Thus, for example, preferential tax status of non-profit organizations is manifested primarily in the form of exemption from corporate income tax. In addition, private non-profit organizations enjoy various other state, local and federal taxes exemptions. Under certain conditions, these organizations are exempt from taxes on donations and membership fees. A feature that differentiates various non-profit organizations and profit-oriented companies is their source of income. Profit oriented companies depend on their income, obtained from sales of their goods or services to customers, who usually cover the price and cost of goods and services plus the profit. In contrast, nonprofit organizations are very dependent on membership fees, tax exemptions, members donations or depend on funds of the sponsoring agency which covers most of their costs, for example a federal government agency. Those non-profit organizations that have substantial operating costs beyond national borders and do not identify themselves as purely domestic in their mandate are International non-profit organizations. Most non-profit organizations remain in their national boundaries, on the territory of the country in which they were created, but a large number of non-profit organizations rapidly internationalize, and some larger non-profits have grown into important global actors. The paper includes the following sections: (1 introduction, (2 why is the 'non-profit' important, (3 the internationalization of non-profit organizations, (4 sources of income of non-profit organizations (4.1. causality of impact and of strategic decisions in cases pertaining to universities, (5 the limits of strategic

  16. 29 CFR 2.36 - Status of nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Status of nonprofit organizations. 2.36 Section 2.36 Labor... Beneficiaries § 2.36 Status of nonprofit organizations. (a) In general, DOL does not require that an... programs. Many such programs, however, do require an organization to be a “nonprofit organization” in...

  17. Auditing Government-nonprofit Relations in the Brazilian Post-reformist Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alketa Peci

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent decades have been marked by a rising interaction between the State and nonprofits in order to addressincreasingly complex public issues. Government-nonprofit relations were guided by a complex and diverse legal framework, that transformed not only the implementation of public policies, but also the auditing practices and control of such relations. Previous studies have shown the influence of NPM reforms in auditing practices and institutions, of particular interest to this research is the Theory of the Audit Explosion (TEA. This paper analyzes the control of government-nonprofits relations, under the perspective of the TEA, specifically trying to comprehend if there is a causal relationship between the growth of government-nonprofit relations and the audit explosion in the Brazilian context, as predicted by the theory. A field research, based on documentary data and interviews, was undertaken in three Brazilian SAIs. The conclusions highlight the limitations of the explanatory capacity of TEA in Brazil. Although a formal audit explosion was observed, as predicted by TEA, there are substantive barriers to the audit explosion. This is mainly due to the organizational and institutional aspects related to governmental fund transfer entities. Such problems reflect the poor quality of the partnerships themselves and might be a consequence of political variables such as the spurious relationships of some parliamentary members or public employees with partner NGOs.

  18. 社会资本举办的非营利性医疗机构营利行为分析与对策研究%Study on Seeking Profit Behavior and Countermeasures of Non-profit Medical Institution s Launched by Social Capital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段光锋; 田文华; 金春林; 吴扬; 夏文明

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, the article summarized the possible seeking profit behavior based upon the characteristics of non-profit hospital launched by social capital. Secondly, the reasons of seeking profit behavior were analyzed. Finally, the preventive countermeasures were put forward, which would make sure that non-profit hospitals launched by social capital were non-profit and public interest.%根据非营利性医疗机构的性质,文章归纳总结了社会资本举办的非营利性医疗机构可能存在的营利行为,并对其愿因进行了分析,最后提出了防范社会办非营利性医疗机构营利行为的对策,以确保其非营利性和公益性.

  19. Nonprofit brand strength’s moderational role

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Wymer

    2015-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the nonprofit brand strength construct are conceptualized.  Brand strength is defined as a multidimensional construct, composed by brand familiarity, brand remarkability, and brand attitude.  Brand familiarity refers to the level of knowledge the target audience has about the brand object. Brand attitude refers to the degree to which a brand object is perceived favorably by a target group. Brand remarkability refers to the degree to which a brand object is pe...

  20. How do nonprofit hospitals manage earnings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Andrew J; Van Horn, R Lawrence

    2005-07-01

    We hypothesize that, unlike for-profit firms, nonprofit hospitals have incentives to manage earnings to a range just above zero. We consider two ways managers can achieve this. They can adjust discretionary spending [Hoerger, T.J., 1991. 'Profit' variability in for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals. Journal of Health Economics 10, 259-289.] and/or they can adjust accounting accruals using the flexibility inherent in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). To test our hypothesis we use regressions as well as tests of the distribution of earnings by Burgstahler and Dichev [Burgstahler, D., Dichev, I., 1997. Earnings management to avoid earnings decreases and losses. Journal of Accounting and Economics 24, 99-126.] on a sample of 1,204 hospitals and 8,179 hospital-year observations. Our tests support the use of discretionary spending and accounting accrual management. Like Hoerger (1991), we find evidence that nonprofit hospitals adjust discretionary spending to manage earnings. However, we also find significant use of discretionary accruals (e.g., adjustments to the third-party-allowance, and allowance for doubtful accounts) to meet earnings objectives. These findings have two important implications. First, the previous evidence by Hoerger that nonprofit hospitals show less variation in income may at least partly be explained by an accounting phenomenon. Second, our findings provide guidance to users of these financial statements in predicting the direction of likely bias in reported earnings.

  1. Strategic communication management in the non-profit sector:  a simplified model

    OpenAIRE

    11714166 - Wiggill, Magrita Nicolene

    2011-01-01

    A model for strategic communication management was developed in South Africa on the basis of the excellence study and relationship management theories. This normative, theoretical model has been applied as part of a project in non-profit organisations (NPOs), government institutions and small-to-medium sized companies. However, the operational reality of organisations' communication practices has not been measured against the model. It was therefore the objective of this article to comprehend...

  2. Nonprofits in Production: Race, Place, and the Politics of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    In the contemporary United States, nonprofits serve as central conduits of urban reform and welfare provision including legal, health and job assistance for racialized neighborhoods. Despite the salience of nonprofit organizations in urban politics, few academic analyses investigate their crucial political work. My work critiques normative academic and popular understandings of nonprofit organizations as ahistorical and nonpolitical service providers fundamentally delinked from the state. In ...

  3. Partnerships and Perceived Organizational Effectiveness of Nonprofit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, interorganizational collaboration has become a prominent aspect of organizational functioning for many different types of organizations. Central Florida nonprofit organizations are catching on to this trend as they find increasing value in the empowerment of partnership. This study aims to contribute to the advancement of the current literature by investigating factors affecting nonprofit collaboration. The study demonstrates that nonprofits tend to collaborate when management perceive that collaboration is needed to accomplish the mission of the organization.

  4. Partnerships and Perceived Organizational Effectiveness of Nonprofit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, interorganizational collaboration has become a prominent aspect of organizational functioning for many different types of organizations. Central Florida nonprofit organizations are catching on to this trend as they find increasing value in the empowerment of partnership. This study aims to contribute to the advancement of the current literature by investigating factors affecting nonprofit collaboration. The study demonstrates that nonprofits tend to collaborate when management perceive that collaboration is needed to accomplish the mission of the organization.

  5. Marketing strategy of non-profit organisation Chance for Children

    OpenAIRE

    Holá, Kristýna

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis addresses the application of marketing in nonprofit organizations using "Chance for children" a civic association as an example. The main aim of this work is to define marketing strategies in nonprofit organizations, the greatest emphasis are placed on communication strategy and partly on product strategy. In the practical part I introduce the chosen nonprofit organization as such, outline the range of their products and their current marketing situation. Based on the re...

  6. Business Associations, Lobbying, and Endogenous Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larrain Aylwin, M.J.; Prüfer, J.O.

    2014-01-01

    Are business associations - private, formal, nonprofit organizations designed to promote the common interests of their members - positive or negative for the economy and overall welfare? Scholars from institutional and organizational economics, on the one side, and from industrial organization, law

  7. Business Associations, Lobbying, and Endogenous Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larrain Aylwin, M.J.; Prüfer, J.O.

    2014-01-01

    Are business associations - private, formal, nonprofit organizations designed to promote the common interests of their members - positive or negative for the economy and overall welfare? Scholars from institutional and organizational economics, on the one side, and from industrial organization, law

  8. APECTS REGARDING INTERNAL AUDIT PLANNING IN THE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA VITAN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Our study refers to the planning of internal audit within the nonprofit organizations. The starting point is the hypothesis that planning of internal audit in nonprofit organizations is printed by their specific features and we want to highlight the way this influence occurs, which are the specific objectives that have to be pursued within the internal audit. During our research, in order to test the hypothesis we studied the national legal regulations, the specific literature of the field and we realized a practical documentation by consulting the internal audit guides of a foreign nonprofit organization. Our study reveals that in this area the legislation in force refers only to the compulsiveness of developing the internal audit activity in some specific categories of nonprofit organizations, without referring to the specific rules of organizing this activity within the nonprofit organizations. The national literature of the field is poor, but at the international level, the authors have concerns regarding the internal audit within the nonprofits. From a practical point of view, we emphasized the specific aspects of nonprofit organizations followed while planning internal audit regarding the financial system, budgetary system, internal control system, financing sources and human resources. We concluded that each audited field is influenced by the specific features of non-profit organizations within them. These features must be taken into account when planning the audit and drawing up the specific procedures within the nonprofits in order to add value to the audited information within internal audit engagement.

  9. Classification of Program Activities: How Nonprofits Create Social Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Brown

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper defines and describes a framework to classify program activities utilized by nonprofit organizations to achieve public benefit objectives. Drawing on theory and practice from strategy, nonprofit management, and program planning, the paper proposes five program activities differentiated by the value created. Several factors define and differentiate the approaches and serve as decision areas for nonprofit managers when developing program strategies. Classifying program activities facilitates further research as it provides a common language and framework to analyze strategic choices enacted in nonprofit organizations.

  10. Community benefit activities of private, nonprofit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Clement, Jan P; Hsieh, Hui-Min

    2010-12-01

    The definition of hospital community benefits has been intensely debated for many years. Recently, consensus has developed about one group of activities being central to community benefits because of its focus on care for the poor and on needed community services for which any payments received are low relative to costs. Disagreements continue, however, about the treatment of bad debt expense and Medicare shortfalls. A recent revision of the Internal Revenue Service's Form 990 Schedule H, which is required of all nonprofit hospitals, highlights the agreed-on set of activities but does not dismiss the disputed items. Our study is the first to apply definitions used in the new IRS form to assess how conclusions about the adequacy of nonprofit hospital community benefits could be affected if bad debt expenses and Medicare shortfalls are included or excluded. Specifically, we examine 2005 financial data for California and Florida hospitals. Overall, we find that conclusions about community benefit adequacy are very different depending on which definition of community benefits is used. We provide thoughts on new directions for the current policy debate about the treatment of bad debts and Medicare shortfalls in light of these findings.

  11. Oxymoron no more: the potential of nonprofit drug companies to deliver on the promise of medicines for the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Victoria G; Woo, Katherine; Lipton, Helene Levens

    2005-01-01

    Although some pharmaceutical company efforts to develop and distribute drugs in developing countries have been successful, many fall short of meeting needs in resource-poor nations. In the context of public-private partnerships, we discuss the concept of a nonprofit pharmaceutical company dedicated to developing and distributing drugs for diseases endemic in developing countries. Using the experience of the Institute for OneWorld Health, we present the vision, core elements of the product development model, and challenges confronting this model. Despite limitations, early successes raise hopes that a nonprofit drug company can exist successfully both as a global health organization and as a business.

  12. Generation and distribution of wealth in Blumenau non-profit social service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loriberto Starosky Filho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organizations exist all over the world and they have an important role to the economy. These are not aimed at profits and they appeared to develop initiatives of social aspects. The main goal of this research is to check how the wealth is generated and distributed by the non-profits that are enrolled in the Welfare Assistance Council in Blumenau city. This data was gotten through a qualitative, descriptive and documentary research based on analysis of published financial statements of a sample consisting of  nineteen non-profit Welfare Assistance Organizations. The results showed that: a To maintain their activities most  institutions  rely on resources coming from social grants, partnerships and donations; b The added value distributed represents more than fifty percent of the total proceeds in a large number  of institutions; c in most organizations the biggest share of the wealth distribution was used to the workers payment; d a low percentage of  the wealth is to lenders and government. As a general rule, most organizations presented a very low rate of retentions for themselves because they do not seek profits. Their goals are related to social services activities.

  13. Profiles of Nonprofit Education Management Organizations: 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This is the second "Profiles" report to examine nonprofit education management organizations (EMOs). This report is modeled after the 11 annual "Profiles" that cover for-profit EMOs. While the number of schools operated by for-profit EMOs grew rapidly in the 1990s and is now leveling off, the number of schools operated by nonprofit EMOs has been…

  14. Nonprofits' Expectations in PR Service-Learning Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Cathy; Andrews, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Little scholarly evidence exists about the communication needs of nonprofit community partners and what they think constitutes an ideal service-learning (SL) relationship. This study seeks to fill this gap by identifying SL projects and relationships that best serve nonprofit community partners with communication needs. The researchers conducted a…

  15. Rice University: Building an Academic Center for Nonprofit Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaworth, Angela

    2012-01-01

    According to the author, the setting for their nonprofit education center was close to ideal: Support from a dean who cares deeply about nonprofit organizations; encouragement from the university and its renewed focus on reaching beyond its walls on the eve of its centennial; and a generous gift from alumni who have been affiliated with the…

  16. 7 CFR 3015.193 - Other non-profit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other non-profit organizations. 3015.193 Section 3015.193 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL... non-profit organizations. (a) OMB Circular No. A-122, including any subsequent amendments to...

  17. Doing Good in Challenging Times: How Nonprofits Can Profit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Argues that the economic trends of the past decade have led to the entrepreneurial nonprofit organization, with strengthened management, redesigned financial systems, revenue-producing ventures, and partnerships with the corporate world. Successful strategies used to meet the challenges faced by nonprofit organizations, including libraries, are…

  18. Sustainability of Rural Nonprofit Organizations: Czech Republic and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Valentinov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of nonprofit organizations is a key concern for today’s nonprofit scholars and practitioners. Building upon the nonprofit economics literature, the present paper introduces the distinction between the demand-side and supply-side determinants of nonprofit sustainability and makes the case for the discrepancy between them. This discrepancy presents not only a generic conceptual explanation of the nonprofit sustainability problems but is also applicable to the context of the European rural nonprofit sector. Three arguments are advanced. First, the notorious implementation problems of LEADER partnerships can be explained as a manifestation of the above discrepancy. Second, and related, the rural context implies the tendency of the supply-side determinants of nonprofit sustainability to undermine the demand-side ones. Third, recent empirical findings from the Czech Republic show that this tendency does not necessarily imply the possibility of a clear classification of the demand-side and supply-side sustainability determinants. Rather, those features of rural areas and communities that significantly affect the size of the local nonprofit sector exhibit a controversial entanglement of demand-side and supply-side identities.

  19. Nonprofits and Evaluation: Empirical Evidence from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Joanne G.; Fredericks, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore what evaluation looks like, in practice, among today's nonprofit organizations on the basis of their survey results. The types of evaluation activities nonprofit organizations are engaging in on a regular basis, as well as the types of data they are collecting and how they are using these data, are described. How nonprofits…

  20. The Role of Nonprofits in Educational Technology Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    For decades, nonprofit organizations have played a vital role in educational technology innovation. "Sesame Street," online high schools, probeware for science and mathematics teaching and learning, and many other innovations now widely used both in and outside schools were developed by nonprofits, including not only universities but also…

  1. A Framework for Assessing the Performance of Nonprofit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chongmyoung; Nowell, Branda

    2015-01-01

    Performance measurement has gained increased importance in the nonprofit sector, and contemporary literature is populated with numerous performance measurement frameworks. In this article, we seek to accomplish two goals. First, we review contemporary models of nonprofit performance measurement to develop an integrated framework in order to…

  2. In for the long haul: knowledge translation between academic and nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, S Mikael; Benoit, Cecilia; Casey, Lauren; Phillips, Rachel; Burns, David

    2010-01-01

    Although scientists are continually refining existing knowledge and producing new evidence to improve health care and health care delivery, far too little scientific output finds its way into the tool kits of practitioners. Likewise, the questions that clinicians would like to be answered all too rarely get taken up by researchers. In this article we focus on knowledge translation challenges accompanying a longitudinal research program with nonprofit organizations providing direct and indirect health and social services to disadvantaged groups in one region of Canada. Three essential factors influencing authentic and reciprocal knowledge transfer and utilization between nonprofit service providers and researchers are discussed: strong institutional partnerships, the use of skilled knowledge brokers, and the meaningful involvement of frontline personnel.

  3. Nonprofit brand strength’s moderational role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Wymer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The nature and characteristics of the nonprofit brand strength construct are conceptualized. Brand strength is defined as a multidimensional construct, composed by brand familiarity, brand remarkability, and brand attitude. Brand familiarity refers to the level of knowledge the target audience has about the brand object. Brand attitude refers to the degree to which a brand object is perceived favorably by a target group. Brand remarkability refers to the degree to which a brand object is perceived by a target group to be extraordinary. In the brand management nomological net, brand strength acts as a moderator, influencing the strength of the relationship between marketing tactics (antecedents and marketing outcomes (consequents. Brand strength’s inter-dimensional relationships are conceptualized. A brand strength strategy grid is presented, which informs brand management strategy based on a brand’s current levels of brand familiarity and brand remarkability.

  4. The Walking Egg non-profit organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, N

    2011-01-01

    The Walking Egg non-profit organisation (npo) was founded in 2010 by scientists and an artist to realise the Arusha Project which strives to implement accessible infertility programmes in resource-poor countries. Right from the start The Walking Egg has opted for a multidisciplinary and global approach towards the problem of infertility and in cooperation with the Special Task Force (STF) on "Developing countries and infertility" of the European Society of Human reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the WHO, it gathers medical, social and economical scientists and experts along with artists to discuss and work together towards its goal. The project aims to raise awareness -surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the population.

  5. Democracy and non-profit housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Vorre; Langergaard, Luise Li

    2017-01-01

    Resident democracy as a special form of participatory democratic set-up is fundamental in the understanding, and self-understanding, of the non-profit housing sector in Denmark. Through a case study, the paper explores how resident democracy is perceived and narrated between residents and employees...... at a housing association. The study indicates that the meta-story of democracy is disconnected from practice and the lived lives of residents. Three analytical tensions structure the analysis, which relate to the conditions for realizing the democratic ideal embedded in the structure of the sector....... The tensions are related to representative versus participatory democracy; collectivity versus individuality; and service versus welfare. The tensions elucidate how resident democracy is squeezed between different logics, which result in an ambiguous setting for practising democracy. Based on the results...

  6. Nonprofit, payload process improvement through lean management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Melissa

    Organizations that are successful and competitive long-term have learned to efficiently utilize their resources, such as money, people, facilities, and time. Over the last half-century, there have been a variety of theories and techniques put forth on how to do this. One recent theory applied in the aerospace industry is Lean Management (LM), which emphasizes a customer focus and a rigorous elimination of activities that do not add value from the customer's perspective. LM has not, until now, been evaluated for small, nonprofit, one-off production organizations (NOPOs). Previous research on LM focused on for-profit companies and large-scale production organizations, producing relatively similar products repetitively (e.g. automobiles, commercial satellites, aircraft, and launch vehicles). One-off production organizations typically create one-of-a-kind products. The purpose of this research is to examine the applicability of LM to a NOPO. LM will improve resource utilization and thereby competitiveness, as well as exploring a new area of knowledge and research. The research methodology consists of conducting case studies, formal and informal interviews, observation and analysis in order to assess whether and how LM may be beneficial. The research focuses on one particular NOPO, BioServe Space Technologies (BST): a nonprofit, payload development organization. Additional NOPOs were interviewed in order to draw more generalized conclusions about LM benefits. The research demonstrates that LM is applicable to NOPOs, thus providing a tool to improve efficiency and competitiveness. Results from this research are guidelines for payload development organizations to implement LM, and highlighting potential LM weaknesses. A major conclusion is that LM needs some minor modifications to be applicable and useful to NOPOs, particularly in terms of value stream mapping. The LM implementation roadmap developed for NOPOs introduces customized metrics, as well as including standard

  7. Lights and Shadows of Business-Nonprofit Partnerships: The Role of Nonprofit Learning and Empowerment in this Ethical Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Sanzo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Business-nonprofit partnerships have gained increased relevance in the context of the evolution of corporate social responsibility strategies and the existence of extremely complex societal and environmental challenges. However, these collaborations are also associated with important ethical concerns. Under such a scenario, this study attempts to shed light on the effects of high value-added partnerships—i.e., those characterized by a process of nonprofit empowerment—on two potential risks of business-nonprofit partnerships: co-optation and loss of personnel’s identification with the nonprofit’s social mission. Based on a two-step survey to a representative sample of Spanish nonprofits involved in social partnerships with firms, results reveal the existence of a mixed influence in both cases, positive and negative. Several implications for practitioners are drawn, specifically about how firms and nonprofits can reduce the negative ethical consequences of partnering.

  8. Using of Marketing Communication for Distance Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, R. Ayhan

    2005-01-01

    Because of increased competition for scarce resources, marketing has become an important activity of many nonprofit organizations. Higher education institutions, as one of these nonprofit organizations, provide us with excellent examples of this trend (Hayes, 1991). The marketing of higher education has received a tremendous amount of emphasis and…

  9. THE CONSTITUTION, ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUMITRU FRANCA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organizations are associations, foundations or federations which use their own assets and revenues in order to pursue activities of general, community or non-patrimonial purpose. According to these legal regulations, associations and foundations can be constituted by natural or legal persons with the purpose of undertaking such activities of general, community or non-patrimonial (non-profit purpose. The organization and operation of non-profit organizations presents a series of particularities in the case of associations as opposed to foundations, but there are also common elements.

  10. Comparative Corporate Governance of Non-Profit Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Based on the impressive work of Hopt and von Hippel (2010), I review the comparative corporate governance of non-profit organizations and propose topics for future research. There is evidence of agency problems in non-profit as well as for-profit organizations, but the governance mechanisms...... employed to address them are by necessity different. In the absence of important governance mechanisms like monitoring by external owners or performance based pay, other mechanisms like regulation, reputation and transparency come to the foreground. However, we have little systematic knowledge of the costs...... and benefits of alternative governance arrangements in non-profits, which provides a range of opportunities for future research....

  11. FIGHTING AGAINST CORRUPTION: POTENTIAL OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (BASED ON EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN NIZHNEKAMSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu. Nosanenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of non-profit organizations in Russia is inquiry of time today. Difficulties in carrying out reforms, the termination of foreign financing of "the third sector", the European sanctions, all these factors stimulate the Russian society to selforganization and force NPOs to take the responsibility for more and more wide range of problems, bringing, thus, to the forefront function of social control. In the last decade studying of "nonprofitable sector" in Russia was carried out generally at the level of territorial subjects of the Russian Federation and didn't affect the level of local government. Thus, the difficulty with collection of information was one of problems. Practically all noted that from 100% of the registered NPOs less than a half really works. This study is the first analysis of the third sector of Nizhnekamsk and its interaction with the government. The results show the strengths and weaknesses of civil society of the city, the feasibility of social control functions. Identified characteristics of non-profit organizations of Nizhnekamsk, as an institution of civil society. It has enormous potential for the fight against corruption, but is not putting itselve such purposes because of financial and organizational weakness. The study's results can be used to develop a concept of civil society and human capital formation at the municipal level.

  12. Running quickbooks in nonprofits the only comprehensive guide for nonprofits using quickbooks

    CERN Document Server

    Ivens, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Updated to include additional topics and to cover all versions of the software, this guide provides the most vital information on using QuickBooks to track financial data in nonprofit organizations. Management of donors, grants, and pledges, and topics such as allocating expenses to programs, handling donor restrictions, and generating the reports needed for donors and tax returns are covered in detail. In addition to easy-to-follow instructions and many tips and workarounds, information on using QuickBooks for fundraising is provided.

  13. User-centric technology design for nonprofit and civic engagements

    CERN Document Server

    Saeed, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increased global political importance of the nonprofit sector, its technological support and organizational characteristics have become important fields of research. In order to conduct effective work, nonprofits need to communicate and coordinate effectively. However, such settings are generally characterized by a lack of resources, an absence of formal hierarchical structures and differences in languages and culture among the activists. Modern technologies could help nonprofit networks in improving their working. In order to design appropriate technological support for such settings, it is important to understand their work practices, which widely differ from traditional business organizations. This book aims to strengthen the body of knowledge by providing user studies and concepts related to user centered technology design process for nonprofit settings. The examination of ethnographic studies and user centered evaluation of IT artifacts in practice will further the understanding of design requ...

  14. PARTICULARITIES OF THE FINANCIAL INFORMATION SYSTEM IN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Corina MIHALȚAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial importance of financial information in the context of a knowledge society like ours, the present paper aims to highlight the typical aspects of the financial information system in nonprofit organizations, for the very reason that, inside it, the financial information is produced, which is so necessary to the decisional process. Starting from the hypothesis that the financial information system is influenced by the features specific of the nonprofit organizations, we have applied a methodological approach that has led us to the formulation of certain conclusions. We have studied the literature, the legislation in this domain and the practical realities of the nonprofit organizations analyzed. We concluded that the financial information system of the nonprofit organizations is structured according to the activities undertaken, the programs assumed, the type of funding, the type of target group, the budget-based activities and the presence of volunteers.

  15. Unforeseen consequences: Medicaid and the funding of nonprofit service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Scott W; Smith, Steven Rathgeb

    2014-12-01

    Medicaid reimbursements have become a key source of funding for nonprofit social service organizations operating outside the medical care sector, as well as an important tool for states seeking resources to fund social service programs within a devolving safety net. Drawing on unique survey data of more than one thousand nonprofit social service agencies in seven urban and rural communities, this article examines Medicaid funding of nonprofit social service organizations that target programs at working-age, nondisabled adults. We find that about one-quarter of nonprofit service organizations--mostly providers offering substance abuse and mental health treatment in conjunction with other services--report receiving Medicaid reimbursements, although very few are overly reliant on these funds. We also find Medicaid-funded social service nonprofits to be less accessible to residents of high-poverty neighborhoods or areas with concentrations of black or Hispanic residents than to residents of more affluent and white communities. We should expect that the role of Medicaid within the nonprofit social service sector will shift in the next few years, however, as states grapple with persistent budgetary pressures, rising Medicaid costs, and decisions to participate in the Medicaid expansion provisions contained within the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  16. Child center closures: Does nonprofit status provide a comparative advantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Marcus; Klein, Sacha; Freisthler, Bridget; Weiss, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Reliable access to dependable, high quality childcare services is a vital concern for large numbers of American families. The childcare industry consists of private nonprofit, private for-profit, and governmental providers that differ along many dimensions, including quality, clientele served, and organizational stability. Nonprofit providers are theorized to provide higher quality services given comparative tax advantages, higher levels of consumer trust, and management by mission driven entrepreneurs. This study examines the influence of ownership structure, defined as nonprofit, for-profit sole proprietors, for-profit companies, and governmental centers, on organizational instability, defined as childcare center closures. Using a cross sectional data set of 15724 childcare licenses in California for 2007, we model the predicted closures of childcare centers as a function of ownership structure as well as center age and capacity. Findings indicate that for small centers (capacity of 30 or less) nonprofits are more likely to close, but for larger centers (capacity 30+) nonprofits are less likely to close. This suggests that the comparative advantages available for nonprofit organizations may be better utilized by larger centers than by small centers. We consider the implications of our findings for parents, practitioners, and social policy.

  17. 40 CFR 35.4011 - Do the general grant regulations for nonprofit organizations apply to TAGs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonprofit organizations apply to TAGs? 35.4011 Section 35.4011 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Assistance General § 35.4011 Do the general grant regulations for nonprofit organizations apply to TAGs? Yes... other nonprofit organizations. Because EPA awards TAGs to nonprofit organizations, 40 CFR part...

  18. 24 CFR 1006.335 - Use of nonprofit organizations and public-private partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of nonprofit organizations and... Requirements § 1006.335 Use of nonprofit organizations and public-private partnerships. (a) Nonprofit organizations. The DHHL must, to the extent practicable, provide for private nonprofit organizations...

  19. 7 CFR 1260.113 - Established national nonprofit industry-governed organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... national nonprofit industry-governed organizations. Established national nonprofit industry-governed organizations means organizations which: (a) Are nonprofit organizations pursuant to sections 501(c) (3), (5) or... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Established national nonprofit...

  20. 7 CFR 1220.114 - National nonprofit producer-governed organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 1220.114 National nonprofit producer-governed organization. The term national nonprofit producer-governed organization means an organization that— (a) Is a nonprofit organization pursuant to section 501(c... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National nonprofit producer-governed...

  1. 24 CFR 5.107 - Audit requirements for non-profit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Non-profit Organizations” (see 24 CFR 84.26). For HUD programs, a non-profit organization is the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audit requirements for non-profit... Federal Requirements; Waivers § 5.107 Audit requirements for non-profit organizations....

  2. Norwegian Fashion Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Heggli, Karolina; Soraas, Nina Cathrine; Thorstensen, Nina Fredrikke; Thorso, Mia

    2010-01-01

    This report has been conducted in cooperation with Norwegian Fashion Institute (hereinafter NFI). NFI is a non-profit organisation that represents the participants within the Norwegian fashion Industry. It seeks to make Norwegian fashion brands recognized at home and overseas. There are 90 members in the organisation that represents the wide spectrum of Norwegian fashion. Obtaining knowledge of the market will help NFI promote Norwegian fashion brands in the UK and identify the...

  3. Norwegian Fashion Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Heggli, Karolina; Soraas, Nina Cathrine; Thorstensen, Nina Fredrikke; Thorso, Mia

    2010-01-01

    This report has been conducted in cooperation with Norwegian Fashion Institute (hereinafter NFI). NFI is a non-profit organisation that represents the participants within the Norwegian fashion Industry. It seeks to make Norwegian fashion brands recognized at home and overseas. There are 90 members in the organisation that represents the wide spectrum of Norwegian fashion. Obtaining knowledge of the market will help NFI promote Norwegian fashion brands in the UK and identify the...

  4. Pamplin College of Business partners with CFA Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business has been named a CFA Program Partner of CFA Institute, the global, non-profit professional association that administers the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) curriculum and examination program.

  5. Interrupter resistance and wheezing phenotypes at 4 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussee, JE; Smit, HA; Koopman, LP; Wijga, AH; Kerkhof, M; Corver, K; Vos, APH; Gerritsen, J; Grobbee, DE; Brunekreef, B; Merkus, PJFM; Jongste, JCC

    2004-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish young children with respiratory symptoms who will develop asthma from those with transient symptoms only. Measurement of interrupter resistance may help to identify children at high risk of asthma. The aim of this study is to compare interrupter resistance in 4-year-ol

  6. The Effectiveness of Alcohol Policies in 4-Year Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Gayle T.

    2010-01-01

    A problem facing American universities is heavy drinking by the student body which results in unintentional injuries and deaths, illegal offenses, sexual assault, altercations, and academic demise. The relationship between the type of alcohol policy enacted on campus and alcohol consumption among undergraduate students attending 4-year public…

  7. The Effectiveness of Alcohol Policies in 4-Year Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Gayle T.

    2010-01-01

    A problem facing American universities is heavy drinking by the student body which results in unintentional injuries and deaths, illegal offenses, sexual assault, altercations, and academic demise. The relationship between the type of alcohol policy enacted on campus and alcohol consumption among undergraduate students attending 4-year public…

  8. Fecal Calprotectin in Healthy Children Aged 1-4 Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingling Zhu

    Full Text Available Calprotectin has been well emulated recently in adults as well as in children. The aim of this study was to assess fecal calprotectin concentrations in healthy children aged from 1 to 4 years.Volunteers were enlisted from 3 nurseries. A brief questionnaire was used to ensure these children meet the inclusion criteria, and some clinical and sociodemographic factors were collected. Anthro software (version 3.1 was used to calculated Length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ, weight-for-age Z-scores (WAZ, and weight-for-length Z-scores (WLZ respectively. Fecal calprotectin was detected by a commercially available ELISA.In total 274 children were recruited, with age ranging from 1 to 4 years old. The median FC concentration was 83.19 μg/g [range 4.58 to 702.50 μg/g, interquartile range (IQR 14.69-419.45 μg/g] or 1.92 log10 μg/g (range 0.66 log10 to 2.85 log10 μg/g, IQR 1.17 log10-2.62 log10 μg/g. All of the children were divided into three groups, 1-2 years (12-24 months, 2-3 years (24-36 months, 3-4 years (36-48 months, with median FC concentrations 96.14 μg/g (1.98 log10 μg/g, 81.48 μg/g (1.91 log10 μg/g, 65.36 μg/g (1.82 log10 μg/g, respectively. There was similar FC level between boys and girls. FC concentrations showed a downward trend by the growing age groups. A statistic difference was found in FC concentrations among groups 1-2 years, 2-3 years and 3-4 years (P = 0.016. In inter-groups comparison, a significant difference was found between children aged 1-2 years and children aged 3-4 years (P = 0.007. A negative correlation trend was found between age and FC concentration (Spearman's rho = -0.167, P = 0.005 in all the participants. A simple correlation was performed among WLZ, WAZ, birth weight, or birth length with FC, and there was no correlation being observed.Children aged from 1 to 4 years old have lower FC concentrations compared with healthy infants (<1years, and higher FC concentrations when comparing with children older than 4

  9. Using of Marketing Communication for Distance Education Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    R.Ayhan Yilmaz

    2005-01-01

    Using of Marketing Communication for Distance Education Institutions R. Ayhan YILMAZ, Ph.DAnadolu UniversityCommunication Sciences FacultyEskisehir, TURKEY INTRODUCTION Because of increased competition for scarce resources, marketing has become an important activity of many nonprofit organizations. Higher education institutions, as one of these nonprofit organizations, provide us with excellent examples of this trend (Hayes, 1991). The marketing of higher education has received a tremendous a...

  10. Energy efficiency in nonprofit agencies: Creating effective program models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Prindle, B.; Scherr, M.I.; White, D.L.

    1990-08-01

    Nonprofit agencies are a critical component of the health and human services system in the US. It has been clearly demonstrated by programs that offer energy efficiency services to nonprofits that, with minimal investment, they can educe their energy consumption by ten to thirty percent. This energy conservation potential motivated the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to conceive a project to help states develop energy efficiency programs for nonprofits. The purpose of the project was two-fold: (1) to analyze existing programs to determine which design and delivery mechanisms are particularly effective, and (2) to create model programs for states to follow in tailoring their own plans for helping nonprofits with energy efficiency programs. Twelve existing programs were reviewed, and three model programs were devised and put into operation. The model programs provide various forms of financial assistance to nonprofits and serve as a source of information on energy efficiency as well. After examining the results from the model programs (which are still on-going) and from the existing programs, several replicability factors'' were developed for use in the implementation of programs by other states. These factors -- some concrete and practical, others more generalized -- serve as guidelines for states devising program based on their own particular needs and resources.

  11. Non-Profit Education Providers vis-a-vis the Private Sector: Comparative Analysis of Non-Governmental Organizations and Traditional Voluntary Organizations in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Masooda

    2008-01-01

    Under the New Policy Agenda, international development institutions have promoted non-profit organizations (NPOs) in developing countries, on a dual logic: firstly, they deliver social services more efficiently than the state; secondly, they mitigate equity concerns around privatization of basic social services by reaching out to the poor. Based…

  12. [4 years experience with the Ulm autologous transfusion concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkens, H H; Geiger, P; Schleinzer, W; Weindler, M; Wollinsky, K H; Pohland, H

    1990-04-01

    After a 4-year period in clinical practice the autologous transfusion concept Ulm (ATU) has proved its value. The effort and expense involved are entirely justified by obvious medical advantages. The patients' active involvement in the therapeutic procedure is a remarkable aspect of positive motivation. Furthermore, the medical staff is positively motivated, too, in spite of the obvious additional load to their daily routine work.

  13. Facebook Usage as a Predictor of Retention at a Private 4-Year Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jason; Reese, Jeff; Beck, Richard; Mattis, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based social networking has become ubiquitous on college and university campuses. However, little is known about how this form of networking reflects social integration which is considered to be an integral component of student persistence. To address this topic, a random sample of 375 entering freshman were used to evaluate the…

  14. Perlite exposure and 4-year change in lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatli, M; Erdinç, M; Erdinç, E; Okyay, E

    2001-07-01

    Perlite is a volcanic glass or amorphous aluminium silicate composed of 71-75% SiO(2). When heated to 800-1100 degrees C, it expands to form processed perlite, which has a low density, high surface area, and a low thermal conductivity. The objective was to determine the effect of perlite exposure on pulmonary function tests. Pulmonary function tests in conjunction with chest radiogram were carried out in 36 perlite-exposed workers and 22 unexposed office workers in 1992 and 1996. Respirable dust level exceeded permissible dust levels in work places in the 4 years under study. Transfer coefficient (K(CO)) decline was significant in nonsmoker perlite-exposed workers (n=9), and found to be 5.28+/-0.71 (predicted 4.32+/-0.11) and 3.84+/-0.96 (predicted 4.18+/-0.18) 1/min/mmHg, in 1992 and 1996, respectively (Pperlite workers and office workers showed significant obstruction to airflow in small airways with respect to predicted values and 4-year change in transfer factor (T(L), CO) was significant. Although predicted, 12-year perlite exposure did not lead to a decrease in mean pulmonary function test parameters, there was a tendency to a decline in T(L), CO in the 4-year study period, which may be due to high perlite dust levels. As early effects of perlite dust exposure may not be detected by spirometric measurements alone, the transfer coefficient should be added to spirometry.

  15. Cost of breast cancer treatment. A 4-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta, A P; Brooks, R J; Leibowitz, A N; Solin, L J

    1996-10-28

    To determine the longitudinal cost of the treatment of patients with breast cancer. An analysis was performed of 200 women with 205 newly diagnosed breast cancers during 1989 in a health maintenance organization population (US Healthcare, Blue Bell, Pa). Medical records and claims data were analyzed for the total costs of medical care during the 4-year period after diagnosis. The costs over time were analyzed for clinical stage and use of mammography screening. The total costs of medical care during the 4-year period after diagnosis were strongly related to clinical stage at diagnosis, with higher total costs for patients with stages III to IV at diagnosis compared with patients with stages 0 to II at diagnosis. The cost for all stages of disease declined after years 1 to 2, with the exception of stage II, which increased slightly in years 3 to 4. The use of screening mammography was associated with a significant decrease in the cost of medical care during the 4-year study period. The goal of mammography screening programs should be to achieve downstaging to stages 0 to 1 to achieve reduction in breast cancer mortality and to reduce the overall consumption of health care resources for the treatment of breast cancer. These cost data should be considered within the framework of future cost-effective analysis for screening mammography programs.

  16. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  17. Survival of the fittest: capacity building for small nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Naim; Healy, Bridget F; Arslan, Tolga

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses capacity building activities designed for small nonprofits who are members of the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida's ADEPT program. The Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida (SHFBCF) is a nonprofit organization that collects, stores and distributes donated food to more than 450 nonprofit partners in Brevard, Lake, Orange, Osceola, Seminole and Volusia counties. This project sought to delineate, design, and implement the capacity building trainings desired by ADEPT member agencies. It also analyzed the relationship between the number of clients served, number of staff, number of volunteers, and the training needs. At the conclusion of the capacity building trainings, data was collected to gauge participants' perceptions of the capacity building trainings and their perceived impact on the effectiveness of the ADEPT Program and its member agencies. The generalizability and applicability of the research results to other small community-based organizations providing social and human services is also discussed.

  18. Information, Community, and Action: How Nonprofit Organizations Use Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Lovejoy, Kristen; 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2012.01576.x

    2012-01-01

    The rapid diffusion of "microblogging" services such as Twitter is ushering in a new era of possibilities for organizations to communicate with and engage their core stakeholders and the general public. To enhance understanding of the communicative functions microblogging serves for organizations, this study examines the Twitter utilization practices of the 100 largest nonprofit organizations in the United States. The analysis reveals there are three key functions of microblogging updates-"information," "community," and "action." Though the informational use of microblogging is extensive, nonprofit organizations are better at using Twitter to strategically engage their stakeholders via dialogic and community-building practices than they have been with traditional websites. The adoption of social media appears to have engendered new paradigms of public engagement. Keywords: microblogging; Twitter; social media; stakeholder relations; organizational communication; organization-public relations; nonprofit organi...

  19. Nonprofit Organizations in Disaster Response and Management: A Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper tracks changes in the national disaster management system with regard to the nonprofit sector by looking at the roles ascribed to nonprofit organizations in the Federal Response Plan (FRP, National Response Plan (NRP, and National Response Framework (NRF. Additionally, the data collected from news reports and organizational after action reports about the inter-organizational interactions of emergency management agencies during the September 11 th attacks and Hurricane Katrina are analyzed by using network analysis tools. The findings of the study indicate that there has been an increase in the interactions of the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (NVOAD network member organizations on par with policy changes in the NRP to involve nonprofit organizations in the national disaster planning process. In addition, those organizations close to the center of the network experienced enhanced communication and resource acquisition allowing them to successfully accomplish their missions, a finding that supports the development of strong network connections.

  20. Internal branding : Within a Swedish non-profit organization

    OpenAIRE

    Diep, Lisa; Stedt, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The aid sector has received a lot of attention the recent years whereas the public has recognized the societal situation in developing countries. As many people has become more generous with their donations, an increasing number of non-profit organizations (NPO) has emerged which has created a competitive environment in the non-profit sector. As a result, many NPOs has started to adapt business-like qualities such as implementing a marketing strategy and building a brand. The purpose of this ...

  1. Internal branding : Within a Swedish non-profit organization

    OpenAIRE

    Diep, Lisa; Stedt, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The aid sector has receive a lot of attention the recent years whereas the public has recognized the societal situation in developing countries. As many people has become more generous with their donations, an increasing number of non-profit organizations (NPO) has emerged which has created a competitive environment in the non-profit sector. As a result, many NPOs has started to adapt business-like qualities such as implementing a marketing strategy and building a brand. The purpose of this s...

  2. Can Management Practices Make a Difference? Nonprofit Organization Financial Performance during Times of Economic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The economic crisis presented unprecedented challenges to nonprofit organizations to sustain their services. In this study, we examined both financial and management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations during times of economic stress. In particular, we investigated whether strategic planning and plan implementation, revenue diversification, and board involvement help nonprofit organizations deal with financial uncertainty and strengthen financial performance. Despite the negative impacts that the economic downturn had on nonprofit organizations, we found that the implementation of strategic plans can help nonprofit organizations reduce financial vulnerability. Our findings call attention to key management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations.

  3. Can Management Practices Make a Difference? Nonprofit Organization Financial Performance during Times of Economic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian HU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The economic crisis presented unprecedented challenges to nonprofit organizations to sustain their services. In this study, we examined both financial and management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations during times of economic stress. In particular, we investigated whether strategic planning and plan implementation, revenue diversification, and board involvement help nonprofit organizations deal with financial uncertainty and strengthen financial performance. Despite the negative impacts that the economic downturn had on nonprofit organizations, we found that the implementation of strategic plans can help nonprofit organizations reduce financial vulnerability. Our findings call attention to key management factors that influence the financial performance of nonprofit organizations.

  4. A case of parasitic myoma 4 years after laparoscopic myomectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Temizkan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of parasitic myoma complaining of abdominal pain, constipation, dyspareunia and dysmenorrhea 4 years after laparoscopic myomectomy. We performed laparoscopic myomectomy for multiple parasitic myomas. Three myomas were very firmly attached to bowel and mesentery. Parasitic myoma after laparoscopic surgery is very rare condition there are almost 35 cases in the literature. It is related with variable symptoms or can be asymptomatic. Laparoscopic surgeons should be aware of this situation, and further investigation should be made in case of suspicion. Surgery for parasitic myomas can be difficult in case of bowel and mesentery involvement and patient should be informed about the extensive surgery.

  5. Nonprofit financial assessment and research service learning: Evaluating the performance of an animal welfare nonprofit organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Maguire

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to evaluate the current financial and compliance status of an animal welfare nonprofit organization (NPO by: analysis of trends over time using information reported on tax filings (Form 990; vertical and horizontal analyses of financial statements; analysis of trends over time using information from financial statements; reconciliation of financial statements to Form 990; ratio analysis of Form 990 Information; and comparison of reported information to local analogs and national standards. This project is conducted in collaboration with The Chapin Foundation. This research serves as a research service learning project with the participation of Master of Accountancy graduate students at Coastal Carolina University. Once the results are presented, recommendations are given for improving operational efficiency and achieving best practices. These recommendations are presented in the form of both short-term items to be addressed immediately—defined in this study as within 60 days—and long-term items to be undertaken in the future. Resources for applicable standards and requirements are also provided.

  6. Through the Looking Glass: Educational Accountability Mirrors Nonprofit Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoole, Emily R.

    2005-01-01

    The field of education has been shaken by announcements from prominent foundations (Annenberg Foundation, Pew Charitable Trusts, and Atlantic Philanthropies) that higher education will no longer be a high-priority funding area, due, in part, to a lack of measurable results (Marcy, 2003). Similarly, the nonprofit sector has been taken aback by an…

  7. Profiles of Nonprofit Education Management Organizations: 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    This is the third Profiles report to examine nonprofit education management organizations (EMOs). This report is modeled after the 12 annual reports that cover for-profit EMOs. While the number of schools operated by for-profit EMOs grew rapidly in the 1990s and is now leveling off, the data contained in this report illustrate how the number of…

  8. A Foucauldian Reading of Learning in Feminist, Nonprofit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on research with eight board members and eight directors of 10 feminist, nonprofit organizations. A Foucauldian poststructuralist reading of the data gives voice to undertheorized aspects of learning in feminist organizations and makes visible the power relationships. It explores women's learned practices of resistance and…

  9. Measurement of the effectiveness of non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudz Petro Vasilovych

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of implementing evaluation of effectiveness in non-profit organizations activity is grounded in this article. Shown adaptation EERL approach based on result monitoring. Analyzed one of the activity effectiveness on the example of the civil organization. Evaluation of effectiveness is important as for organizations to improve their services as to present the results for audience.

  10. Governance and Board Member Identity in an Emerging Nonprofit Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulgur, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Organizational effectiveness is a term without a single definition about the nonprofit community; it is difficult to define, much less measure, due to the wide disparity in that community. Inconsistency in the sector leads to an array of hypotheses in the literature addressing organizational effectiveness. Through a comprehensive examination of a…

  11. Organizational Characteristics Associated With Fundraising Performance of Nonprofit Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Cathleen Owens; Landry, Amy Yarbrough

    2015-01-01

    Fundraising has become increasingly important to nonprofit hospitals as access to capital has grown more difficult and reimbursement for services more complex. This study analyzes the variation in organizational characteristics and fundraising performance among nonprofit acute care hospitals in the United States to identify and measure critical factors related to one key fundraising performance indicator: public support. Results indicate that the presence of an endowment, along with its value, investments in fundraising, and the geographic location of the organization, account for approximately 46% of variance in public support among nonprofit hospitals. The use of a separate foundation for the fundraising operation is not necessarily associated with measures of fundraising success; however, a majority of hospitals do use a foundation, signaling a strategic choice that may be made for numerous reasons. The study results and limitations are discussed and recommendations are made for maximizing the effectiveness of the fundraising enterprise within nonprofit hospitals. Increasing awareness of challenges associated with fundraising success will enhance the strategic management of fundraising operations by hospital executives and board members.

  12. Vocational Home Economics Education Classes as Non-Profit Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Vesta C.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests organizing one or more vocational home economics classes by the entrepreneur system to operate the class as a nonprofit business. Lists activities for planning and implementing the operation, benefits for the students, and ideas to develop skills in professional sewing, food service production, and occupational homemaking. (MF)

  13. Nonprofit Groups Offer Genetic Testing for Jewish Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how nonprofit organizations like Hillel are offering free genetic testing for Jewish college students. A growing number of colleges, including Pittsburgh, Brandeis University, and Columbia University are offering students free or reduced-cost screenings for diseases common to Jewish population. Genetic diseases common to…

  14. CRM Implementation in Nonprofits: An Analysis of the Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, Kelly E.

    2012-01-01

    Constituent Relationship Management ("CRM") is defined as an organization-wide strategy designed to enable the organization to better manage, track and steward its constituents. CRM has benefited for-profit enterprises for nearly three decades. In the nonprofit sector, the concept of CRM is fairly new. Despite the increase in CRM…

  15. Micro-Level Interactions in Business-Nonprofit Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vock, M.; van Dolen, W.; Kolk, A.

    2014-01-01

    While most research on business-nonprofit partnerships has focused on macro and meso perspectives, this article pays attention to the micro level. Drawing on various theoretical perspectives from both marketing and management, this study conceptually relates the outcomes of active employee

  16. Transformative Learning in Nonprofit Organizations: A Feminist Interpretive Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.; Peters, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on interpretive research, influenced by a feminist theoretical framework, with 8 women, in their 20s to 60s, who work or volunteer in feminist nonprofit organizations. Particular emphasis is placed on their experience of transformative learning in these organizations; the linkages with the theory of transformative learning;…

  17. 10 CFR 603.635 - Cost principles for nonprofit participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 603.635 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 603.635 Cost principles for nonprofit participants. So as not to force financial system changes for...

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  19. Legitimacy, trustee incentives, and board processes: the case of public and private non-profit nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaelheyns, Nico; Eeckloo, Kristof; Van Hulle, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Using a unique data set, this study explores how type of ownership (government/private) is related to processes of governance. The findings suggest that the neo-institutional perspective and the self-interest rationale of the agency perspective are helpful in explaining processes of governance in both government- and privately owned non-profit organizations. Due to adverse incentives and the quest for legitimacy, supervising governance bodies within local government-owned non-profit institutions pay relatively less attention to the development of high quality supervising bodies and delegate little to management. Our findings also indicate that governance processes in private institutions are more aligned with the business model and that this alignment is likely driven by a concern to improve decision making. By contrast, our data also suggest that in local government-owned institutions re-election concerns of politicians-trustees are an important force in the governance processes of these institutions. In view of these adverse incentives - in contrast to the case of private organizations - a governance code is unlikely to entail much improvement in government-owned organizations.

  20. Physically active lifestyles for all Americans: a call to action for non-profit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Colleen; Hutber, Adrian; McCarthy, William J

    2009-10-01

    Many nonprofit organizations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are strategically poised to encourage and facilitate healthier lifestyles. Non-profit organizations can play leadership roles in improving physical levels among all Americans.

  1. FACILITATORS OF INTERNET PROMOTION (E-BROCHURE ADOPTION BY NON-PROFIT ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Oly Ndubisi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet promotion, otherwise e-brochure (EB or partial e-commerce adoption by non-profit organisations denotes the use of the Internet to provide business and service related information by academic institutions (as in the present study, non-profit organisations, religious organisations, and government agencies to reduce their expenses or to improve their operations and customer service. A field survey of Malaysian universities was conducted to determine the key factors that facilitate the adoption of non-business EB. Since EB adoption decision is a strategic one, a comprehensive list of potential facilitators for the strategic use of information technology (IT was derived from extant literature and used in collecting data from 65 schools and centres in five public universities in Kota Kinabalu and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The data were factor-analysed to determine the key underlying dimensions of facilitators. On the basis of the resulting five dimensions namely, relative advantage orientation, network orientation, information efficiency orientation, innovativeness orientation, and competitiveness orientation, regression analysis was done to determine the impact of the five dimensions on non-business EB adoption.

  2. Breaking Down the Door: A Nonprofit Model Creating Pathways for Non-Traditional STEM Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez, C.; Pelaez, J.

    2015-12-01

    Blueprint Earth was created as a nonprofit scientific research organization dedicated to conducting micro-scale interdisciplinary environmental investigations to generate macroscopic, system-level environmental understanding. The field data collection and analysis process was conceived to be dependent on student participation and collaboration with more senior scientists, effecting knowledge transfer and emphasizing the critical nature of interdisciplinary research in investigating complex, macroscopic questions. Recruiting for student volunteer researchers is conducted in academic institutions, and to date has focused primarily on the Los Angeles area. Self-selecting student participation has run contrary to traditional STEM demographics. The vast majority of research participants in Blueprint Earth's work are female and/or from a minority (non-white) background, and most are first-generation college students or from low-income, Pell grant-eligible households. Traditional field research programs for students often come at a high cost, creating barriers to access for field-based STEM opportunities. The nonprofit model employed by Blueprint Earth provides zero-cost access to opportunity for students that the STEM world is currently targeting for future professional development.

  3. Toward a Collaborative, Transformative Model of Non-Profit Leadership: Some Conceptual Building Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Bramwell Osula; Eddie C. W. Ng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model of non-profit leadership. The paper begins with a review of emergent trends in leadership theory and the changing context of the non-profit sector. The argument is made that the extraordinary...

  4. The management strategies of advocacy-oriented social service nonprofit organizations in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Hoi-lam; 王凱琳

    2014-01-01

    The political function of nonprofit organizations is widely recognized in the field of nonprofit management, but less practiced in the real world. The phenomenon has been attributed to neoliberal reforms in the welfare sector by some scholars, but aspirations of nonprofit organizations to be more engaged in the political arena have also been studied in other fields. This results in scattered insights concerning the topic of nonprofit advocacy, for which this thesis attempt to integrate under ...

  5. Pneumococcal sacroiliitis in a 4-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A; Padilla, E; Marco, A; De Otero, J; Bandiera, D; Marimón, I

    2008-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is an extremely rare manifestation of invasive pneumococcal disease in childhood as only four cases have been described to date. We report and comment on a case of pneumococcal sacroiliitis in a 4-year-old boy. This patient was diagnosed promptly on account of the symptom triad of fever, buttock pain, and limping gait, along with characteristic findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scans, and recovered fully after 6 weeks of antimicrobial therapy. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is an uncommon disease in which the diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific clinical presentation. The key to successful management is early diagnosis in which MRI and bone scan findings play a crucial role. If the diagnosis is established promptly, most patients can be managed successfully following the therapeutic principles used in other osteoarticular infections.

  6. The Nonprofit Advantage: Producing Quality in Thick and Thin Child Care Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Gordon; Krashinsky, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nonprofit child care centers are frequently observed to produce child care which is, on average, of higher quality than care provided in commercial child care centers. In part, this nonprofit advantage is due to different input choices made by nonprofit centers--lower child--staff ratios, better-educated staff and directors, higher rates of…

  7. 32 CFR 37.710 - What standards do I include for purchasing systems of nonprofit organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... systems of nonprofit organizations? 37.710 Section 37.710 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... standards do I include for purchasing systems of nonprofit organizations? (a) So as not to force system... governmental organization. (2) 32 CFR 32.40 through 32.49 if the participant is a nonprofit organization...

  8. 48 CFR 52.226-6 - Promoting excess food donation to nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... donation to nonprofit organizations. 52.226-6 Section 52.226-6 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.226-6 Promoting excess food donation to nonprofit organizations. As prescribed in 26.404, insert the following clause: PROMOTING EXCESS FOOD DONATION TO NONPROFIT...

  9. 7 CFR 3560.659 - Sale or transfer to nonprofit organizations and public bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sale or transfer to nonprofit organizations and... Housing Preservation § 3560.659 Sale or transfer to nonprofit organizations and public bodies. (a) Sales... housing project to a nonprofit organization or public body, two independent appraisals will be...

  10. Evaluation Capacity and Nonprofit Organizations: Is the Glass Half-Empty or Half-Full?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Joanne G.; Fredericks, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we explore the evaluation capacity of today's nonprofit organizations. We report the findings of a cluster analysis that suggest that when it comes to evaluation, there are three types of nonprofit organizations. The first type of nonprofit organization is one that, by most accounts, is satisfied with their evaluation efforts.…

  11. 48 CFR 731.770 - OMB Circular A-122, cost principles for nonprofit organizations; USAID implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... principles for nonprofit organizations; USAID implementation. 731.770 Section 731.770 Federal Acquisition... PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Nonprofit Organizations 731.770 OMB Circular A-122, cost principles for nonprofit organizations; USAID implementation. (a) Paragraph 6 of the transmittal letter for...

  12. 32 CFR 37.665 - Must I require nonprofit participants to have periodic audits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonprofit organizations. Note that those requirements also are appropriate for Government-owned, contractor... from the definition of “recipient” in 32 CFR part 32, because nonprofit GOCOs and FFRDCs are subject to... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must I require nonprofit participants to...

  13. Welcome to Our World: Bridging Youth Development Research in Nonprofit and Academic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah; Conn, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This commentary discusses the emergence of youth development research and evaluation in the nonprofit arena over the past 10 to 15 years. Included in this discussion is the establishment of the context for youth development research in nonprofits, a brief description of key examples of research from three youth nonprofits that illustrate the…

  14. Welcome to Our World: Bridging Youth Development Research in Nonprofit and Academic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah; Conn, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This commentary discusses the emergence of youth development research and evaluation in the nonprofit arena over the past 10 to 15 years. Included in this discussion is the establishment of the context for youth development research in nonprofits, a brief description of key examples of research from three youth nonprofits that illustrate the…

  15. 25 CFR 276.16 - Subgrants and subcontracts to non-profit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subgrants and subcontracts to non-profit organizations... Subgrants and subcontracts to non-profit organizations. The uniform administrative requirements in this part... subgrants or subcontracts made to non-profit organizations....

  16. 13 CFR 120.820 - CDC non-profit status and good standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CDC non-profit status and good... CDC non-profit status and good standing. A CDC must be a non-profit corporation, except that for-profit CDCs certified by SBA prior to January 1, 1987 may retain their certifications. An SBIC may...

  17. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  18. 28 CFR 58.15 - Qualifications for approval as a nonprofit budget and credit counseling agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonprofit budget and credit counseling agency. 58.15 Section 58.15 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF... Qualifications for approval as a nonprofit budget and credit counseling agency. (a) Definition of agency. As used in this section the term “agency” means nonprofit budget and credit counseling agency....

  19. The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh: Preparing Students for Transition to Professional Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh gives graduate students the opportunity to serve as management consultants to nonprofit organizations. This article describes the learning objectives, logistics, and outcomes of the Nonprofit Clinic. Bloom's 1956 taxonomy of learning objectives is employed to assess learning outcomes.

  20. 非营利组织公信力问题论析%On the Credibility of Nonprofit Organizations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴肖

    2015-01-01

    社会结构的调整与转型使非营利组织的存在和发展成为必然,非营利组织既拥有发展机遇,又面临严峻挑战。我国的非营利组织建设起步晚,社会信用体系和制度体系不健全,“自愿失灵”现象突出,公信力缺失。解决非营利组织公信力缺失的现状,重拾民众信心,不仅需要非营利组织自身的科学管理和有效监管,更需要政府、社会媒体、捐赠者共同参与和监督。%The adjustment and transformation of social structures makes necessary the existence and development of nonprofit organizations which have both development opportunities and severe challenges. In China, nonprofit organizations started rather late. Social credit and institutional systems are still imperfect, thus causing“failure of willingness” and lack of credibility. The so-lution of the current problem requires not only the scientific management and effective supervision of nonprofit organizations but also the participation and supervision of government, social media and donators.

  1. An examination of contemporary financing practices and the global financial crisis on nonprofit multi-hospital health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J; Smith, Pamela C

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the impact of the 2008 global financial crisis on large US nonprofit health systems. We proceed from an analysis of the contemporary capital financing practices of 25 of the nation's largest nonprofit hospitals and health systems. We find that these institutions relied on operating cash flows, public issues of insured variable rate debt, and accumulated investment to meet their capital financing needs. The combined use of these three financial instruments provided these organizations with $22.4 billion of long-term capital at favorable terms and the lowest interest rates. Our analysis further indicates that the extensive utilization of bond insurance, auction rate debt, and interest rate derivatives created significant risk exposures for these health systems. These risks were realized by the broader global financial crisis of 2008. Findings indicate these health systems incurred large losses from the early retirement of their variable rate debt. In addition, many organizations were forced to post nearly $1 billion of liquid collateral due to the falling values of their interest rate derivatives. Finally, the investment portfolios of these large nonprofit health systems suffered millions of dollars of unrealized capital losses, which may minimize their ability to finance future capital investment requirements.

  2. ALEXIS, the little satellite that could -- 4 years later

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel-Dupre, D.; Bloch, J.; Little, C. [and others

    1997-10-01

    The 113-kg Array of Low Energy X-ray Imaging Sensors (ALEXIS) satellite was launched from the fourth flight of Pegasus on 25 April, 1993 into a 750 x 850 km, 70 degree inclination orbit. Due to damage sustained at the time of launch, ground controllers did not make contact with the satellite until late June. By late July, full satellite operations had been restored through the implementation of new procedures for attitude control. Science operations with the two onboard experiments began at that time. Now 4 years later is still collecting more than 100 MB of mission data per day. ALEXIS was originally designed to be a high risk, single string. {open_quotes}Smarter-Faster-Cheaper{close_quotes} satellite, with a 1 year nominal and a 3 year design limit. This paper will discuss how well the various satellite and experiment subsystems are surviving a variety of low and high radiation environments and what improvements have been made to make operations more autonomous. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Nonprofit organizations versus government agencies to reduce tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Vivien; Reinert, Bonita; Range, Lillian M; Campbell, Catherine; Boyd, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Tobacco settlement money can be allocated to nonprofit organizations or government agencies. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Nonprofit organizations may have relatively (a) more efficiency/flexibility, but less accountability; (b) narrower focus, but less experience; (c) more ability to advocate, but more obligations; (d) more independence from tobacco industry influence, but less funding; and, (e) more public trust, but less visibility. The present case study of the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi focuses on six interconnected areas: education (school and community), raising awareness, advocacy, service, enforcement, and research. In 1999 and 2000, tobacco use declined in Mississippi, even compared to neighboring states. This unique partnership's multifaceted approach to social change probably facilitated this decline.

  4. Polish and Silesian Non-Profit Organizations Liquidity Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Michalski

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The kind of realized mission inflows the sensitivity to risk. Among other factors, the risk results from decision about liquid assets investment level and liquid assets financing. The higher the risk exposure, the higher the level of liquid assets. If the specific risk exposure is smaller, the more aggressive could be the net liquid assets strategy. The organization choosing between various solutions in liquid assets needs to decide what level of risk is acceptable for her owners (or donors and / or capital suppliers. The paper shows how, in authors opinion, decisions, about liquid assets management strategy inflow the risk of the organizations and its economicalresults during realization of main mission. Comparison of theoretical model with empirical data for over 450 Silesian nonprofit organization results suggests that nonprofit organization managing teams choose more risky aggressive liquid assets solutions than for-profit firms.

  5. Effective Social Media Engagement for Nonprofits: What Matters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L Carboni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ public management relationship theory to examine how nonprofits can effectively engage social media stakeholders in two-way communication. Though many nonprofit organizations have a social media presence, there is variance in how well organizations use social media to engage stakeholders. Simply having a social media presence is not enough to engage stakeholders.  We examine Facebook posts of a stratified random sample of youth development organizations to determine what predicts stakeholder engagement. We find the type of Facebook post is a significant predictor of stakeholder engagement.  Longer posts also significantly predict increased stakeholder engagement.  At the organizational level, having many posts is a significant negative predictor of stakeholder engagement, indicating that users may feel bombarded and are less likely to engage.  Increased organizational spending on advertising as a proportion of total budget is positively associated with stakeholder engagement. 

  6. The Features of Forming and Using the Finansial and Material Resources of Socially Oriented Non-Profit Organizations of Volgograd Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleynik Olga Stepanovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of interaction of regional authorities and the institute of socially oriented non-profit organizations that carry out the activity aimed at solving social problems, the development of civil society in Russia. The forms and activities of socially oriented non-profit organizations are systematically presented. The authors reveal the directions and tools for supporting the activities of socially oriented non-profit organizations by public authorities and local self-government bodies. The authors aimed at fixing the peculiarities of organization and conduct of statistical observation over the activity of socially-oriented organizations in Volgograd region. The organizational events were arranged. They were necessary for the conduct of qualitative statistical analysis of the activity of socially oriented organizations. For the first time the official data on the activity of socially oriented non-profit organizations in Volgograd region, including the information on formation and use of money and other property, was received as a result of the statistical observation. The authors focus on the analysis of the sources of money and other property, reveal the composition of income in non-profit organizations of various organizational and legal forms. The forms of work in socially oriented non-profit organizations of Volgograd region and its results as of 2013 are thoroughly studied. The conducted statistical analysis showed that the significant public sector has been established in the region. It provides the necessary public social services, financial or social assistance to the most vulnerable members of society.

  7. Information, Community, and Action: How Nonprofit Organizations Use Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Lovejoy, Kristen; Saxton, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid diffusion of "microblogging" services such as Twitter is ushering in a new era of possibilities for organizations to communicate with and engage their core stakeholders and the general public. To enhance understanding of the communicative functions microblogging serves for organizations, this study examines the Twitter utilization practices of the 100 largest nonprofit organizations in the United States. The analysis reveals there are three key functions of microblogging updates-"in...

  8. Evolution of public and non-profit funding for mental health research in France between 2007 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandré, Coralie; Prigent, Amélie; Kemel, Marie-Louise; Leboyer, Marion; Chevreul, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, actions have been undertaken in France to foster mental health research. Our objective was to assess their utility by estimating the evolution of public and non-profit funding for mental health research between 2007 and 2011, both in terms of total funding and the share of health research budgets. Public and non-profit funding was considered. Core funding from public research institutions was determined through a top-down approach by multiplying their total budget by the ratio of the number of psychiatry-related publications to the total number of publications focusing on health issues. A bottom-up method was used to estimate the amount of project-based grants and funding by non-profit organizations, which were directly contacted to obtain this information. Public and non-profit funding for mental health research increased by a factor of 3.4 between 2007 and 2011 reaching €84.8 million, while the share of health research funding allocated to mental health research nearly doubled from 2.2% to 4.1%. Public sources were the main contributors representing 94% of the total funding. Our results have important implications for policy makers, as they suggest that actions specifically aimed at prioritizing mental health research are effective in increasing research funding. There is therefore an urgent need to further undertake such actions as funding in France remains particularly low compared to the United Kingdom and the United States, despite the fact that the epidemiological and economic burden represented by mental disorders is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years.

  9. Nonprofit Human Milk Banking in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegrove, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Human milk, widely understood to be beneficial for infants, can be lifesaving for preterm neonates, especially in reducing the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis. Donor human milk (DHM) is an option when mothers are unable to provide milk or have an inadequate supply for their infants. Nonprofit donor human milk banks are established to provide safe, processed human milk from milk donated by healthy lactating mothers who have undergone a rigorous screening process. These milk banks, operating under the auspices of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America, obtain, process, and dispense human milk under strict guidelines set by the association. Increasing the supply of donor human milk to meet a dramatic increase in demand poses a significant challenge for nonprofit milk banks. Efforts to increase supply nationwide include education of providers, use of social media to engage potential donors, and outreach to news media. In parallel, milk banks are establishing regional depots to collect donations, and additional milk banks are being developed. This article describes the current nonprofit milk bank industry in the United States, its challenges, and its future prospects. © 2013 by the American College of Nurse‐Midwives.

  10. The National Practitioner Data Bank: the first 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshel, R E; Croft, T; Rodak, J

    1995-01-01

    The National Practitioner Data Bank became operational September 1, 1990, as a flagging system to identify health care practitioners who may have been involved in incidents of medical incompetence. Query volumes have grown substantially over the Data Bank's first 4 years of operation. The greatest increase has come in the number of voluntary queries. By the end of 1994, the Data Bank had processed more than 4.5 million requests for information on practitioners, more than 1.5 million of which were received in 1994 alone. The proportion of queries for which the Data Bank contains information on the practitioner in question has grown as the Data Bank has come to contain more reports. During 1994, 7.9 percent of queries were matched. The Data Bank contained more than 97,500 reports at the end of 1994. More than 82 percent of the reports concerned malpractice payments. Licensure reports made up the bulk of the rest. Physicians predominate in reports, accounting for slightly more than 76 percent of the total. The remainder are related to dentists (16 percent) and all other types of practitioners (8 percent). Since reporting of adverse actions is mandatory only for physicians and dentists, the proportion of reports attributable to these types of practitioners is higher than it would be if adverse action reporting requirements were uniform for all practitioners. State malpractice payment rates and adverse action rates vary widely, but a State's rate in any given year is highly correlated with its rate in any other year. State malpractice rates are not strongly correlated with adverse action rates, neither are the rates for physicians strongly correlated with those for dentists. There is a weak tendency for States with smaller physician populations to have higher levels of licensure and privileging actions.

  11. Do non-profits make a difference?: Evaluating non-profit vis-à-vis for-profit organisations in social

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, P.; Noailly, J.; Visser, S.

    2006-01-01

    This CPB Document provides a framework for the evaluation of non-profit organisations. This framework addresses the question under which conditions, and, if so, in what way non-profits should be stimulated. Essentially, in order to answer these questions, three steps can be followed: (i)

  12. Do non-profits make a difference?: Evaluating non-profit vis-à-vis for-profit organisations in social

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, P.; Noailly, J.; Visser, S.

    2006-01-01

    This CPB Document provides a framework for the evaluation of non-profit organisations. This framework addresses the question under which conditions, and, if so, in what way non-profits should be stimulated. Essentially, in order to answer these questions, three steps can be followed: (i) identifyin

  13. 77 FR 30306 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Hispanic Serving Institutions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...: SF-425, HUD-40077, and HUD-96010. Members of the Affected Public: Nonprofit Hispanic-Serving Institutions ] that meet the definition of an HSI established in Title V of the 1998 Amendments to the...

  14. Managing Competency in Non-Profit Organization: Experience with a European University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaq M. Hussain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Competence Management (CM has been discussed in contemporary academic and practitioner literature as a managing tool of Core Competences. Most of the studies of CM deal with manufacturing sector and profit organizations. Very little is known about CM in services and almost nothing in not-for profit organization. No research report has yet been found in educational institutions. Although, CM is not only important in manufacturing and profit organizations but also important in non-profit, like educational institutions, in order to meet the required quality and competitiveness of 21st century's education. Thus, an attempt has been made in this research to study CM in the administration of one the top ranking University in a Nordic country. The result results reveal that competencies had been defined in individual, network and unit level, but lack of integration of a comprehensive CM framework unable the higher educational institution to achieve the benefits of core competence. Based on the empirical findings, some policy and research directions are given at the end of the research.

  15. Optimization of Non-Profit Projects’ Portfolio: Chosen Aspects and Assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźniak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The chosen aspects and assumptions of the author’s proposal of the optimization model of the non-profit projects’ portfolio are presented. The functional model of the non-profit sector (third sector, which is the base for the further analyses, is also characterized. The article also contains the quantification of fundamental conditions of portfolio optimization. There is developed the utility model for the management system in the non-profit portfolio, in the framework of which there are specified the scope of the model and relationships between four categories of the non-profit portfolio’s participants/stakeholders: non-profit organizations, donors, co-participants and customers (recipients of the basic benefits/values associated with the realization of the non-profit projects. The main optimality conditions and optimization algorithm of the non-profit portfolio are also given. The paper is concluded with exemplary analytical matrixes used for optimization of the non-profit portfolios and based on the evaluation of both the optimization utility conditions and added parameters. Only basic and chosen aspects of the optimization of the non-profit projects’ portfolio have been described here. [b]Keywords[/b]: Management, Organization, Non-Profit, Project, Portfolio, Optimization, Utility

  16. Managing competition in the countryside: Non-profit and for-profit perceptions of long-term care in rural Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Mark W; Rosenberg, Mark W

    2006-12-01

    This paper contributes to the current debates surrounding private delivery of health care services by addressing the distinctive challenges, constraints and opportunities facing for-profit and non-profit providers of long-term care in rural and small town settings. It focuses on the empirical case of Ontario, Canada where extensive restructuring of long-term care, under the rubric of managed competition, has been underway since the mid-1990s. In-depth interviews with 72 representatives from local governments, public health institutions and authorities, for-profit and non-profit organisations, and community groups during July 2003 to December 2003 form the platform for a qualitative analysis of the implications of managed competition as it relates to the provision of long-term care in the countryside. The results suggest that the introduction and implementation of managed competition has accentuated the problems of service provision in rural communities, and that the long-standing issues of caregiving in rural situations transcend the differences, perceived or otherwise, between for-profit and non-profit provision. Understanding the implications of market-oriented long-term care restructuring initiatives for providers, and their clients, in rural situations requires a re-focussing of research beyond the for- versus non-profit dichotomy.

  17. Repositioning for Quality Services Delivery in Tertiary Institutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    underpinning and literature review and model formulation are the focus of part IV and V ..... The institution's investment decision involves capital expenditures. They are, ... when an asset becomes less productive or non-profitable. - Working ... institution. Also adequate pricing and prompt payment of student workers is.

  18. [Comparative analysis of the non-profit, for-profit and public hospital providers: American experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogyorósy, Zsolt

    2004-07-04

    The new legislation allowed hospitals and other health care facilities to be converted into for-profit status. The detailed regulatory framework is under development in Hungary. This article reviews the literature of studies comparing hospital financial performance and the quality of care before and after conversion from public or non-profit status to for-profit. Studies were identified through electronic search of Medline (Pubmed), EconLit, Cochrane Library, Economic Evaluation Database (EED), az Health Technology Assessment (HTA) databases, library files and reference lists. The literature search was extended to the Internet, World Bank, International Labor Office (ILO), Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and WHO websites as well as government, academic institutions and large insurance companies web pages for unpublished online information. Time series and before-after studies and systematic literature reviews were included. The conversion from non-profit to for-profit status improved the profitability of the hospitals. However the quality of care (measures in mortality, frequency of side effects, complications) might suffer in the first couple years of the conversion. The conversion may increase the total health care expenditures per capita. Trustful relationship between patients and physicians may also be threatened. The generalisability of the American experiences into the Hungarian single payer system may be limited. From societal point of view, for-profit providers could provide socially beneficial care in areas where it is possible to define, monitor and evaluate the nature and quality characteristics of the services, as well as market competition can be ensured. However most of the healthcare services are too complex to fall into this category.

  19. The need for strategic tax planning among nonprofit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pamela C

    2005-01-01

    Strategic tax planning issues are important to the nonprofit health care sector, despite its philanthropic mission. The consolidation of the industry has led management to fight for resources and develop alternative strategies for raising money. When management evaluates alternative collaborative structures to increase efficiency, the impact on governance structures must also be considered. The increased governmental scrutiny of joint ventures within the health care sector warrants management's attention as well. The financial incentives must be considered, along with the various tax policy implications of cross-sector collaborations.

  20. Fiduciary duties of interlocking directors within a nonprofit health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, Nathan; Jarzab, Christine M

    2005-01-01

    In response to regulatory and financial pressures, entities participating in the healthcare industry have joined with others in order to maintain, even improve, their market positions. In the non-profit sector of the industry, partnerships, mergers, and acquisitions have included arrangements whereby some corporate partners have interlocking directors. After review of the fiduciary duties of care and loyalty owed by corporate board members, and their application to traditional performance and conflict of interest situations, the authors address two scenarios raising interlocking director issues.

  1. Are religiously affiliated hospitals more than just nonprofits? A study on stereotypical patient perceptions and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ann-Kathrin; Drevs, Florian; Gebele, Christoph; Tscheulin, Dieter K

    2015-06-01

    Recent research on patients' perceptions of different hospitals predominantly concentrates on whether hospitals are nonprofit or for-profit. Nonprofit hospitals can be subdivided into hospitals that are affiliated with a religious denomination and those that are not. Referring to the stereotypic content model, this study analyzes patients' perceptions of religious hospitals based on the factors of warmth, competence, trustworthiness and Christianity. Using a survey of German citizens (N = 300) with a one-factorial between-subject design (for-profit vs. nonprofit vs. religious nonprofit), we found that religious affiliation increases the perceptions of hospitals' trustworthiness and attractiveness. The study indicated that patients' perceptions of nonprofit hospitals with a religious affiliation differ from patients' beliefs about nonprofit hospitals without a religious affiliation, implying that research into ownership-related differences must account for hospital subtypes. Furthermore, religious hospitals that communicate their ownership status may have competitive advantages over those with a different ownership status.

  2. Inter-American Institute Data and Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Marcelo Achite

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI is an international institution supported by 19 countries in the Americas dedicated to foster scientific research, international collaboration and creation of networks and full and open exchange of scientific information. In general terms, the institute was conceived because of the need for an international non-governmental and non-profit institution whose main objective would be to support scientific development in the Americas, f...

  3. Call for Papers – Special issue: Project Management in the Non-Profit Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Sankaran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This journal special issue will explore diverse stakeholder perspectives and share examples of project management practices in the non-profit sector. Key objectives are to develop understandings of project management practice in the sector, to examine how cross-sectoral collaboration and learning can help non-profit organisations achieve their project and programme objectives, and to explore ways in which the wider project management community can learn from experiences in the non-profit sector.

  4. Applying the brand community concept in the nonprofit sector : the case of junior achievement Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsteinsson, Tomas Gunnar; Casalini, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to investigate the benefits of the application of a brand community strategy into a nonprofit organization (NPO), as well as the strategies that the NPO could adopt in order to facilitate the creation of such a community. We review the challenges and opportunities of using marketing strategies in the nonprofit sector. With increased competition in the “third” sector, it has become ever more important for nonprofit organizations to engage in branding and ma...

  5. The Effective Use of Scientific and Technical Information in Industrial and Non-Profit Settings: Explorations through Experimental Interventions in On-Going R & D Activities. Progress Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, Albert

    This is a second report of a study of the use of scientific and technical information in industrial and nonprofit settings. It focuses on mapping the information-communication behavior of the engineering division of the Southwest Research Institute. Data include questionnaires, library records, travel records, telephone records, and contractual…

  6. Strategies and techniques of communication and public relations applied to non-profit sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana – Julieta Josan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to summarize the strategies and techniques of communication and public relations applied to non-profit sector.The approach of the paper is to identify the most appropriate strategies and techniques that non-profit sector can use to accomplish its objectives, to highlight specific differences between the strategies and techniques of the profit and non-profit sectors and to identify potential communication and public relations actions in order to increase visibility among target audience, create brand awareness and to change into positive brand sentiment the target perception about the non-profit sector.

  7. Performance of non-profit organizations: Empirical contrasts between privately and publicly funded Croatian humanitarian organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfirević Nikša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we contrast different aspects of non-profit organizations’ performance from the perspective of their funding sources. Based on previous empirical results indicating that sources of funding influence fundraising performance, we extend the existing research to the analysis of overall non-profit organizational performance. We use the social constructivist approach to non-profit performance to discuss contrasts between privately and publicly funded humanitarian organizations in Croatia. Some differences in growth- and development-oriented measures of nonprofit performance for these groups are identified and discussed in the context of future regional research.

  8. Trends in CT scan rates in children and pregnant women: teaching, private, public and nonprofit facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshiko, Sumi; Smith, Daniel; Fan, Cathyn; Jones, Carrie R.; McNeel, Sandra V. [Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA (United States); Cohen, Ronald A. [Children' s Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Department of Radiology, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Radiation exposure from medical sources now equals or exceeds that from natural background sources, largely attributable to a 20-fold increase in CT use since 1980. Increasing exposure to children and fetuses is of most concern due to their heightened susceptibility. More recently, CT use may be leveling or decreasing, but it is unclear whether this change is widespread or varies by type of institution. We sought to characterize trends in CT utilization in California hospitals and emergency departments among children and pregnant women, looking at different types of facilities, such as teaching, private, public and nonprofit institutions. We examined frequency of CT examinations by year from 229 facilities reporting CT usage in routinely collected California statewide data for 2005-2012. We modeled trends overall and by facility type. CT scans for pediatric and pregnant patient visits in the emergency department increased initially, then started to decline after 2008. Among hospital admissions, rates declined or leveled after 2005. In the emergency department, CT rates varied between types of facilities, with teaching hospitals reducing use sooner and more sharply than other types of facilities. CT utilization in California among children and pregnant women has begun to level or decline. Still, population exposure remains at historically high levels, warranting consideration of potential public health implications. Further examination of reasons for trends among hospital types, particularly how teaching hospitals have reduced rates of CT utilization, may help identify strategies for CT reduction without compromising patient care. (orig.)

  9. 32 CFR 37.620 - What financial management standards do I include for nonprofit participants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What financial management standards do I include... financial management standards do I include for nonprofit participants? So as not to force system changes..., your expenditure-based TIA's requirements for the financial management system of any nonprofit...

  10. Boards of directors under fire: an examination of nonprofit board duties in the health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, N

    1998-01-01

    Attorney Ono presents a detailed discussion of fiduciary duty principles as applied to the directors of nonprofit health care corporations in the current health care environment. The article reviews general corporate responsibilities, the implication of the taxpayer's Bill of Rights 2, the care of In re Caremark International Inc. Derivative Litigation and particular issues faced by boards in nonprofit conversions.

  11. 10 CFR 603.705 - Standards for purchasing systems of nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Purchasing § 603.705 Standards for purchasing systems of nonprofit organizations. So as not to force system... governmental organization. (b) 10 CFR 600.140 through 10 CFR 600.149, if the participant is a nonprofit... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for purchasing systems of...

  12. Impact of Sarbanes-Oxley and IRS Form 990 on Nonprofit Organizations in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisow, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, an attempt to reform publicly traded companies that suffered from a series of scandalous failures in the late 1990's, did not apply to nonprofit organizations. Several high-profile scandals which occurred in the nonprofit sector between 1996 and 2002 led lawmakers to make several unsuccessful attempts at mandating that the…

  13. Nonprofit Organizations and Outcome Measurement: From Tracking Program Activities to Focusing on Frontline Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Lehn M.

    2012-01-01

    Why do we continue to see evidence that nonprofit staff feel like outcome measurement is missing important aspects of their work? Based on an analysis of over 1,000 pages of material in 10 outcome measurement guides and a focused literature review of frontline work in three types of nonprofit organizations, this article shows that existing outcome…

  14. 34 CFR 361.31 - Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration § 361.31 Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations. The State plan must describe... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations. 361.31 Section 361.31 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of...

  15. 48 CFR 942.705-5 - Nonprofit organizations other than educational and state and local governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonprofit organizations... Indirect Cost Rates 942.705-5 Nonprofit organizations other than educational and state and local... procurement organization, distributes to each CDO the rates established by the cognizant agency....

  16. 48 CFR 42.705-5 - Nonprofit organizations other than educational and state and local governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonprofit organizations other than educational and state and local governments. 42.705-5 Section 42.705-5 Federal Acquisition... SERVICES Indirect Cost Rates 42.705-5 Nonprofit organizations other than educational and state and...

  17. Toward a Collaborative, Transformative Model of Non-Profit Leadership: Some Conceptual Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramwell Osula

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model of non-profit leadership. The paper begins with a review of emergent trends in leadership theory and the changing context of the non-profit sector. The argument is made that the extraordinary challenges facing the sector signal the need for fresh new perspectives in leadership. The authors then proceed to examine the significance of a nascent non-profit culture point to a re-alignment of the sector that is informed by transformational principles and a values-orientation. The result is said to be a new model of non-profit and public sector leadership that raises important methodological questions which the authors maintain can inform future analyses of the structure, role, and responsibilities of non-profit leadership. Finally, a world of new possibilities is envisioned, one in which non-profit organizations are strategically repositioned to take advantage of a new values-based ethic that is rooted in principles of integrity, increased self-awareness, a collaborative agenda, intentionality, emphasis of followership, cultural competence, and orientation toward the future.

  18. 22 CFR 228.53 - Suppliers of services-privately owned commercial suppliers and nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suppliers of services-privately owned commercial suppliers and nonprofit organizations. 228.53 Section 228.53 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... Waivers § 228.53 Suppliers of services—privately owned commercial suppliers and nonprofit...

  19. 37 CFR 201.24 - Warning of copyright for software lending by nonprofit libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... software lending by nonprofit libraries. 201.24 Section 201.24 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.24 Warning of copyright for software lending by nonprofit libraries. (a) Definition. A Warning of Copyright for...

  20. Training in Portuguese Non-Profit Organizations: The Quest towards Professionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana; Melo, Solange; Ferreira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    The non-profit sector is increasingly important, both in terms of the services rendered to society and level of employment provided. As part of a move towards the professionalization of the sector, training is seen as a vital tool for capacity building. Although the training practices of non-profits are fairly well documented in countries like…

  1. Between state and market: Non-profit housing organisations in three national contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullins, D.W.; Milligan, V.; Nieboer, N.E.T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an international collaborative study5 of non-profit housing involving researchers6 in three countries using a common methodology to engage the leaders of non-profit organisations themselves in the research process. The paper draws on earlier work on the

  2. 2 CFR Appendix C to Part 230 - Non-Profit Organizations Not Subject to This Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Non-Profit Organizations Not Subject to This... GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-122) Pt. 230, App. C Appendix C to Part 230—Non-Profit Organizations Not Subject to This Part 1. Advance Technology...

  3. 48 CFR 408.714 - Communications with the central nonprofit agencies and the Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Communications with the central nonprofit agencies and the Committee. Any matter requiring referral to the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Communications with the central nonprofit agencies and the Committee. 408.714 Section 408.714 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  4. 48 CFR 8.714 - Communications with the central nonprofit agencies and the Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... From Nonprofit Agencies Employing People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled 8.714 Communications with... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Communications with the central nonprofit agencies and the Committee. 8.714 Section 8.714 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  5. Museums and Other Nonprofits in the Current Recession: A Story of Resilience, Innovation, and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Stephanie Lessans; Salamon, Lester M.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a nationwide survey conducted in the spring of 2009 that examined the impacts of the current recession on nonprofit organizations, including museums. The survey identified a host of negative effects that nonprofits have been experiencing as a result of the recession, including reduced organizational revenues,…

  6. Cooperation between Non-Profit Fee-Based Information Services and For-Profit Brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Suzanne M.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of U.S. nonprofit fee-based information services with emphasis on Purdue University's Technical Information Service. Discusses how these services can benefit profit-making brokers by supplying them documents on a nonprofit basis and by referring clients to brokers for specialized information projects. (Author/AEF)

  7. Museums and Other Nonprofits in the Current Recession: A Story of Resilience, Innovation, and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Stephanie Lessans; Salamon, Lester M.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a nationwide survey conducted in the spring of 2009 that examined the impacts of the current recession on nonprofit organizations, including museums. The survey identified a host of negative effects that nonprofits have been experiencing as a result of the recession, including reduced organizational revenues,…

  8. 10 CFR 603.620 - Financial management standards for nonprofit participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 603.620 Financial management standards for nonprofit participants. So as not to force... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial management standards for nonprofit participants...

  9. Factors associated with financial distress of nonprofit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Financial distress can have a detrimental influence on the performance of hospitals. Hospital management needs to monitor potential financial distress effectively and know how it will respond depending on the severity of the circumstances. This study examined the multiple factors that may explain the financial distress of nonprofit hospitals during 1998 to 2001 and discussed their importance. To obtain more robust results, financial distress was assessed in 2 ways: first, financial strength index was used to incorporate 4 financial dimensions including profitability, liquidity, leverage, and physical facilities; second, cash flow (CF) was used to address the issues of accrual-based accounting in hospitals. This study finds that decrease in occupancy rate and increase in Medicaid payer mix, health maintenance organization penetration, market competition, physician supply, and percentage of the elderly are associated with increased likelihood of financial distress of urban hospitals. Increases in both Medicare and Medicaid payer mix, however, are related to higher likelihood of financial distress of rural hospitals.

  10. A Hybrid Program Projects Selection Model for Nonprofit TV Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Lun Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a hybrid multiple criteria decision making (MCDM model to select program projects for nonprofit TV stations on the basis of managers’ perceptions. By the concept of balanced scorecard (BSC and corporate social responsibility (CSR, we collect criteria for selecting the best program project. Fuzzy Delphi method, which can lead to better criteria selection, is used to modify criteria. Next, considering the interdependence among the selection criteria, analytic network process (ANP is then used to obtain the weights of them. To avoid calculation and additional pairwise comparisons of ANP, technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS is used to rank the alternatives. A case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model.

  11. [Experience with prosthetic disc nucleus device in Mexico. Final report of a 4-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Pérez-Víquez, Ariel; Miramontes-Martínez, Víctor; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Discal hernia is generally treated by discectomies that are mutilating and cause instability and low back pain in 50% of the patients. Partial arthroplasty is used in an attempt to avoid degeneration after a discectomy. Nineteen patients from the INR (National Institute of Rehabilitation) were selected with extruded discal hernia. All inclusion criteria were met, with a minimal follow-up of 4 years. Evolution was evaluated with the Oswestry scale (OS) and x-ray studies. Statistical analysis was done with Student's t-test. Sixteen men and three women were included in the study, with an average age of 35.4 years. OS before surgery was 57.37% and improved to 22% (p < 0.001). The results obtained in the Prolo scale 4 years later were for the economy scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = 3.87) and for the functional scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = -3.94). The intervertebral space height (IS) before surgery was 6 and 8 mm, and 4 years later, in 12 patients it remained between 8 and 10 mm. The prosthesis had variations according to its initial placement in seven patients, and in all there was subsidence. In two cases migration surpassed the limits of the vertebral body without clinical repercussion. None of the patients required re-operation. Prosthetic disc nucleus device improved clinical conditions and x-rays of the patients using Oswestry, Prolo and intersomatic space height enhancement after 4 years of follow-up in 12/19 patients.

  12. Wolves in sheep's clothing: Is non-profit status used to signal quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel B; Propper, Carol; Smith, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    Why do many firms in the healthcare sector adopt non-profit status? One argument is that non-profit status serves as a signal of quality when consumers are not well informed. A testable implication is that an increase in consumer information may lead to a reduction in the number of non-profits in a market. We test this idea empirically by exploiting an exogenous increase in consumer information in the US nursing home industry. We find that the information shock led to a reduction in the share of non-profit homes, driven by a combination of home closure and sector switching. The lowest quality non-profits were the most likely to exit. Our results have important implications for the effects of reforms to increase consumer provision in a number of public services. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. CSR and Sustainability Report for Nonprofit Organizations. An Italian Best Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia GAZZOLA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the sustainability report for the communication of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in a nonprofit organization. To this aim, an Italian case study is analyzed: the Fondazione Renato Piatti Onlus, a nonprofit organization of Social Utility. In the first part, we analyze the CSR for nonprofit organizations and the sustainability report (also called ‘social balance’. In the second part, we present evidence from the case study. The research is exploratory in nature when considering the connection of corporate social responsibility efforts to the nonprofit sector, a qualitative methodology was chosen over quantitative methods. Specifically, the case study was used to show what strategy a nonprofit organization can develop. Nowadays CSR strategies received a growing attention from both businesses and nonprofit organizations but also from the EU which forced large public-interest entities to present a social balance. For nonprofit organizations, applying social responsibility is not a voluntary issue. Nonprofit organizations have an ethical obligation to their stakeholder and to the public to conduct their activities with accountability and transparency. Scholars have increasingly been studying the impact of corporate social responsibility as a business strategy in for-profit companies. However, there is still lack of researches on how nonprofit organizations implement CSR into the strategy. As a consequence of the above remarks, a large part of nonprofit organizations fails to correctly implement a successful long term CSR strategy. The Fondazione Renato Piatti Onlus belongs to that group that has been able to incorporate social responsibility within the organization, then expanding its content into a social report drawn up in accordance with the guidelines of the Italian Agency for the Third Sector.

  14. 10 CFR 140.95 - Appendix E-Form of indemnity agreement with nonprofit educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Any issue or defense as to charitable or governmental immunity: (c) Any issue or defense based on any... jurisdictional or relating to an element in the cause of action. The waivers shall be judicially enforceable in...

  15. Educational and Nonprofit Institutions Receiving Prime Contract Awards for RDT&E, Fiscal Year 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Nida Oklahoma 90 UN:VERSITY OF VIRGINIA 3,473 Norman Ok Iahoma 683 Austin Texas 09 Charlotteevill Virginia 3,264 UNIVERSITY OF OREGON 9158 Eugene ...ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY 1,655 * Tulsa Oklahoma 77 Tempe Arizona 1,605 Eugene Oregon 96 Tucson Arizona 50 Bethlehem Penn 46 Philadelphia Penn 34 ASSOC

  16. Educational and Nonprofit Institutions Receiving Prime Contract Awards for RDT&E Fiscal Year 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    4,842 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 9,619 * Johnstown Penn 8,130 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 9,145 * Pittsburgh Penn 1,425 CHILE 149 Morgantown U Virginia 64... CULTURA SCIENTIFICA 37 * ROYAL NORWEGIAN NAVAL MATERIAL 1,608 * ITALY 37 NORWAY 1,608 CTR FOR FIELD & APPLIED RESCH 70 * ROYAL NORUEGION COUNCIL 460

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.70 - Are commercial vendors and nonprofit organizations required to operate vending facilities by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and nonprofit organizations required to operate vending facilities by permit or contractual... Management Concession Services § 102-74.70 Are commercial vendors and nonprofit organizations required to operate vending facilities by permit or contractual arrangement? Commercial vendors and...

  18. [Effects of Montessori education on the intellectual development in children aged 2 to 4 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Ling; Yan, Hong; Zuo, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Xi-Ping

    2009-12-01

    To compare the effects of Montessori education and traditional education on the intellectual development in children aged 2 to 4 years. Children aged between 2 to 3 years who were enrolled in a kindergarten in September 2006 were randomly assigned to the Montessori education and the traditional education groups. In addition to receiving the traditional education, the Montessori education group participated in the two-hour Montessori pedagogical activities every day. The intellectual development was evaluated by the Neuropsychological Development Examination Format for Children Aged 0~6 years published by Capital Pediatrics Research Institute at enrollment and one year after the trial. There were no significant differences in the intelligence growth level between the Montessori education and the traditional education groups at enrollment. After one year, the levels of fine movements, adaptation ability, language, and social behavior developments in the Montessori education group were significantly higher than those in the traditional education group (pMontessori education group were also higher than those in the traditional education group (pMontessori education can promote the development of large motor ability, fine movements, language, and social behavior in children.

  19. Facial esthetics in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate 3 years after alveolar bonegrafting combined with rhinoplasty between 2 and 4 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offert, B.; Janiszewska-Olszowska, J.; Dudkiewicz, Z.; Brudnicki, A.; Katsaros, C.; Fudalej, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate facial esthetics in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) after alveolar bone grafting combined with rhinoplasty between 2 and 4 years of age. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. SETTING: The Department of Pediatric Surgery, Institute of Mother and Child,

  20. Facial esthetics in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate 3 years after alveolar bonegrafting combined with rhinoplasty between 2 and 4 years of age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offert, B.; Janiszewska-Olszowska, J.; Dudkiewicz, Z.; Brudnicki, A.; Katsaros, C.; Fudalej, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate facial esthetics in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) after alveolar bone grafting combined with rhinoplasty between 2 and 4 years of age. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. SETTING: The Department of Pediatric Surgery, Institute of Mother and Child,

  1. 34 CFR 675.22 - Employment provided by a Federal, State, or local public agency, or a private nonprofit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... public agency, or a private nonprofit organization. 675.22 Section 675.22 Education Regulations of the..., State, or local public agency, or a private nonprofit organization. (a) If a student is employed by a Federal, State, or local public agency, or a private nonprofit organization, the work that the...

  2. 75 FR 28815 - Application and Re-certification Packages for Approval of Nonprofit Organizations in FHA Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Application and Re-certification Packages for Approval of Nonprofit Organizations in... public comments on the subject proposal. In general, a nonprofit organization must be HUD-approved and meet specific requirements to maintain approval and remain on the Nonprofit Organization Roster...

  3. 7 CFR 1955.119 - Sale of SFH inventory property to a public body or nonprofit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nonprofit organization. 1955.119 Section 1955.119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... to a public body or nonprofit organization. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 1955.111 through... public body or nonprofit organization to use for transitional housing for the homeless. A public body...

  4. 32 CFR 37.920 - What requirement for access to a nonprofit participant's records do I include in a TIA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... participant that is a nonprofit organization. The same requirement applies to any nonprofit GOCO or FFRDC, even though nonprofit GOCOs and FFRDCs are exempted from the definition of “recipient” in 32 CFR part... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirement for access to a...

  5. Exploring Reasons for the Resistance to Sustainable Management within Non-Profit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Heinrich Daub

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The numerous empirical and conceptual studies that have been conducted over recent years concerning the social responsibility of enterprises and their contributions towards sustainable development have given very little consideration to non-profit organizations (NPOs. This is surprising, because NPOs are confronted with very similar challenges to profit-orientated enterprises regarding their evolution into sustainable organizations. This paper is a preliminary conceptual study and explores the question of why the corporate social responsibility, or corporate sustainability, of NPOs has to date been both neglected by research establishments and also extensively ignored by the NPOs during their day-to-day practical management. The example of church and pastoral institutions in Germany is used to demonstrate the extent to which they take account of ecological and social aspects in their management systems and processes and, thus, implement sustainable management within their day-to-day practice. The paper concludes with some proposals for further empirical and conceptual research projects, which are designed to analyze developments within NPOs with relation to the integration of sustainability into their management systems and processes.

  6. Building sustainable neuroscience capacity in Africa: the role of non-profit organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, Thomas K; Cobham, Ansa E; Ndams, Iliya S

    2016-02-01

    While advances in neuroscience are helping to improve many aspects of human life, inequalities exist in this field between Africa and more scientifically-advanced continents. Many African countries lack the infrastructure and appropriately-trained scientists for neuroscience education and research. Addressing these challenges would require the development of innovative approaches to help improve scientific competence for neuroscience across the continent. In recent years, science-based non-profit organisations (NPOs) have been supporting the African neuroscience community to build state-of-the-art scientific capacity for sustainable education and research. Some of these contributions have included: the establishment of training courses and workshops to introduce African scientists to powerful-yet-cost-effective experimental model systems; research infrastructural support and assistance to establish research institutes. Other contributions have come in the form of the promotion of scientific networking, public engagement and advocacy for improved neuroscience funding. Here, we discuss the contributions of NPOs to the development of neuroscience in Africa.

  7. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  8. Traditions and Management Perspectives of Community and Non-Profit Organizations in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Stasiukynas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To overview the traditions and management perspectives of community and non-profit organizations in Lithuania.Methodology – For the purpose of this research a literature analysis on community and non-profit organization case studies was conducted. The case studies describing stories of success were singled out and leaders of these organizations were interviewed.Findings – The research has showed the growth of the number of community and nonprofit organizations during the last twenty years and the difficulties of collecting the statistical data. This study presupposes the possibility to identify the tendencies of management in community and non-profit organizations, including the following: increasing use of the social networks for communication; proliferation of strategic planning; greater emphasis on educating and empowering new generation of leaders.Research implications – Prior studies in this area in Lithuania have not exhaustively analyzed the components of human resource management of non-profit organizations. An important follow up on this study would be to analyze the human resource management in community organizations.Practical implications – This study covered the management aspects important for the improvement of how community and non-profit organizations work.Originality/Value – This study expands the knowledge on Lithuanian community and non-profit organization development and management.Research type – literature review, research paper.

  9. Working on nonprofit boards. Don't assume the shoe fits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlan, F W

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to popular perception, businesspeople can be benevolent. For instance, one recent study notes that four-fifths of all Harvard Business School graduates are involved with nonprofits, with more than half of those serving on boards. Most business professionals will spend some time on a nonprofit board. That's the good news, the author says. The bad news is that the involvement of businesspeople can easily backfire. That's because they often try to take what they have learned from business school and the corporate world and apply it to their duties in the nonprofit sector. On the surface, there are similarities between the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Both have boards of directors, trustees and chairpeople, regular meetings, and so forth. But the governance of nonprofit organizations is very different from the governance of for-profit businesses in several critical areas, including missions, measurements, and board composition. For instance, the CEO in the nonprofit world must manage a relationship with a nonexecutive board chair. In the for-profit world, the CEO is the chair. Such significant differences make it difficult to transfer ideas and practices between the for-profit and nonprofit worlds. In this article, F. Warren McFarlan describes the main differences between serving on a for-profit board and serving on a nonprofit board. As he points out, understanding the differences will make it easier for businesspeople to move smoothly from one environment to the other and will therefore make their commitments more effective. Nonprofits need businesspeople, but only on the right terms.

  10. Using Promotores Programs to Improve Latino Health Outcomes: Implementation Challenges for Community-based Nonprofit Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C; Holtz, Kristen D; Stringer, Kimberly

    2012-05-01

    Promotores are community lay health workers, who provide outreach and services to Latinos. Little research on the promotores programs exists and the focus of this article is to identify the challenges faced by community-based nonprofits when implementing promotores programs. To explore this type of program telephone interviews were conducted with ten promotores academic experts and nonprofit executives. The results suggest that implementation challenges fall into three major categories: the lack of standardized information on promotores programs, labor issues, and organizational costs. Future recommendations are made which highlight promotores recruitment and retention strategies, and the development of a clearinghouse of programmatic implementation information for community-based nonprofits.

  11. Nonprofit Organizations in Danish Welfare Provision – Explaining Differences Across Welfare Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Malene

    This paper describes and analyzes the large variation in the proportion of non-profit providers across different welfare areas in Denmark with specific focus on two selected areas: Primary schools and care homes for elderly. With inspiration from niche theory, the aim is to get a deeper insight...... knowledge on the varying conditions for non-profit welfare provision which in the end can help to understand and explan the large variations in the proportion of non-profit welfare provision and the recent development trends....

  12. Health care reform and Connecticut's non-profit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeffrey R; Gerrish, William; Galvin, J Robert

    2010-01-01

    The recent federal Health Care Reform Act signed into law by President Obama is expected to lead to greater patient volumes at non-profit hospitals in Connecticut (and throughout the country). The financial implications for these hospitals depend on how the costs per patient are expected to change in response to the anticipated higher patient volumes. Using a regression analysis of costs with annual data on 30 Connecticut hospitals over the period 2006 to 2008, we find that there are considerable differences between outpatient and inpatient unit cost structures at these hospitals. Based on the results of our analysis, and assuming health care reform leads to an overall increase in the number of outpatients, we would expect Connecticut hospitals to experience lower costs per outpatient treated (economies of scale). On the other hand, an influx of additional inpatients would be expected to raise unit costs (diseconomies of scale). After controlling for other cost determinants, we find that the marginal cost of an inpatient is about $8,000 while the marginal cost of an outpatient is about $44. This disparity may provide an explanation for our finding that the effect of additional patient volumes overall (combining inpatient and outpatient) is an increase in hospitals' unit costs.

  13. The Economic Relationships between Institutions of Higher Education and Municipalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Dale H.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between municipal government and a local, private, nonprofit institution of higher education (IHE) can be characterized as a delicate balance between conflict and cooperation. In recent years as municipal expenses have significantly increased, revenue generated from tax collection and state aid has lagged, creating an increasing…

  14. Neurodevelopmental and cardiometabolic outcome in 4-year-old twins and singletons born after IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Derk; Bennema, Anne; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Seggers, Jorien; Schendelaar, Pamela; Haadsma, Maaike; Hoek, Annemieke; Heineman, Maas-Jan; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluated whether the cognitive development, neurological condition, anthropometrics and blood pressure of 4-year-old IVF twins differed from those of 4-year-old IVF singletons; 103 IVF singletons and 48 IVF twins born after conventional IVF treatment were included. Pri

  15. Shifting gears higher - digital slides in graduate education - 4 years experience at Semmelweis University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár Béla

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spreading of whole slide imaging or digital slide systems in pathology as an innovative technique seems to be unstoppable. Successful introduction of digital slides in education has played a crucial role to reach this level of acceptance. Practically speaking there is no university institute where digital materials are not built into pathology education. At the 1st. Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University optical microscopes have been replaced and for four years only digital slides have been used in education. The aim of this paper is to summarize our experiences gathered with the installation of a fully digitized histology lab for graduate education. Methods We have installed a digital histology lab with 40 PCs, two slide servers - one for internal use and one with external internet access. We have digitized hundreds of slides and after 4 years we use a set of 126 slides during the pathology course. A Student satisfaction questionnaire and a Tutor satisfaction questionnaire have been designed, both to be completed voluntarily to have feed back from the users. The page load statistics of the external slide server were evaluated. Results The digital histology lab served ~900 students and ~1600 hours of histology practice. The questionnaires revealed high satisfaction with digital slides. The results also emphasize the importance of the tutors' attitude towards digital microscopy as a factor influencing the students' satisfaction. The constantly growing number of page downloads from the external server confirms this satisfaction and the acceptance of digital slides. Conclusions We are confident, and have showed as well, that digital slides have got numerous advantages over optical slides and are more suitable in education.

  16. Who does it better? The corporate versus the nonprofit governance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Laurie

    2005-05-01

    Weighing the corporate against the nonprofit governance model, the answer may be "neither." Both systems can learn from each other, experts say, and best practices in public companies do not automatically translate to health care boards.

  17. THE INSUFFICIENCY OF FINANCIAL ANALYSIS FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Corina MIHĂLŢAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper work is based on the hypothesis that the financial analysis is insufficient when it comes to reflecting the performance of nonprofit organizations. Our main argument is the social purpose of non-profit organization, which is the reason why the analyst has to find optimal solutions for analyzing their performance while taking into account their social impact. Our research focused on the conceptualizations of the performance of non-profit organizations and the adequacy of the existing models for analyzing it. The research results refer to the limits of financial analysis regarding the performance of non-profit organizations because it can only offer relevant information regarding its effectiveness.

  18. 48 CFR 215.404-72 - Modified weighted guidelines method for nonprofit organizations other than FFRDCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 215.404-72 Modified weighted guidelines method for nonprofit organizations other than FFRDCs. (a) Definition. As used in this subpart,...

  19. Administrative Coordination in Non-Profit Human Service Delivery Networks: The Role of Competition and Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C

    2013-12-01

    Non-profit human service organizations operating within the same regional network are often faced with dual pressure to compete as well as coordinate administrative operations (by sharing funding, staff or space) to enhance efficiency. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that competing organizations coordinate, despite the risks. Trust, or perceived trustworthiness between two organizations may mitigate the negative influence of competition on coordination, however there have been few explicit tests of this hypothesis among non-profit organizations. Drawing on quantitative data collected from a network of 36 non-profit children's behavioral health organizations, this paper empirically tests how competition and perceived trustworthiness interact to influence administrative coordination. Results support the hypothesis that trustworthiness moderates the influence of competition on administrative coordination. Findings suggest that as competing non-profit leaders build trust, the more their agencies coordinate their administrative functions. This study highlights the importance of leaders' perceptions for organizational strategy.

  20. Nonprofit Health Insurers: The Story Wall Street Doesn't Tell

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan R. Johnson

    2003-01-01

    For several years, Wall Street investment firms have campaigned for conversion of nonprofit health insurers to investor ownership, arguing that an infusion of equity capital is critical to insurers' survival...

  1. The Importance and Interest of Introductory Psychology Textbook Topics: Student Opinions at Technical College, 2-, and 4-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Lee I.; Immel, Kathy R.; Kadah-Ammeter, Tammy L.; Adelson, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Introductory psychology students at a technical college, 2-year community college, and a regional university rated how important textbook chapters or topics were to them now and in the future and how interesting they were. Importance and interest ratings were highly correlated, and the whole course was rated of greater importance and interest than…

  2. An Examination of the Influence of Institutional Context on Student Persistence at 4-Year Colleges and Universities: A Multilevel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Marvin A.

    2004-01-01

    Using constructs from Bean's (1990) [In: D. Hossler and J. P. Bean (Eds.), The strategic management of college enrollments. San Francisco:Jossey-Bass] student attrition model and the Berger and Milem (2000) [In: J. C. Smart (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research (Vol. XV, pp. 268?338). New York: Agathon Press] college impact…

  3. A Project Portfolio Management model adapted to non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Martins Lacerda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As they strive towards greater professionalism in carrying out their activities, non-profit organizations (NPOs have begun paying attention to project management. The non-profit sector (NPS has also begun to adopt strategic planning techniques, thus making the acceptance of project portfolio management (PPM methodology a natural consequence. This article aims to propose a project portfolio management model adapted to the context of NPOs.

  4. A Critical Appraisal of the Concept of Non-profit Services Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    NOVATOROV, Edouard V.

    2010-01-01

    The author deconstructs the prevailing conceptualization of non-profit marketing and concludes it rests on three principles: voluntary exchange, an open system organization, and self-interest motivation. A review of the genesis of these principles revealed that alternative principles were ignored in the social science literature. Based on a qualitative analysis a revised conceptualization of non-profit marketing was suggested which incorporated the principles of reciprocity, the features of a...

  5. Charity and community: the role of nonprofit ownership in a managed health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, M; Gray, B; Bradley, E

    1996-01-01

    As American medicine has been transformed by the growth of managed care, so too have questions about the appropriate role of nonprofit ownership in the health care system. The standards for community benefit that are increasingly applied to nonprofit hospitals are, at best, only partially relevant to expectations for nonprofit managed care plans. Can we expect nonprofit ownership to substantially affect the behavior of an increasingly competitive managed care industry dealing with insured populations? Drawing from historical interpretations of tax exemption in health care and from the theoretical literature on the implications of ownership for organizational behavior, we identify five forms of community benefit that might be associated with nonprofit forms of managed care. Using data from a national survey of firms providing third-party utilization review services in 1993, we test for ownership-related differences in these five dimensions. Nonprofit utilization review firms generally provide more public goods, such as information dissemination, and are more "community oriented" than proprietary firms, but they are not distinguishable from their for-profit counterparts in addressing the implications of medical quality or the cost of the review process. However, a subgroup of nonprofit review organizations with medical origins are more likely to address quality issues than are either for-profit firms or other nonprofit agencies. Evidence on responses to information asymmetries is mixed but suggests that some ownership related differences exist. The term "charitable" is thus capable of a definition far broader than merely the relief of the poor. While it is true that in the past Congress and the federal courts have conditioned the hospital's charitable status on the level of free or below cost care that it provided for indigents, there is no authority for the conclusion that the determination of "charitable" status was always so limited. Such an inflexible

  6. From Stories to Evidence: How Mining Data Can Promote Innovation in the Nonprofit Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Phillips

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Being a director at a nonprofit organization often means making guesses instead of properly informed decisions. One source of the “information fog” is fragmented funding. Nonprofit organizations have multiple types of funders, most of whom are not their direct beneficiaries. Predicting funder behaviour is therefore more of an art than a science. Planning for the future, setting goals, and making decisions all suffer in the nonprofit sector because of a lack of timely and accurate information. This article examines the opportunities to use newly available digitized information to address this information deficit. It shows how the rich, variegated and fast-changing landscape of information available online can be collected, combined, and repurposed in order to deliver it in actionable forms to decision makers across the nonprofit sector. This information can significantly improve planning decisions and enhance the effectiveness of the sector. The article concludes that a cultural shift is required in order for the nonprofit sector to exploit the opportunities presented by digital information. Nonprofits and funders are enjoined to increase their numeracy and to find creative ways to use data as part of their evaluation, planning and decision making. Researchers need to be adventurous in their use of quantitative information and specifically should employ linked datasets in order to explore previously unanswerable research and policy questions. The producers of data need to collect and publish their information in ways that facilitate reuse. Finally, funders need to support a variety of projects that seek to exploit these new opportunities.

  7. Relevant factors to consider prior to an investor-owned acquisition of a nonprofit healthcare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Kelvin; Childs, Brad; Wainright, Charles F; Young, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the factors that affect the negotiations for an acquisition of a nonprofit system by an investor-owned entity. The recent economic downturn, accompanying credit crisis, and healthcare reform legislation will likely encourage and accelerate the pace of merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions between investor-owned entities and nonprofit hospitals. As many nonprofits are smaller, more financially vulnerable, and more limited in their access to capital than their investor-owned counterparts, nonprofits could be prime targets for investor-owned acquirers during the healthcare reform implementation period. In M&A transactions of this type, the investor-owned acquirer typically is motivated to pursue an acquisition when the deal promises an acceptable return on investment and decreased operating costs from economies of scale. Alternatively, the nonprofit target is typically seeking funding for upgrades to facilities and information technology systems as well as a continued commitment to charity care and managed-care contracting leverage. A successful acquisition of a nonprofit hospital by an investor-owned company requires a careful analysis of relevant tax, economic, and strategic factors prior to closing the deal. This article lists the most significant factors to consider in these deals and explains how these factors should influence the purchase price and postacquisition cash flow.

  8. Mental health promotion and non-profit health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Frances M; Donald, Maria; Dean, Julie H; Conrad, Sue; Mutch, Allyson J

    2007-11-01

    Health related non-profit organisations (NPOs) provide a potentially important but largely untapped role in mental health promotion in communities. This paper reports on a study investigating the activities and contributions made by NPOs to mental health and well-being. One hundred and eight NPOs based in the metropolitan area of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, participated in a survey exploring agency activities that contribute to promoting mental well-being; factors that helped or hindered the organisation in engaging in mental health promotion activities and evaluation methods and processes. An index of key themes was developed and frequencies derived from categorical data. NPOs undertook five key types of activities to promote mental health and well-being: support provision (81%); service provision (59%); information sharing (52%); activities to promote well-being (24%); and advocacy (6%). Systematic evaluation of longer-term outcomes was rare, with most NPOs (72%) relying on informal feedback from clients. Human resources in the form of paid or volunteer workers were most frequently (58%) identified as contributing to the capacity of agencies to carry out mental health promotion activities. Training and education emerged as a substantive need (34%). NPOs are well placed to enhance resiliency in the context of ongoing health problems, disability or other adverse psychosocial circumstances that place people at risk of mental health problems. As such they constitute a significant resource for advancing mental health promotion goals. What is needed to extend the practice and evidence base in this area is training and skill development for NPO workers, along with larger-scale research conducted in collaboration with NPOs to assess the contributions and cost-effectiveness of the sector.

  9. Institutes, Foundations and Think Tanks: Neoconservative Influences on U.S. Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Philip; Boyles, Deron

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to think tanks, institutes, foundations, and their roles in shaping U.S. educational policy. Quite simply, think tanks, institutes, and foundations are nonprofit organizations that both produce and rely on research and expertise to aggressively influence the public, political leaders, and policy. Via an analysis of…

  10. Contamination during 4 years of annual CT screening in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghir, Zaigham; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    Contamination, defined as screening in the control arm, may dilute the statistical power of randomised screening trials. We investigated the rate of contamination in DLCST during 4 years of annual CT screening.......Contamination, defined as screening in the control arm, may dilute the statistical power of randomised screening trials. We investigated the rate of contamination in DLCST during 4 years of annual CT screening....

  11. [A continuous 4-year evaluation of medical informatics education in a graduate school of health sciences using a questionnaire survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzen, Satoru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of awareness among undergraduate students regarding medical informatics and to ascertain whether educational training has progressed with time in the Department of Health Sciences at Hirosaki University, Japan, which is a co-medical staff training institution that conducts a 4-year university course in medical informatics. The university accepts students who have completed the 3rd grade of medical licensing tests and who have attended the medical informatics lectures for 4 years (2007-2010). The ratio of first sight terminology percentage in any given fiscal year in all the 30 terminology categories varied widely from 0% to 80%, but the trend in various categories did not vary between fiscal years. The terminology of informatics under medical technology students obtained high scores of 52.5-77.3% after attending courses, which was higher compared with students from other classes. On the other hand, student nurses and occupational therapy students obtained 0-44.2%. Each class scored a high percentage of correct answers in the medical information-related terminology. Among the radiology students who attended the classes, the percentage of correct answers in categories of "digital imaging and communication in medicine" and "picture archiving and communication system" were lower than other medical terminology categories. These results reflect the gaps in educational curriculum of 1st and 2nd grades of medical licensing tests.

  12. Historical perspective and current status of the physical education graduation requirement at American 4-year colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J; Sorensen, Spencer D; Cardinal, Marita K

    2012-12-01

    This study gives an overview of the history of required physical education in America's 4 year colleges and universities and provides an update on the requirement status. After randomly identifying 354 institutions, we searched their respective websites to determine whether physical education was a requirement to earn a baccalaureate degree. The major finding was that the physical education requirement declined from an all-time high of 97% in the 1920s and 1930s to an all-time low of 39.55% in 2010. Given society's ongoing health challenges and the important role of physical activity in maintaining health, this seems counterintuitive. It is also inconsistent with the National Physical Activity Plan (2010).

  13. Economic and social pre-conditions for marketization of domestic non-profit sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Borysova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to analyze social and economic conditions of development of non-profit organizations (NPOs. Among them are shifting responsibility for social problems from governmental bodies on not-for-profit subjects, low quality of social product, declining of volume of financing from governmental bodies, business and international organizations, reducing of skilled labour potential, radical changes in composition of clients which are served by non-profit organizations. The research objectives are: to find out economic and social conditions of activity of domestic nonprofits; to ground expedience of domestic non-profit sphere marketization. The results of the analysis. The research makes possible to state the following: - permanent shifting responsibility for social problems from governmental bodies on not-for-profit subjects is the imperative of development, that stimulates marketization of not-for-profit sector in particular; - social services are delivered by governmental bodies and NPOs and characterized by low level of quality. That why it is necessary to search the ways of solving the problem through organizational development and strengthening of financial potential of NPOs, and by control of accordance of social services delivered by the governmental bodies to the minimum standards of ones; - the main reasons of diminishing of financial possibility of the majority of NPOs are: growth of amount of non-profit organizations, ineffective use of grants caused by the failed mechanisms of verification of recipients activity, corruption and problem of estimation of effectiveness of the non-profit programs and services, a recent financial crisis which compelled to cut down expenses for such programs; - client market of non-profit organizations is constantly transformed in results of change of demographic structure, change of old and appearance of new behaviour models, appearance of new target markets and

  14. Applying Emotional Intelligence Skills to Leadership and Decision Making in Non-Profit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Hess

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organizations and leaders may benefit from the utilization of behaviors attributed to emotional intelligence. The consideration of emotional intelligence skills becomes a strategy for the development of the non-profit organizational leader’s ability to assess the impact and consequences of decisions, while simultaneously improving the quality and effectiveness of the decision-making process. The purpose of this paper is to identify how emotional intelligence skills can be applied to enhance the leadership decision-making processes within the non-profit organization. Goleman’s (2001 and Boyatzis’ et al. (2000 four essential elements of emotional intelligence and their associated 20 behavioral competencies are utilized to develop a methodology for the practical application of emotional intelligence skills to leadership decision-making within the non-profit organization. A checklist of questions and observations is provided to assist non-profit leaders in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness, as well as the application of emotional intelligence skills to decisions and decision-making processes.

  15. NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION AS RESOURCE FOR SUPPORT OF A CHILD WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Анатольевна Калашникова

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonprofit organization is represented as significant resource for support of children with disabilities which helps to resolve social integration problems efficiently. The characteristic of nonprofit foundation for support children and teenagers with developmental delay and also citizens in hard situation named “Psycholog” (eng. Psychologist, which conducts its activity in Chita City, Transbaikal region is considered. The problem of psychological resource of children with disabilities is denoted as the process and result of interaction in system “human- living environment” in the context of the systematic approach.The potential of nonprofit organization is examined as resource of social training of volunteers and of the formation of their social and professional competence. The theoretic and methodological principles defining the professional attitude of nonprofit organization employees and the content of implementable work programs with children with disabilities are revealed. The support of children with disabilities with the help of nonprofit organization specialists is defined as the efficient social-psychological mechanism, providing the adequate implementation of the idea of social integration.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-49

  16. Corporate reorganization: the last gasp or last clear chance for the tax-exempt, nonprofit hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, M

    1988-01-01

    The current revolution in health care organization and financing, increased competition, and a retrenching of industry from its commitments to expansion of health care benefits challenge the nonprofit hospital's existence as a viable entity. Hospital governing boards and administrators have turned to corporate reorganization in order to maintain their financial position and to continue to serve their communities. This Article examines the not-for-profit concept and the problems facing nonprofit hospitals. It reviews the pros and cons of reorganization and the for-profit/nonprofit controversy. It questions whether the hybridization of the hospital results in a stronger or weaker species and discusses the possible effects of the newly structured entity on the quality and delivery of health care. Finally, the Article suggests that the nonprofit hospital may survive only by a continued commitment to societal and communal values, to service rather than to profit; that this commitment is adequate justificaton for the preservation of the nonprofit system, and its preservation will reinforce and strengthen the concept.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF THE INTEGRATED MODEL OF SOCIAL STRATIFICATION STRUCTURE ON THE PUBLIC PARTICIPATING NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tien Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main body of social stratification structure in Taiwan is transformed with social mobility. By transforming the social stratification structure, the function of non-profit organizations is operating steadily. How does people’s awareness of social strata directly or indirectly influence the operation of non-profit organizations? How do non-profit organizations and governments respond to the transformation of social stratum compositions? And how promotion and policy marketing could guide the general public to be attentive and participate in the operations of non-profit organizations? These questions require in-depth investigation. This study bases on the experiments and concepts of fairness measurement in information integration theory to comprehend the integrated model of social stratification in the public. By means of analyzing the awareness and orientation of the public to the constitution of social stratification which lead the public to identify themselves with the visions of non-profit organizations and the motion of participating non-profit matters to provide the interrelated recommendations of proceeding non-profit matters to non-profit organizations and the government. Comparing the cognitive algebraic functions of input information and outcome information of various groups in the social strata, the only difference is that if the input information is education background and the outcome information profession prestige. Empirically, non-profit organizations promoting and encouraging people to engage in occupational aid related activities could find different methods available.

  18. The Theoretical Analysis and Countermeasures Establishment of Financial Systems at Nonprofit Organizations%非营利组织财务制度问题及构建对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于国旺

    2011-01-01

    At present, there exist many financial problems in Chinese nonprofit organizations, which have resuhed in crisis of confidence on the whole social commonweal undertaking to some extent. Under the realistic background, this paper discusses the Chinese nonprofit financial institutions and proposes the establishment of countermeasures. These set of rules of conduction are used to restrain financial operations and deal with financial relations of nonprofit organizations. Although undergoing a long process of transition, the financial institutions still comparatively fall behind, which is difficult to effectively instruct and restrain the financial operations of Chinese nonprofit organizations. With the development of nonprofit organizations' number and scale, China urgently awaits to establish nonprofit financial institutions from the plane of laws and financial regulations.%当前,我国非营利组织已暴露出许多财务问题,致使社会公益事业在某种程度上陷入了信任危机。在此现实背景下,本文依据新制度经济学,对我国非营利组织财务制度进行探讨,并提出相应的构建对策。非营利组织财务制度是用于规范组织财务活动、处理组织财务关系的一套行为规则。尽管我国非营利组织财务制度历经变迁,但依然难以有效指导和规范非营利组织财务活动。随着我国非营利组织数量和规模的持续增长,亟待从法律和财务规章层面构建相应的非营利组织财务制度。

  19. Hospital ownership and medical services: market mix, spillover effects, and nonprofit objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2009-09-01

    Hospitals operate in markets with varied demographic, competitive, and ownership characteristics, yet research on ownership tends to examine hospitals in isolation. Here we examine three hospital ownership types -- nonprofit, for-profit, and government -- and their spillover effects. We estimate the effects of for-profit market share in two ways, on the provision of medical services and on operating margins at the three types of hospitals. We find that nonprofit hospitals' medical service provision systematically varies by market mix. We find no significant effect of market mix on the operating margins of nonprofit hospitals, but find that for-profit hospitals have higher margins in markets with more for-profits. These results fit best with theories in which hospitals maximize their own output.

  20. Study of China's Non-profit Sectors Participating in Emergency Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-jun Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to confront public crisis actively and implement emergency management effectively?, this is a very question for governments in charge of supplying public service and public goods. However, government strength has been proved to be not able to match their own ambitions in emergency management any more. In contrast, the nonprofit sector has an advantage of rapid combined action, extensive social participation, and strong social mobilization over the public and the private sector. Therefore, it is necessary to bring into full play its role in this respect. This paper devotes to give some suggestion for China’s nonprofit sector so as to actively participate in emergency management through analyzing the theoretical basis and present predicament of China’s nonprofit sector participating in emergency management.

  1. A lack of response of the financial behaviors of biodiversity conservation nonprofits to changing economic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric R; Boyer, Alison G; Armsworth, Paul R

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of conservation organizations is determined in part by how they adapt to changing conditions. Over the previous decade, economic conditions in the United States (US) showed marked variation including a period of rapid growth followed by a major recession. We examine how biodiversity conservation nonprofits in the US responded to these changes through their financial behaviors, focusing on a sample of 90 biodiversity conservation nonprofits and the largest individual organization (The Nature Conservancy; TNC). For the 90 sampled organizations, an analysis of financial ratios derived from tax return data revealed little response to economic conditions. Similarly, more detailed examination of conservation expenditures and land acquisition practices of TNC revealed only one significant relationship with economic conditions: TNC accepted a greater proportion of conservation easements as donated in more difficult economic conditions. Our results suggest that the financial behaviors of US biodiversity conservation nonprofits are unresponsive to economic conditions.

  2. For profit versus non-profit: does economic sector make a difference in child-care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, E

    1999-01-01

    The child-care industry in a large, southeastern community serves as this study's vehicle for comparing non-profit with for profit dependent care in areas not easily observable to clients. The cross-sectional analysis compares child-care centers on marketed and actual staff-to-child ratio; staff salary; consistency in the child's group environment; staff stability; and extent of parental involvement. Findings are based on self-reports of directors and support hypotheses derived from the theory that for profit day care centers will use their discretionary authority to vary the care environment to achieve profit goals despite the potential effect on the quality of the child's environment. Further, despite potential cost economies and enhanced quality of care achievable as a non-profit entity, few for profit center directors consider becoming non-profit centers.

  3. Guest Editorial: Reinvigorating Project Management Research and Practice: Perspectives from the Non-Profit Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lannon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The genesis of this Special Issue was a conference on “Delivering Social Good: Managing Projects in the Non-Profit Sector” held at the University of Limerick in October 2014.  The diversity that exists within the broad non-profit sector became apparent at this event, as did its increasing projectification and the variety of organizational forms and models resulting from this trend. Tools, techniques, processes and practices inherited from the business world were described, as were methodologies adopted, adapted and specifically designed for work in areas like international development, humanitarian work and community settings. Insights into the lived experiences of project managers in the non-profit sector were also shared, as were a number of diverse conceptualisations of temporary organisations.

  4. Pricing behaviour of nonprofit insurers in a weakly competitive social health insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douven, Rudy C H M; Schut, Frederik T

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we examine the pricing behaviour of nonprofit health insurers in the Dutch social health insurance market. Since for-profit insurers were not allowed in this market, potential spillover effects from the presence of for-profit insurers on the behaviour of nonprofit insurers were absent. Using a panel data set for all health insurers operating in the Dutch social health insurance market over the period 1996-2004, we estimate a premium model to determine which factors explain the price setting behaviour of nonprofit health insurers. We find that financial stability rather than profit maximisation offers the best explanation for health plan pricing behaviour. In the presence of weak price competition, health insurers did not set premiums to maximize profits. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that regulations on financial reserves are needed to restrict premiums. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The engagement and retention of non-profit employees in Belgium and South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Renard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A lack of qualitative research exists that investigates work engagement and retention within Belgium and South Africa, particularly within the non-profit sector.Research purpose: The study aimed to gather in-depth qualitative data pertaining to the factors that promote work engagement and retention amongst non-profit employees working within these two countries.Motivation for the study: Because of scarce funding and resources, non-profit organisations are pressured to retain their talented employees, with high levels of turnover being a standard for low-paid, human-service positions. However, when individuals are engaged in their work, they display lower turnover intentions, suggesting the importance of work engagement in relation to retention.Research design, approach and method: Non-probability purposive and convenience sampling was used to organise in-depth interviews with 25 paid non-profit employees working on either a full-time or a part-time basis within Belgium and South Africa. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data produced.Main findings: Participants were found to be absorbed in, dedicated to and energised by their work, and revealed numerous aspects promoting their retention including working towards a purpose, finding fulfilment in their tasks and working in a caring environment.Practical/managerial implications: Non-profit organisations should develop positive work environments for their employees to sustain their levels of work engagement, as well as place significance on intrinsic rewards in order to retain employees.Contribution: This study provides insights into the means by which non-profit employees across two nations demonstrate their enthusiasm, pride and involvement in the work that they perform. It moreover sheds light on the factors contributing to such employees intending to leave or stay within the employment of their organisations.

  6. Creating Your Strategic Plan A Workbook for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, John M

    2011-01-01

    Creating Your Strategic Plan is the best-selling companion workbook to Bryson's landmark book, Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. Whether used with the main text or by itself, this thoroughly revised third edition provides a step-by-step guide to putting strategic planning to work in public and nonprofit organizations. The workbook contains new and revised worksheets and additional material on readiness assessment, teamwork, stakeholder analysis, visioning, strategic issue identification, and implementation. Creating Your Strategic Plan covers each of the ten key steps

  7. Maximizing Return on Investment (ROI of Enterprise Resource Planning Systems (ERP for Nonprofit Organizations: Proposed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain A.H. Awad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ERP are the core business application for many companies; and it’s very apparent that organization spending on those systems is in a continuous rise, on the other hand this also raised the issue of how can ERP systems pay those spending; and when that investment can reach ROI point. In this study the researcher will attempt to propose a model that contains guide line phases for nonprofit organizations in order to speed up the stage in which ERP system can reach ROI, the researcher opted for universities since they are one of the main nonprofit organizations that employ ERP in their processes.

  8. Lifting the veil of secrecy from industry funding of nonprofit health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Michael F

    2005-01-01

    Those who provide information about scientific issues and science policy normally present themselves as being objective and "scientific." This article describes a range of health charities, professional associations, nonprofit advocacy organizations, and industry-created organizations that receive significant funding from industry. In some cases, industry appears either to influence an organization's positions or to limit an organization's freedom to speak out on matters of interest to the funders. Nonprofit organizations need to consider the potential influence on their independence if they accept funding from interested companies and trade associations.

  9. Mitigating Concerns and Maximizing Returns: Social Media Strategies for Injury Prevention Non-profits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tressie McMillan-Cottom

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Injury prevention programs can use social media to disseminate information and recruit participants. Non-profit organizations have also used social media for fundraising and donor relationship management. Non-profit organizations (NPOs with injury prevention missions often serve vulnerable populations. Social media platforms have varied levels of access and control of shared content. This variability can present privacy and outreach challenges that are of particular concern for injury prevention NPOs. This case report of social media workshops for injury prevention NPOs presents concerns and strategies for successfully implementing social media campaigns.

  10. An ounce of prevention on a budget: a nonprofit approach to developing vaccines against neglected diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Miles, Aaron P; Diemert, David; Hotez, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    This article provides a perspective on vaccine development for neglected tropical diseases in the nonprofit setting, with particular emphasis on recombinant protein vaccines. The Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative is discussed as a model product development public-private partnership, and the major challenges are covered that accompany antigen selection, gene cloning, fermentation and purification process development, assay development, vaccine formulation and testing and clinical evaluation for those developing vaccines, especially against neglected tropical diseases, in the nonprofit sector. Throughout this perspective, special emphasis is placed on the growing promise that product development public-private partnerships hold for developing vaccines for the world's poorest people.

  11. Mitigating concerns and maximizing returns: social media strategies for injury prevention non-profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan-Cottom, Tressie

    2014-08-01

    Injury prevention programs can use social media to disseminate information and recruit participants. Non-profit organizations have also used social media for fundraising and donor relationship management. Non-profit organizations (NPOs) with injury prevention missions often serve vulnerable populations. Social media platforms have varied levels of access and control of shared content. This variability can present privacy and outreach challenges that are of particular concern for injury prevention NPOs. This case report of social media workshops for injury prevention NPOs presents concerns and strategies for successfully implementing social media campaigns.

  12. Entrepreneurship in a Finnish public institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Burcea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the idea of entrepreneurship in public institutions has been the subject of intense debates, activities and academic research. The scopes of our article are to briefly underline the importance of developing an entrepreneurial spirit by presenting a case study from a Finnish local public administration and making aware the proactive aspect in the process of managing public institutions in Romania. Our hypotheses have been mainly of an interrogative nature. Hypothesis testing was achieved through the analysis of statistical data and conducting a set of sociological interviews with key people from Finnish institutions which were used in the survey. The results of the research emphasize that where there is an entrepreneurial behaviour with the local administration management, the community undergoes a process of conservation and development. The way in which they relate to community partners (such as entrepreneurs, non-profit organizations, citizens is essential to the entrepreneurial spirit within the local public institution.

  13. Psychosocial health of 4-year-old boys and girls, as observed by parents and teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Louise; Hoekman, Joop; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Sieneke M.

    2012-01-01

    Both parents and teachers assessed the psychosocial health of 228 4-year-old children at the start of elementary school in the Netherlands. Assessments were conducted using the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL; ages 1 1/2-5) and the Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF; ages 1 1/2-5). Results were

  14. Natural history of stuttering to 4 years of age: a prospective community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sheena; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Cini, Eileen; Conway, Laura; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Bavin, Edith L; Prior, Margot; Eadie, Patricia; Block, Susan; Wake, Melissa

    2013-09-01

    To document the natural history of stuttering by age 4 years, including (1) cumulative incidence of onset, (2) 12-month recovery status, (3) predictors of stuttering onset and recovery, and (4) potential comorbidities. The study cohort was a prospective community-ascertained cohort (the Early Language in Victoria Study) from Melbourne, Australia, of 4-year-old children (n = 1619; recruited at age 8 months) and their mothers. Outcome was stuttering onset by age 4 years and recovery within 12 months of onset, defined using concurrent monthly parent and speech pathologist ratings. Potential predictors: child gender, birth weight, birth order, prematurity, and twinning; maternal mental health and education; socioeconomic status; and family history of stuttering. Potential comorbidities: preonset and concurrent temperament, language, nonverbal cognition, and health-related quality of life. By age 4 years, the cumulative incidence of stuttering onset was 11.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.7% to 12.8%). Higher maternal education (P = .004), male gender (P = .02), and twinning (P = .005) predicted stuttering onset. At outcome, stuttering children had stronger language (mean [SD]: 105.0 [13.0] vs 99.6 [14.6]; mean difference 5.5, 95% CI: 3.1 to 7.8; P stuttering onset is common in preschoolers, adverse affects are not the norm in the first year after onset.

  15. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 4-year-old girl associated with alimemazine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maldegem, Bianca T; Smit, Leo M E; Touw, Daan J; Gemke, Reinoud J B J

    UNLABELLED: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but serious disorder caused by antipsychotic medication including phenothiazines. For sedative purposes, increasing doses of alimemazine were administered to a 4-year-old multiple handicapped girl, with cerebral damage of the basal ganglia.

  16. Preventing and Responding to Bullying: An Elementary School's 4-Year Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormac, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a pervasive problem in schools and requires a schoolwide approach. This article describes the action research process used to examine the impact of a 4-year, K-5 school bullying prevention and intervention. The school counselors collaborated with students, staff, and parents to implement the program, and collected and…

  17. Case of indolent endocarditis due to Pseudomonas stutzeri with genetic evidence of relapse after 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, David; Podglajen, Isabelle; Aubert, Agnès; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Diebold, Benoit; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2009-02-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri, a gram-negative bacterium, is a common inhabitant of soil and water. We report an unusual case of a relapse of infective endocarditis due to P. stutzeri 4 years after the initial episode. The identity of the strains was proven by genomic analysis.

  18. Vowel Confusion Patterns in Adults during Initial 4 Years of Implant Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaalimaa, Taina T.; Sorri, Martti J.; Laitakari, Jaakko; Sivonen, Ville; Muhli, Arto

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated adult cochlear implant users' (n == 39) vowel recognition and confusions by an open-set syllable test during 4 years of implant use, in a prospective repeated-measures design. Subjects' responses were coded for phoneme errors and estimated by the generalized mixed model. Improvement in overall vowel recognition was highest…

  19. Pegvisomant treatment in a 4-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, Katharina M; Sehested, Astrid; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    with acromegaly. We wanted to investigate whether pegvisomant was effective in a child with octreotide-resistant GH excess. CASE: A 4-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 and GH excess associated with optic glioma received pegvisomant injections (10 mg subcutaneously) with increasing intervals from daily...

  20. Local intra-arterial thrombolysis in a 4-year-old male with vertebrobasilar artery thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janmaat, Mirjam; Gravendeel, Joost P; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Vroomen, Patrick C; Brouwer, Oebele F; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old male with vertebrobasilar artery thrombosis for which he was treated with local intra-arterial urokinase 60 hours after onset of symptoms. Initially the patient had dysarthria and dysphagia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a community hospital showed abno

  1. 26 CFR 1.702-3T - 4-Year spread (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with or within which such short year ends. Example 9. Assume that P3 is a partnership with a taxable... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.702-3T 4-Year spread (temporary). (a) Applicability. This section applies to a partner in a partnership if— (1) The partnership is required by section...

  2. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 4-year-old girl associated with alimemazine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maldegem, Bianca T; Smit, Leo M E; Touw, Daan J; Gemke, Reinoud J B J

    2002-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but serious disorder caused by antipsychotic medication including phenothiazines. For sedative purposes, increasing doses of alimemazine were administered to a 4-year-old multiple handicapped girl, with cerebral damage of the basal ganglia.

  3. Social Context Effects in 2- and 4-Year-Olds' Selective versus Faithful Imitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Kushnir, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    This study asked whether children's tendency to imitate selectively (ignore causally unnecessary actions) versus faithfully ("overimitate" causally unnecessary actions) varies across ages and social contexts. In the first experiment, 2-year-olds and 4-year-olds were randomly assigned to play 1 of 3 prior games with a demonstrator: a…

  4. Preventing and Responding to Bullying: An Elementary School's 4-Year Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormac, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a pervasive problem in schools and requires a schoolwide approach. This article describes the action research process used to examine the impact of a 4-year, K-5 school bullying prevention and intervention. The school counselors collaborated with students, staff, and parents to implement the program, and collected and…

  5. Preventing and Responding to Bullying: An Elementary School's 4-Year Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormac, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a pervasive problem in schools and requires a schoolwide approach. This article describes the action research process used to examine the impact of a 4-year, K-5 school bullying prevention and intervention. The school counselors collaborated with students, staff, and parents to implement the program, and collected and…

  6. Overweight among Low-Income Texas Preschoolers Aged 2 to 4 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kayan L.; Castrucci, Brian C.; Gossman, Ginger; Mirchandani, Gita; Sayegh, M. Aaron; Moehlman, Clint; Van Eck, Mary; Petrilli, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Determine child/maternal factors associated with overweight among 2- to 4-year-olds enrolled in the Texas Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Design: Matched child and maternal data collected by self-report of the mother during WIC certification. These data were extracted from existing…

  7. Factors Related to the Adoption of IT Emerging Technologies by Research and Non-Research Based Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Then, Keri Ann; Amaria, Pesi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the adoption of information technology (IT) emerging technology by higher education institutions with a focus on non-research and research based institutions categorized by Carnegie Mellon classifications that are members of EDUCAUSE, a higher education non-profit organization, whose mission is the use of IT in higher…

  8. Proatherogenic Lipid Profile in Early Childhood: Association with Weight Status at 4 Years and Parental Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaño-Galán, Isolina; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Rodríguez-Dehli, Cristina; Valvi, Damaskini; Vrijheid, Martine; Tardón, Adonina

    2017-08-01

    To determine lipid profiles in early childhood and evaluate their association with weight status at 4 years of age. Additionally, we evaluated whether the risk of overweight or having an altered lipid profile was associated with parental weight status. Five hundred eighty two mothers and their 4-year-old children from 2 Spanish population-based cohorts were studied. Weight status in children at 4 years of age was classified as overweight or obese using the International Obesity Task Force criteria. Plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were determined in children and lipid ratios were calculated. A proatherogenic lipid profile was defined as having the 3 lipid ratios in the third tertile. A total of 12.9% of children were overweight and 6.4% were obese. Weight status at 4 years of age was related to maternal prepregnancy body mass index, paternal body mass index, gestational diabetes, and birth weight, but not with other sociodemographic characteristics of the mother. We found no association with gestational age, sex of the child, or breastfeeding. The risk of overweight/obesity was increased 4.17-fold if mothers were overweight/obese (95% CI 1.76-9.88) and 5.1-fold (95% CI 2.50-10.40) if both parents were overweight/obese. There were 133 children (22.8%) with a proatherogenic lipid profile. The risk of a proatherogenic lipid profile was increased 2.44-fold (95% CI 1.54-3.86) if they were overweight/obese at 4 years of age and 2-fold if the father was overweight/obese (95% CI 1.22-3.35). Four-year-old overweight/obese children have higher lipid risk profiles. Offspring of overweight/obese parents have an increased risk for obesity and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Non-Profit University and a For-Profit Consulting Company Partner to a Offer a New Master's Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Gary; Dalton, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    The University of San Diego, School of Business Administration (non-profit university) and the Ken Blanchard Companies (for profit management consulting company) teamed to create the Master of Science in Executive Leadership at USD. Fusing a traditional non-profit university faculty and staff with a for-profit consulting company created a plethora…

  10. Seeking Policies for Cultural Democracy: Examining the Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Nonprofit Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lillian; McKay, Sara Wilson

    2008-01-01

    Against a backdrop exploring the relationships between cultural democracy and nonprofit arts funding policies, this article describes the impact of unwritten arts funding policies that are manifest in tax breaks for individuals, foundations, and corporations as well as federal contributions to nonprofit arts organizations in the United States. We…

  11. 20 CFR 404.112 - When we consider certain employees of private nonprofit organizations to be fully insured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nonprofit organizations to be fully insured. 404.112 Section 404.112 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... Coverage Fully Insured Status § 404.112 When we consider certain employees of private nonprofit organizations to be fully insured. If you are age 55 or over on January 1, 1984, and are on that date...

  12. 14 CFR 91.146 - Passenger-carrying flights for the benefit of a charitable, nonprofit, or community event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... benefit of a charitable, nonprofit, or community event. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply: Charitable event means an event that raises funds for the benefit of a... of a charitable, nonprofit, or community event. 91.146 Section 91.146 Aeronautics and Space...

  13. Between state and market: The relationship between non-profit housing organisations and the state in three national contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullins, D.W.; Milligan, V.; Nieboer, N.E.T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an international collaborative study5 of non-profit housing; one of the main alternatives to public housing developed in many countries. The study involved researchers6 in three countries using a common methodology to engage the leaders of non-profit organisations

  14. An empirical investigation of for-profit and tax-exempt nonprofit hospitals engaged in joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pamela C

    2004-01-01

    Joint ventures between nonprofit and for-profit hospitals offer opportunities for collaboration to increase efficiency. These transactions have attracted the attention of the Internal Revenue Service, which may threaten tax-exempt status. This article analyzes inherent financial characteristics of nonprofit hospitals that joint venture with for-profit hospitals and those that choose not to joint venture.

  15. 33 CFR 263.25 - Authority for emergency streambank and shoreline protection of public works and nonprofit public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... streambank and shoreline protection of public works and nonprofit public services (Section 14). 263.25... and shoreline protection of public works and nonprofit public services (Section 14). (a) Legislative... year, for the construction, repair, restoration, and modification of emergency streambank and...

  16. Organizational Structure and Behaviour in Day Care: Differences between Non-Profit and For-Profit Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Patricia M.; Lyon, Mary E.; Kienapple, Kim; Young, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Examined how Canadian day care centers are operated and managed, to identify differences in organizational structure and behavior between non-profit and for-profit centers and characteristics of structure and management linked with high quality care. Found that non-profit centers were more complex, more formalized, and less centralized than…

  17. 29 CFR 780.407 - System must be nonprofit or operated on a share-crop basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false System must be nonprofit or operated on a share-crop basis... Requirements Under Section 13(b)(12) The Irrigation Exemption § 780.407 System must be nonprofit or operated on... on facilities of any irrigation system unless the ditches, canals, reservoirs, or waterways in...

  18. Dental Caries and Associated Factors in Children Aged 2-4 Years Old in Mbeya City, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakayoka, Hery; Masalu, Joyce Rose; Namakuka Kikwilu, Emil

    2017-06-01

    Dental caries in infants and young children is prevalent worldwide; its magnitude and associated factors vary between communities because of cultural and social economic differences. No such information was available for pre-school children in Mbeya city. To determine dental caries status and associated factors in 2 to 4-year-old children in Mbeya city. A cross sectional study was conducted among 525 children aged 2-4 years and their parents/caregivers. Caries was assessed using caries assessment spectrum and treatment index, oral hygiene by visual inspection for visible plaque on index teeth, and dietary and oral hygiene habits by a questionnaire. Kappa statistics was used to test reliability of study instruments, χ(2)-test and logistic regression was employed for studying associations. Caries free children for dmft1, dmft2 and dmft3 were 79.8%, 83.8% and 94.7% and caries experience was 0.49 (1.23), 0.4 (1.14) and 0.10 (0.53) respectively. Older age [(OR =2.722 (1.617-4.582) p=caries. Prolonged breastfeeding for more than 1 year and breastfeeding at night had no association with dental caries. The prevalence of dental caries was very low. Older age and frequent consumption of factory made sugary foods at age 1-2 years were associated with higher odds of developing dental caries. Prolonged breasfeeding and breastfeeding at night had no association with dental caries. Prevention of dental caries should be instituted as soon as primary teeth start erupting, especially through discouraging consumption of factory made sugary foods/snacks.

  19. Increased Public Accountability for Hospital Nonprofit Status: Potential Impacts on Residency Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffoul, Melanie C; Phillips, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine recently called for greater graduate medical education (GME) accountability for meeting the workforce needs of the nation. The Affordable Care Act expanded community health needs assessment (CHNA) requirements for nonprofit and tax-exempt hospitals to include community assessment, intervention, and evaluation every 3 years but did not specify details about workforce. Texas receives relatively little federal GME funding but has used Medicaid waivers to support GME expansion. The objective of this article was to examine Texas CHNAs and regional health partnership (RHP) plans to determine to what extent they identify community workforce need or include targeted GME changes or expansion since the enactment of the Affordable Care Act and the revised Internal Revenue Service requirements for CHNAs. Texas hospitals (n = 61) received federal GME dollars during the study period. Most of these hospitals completed a CHNA; nearly all hospitals receiving federal GME dollars but not mandated to complete a CHNA participated in similar state-based RHP plans. The 20 RHPs included assessments and intervention proposals under a 1115 Medicaid waiver. Every CHNA and RHP was reviewed for any mention of GME-related needs or interventions. The latest available CHNAs and RHPs were reviewed in 2015. All CHNA and RHP plans were dated 2011 to 2015. Of the 38 hospital CHNAs, 26 identified a workforce need in primary care, 34 in mental health, and 17 in subspecialty care. A total of 36 CHNAs included implementation plans, of which 3 planned to address the primary care workforce need through an increase in GME funding, 1 planned to do so for psychiatry training, and 1 for subspecialty training. Of the 20 RHPs, 18 identified workforce needs in primary care, 20 in mental health, and 15 in subspecialty training. Five RHPs proposed to increase GME funding for primary care, 3 for psychiatry, and 1 for subspecialty care. Hospital CHNAs and other regional health assessments

  20. Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations: Uses and Applications in a Social Entrepreneurship Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Lowell S.; Thornton, Jeremy P.; Carson, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Social Entrepreneurship (SE) programs have been expanding over the past decade. The emergence of this new discipline can be attributed to two overlapping factors. Students (particularly business students) have expressed an increased desire to blend values, ethics and social causes into their own vocations. At the same time, the nonprofit and…

  1. The social media participation framework: studying the effects of social media on nonprofit communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Social media could help nonprofit communities to organize their communication with their members in new and innovative ways. This could contribute to sustaining or improving the participation of members within these communities. Yet little is known of how to measure and understand the offline commun

  2. Examining the Experiences, Perceptions, and Challenges of Women Leaders in Private, Nonprofit Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Barbara Jean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to interview women presidents and leaders in private, nonprofit universities regarding commonalities of perceptions and experiences in the leadership role, to examine the meaning of reactive behavior in the perceptions about their role, how they react or behave in their role, and if they perceived gender…

  3. Enhancing the Understanding of Government and Nonprofit Accounting with THE PUZZLE GAME: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Raymond J.; Ostapski, S. Andrew; O'Callaghan, Susanne; Walker, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional teaching aids such as crossword puzzles have been successfully used in the classroom to enhance student learning. Government and nonprofit accounting is a confusing course for students since it has strange terminologies and contradicts the accounting concepts learned in other courses. As such, it is an ideal course for a…

  4. Primary care teams: New Zealand's experience with community-governed non-profit primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Peter; Davis, Peter; Lay-Yee, Roy

    2005-05-01

    Community-governed non-profit primary care organisations started developing in New Zealand in the late 1980s with the aim to reduce financial, cultural and geographical barriers to access. New Zealand's new primary health care strategy aims to co-ordinate primary care and public health strategies with the overall objective of improving population health and reducing health inequalities. The purpose of this study is to carry out a detailed examination of the composition and characteristics of primary care teams in community-governed non-profit practices and compare them with more traditional primary care organisations, with the aim of drawing conclusions about the capacity of the different structures to carry out population-based primary care. The study used data from a representative national cross-sectional survey of general practitioners in New Zealand (2001/2002). Primary care teams were largest and most heterogeneous in community-governed non-profit practices, which employed about 3% of the county's general practitioners. Next most heterogeneous in terms of their primary care teams were practices that belonged to an Independent Practitioner Association, which employed the majority of the country's general practitioners (71.7%). Even though in absolute and relative terms the community-governed non-profit primary care sector is small, by providing a much needed element of professional and organisational pluralism and by experimenting with more diverse staffing arrangements, it is likely to continue to have an influence on primary care policy development in New Zealand.

  5. Profiles of For-Profit and Nonprofit Education Management Organizations: Thirteenth Annual Report, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.; Yat Aguilar, Mayra A.; Dailey, Breanna

    2012-01-01

    While past annual "Profiles" reports have focused on either for-profit EMOs (education management organizations) or nonprofit EMOs, this is the first annual "Profiles" report to cover both categories in a single report which allows for easier comparisons. The 2010-2011 school year marked another year of relatively slow growth in the for-profit…

  6. 7 CFR 1770.16 - Supplementary accounts required of nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplementary accounts required of nonprofit organizations. 1770.16 Section 1770.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Uniform System of Accounts § 1770.16 Supplementary accounts required of...

  7. Nonprofit Organizations and Innovation: A Model of Neighborhood-Based Collaboration to Prevent Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, Elizabeth A.; Shay, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a theoretical and conceptual framework for neighborhood-based collaboration by nonprofit organizations. Analyzes the main concepts of innovation in the design and implementation of a collaboration to prevent child maltreatment in an undervalued neighborhood and draws implications for social policy, social work practice, and social work…

  8. The Effect of Gendered Communication on Women's Behavioral Intentions Regarding Nonprofit and For-Profit Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffert, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of gendered communication on women's behavioral intentions regarding nonprofit and for-profit entrepreneurship. Women represent half of the U.S. workforce, but only about one third of all American entrepreneurs are women. Feminists have argued that because entrepreneurship is largely understood…

  9. Resistance towards persuasion: differences between non-profit and commercial advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, C.R.; Fransen, M.L.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    In the present research we examined a variety of strategies that consumers may use to resist persuasion towards non-profit and commercial advertising. Based on research by Jacks and Cameron (2003), we investigated seven strategies (i.e., attitude bolstering, counter arguing, negative affect, selecti

  10. 26 CFR 48.4041-17 - Tax-free retail sales to certain nonprofit educational organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used exclusively by the school. (b) Definition of nonprofit educational organization. For purposes of... curriculum and normally has a regularly enrolled body of pupils or students in attendance at the place where... 501 (a), provided such school normally maintains a regular faculty and curriculum and normally has a...

  11. Examining the Experiences, Perceptions, and Challenges of Women Leaders in Private, Nonprofit Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Barbara Jean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to interview women presidents and leaders in private, nonprofit universities regarding commonalities of perceptions and experiences in the leadership role, to examine the meaning of reactive behavior in the perceptions about their role, how they react or behave in their role, and if they perceived gender…

  12. Changing behaviour through business-nonprofit collaboration? Consumer responses to social alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vock, M.; van Dolen, W.; Kolk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' responses to social alliances, a specific type of corporate social marketing in which companies cooperate with non-profit organizations. This paper extends previous studies that suggested that a social marketing effort may be a

  13. The social media participation framework: studying the effects of social media on nonprofit communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Social media could help nonprofit communities to organize their communication with their members in new and innovative ways. This could contribute to sustaining or improving the participation of members within these communities. Yet little is known of how to measure and understand the offline commun

  14. Analysis of capital spending and capital financing among large US nonprofit health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the recent trends (2006 to 2009) in capital spending among 25 of the largest nonprofit health systems in the United States and analyzes the financing sources that these large nonprofit health care systems used to fund their capital spending. Total capital spending for these 25 nonprofit health entities exceeded $41 billion for the four-year period of this study. Less than 3 percent of total capital spending resulted in mergers and acquisition activities. Total annual capital spending grew at an average annual rate of 17.6 percent during the first three year of this study's period of analysis. Annual capital spending for 2009 fell by more than 22 percent over prior year's level due to the impact of widespread disruption in US tax-exempt variable rate debt markets. While cash inflow from long-term debt issues was a significant source of capital financing, this study's primary finding was that operating cash flow was the predominant source of capital spending funding. Key words: nonprofit, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), capital spending, capital financing.

  15. A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-Profit Project Development (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, J.; Grove, J.; Irvine, L.; Jacobs, J. F.; Johnson Phillips, S.; Sawyer, A.; Wiedman, J.

    2012-05-01

    This guide is organized around three sponsorship models: utility-sponsored projects, projects sponsored by special purpose entities - businesses formed for the purpose of producing community solar power, and non-profit sponsored projects. The guide addresses issues common to all project models, as well as issues unique to each model.

  16. Nonprofit Governance: Exploring Leadership Practices and Demographics of Local Education Foundation Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Marva L.

    2012-01-01

    Expectations for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) continue to increase. Additionally, it is difficult to successfully carry out the mission of organizations while dealing with decreased funding and reduced staffing. NPOs need to be operationally consistent and precise to achieve pre-defined measures of success. Many factors impact…

  17. The Homogenized Imagery of Non-Profit Organizations on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenix, Linda Jean

    2007-01-01

    This research evaluates websites from 200 "non-deviant" and 200 "deviant" non-profit organizations to better understand the relationship between the type of advocacy group and the visual imagery used for self-representation. Seventeen of 21 variables measured for this study found no difference between non-deviant and deviant non-profit…

  18. An Examination of Childcare Teachers in For-Profit and Non-Profit Childcare Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Mullis, Ann K.; Shriner, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Perceptions of childcare teachers in for-profit and non-profit centers were examined. Previous research indicates that childcare teachers earn consistently low wages, have little employee benefits and are dissatisfied with their work environments. This study further explores the employment issues and work environments that childcare teachers…

  19. Embedding energy saving policies in the Dutch non-profit housing sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, N.; Kroese, R.; Straub, A.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies on policy implementation have emphasized the difficulties of putting policies into practice. The paper presents several ways in which Dutch non-profit housing providers incorporate their energy saving policies in their ‘regular’ housing management regarding the existing stock, such as

  20. Changing behaviour through business-nonprofit collaboration? Consumer responses to social alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vock, M.; van Dolen, W.; Kolk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' responses to social alliances, a specific type of corporate social marketing in which companies cooperate with non-profit organizations. This paper extends previous studies that suggested that a social marketing effort may be a "double-edg

  1. Implementation Evaluation in a Private Nonprofit Setting: A Mixed-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jacquelyn Ann

    2013-01-01

    Demand for quality service provision in the human services industry requires that private nonprofit organizations have the administrative and management capacities to ensure successful implementation and sustain staff development programs. Unfamiliarity with implementation challenges, and limited awareness of implementation strategies, can trigger…

  2. Mind the Gap: A Case Study of Values-Based Decision Making in a Nonprofit Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Jana L.

    2013-01-01

    Using an exploratory case study approach, this research examined the consistency between espoused and enacted values within a large nonprofit organization known as an ethical leader in the human services industry. This research explored ethical business culture, ethical decision making, deontological and utilitarian moral paradigms and learning…

  3. Validation of the Wood's Job Satisfaction Questionnaire among Taiwanese Nonprofit Sport Organization Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Yen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of Wood's Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (JSQ) among Taiwanese workers. The participants were 341 nonprofit sport organization workers (M[subscript age] = 35.89, SD = 9.23) who completed the job satisfaction questionnaire, turnover intention scale, and organizational commitment.…

  4. The Effect of Gendered Communication on Women's Behavioral Intentions Regarding Nonprofit and For-Profit Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffert, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of gendered communication on women's behavioral intentions regarding nonprofit and for-profit entrepreneurship. Women represent half of the U.S. workforce, but only about one third of all American entrepreneurs are women. Feminists have argued that because entrepreneurship is largely understood…

  5. 32 CFR 37.635 - What cost principles do I require a nonprofit participant to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What cost principles do I require a nonprofit... DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 37.635 What cost principles do...

  6. The social media participation framework: studying the effects of social media on nonprofit communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Social media could help nonprofit communities to organize their communication with their members in new and innovative ways. This could contribute to sustaining or improving the participation of members within these communities. Yet little is known of how to measure and understand the offline

  7. Evaluating Outsourcing Information Technology and Assurance Expertise by Small Non-Profit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Fillmore

    2013-01-01

    Small non-profit organizations outsource at least one information technology or information assurance process. Outsourcing information technology and information assurance processes has increased every year. The study was to determine the key reasons behind the choice to outsource information technology and information assurance processes. Using…

  8. From health services to medical markets: the commodity transformation of medical production and the nonprofit sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imershein, A W; Estes, C L

    1996-01-01

    In recent years the language and logic of medical care have moved from providing medical services to marketing product lines. Analysis in this article examines this task transformation and its implications for transformation of the nonprofit sector and of the state. The authors argue that these transformations are essential explanatory elements to account for the origins of medical services in the nonprofit sector, the early exclusion of capitalist organizations from hospital care, and the changes that fostered corporate entry. To wit, medical care tasks have undergone a two-stage transformation. The first transformation changed open-ended, ill-defined services with uncertain funding into more highly organized and codified services with stable funding, attracting both capitalist enterprises and capitalist logic into the nonprofit sector. The second transformation standardized medical care tasks into product lines, a process that also challenged the status of the nonprofit organizations performing these tasks. In an analysis of the second transformation, the authors argue that this challenge is in the process of turning back upon itself, undermining the conditions that fostered capitalist entry into medical care delivery in the first place.

  9. Evaluating Outsourcing Information Technology and Assurance Expertise by Small Non-Profit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Fillmore

    2013-01-01

    Small non-profit organizations outsource at least one information technology or information assurance process. Outsourcing information technology and information assurance processes has increased every year. The study was to determine the key reasons behind the choice to outsource information technology and information assurance processes. Using…

  10. From "Charity" to "Social Enterprise": Managing Volunteers in Public-Serving Nonprofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappala, Gianni

    2001-01-01

    The changing environment has shifted the model of nonprofit organizations from charity to social enterprise, which emphasizes partnerships with business and government. Approaches to volunteer management, recruitment, retention, and recognition are different in social enterprises, and a move beyond human resource management practices is required.…

  11. Evaluating Performance Measurement Systems in Nonprofit Agencies: The Program Accountability Quality Scale (PAQS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Dennis L.; Nelson, Joan; Carnahan, Sharon; Chepenik, Nancy G.; Tubiak, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Developed and field tested the Performance Accountability Quality Scale (PAQS) on 191 program performance measurement systems developed by nonprofit agencies in central Florida. Preliminary findings indicate that the PAQS provides a structure for obtaining expert opinions based on a theory-driven model about the quality of proposed measurement…

  12. Staffing of the Systems Development Life Cycle: An Empirical Study of Charitable Nonprofit Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Explains the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) construct, which is used for development of management information systems, and analyzes the staffing composition of SDLC steps for nonprofit arts organizations including art museums and symphony orchestras. The use of outside help, in-house personnel, and volunteers is examined; and the influence…

  13. 8 CFR 319.6 - United States nonprofit organizations engaged abroad in disseminating information which...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... organizations engaged abroad in disseminating information which significantly promotes U.S. interests. The... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false United States nonprofit organizations engaged abroad in disseminating information which significantly promotes U.S. interests. 319.6 Section 319...

  14. Gender, Occupation, and Promotion to Management in the Nonprofit Sector : The critical case of Médecins sans Frontières Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Marleen; Heyse, Liesbet; Mills, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Although one can assume the work values within nonprofit organizations promote gender equality in promotion decisions, there is preliminary evidence that in the nonprofit sector women are underrepresented in higher management positions. Whereas the mechanisms resulting in underrepresentation of

  15. Gender, Occupation, and Promotion to Management in the Nonprofit Sector : The critical case of Médecins sans Frontières Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Marleen; Heyse, Liesbet; Mills, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Although one can assume the work values within nonprofit organizations promote gender equality in promotion decisions, there is preliminary evidence that in the nonprofit sector women are underrepresented in higher management positions. Whereas the mechanisms resulting in underrepresentation of wome

  16. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: 4-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coelho Okida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the main causes of dental erosion. The aim of this case presented is to describe the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with GERD after 4 years of followup. A 33-year-old male patient complained about tooth sensitivity. The lingual surface of the maxillary anterior teeth and the cusps of the upper and lower posterior teeth presented wear. It was suspected that the feeling of heartburn reported by the patient associated with the intake of sports supplements (isotonics was causing gastroesophageal changes. The patient was referred to a gastroenterologist and was diagnosed with GERD. Dental treatment was performed with metal-free crowns and porcelain veneers after medical treatment of the disease. With the change in eating habits, the treatment of GERD and lithium disilicate ceramics provided excellent cosmetic results after 4 years and the patient reported satisfaction with the treatment.

  17. An integrated ultrasound curriculum (iUSC) for medical students: 4-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Richard A; Rao, Victor V; Poston, Mary Beth; Howe, Duncan B; Hunt, Patrick S; Fowler, Stanley D; Paulman, Lance E; Wells, James R; Richeson, Nancy A; Catalana, Paul V; Thomas, Lynn K; Britt Wilson, L; Cook, Thomas; Riffle, Shaun; Neuffer, Francis H; McCallum, James B; Keisler, Brian D; Brown, Rachel S; Gregg, Anthony R; Sims, Kerry M; Powell, Caroline K; Garber, Matthew D; Morrison, James E; Owens, William B; Carnevale, Kevin A; Jennings, William R; Fletcher, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    A review of the development and implementation of a 4-year medical student integrated ultrasound curriculum is presented. Multiple teaching and assessment modalities are discussed as well as results from testing and student surveys. Lessons learned while establishing the curriculum are summarized. It is concluded that ultrasound is a well received, valuable teaching tool across all 4 years of medical school, and students learn ultrasound well, and they feel their ultrasound experience enhances their medical education.

  18. Intrathyroidal thymic tissue mimicking a malignant thyroid nodule in a 4-year-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chang Woo; Kim, Gou Young; Shim, Kye Shik [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Intrathyroidal thymic tissue is rare and may be confused with a malignant thyroid nodule because of hyperechoic dots mimicking calcifications. We report the case of a thyroid nodule with malignant ultrasonographic findings in a 4-year-old child, which was confirmed cytologically as ectopic thymic tissue. The sonographic findings of ectopic thymus were similar to those of the thymus; therefore, clinicians should be familiar with ultrasonography findings of normal thymic tissue.

  19. Total Body Fat Content versus BMI in 4-Year-Old Healthy Swedish Children

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabet Forsum; Eva Flinke Carlsson; Hanna Henriksson; Pontus Henriksson; Marie Löf

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity, a worldwide problem, is generally identified using BMI (body mass index). However, this application of BMI has been little investigated in children below 5 years of age due to a lack of appropriate methods to assess body composition. Therefore, we used air displacement plethysmography (ADP) to study 4.4-year old boys and girls since this method is accurate in young children if they accept the requirements of the measurement. The purpose was to analyze the rel...

  20. Intrathyroidal thymic tissue mimicking a malignant thyroid nodule in a 4-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Hyun Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Intrathyroidal thymic tissue is rare and may be confused with a malignant thyroid nodule because of hyperechoic dots mimicking calcifications. We report the case of a thyroid nodule with malignant ultrasonographic findings in a 4-year-old child, which was confirmed cytologically as ectopic thymic tissue. The sonographic findings of ectopic thymus were similar to those of the thymus; therefore, clinicians should be familiar with ultrasonography findings of normal thymic tissue.

  1. A randomized clinical trial on the sealing of occlusal carious lesions: 3-4-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luana Severo; Giongo, Fernanda Cristina Mendes de Santa; Mua, Bruna; Martins, Vanessa Balbé; Barbachan E Silva, Berenice; Qvist, Vibeke; Maltz, Marisa

    2017-06-05

    This randomized clinical trial aimed to assess the efficacy of sealing occlusal carious lesions in permanent teeth. The sample consisted of 54 occlusal carious lesions in permanent molars and premolars of 49 patients aged 8-43 years (median: 19 years). The inclusion criteria comprised the presence of a cavity with no access allowing biofilm control. The maximum depth of the lesion was the middle third of the dentin thickness, as assessed by bitewing radiography. The teeth were randomly assigned to sealant treatment (n = 28) or restorative treatment (n = 26). Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed after 1 year and after 3-4 years. The outcomes depended on the clinical performance of the sealant/restoration and the control of caries progression observed radiographically. Survival analysis was performed to assess success rates. Over the 3-4 years of monitoring, 2 sealants were totally lost, 1 needed repair, and 1 showed caries progression, totaling 4 failures in the sealant group. In the restoration group, 1 failure was observed (in need of repair). The success rates were 76% and 94% in the sealant and the restoration groups, respectively (p > 0.05). The sealing of occlusal carious lesions in permanent teeth succeeded in controlling caries over a 3-4-year period. However, sealed carious lesions require patient compliance in attending regular follow-ups to control the occurrence of clinical failures of the sealants.

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.575 - Who notifies non-profit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who notifies non-profit... Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.575 Who notifies non-profit organizations that surplus real property... available? HUD notifies eligible non-profit organizations, following guidance in the GSA Customer Guide...

  3. 75 FR 8988 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Yosemite Institute Environmental Education Campus; Yosemite...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Campus in Yosemite National Park, California. Yosemite Institute (YI) is a non-profit park partner which... environment, extending more opportunities for young children from diverse backgrounds to experience and enjoy... provide potable water, due to an antiquated system that draws surface water from Indian Creek,...

  4. Unwanted horses: The role of nonprofit equine rescue and sanctuary organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, K E; Stull, C L; Kass, P H

    2010-12-01

    Closure of US equine slaughter facilities in 2007 along with the concomitant economic recession have contributed to a sharp increase in the number of unwanted horses throughout the United States, with estimates totaling 100,000 horses per year. The objective of the study was to obtain comprehensive data regarding nonprofit organizations caring for unwanted horses, along with the characteristics and outcome of horses relinquished to these organizations. Nonprofit organizations that accept relinquished equines were contacted to participate in a 90-question survey. Responding organizations (144 of 326 eligible) in 37 states provided information on 280 cases representative of the 7,990 horses relinquished between 2007 and 2009. Data collected characterized these organizations as being in existence for 6 yr, financially supported through donations and personal funds, dedicated to the care of only 10 to 20 horses on a property of just over 30 acres, and reliant on volunteers for help. Funding was the greatest challenge to continued operation of nonprofit equine organizations, with maintenance costs for the care of a relinquished horse averaging $3,648 per year. Financial hardship, physical inability, or lack of time to care for the horses by owners were the most common reasons for relinquishment, followed by seizure through law enforcement agencies for alleged neglect or abuse. Relinquished horses consisted of mostly light horse breeds (79.3%), with Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses as the most represented breeds. The age of relinquished horses ranged from 3 d to 42 yr old (12.4 ± 0.5 yr). About one-half of the horses entered in the survey were considered unhealthy due to illness, injury, lameness, or poor body condition. For every 4 horses relinquished to a nonprofit organization, only 3 horses were adopted or sold between 2006 and 2009, and many organizations had refused to accept additional horses for lack of resources. The estimated maximum capacity for the 326

  5. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  6. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  7. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  8. THE CHANGING ROLE OF PRIVATE, NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY OF HUMAN SERVICES IN THE UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris-Tirrell, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    With diverse missions and multiple service provision strategies, nonprofit human services organizations have worked individually and collaboratively to create responses to social problems throughout the history of United States. This article highlights the important historic roots of the sector in understanding the scope and breadth of nonprofit human service organizations today. Challenges influencing this set of organizations, including the competing values of contracting out versus collaboration and the push-pull of grassroots or community-based versus professionalized orientations, are discussed. The article closes with important questions for nonprofit leaders and policymakers about the role of government in the human services arena.

  9. An empirical comparison between the board's strategic role in nonprofit hospitals and in for-profit industrial firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, W Q; Zeithaml, C P

    1992-04-01

    As the health care environment becomes more competitive, nonprofit hospitals are under pressure to adopt for-profit business practices. Based on an extensive field study, this research examines the central issue of organizational governance by comparing the strategic roles of nonprofit hospital boards with for-profit industrial boards. The results show that nonprofit hospital boards are generally more involved in the strategic decision process than their for-profit counterparts. If this governance activity is seen as desirable, hospital boards should exercise caution in emulating for-profit board practices.

  10. No population bias to left-hemisphere language in 4-year-olds with language impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy V.M. Bishop

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. An apparent paradox in the field of neuropsychology is that people with atypical cerebral lateralization do not appear to suffer any cognitive disadvantage, yet atypical cerebral lateralization is more common in children and adults with developmental language disorders. This study was designed to explore possible reasons for this puzzling pattern of results. Methods. We used functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD to assess cerebral blood flow during language production in 57 four-year-olds, including 15 children who had been late-talkers when first seen at 20 months of age. We categorized cerebral lateralization as left, right or bilateral, and compared proportions with each type of laterality with those seen in a previously tested sample of children aged 6–16 years. We also compared language scores at 4 years for those with typical and atypical lateralization, and then looked at the association the opposite way: comparing those with typical or impaired language in terms of their cerebral lateralization. Results. The distribution of types of cerebral lateralization was similar for 4-year-olds to that seen in older children. Overall, cerebral lateralization was not predictive of language level. However, for children who had language difficulties at 20 months and/or 4 years (N = 21, there was no population bias to left-hemisphere language activation, whereas children without language problems at either age showed a pronounced bias to left-sided language lateralization. Nevertheless, many children with right hemisphere language had no indications of language difficulties, confirming that atypical cerebral asymmetry is not a direct cause of problems. Conclusions. We suggest that atypical lateralization at the individual level is not associated with language impairment. However, lack of lateralization at the population level is a marker of risk for language impairment, which could be due to genetic or non-genetic causes.

  11. Risk factors for high blood pressure in low income children aged 3-4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolo, Márcia Regina; da Costa Louzada, Maria Laura; Rauber, Fernanda; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bó

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dietary sodium intake on blood pressure among low income children aged 3-4 years. Data were collected during a randomized trial conducted in São Leopoldo, Brazil, with 500 mother-child pairs recruited from the maternity ward of a local hospital. Breastfeeding data were obtained during the children's first year of life. At 3 to 4 years of age, children's anthropometric, dietary, and blood pressure assessments were obtained. Sodium intake was estimated from two multiple-pass 24-h dietary recalls. Systolic blood pressure > 90th percentile for age, sex, and height was classified as high systolic blood pressure, according to the population-based percentiles provided by the Task Force on Hypertension Control in Children and Adolescents. Blood pressure data were obtained from 331 children at 3 to 4 years. The mean value of systolic blood pressure was 91.31 mmHg (SD = 8.30 mmHg) and 5.2% (n = 17) presented high systolic blood pressure. The results of the multivariable analyses showed that children who consumed more than 1,200 mg of sodium/day and with waist-to-height ratio higher than 0.5 presented, respectively, 3.32 (95%CI 0.98-11.22) and 8.81 (95%CI 2.13-36.31) greater risk of having high systolic blood pressure. Exclusive breastfeeding, child overweight and change in body mass index z score during the first year of life were not associated with the outcome. The results of this study suggest that at preschool age sodium intake and high waist-to-height ratio are risk factors for high systolic blood pressure.

  12. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality 4 Years into Global Payment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zirui; Rose, Sherri; Safran, Dana G.; Landon, Bruce E.; Day, Matthew P.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spending and quality under global budgets remain unknown beyond 2 years. We evaluated spending and quality measures during the first 4 years of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Alternative Quality Contract (AQC). METHODS We compared spending and quality among enrollees whose physician organizations entered the AQC from 2009 through 2012 with those among persons in control states. We studied spending changes according to year, category of service, site of care, experience managing risk contracts, and price versus utilization. We evaluated process and outcome quality. RESULTS In the 2009 AQC cohort, medical spending on claims grew an average of $62.21 per enrollee per quarter less than it did in the control cohort over the 4-year period (P<0.001). This amount is equivalent to a 6.8% savings when calculated as a proportion of the average post-AQC spending level in the 2009 AQC cohort. Analogously, the 2010, 2011, and 2012 cohorts had average savings of 8.8% (P<0.001), 9.1% (P<0.001), and 5.8% (P = 0.04), respectively, by the end of 2012. Claims savings were concentrated in the outpatient-facility setting and in procedures, imaging, and tests, explained by both reduced prices and reduced utilization. Claims savings were exceeded by incentive payments to providers during the period from 2009 through 2011 but exceeded incentive payments in 2012, generating net savings. Improvements in quality among AQC cohorts generally exceeded those seen elsewhere in New England and nationally. CONCLUSIONS As compared with similar populations in other states, Massachusetts AQC enrollees had lower spending growth and generally greater quality improvements after 4 years. Although other factors in Massachusetts may have contributed, particularly in the later part of the study period, global budget contracts with quality incentives may encourage changes in practice patterns that help reduce spending and improve quality. (Funded by the Commonwealth Fund and others

  13. No population bias to left-hemisphere language in 4-year-olds with language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Dorothy V M; Holt, Georgina; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Groen, Margriet

    2014-01-01

    Background. An apparent paradox in the field of neuropsychology is that people with atypical cerebral lateralization do not appear to suffer any cognitive disadvantage, yet atypical cerebral lateralization is more common in children and adults with developmental language disorders. This study was designed to explore possible reasons for this puzzling pattern of results. Methods. We used functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) to assess cerebral blood flow during language production in 57 four-year-olds, including 15 children who had been late-talkers when first seen at 20 months of age. We categorized cerebral lateralization as left, right or bilateral, and compared proportions with each type of laterality with those seen in a previously tested sample of children aged 6-16 years. We also compared language scores at 4 years for those with typical and atypical lateralization, and then looked at the association the opposite way: comparing those with typical or impaired language in terms of their cerebral lateralization. Results. The distribution of types of cerebral lateralization was similar for 4-year-olds to that seen in older children. Overall, cerebral lateralization was not predictive of language level. However, for children who had language difficulties at 20 months and/or 4 years (N = 21), there was no population bias to left-hemisphere language activation, whereas children without language problems at either age showed a pronounced bias to left-sided language lateralization. Nevertheless, many children with right hemisphere language had no indications of language difficulties, confirming that atypical cerebral asymmetry is not a direct cause of problems. Conclusions. We suggest that atypical lateralization at the individual level is not associated with language impairment. However, lack of lateralization at the population level is a marker of risk for language impairment, which could be due to genetic or non-genetic causes.

  14. Kenny-Caffey Syndrome: oral findings and 4-year follow-up of overlay denture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Tahsin; Kecik, Defne; Cehreli, Zafer C

    2007-01-01

    Kenny-Caffey Syndrome (KCS) is an extremely rare osteosclerotic bone dysplasia associated with hypocalcemia and ocular abnormalities. Although the condition is well reported in the medical literature, dental manifestations have not been discussed in great detail. The purpose of this report is to present specific oral features and prosthetic management in a KCS patient. Overlay dentures were utilized in the management of low vertical dimension of occlusion, congenital absence of several permanent teeth, and problems associated with function and esthetics. Results of the 4-year follow-up overlay denture therapy are presented.

  15. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J. Patton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis.

  16. The effectiveness of physical education of the military academy cadets during a 4-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Lela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main role of physical education is health and educational practices of cadets and all-round personality development. Instruction executing is successful only when the set requirements are realized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of physical education in order to rise physical capabilities of the Military Academy cadets during a 4-year education. Methods. The study was conducted in the Military Academy, Belgrade. A total of 120 cadets who at the beginning of the study were 19 years ± 6 months and at the end 23 years ± 6 months were included in this study. The study used the following tests for verification and assessment of physical fitness: pull-ups, lifting the trunk from the ground, standing long jump seats, running at 1,600 m and overcoming the infantry obstacles. The data were analyzed using statistical programs to calculate the central and dispersion parameters. The difference in the achieved results in the individual variables were evaluated by the univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA, while the differences in the system variables by region were identified by the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and discriminant analysis. The group membership was determined using profile analysis. Results. There were statistically significant differences in all the tests to evaluate the effectiveness of physical education during a 4-year study, except in the standing long jump test. The best average results in motor capabilities tests, were achieved after two years of study, while in the endurance tests showed the best results achieved at the end of a 4-years studying. Conclusion. The results of overcoming specific tests for the physical abilities of the Military Academy cadets show that the physical education curriculum only slightly improves the development of physical skills of cadets during a 4-year study. The existing program shows the best results in the pull-ups test of the ground troops, and

  17. Idiopathic myelofibrosis with generalized periostitis in a 4-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Mandeep; Mehta, Rajesh; Paul, Premila; Saluja, Sumita; Kapoor, Sujala; Sharma, Monika

    2005-05-01

    Idiopathic myelofibrosis, a chronic myeloproliferative disorder of unknown origin, is characterized by splenomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis, leukoerythroblastosis, teardrop erythrocytes, and myelofibrosis. It is a rare disorder in childhood. The authors describe a 4-year-old girl with features consistent with idiopathic myelofibrosis, who also had generalized solid laminated periosteal reaction involving all long bones. The presence of thrombocytopenia at the onset and lack of leukocytosis were in contrast to the reported features seen in children. Recent case reports describe a relatively indolent course in children. Spontaneous remissions have also been described in pediatric cases. The fulminant course of this patient without any features of malignant transformation was noteworthy in this regard.

  18. Infant Sleep Predicts Attention Regulation and Behavior Problems at 3-4 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Avi; De Marcas, Gali; Guri, Yael; Berger, Andrea; Tikotzky, Liat; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study assessed the role of early sleep patterns in predicting attention regulation and behavior problems. Sleep of 43 infants was assessed using actigraphy at 12 months of age and then reassessed when the children were 3-4 years old. During this follow-up, their attention regulation and behavior problems were also assessed using a computerized test and parental reports. Lower quality of sleep in infancy significantly predicted compromised attention regulation and behavior problems. These findings underscore the need to identify and treat early sleep problems.

  19. Ingestion of tea tree oil (Melaleuca oil) by a 4-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marilyn C; Donoghue, Aaron; Markowitz, Jennifer A; Osterhoudt, Kevin C

    2003-06-01

    A 4-year-old boy ingested a small quantity of tea tree oil. Within 30 minutes, he became ataxic and shortly thereafter progressed to unresponsiveness; he was endotracheally intubated by paramedics. His neurologic status improved gradually over 10 hours, and he remains well on follow-up. Tea tree oil is an increasingly popular topical antiseptic that is available in a wide variety of products, often without warning labels. Healthcare providers should be aware of the common uses of tea tree oil, as well as its potential toxicity.

  20. [Awake Nasotracheal Intubation for a 4-Year-old Boy with an Oral Penetrating Toothbrush Injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Ando, Kokichi; Saito, Kazutomo; Toyama, Hiroaki; Fudeta, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an oral penetrating injury caused by a toothbrush in a 4-year-old 17-kg boy. The toothbrush was lodged in the right cervical region through the oral cavity, and emergency surgery for removal was planned under general anesthesia. Although mask ventilation was not possible because of the protruding toothbrush handle, awake nasotracheal intubation was successfully performed with a fiber-scope and intravenous fentanyl 25 μg. We conclude that appropriate analgesics could facilitate awake intubation in pediatric patients.

  1. Intermuscular lipoma in a 4-year-old child presenting like Spigelian hernia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas are commonest benign tumor and can occur at any part of the body, but intermuscular lipomas are very rare and usually occur at middle age or later. Intermuscular lipomas remain hidden till they attain a large size. They commonly appear on anterior abdominal wall. We treated a case of intermuscular lipoma in a 4-year-old girl. It presented as a bulge at right iliac fossa during straining; its location and symptoms were similar to that of Spigelian hernia. Actual diagnosis was made unde...

  2. Myositic Type of Idiopathic Orbital Pseudotumor in a 4-Year-Old Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Bakan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor is a benign, noninfectious, and nonneoplastic disease with unknown cause. It is the third most common orbital disease after thyroid orbitopathy and lymphoproliferative disorder. Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor is extremely rare in pediatric age group and may cause real diagnostic problems. This paper describes a 4-year-old girl who presented with sudden ptosis in the right eye and swollen eyelid. She recovered completely with high-dose steroid therapy. We report clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings of orbital myositis, which is a rare subtype of idiopathic orbital pseudotumor in children and needs to be differentiated from other orbital disease especially malignancy.

  3. Strategic Planning at The State’s Education Instutitions Serving “Open And Distance Education”, Which Are of Nonprofit Concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza ERDEM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In conventional education process, there have always been certain obstacles throughout the human history. From that point of view, “Open and Distance Education” are the ones which are much more sensitive to quality and to the dissemination of knowledge to society as well as having certain advantages in getting over matters rather than in-class processes. In our country, for public institutions, the vitality of “strategic planning” has recently been recognized and established as a legal substructure. Besides, organizations and educational institutions of the government, which legally offers “Open and Distance Education” without any profit concern, are also responsible for creating a strategic guide-line. A process established by Bryson for public institutions, “A Ten-Step Strategic Planning Process” could be used in those strategic planning of the educational institutions of the government, which are of nonprofit concern, to ease strategic thought and organizational momentum by their administrators in on attendant, careful, and logical way.

  4. Leading, Following or Complementing in Economic Crisis: A Conceptual Model Illustrating Nonprofit Relationships with Public Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Paarlberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Public and nonprofit organizations, entwined in the delivery of public goods and services, are in the midst of challenging economic times. In these circumstances, sound collaborative leadership may help bridge budget and program service delivery shortfalls. In this paper, we examine the administrative dynamics of mutual reliance between two prominent public and nonprofit organizations: public schools and parent-teacher groups (PTGs. We conclude that the partnership is changing as a result of external, economic forces. In essence, we are seeing a threat-rigidity response. The economic crisis may be responsible for causing PTGs to narrow their range of activities away from broader strategic issues that can be addressed through their confrontation activities and advocacy mission towards a narrower focus on classroom activities that protect core school operations, namely instruction.

  5. ‘Value for Whom, by Whom’: Investigating Value Constructs in Non-Profit Project Portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyne Cheng Siew Ang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In most non-profit organisations (NPOs, there are multiple programs, projects or initiatives running simultaneously. The management of multiple projects in organisations can be coined as project portfolio management (PPM (Archer & Ghasemzadeh 1999; Pennypacker & Dye 2002.  In any project-based organisation, it is critical that selected projects align with and deliver the organisation’s strategy or mission. Decisions about project funding are strategic decisions, particularly when there are resource limitations. In PPM decision making, the allocation of resources to projects requires a clear judgement of value across multiple perspectives. Value has often been expressed in financial terms, however increasingly research indicates that non-financial considerations are equally important in evaluating value. A key task in project portfolio management is to maximise value across the portfolio.  However, value can be a subjective notion, as each person may have different expectations of what is valuable. The involvement of diverse stakeholder interests could create complexities in decision making in non-profit organisations due to value being interpreted in different ways by the stakeholders. Furthermore in order to achieve its purpose, non-profits depend heavily on donors, patrons and sponsors - stakeholders who contribute to the portfolio but are often not the direct recipients of the services provided by the non-profit organisation (Kaplan 2012. Non-profit portfolios often compete with other initiatives for resources and attention from the same donors and sponsors, and may need to constantly justify the value they provide to these stakeholders. Most research about value in PPM has been conducted in the ‘for-profit’ sector. Recent value-based studies in the project portfolio field stress the importance of considering both commercial and non-commercial value in portfolio decision making (Killen, du Plessis & Young 2012; Kopman 2013; Martinsuo

  6. Social Media and the Social Good: How Nonprofits Use Facebook to Communicate with the Public

    CERN Document Server

    Saxton, Gregory D; Chiu, I-Hsuan; Feng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the social networking practices of the 100 largest nonprofit organizations in the United States. More specifically, we develop a comprehensive classification scheme to delineate these organizations' use of Facebook as a stakeholder engagement tool. We find that there are 5 primary categories of Facebook "statuses", which can be aggregated into three key dimensions - "information", "community", and "action". Our analysis reveals that, though the "informational" use of Facebook is still significant, nonprofit organizations are better at using Facebook to strategically engage their stakeholders via "dialogic" and "community-building" practices than they have been with traditional websites. The adoption of social media seems to have engendered new paradigms of public engagement.

  7. Engaging Stakeholders through Twitter: How Nonprofit Organizations are Getting More Out of 140 Characters or Less

    CERN Document Server

    Lovejoy, Kristen; Saxton, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    140 characters seems like too small a space for any meaningful information to be exchanged, but Twitter users have found creative ways to get the most out of each Tweet by using different communication tools. This paper looks into how 73 nonprofit organizations use Twitter to engage stakeholders not only through their tweets, but also through other various communication methods. Specifically, it looks into the organizations' utilization of tweet frequency, following behavior, hyperlinks, hashtags, public messages, retweets, and multimedia files. After analyzing 4,655 tweets, the study found that the nation's largest nonprofits are not using Twitter to maximize stakeholder involvement. Instead, they continue to use social media as a one-way communication channel, as less than 20% of their total tweets demonstrate conversations and roughly 16% demonstrate indirect connections to specific users.

  8. Person-Organization Commitment: Bonds of Internal Consumer in the Context of Non-profit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaneda-Ayensa, Emma; Clavel San Emeterio, Mónica; González-Menorca, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    From an Organizational Behavior perspective, it is important to recognize the links generated between individuals and the organization that encourage a desire for permanence. After more than a half century of research, Organizational Commitment remains one of the open questions in the Psychology of Organizations. It is considered an essential factor for explaining individual behavior in the organization such as satisfaction, turnover intention, or loyalty. In this paper, we analyze different contributions regarding the nature of the bond between the individual and the organization. Taking into account the peculiarities of Non-profit Organizations, we present different interpretation for later validation, comparing results from the Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the four models obtained using exploratory factor analysis, both conducted on a sample of 235 members of Non-profit Organizations. PMID:28775699

  9. State power and elite autonomy: The board interlock network of Chinese non-profits

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ji

    2016-01-01

    In response to failures of central planning, the Chinese government has experimented not only with free-market trade zones, but with allowing non-profit foundations to operate in a decentralized fashion. A network study shows how these foundations have connected together by sharing board members, in a structural parallel to what is seen in corporations in the United States. This board interlock leads to the emergence of an elite group with privileged network positions. While the presence of government officials on non-profit boards is widespread, state officials are much less common in a subgroup of foundations that control just over half of all revenue in the network. This subgroup, associated with business elites, not only enjoys higher levels of within-elite links, but even preferentially excludes government officials from the nodes with higher degree. The emergence of this structurally autonomous sphere is associated with major political and social events in the state-society relationship.

  10. Give Me a Like: How HIV/AIDS Nonprofit Organizations Can Engage Their Audience on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chao; Lin, Yi-Pin; Saxton, Gregory D

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid proliferation and adoption of social media among healthcare professionals and organizations, social media-based HIV/AIDS intervention programs have become increasingly popular. However, the question of the effectiveness of the HIV/AIDS messages disseminated on social media has received scant attention in the literature. The current study applies content analysis to examine the relationship between Facebook messaging strategies employed by 110 HIV/AIDS nonprofit organizations and audience reactions in the form of liking, commenting, and sharing behavior. The results reveal that HIV/AIDS nonprofit organizations often use informational messages as one-way communication with their audience instead of dialogic interactions. Some specific types of messages, such as medication-focused messages, engender better audience engagement; in contrast, event-related messages and call-to-action messages appear to translate into lower corresponding audience reactions. The findings provide guidance to HIV/AIDS organizations in developing effective social media communication strategies.

  11. Person-Organization Commitment: Bonds of Internal Consumer in the Context of Non-profit Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaneda-Ayensa, Emma; Clavel San Emeterio, Mónica; González-Menorca, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    From an Organizational Behavior perspective, it is important to recognize the links generated between individuals and the organization that encourage a desire for permanence. After more than a half century of research, Organizational Commitment remains one of the open questions in the Psychology of Organizations. It is considered an essential factor for explaining individual behavior in the organization such as satisfaction, turnover intention, or loyalty. In this paper, we analyze different contributions regarding the nature of the bond between the individual and the organization. Taking into account the peculiarities of Non-profit Organizations, we present different interpretation for later validation, comparing results from the Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the four models obtained using exploratory factor analysis, both conducted on a sample of 235 members of Non-profit Organizations.

  12. Reporting outcome measures of functional constipation in children from 0 to 4 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuizenga-Wessel, Sophie; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M

    2015-04-01

    Functional constipation (FC) often begins in the first year of life. Although standard definitions and criteria have been formulated to describe FC, these are rarely used in research and clinical practice. The aim of the study is to systematically assess how definitions and outcome measures are defined in therapeutic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of infants with FC. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched. Studies were included if it was a (systematic review of) therapeutic RCT, children ≤4 years old, they had FC, a clear definition of constipation was provided, and were written in English. Quality was assessed using the Delphi list. A total of 1115 articles were found; only 5 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four different definitions were used, of which only 2 used the internationally accepted Rome III criteria. Defecation frequency was used as primary outcome in all included trials and stool consistency in 3 trials. Two trials involving infants investigated new infant formulas, whereas the third RCT evaluated the efficacy of a probiotic strain. The 2 trials including infants up to 4 years of age compared polyethylene glycol without electrolytes (PEG4000) with lactulose and milk of magnesia. All of the trials used nonvalidated parental diaries. Different definitions and outcome measures for FC in infants are used in RCTs. Disappointingly, there is a lack of well-designed therapeutic trials in infants with constipation. To make comparison between future trials possible, standard definitions, core outcomes, and validated instruments are needed.

  13. Intellectual Disability in a Birth Cohort: Prevalence, Etiology, and Determinants at the Age of 4 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Simone M.; Barros, Aluísio J.D.; Matijasevich, Alícia; dos Santos, Iná S.; Anselmi, Luciana; Barros, Fernando; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Félix, Têmis M.; Riegel, Mariluce; Maluf, Sharbel W.; Giugliani, Roberto; Black, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID), characterized by impairments in intellectual function and adaptive behavior, affects 1-3% of the population. Many studies investigated its etiology, but few are cohort studies in middle-income countries. Aims To estimate prevalence, etiology, and factors related to ID among children prospectively followed since birth in a Southern Brazilian city (Pelotas). Methods In 2004, maternity hospitals were visited daily and births were identified. Live-born infants (n = 4,231) whose family lived in the urban area have been followed for several years. At the age of 2 and 4 years, performances in development and intelligence tests were evaluated using the Battelle Developmental Inventory and Wechsler Intelligence Scale, respectively. Children considered as having developmental delay were invited to attend a genetic evaluation. Results At 4 years of age, the prevalence of ID was 4.5%, and the etiology was classified into 5 groups: environmental (44.4%), genetic (20.5%), idiopathic (12.6%), neonatal sequelae (13.2%), other diseases (9.3%). Most children presented impairment in two or more areas of adaptive behavior. There was no difference in prenatal care attendance or maternal schooling among the groups. Conclusion For about 40% of children, ID was attributed to nonbiological factors, suggesting that the rate may be reduced with appropriate interventions early in life. PMID:27595410

  14. Total Body Fat Content versus BMI in 4-Year-Old Healthy Swedish Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Forsum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood overweight and obesity, a worldwide problem, is generally identified using BMI (body mass index. However, this application of BMI has been little investigated in children below 5 years of age due to a lack of appropriate methods to assess body composition. Therefore, we used air displacement plethysmography (ADP to study 4.4-year old boys and girls since this method is accurate in young children if they accept the requirements of the measurement. The purpose was to analyze the relationship between BMI and body fat in these children. Body composition was assessed in 76 (43 boys, 33 girls of the 84 children brought to the measurement session. Boys and girls contained 25.2±4.7 and 26.8±4.0% body fat, respectively. BMI-based cut-offs for overweight could not effectively identify children with a high body fat content. There was a significant (P<0.001 but weak (r=0.39 correlation between BMI and body fat (%. In conclusion, requirements associated with a successful assessment of body composition by means of ADP were accepted by most 4-year-olds. Furthermore, BMI-based cut-offs for overweight did not effectively identify children with a high body fatness and BMI explained only a small proportion of the variation in body fat (% in this age group.

  15. Partial achilles tendon rupture presenting with giant hematoma; MRI findings of 4 year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsilmaz, Aysegul; Varer, Makbule; Coskun, Gulten; Apaydın, Melda; Oyar, Orhan

    2011-12-01

    In the young population, spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon is very rare. The big hematoma is also rare finding of the Achilles tendon partial rupture. It is usually seen with complete rupture. We presented imaging findings of 4 years follow up of the spontaneous partial rupture of Achilles tendon presenting with giant expanding hematoma and mimicking complete rupture radiologically. We discussed the alterations of tendon signal intensity and result of conservative therapy after partial rupture with big hematoma in the long term. A 29 year-old man, applied with pain and swelling in the retrocalcaneal region of left ankle. He did not have chronic metabolic disease. He was not active in physical activities. X-ray radiograms were normal. At magnetic resonance images (MRI), there was an intratendinous big hematoma, subcutanous fat planes were edematous around tendon. The diagnosis was partial rupture and giant hematoma. Hematoma was drained. The conservative treatment was applied and his complaints disappeared. After treatment, approximately 4 years later, control MRI showed thickened and hypointense tendon in all images. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mark S; Leblanc, Allana G; Carson, Valerie; Choquette, Louise; Connor Gorber, Sarah; Dillman, Carrie; Duggan, Mary; Gordon, Mary Jane; Hicks, Audrey; Janssen, Ian; Kho, Michelle E; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Leblanc, Claire; Murumets, Kelly; Okely, Anthony D; Reilly, John J; Stearns, Jodie A; Timmons, Brian W; Spence, John C

    2012-04-01

    The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), with assistance from multiple partners, stakeholders, and researchers, developed the first Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years). These national guidelines are in response to a call from health and health care professionals, child care providers, and fitness practitioners for guidance on sedentary behaviour in the early years. The guideline development process followed the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II framework. The recommendations are informed by evidence from a systematic review that examined the relationships between sedentary behaviour (predominantly screen time) and health indicators (healthy body weight, bone and skeletal health, motor skill development, psychosocial health, cognitive development, and cardio-metabolic disease risk factors) for three age groups (infants aged Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context, followed by the specific recommendations. The final guidelines benefitted from extensive on-line consultations with input from >900 domestic and international stakeholders, end-users, and key informants. The final guidelines state: for healthy growth and development, caregivers should minimize the time infants (aged games) is not recommended. For children 2-4 years, screen time should be limited to under 1 h per day; less is better.

  17. Three- and 4-year-old children's response tendencies to various interviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Kanda, Takayuki; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Itakura, Shoji

    2013-09-01

    Unlike young preschoolers, older preschoolers may exhibit a response bias under social pressure from authoritative interviewers. To examine this, 3- and 4-year-old preschoolers were asked yes-no questions about familiar and unfamiliar objects in three conditions. In one condition an adult asked them questions in a live interaction, in a second condition an adult asked questions via video, and in a third condition a robot asked questions via video. The 3-year-olds exhibited a yes bias-a tendency to say "yes"-in nearly all conditions. The only exception was when they were asked questions about unfamiliar objects by the human interviewer via video, where they did not respond in a biased manner. The 4-year-olds exhibited a yes bias in only one condition-when they were questioned by a live human interviewer about both objects. They also exhibited a nay-saying bias when asked questions about unfamiliar objects in both video conditions, and they did not show any response bias in other conditions. The results suggest that the social pressure from an authoritative adult in a live interaction is problematic.

  18. Total body fat content versus BMI in 4-year-old healthy Swedish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsum, Elisabet; Flinke Carlsson, Eva; Henriksson, Hanna; Henriksson, Pontus; Löf, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity, a worldwide problem, is generally identified using BMI (body mass index). However, this application of BMI has been little investigated in children below 5 years of age due to a lack of appropriate methods to assess body composition. Therefore, we used air displacement plethysmography (ADP) to study 4.4-year old boys and girls since this method is accurate in young children if they accept the requirements of the measurement. The purpose was to analyze the relationship between BMI and body fat in these children. Body composition was assessed in 76 (43 boys, 33 girls) of the 84 children brought to the measurement session. Boys and girls contained 25.2 ± 4.7 and 26.8 ± 4.0% body fat, respectively. BMI-based cut-offs for overweight could not effectively identify children with a high body fat content. There was a significant (P BMI and body fat (%). In conclusion, requirements associated with a successful assessment of body composition by means of ADP were accepted by most 4-year-olds. Furthermore, BMI-based cut-offs for overweight did not effectively identify children with a high body fatness and BMI explained only a small proportion of the variation in body fat (%) in this age group.

  19. Nocardia brasiliensis infection mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a 4-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Nitin; Adib, Navid; Grimwood, Keith

    2013-11-01

    Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes that cause pneumonia and disseminated disease in immunocompromised patients. They can also cause localized cutaneous and soft tissue infections in healthy people after direct percutaneous inoculation. Nocardia arthritis is rare in both forms of the disease. Here we present the first published case of a child with septic arthritis caused by N brasiliensis. Importantly, this otherwise well 4-year-old girl had no known history of trauma but presented with transient cutaneous lesions and a 6-week history of arthritis involving the right fourth digit proximal interphalangeal joint without accompanying fever or raised systemic inflammatory markers. She received a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and underwent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant therapy. After 2 months she developed frank septic arthritis, which necessitated a surgical joint washout, from which an intraoperative swab grew N brasiliensis. The patient received 6 months of high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and remains well more than 4 years after treatment. This unusual case highlights the importance of considering an indolent infection from slow-growing organisms, including Nocardia, when diagnosing the oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is especially relevant when a single joint is involved and response to antiinflammatory therapy is suboptimal because antiinflammatory agents may mask evolving signs of infection.

  20. A longitudinal study of the emerging self from 9 months to the age of 4 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eKristen-Antonow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if children’s early responsiveness towards social partners is developmentally related to their growing concept of self, as reflected in their mirror self recognition (MSR and delayed self recognition (DSR. Thus, a longitudinal study assessed infants' responsiveness (e.g., smiling, gaze towards social partners during the still-face task and a social imitation game and related it to their emerging MSR and DSR. Thereby, children were tested at regular time points from 9 months to 4 years of age. Results revealed significant predictive relations between children’s responsiveness towards a social partner in the still-face task at 9 months and their MSR at 24 months. Further, interindividual differences in children’s awareness of and responsiveness towards being imitated in a social imitation game at 12 months proved to be the strongest predictor of children’s DSR at 4 years, while some additional variance was explained by MSR at 24 months and verbal intelligence. Overall, findings suggest a developmental link between children’s early awareness of and responsiveness towards the social world and their later ability to form a concept of self.

  1. Experience with headwear influences the other-race effect in 4-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrke, Janina; Freitag, Claudia; Lamm, Bettina; Teiser, Johanna; Poloczek, Sonja; Fassbender, Ina; Teubert, Manuel; Voehringer, Isabel; Keller, Heidi; Knopf, Monika; Lohaus, Arnold; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2015-09-01

    The other-race effect (ORE) implies the better recognition of faces of one's own race compared with faces of a different race. It demonstrates that face recognition is shaped by daily experience with human faces. Such experience mainly includes structural information of own-race faces and also information on the way faces are usually seen, as a whole or partly covered by scarves or other headwear. In two experiments, we investigated how this mode of presentation is related to the occurrence of the ORE during childhood. In Experiment 1, 4-year-old German children (N = 104), accustomed to seeing faces without headwear in daily life, were asked to recognize female Caucasian or African faces, presented either as a whole or wearing a woolen hat, in a forced choice paradigm. In Experiment 2, 4-year-olds from rural Cameroon (N = 70), accustomed to seeing faces with and without headwear in daily life, participated in the same task. In both groups, the ORE was present in the familiar mode of presentation, that is, in whole faces in German children and in whole and partly covered faces in Cameroonian children. The results are discussed in relation to the role of experience for face recognition processes.

  2. Regulation of executive compensation at nonprofit health care organizations: coming changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, David Albert

    2010-01-01

    Executive compensation in health care organizations, particularly tax-exempt organizations, has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. This paper identifies the implications for tax-exempt health care organizations of recent efforts to regulate executive pay, as well as some changes that the boards of nonprofit health care providers and insurers should consider to minimize the case for further scrutiny and regulation of their executive pay practices.

  3. Designing and implementing a balanced scorecard: lessons learned in nonprofit implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbus, Andra; Wilson, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The balanced scorecard has been referred to as the management innovation of the century, and extensive articles have been written using case studies of organizations that use this performance measurement system. This article addresses the key issues of design and implementation with a step-by-step guide to how to design a balanced scorecard and lessons to avoid implementation problems in government and nonprofit settings.

  4. Ethical climates in for-profit, nonprofit, and government skilled nursing facilities: managerial implications for partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova, Anna A

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates ethical climates in government, nonprofit, and for-profit nursing homes and determines their similarities and differences. Surveys were collected from 656 (21.4%) licensed nurses who worked in 100 skilled nursing facilities in one Midwestern state. Shared law and code and caring ethical climates were identified across the 3 sector nursing homes. Those climates were also polarized. Important implications were drawn for consideration of ethical perceptions of each sector during negotiations and contract management.

  5. Implementation of a 4-Year Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in a Liaison Committee on Medical Education-Accredited US Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sean P; Mefford, Jason M; Lahham, Shadi; Lotfipour, Shahram; Subeh, Mohammad; Maldonado, Gracie; Spann, Sophie; Fox, John C

    2017-02-01

    The established benefits of point-of-care ultrasound have given rise to multiple new and innovative curriculums to incorporate ultrasound teaching into medical education. This study sought to measure the educational success of a comprehensive and integrated 4-year point-of-care ultrasound curriculum. We integrated a curriculum consisting of traditional didactics combined with asynchronous learning modules and hands-on practice on live models with skilled sonographers into all 4 years of education at a Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited US Medical School. Each graduating student was administered an exit examination with 48 questions that corresponded to ultrasound milestones. Ninety-five percent (n = 84) of fourth-year medical students completed the exit examination. The mean score was 79.5% (SD, 10.2%), with mean scores on the ultrasound physics and anatomy subsections being 77.1% (SD, 11.0%) and 85.9% (SD, 21.0%), respectively. A comprehensive 4-year point-of-care ultrasound curriculum integrated into medical school may successfully equip graduating medical students with a fundamental understanding of ultrasound physics, anatomy, and disease recognition. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  6. Strategic planning models in public and non-profit sport organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA THEAKOU

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic planning is widely used by organisations, as itis an integral part of strategy. The present study tackles thetopic of strategic planning as it is developed by public andnon-profit organizations and provides an extensive review ofliterature in the area of the development and role of strategic planning within strategic management and the way it is adopted by public and non-profit organizations. For the purposes of this paper, five models of strategic planning have been discussed with the belief that they describe better the models that can be approached and developed by public and non-profit organizations in the area of sport. This article aims at partly contributing to the theoretical discussion concerning the ability of organizations to integrate and deploy strategic planning. For this study we examined a non-profitsport organization in British Columbia, Canada. The authorspropose that public and non-profit sport organizations shoulddevelop their own model of strategic planning, which mayhelp them to think and act strategically.

  7. Organizational Mission and Revenue Diversification among Non-profit Sports Clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Breuer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of diversified income portfolios are well documented in previous research on non-profit organizations. This study examines how different types of organizational missions affect the level of revenue diversification of organizations in one industry, a question that was neglected in previous research. Based on contingency theory, it is assumed that different missions are associated with different funding sources. Since missions can be complementary or conflicting, specific attention needs to be paid to the combination of missions. The sport sector is chosen as an empirical setting because non-profit sports clubs can have various missions while their overall purpose is promoting sport. Panel data from a nationwide survey of non-profit sports clubs in Germany are used for the analysis. The regression results show that revenue diversification is significantly determined by organizational mission. Historically, typical mission statements like promoting elite sport, tradition, conviviality, non-sport programs, and youth sport have a positive effect on revenue diversification, while clubs with a commercial orientation and a focus on leisure and health sport have more concentrated revenues. The findings have implications for club management in the sense that some missions are associated with higher financial risk and that the combination of missions should be chosen carefully.

  8. Lobbying and advocacy for the public's health: what are the limits for nonprofit organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, J S

    1999-09-01

    Nonprofit organizations play an important role in advocating for the public's health in the United States. This article describes the rules under US law for lobbying by nonprofit organizations. The 2 most common kinds of non-profits working to improve the public's health are "public charities" and "social welfare organizations." Although social welfare organizations may engage in relatively unlimited lobbying, public charities may not engage in "substantial" lobbying. Lobbying is divided into 2 main categories. Direct lobbying refers to communications with law-makers that take a position on specific legislation, and grassroots lobbying includes attempts to persuade members of the general public to take action regarding legislation. Even public charities may engage in some direct lobbying and a smaller amount of grassroots lobbying. Much public health advocacy, however, is not lobbying, since there are several important exceptions to the lobbying rules. These exceptions include "non-partisan analysis, study, or research" and discussions of broad social problems. Lobbying with federal or earmarked foundation funds is generally prohibited.

  9. Differences between non-profit and for-profit hospices: patient selection and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sabina Ohri

    2012-06-01

    This research compares the behavior of non-profit organizations and private for-profit firms in the hospice industry, where there are financial incentives created by the Medicare benefit. Medicare reimburses hospices on a fixed per diem basis, regardless of patient diagnosis. Because under this system patients with lower expected costs are more profitable, hospices can selectively enroll patients with longer lengths of stay. While it is illegal for hospices to reject potential patients explicitly, they can influence their patient mix through referral networks. A fixed per diem rate also creates an incentive shirk on quality and to substitute lower skilled for higher skilled labor, which has implications for quality of care. By using within-market variation in hospice characteristics, the empirical evidence suggests that for-profit hospices differentially take advantage of these incentives. The results show that for-profit hospices engage in patient selection through significantly different referral networks than non-profits. They receive more patients from long-term care facilities and fewer patients through more traditional paths, such as physician referrals. This mechanism of patient selection is supported by the result that for-profits have fewer cancer patients and more patients with longer lengths of stay. While non-profit and for-profit hospices report similar numbers of staff visits per patient, for-profit firms make significantly less use of skilled nursing providers. We also find some weak evidence of lower levels of quality in for-profit hospices.

  10. Growth and resilience of pioneering nonprofit human service organizations: a cross-case analysis of organizational histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, Sara E; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of organizational history is important for recognizing patterns in effective management and understanding how organizations respond to internal and external challenges. This cross-case analysis of 12 histories of pioneering nonprofit human service organizations contributes an important longitudinal perspective on organizational history, complementing the cross-sectional case studies that dominate the existing research on nonprofit organizations. The literature on organizational growth, including lifecycle models and growth management, is reviewed, along with the literature on organizational resilience. Based on analysis of the 12 organizational histories, a conceptual model is presented that synthesizes key factors in the areas of leadership, internal operations, and external relations that influence organizational growth and resilience to enable nonprofit organizations to survive and thrive over time. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal examples from the organizational histories illustrate the conceptual map. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future research on nonprofit organizational history.

  11. Argus II retinal prosthesis implantation with scleral flap and autogenous temporalis fascia as alternative patch graft material: a 4-year follow-up

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    Matet A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Matet,1,2 Nawel Amar,1,2 Saddek Mohand-Said,1–4 José-Alain Sahel,1–7 Pierre-Olivier Barale1,2 1INSERM and DHOS, CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, 2Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6, Institut de la Vision, 3INSERM, 4CNRS, Paris, France; 5Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK; 6Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, 7Académie des Sciences, Institut de France, Paris, France Introduction: The Argus II retinal prosthesis is composed of an epiretinal electrode array positioned over the macula and connected to an extrascleral electronics case via a silicone cable, running through a sclerotomy. During implantation, the manufacturer recommends to cover the sclerotomy site with a patch of processed human pericardium to prevent postoperative hypotony and conjunctival erosion by the underlying electronics case. Due to biomedical regulations prohibiting the use of this material in France, we developed an alternative technique combining a scleral flap protecting the sclerotomy and an autogenous graft of superior temporalis fascia overlying the electronics case. Methods: The purpose of this study is to describe the 4-year outcomes of this modified procedure in three subjects who underwent Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System implantation. Clinical data consisting of intraocular pressure measurements and tolerance in terms of conjunctival erosion or inflammation were retrospectively assessed over a 4-year postoperative follow-up. Results: None of the three patients implanted with the modified technique developed ocular hypotony over 4 years. A normal, transient conjunctival inflammation occurred during the first postoperative month but conjunctival erosion was not observed in any of the three patients over 4 years. Four years after implantation, the autogenous temporalis fascia graft remained well tolerated and the retinal prosthesis was functional in all three patients. Conclusion: The combination of an

  12. Caffeine consumption and the 4-year progression of de novo Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Marcello; Erro, Roberto; Picillo, Marina; Vitale, Carmine; Longo, Katia; Amboni, Marianna; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Barone, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Higher caffeine consumption has been associated with reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), and with a more benign progression of motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). The present observational cohort study investigated motor and non-motor correlates of caffeine consumption in de novo PD. 79 newly diagnosed, drug naïve PD patients have been included and followed up for 4 years. The total caffeine use was calculated with the Caffeine Consumption Questionnaire. Following study variables were recorded at baseline, and after 2 and 4 years: UPDRS part III, UPDRS part IV, l-dopa Equivalent Daily Dose (LEDD), NMS Questionnaire (NMSQuest), and the time occurring from PD diagnosis to the need for l-dopa treatment. Age, gender and disease duration were included as covariates in the statistical models. The average daily caffeine consumption was 296.1 ± 157.2 mg. At Cox regression models, higher caffeine consumption was associated with a lower rate of starting l-Dopa treatment (HR = 0.630; 95%CI = 0.382-0.996). At the mixed-effects linear regression models considering the whole study period, each additional espresso cup per day (50 mg of caffeine) was more likely associated with 5-point lower UPDRS part III total score (Coef = -0.01; 95%CI = -0.02 to 0.00), with 50% reduced LEDD (Coef = -0.01; 95%CI = -0.15 to 0.00; p = 0.021), and with 5-point lower NMSQuest total score (Coef = -0.01; 95%CI = -0.01 to 0.00), but not with UPDRS part IV total score (Coef = -0.00; 95%CI = -0.00 to 0.00). Caffeine consumption was associated with a reduced accrual of motor and non-motor disability during 4-year follow-up in de novo PD, highlighting the rationale for using adenosine A2A antagonists since the early phases of PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Performance Measurement and Accountability of WAQF Institutions in Malaysia

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    Arshad Roshayani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been seen for the past few years that the revival of waqf institutions has been an upsurge interest of Muslim communities around the world. In line with the revitalization, the issues of measuring and managing waqf performance are growingly being discussed and concerned by the academicians and constituents. Waqf institutions need to demonstrate their performance as whether they have effectively and efficiently managed in order to discharge their accountability to various waqf stakeholders. There are many studies conducted to measure the performance of various organizations in the private, public and third sector. However, studies on the performance measurement of waqf institution are still limited, and financial ratios become the dominant measurement in those studies. Being a non-profit in nature and religious entity, managing the entrusted waqf assets for social and economic development of the society, the performance measurement of waqf institutions should also focus on realizing their missions. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to discuss both financial and non-financial measurement that can be adapted by waqf institutions to assess their performance in discharging their accountability. Drawing from the experience on performance measurement discussed in the non-profit organizations literatures, this conceptual paper is hoped to provide significant insight on how waqf institutions performance may be measured and provide a tool to benchmark the best practices that can guide them to achieve their goals and missions.

  14. Predicting reading and spelling disorders: a 4-year prospective cohort study

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    Lucia eBigozzi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this 4-year prospective cohort study, children with a reading and spelling disorder, children with a spelling impairment, and children without a reading and/or spelling disorder (control group in a transparent orthography were identified in third grade, and their emergent literacy performances in kindergarten compared retrospectively. 642 Italian children participated. This cohort was followed from the last year of kindergarten to third grade. In kindergarten, the children were assessed in phonological awareness, conceptual knowledge of writing systems and textual competence. In third grade, 18 children with a reading and spelling impairment and 13 children with a spelling impairment were identified. Overall, conceptual knowledge of the writing system was the only statistically significant predictor of the clinical samples. No differences were found between the two clinical samples.

  15. Cooperation, but not competition, improves 4-year-old children's reasoning about others' diverse desires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinyi; Li, Pengchao; He, Jie; Shen, Mowei

    2017-05-01

    Three experiments examined whether cooperation or competition affects 4-year-old children's reasoning about other people's desires-which differed from their own-in a gift selection task. Experiment 1 (N=72) found that children's performance in selecting an adult-preferred gift for an adult experimenter was enhanced by a short period of preceding cooperative, but not competitive or individualistic, play with the experimenter. Experiment 2 (N=24) ruled out the alternative explanation that children resisted satisfying their opponent after competition. Experiment 3 (N=48) replicated the cooperation advantage in selecting a gift for someone else, indicating that children's understanding of diverse desires was generally improved by cooperation but not competition. These findings support the constructivist view of social development and highlight the advantage of cooperation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Growing teratoma syndrome: first case report in a 4-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Paul; Riachy, Edward; Khoury, Antoine; Raffoul, Lara; Ghorra, Claude; Rehayem, Caline

    2015-02-01

    Growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) consists of germ cell tumors that grow following chemotherapy despite complete eradication of the malignant cells. They can metastasize to any site, particularly the retroperitoneum, mediastinum and cervical region. It typically affects young adults and adolescents. Here we describe the youngest case reported in a 4-year-old girl with an ovarian mixed germ cell tumor who underwent an oophorectomy. Her tumor markers normalized by the end of her chemotherapeutic treatment; however, she developed a retroperitoneal mass that was subsequently resected. Histopathology revealed a mature teratoma, consisting of a GTS. We stress the need for early recognition and treatment of GTS to avoid the subsequent morbidity and mortality associated with it. Although GTS has an excellent prognosis when completely resected, it is essential that the patient be regularly followed-up with serum tumor markers and imaging.

  17. Cerebral candidiasis in a 4-year-old boy after intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral candidiasis is a devastating disease which contributes to a high mortality. Most of the cerebral candidiasis are never microbiologically or radiologically confirmed. In this case, a 4-year-old boy who developed cerebral candidiasis was successfully rescued and presented. The diagnosis of cerebral candidiasis was established based on both microbiologic and radiologic examinations. The pathogen was revealed to be Candida albicans by cerebrospinal fluid and central venous catheter cultures, and the cerebral involvement was recorded by series head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an appearance of special encephalitis demonstrated. The imaging studies played a critical role throughout the diagnosis and treatment. Familiarity with the imaging findings in the appropriate clinical setting may result in a heightened level of awareness of this infection and, consequently, in earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  18. A Review and Report of Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a 4-Year-Old Child

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    Afsaneh Nekouei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a common benign and reactive gingival epulis in oral cavity. It is often difficult to make a clinical diagnosis; thereby definitive diagnosis depends on histopathologic features. We report a case of a 4-year-old Caucasian boy presenting with a five-month history a 20 × 15 × 12 mm pedunculated, lobular soft tissue mass of the left anterior maxilla gingiva which was misdiagnosed and maltreated before his referral. An excisional biopsy of the lesion followed by histopathologic examination of the biopsy specimen revealed distinctive features of peripheral giant cell granuloma. Early detection and excision of this hyperplastic nodule especially in children are important to minimize potential dentoalveolar complications.

  19. Conjunctival lymphangioma in a 4-year-old girl revealed tuberous sclerosis complex

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    Freiberg, Florentina Joyce

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To present a case of conjunctival lymphangioma in a girl with tuberous sclerosis complex.Methods/results: A 4-year-old girl presented with a relapsing cystic lesion of the bulbar conjunctiva in the right eye with string-of-pearl-like dilation of lymphatic vessels and right-sided facial swelling with mild pain. Best-corrected vision was not impaired. Examination of the skin revealed three hypomelanotic macules and a lumbal Shagreen patch. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings displayed minimal enhancement of buccal fat on the right side. Cranial and orbital MRI showed signal enhancement in the right cortical and subcortical areas. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 and 2 of the gene (tuberous sclerosis complex 1 gene, confirming the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex.Conclusion: In conjunctival lymphangioma, tuberous sclerosis complex should be considered as the primary disease.

  20. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CERAMIC PROSTHETIC RESTORATIONS ON A ZIRCONIUM STRUCTURE AFTER 4 YEARS

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    Delia Cristina Bahrim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of zirconium are optimum, comparatively with the other ceramic materials. Initial and fracture resistance, as well as its resistance to flexion, the white, opaque colour, permitting several shades, the special biological properties, largely recommend largescale utilization of zirconium in prosthetic restorations. Zirconium crowns and bridges were realized in 129 patients (81 women and 48 boys, with ages between 15 and 57 years, along 4 years. The working method applied in the laboratory made use of the CAD-CAM system, followed by scanning on a Dental Wings scanner and a CAM burring system from Wieland 917, 18. In a few cases, repeated evaluations demonstrated accidents and complications, such as skeletal fractures, ceramic chipping, decementation, etc.

  1. Intermuscular lipoma in a 4-year-old child presenting like Spigelian hernia

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    Manoj Saha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are commonest benign tumor and can occur at any part of the body, but intermuscular lipomas are very rare and usually occur at middle age or later. Intermuscular lipomas remain hidden till they attain a large size. They commonly appear on anterior abdominal wall. We treated a case of intermuscular lipoma in a 4-year-old girl. It presented as a bulge at right iliac fossa during straining; its location and symptoms were similar to that of Spigelian hernia. Actual diagnosis was made under general anesthesia and complete surgical excision was done. This is a rare mode of presentation of an intermuscular lipoma. Intermuscular lipoma of the abdominal wall at this young age was not reported earlier.

  2. Intermuscular lipoma in a 4-year-old child presenting like Spigelian hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas are commonest benign tumor and can occur at any part of the body, but intermuscular lipomas are very rare and usually occur at middle age or later. Intermuscular lipomas remain hidden till they attain a large size. They commonly appear on anterior abdominal wall. We treated a case of intermuscular lipoma in a 4-year-old girl. It presented as a bulge at right iliac fossa during straining; its location and symptoms were similar to that of Spigelian hernia. Actual diagnosis was made under general anesthesia and complete surgical excision was done. This is a rare mode of presentation of an intermuscular lipoma. Intermuscular lipoma of the abdominal wall at this young age was not reported earlier.

  3. [Noma in a 4 year-old girl: a case report from Chad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocquempot, K; Javaudin, O; Lerasle, P; Aigle, L

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 4-year-old girl in Chad with noma, also called cancrum oris. This acute gangrenous stomatitis has a combined morbidity-mortality rate that can reach 70%. It occurs worldwide but is most common in sub-Saharan Africa in children aged 2 to 16 years. Its pathogenesis is uncertain, but several bacteria including Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be responsible for the development of noma, which develops over the oral lesions these bacteria cause. Poverty is its most important risk factor. Due to its rapid course and high lethality, it requires emergency treatment with antibiotics, daily dressing of the lesion, and nutritional rehabilitation. Surgical removal of the remaining necrotic tissue can be followed by reconstructive procedures. Physical and speech therapy should be initiated to prevent functional complications.

  4. Predicting Reading and Spelling Disorders: A 4-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigozzi, Lucia; Tarchi, Christian; Caudek, Corrado; Pinto, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    In this 4-year prospective cohort study, children with a reading and spelling disorder, children with a spelling impairment, and children without a reading and/or spelling disorder (control group) in a transparent orthography were identified in third grade, and their emergent literacy performances in kindergarten compared retrospectively. Six hundred and forty-two Italian children participated. This cohort was followed from the last year of kindergarten to third grade. In kindergarten, the children were assessed in phonological awareness, conceptual knowledge of writing systems and textual competence. In third grade, 18 children with a reading and spelling impairment and 13 children with a spelling impairment were identified. Overall, conceptual knowledge of the writing system was the only statistically significant predictor of the clinical samples. No differences were found between the two clinical samples.

  5. Indirect pulp treatment in a permanent molar: case reort of 4-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiane Cestari Fagundes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the Indirect Pulp Treatment (IPT of deep caries lesion in a permanent molar. A 16-year-old male patient reported discomfort associated with thermal stimulation on the permanent mandibular left first molar. The radiographs revealed a deep distal caries lesion, very close to the pulp, absence of radiolucencies in the periapical region, and absence of periodontal space thickening. Pulp sensitivity was confirmed by thermal pulp vitality tests. Based on the main complaint and the clinical and radiographic examinations, the treatment plan was established to preserve pulp vitality. Clinical procedures consisted of removing the infected dentin and lining the caries-affected dentin with calcium hydroxide paste. The tooth was provisionally sealed for approximately 60 days. After this period, tooth vitality was confirmed, the remaining carious dentin was removed, and the tooth was restored. At 4-year follow-up, no clinical or radiographic pathological findings were found.

  6. LOCAL RECURRENCE OF TUBULOCYSTIC CARCINOMA 4 YEARS AFTER RENAL RESECTION (A CLINICAL OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Peters

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of a local recurrence of tubulocystic carcinoma (TCC in a 46-year-old man, a relatively good course (the relapse occurred after 4 years, who has been successfully operated on and is being followed up. This disease is a rare renal malignancy and, until recently, it has been referred to as collecting tubular carcinoma. However, this disease has come to be regarded as an independent nosological entity, by taking into account its certain morphological, immunohistohemical, and cytogenetic characteristics, as well as the nature of its course. About 80 TCC cases have been described to date. Further study of this disease and other rare renal malignancies will allow the more accurate elaboration of management tactics for such patients in terms of certain prognostic factors, which calls for a larger number of cases of this disease.

  7. Long-Term Exercise in Older Adults: 4-Year Outcomes of Music-Based Multitask Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, François R.; Fielding, Roger A.; Reid, Kieran F.; Rizzoli, René; Trombetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prospective controlled evidence supporting the efficacy of long-term exercise to prevent physical decline and reduce falls in old age is lacking. The present study aimed to assess the effects of long-term music-based multitask exercise (i.e., Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics) on physical function and fall risk in older adults. A 3-year follow-up extension of a 1-year randomized controlled trial (NCT01107288) was conducted in Geneva (Switzerland), in which 134 community-dwellers aged ≥65 years at increased risk of falls received a 6-month music-based multitask exercise program. Four years following original trial enrolment, 52 subjects (baseline mean ± SD age, 75 ± 8 years) who (i) have maintained exercise program participation through the 4-year follow-up visit (“long-term intervention group”, n = 23) or (ii) have discontinued participation following original trial completion (“control group”, n = 29) were studied. They were reassessed in a blind fashion, using the same procedures as at baseline. At 4 years, linear mixed-effects models showed significant gait (gait speed, P = 0.006) and balance (one-legged stance time, P = 0.015) improvements in the long-term intervention group, compared with the control group. Also, long-term intervention subjects did better on Timed Up & Go, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand and handgrip strength tests, than controls (P < 0.05, for all comparisons). Furthermore, the exercise program reduced the risk of falling (relative risk, 0.69; 95 % confidence interval, 0.5–0.9; P = 0.008). These findings suggest that long-term maintenance of a music-based multitask exercise program is a promising strategy to prevent age-related physical decline in older adults. They also highlight the efficacy of sustained long-term adherence to exercise for falls prevention. PMID:25148876

  8. Fear of repeated injections in children younger than 4 years receiving subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Gabriele; Shankar, Viswanathan; Nazari, Ramin; Kooragayalu, Shravan; Smith, Mitchell; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenstreich, David

    2012-12-01

    Allergy immunotherapy during early childhood may have potential benefits for the prevention of asthma and allergy morbidity. However, subcutaneous immunotherapy has not yet been prospectively researched in children younger than 4 years, primarily because of safety concerns, including the fear and psychological distress young children may experience with repeated needle injections. To quantify fear in atopic children younger than 4 years with a history of wheezing who are receiving subcutaneous immunotherapy. Fear of injection was graded during a total of 788 immunotherapy injection visits in 18 children (age, 37 months; SD, 9 months) receiving subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy. The parent and the injection nurse assigned fear scores on a scale of 0 to 10 after each injection visit. At the time of analysis, children had a median of 49 injection visits (range, 12-88) during a median study period of 81.5 weeks (range, 15-165 weeks). Fifteen children (83%) lost their fear of injections during the study. A fear score of 0 was achieved after a mean of 8.4 visits (SD, 7.4). The more injection visits were missed, the more likely children were to retain fear of injections (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-1.02; P=.05). Age, adverse events, number of injections at each visit, and change of injection personnel were not associated with increased fear. Our analysis suggests that most children receiving weekly subcutaneous immunotherapy lose their fear of injections during the treatment course. Children with increased intervals between visits may be at higher risk of experiencing fear of injections. clinicaltrial.gov identifier NCT01028560. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term exercise in older adults: 4-year outcomes of music-based multitask training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hars, Mélany; Herrmann, François R; Fielding, Roger A; Reid, Kieran F; Rizzoli, René; Trombetti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Prospective controlled evidence supporting the efficacy of long-term exercise to prevent physical decline and reduce falls in old age is lacking. The present study aimed to assess the effects of long-term music-based multitask exercise (i.e., Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics) on physical function and fall risk in older adults. A 3-year follow-up extension of a 1-year randomized controlled trial (NCT01107288) was conducted in Geneva (Switzerland), in which 134 community-dwellers aged ≥65 years at increased risk of falls received a 6-month music-based multitask exercise program. Four years following original trial enrolment, 52 subjects (baseline mean ± SD age, 75 ± 8 years) who (i) have maintained exercise program participation through the 4-year follow-up visit ("long-term intervention group", n = 23) or (ii) have discontinued participation following original trial completion ("control group", n = 29) were studied. They were reassessed in a blind fashion, using the same procedures as at baseline. At 4 years, linear mixed-effects models showed significant gait (gait speed, P = 0.006) and balance (one-legged stance time, P = 0.015) improvements in the long-term intervention group, compared with the control group. Also, long-term intervention subjects did better on Timed Up & Go, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand and handgrip strength tests, than controls (P < 0.05, for all comparisons). Furthermore, the exercise program reduced the risk of falling (relative risk, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-0.9; P = 0.008). These findings suggest that long-term maintenance of a music-based multitask exercise program is a promising strategy to prevent age-related physical decline in older adults. They also highlight the efficacy of sustained long-term adherence to exercise for falls prevention.

  10. Vectors of marketing implementation into domestic practice of non-profit entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Borysova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research results concerning problems of marketization of domestic non-profits in the context of financial paradigm are presented in the paper. The aim of our research is to analyze the dimensions of marketing implementation into non-profit organization activity. The methods of the research are written surveys of leading Ukrainian non-profit organizations, systematic and comparative analysis of scientific literature. The study of the works of native and foreign scientists, as well as our own empirical research allowed to identify the most important factors of intensification of the marketization of domestic non-profit sphere, including the growth in the number of NPOs at various levels of reduced funding on existing significant donor dependence, increased competition for labour resources, the growing importance of human capacity and marketing culture. Study allows to identify a number of areas of the marketization of domestic NPOs: delineation of consumer and producer of social services through creation of quasi-markets; a shift towards short term contracts on the basis of competition, collateral and tax credit; measurement of the effectiveness of projects and social audit that are more adaptable foundations for the evaluation of the results of NPOs; the focus on the measurability of results, on achieving a positive rate of return philanthropic investments, in attracting donors to ensure the effective management of the organization; strengthening adaptation practices and ideals of business management to the management of NPOs; social enterprise development. In general, the marketization of domestic non-profit sector has a positive impact on social capital in two directions at least. On the one hand, a non-profit organization will become less dependent on public funding or donors, diversifying sources of revenues and gaining some financial independence. The dominance of the financial paradigm in the NPOs will make effectively wasting all the

  11. Survival and psychosocial adjustment to stoma surgery and nonstoma bowel resection: a 4-year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, M.J.T.M.; Knippenberg, F.C.E. van; Dulmen, A.M. van; Borne, H.W. van den; Berge Henegouwen, G.P. van

    1997-01-01

    A prospective 4-year follow-up study was conducted to compare the psychosocial adjustment process and survival rate of 59 stoma patients with 64 bowel-resected nonstoma patients. Adjustment was assessed at 4 months, 1 year, and 4 years after surgery by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale

  12. Is ovarian hyperstimulation associated with higher blood pressure in 4-year-old IVF offspring? Part I : multivariable regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seggers, Jorien; Haadsma, Maaike L.; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Heineman, Maas Jan; Middelburg, Karin J.; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Schendelaar, Pamela; Van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Does ovarian hyperstimulation, the in vitro procedure, or a combination of these two negatively influence blood pressure (BP) and anthropometrics of 4-year-old children born following IVF? SUMMARY ANSWER: Higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) percentiles were found in 4-year-old child

  13. Is ovarian hyperstimulation associated with higher blood pressure in 4-year-old IVF offspring? Part I : multivariable regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seggers, Jorien; Haadsma, Maaike L.; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Heineman, Maas Jan; Middelburg, Karin J.; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Schendelaar, Pamela; Van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    STUDY QUESTION: Does ovarian hyperstimulation, the in vitro procedure, or a combination of these two negatively influence blood pressure (BP) and anthropometrics of 4-year-old children born following IVF? SUMMARY ANSWER: Higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) percentiles were found in 4-year-old

  14. Transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy: a single-centre experience of 148 cases with up to 4 years of follow-up†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Huan; Chen, Weisheng; Chen, Long; Yang, Shengsheng; Lu, Zhao-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is considered as the most effective method to treat palmar hyperhidrosis (PH). Here, we report our experience of transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy with an ultrathin flexible endoscope for PH in a series of 148 patients with up to 4 years of follow-up. A prospective database was used in this retrospective analysis of 148 patients (61 males, 87 females, with a mean age of 21.3 years) with PH who were operated on by the same surgeon in a single institution from April 2010 to March 2014. All procedures were performed under general anaesthesia involving intubation with a double-lumen endotracheal tube. Demographic, postoperative and long-term data of patients were recorded and statistical analyses were performed. All patients were followed up at least 6 months post procedure through clinic visits or telephone/e-mail interviews. The procedure was performed successfully in 148 of the 150 patients. Two patients had to be converted to conventional thoracoscopic procedure because of severe pleural adhesions. The mean operating time was 43 min (ranging from 39 to 107 min) and the mean postoperative length of stay was 1 day (range 1-4 days). All patients were interviewed 6-48 months after surgery and no diaphragmatic hernia or syndrome was observed. The rate of resolution of PH and axillary hyperhidrosis was 98 and 74.6%, respectively. Compensatory sweating was reported in 22.3% of patients. Almost all of the patients were satisfied with the surgical results and the cosmetic outcome of the incision. This preliminary human experience suggested that transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy was a safe and efficacious alternative to the conventional approach. This technique avoided the chronic pain and chest wall paraesthesia that are associated with the chest incision. In addition, this novel procedure afforded maximum cosmetic benefits. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  15. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    . In institutional ethnography the notion of objectification is applied to describe research processes like those that have been found to dominate in scholarly work on M&As. In this chapter, we offer an outline of Smiths critique of objectification, elucidate how institutional ethnography seeks to address it...

  16. Colonial Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura; Palmer, Russell

    2016-01-01

    and the USA which reveal that the study of colonial institutions should not be limited to the functional life of these institutions—or solely those that take the form of monumental architecture—but should include the long shadow of “imperial debris” (Stoler 2008) and immaterial institutions....

  17. Institutional actorhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Uhrenholdt

    In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts to c...... to comply with the Danish work environment regulation. And by doing so I also describe how institutional complexity and organizational responses to this complexity are particular important for the changing modes of governance that characterizes contemporary welfare states.......In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts...

  18. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    In the chapter, I discuss the role day care institutions play in the construction of the idea of proper childhood in Denmark. Drawing on findings from research on ethnic minority children in two Danish day care institutions, I begin with a discussion of how childcare institutions act as civilising...... agents, empowered with the legitimate right to define and control normality and proper ways of behaving oneself. I aim to show how institutions come to define the normal child and proper childhood in accordance with current efforts toward reinventing national culture, exemplified by legislation requiring...... current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  19. Transparent Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fombona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to create sets of media-based imagery that illustrate the internal workings of public institutions to the common citizen. This is an important need in countries that are seeking to open up their public and private institutions and bring them closer to their users. Method: There is a clear need to carry out proposals that tackle organizational lack of transparency; to this end, through an interdisciplinary approach, we propose the creation of a freeaccess Web-based portal that shows the interior of the institutions at hand, learning institutions to start with, this scope will be broadened later to institutions of health and public safety. The project chooses and shows a core selection of features capable of becoming international models for each kind of institutions, elementary schools in this phase. These features are shown in short videos, depicting every core element found: installations, governing bodies, documentation, samples of learning and teaching methodologies in use, etc. Results: the propossed project succeeds in getting institutions closer to their users. It has been developed in Spain, and translated to other Latin-American countries and the United States.

  20. Transparent Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fombona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to create sets of media-based imagery that illustrate the internal workings of public institutions to the common citizen. This is an important need in countries that are seeking to open up their public and private institutions and bring them closer to their users. Method: There is a clear need to carry out proposals that tackle organizational lack of transparency; to this end, through an interdisciplinary approach, we propose the creation of a freeaccess Web-based portal that shows the interior of the institutions at hand, learning institutions to start with, this scope will be broadened later to institutions of health and public safety. The project chooses and shows a core selection of features capable of becoming international models for each kind of institutions, elementary schools in this phase. These features are shown in short videos, depicting every core element found: installations, governing bodies, documentation, samples of learning and teaching methodologies in use, etc. Results: the propossed project succeeds in getting institutions closer to their users. It has been developed in Spain, and translated to other Latin-American countries and the United States.

  1. Charity care in nonprofit urban hospitals: analysis of the role of size and ownership type in Washington State for 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Joseph S; Ogle, Natalie M; McPherson, Sterling; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Gary J; Davidson, Gregg Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Nonprofit hospitals are expected to serve their communities as charitable organizations in exchange for the tax exemption benefits they receive. With the passage into law of the Affordable Care Act, additional guidelines were generated in 2010 to ensure nonprofit hospitals are compliant. Nonetheless, the debate continues on whether nonprofit hospitals provide adequate charity care to their patient population. In this study, charity care provided by 29 Washington State nonprofit urban hospitals was examined for 2011 using financial data from the Washington State Department of Health. Charity care levels were compared to both income tax savings and gross revenues to generate two financial ratios that were analyzed according to hospital bed size and nonprofit ownership type. For the first ratio, 97% of the hospitals (28 of 29) were providing charity care in greater amounts than the tax savings they accrued. The average ratio value using total charity care and total income tax savings of all the hospitals in the study was 6.10, and the median value was 3.46. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test results by bed size and nonprofit ownership type indicate that ownership type has a significant effect on charity care to gross revenue ratios (p = .020). Our analysis indicates that church-owned hospitals had higher ratios of charity care to gross revenues than did the other two ownership types--government and voluntary--in this sample. Policy implications are offered and further studies are recommended to analyze appropriate levels of charity care in nonprofit hospitals given new requirements for maintaining a hospital's tax-exempt status.

  2. Observations from a 4-year contamination study of a sample depth profile through Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, Jan; Steele, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    Morphological, compositional, and biological evidence indicates the presence of numerous well-developed microbial hyphae structures distributed within four different sample splits of the Nakhla meteorite obtained from the British Museum (allocation BM1913,25). By examining depth profiles of the sample splits over time, morphological changes displayed by the structures were documented, as well as changes in their distribution on the samples, observations that indicate growth, decay, and reproduction of individual microorganisms. Biological staining with DNA-specific molecular dyes followed by epifluorescence microscopy showed that the hyphae structures contain DNA. Our observations demonstrate the potential of microbial interaction with extraterrestrial materials, emphasize the need for rapid investigation of Mars return samples as well as any other returned or impactor-delivered extraterrestrial materials, and suggest the identification of appropriate storage conditions that should be followed immediately after samples retrieved from the field are received by a handling/curation facility. The observations are further relevant in planetary protection considerations as they demonstrate that microorganisms may endure and reproduce in extraterrestrial materials over long (at least 4 years) time spans. The combination of microscopy images coupled with compositional and molecular staining techniques is proposed as a valid method for detection of life forms in martian materials as a first-order assessment. Time-resolved in situ observations further allow observation of possible (bio)dynamics within the system.

  3. Corneal Cross-Linking in a 4-Year-Old Child With Keratoconus and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabti, Saad; Tappeiner, Christoph; Frueh, Beatrice E

    2015-09-01

    To describe the clinical outcome of corneal cross-linking (CXL) in a young child with keratoconus. This is a case report of a young girl with keratoconus with ophthalmologic findings and 3-year follow-up. Follow-up visits included visual acuity measurement, retinoscopy, corneal tomography, and topography. A girl with Down syndrome was diagnosed with bilateral keratoconus and relative amblyopia at the age of 4 years. The best-corrected near visual acuity was 20/100 binocularly. Corneal tomography showed the following parameters: OD K(max) 47.2 diopters (D), thinnest location 442 μm; OS K(max) 49.6 D, thinnest location 432 μm. Three months later, the keratoconus in the left eye progressed (K(max) 50.2 D, thinnest location 424 μm), and CXL was performed. One year later, CXL was necessary also in the right eye because of progression. The girl was most recently reexamined at the age of 7 years. The corrected near visual acuity was 20/80 in both eyes. The corneal curvature slightly flattened, and the corneal thickness stabilized (OD K(max) 46.8 D, thinnest location 389 μm; OS K(max) 49.4 D, thinnest location 360 μm). Onset of keratoconus can occur in early childhood, especially in patients with Down syndrome. In this case, CXL was performed at 4 and 5 years of age without complications and stopped further keratoconus progression.

  4. Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mark S; Leblanc, Allana G; Carson, Valerie; Choquette, Louise; Connor Gorber, Sarah; Dillman, Carrie; Duggan, Mary; Gordon, Mary Jane; Hicks, Audrey; Janssen, Ian; Kho, Michelle E; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Leblanc, Claire; Murumets, Kelly; Okely, Anthony D; Reilly, John J; Spence, John C; Stearns, Jodie A; Timmons, Brian W

    2012-04-01

    The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), with assistance from multiple partners, stakeholders, and researchers, developed the first Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years). These national guidelines were created in response to an urgent call from public health, health care, child care, and fitness practitioners for healthy active living guidance for the early years. The guideline development process was informed by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument and the evidence assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The recommendations are informed by evidence from a systematic review that examined the relationships between physical activity and health indicators (healthy body weight, bone and skeletal health, motor skill development, psychosocial health, cognitive development, and cardio-metabolic disease risk factors) for three age groups (infants aged benefitted from an extensive on-line consultation process with input from over 900 domestic and international stakeholders, end-users, and key informants. The final guideline recommendations state that for healthy growth and development, infants (aged develop movement skills, and progression toward at least 60 min of energetic play by 5 years of age. More daily physical activity provides greater benefits.

  5. Visual access trumps gender in 3- and 4-year-old children's endorsement of testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Nathalie; Bernard, Stéphane; Mercier, Hugo; Clément, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have investigated how preschoolers weigh social cues against epistemic cues when taking testimony into account. For instance, one study showed that 4- and 5-year-olds preferred to endorse the testimony of an informant who had the same gender as the children; by contrast, when the gender cue conflicted with an epistemic cue--past reliability--the latter trumped the former. None of the previous studies, however, has shown that 3-year-olds can prioritize an epistemic cue over a social cue. In Experiment 1, we offer the first demonstration that 3-year-olds favor testimony from a same-gender informant in the absence of other cues. In Experiments 2 and 3, an epistemic cue-visual access--was introduced. In those experiments, 3- and 4-year-olds endorsed the testimony of the informant with visual access regardless of whether it was a same-gender informant (Experiment 3) or a different-gender informant (Experiment 2). These results demonstrate that 3-year-olds are able to give more weight to an epistemic cue than to a social cue when evaluating testimony. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  7. [Case of Colon Metastasis from Early Gastric Cancer 4 Years after Laparoscopic Assisted Distal Gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kosuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Maezawa, Yukio; Kano, Kazuki; Satoyoshi, Tetsuta; Segami, Kenki; Nakajima, Tetsushi; Ogata, Takashi; Cho, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer(pathological T1bN1M0)in June 2011was admitted to the hospital because of abdominal pain in May 2015.A n abdominal CT scan showed ileus caused by a transverse colon tumor and ascending colon perforation.We performed emergency right hemicolectomy and diverting ileostomy.The postoperative pathological findings revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signetring cell carcinoma similar to the gastric cancer resected 4 years ago.Immunohistochemical findings showed that the colon tumor was positive for CK7, but negative for CK20 and expressed a gastric mucin phenotype.From these findings, the colon tumor was diagnosed as a metastasis from early gastric cancer.Colon metastasis from early gastric cancer is rare and the diagnosis is difficult in some cases.We herein report this case and discuss the clinical and pathologic features of colon metastasis from gastric cancer.

  8. Traumatic ventricular septal defect in a 4-year-old boy after blunt chest injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mi Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD resulting from blunt chest injury is a very rare event. The mechanisms of traumatic VSD have been of little concern to dateuntil now, but two dominant theories have been described. In one, the rupture occurs due to acute compression of the heart; in the other, it is due to myocardial infarction of the septum. The clinical symptoms and timing of presentation are variable, so appropriate diagnosis can be difficult or delayed. Closure of traumatic VSD has been based on a combination of heart failure symptoms, hemodynamics, and defect size. Here, we present a case of a 4-year-old boy who presented with a traumatic VSD following a car accident. He showed normal cardiac structure at the time of injury, but after 8 days, his repeated echocardiography revealed a VSD. He was successfully treated by surgical closure of the VSD, and has been doing well up to the present. This report suggests that the clinician should pay great close attention to the patients injured by blunt chest trauma, keeping in mind the possibility of cardiac injury.

  9. Performance of the SCUBA-2 dry dilution refrigerator: 4 years of operation at the JCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintley, Dan; Kuroda, John T.; Starman, Erik G.; Craig, Simon; Holland, Wayne S.

    2012-09-01

    Cryogen free or ‘dry’ dilution refrigerators that integrate a cryocooler such as a two stage pulse tube to replace the conventional liquid helium bath and 1K pot, have become a practical alternative for cooling astronomical detectors to mK temperatures and offer many advantages. SCUBA-2, the new submillimetre camera in operation at the JCMT, on the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, was one of the first instruments to use such a fridge design. The dry dilution fridge for SCUBA-2 has now been in service for almost 4 years during commissioning at JCMT. In the most recent astronomical commissioning phase, the dilution fridge was in continuous operation for 10 months with no loss of base temperature or cooling power, cooling the SCUBA-2 detector arrays to below 100mK while maintaining a further 100Kg of enclosure, shields and SQUID amplifiers at 1K. In this paper we review some of the lessons from operating a dry dilution fridge at the JCMT and the necessary changes that have been incorporated. We present the performance of the fridge and discus its role in ensuring the success of SCUBA-2.

  10. Low-friction arthroplasty with Boneloc bone-cement: outcome at 2 to 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, J P; D'Arcy, J C; Ross, K R; James, S E; Bonnici, A V; Koka, S R; Morris, R W

    2000-02-01

    We report the clinical and radiologic outcome of 109 Chamley low-friction arthroplasties implanted with Boneloc bone-cement (Biomet, Bridgend, South Wales, UK) into 104 patients. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range, 2-48 months). There were 72 women (mean age, 71 years) and 32 men (mean age, 72). Cartridge-packed cement was used in 37 cases and vacuum-packed cement in 72 cases. Survivorship analysis based on revision for aseptic loosening showed 79% survival at 4 years. Seventeen (15.5%) hips have been revised for aseptic loosening to date, in which all stems and 4 cups were loose. Extensive femoral osteolysis was always present and resulted in 4 cases of femoral cortical perforation at revision. Survivorship analysis based on revision and radiologic failure showed only 55% survival over the same period. When radiologic loosenings were included as failures, the vacuum-packed cement performed significantly worse than the cartridge-packed cement it replaced. These poor results were consistent with the withdrawal of Boneloc from clinical use in 1995, and we recommend indefinite follow-up for surviving prostheses.

  11. Joint Rhythmic Movement Increases 4-Year-Old Children's Prosocial Sharing and Fairness Toward Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen; Meltzoff, Andrew N

    2017-01-01

    The allocation of resources to a peer partner is a prosocial act that is of fundamental importance. Joint rhythmic movement, such as occurs during musical interaction, can induce positive social experiences, which may play a role in developing and enhancing young children's prosocial skills. Here, we investigated whether joint rhythmic movement, free of musical context, increases 4-year-olds' sharing and sense of fairness in a resource allocation task involving peers. We developed a precise procedure for administering joint synchronous experience, joint asynchronous experience, and a baseline control involving no treatment. Then we tested how participants allocated resources between self and peer. We found an increase in the generous allocation of resources to peers following both synchronous and asynchronous movement compared to no treatment. At a more theoretical level, this result is considered in relation to previous work testing other aspects of child prosociality, for example, peer cooperation, which can be distinguished from judgments of fairness in resource allocation tasks. We draw a conceptual distinction between two types of prosocial behavior: resource allocation (an other-directed individual behavior) and cooperation (a goal-directed collaborative endeavor). Our results highlight how rhythmic interactions, which are prominent in joint musical engagements and synchronized activity, influence prosocial behavior between preschool peers.

  12. The psychosocial effects of severe caries in 4-year-old children in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Feitosa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the psychosocial effects of severe caries in 4-year-old children in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. The clinical examination was conducted by a single examiner in order to select children with severe caries and caries-free (kappa = 1. Of the 861 children examined, 77 (8.1% had severe caries and 225 (23.6% were caries-free. Data were collected by applying validated questionnaires answered by the parents or guardians. Most of the parents or guardians of children with severe caries reported that their children complained of toothache (72.7%, and a significant portion stated that their children had problems eating certain kinds of food (49.4% and missed school (26.0% because of their teeth. Most of the parents or guardians of children with severe caries (68.8% stated that oral health affects their children's life, while the same was stated by 9.8% of the parents or guardians of the caries-free children. Severe caries was found to have a negative impact on children's oral health-related quality of life.

  13. Description of exercise participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy across a 4-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Laura K; Bartlett, Doreen J

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe (1) the types of exercise participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy; (2) the weekly duration of stretching, strengthening, and cardiovascular exercise; (3) how the level of activity compares with national health guidelines; and (4) the change in participation over 4 years. Participants included 126 males and 104 females (mean age = 14.7 years, SD = 1.7 years) who reported physical activities in the previous week. Analyses included frequency counts and proportions, stacked bar graphs, and 2-way analyses of variance of exercise participation by Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and sex. A significant main effect of GMFCS level was detected for light and moderate exercise. A significant interaction of GMFCS level and sex was found for stretching; females stretched more. An average of 9.4% and 11.4% of our sample participated in weekly levels of moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively. Pediatric physical therapists should promote increased exercise participation rates among youths with cerebral palsy.

  14. Ameloblastic Fibro-Odontoma in a 4-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghandehari-Motlagh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO is defined as a benign odontogenic tumor with slow growing behavior. Its prevalence is rare. AFO is characterized by histologic features of ameloblastic fibroma (AF with the formation of enamel and dentine. Case Presentation This is a case report of AFO accompanied with a number of impacted deciduous teeth and its management in a 4-year old boy. Examination of oral cavity revealed an extensive swelling from midline to left deciduous maxillary first molar, covered with normal mucosa. Radiographic examination showed a well-defined mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion that extended horizontally from midline to mesial border of the left maxillary primary first molar and vertically from alveolar crest to the floor of nose. The differential diagnosis was odontoma (ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, complex odontoma. Surgical enucleation and curettage was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathologic sections show bone trabeculae in marrow spaces. There was myxoid matrix in some spaces which contained odontogenic epithelial cells. These findings led to diagnosis of AFO. No sign of recurrence has been observed during the 12-month follow-up period. Conclusion Although AFO is a rare tumor, it is more prevalent in childrenʼs jaw. Conservative surgical treatment allowed the normal development of teeth.

  15. Generalized tetanus in a 4-year old boy presenting with dysphagia and trismus: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The low incidence of tetanus in developed countries has resulted in a decreased vigilance of this disease. This raises concern, as the prodromal stadium of a generalized tetanus infection may lack the characteristic paroxysmal muscle spasms. Tetanus can rapidly progress into life-threatening muscle spasms accompanied by respiratory insufficiency and/or autonomic dysfunction. This emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and treatment. Case presentation A 4-year-old Caucasian boy presented with a one-week history of general malaise, mild fever, indolence and anorexia. He subsequently developed dysphagia, sialorrhoea, difficulties opening the mouth and eventually dehydration. Due to parental concerns about the boy's refusal of fluids, a pediatrician was consulted. At that time of presentation he showed signs of trismus and muscle rigidity. Together with the lack of immunization and a toe nail infection, this lead to the suspicion of a generalized tetanus infection. After sedation, endotracheal intubation and ventilation, passive immunization and initiation of antimicrobial treatment, he was immediately transferred to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for further treatment. The frequency and severity of paroxysmal muscle spasms increased progressively during his PICU stay, despite high doses of sedatives. Not before two weeks after admittance, extubation and careful weaning off sedatives was achieved. Conclusion Tetanus infection remains a rare but potentially lethal disease in developed countries. As the full scope of classical symptoms may be absent at first presentation, tetanus should always be considered in non-immunized patients with an acute onset of dysphagia and trismus. PMID:19829891

  16. AMS02 results after 4 years of data taking on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incagli, M.; AMS02 Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The AMS02 experiment is taking data on the International Space Station since May, 19, 2011. This report summarizes the key results published or presented in public conferences using the data collected in the first 4 years of the mission, trying to interpret them in terms of the latest models of Cosmic Ray (CR) propagation. In particular the fluxes of primary CR, like proton, Helium and Carbon, or of secondaries like Lithium and Boron, can be used to constraint the models and compare them with the observed anti-proton flux, to see if hints of Dark Matter (DM) can be identified. The same can be done in the lepton sector by looking at electrons and positrons. In the near future AMS02 will continue the observation of light nuclei, including isotopes like Deuterium, He-3 and He-4, and of anti-nuclei, like anti-Deuterium and anti-Helium, which represent, together with anti-protons and positrons, the golden channels in which to look for eventual Dark Matter or antimatter signals.

  17. [Validity of anthropometric measurements and weight perceptions reported by relatives of children under 4 years old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño-Villena, Begoña; Chirlaque, María Dolores; Salmerón, Diego; González, Eduardo; Navarro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    To assess the validity of weight and height measurements reported by parents and the perception of their children's weight status in order to assess the prevalence of overweight children under 4 years old. Cross-sectional study. Anthropometric data was collected by self-report questionnaires completed by parents of children 3-45 months old: 1) information from paediatric check-ups (gold standard); 2) information reported from the home environment; and 3) data from individual perceptions. WHO standards were used. Reported height was underestimated, thus reported weight/height and BMI/age were overestimated. Overweight prevalence according to paediatric check-ups was 18.6%, compared to 26.5% reported prevalence, showing a moderate concordance (Kappa: 0.47 [0.34-0.60]), 70% sensitivity and 84% specificity. Subjective perception was 11.2%, representing 30% sensitivity and 93% specificity. The reported information has little validity for population-based studies, as height is underestimated and overweight status is not correctly perceived due to distortion of individual perception. Questionnaires must be validated and awareness raised among families. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Ameloblastic Fibro-Odontoma in a 4-Year-Old Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari-Motlagh, Mehdi; Khosravi, Zahra; Meighani, Ghasem; Baradaran-Nakhjavani, Yahya

    2016-04-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO) is defined as a benign odontogenic tumor with slow growing behavior. Its prevalence is rare. AFO is characterized by histologic features of ameloblastic fibroma (AF) with the formation of enamel and dentine. This is a case report of AFO accompanied with a number of impacted deciduous teeth and its management in a 4-year old boy. Examination of oral cavity revealed an extensive swelling from midline to left deciduous maxillary first molar, covered with normal mucosa. Radiographic examination showed a well-defined mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion that extended horizontally from midline to mesial border of the left maxillary primary first molar and vertically from alveolar crest to the floor of nose. The differential diagnosis was odontoma (ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, complex odontoma). Surgical enucleation and curettage was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathologic sections show bone trabeculae in marrow spaces. There was myxoid matrix in some spaces which contained odontogenic epithelial cells. These findings led to diagnosis of AFO. No sign of recurrence has been observed during the 12-month follow-up period. Although AFO is a rare tumor, it is more prevalent in children's jaw. Conservative surgical treatment allowed the normal development of teeth.

  19. Delirium due to Scopolamine Patch in a 4-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Guang Lin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The scopolamine patch is usually used to reduce postoperative nausea and vomiting associated with anesthesia and/or surgery. It is also commonly used for the prevention of motion sickness. Transdermal scopolamine patches have been used for decades and there are few reports in the literature of toxic psychosis associated with the product. Most documented cases of acute psychosis following administration of scopolamine or other anticholinergic agents have been from the adult population. Here we present a 4-year-old boy with deteriorated cognitive function and changed mental status acutely. Besides flushing skin and psychotic behaviors including bizarre actions, hallucinations, aggressive behavior, hyperactivity, and incoherent speech were also noticed. Symptoms and signs were resolved after removal of scopolamine patch and conservative management. This case is possibly one of the youngest patients to exhibit such toxic effects. We hope to relay information about common agents with anticholinergic effects to clinical practitioners and remind that drug-induced psychosis should be considered in children with acute changes in behavior.

  20. Physical activity implementation in schools: a 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mâsse, Louise C; McKay, Heather; Valente, Maria; Brant, Rollin; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2012-10-01

    Action Schools! BC (AS!BC) is a comprehensive school-based model that utilizes a socioecologic approach to provide children with opportunities for physical activity at school in British Columbia. The hierarchy of factors associated with successful implementation of AS!BC was examined 4 years after it was scaled up. A cross-sectional multistage survey was administered to principals (n=133; 92% response rate) and Grade 4-7 teachers (n=587; 71% response rate) in 2008-2009. Constructs from the theories of organizational change, social cognitive theory and Rogers's diffusion of innovation model were used to examine characteristics of teachers and schools and attributes of the innovation associated with implementation. Multilevel mixed-effect logistic regression analyses were employed (analyzed in November 2011). Self-efficacy, outcome expectation, training received, organizational climate/support, level of institutionalization, environmental influence, and attributes of the innovation were associated with implementation. In multivariate analyses, self-efficacy, training, and level of institutionalization remained significant (all pschool level, policies and guidelines provided a necessary, supportive environment for implementation. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Periodontal parameters of osseointegrated dental implants. A 4-year controlled follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K; Itoh, T; Takaki, K; Hosokawa, R; Naito, T; Yokota, M

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the periodontal parameters of osseointegrated dental implants. The condition of the peri-implant mucosa was assessed using periodontal parameters, i.e., of plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, probing attachment level and Periotest scores as well as a radiographic parameter, over a 4-year follow-up period. 32 non-submerged ITI dental implants, all placed in the mandible, were studied in 12 patients who had good oral hygiene. All patients were regularly recalled at 6-month intervals. The overall implant success rate was 100%. None of the implants showed any signs of inflammation, radiographic bone loss or any detectable mobility during the follow-up period. Methods similar to those used to evaluate the natural dentition were effectively employed to assess the clinical status of the dental implants. The diagnostic value of these parameters could not, however, be determined from this study due to the absence of any peri-implant tissue complications. The results indicated that some periodontal parameters of healthy peri-implant mucosa might be slightly different from healthy periodontal tissue.

  2. Food intake and nutrition in children 1-4 years of age in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuanalo de la Cerda, Heriberto E; Ochoa Estrada, Ernesto; Tuz Poot, Felipe R; Datta Banik, Sudip

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT in Spanish) reported high rates of under-nutrition in children of Yucatan. Is food intake the main cause of under-nutrition in children of the state of Yucatan, Mexico? Identify the primary causes of under-nutrition in pre-school children in Yucatan. A sample of 111 children (59 girls and 52 boys) aged 1-4 years representing Yucatan was taken from a database of ENSANUT 2006 and another national survey, a federal poverty mitigation programme for the state of Yucatan, Mexico entitled "Oportunidades". A human ecology approach together with life history theory was used to analyse anthropometric indices and food intake data from the ENSANUT 2006 and "Oportunidades". Height and weight were significantly correlated to age and total food intake. No correlations were found between age and anthropometric indices or food intake rates. The children in the sample had adequate protein intake but deficient energy intake. No correlation was identified between nutritional status and food intake rates. Pre-schoolers with higher weight-for-height values achieved greater height-for-age. These relationships can be explained by life history theory in that energy intake was used either for maintenance (combating and recovering from infections) or growth. The poor relationship between food intake rates and nutritional status is probably explained by the interaction between high disease incidence and insufficient energy intake. These conditions are endemic in Yucatan due to widespread poor housing, water and sanitation conditions.

  3. [Effects of self-control strategies on 4-year-olds' resistance to temptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutomi, T

    1991-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the hypothesis that 4-year-olds' failure to resist to temptation was caused by their attention to motivational qualities of tempting objects. The forbidden toy situation forbidden to play with the attractive toy was used. In Experiment I that manipulated attention style of tempting objects, four conditions were set. Two conditions of these were conditions that prevented from attending to the motivational qualities of tempting objects and consisted of distraction condition that distracted from toy and toy-negative condition that evaluated the toy negatively. The other two conditions were control condition and toy-positive condition that attended to the motivational qualities of toy. The main results indicated that the transgression latencies of distraction and toy-negative conditions were longer than the other two conditions. In Experiment II, subjects were instructed to choose the strategy that they would use between stimulus pairs obtained by combining three strategy used in Experiment I. The results indicated that the number of subjects choosing toy-positive strategy were more than the other strategies in pairing toy-positive strategy with other two strategies. The hypothesis was supported from the present study.

  4. Recovery, non-profit organisations and mental health services: 'Hit and miss' or 'dump and run'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Catherine; Hungerford, Alice; Fox, Cathy; Cleary, Michelle

    2016-03-08

    The evolution of Recovery-oriented mental health services in Western nations across the globe has given rise to a growth in community-based psychosocial support services, to assist in meeting the diverse needs of consumers. This article reports findings of research that explored the perceptions of community workers who are employed by non-profit organisations and deliver psychosocial support services to support delivery of Recovery-oriented clinical mental health services. The focus of the research reported in this article includes the benefits and challenges encountered by the community workers when working with clinicians. The research was undertaken as part of a single-case embedded study, which evaluated the implementation of Recovery-oriented approaches to the delivery of clinical mental health services in a major urban centre located in south-eastern Australia. Generally, community workers employed by the non-profit organisations perceived the implementation of Recovery-oriented clinical mental health services to be a positive step forward for consumers. Challenges to the delivery of Recovery-oriented services included issues arising from the many different understandings of what it means to experience mental health Recovery, the quality of communication between the community workers and clinicians and the clinicians' lack of understanding of the role of non-profit organisations and community workers. The article concludes with recommendations to address the challenges involved, with a view to improving the partnerships between community workers and clinicians, and the Recovery journey of people with serious mental illness. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Burn Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Help keep local seniors safe from fire! Burn Survivor Support If you are reading this, chances ... year – a burn injury. Learn more Fire and Burn Prevention Each year, the Burn Institute provides fire ...

  6. CSCAPES Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  7. Institutional Controls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of institutional control data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different...

  8. Reflection in the non-profit legal persons accounting of the grant-oriented operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nătăliţa-Mihaela Lesconi Frumuşanu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will analyse the legal stipulations regarding the reflection in accounting of the grant-oriented (structural funds operations within a non-profit organization. The suitability and importance of the paper is obvious, since the grants constitute an important source of funds for this category of entities. The paper indicates, in addition to the specific accounting notes, the main problems the grant beneficiaries have to face regarding the organization and management of the project accounting, thus the paper having a profound practical nature.

  9. Paying their way? Do nonprofit hospitals justify their favorable tax treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Helen

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses the effect of hospital ownership on the delivery of services to medically indigent patients and on their communities, using two alternative definitions of community benefits. Using data from hospitals in California, the study finds that in similar markets, the amount of community benefits provided by a tax-exempt private hospital is equivalent in value to that provided by an investor-owned hospital. These results are sensitive to the definition of community benefits, thus indicating need for a more explicit identification and minimum standard of the community benefits expected of nonprofit hospitals in return for their special tax treatment.

  10. False belief understanding and cool inhibitory control in 3-and 4-year-old Italian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eBellagamba

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During preschool years, major developments occur in both executive function and theory of mind (ToM, and several studies have demonstrated a correlation between these processes. Research on the development of inhibitory control (IC has distinguished between more cognitive, cool aspects of self-control, measured by conflict tasks, that require inhibiting an habitual response to generate an arbitrary one, and hot, affective aspects, such as affective decision making, measured by delay tasks, that require inhibition of a prepotent response. The aim of this study was to investigate the relations between 3- and 4-year-olds’ performance on a task measuring false belief understanding, the most widely used index of ToM in preschoolers, and two tasks measuring cognitive versus affective aspects of IC. To this end, we tested 101 Italian preschool children in three tasks: (a the Unexpected Content False Belief task, (b the Conflict task (a simplified version of the Day-Night Stroop task, and (c the Delay task. Children’s receptive vocabulary was assessed by the Peabody Picture Vocabulary test. Children’s performance in the False Belief task was significantly related only to performance in the Conflict task, controlling for vocabulary and age. Importantly, children’s performance in the Conflict task did not significantly correlate with their performance in the Delay task, suggesting that these tasks measure different components of IC. The dissociation between the Conflict and the Delay task may indicate that monitoring and regulating a cool process (as flexible categorization may involve different abilities than monitoring and regulating a hot process (not touching an available and highly attractive stimulus. Moreover, our findings support the view that cool aspects of IC and ToM are interrelated, extending to an Italian sample of children previous findings on an association between self-control and ToM.

  11. Nordic Nuclear Safety Research 1994 - 2008: From standardized 4-year classics to customized R and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennerstedt, T.N.O. (TeknoTelje HB, Torhamn (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    This is a presentation of NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research), its work and achievements in the years 1994 - 2008, during which the author served as Nordic secretary and (later) as coordinator. NKS and the Nordic perspective are briefly introduced together with the NKS support structure, organization and administration: Owners, Board, Nordic secretary, Bureau and Secretariat. The author then embarks on a journey through the modern history of NKS work. The last two of the six fixed 4-year programs are described as regards planning, contents, project work, administration, dissemination of results, evaluations and conclusions. The trip continues to the land of R and B and the present (2011) structure of two general frameworks, namely, NKS-R: reactor safety, and NKS-B: emergency preparedness; each consisting of a set of flexible activities; hence, R and B. The reasoning behind this makeover is touched upon together with the new organization and simpler administration that developed. Major activities and the produced results are introduced and the evaluations summarized. The author's own conclusions and recommendations are followed by a short and subjective list of references. In a number of appendices some important background material has been compiled: bullet point versions of minutes of Owners Group and Board meetings; economic contributions and budgets; the NKS policy document; an overview of all NKS programs and evaluations; lists of R and B activities and funding; the author's personal remarks; a list of some NKS documents (other than technical reports and minutes); and a list of acronyms used in this report. (Author)

  12. Comparing three short questionnaires to detect psychosocial problems among 3 to 4-year olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Meinou H C; Vogels, Anton G C; de Wolff, Marianne S; Crone, Mathilde R; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-07-16

    Validated questionnaires help community pediatric services to identify psychosocial problems. Our aim was to assess which of three short questionnaires was most suitable for this identification among pre-school children. We included 1,650 children (response 64 %) aged 3-4 years undergoing routine well-child health assessments in 18 services across the Netherlands. Child healthcare professionals (CHPs) interviewed and examined children and parents. Parents were randomized regarding filling out the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) or the KIPPPI, a Dutch-origin questionnaire. In addition, all filled out the Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social-Emotional (ASQ:SE) and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). We assessed the internal consistency and validity of each questionnaire, with CBCL and treatment status as criteria, and the degree to which each questionnaire could improve identification based solely on clinical assessment. The internal consistency of the total problems scale of each questionnaire was satisfactory, Cronbach's alphas varied between 0.75 and 0.98. Only the SDQ discriminated sufficiently between children with and without problems as measured by the CBCL (sensitivity = 0.76 at a cut-off point with specificity = 0.90), in contrast to the other two questionnaires (with sensitivity indices varying between 0.51-0.63). Similar results were found for the treatment status criterion, although sensitivity was lower for all questionnaires. The SDQ seemed to add most to the identification of psychosocial problems by CHPs, but the differences between the SDQ and the ASQ:SE were not statistically significant. The SDQ is the best tool for the identification of psychosocial problems in pre-school children by community paediatric services.

  13. Effects of explicit teacher-implemented phoneme awareness instruction in 4-year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Ann A; Osterhouse, Heather; Wickham, Katherine; Mcnutt, Robert; Shao, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether gains would be observed in an integrated group of 4-year-olds when phoneme awareness skills were explicitly taught by trained early childhood educators. In a quasi-experimental design with a delayed treatment approach, one classroom (N = 14) was randomly assigned to receive the instructional program in fall, while a second classroom (N = 10) served as a control and subsequently received the program in spring. Baseline assessment of speech and language skills indicated there were four participants with speech and/or language impairments. The teacher training involved an initial workshop and weekly hour-long mentoring meetings; the program was provided for 20 min a day, 4 d a week, for 10 weeks. Outcome measures of phoneme awareness and letter knowledge skills were obtained from non-standardized tasks administered pre-instruction and post-instruction, at mid-year and end-year points. When each classroom received the phoneme instruction, participants made gains in letter knowledge and phoneme level skills in comparison with group performance under regular instruction. These gains were statistically significant for phoneme blending and letter knowledge. Using an aggregate of all outcome measures, the gain for each classroom when under instruction was statistically significant as compared with when that same classroom was receiving the regular curriculum. Children with speech and/or language impairment responded more variably. Gains in the more difficult phoneme awareness skill of blending suggest the potential for marked change with an intensive, explicit classroom instruction and hold promise for SLPs collaborating with preschool teachers to provide time-efficient PA instruction.

  14. Unemployment risk at 2 and 4 years following colorectal cancer diagnosis: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Yakir; Ratzon, Navah Z; Cohen, Miri; Hubert, Ayala; Uziely, Beatrice; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2016-12-01

    About half of colorectal patients are diagnosed less than 65 years of age and they have a relatively high cure rate. However, little is known about their employment and related risk factors. The aim of the current study was to clarify the association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and subsequent risk of being unemployed. A historical prospective cohort study included baseline socio-demographic measurements of age, sex, ethnicity, residential socio-economic position and education from the 1995 Israeli National Census, cancer incidence between 2000 and 2007 and employment data between 1998 and 2011. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess odds ratios for unemployment, while controlling for socio-economic measurements and employment status at 2 years prior to diagnosis. The final study population included 885 colorectal patients and 2646 healthy controls. After controlling for confounders, positive associations were found between stages II (odds ratio [OR] = 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31-2.76 or III (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-2.54) and increased risk for unemployment at 2 years. At 4 years follow-up, stages I (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.11-2.19), II (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.09-2.26) and III (OR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.55-3.37) were associated with increased risk for unemployment. Higher risk was seen among rectal cancer patients and among patients aged ≤50 years old at the time of cancer diagnosis. CRC patients are at increased long-term risk for unemployment, especially among rectal cancer and younger patients. The clinical ramifications of our findings emphasise the importance of an accurate evaluation and attention to unemployment status during the care of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal child-feeding practices and dietary inadequacy of 4-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durão, Catarina; Andreozzi, Valeska; Oliveira, Andreia; Moreira, Pedro; Guerra, António; Barros, Henrique; Lopes, Carla

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between maternal perceived responsibility and child-feeding practices and dietary inadequacy of 4-year-old children. We studied 4122 mothers and children enrolled in the population-based birth cohort - Generation XXI (Porto, Portugal). Mothers self-completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire and a scale on covert and overt control, and answered to a food frequency questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. Using dietary guidelines for preschool children, adequacy intervals were defined: fruit and vegetables (F&V) 4-7 times/day; dairy 3-5 times/day; meat and eggs 5-10 times/week; fish 2-4 times/week. Inadequacy was considered as below or above these cut-points. For energy-dense micronutrient-poor foods and beverages (EDF), a tolerable limit was defined (feeding practices (restriction, monitoring, pressure to eat, overt and covert control) and children's diet were examined by logistic regression models. After adjustment for maternal BMI, education, and diet, and children's characteristics (sex, BMI z-scores), restriction, monitoring, overt and covert control were associated with 11-18% lower odds of F&V consumption below the interval defined as adequate. Overt control was also associated with 24% higher odds of their consumption above it. Higher perceived responsibility was associated with higher odds of children consuming F&V and dairy above recommendations. Pressure to eat was positively associated with consumption of dairy above the adequate interval. Except for pressure to eat, maternal practices were associated with 14-27% lower odds of inadequate consumption of EDF. In conclusion, children whose mothers had higher levels of covert control, monitoring, and restriction were less likely to consume F&V below recommendations and EDF above tolerable limits. Higher overt control and pressure to eat were associated, respectively, with higher possibility of children consuming F&V and dairy above recommendations.

  16. Survival and quality of life of cholangiocarcinoma patients: a prospective study over a 4 year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Florentina; Tantau, Marcel; Diaconu, Brindusa; Acalovschi, Monica

    2010-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCAs) are tumors with a poor prognosis and a lower quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival rate and quality of life in CCA patients. We prospectively enrolled 133 patients diagnosed with CCA in the 3rd Medical Clinic, Cluj Napoca, over a 4-year period (2005-2009). The QoL was evaluated by means of a QoL questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). The mean age of the patients was 65 +/- 10.6 years: 55% were males. 71% of the patients had hilar tumor (Klatskin), 23% distal and 6% intrahepatic CCA (IH). Only 11.3% of the patients were eligible to receive curative treatment. The 1-year overall survival was 22.3 +/- 4.4% and the 2-year survival was 3.4 +/- 2.1%. The patients receiving metallic stents had better survival than those receiving plastic stents (40.4% vs 12.5% at 1 year, 9.1% vs 5.0% at 2 years, respectively). The 1-year survival was significantly improved for patients who underwent surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy. The post-therapy QoL demonstrated a less improvement in Klatskin tumor patients than in patients with other types of tumors. Endoscopic palliative therapy allowed a faster community reintegration, but with variable evolution. The highest 2-year survival rate was 5.5%. Slightly longer survival was recorded when chemotherapy was added and also after endoscopic placement of metallic stents. Endoscopic biliary decompression improved the QoL faster than surgery.

  17. A 4-year-old boy presenting with persistent urinary incontinence: Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenswijk, Werner; Walle, Johan Vande

    2017-05-01

    A 4-year-old boy was referred to the nephrologist with daytime urinary incontinence and suspicion of an overactive bladder. At the age of 17 months he had been referred to the pediatric endocrinologist because of polyuria and polydipsia in order to exclude diabetes insipidus. Repeated water deprivation tests and a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain were normal. Diabetes insipidus was excluded, and primary polydipsia was thought to be most likely since diabetes mellitus also had been excluded. At the current presentation, he drank up to 3 L a day and quite often had wet diapers. He also seemed to pass stools infrequently and with difficulty. Curiously his grandmother had similar symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia since childhood and had been diagnosed with primary polydipsia. The physical examination of our pediatric patient was normal. In the differential diagnosis we included diabetes insipidus but also contemplated other possibilities, such as nephronophthisis, tubulopathies and hypercalciuria. Laboratory results including urinalysis and an ultrasound of the kidney did not show any abnormalities, making a tubulopathy or hypercalciuria unlikely. A desmopressin test by the intravenous route came back completely normal, pointing to another cause than diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing for the nephronophthisis came back negative but was positive for a missense mutation in the AVPR2 gene (p.Arg104Cys) associated with partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. He was started on daily desmopressin. Within 3 days the urinary incontinence resolved as did the polyuria and faecal incontinence. His grandmother was referred to the geneticist and eventually the adult nephrologist. This case highlights the importance of being thorough when confronted with a difficult diagnosis. It also emphasizes that a test result does not necessarily equate to the presence or absence of a condition since the test with 100 % sensitivity and specificity has yet to be discovered.

  18. Timing and duration of autumn leaf development in Sweden, a 4-year citizen science study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmgren, Kjell; Langvall, Ola

    2017-04-01

    Phenology monitoring has traditionally focused on the start of phenological phases and the start of the growing season, especially when it comes to species-specific observations on the ground. The patterns of and the mechanisms behind the end of particular phases and the growing season itself are less studied and poorly understood. With a changing climate, the need to understand and predict effects on the length as well as on the end of phenological phases increase in importance, e.g. in relation to estimations of carbon budgets and validation of remote sensing data. Furthermore, different species may be affected in different ways by changing conditions. In this 4-year-study, tens of thousands of pupils in ages from 6 to 19 years old were involved in observing autumn leaf development of common deciduous tree species. Their observations were made near schools all over Sweden (55-68°N). Observations were made weekly between late August and early November and followed an image-based observation protocol, classifying autumn leaf development into five levels, from a summer-green (level 0) to a 100% autumn-colored (level 4) canopy. As expected, there was a general (negative) correlation between latitude and the start of leaf senescence (level 2; 1/3 autumn-colored canopy), but the correlation differed largely among years and between species. There was a week correlation between latitude and duration of the leaf senescence period, defined as the period between 1/3 (level 2) and 100% (level 4) of autumn-colored canopy. A delayed onset of the leaf senescence affected the duration of the leaf senescence period more strongly; One (1) day later start was correlated with a 5-day shorter period. Different species had different length of their senescence period, with oak (mainly Quercus robur) and birches (Betula pendula and B. pubescence) having on average a 50% longer period than trembling aspen (Populus tremula) and Norway maple (Acer platanoides).

  19. Somatosensory evoked field in response to visuotactile stimulation in 3- to 4-year-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Bastiaan Remijn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A child-customsized magnetoencephalography (MEG system was used to investigate somatosensory evoked field (SEF in 3- to 4-year-old children. Three stimulus conditions were used in which the children received tactile-only stimulation to their left index finger, or visuotactile stimulation. In the two visuotactile conditions the children received tactile stimulation to their finger while they watched a video of tactile stimulation applied either to someone else’s finger (the finger-touch condition, or to someone else’s toe (the toe-touch condition. The latencies and source strengths of equivalent current dipoles (ECD over contralateral (right somatosensory cortex were analyzed. In the preschoolers who provided valid ECDs, the stimulus conditions induced an early-latency ECD occurring in between 60-68 ms mainly with an anterior direction. We further identified a middle-latency ECD in between 97-104 ms, which predominantly had a posterior direction. Finally, initial evidence was found for a late-latency ECD at about 139-151 ms again more often with an anterior direction. Differences were found in the source strengths of the middle-latency ECDs among the stimulus conditions. For the paired comparisons that could be formed, ECD source strength was more pronounced in the finger-touch condition than in the tactile-only and the toe-touch condition. Although more research is necessary to expand the data set, this suggests that visual information modulated preschool SEF. The finding that ECD source strength was higher when seen and felt touch occurred to the same body part, as compared to a different body part, might further indicate that connectivity between visual and tactile information is indexed in preschool somatosensory cortical activity, already in a somatotopic way.

  20. Somatosensory Evoked Field in Response to Visuotactile Stimulation in 3- to 4-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remijn, Gerard B.; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Shitamichi, Kiyomi; Ueno, Sanae; Yoshimura, Yuko; Nagao, Kikuko; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa; Kojima, Haruyuki; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    A child-customized magnetoencephalography system was used to investigate somatosensory evoked field (SEF) in 3- to 4-year-old children. Three stimulus conditions were used in which the children received tactile-only stimulation to their left index finger or visuotactile stimulation. In the two visuotactile conditions, the children received tactile stimulation to their finger while they watched a video of tactile stimulation applied either to someone else’s finger (the finger-touch condition) or to someone else’s toe (the toe-touch condition). The latencies and source strengths of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) over contralateral (right) somatosensory cortex were analyzed. In the preschoolers who provided valid ECDs, the stimulus conditions induced an early-latency ECD occurring between 60 and 68 ms mainly with an anterior direction. We further identified a middle-latency ECD between 97 and 104 ms, which predominantly had a posterior direction. Finally, initial evidence was found for a late-latency ECD at about 139–151 ms again more often with an anterior direction. Differences were found in the source strengths of the middle-latency ECDs among the stimulus conditions. For the paired comparisons that could be formed, ECD source strength was more pronounced in the finger-touch condition than in the tactile-only and the toe-touch conditions. Although more research is necessary to expand the data set, this suggests that visual information modulated preschool SEF. The finding that ECD source strength was higher when seen and felt touch occurred to the same body part, as compared to a different body part, might further indicate that connectivity between visual and tactile information is indexed in preschool somatosensory cortical activity, already in a somatotopic way. PMID:24715860