WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonphotorespiratory co2 release

  1. Transient modeling of electrochemically assisted CO2 capture and release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shobhana; Stechel, Ellen B.; Buttry, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims to develop a model of a new electrochemical CO2 separation and release technology. We present a one-dimensional transient model of an electrochemical cell for point source CO2 capture and release, which mainly focuses on the simultaneous mass transport and complex chemical...... reactions associated with the separation process. For concreteness, we use an ionic liquid (IL) with 2 M thiolate anion (RS−) in 1 M disulfide (RSSR) as an electrolyte in the electrochemical cell to capture, transport and release CO2 under standard operating conditions. We computationally solved the model...... to analyze the time-dependent behavior of CO2 capture and electro-migration transport across the cell length. Given high nonlinearity of the system, we used a finite element method (FEM) to numerically solve the coupled mass transport equations. The model describes the concentration profiles by taking...

  2. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment facilitates cation release from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Zhu, J; Chen, G; Zheng, X; Oh, N-H; Rufty, T W; Richter, D deB; Hu, S

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) enrichment generally stimulates plant photosynthesis and nutrient uptake, modifying the local and global cycling of bioactive elements. Although nutrient cations affect the long-term productivity and carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems, little is known about the effect of CO(2) enrichment on cation availability in soil. In this study, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of CO(2)-enhancement of cation release from soil in rice agricultural systems. Elevated CO(2) increased organic C allocation belowground and net H(+) excretion from roots, and stimulated root and microbial respiration, reducing soil redox potential and increasing Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in soil solutions. Increased H(+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+) promoted Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release from soil cation exchange sites. These results indicate that over the short term, elevated CO(2) may stimulate cation release from soil and enhance plant growth. Over the long-term, however, CO(2)-induced cation release may facilitate cation losses and soil acidification, negatively feeding back to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  3. Detection of CO2 leakage by the surface-soil CO2-concentration monitoring (SCM) system in a small scale CO2 release test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Gitak; Yu, Soonyoung; Sung, Ki-Sung; Choi, Byoung-Young; Park, Jinyoung; Han, Raehee; Kim, Jeong-Chan; Park, Kwon Gyu

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of CO2 release through the ground surface is essential to testify the safety of CO2 storage projects. We conducted a feasibility study of the multi-channel surface-soil CO2-concentration monitoring (SCM) system as a soil CO2 monitoring tool with a small scale injection. In the system, chambers are attached onto the ground surface, and NDIR sensors installed in each chamber detect CO2 in soil gas released through the soil surface. Before injection, the background CO2 concentrations were measured. They showed the distinct diurnal variation, and were positively related with relative humidity, but negatively with temperature. The negative relation of CO2 measurements with temperature and the low CO2 concentrations during the day imply that CO2 depends on respiration. The daily variation of CO2 concentrations was damped with precipitation, which can be explained by dissolution of CO2 and gas release out of pores through the ground surface with recharge. For the injection test, 4.2 kg of CO2 was injected 1 m below the ground for about 30 minutes. In result, CO2 concentrations increased in all five chambers, which were located less than 2.5 m of distance from an injection point. The Chamber 1, which is closest to the injection point, showed the largest increase of CO2 concentrations; while Chamber 2, 3, and 4 showed the peak which is 2 times higher than the average of background CO2. The CO2 concentrations increased back after decreasing from the peak around 4 hours after the injection ended in Chamber 2, 4, and 5, which indicated that CO2 concentrations seem to be recovered to the background around 4 hours after the injection ended. To determine the leakage, the data in Chamber 2 and 5, which had low increase rates in the CO2 injection test, were used for statistical analysis. The result shows that the coefficient of variation (CV) of CO2 measurements for 30 minutes is efficient to determine a leakage signal, with reflecting the abnormal change in CO2

  4. Photovoltaic Parks' Impact On Soil CO2 Releasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodea, Larisa; Popescu, Iustina; Gabriela, Dorobantu; Deák, Gyorgy

    2015-04-01

    The sun provides a tremendous source for generating green and sustainable energy without any greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions. Even though photovoltaic energy is a promising alternative to fossil fuel-based energy, its development poses new environmental questions and potential threats. Due to its no GHG emissions property, photovoltaic energy grew at an unprecedented rate at global level, expanding by 50 % per year over the last decade. Unfortunately, there is still a knowledge gap on the long-term effects of photovoltaic parks on habitat loss, on soil quality, and hence on soil carbon dynamics. This subject should draw scientists' attention due to the occurred land use changes, possible soil compaction, potential alteration of drainage channels, increased runoff and erosion, use of herbicides which may leach to groundwater, but mainly due to the soil probability to lose the storing capacity of organic C, leading to CO2 emissions. Soil capacity of storing organic C emission may be affected by photovoltaic parks construction as follows: soil temperature increase due to poor ventilation, changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration processes, the balance of direct and diffuse radiation, climate induced changes in plant and soil microbial community composition and activity, but not only. Anyhow, studies reported by other authors showed that CO2 emission led by removal of vegetation followed by photovoltaic parks construction is high, total organic C remained 30 % lower than on undisturbed areas. The aim of this study was to perform an in-depth analysis of photovoltaic parks development in Romania and to assess their potential impact on below-ground organic C pools regarding the increasing of C release back into the atmosphere as CO2. The study showed that the photovoltaic parks constructed in Romania reached, until the January 2014, a total installed power of 1022 MW, some of them being installed on arable land, thus changing land use and posing a risk to soil

  5. A Reversed Photosynthesis-like Process for Light-Triggered CO2 Capture, Release, and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingguan; Liao, Shenglong; Zhang, Shiming; Wang, Yapei

    2017-06-22

    Materials for CO2 capture have been extensively exploited for climate governance and gas separation. However, their regeneration is facing the problems of high energy cost and secondary CO2 contamination. Herein, a reversed photosynthesis-like process is proposed, in which CO2 is absorbed in darkness while being released under light illumination. The process is likely supplementary to natural photosynthesis of plants, in which, on the contrary, CO2 is released during the night. Remarkably, the material used here is able to capture 9.6 wt.% CO2 according to its active component. Repeatable CO2 capture at room temperature and release under light irradiation ensures its convenient and cost-effective regeneration. Furthermore, CO2 released from the system is successfully converted into a stable compound in tandem with specific catalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Stem CO2 release under illumination: corticular photosynthesis, photorespiration or inhibition of mitochondrial respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Christiane; Pfanz, Hardy; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro; Pietrini, Fabrizio; Alessio, Giorgio

    2006-06-01

    In illuminated stems and branches, CO2 release is often reduced. Many light-triggered processes are thought to contribute to this reduction, namely photorespiration, corticular photosynthesis or even an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In this study, we investigated these processes with the objective to discriminate their influence to the overall reduction of branch CO2 release in the light. CO2 gas-exchange measurements of young birch (Betula pendula Roth.) branches (photorespiration does not play a pre-dominant role in carbon exchange. This suppression of photorespiration was attributed to the high CO2 concentrations (C(i)) within the bark tissues (1544 +/- 227 and 618 +/- 43 micromol CO2 mol(-1) in the dark and in the light, respectively). Changes in xylem CO2 were not likely to explain the observed decrease in stem CO2 release as gas-exchange measurements before and after cutting of the branches did not effect CO2 efflux to the atmosphere. Combined fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements provided evidence that the light-dependent reduction in CO2 release can pre-dominantly be attributed to corticular refixation, whereas an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in the light is unlikely to occur. Corticular photosynthesis was able to refix up to 97% of the CO2 produced by branch respiration, although it rarely led to a positive net photosynthetic rate.

  7. Particle image velocimetry for quantification of high pressure CO 2 release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A. de; Spruijt, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the current work evaluation of CO2 release velocity profiles is determined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The formation of solid CO2 particles using the rapid expansion of nozzle flow is used as a seeder particle, making the method truly nonintrusive and negates the use of special seeder

  8. Ligand-based reduction of CO2 and release of CO on iron(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammavongsy, Zachary; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Kaminsky, Werner; Gilbertson, John D

    2012-09-01

    A synthetic cycle for the CO(2)-to-CO conversion (with subsequent release of CO) based on iron(II), a redox-active pydridinediimine ligand (PDI), and an O-atom acceptor is reported. This conversion is a passive-type ligand-based reduction, where the electrons for the CO(2) conversion are supplied by the reduced PDI ligand and the ferrous state of the iron is conserved.

  9. The physical origins of rapid soil CO2 release following wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus; Grahm, Lina; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    A rainfall event after an extended dry period is known to produce large spikes in CO2 release from soil, a phenomenon referred to as the "Birch effect". The Birch effect is commonly attributed to biological factors, such as the rapid activation of dormant microbial populations and stimulation of soil organic carbon turnover. Evidence suggests that CO2 emissions set in at time scales too short for microbial activation and growth (seconds to minutes after onset of wetting). We conducted controlled wetting experiments on sterilized soil in the lab showing CO2 efflux dynamics that are consistent in magnitude with those reported in field studies (up to 4 mmol m-2 s-1 per mm of precipitation). The explanation proposed is purely physical, involving desorption of CO2 from soil surfaces as it is replaced by the more polar water during wetting. We present experimental results and a CO2 adsorption and desorption model that lend credence to the notion that a large fraction of the early soil CO2 emission during wetting (minutes to an hour) is associated with physical processes independent of microbial activity. This suggests that a significant amount of atmospheric CO2 becomes bound to soil surfaces during dry seasons and is rapidly released at the onset of wet seasons world-wide, irrespective of the soil organic carbon cycle.

  10. Recharge of the early atmosphere of Mars by impact-induced release of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1989-01-01

    The question as to whether high impact rates early in the history of Mars could have aided in maintaining a relatively thick CO2 atmosphere is discussed. Such impacts could have released CO2 into the atmosphere by burial, by shock-induced release during impact events, and by the addition of carbon to Mars from the impacting bolides. On the assumption that cratering rates on Mars were comparable to those of the moon's Nectarial period, burial rates are a result of 'impact gardening' at the end of heavy bombardment are estimated to have ranged from 20 to 45 m/million years; at these rates, 0.1-0.2 bar of CO2 would have been released every 10 million years as a result of burial to depths at which carbonate dissociation temperatures are encountered.

  11. Using the Bongwana natural CO2 release to understand leakage processes and develop monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Johnson, Gareth; Hicks, Nigel; Bond, Clare; Gilfillan, Stuart; Kremer, Yannick; Lister, Bob; Nkwane, Mzikayise; Maupa, Thulani; Munyangane, Portia; Robey, Kate; Saunders, Ian; Shipton, Zoe; Pearce, Jonathan; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Natural CO2 leakage along the Bongwana Fault in South Africa is being studied to help understand processes of CO2 leakage and develop monitoring protocols. The Bongwana Fault crops out over approximately 80 km in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. In outcrop the fault is expressed as a broad fracture corridor in Dwyka Tillite, with fractures oriented approximately N-S. Natural emissions of CO2 occur at various points along the fault, manifest as travertine cones and terraces, bubbling in the rivers and as gas fluxes through soil. Exposed rock outcrop shows evidence for Fe-staining around fractures and is locally extensively kaolinitised. The gas has also been released through a shallow water well, and was exploited commercially in the past. Preliminary studies have been carried out to better document the surface emissions using near surface gas monitoring, understand the origin of the gas through major gas composition and stable and noble gas isotopes and improve understanding of the structural controls on gas leakage through mapping. In addition the impact of the leaking CO2 on local water sources (surface and ground) is being investigated, along with the seismic activity of the fault. The investigation will help to build technical capacity in South Africa and to develop monitoring techniques and plans for a future CO2 storage pilot there. Early results suggest that CO2 leakage is confined to a relatively small number of spatially-restricted locations along the weakly seismically active fault. Fracture permeability appears to be the main method by which the CO2 migrates to the surface. The bulk of the CO2 is of deep origin with a minor contribution from near surface biogenic processes as determined by major gas composition. Water chemistry, including pH, DO and TDS is notably different between CO2-rich and CO2-poor sites. Soil gas content and flux effectively delineates the fault trace in active leakage sites. The fault provides an effective testing ground for

  12. CFD dispersion investigation of CO2 worst case scenarios including terrain and release effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mack, A.; Spruijt, M.P.N.

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, CFD (computational fluid dynamics) computations were performed in order to get insight in heavy gas dispersion behavior based on experimental results and extrapolate them to a representative full bore rupture scenario of a CO2 pipeline. The impact of the release process is inve

  13. Quantification and Origin of the Anomalous CO2 Release Accompanying L'Aquila 2009 Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G.; Atzori, S.; Brunori, C. A.; Caliro, S.; Cardellini, C.; Di Luccio, F.; Frondini, F.; Rosiello, A.; Selva, J.; Ventura, G.

    2016-12-01

    Deep pressurised pockets of CO2 were recognised to be involved in two seismic crisis of the Apennines that preceded the Amatrice earthquake: the 1997 Umbria-Marche and the 2009 L'Aquila earthquakes (LAE). Here we focus on the LAE that in 2009 caused 309 victims, 1600 injured people and 80000 displaced persons. A previous investigation highlighted that important amounts of deeply derived CO2 enter in the two aquifers outcropping in the LAE area. Here, we update the previous dataset with the results of other eight campaigns, the last of which in September 2015, with the aim of evaluating any variation in the flux of deep CO2 related to the 2009 earthquakes. This long time series of chemical and isotopic compositions of the main springs in the area highlights an evident anomalous CO2 release associated with the earthquakes. In particular, starting from the date of the main shock, we observed an anomalous release of CO2 that lasted for years and involved hundred thousands tonnes of deeply derived gas. In order to interpret this anomaly we re-considered DinSAR data discovering that a 4 years long inflation preceded the LAE. We argue that the LAE event was anticipated by a years-long deep pressurization stage. Few months before the LAE, concurrently with the beginning of the seismicity, the ground movement changed from inflation to an accelerating deflection that culminated in the April 2009 mainshock. In our model, the observed anomalous release of deep CO2 in the years following the LAE is the last step of a process that began in 2005 causing the observed period of inflation of the area affected by the earthquakes.

  14. Large CO2 and CH4 release from a flooded formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Franz, D.; Koebsch, F.; Larmanou, E.; Augustin, J.

    2016-12-01

    Drained peatlands are usually strong carbon dioxide (CO2) sources. In Germany, up to 4.5 % of the national CO2 emissions are estimated to be released from agriculturally used peatlands and for some peatland-rich northern states, such as Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, this share increases to about 20%. Reducing this CO2 source and restoring the peatlands' natural carbon sink is one objective of large-scale nature protection and restoration measures, in which 37.000 ha of drained and degraded peatlands in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania are slated for rewetting. It is well known, however, that in the initial phase of rewetting, a reduction of the CO2 source strength is usually accompanied by an increase in CH4 emissions. Thus, whether and when the intended effects of rewetting with regard to greenhouse gases are achieved, depends on the balance of CO2 and CH4 fluxes and on the duration of the initial CH4 emission phase. In 2013, a new Fluxnet site went online at a flooded formerly drained river valley fen site near Zarnekow, NE Germany (DE-Zrk), to investigate the combined CO2 and CH4 dynamics at such a heavily degraded and rewetted peatland. The site is dominated by open water with submerged and floating vegetation and surrounding Typha latifolia.Nine year after rewetting, we found large CH4 emissions of 53 g CH4 m-2 a-1 from the open water area, which are 4-fold higher than from the surrounding vegetation zone (13 g CH4 m-2 a-1). Surprisingly, both the open water and the vegetated area were net CO2 sources of 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1, respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions with a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates, particularly from temporally non-inundated organic mud in the vegetation zone.

  15. Electrochemical Capture and Release of CO2 in Aqueous Electrolytes Using an Organic Semiconductor Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Dogukan H; Gora, Monika; Portenkirchner, Engelbert; Oppelt, Kerstin T; Neugebauer, Helmut; Jakesova, Marie; Głowacki, Eric D; Kunze-Liebhäuser, Julia; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Mieczkowski, Jozef; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2017-04-19

    Developing efficient methods for capture and controlled release of carbon dioxide is crucial to any carbon capture and utilization technology. Herein we present an approach using an organic semiconductor electrode to electrochemically capture dissolved CO2 in aqueous electrolytes. The process relies on electrochemical reduction of a thin film of a naphthalene bisimide derivative, 2,7-bis(4-(2-(2-ethylhexyl)thiazol-4-yl)phenyl)benzo[lmn][3,8]phenanthroline-1,3,6,8(2H,7H)-tetraone (NBIT). This molecule is specifically tailored to afford one-electron reversible and one-electron quasi-reversible reduction in aqueous conditions while not dissolving or degrading. The reduced NBIT reacts with CO2 to form a stable semicarbonate salt, which can be subsequently oxidized electrochemically to release CO2. The semicarbonate structure is confirmed by in situ IR spectroelectrochemistry. This process of capturing and releasing carbon dioxide can be realized in an oxygen-free environment under ambient pressure and temperature, with uptake efficiency for CO2 capture of ∼2.3 mmol g(-1). This is on par with the best solution-phase amine chemical capture technologies available today.

  16. A natural analogue for CO2 leakage: The release and fate of CO2 at the Jan Mayen vent fields (AMOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, T.; Lilley, M. D.; Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a new possible technique for reducing the emission of industrial CO2 to the atmosphere. To evaluate the risks of sub-seabed CO2 storage, the European Commission is supporting the international and multi-disciplinary ECO2 project. Among other objectives, this project is dealing with evaluating the likelihood of leakage and the resulting possible impacts on marine ecosystems. In the framework of the ECO2 project, the release and dispersal of CO2 have been studied at several natural seep sites. In this study, we present geochemical data collected at the natural CO2 leakage analogue, Jan Mayen vent fields (JMVF). The basalt-hosted JMVF are located at 71° N on the southern end of the ultra-slow spreading Mohns Ridge, which is part of the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) system. The JMVF are composed of several venting sites, spread over a large area. These venting areas include focused high-temperature venting and diffuse low-temperature fluid flow vents as well as areas where free gas bubbles are released. Over the past few years, we have repeatedly visited and extensively sampled these vent fields to study the release and fate of CO2 in this natural seep area. One of our main objectives was to constrain the CO2 content of the widely emitted gas and to study its dispersion and fate in the water column. We have also investigated hydrate formation, which is observed at various locations. The venting fluids are chemically characterized by CO2 concentrations of up to 110 mmol/kg, having an associated isotopic composition representing a mantle carbon source. Thus, the CO2 concentrations measured at the JMVF represent the high-end compared to the concentration range of most other basalt-hosted hydrothermal mid-ocean ridge systems. Even though the concentrations of the emitted CO2 vary over time and with the type of venting (focused flow, diffuse flow or bubbles), the overall release is continuously high. The dispersion of the

  17. Potential for iron oxides to control metal releases in CO2 sequestration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P.M.; Roy, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the release of metals into groundwater following the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subsurface during carbon sequestration projects remains an open research question. Changing the chemical composition of even the relatively deep formation brines during CO2 injection and storage may be of concern because of the recognized risks associated with the limited potential for leakage of CO2-impacted brine to the surface. Geochemical modeling allows for proactive evaluation of site geochemistry before CO2 injection takes place to predict whether the release of metals from iron oxides may occur in the reservoir. Geochemical modeling can also help evaluate potential changes in shallow aquifers were CO2 leakage to occur near the surface. In this study, we created three batch-reaction models that simulate chemical changes in groundwater resulting from the introduction of CO2 at two carbon sequestration sites operated by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). In each of these models, we input the chemical composition of groundwater samples into React??, and equilibrated them with selected mineral phases and CO 2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The model then simulated the kinetic reactions with other mineral phases over a period of up to 100 years. For two of the simulations, the water was also at equilibrium with iron oxide surface complexes. The first model simulated a recently completed enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project in south-central Illinois in which the MGSC injected into, and then produced CO2, from a sandstone oil reservoir. The MGSC afterwards periodically measured the brine chemistry from several wells in the reservoir for approximately two years. The sandstone contains a relatively small amount of iron oxide, and the batch simulation for the injection process showed detectable changes in several aqueous species that were attributable to changes in surface complexation sites. After using the batch reaction

  18. THE POPULATION OF BACTERIA AND CO2 RELEASE ON PROCESS OF COMPOSTING MANURE AND SWAMP GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Utama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the bacteria population, the release of CO2, pH and organic-C and total-N in the process of compost made from manure and swamp grass. Treatment level consist of 100% manure (K100, 50% of manure + 50% swamp grass (K50R50, 25% of manure + 75% swamp grass (K25R75, and 10% of manure + 90% swamp grass (K10R90. The result of this study indicated the dynamic of different bacteria population on different composting materials by increasing of the composting time. The release of CO2 decrease on all treatment levels by increasing of the composting time. The pH value increased at all levels of treatment, except the composition of 100% manure. The best composition obtained by mixing of 10% manure and 90% swamp grass.

  19. A CO2-switchable polymer brush for reversible capture and release of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surjith; Tong, Xia; Dory, Yves L; Lepage, Martin; Zhao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    We report on a polymer brush that can be switched between extended (hydrated) and collapsed (dehydrated) chain conformational states just by passing CO(2) and an inert gas like N(2) in solution alternately. This conformational change allows for reversible adsorption and release of a protein. In contrast to adding acids and bases for pH change, using gases as the trigger makes it possible to repeat the switching cycle many times without salt accumulation.

  20. High pressurized CO2 release CFD calculations from onshore pipeline leakages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nicoleta; Gorenz, Paul; Egbers, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Emissions from high pressurized pipelines can be determined on the basis of hydrodynamical and thermophysical calculations of the escaped fluid. If a rupture occurs when CO2 is onshore transported in liquid form there will be initially a large pressure drop in the pipeline, the pressure will fall until the liquid becomes a mixture of saturated vapor/liquid. In the vicinity of the rupture, liquid CO2 will escape and immediately vaporize and expand, some of the liquid will desublimate into dry ice, which will precipitate onto the ground [1, 2]. The period of time taken for a large amount of carbon dioxide to be discharged would be short. Initially CO2 will escape by pushing the overlying soil upwards at an explosion-like speed. After the pressure in the pipe fell the flow profile of the escaping gas will almost be as described for gaseous material transport. The expansion of carbon dioxide will occur at sonic speed and will continue to do so until the pressure ratio between the CO2 and the ambient air is lower than about 1.9 [3]. As a result of the expansion also the temperature of the escaping gas will fall drastically and a cloud of cold gas will form which is then dispersed and slowly mixed with ambient air. The rate of emptying the pipeline is controlled by the pipe cross-section area and the speed of the escaping gas, or by the pressure difference between the pipeline and the atmosphere. Therefore the mass flow will be largest immediately after the accident with an exponential decay in time. In this study a two-phase model is applied to a high pressurized pipeline through which liquid carbon dioxide flows. A leakage is considered to be at different positions along the pipeline and the release pressure is calculated over several parameter ranges. It is also intended to characterize from hydrodynamical point of view the dispersion of released CO2 in the ambient medium by means of CFD simulations which includes multiphase flow treatment. For that a turbulent two

  1. Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Litter Decomposition and CO2 Release: Considering Changes in Litter Quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Chao; Hu, Ya-Lin; Mao, Rong; Zhao, Qiong; Zeng, De-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impacts of changes in litter quantity under simulated N deposition on litter decomposition, CO2 release, and soil C loss potential in a larch plantation in Northeast China. We conducted a laboratory incubation experiment using soil and litter collected from control and N addition (100 kg ha-1 year-1 for 10 years) plots. Different quantities of litter (0, 1, 2 and 4 g) were placed on 150 g soils collected from the same plots and incubated in microcosms for 270 days. We found that increased litter input strongly stimulated litter decomposition rate and CO2 release in both control and N fertilization microcosms, though reduced soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and dissolved inorganic N (DIN) concentration. Carbon input (C loss from litter decomposition) and carbon output (the cumulative C loss due to respiration) elevated with increasing litter input in both control and N fertilization microcosms. However, soil C loss potentials (C output-C input) reduced by 62% in control microcosms and 111% in N fertilization microcosms when litter addition increased from 1 g to 4 g, respectively. Our results indicated that increased litter input had a potential to suppress soil organic C loss especially for N addition plots.

  2. Surface exposure to sunlight stimulates CO2 release from permafrost soil carbon in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Rose M; Crump, Byron C; Dobkowski, Jason A; Kling, George W

    2013-02-26

    Recent climate change has increased arctic soil temperatures and thawed large areas of permafrost, allowing for microbial respiration of previously frozen C. Furthermore, soil destabilization from melting ice has caused an increase in thermokarst failures that expose buried C and release dissolved organic C (DOC) to surface waters. Once exposed, the fate of this C is unknown but will depend on its reactivity to sunlight and microbial attack, and the light available at the surface. In this study we manipulated water released from areas of thermokarst activity to show that newly exposed DOC is >40% more susceptible to microbial conversion to CO(2) when exposed to UV light than when kept dark. When integrated over the water column of receiving rivers, this susceptibility translates to the light-stimulated bacterial activity being on average from 11% to 40% of the total areal activity in turbid versus DOC-colored rivers, respectively. The range of DOC lability to microbes seems to depend on prior light exposure, implying that sunlight may act as an amplification factor in the conversion of frozen C stores to C gases in the atmosphere.

  3. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil CO2 release to substrate, environmental, and microbial properties across alpine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jinzhi; Chen, Leiyi; Zhang, Beibei; Liu, Li; Yang, Guibiao; Fang, Kai; Chen, Yongliang; Li, Fei; Kou, Dan; Ji, Chengjun; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of fundamental drivers of the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) release is crucial for improving the predictability of soil carbon dynamics in Earth System Models. However, patterns and determinants of Q10 over a broad geographic scale are not fully understood, especially in alpine ecosystems. Here we addressed this issue by incubating surface soils (0-10 cm) obtained from 156 sites across Tibetan alpine grasslands. Q10 was estimated from the dynamics of the soil CO2 release rate under varying temperatures of 5-25°C. Structure equation modeling was performed to evaluate the relative importance of substrate, environmental, and microbial properties in regulating the soil CO2 release rate and Q10. Our results indicated that steppe soils had significantly lower CO2 release rates but higher Q10 than meadow soils. The combination of substrate properties and environmental variables could predict 52% of the variation in soil CO2 release rate across all grassland sites and explained 37% and 58% of the variation in Q10 across the steppe and meadow sites, respectively. Of these, precipitation was the best predictor of soil CO2 release rate. Basal microbial respiration rate (B) was the most important predictor of Q10 in steppe soils, whereas soil pH outweighed B as the major regulator in meadow soils. These results demonstrate that carbon quality and environmental variables coregulate Q10 across alpine ecosystems, implying that modelers can rely on the "carbon-quality temperature" hypothesis for estimating apparent temperature sensitivities, but relevant environmental factors, especially soil pH, should be considered in higher-productivity alpine regions.

  4. Permafrost thaw and soil moisture driving CO2 and CH4 release from upland tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Susan M.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Mauritz, Marguerite; Schade, John D.; Celis, Gerardo; Crummer, Kathryn G.; Johnston, Catherine; Krapek, John; Pegoraro, Elaine; Salmon, Verity G.; Webb, Elizabeth E.

    2015-03-01

    As permafrost degrades, the amount of organic soil carbon (C) that thaws during the growing season will increase, but decomposition may be limited by saturated soil conditions common in high-latitude ecosystems. However, in some areas, soil drying is expected to accompany permafrost thaw as a result of increased water drainage, which may enhance C release to the atmosphere. We examined the effects of ecosystem warming, permafrost thaw, and soil moisture changes on C balance in an upland tundra ecosystem. This study was conducted at a water table drawdown experiment, established in 2011 and located within the Carbon in Permafrost Experimental Heating Research project, an ecosystem warming and permafrost thawing experiment in Alaska. Warming and drying increased cumulative growing season ecosystem respiration by 20% over 3 years of this experiment. Warming caused an almost twofold increase in decomposition of a common substrate in surface soil (0-10 cm) across all years, and drying caused a twofold increase in decomposition (0-20 cm) relative to control after 3 years of drying. Decomposition of older C increased in the dried and in the combined warmed + dried plots based on soil pore space 14CO2. Although upland tundra systems have been considered CH4 sinks, warming and ground thaw significantly increased CH4 emission rates. Water table depth was positively correlated with monthly respiration and negatively correlated with CH4 emission rates. These results demonstrate that warming and drying may increase loss of old permafrost C from tundra ecosystems, but the form and magnitude of C released to the atmosphere will be driven by changes in soil moisture.

  5. Influence of composition (CO2 and sugar) on aroma release and perception of mint-flavored carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Eve, Anne; Déléris, Isabelle; Aubin, Elodie; Semon, Etienne; Feron, Gilles; Rabillier, Jean-Marc; Ibarra, Dominique; Guichard, Elisabeth; Souchon, Isabelle

    2009-07-08

    The aim of the present work was to identify and quantify physical mechanisms responsible for in-nose aroma release during the consumption of mint-flavored carbonated beverages in order to better understand how they are perceived. The effect of two composition factors (sugar and CO(2)) was investigated on both the sensory and physicochemical properties of drinks by studying in vitro and in vivo aroma release. Sensory results revealed that the presence of CO(2) increased aroma perception regardless of the sugar content. In agreement with volatility parameters, in vivo measurements showed that carbonated drinks released a greater quantity of aroma compounds in the nose space than non-carbonated ones. CO(2) seemed thus to induce large modifications of the physicochemical mechanisms responsible for the aroma release and flavor perception of soft drinks. Moreover, sugar content seemed to have an impact (increase) on aroma perception only in the case of non-carbonated beverages. Sensory interactions were thus observed, in particular, between sweet and aroma perceptions. For carbonated beverages, sugar content had an impact only on aroma release, but not on their perception.

  6. Efficacy of a CO2-releasing suppository in dyschezia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrerias, Anne Laure; Abramowitz, Laurent; Marty, Marc M L; Coulom, Pierre; Staumont, Ghislain; Merlette, Christophe; Berger, Véronique; Savarieau, Bernard; Ducrotté, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Constipation has a significant impact on quality of life. Aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and the efficacy for relieving dyschezia symptoms of a CO2-releasing suppository in a randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. Fifty-three office-based primary care physicians and 24 gastroenterologists conducted the study in France, between November 2010 and January 2012. Patients (aged 18-75 years) with dyschezia were eligible. Patients were randomly allocated a once-a-day suppository (CO2-releasing suppository or placebo) for 21 days. Primary endpoint was the change, from Day 0 to Day 21, in the intensity of discomfort related to dyschezia based on a self-assessed 0-100 visual analogue scale. A total of 323 patients were randomized, i.e. 166 into the intervention group and 157 into the placebo group. Co-variance analysis showed a greater reduction in discomfort visual analogue scale score in the intervention group (-34.5mm; standard error of the mean: 1.8mm) than in the placebo group (-26.2mm; standard error of the mean: 1.9 mm; psuppository was confirmed for all secondary efficacy parameters. No significant side effects for either treatment were observed. A CO2-releasing suppository is more effective than a placebo for the relief of symptoms of dyschezia. This efficacy is associated with a good safety profile. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  8. Dehydration of CO2-α-cyclodextrin complex powder by desiccant adsorption method and its release properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-12-01

    Stability and release properties of CO2-α-cyclodextrin complex powder prepared by solid encapsulation (water activity, aw ≈ 0.95) followed by moisture removal using silica gel and CaCl2 desiccants during post-dehydration were investigated. The results showed that CaCl2 reduced aw much faster than silica gel did under the same conditions. After approximately 60 h, aw of complex powders reduced using silica gel was almost constant at 0.247 (±0.012), while those treated with CaCl2, aw was 0.225 (±0.005) and had not yet reached their lowest value. Moisture adsorption by silica gel and CaCl2 also led to a decrease in the CO2 concentration of complex powder (higher decrease for silica gel adsorption) without affecting the structure and morphology of complex powder. The CO2 release properties of CaCl2-aw-reduced complex powder at different relative humidities (32.73, 52.86, 75.32 and 97.30% RH), liquid environments (water and oil) and packaging methods (normal and vacuum) were also studied.

  9. Potential influence of CO2 release from a carbon capture storage site on release of trace metals from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, M Cruz; Verbinnen, Bram; Galan, Berta; Coz, Alberto; Vandecasteele, Carlo; Viguri, Javier R

    2012-03-01

    One of the main risks of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) is CO(2) leakage from a storage site. The influence of CO(2) leakage on trace metals leaching from contaminated marine sediment in a potential storage area (Northern Spain) is addressed using standardized leaching tests. The influence of the pH of the leaching solution on the leachates is evaluated using deionized water, natural seawater and acidified seawater at pH = 5, 6 and 7, obtained by CO(2) bubbling. Equilibrium leaching tests (EN 12457) were performed at different liquid-solid ratios and the results of ANC/BNC leaching test (CEN/TS 15364) were modeled using Visual Minteq. Equilibrium tests gave values of the final pH for all seawater leachates between 7 and 8 due to the high acid neutralization capacity of the sediment. Combining leaching test results and geochemical modeling provided insight in the mechanisms and prediction of trace metals leaching in acidified seawater environment.

  10. Pteropod eggs released at high pCO2 lack resilience to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Clara; Peck, Victoria L.; Tarling, Geraint A.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification (OA) on the early recruitment of pteropods in the Scotia Sea, was investigated considering the process of spawning, quality of the spawned eggs and their capacity to develop. Maternal OA stress was induced on female pteropods (Limacina helicina antarctica) through exposure to present day pCO2 conditions and two potential future OA states (750 μatm and 1200 μatm). The eggs spawned from these females, both before and during their exposure to OA, were incubated themselves in this same range of conditions (embryonic OA stress). Maternal OA stress resulted in eggs with lower carbon content, while embryonic OA stress retarded development. The combination of maternal and embryonic OA stress reduced the percentage of eggs successfully reaching organogenesis by 80%. We propose that OA stress not only affects the somatic tissue of pteropods but also the functioning of their gonads. Corresponding in-situ sampling found that post-larval L. helicina antarctica concentrated around 600 m depth, which is deeper than previously assumed. A deeper distribution makes their exposure to waters undersaturated for aragonite more likely in the near future given that these waters are predicted to shoal from depth over the coming decades. PMID:27181210

  11. CO2 release due to impact devolatilization of carbonate: Results of shock experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2016-04-01

    A study of pure, single crystal calcite shocked to pressures from 9.0 to 60.8 GPa was conducted to address contradictory data for carbonate shock behavior. The recovered materials were analyzed optically and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as by thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman-spectroscopy. In thin section, progressive comminution of calcite is observed although grains remain birefringent to at least 60.8 GPa. TGA analysis reveals a positive correlation between percent of mass loss due to shock and increasing shock pressure (R = 0.77) and suggests that shock loading leads to the modest removal of structural volatiles in this pressure range. XRD patterns of shocked Iceland spar samples produce peaks that are qualitatively and quantitatively less intense, more diffuse, and shift to lower o2θ. However, the regularity observed in these shocked powder patterns suggests that structures with very uniform unit cell separations persist to shock pressures as high as 60.8 GPa. Raman spectral analyses indicate no band asymmetry and no systematic peak shifting or broadening. TEM micrographs display progressively diminishing crystallite domain sizes. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns reveal no signatures of amorphous material. These data show that essentially intact calcite is recovered at shock pressures up to 60.8 GPa with only slight mass loss (~7%). This work suggests that the amount of CO2 gas derived from shock devolatilization of carbonate by large meteorite impacts into carbonate targets has been (substantially) overestimated.

  12. Development of a CO2 releasing co-formulation 1 based on starch, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Beauveria bassiana attractive towards western corn rootworm larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    CO2 is known as an attractant for many soil-dwelling pests. To implement an attract-and-kill strategy for soil pest control, CO2 emitting formulations need to be developed. This work aimed at the development of a slow release bead system in order to bridge the gap between application and hatching of...

  13. Sudden cold temperature regulates the time-lag between plant CO2 uptake and release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, M.; Cieraad, E.; Zakharova, A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    Since substrates for respiration are supplied mainly by recent photo-assimilates, there is a strong but time-lagged link between short-term above- and belowground carbon (C) cycling. However, regulation of this coupling by environmental variables is poorly understood. Whereas recent studies focussed on the effect of drought and shading on the link between above and belowground short-term C cycling, the effect of temperature remains unclear. We used a 13CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiment to investigate the effect of a sudden temperature change from 25 °C to 10 °C on the short-term coupling between assimilatory C uptake and respiratory loss. The study was done in the laboratory using two month old perennial rye-grass plants (

  14. Effect of CO2 concentration on the release of NO from char combustion in cement precalciner%分解炉内CO2浓度对煤焦燃烧NO释放的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕刚; 陆继东; 蔡吕清

    2011-01-01

    利用高温气固悬浮实验台对水泥行业中两种典型煤焦在不同CO2浓度下燃烧时NO的释放特性进行了实验研究,考察了不同CO2浓度气氛下,温度变化和添加生料对煤焦炭氮向NO转化的影响.研究结果表明,随着气氛中CO2浓度的升高,煤焦燃烧时NO的释放速率减小,体积浓度的峰值降低,焦炭氮转化为NO的转化率下降.水泥生料对焦炭氮向NO的转化具有正催化作用;温度升高也会促进焦炭氮向NO的转化.但随着气氛中CO2浓度的升高,升高温度和添加生料对焦炭氮向NO转化的促进作用相对减弱.%The release of NO from coal char combustion under the atmosphere of different CO2 concentrations was investigated in a high temperature gas-solid reactor with suspension and spray.The effects of temperature and cement raw meal on the release of NO under different CO2 concentrations were discussed.The results indicate that with the increase of CO2 concentration, the rate of NO release, the peak value of NO concentration and the percent conversion of char-N to NO decrease.The percent conversion of char-N to NO greatly rises due to the catalysis of cement raw meal, while the catalysis of the cement raw meal becomes weakening with the increase of CO2 concentration.It is also found that the conversion of char-N to NO increases with the rise of temperature.However, the effect of temperature on the NO release reduces with the increase of CO2 concentration.

  15. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Barr, J.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Repasky, K.S.; Lewicki, J.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, T.; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Wielopolski, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-10-20

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  16. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Nehrir, A.R.; Humphries, S.D.; Keith, C.J.; Shaw, J.A.; Rouse, J.H.; Cunningham, A.B.; Benson, S.M.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.W.; Diehl, J.R.; Strazisar, B.R.; Fessenden, J.E.; Rahn, T.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Barr, J.L.; Pickles, W.L.; Jacobson, J.D.; Silver, E.A.; Male, E.J.; Rauch, H.W.; Gullickson, K.S.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2010-01-01

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 The Author(s).

  17. The contribution of changes in P release and CO2 consumption by chemical weathering to the historical trend in land carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, D. S.; Moosdorf, N.; Brovkin, V.; Hartmann, J.

    2013-12-01

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased to a level unprecedented in the last 2 million years, and the concentration is projected to increase further with a rate unseen in geological past. The increase in CO2 cause a rise in surface temperatures and changes in the hydrological cycle through the redistribution of rainfall patterns. All of these changes will impact the weathering of rocks, which in turn affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations via two different pathways. On the one hand, CO2 is consumed by the dissolution reaction of the exposed minerals. And on the other hand, biological CO2 fixation is affected due to changes in phosphorus release from minerals, as biological activity is constrained by phosphorus availability at large scales. The traditional view is that both effects are negligible on a centennial time scale, but recent work on catchment scale challenge this view in favor of a potential high sensitivity of weathering to ongoing climate and land use changes. To globally quantify the contribution of CO2 fixation associated with weathering on the historical trend in terrestrial CO2 uptake, we applied a model of chemical weathering and phosphorus release under climate reconstructions from four Earth System Models. The simulations indicate that changes in weathering could have contributed considerably to the trend in terrestrial CO2 uptake since the pre-industrial revolution, with warming being the main driver of change. The increase in biological CO2 fixation is of comparable magnitude as the increase in CO2 consumption by chemical weathering. Our simulations support the previous findings on catchment scale that weathering can change significantly on a centennial time scale. This finding has implications for 21st century climate projections, which ignore changes in weathering, as well as for long-term airborne fraction of CO2 emissions, whose calculation usually neglects changes in phosphorus availability.

  18. Development of thermosensitive poly(n-isopropylacrylamide-co-((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate))-based nanoparticles for controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Cheng-Liang; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Lin, Wuu-Jyh [Isotope Application Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, PO Box 3-27, Longtan Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Han-Min; Yang, Shu-Jyuan; Lin, Chia-Fu; Shieh, Ming-Jium, E-mail: soloman@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No 1, Section 1, Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 10051, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-01

    Thermosensitive nanoparticles based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-((2-dimethylamino)ethylmethacrylate)) (poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA)) copolymers were successfully fabricated by free radical polymerization. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the synthesized nanoparticles was 41 deg. C and a temperature above which would cause the nanoparticles to undergo a volume phase transition from 140 to 100 nm, which could result in the expulsion of encapsulated drugs. Therefore, we used the poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA) nanoparticles as a carrier for the controlled release of a hydrophobic anticancer agent, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38). The encapsulation efficiency and loading content of SN-38-loaded nanoparticles at an SN-38/poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA) ratio of 1/10 (D/P = 1/10) were about 80% and 6.293%, respectively. Moreover, the release profile of SN-38-loaded nanoparticles revealed that the release rate at 42 deg. C (above LCST) was higher than that at 37 deg. C (below LCST), which demonstrated that the release of SN-38 could be controlled by increasing the temperature. The cytotoxicity of the SN-38-loaded poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA) nanoparticles was investigated in human colon cancer cells (HT-29) to compare with the treatment of an anticancer drug, Irinotecan (CPT-11). The antitumor efficacy evaluated in a C26 murine colon tumor model showed that the SN-38-loaded nanoparticles in combination with hyperthermia therapy efficiently suppressed tumor growth. The results indicate that these thermo-responsive nanoparticles are potential carriers for controlled drug delivery.

  19. Peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Asaph B; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Zhou, Wenxu; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes are important for recycling carbon and nitrogen that would otherwise be lost during photorespiration. The reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate catalyzed by hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) in the peroxisomes is thought to be facilitated by the production of NADH by peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase (PMDH). PMDH, which is encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), reduces NAD(+) to NADH via the oxidation of malate supplied from the cytoplasm to oxaloacetate. A double mutant lacking the expression of both PMDH genes was viable in air and had rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than in the wild type. This is in contrast to other photorespiratory mutants, which have severely reduced rates of photosynthesis and require high CO(2) to grow. The pmdh mutant had a higher O(2)-dependent CO(2) compensation point than the wild type, implying that either Rubisco specificity had changed or that the rate of CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation was increased in the pmdh plants. Rates of gross O(2) evolution and uptake were similar in the pmdh and wild-type plants, indicating that chloroplast linear electron transport and photorespiratory O(2) uptake were similar between genotypes. The CO(2) postillumination burst and the rate of CO(2) released during photorespiration were both greater in the pmdh mutant compared with the wild type, suggesting that the ratio of photorespiratory CO(2) release to Rubisco oxygenation was altered in the pmdh mutant. Without PMDH in the peroxisome, the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction can be increased by over 50%. In summary, PMDH is essential for maintaining optimal rates of photorespiration in air; however, in its absence, significant rates of photorespiration are still possible, indicating that there are additional mechanisms for supplying reductant to the peroxisomal HPR reaction or that the HPR reaction is altogether circumvented.

  20. Modeling Effects of Bicarbonate Release on Carbonate Chemistry and pH of the North Sea: A Pilot Study for Atmospheric CO2 Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettmann, K.; Kirchner, J.; Schnetger, B.; Wolff, J. O.; Brumsack, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Rising CO2-emissions accompanying the industrial revolution are the main drivers for climate change and ocean acidification. Several methods have been developed to capture CO2 from effluents and reduce emission. Here, we consider a promising approach that mimics natural limestone weathering: CO2 in effluent gas streams reacts with calcium carbonate in a limestone suspension. The resulting bicarbonate-rich solution can be released into natural systems. In comparison to classical carbon capture and storage (CCS) methods this artificial limestone weathering is cheaper and does not involve using toxic chemical compounds. Additionally there is no need for the controversially discussed storage of CO2 underground. The reduction of CO2-emissions becomes more important for European industries as the EU introduced a system that limits the amount of allowable CO2-emissions. Therefore, large CO2 emitters are forced to find cheap methods for emission reduction, as they often cannot circumvent CO2-production. The method mentioned above is especially of interest for power plants located close to the coast that are already using seawater for cooling purposes. Thus, it is important to estimate the environmental effects if several coastal power plants will release high amounts of bicarbonate-rich waters into coastal waters, e.g. the North Sea. In a first pilot study, the unstructured-grid finite-volume community ocean model (FVCOM) was combined with a chemical submodul (mocsy 2.0) to model the hydrodynamic circulation and mixing of bicarbonate-rich effluents from a gas power plant located at the German North Sea coast. Here, we present the first preliminary results of this project, which include modelled changes of the North Sea carbonate system and changes in pH value after the introduction of these bicarbonate-rich waters on short time scales up to one year.

  1. Preparation of porous poly(trimethylene carbonate structures for controlled release applications using high pressure CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, S.P.; Hennink, W.E.; Westerman, D.; Feijen, J.; Sam, A.P.; Leeke, G.; Santos, R.C.D.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Porous poly(trimethylene carbonate) structures can readily be prepared using high pressure CO2. Differences in CO2 solubility in the polymer matrix at the different processing temperatures and pressures lead to different pore morphologies upon depressurization. Furthermore, crystallization of the

  2. Preparation of porous poly(trimethylene carbonate) structures for controlled release applications using high pressure CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, S.P.; Westerman, D.; Leeke, G.; Santos, R.C.D.; Grijpma, D.W.; Feijen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Porous poly(trimethylene carbonate) structures can readily be prepared using high pressure CO2. Differences in CO2 solubility in the polymer matrix at the different processing temperatures and pressures lead to different pore morphologies upon depressurization. Furthermore, crystallization of the in

  3. Electrochemically triggered release of acetylcholine from scCO2 impregnated conductive polymer films evokes intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in neurotypic SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Susanne; Seyock, Silke; Nybom, Rolf; Jacobson, Gunilla B; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2016-12-10

    Implantable devices for electronically triggered drug release are attractive to achieve spatial and temporal control over drug concentrations in patients. Realization of such devices is, however, associated with technical and biological challenges. Among these are containment of drug reservoirs, lack of precise control cues, as well as the charge and size of the drug. Here, we present a method for electronically triggered release of the quaternary ammonium cation acetylcholine (ACh) from an impregnated conductive polymer film. Using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), a film of PEDOT/PSS (poly(3,4)-ethylenedioxythiophene doped with poly(styrenesulfonate)) is impregnated with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The gentle scCO2 process generated a dry, drug-impregnated surface, well suited for interaction with biological material, while maintaining normal electrochemical properties of the polymer. Electrochemical switching of impregnated PEDOT/PSS films stimulated release of ACh from the polymer matrix, likely due to swelling mediated by the influx and efflux of charged and solvated ions. Triggered release of ACh did not affect the biological activity of the drug. This was shown by real-time monitoring of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in neurotypic cells growing on the impregnated polymer surface. Collectively, scCO2 impregnation of conducting polymers offers the first one-step, dopant-independent drug impregnation process, potentially facilitating loading of both anionic and cationic drugs that can be dissolved in scCO2 on its own or by using a co-solvent. We foresee that scCO2-loaded devices for electronically triggered drug release will create novel opportunities when generating active bio-coatings, tunable for specific needs, in a variety of medical settings.

  4. Joint interpretation of geoelectrical and soil-gas measurements for monitoring CO2 releases at a natural analogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, U.; Watanabe, N.; Singh, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    The development and validation of hierarchic monitoring concepts is essential for detecting and assessing possible leakages from storage formations, especially for carbon capture and storage (CCS) applications. Joint interpretation of various techniques (such as carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration...... and flux measurements, self-potential (SP) and geoelectrical surveys) showed that the combination of geophysical methods with soil-gas analysis for mesoscale monitoring of the shallow subsurface above geologic CO2 storages can be a valuable tool for mapping and monitoring potential CO2 spread...... in the subsurface. Three measurement campaigns were undertaken - May 2011, July 2011 and April 2012 - at an analogue site in the Cheb Basin, Czech Republic, with the aim of studying CO2 leakages and their temporal and spatial behaviour. Results of geoelectrical investigations give an insight into the structural...

  5. Joint interpretation of geoelectrical and soil-gas measurements for monitoring CO2 releases at a natural analogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, U.; Watanabe, N.; Singh, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    The development and validation of hierarchic monitoring concepts is essential for detecting and assessing possible leakages from storage formations, especially for carbon capture and storage (CCS) applications. Joint interpretation of various techniques (such as carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration...

  6. Radiocarbon studies of plant leaves and rings from mammoth mountain, CA: A long-term record of magmatic CO2 release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A.C.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Southon, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of 14C in tree rings provides a measure of the flux of magmatic CO2 from Mammoth Mountain both before and after 1994 when copious diffuse emissions were first discovered and linked to tree kill. We analyzed the annual rings of trees with two main purposes: (1) to track changes in the magnitude of magmatic CO2 emission over time, and (2) to determine the onset of magmatic CO2 emission at numerous sites on Mammoth Mountain. The onset of CO2 emission at different areas of tree kill was determined to be in 1990, closely following the seismic events of 1989. At Horseshoe Lake (HSL), CO2 emission was found to have peaked in 1991 and to have subsequently declined by a factor of two through 1998. The tree-ring data also show that emissions of magmatic carbon from cold springs below the tree-kill areas occurred well before 1989. Trees located on the margins of the kill areas or otherwise away from zones of maximum gas discharge were found to be better integrators of magmatic CO2 emission than those located in the center of tree kills. Although quantitative extrapolations from our data to a flux history will require that a relationship be established between 14C depletion in tree rings and average annual magmatic CO2 flux, the pattern of 14C depletion in tree rings is likely to be the most reliable indicator of the long-term changes in the magnitude of CO2 release from Mammoth Mountain. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Release of N 2, CH 4, CO 2, and H 2O from surface ices on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyss, Robert; Goguen, Jay D.; Johnson, Paul V.; Campbell, Colin; Kanik, Isik

    2008-09-01

    We vapor deposit at 20 K a mixture of gases with the specific Enceladus plume composition measured in situ by the Cassini INMS [Waite, J.H., Combi, M.R., Ip, W.H., Cravens, T.E., McNutt, R.L., Kasprzak, W., Yelle, R., Luhmann, J., Niemann, H., Gell, D., Magee, B., Fletcher, G., Lunine, J., Tseng, W.L., 2006. Science 311, 1419-1422] to form a mixed molecular ice. As the sample is slowly warmed, we monitor the escaping gas quantity and composition with a mass spectrometer. Pioneering studies [Schmitt, B., Klinger, J., 1987. Different trapping mechanisms of gases by water ice and their relevance for comet nuclei. In: Rolfe, E.J., Battrick, B. (Eds.), Diversity and Similarity of Comets. SP-278. ESA, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, pp. 613-619; Bar-Nun, A., Kleinfeld, I., Kochavi, E., 1988. Phys. Rev. B 38, 7749-7754; Bar-Nun, A., Kleinfeld, I., 1989. Icarus 80, 243-253] have shown that significant quantities of volatile gases can be trapped in a water ice matrix well above the temperature at which the pure volatile ice would sublime. For our Enceladus ice mixture, a composition of escaping gases similar to that detected by Cassini in the Enceladus plume can be generated by the sublimation of the H 2O:CO 2:CH 4:N 2 mixture at temperatures between 135 and 155 K, comparable to the high temperatures inferred from the CIRS measurements [Spencer, J.R., Pearl, J.C., Segura, M., Flasar, F.M., Mamoutkine, A., Romani, P., Buratti, B.J., Hendrix, A.R., Spilker, L.J., Lopes, R.M.C., 2006. Science 311, 1401-1405] of the Enceladus "tiger stripes." This suggests that the gas escape phenomena that we measure in our experiments are an important process contributing to the gases emitted from Enceladus. A similar experiment for ice deposited at 70 K shows that both the processes of volatile trapping and release are temperature dependent over the temperature range relevant to Enceladus.

  8. Release of Oceanic Intraplate Magmatic CO2, Carbonatization, and Decarbonatization Reactions in the Lower Oceanic Lithosphere and Subducting Slabs and Associated Intraplate and Intraslab Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2011-12-01

    Release of free CO2 from ascending mafic magmas is thought to be important for intraplate magmatic systems under the ocean basins and gives insight into the cause of deep mantle earthquakes such as those that occur under the Island of Hawai'i at depths of 20 to 60 km via pore-pressure effects. Moreover, this hypothesis is consistent with the occurrence of CO2-filled inclusions along healed fractures in mantle xenoliths in Hawai'ian in ultramafic xenoliths of presumed mantle or deep-crustal origin. The positive pressure effect on CO2 solubility in mafic melts implies that this volatile boils out of such magmas as they ascend and enables fracture and frictional sliding at mantle depths by reducing the effective normal stresses. It is likely that such CO2 is stored along such fractures and faults during the active stage of plume magmatic activity and that during cooling, this CO2 reacts with mantle silicates to form magnesite and dolomite as oceanic lithosphere cools. Such carbonates are much weaker than mantle peridotites (Holyoke and Kronenberg, this session) and are therefore expected to localize strain along such carbonated zones where the oceanic plate is under tectonic stresses. Such conditions are found in the zone of bending near trenches and within subducting slabs where double zones of seismicity are locally present. Localized plastic deformation and viscous heating leading to free CO2 release through decarbonatization and perhaps melting may enable seismogenesis at such depths in mantle lithosphere. This model for the lower zones of double seismic zones where the enabling fluid comes from below the plate from plume magmatic processes (Kirby, 1995; Seno and Yamanaka, 1996) is much more appealing than positing fluid penetration and serpentization downward through the entire oceanic lithosphere from the ocean floor followed by serpentinite dehydration upon subsequent heating during slab descent.

  9. Peroxisomal hydroxypyruvate reductase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Asaph B; Walker, Berkley J; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2011-09-01

    Recycling of carbon by the photorespiratory pathway involves enzymatic steps in the chloroplast, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Most of these reactions are essential for plants growing under ambient CO(2) concentrations. However, some disruptions of photorespiratory metabolism cause subtle phenotypes in plants grown in air. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana lacking both of the peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase genes (pmdh1pmdh2) or hydroxypyruvate reductase (hpr1) are viable in air and have rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than wild-type plants. To investigate how disruption of the peroxisomal reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate influences photorespiratory carbon metabolism we analyzed leaf gas exchange in A. thaliana plants lacking peroxisomal HPR1 expression. In addition, because the lack of HPR1 could be compensated for by other reactions within the peroxisomes using reductant supplied by PMDH a triple mutant lacking expression of both peroxisomal PMDH genes and HPR1 (pmdh1pmdh2hpr1) was analyzed. Rates of photosynthesis under photorespiratory conditions (ambient CO(2) and O(2) concentrations) were slightly reduced in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants indicating other reactions can help bypass this disruption in the photorespiratory pathway. However, the CO(2) compensation points (Γ) increased under photorespiratory conditions in both mutants indicating changes in photorespiratory carbon metabolism in these plants. Measurements of Γ*, the CO(2) compensation point in the absence of mitochondrial respiration, and the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction demonstrated that the increase in Γ in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants is not associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration but with an increase in the non-respiratory CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction.

  10. Low temperature-pressure batch experiments and field push-pull tests: Assessing potential effects of an unintended CO2 release from CCUS projects on groundwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickler, P. J.; Yang, C.; Lu, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage projects (CCUS), where CO2 is captured at point sources such as power stations and compressed into a supercritical liquid for underground storage, has been proposed to reduce atmospheric CO2 and mitigate global climate change. Problems may arise from CO2 releases along discreet pathways such as abandoned wells and faults, upwards and into near surface groundwater. Migrating CO2 may inversely impact fresh water resources by increasing mineral solubility and dissolution rates and mobilizing harmful trace elements including As and Pb. This study addresses the impacts on fresh water resources through a combination of laboratory batch experiments, where aquifer sediment are reacted in their corresponding groundwater in 100% CO2 environments, and field push-pull tests where groundwater is equilibrated with 100% CO2, reacted in-situ in the groundwater system, and pulled out for analyses. Batch experiments were performed on aquifer material from carbonate dominated, mixed carbonate/silicalstic, and siliclastic dominated systems. A mixed silicalstic/carbonate system was chosen for the field based push-pull test. Batch experiment results suggest carbonate dissolution increased the concentration of Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, Mn, U and HCO3- in groundwater. In systems with significant carbonate content, dissolution continued until carbonate saturation was achieved at approximately 1000 hr. Silicate dissolution increased the conc. of Si, K Ni and Co, but at much lower rates than carbonate dissolution. The elements As, Mo, V, Zn, Se and Cd generally show similar behavior where concentrations initially increase but soon drop to levels at or below the background concentrations (~48 hours). A Push-Pull test on one aquifer system produced similar geochemical behavior but observed reaction rates are higher in batch experiments relative to push-pull tests. Release of CO2 from CCUS sites into overlying aquifer systems may adversely impact groundwater quality

  11. The emerging role of photorespiration and non-photorespiratory peroxisomal metabolism in pathogen defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørhagen, K; Laxa, M; Peterhänsel, C; Reumann, S

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration represents one of the major highways of primary plant metabolism and is the most prominent example of metabolic cell organelle integration, since the pathway requires the concerted action of plastidial, peroxisomal, mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes and organellar transport proteins. Oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate by Rubisco leads to the formation of large amounts of 2-phosphoglycolate, which are recycled to 3-phosphoglycerate by the photorespiratory C2 cycle, concomitant with stoichiometric production rates of H2 O2 in peroxisomes. Apart from its significance for agricultural productivity, a secondary function of photorespiration in pathogen defence has emerged only recently. Here, we summarise literature data supporting the crosstalk between photorespiration and pathogen defence and perform a meta-expression analysis of photorespiratory genes during pathogen attack. Moreover, we screened Arabidopsis proteins newly predicted using machine learning methods to be targeted to peroxisomes, the central H2 O2 -producing organelle of photorespiration, for homologues of known pathogen defence proteins and analysed their expression during pathogen infection. The analyses further support the idea that photorespiration and non-photorespiratory peroxisomal metabolism play multi-faceted roles in pathogen defence beyond metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

  12. Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storagereservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-03-03

    The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in deep geologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologic carbon storage is to trap CO{sub 2} underground, CO{sub 2} could migrate away from the storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeable pathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitude releases of CO{sub 2} have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs in numerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbon dioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO{sub 2} reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due to influences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. These systems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potential release of CO{sub 2} from geologic storage reservoirs and provide important information about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that are associated with releases, as well as the health, safety, and environmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can be applied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO{sub 2} and industrial releases of CO{sub 2} and natural gas in the context of these characteristics. Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessons can be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO{sub 2} can both accumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondary reservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Both primary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO{sub 2} should therefore be well characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO{sub 2} have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release, such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential for processes that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks and trigger the release of CO{sub 2} from a storage

  13. CO2-Sensitive Polymers for Controlled Drug Release%CO2敏感型聚合物及其在药物控释领域的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦宏阳; 李草; 江兵兵

    2016-01-01

    刺激响应性材料被广泛应用于药物控释领域.作为一类新型的刺激响应性材料,CO2敏感型聚合物是目前研究的热点.为此,本综述简单回顾了近10年来CO2敏感型聚合物的研究进展,并介绍了其在药物控制释放领域的应用情况.

  14. 科尔沁沙地不同水分条件下植物叶凋落物 CO2释放研究%The Study on CO2 Release of Leaf Litters in Different Water Conditions in Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆涛; 李薛飞; 杨宁

    2013-01-01

    This experiment uses laboratory soil incubation experiment that can control environment factor measures the effect on CO 2 re-lease of leaf litters in different water content in fixed dunes .The results showed that:Total CO2 release and litter decomposition were corre-lated to water content of soil .Whether litter added or not , CO2 release rate of low water content was significantly different from that of medi -um and high water contents in the first 4 days.In sand land, either wetness or dryness of soil imposed great influence on litter decomposi -tion, because soil and litter CO2 release amount were significantly different from that of the water content .%采用可以有效控制环境因子的室内土壤培养试验,对固定沙地土壤不同水分作用下叶凋落物释放CO2的情况进行了初步研究。结果表明:土壤CO2的释放量及凋落物的分解均与土壤干湿情况相关。在添加凋落物与不添加凋落物的处理中,培养前4天的低含水条件下CO2释放速率与中高含水处理相比差异均呈极显著,而4天以后不同水分条件下的释放速率无显著差异。在沙地中,土壤过于湿润或干旱均能够阻碍凋落物的分解。

  15. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  16. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  17. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  18. Anomalous increase of diffuse CO_{2} emission from Brava (Cape Verde): evidence of volcanic unrest or increase gas release from a stationary magma body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, Marta; García-Hernández, Rubén; Montrond, Eurico; Dionis, Samara; Fernandes, Paulo; Silva, Sonia V.; Alfama, Vera; Cabral, Jeremías; Pereira, Jose M.; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Brava (67 km2) is the southwestern most and the smallest inhabited island of the Cape Verde archipelago. It is located 18 km west of Fogo Island and rises 976 m from the sea level. Brava has not any documented historical eruptions, but its Holocene volcanism and relatively high seismic activity clearly indicate that it is an active volcanic island. Since there have been no historic eruptions in Brava, volcanic hazard awareness among the population and the authorities is very low; therefore, its volcano monitoring program is scarce. With the aim of helping to provide a multidisciplinary monitoring program for the volcanic surveillance of the island, diffuse CO2 emission surveys have been carried out since 2010; approximately every 2 years. Soil CO2 efflux measurements are periodically performed at ˜ 275 observation sites all over the island and after taking into consideration their accessibility and the island volcano-structural characteristics. At each sampling site, soil CO2 efflux measurement was performed by means of a portable NDIR sensor according to the accumulation chamber method. To quantify the total diffuse CO2 emission from Brava volcanic system, soil CO2 efflux maps were constructed using sequential Gaussian simulations (sGs). An increase trend of diffuse CO2 emission rate from 42 to 681 t d-1at Brava was observed; just one year prior the 2014-2015 Fogo eruption and almost three years before the anomalous seismic activity recorded on August 2016 with more than 1000 seismic events registered by the INMG on August 1st, 2016 (Bruno Faria, personal communication). Due to this anomalous seismic activity, a diffuse CO2 emission survey at Brava was performed from August 2 to 10, 2016, and the estimated degassing rate yield a value about 72 t d-1; typical background values. An additional survey was carried out from October 22 to November 6, 2016. For this last survey, the estimated diffuse CO2 emission from Brava showed the highest observed value with a

  19. Hydrogeochemical and mineralogical effects of sustained CO2 contamination in a shallow sandy aquifer: A field-scale controlled release experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahill, Aaron Graham; Marker, Pernille Aabye; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    A shallow aquifer CO2 contamination experiment was performed to investigate evolution of water chemistry and sediment alteration following leakage from geological storage by physically simulating a leak from a hypothetical storage site. In a carbonate-free aquifer, in western Denmark, a total...... of 1600 kg of gas phase CO2 was injected at 5 and 10 m depth over 72 days through four inclined injection wells into aeolian and glacial sands. Water chemistry was monitored for pH, EC, and dissolved element evolution through an extensive network of multilevel sampling points over 305 days. Sediment cores...... injection of CO2 into shallow potable aquifer studied Water chemistry monitored over 305 days and effects on sediment investigated Results show distinct chemical development, high Al concentrations, and sediment alteration © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved....

  20. Avaliação da decomposição de plantas aquáticas no solo através da liberação de CO2 Evaluation of aquatic plant decomposition on soil through CO2 release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Corrêa

    2005-06-01

    and incorporated into soil, degradation of the three aquatic macrophyte weed species could be verified through released CO2. To quantify released CO2, a flask with NaOH solution was placed into each vase, sealed and incubated for 24 hours, followed by HCl titration. For data adjustment and interpolation, Mitscherlich model modified was used. CO2 released into wet soil was 1,294 and 1,582 kg ha-1, being 6.2 and 5.6 times than that released into dry soil, for 50 and 100 t FM ha-1, respectively. It was observed that about 55% of the released CO2 occurred at day 30. It can be concluded that dry soil is the best condition for biomass discard and incorporation. However, degradation is accelerated under irrigation.

  1. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  2. CO2 laser modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  3. The acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration to temperature in the C3 -C4 intermediate Salsola divaricata: induction of high respiratory CO2 release under low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Anthony; Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-11-01

    Photosynthesis in C(3) -C(4) intermediates reduces carbon loss by photorespiration through refixing photorespired CO(2) within bundle sheath cells. This is beneficial under warm temperatures where rates of photorespiration are high; however, it is unknown how photosynthesis in C(3) -C(4) plants acclimates to growth under cold conditions. Therefore, the cold tolerance of the C(3) -C(4) Salsola divaricata was tested to determine whether it reverts to C(3) photosynthesis when grown under low temperatures. Plants were grown under cold (15/10 °C), moderate (25/18 °C) or hot (35/25 °C) day/night temperatures and analysed to determine how photosynthesis, respiration and C(3) -C(4) features acclimate to these growth conditions. The CO(2) compensation point and net rates of CO(2) assimilation in cold-grown plants changed dramatically when measured in response to temperature. However, this was not due to the loss of C(3) -C(4) intermediacy, but rather to a large increase in mitochondrial respiration supported primarily by the non-phosphorylating alternative oxidative pathway (AOP) and, to a lesser degree, the cytochrome oxidative pathway (COP). The increase in respiration and AOP capacity in cold-grown plants likely protects against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria and photodamage in chloroplasts by consuming excess reductant via the alternative mitochondrial respiratory electron transport chain.

  4. CO2NNIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a system for calculating the personalized annual fuel consumption and CO2 emissions from transportation. The system, named CO2NNIE, estimates the fuel consumption on the fastest route between the frequent destinations of the user. The travel time and fuel consumption estimated are based......% of the actual fuel consumption (4.6% deviation on average). We conclude, that the system provides new detailed information on CO2 emissions and fuel consumption for any make and model....

  5. Wearable CO2 sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Radu, Tanja; Fay, Cormac; Lau, King-Tong; Waite, Rhys; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    High concentrations of CO2 may develop particularly in the closed spaces during fires and can endanger the health of emergency personnel by causing serious physiological effects. The proposed prototype provides real-time continuous monitoring of CO2 in a wearable configuration sensing platform. A commercially available electrochemical CO2 sensor was selected due to its selectivity, sensitivity and low power demand. This was integrated onto an electronics platform that performed signal capture...

  6. Effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on soil CO2 efflux in a young longleaf pine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can affect the quantity and quality of plant tissues which will impact carbon (C) cycling and storage in plant/soil systems and the release of CO2 back to the atmosphere. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated CO2 on soil CO2 efflux to predi...

  7. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  8. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  9. Effects of temperature and moisture on soil CO2 release potential under three typical land use types in the hill-gully area of the Loess Plateau%温度和水分对黄土丘陵区3种典型土地利用方式下土壤释放CO2潜力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏; 黄懿梅; 祁金花; 安韶山

    2011-01-01

    samples and the infrared absorption CO2 analyzer to measure soil respiration. CO2 release rate was analyzed in the laboratory using undisturbed soil samples under four temperatures of 5 °C, 15 °C,25 °C. And 35 °C;and five moisture contents of wilting water holding capacity, natural water holding capacity, fracture capillary water holding capacity, field capacity, and saturated water holding capacity. The aim was to determine the correct relationship among the factors and soil respiration rate. Factors that influenced soil CO2 release potential under different land use types in the Loess hilly-gully area were then determined. The results showed that under different land use types in the loess hilly region, the rates of soil respiration under different moisture contents were mainly driven by temperature variation. The "Ra=aehT" exponential model precisely forecasted the changes in respiration rate as affected by temperature. Though, soil moisture slightly influenced soil respiration rate, it greatly affected Q10, which indicated the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. Both high and low moisture contents inhibited the sensitivity of soil respiration. Whilethe rates of soil respiration substantially differed, it generally tracked the following order: forest land soil > grass land soil > orchard soil. Organic carbon significantly contributed to the variation in soil CO; release, followed by organic nitrogen. Furthermore, micro-bial biomass carbon might indirectly affect rate of soil respiration.

  10. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  11. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, L.H.; Wielopolski, L.; Dobeck, L. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Humphries, S. D.; Barr, J. L.; Keith, C. J.; Shaw, J. A.; Rouse, J. H.; Cunningham, A. B.; Benson, S. M.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Lewicki, J. L.; Wells, A. W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, B. R.; Fessenden, J. E.; Rahn, T. A.; Amonette, J. E.; Barr, J. L.; Pickles, W. L.; Jacobson, J. D.; Silver, E. A.; Male, E. J.; Rauch, H. W.; Gullickson, K. S.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.

    2010-03-01

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO{sub 2} transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO{sub 2} release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO{sub 2} transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO{sub 2} from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO{sub 2} through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  12. Multi-technique monitoring of CO2 leakage from an engineered CO2 leakage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Apple, M. E.; Dobeck, L.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring of canopy and soil geophysical and geochemical properties in vadose zone by multiple techniques were carried out from 1999 to 2012 using an engineered CO2 release to simulate the CO2 leakage from CO2 storage at an agricultural plot at Bozeman, MT. The CO2 release was based on a horizontally-drilled well of 100 m at a depth of about 2.0-2.3m (Fig.1). Techniques utilized include hyperspectral and infrared radiation of various vegetations, electric conductivity in soil, magnetic field at the ground surface, and soil gas composition and dynamics using various gas sensors and soil moisture sensors. Measurements were made at several sites along a transect perpendicular to the releasing well, along which the soil CO2 concentration attenuated from high to normal condition at control site. The response of the canopy hyperspectral reflectance, infrared radiation, soil geophysical properties such as soil electric conductivity, top soil magnetic susceptibility and magnetic field, soil gas composition such as CO2 and O2 concentration to CO2 release at different rates were quantified and will be shown at this presentation. Fig.2 shows some examples of the results. The different responses at the impact and control sites are used to assess the effectiveness for CO2 surface and near-surface detection when a possible CO2 leakage occurs.ig.1. A schematic showing the injection and release of CO2 at an agricultral plot in Bozeman, MT. ig.2. Some examples of results showing the response of vegetation, hyperspectral reflectance, soil electric conductivity, soil O2 concentration to the release of CO2.

  13. A concomitant treatment by CO2-releasing suppositories improves the results of anorectal biofeedback training in patients with dyschezia: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, Odile; Cargill, Guillaume; Marty, Marc M L; Bueno, Lionel; Cappelletti, Max Claude; Colangeli-Hagège, Hélène; Savarieau, Bernard; Ducrotté, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Dyschezia is a defecatory disorder that places a heavy burden on a patient's quality of life. Biofeedback is the recommended treatment in most cases. The objective of our study was to test whether a CO2-releasing suppository for patients with dyschezia could be effective in improving biofeedback training results. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled study was conducted in patients (18-75 years of age) with dyschezia defined according to the modified Rome III criteria. Patients were randomly assigned to either a CO2-releasing suppository or placebo suppository once per day for 21 days. This was a multicenter trial. A total of 122 patients were randomly assigned (62 intervention group and 60 placebo group). The primary end point was the change from day 0 to day 21 in intensity of symptoms on the basis of a self-assessed dyschezia using a visual analog scale (range, 0-100). Analyses were performed using intention-to-treat principles. A greater reduction from baseline to day 21 in symptom visual analog scale score was observed in the intervention group (-41.3 mm) than in the control group (-22.3 mm). Some secondary efficacy parameters improved more in the intervention group, including the percentage of patients who improved ≥50%, symptom intensity over 21 days, stool stains on underwear or pads, and need to practice manual maneuvers to facilitate defecation at day 21. At day 21, rectal sensitivity in the intervention group (31.4 mL) was lower than in the control group (39.1 mL). There was a lower number of patients recruited than planned by the protocol. The sponsor stopped the trial before the inclusion of 306 participants, with no intermediate analysis. In addition, the main analysis conducted on the full analysis set population could have led to a statistical bias. The results of this multicenter trial demonstrate the added benefits of a CO2-releasing suppository in patients with dyschezia who were treated by anorectal biofeedback training.

  14. Assay of 6-gingerol in CO2 supercritical fluid extracts of ginger and evaluation of its sustained release from a transdermal delivery system across rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Cuiping; Zhang, Mei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-07-01

    Ginger has been widely used as healthy food condiment as well as traditional Chinese medicine since antiquity. Multiple potentials of ginger for treatment of various ailments have been revealed. However, the biological half-life of 6-gingerol (a principal pungent ingredient of ginger) is only 7.23 minutes while taken orally. Delivery of ginger compositions by routes other than oral have scarcely been reported. Therefore, we studied a noninvasive transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) of ginger to bypass hepatic first pass metabolism, avoid gastrointestinal degradation and achieve long persistent release of effective compositions. After establishment of a HPLC analysis method of 6-gingerol, assays of 6-gingerol were performed to compare two kinds of ginger extracts. Then, the characteristics of transdermal delivery of 6-gingerol in TDDS were exhibited. The results showed that the contents of 6-gingerol in two kinds of ginger extracts were significantly different. The maximal delivery percentage of 6-gingerol across rat skin at 20 h was more than 40% in different TDDS formulations. TDDS may provide long-lasting delivery of ginger compounds.

  15. CO2-strategier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    I 2007 henvendte Lyngby-Taarbæk kommunens Agenda 21 koordinator sig til Videnskabsbutikken og spurgte om der var interesse for at samarbejde om CO2-strategier. Da Videnskabsbutikken DTU er en åben dør til DTU for borgerne og deres organisationer, foreslog Videnskabsbutikken DTU at Danmarks...... Naturfredningsforening’s lokalkomité for Lyngby blev en del af samarbejdet for at få borgerne i kommunen involveret i arbejdet med at udvikle strategier for reduktion af CO2. Siden sommeren 2007 har Videnskabsbutikken DTU, Lyngby-Taarbæk kommune og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening i Lyngby-Taarbæk samarbejdet om analyse...... og innovation i forhold til CO2-strategier....

  16. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  17. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  18. Mechanisms of CO2 Capture into Monoethanolamine Solution with Different CO2 Loading during the Absorption/Desorption Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bihong; Guo, Bingsong; Zhou, Zuoming; Jing, Guohua

    2015-09-01

    Though the mechanism of MEA-CO2 system has been widely studied, there is few literature on the detailed mechanism of CO2 capture into MEA solution with different CO2 loading during absorption/desorption processes. To get a clear picture of the process mechanism, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to analyze the reaction intermediates under different CO2 loadings and detailed mechanism on CO2 absorption and desorption in MEA was evaluated in this work. The results demonstrated that the CO2 absorption in MEA started with the formation of carbamate according to the zwitterion mechanism, followed by the hydration of CO2 to form HCO3(-)/CO3(2-), and accompanied by the hydrolysis of carbamate. It is interesting to find that the existence of carbamate will be influenced by CO2 loading and that it is rather unstable at high CO2 loading. At low CO2 loading, carbamate is formed fast by the reaction between CO2 and MEA. At high CO2 loading, it is formed by the reaction of CO3(-)/CO3(2-) with MEA, and the formed carbamate can be easily hydrolyzed by H(+). Moreover, CO2 desorption from the CO2-saturated MEA solution was proved to be a reverse process of absorption. Initially, some HCO3(-) were heated to release CO2 and other HCO3(-) were reacted with carbamic acid (MEAH(+)) to form carbamate, and the carbamate was then decomposed to MEA and CO2.

  19. Investigation of CO2 precursors in roasted coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuju; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2017-03-15

    Two CO2 formation pathways (chlorogenic acid (CGA) degradation and Maillard reaction) during coffee roasting were investigated. CGA is shown not a major contributor to CO2 formation, as heating of this compound under typical roasting conditions did not release a large quantity of CO2. However, heating of a CGA moiety, caffeic acid, resulted in high yield of CO2 (>98%), suggesting that CGA hydrolysis could be the rate limiting step for CO2 formation from CGA. A large amount of CO2 was detected from glycine-sucrose model system under coffee roasting conditions, implying the importance of Maillard reactions in CO2 formation. Further studies on the heating of various components isolated from green coffee beans showed that CO2 was generated from various green coffee components, including water insoluble proteins and polysaccharides. Around 50% of CO2 was formed from thermal reactions of lower molecular weight compounds that represent ∼25% by weight in green coffee.

  20. Simulating the integrated summertime Δ14CO2 signature from anthropogenic emissions over Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozhinova, D.; van der Molen, M. K.; van der Velde, I. R.; Krol, M. C.; van der Laan, S.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Peters, W.

    2014-01-01

    Radiocarbon dioxide (14CO2, reported in Δ14CO2) can be used to determine the fossil fuel CO2 addition to the atmosphere, since fossil fuel CO2 no longer contains any 14C. After the release of CO2 at the source, atmospheric transport causes dilution of strong local signals into the background and det

  1. Harvesting Energy from CO2 Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Paz-García, J.M.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    When two fluids with different compositions are mixed, mixing energy is released. This holds true for both liquids and gases, though in the case of gases, no technology is yet available to harvest this energy source. Mixing the CO2 in combustion gases with air represents a source of energy with a to

  2. CO2 laser preionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  3. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2

  4. Effects of dissolved CO2 on Shallow Freshwater Microbial Communities simulating a CO2 Leakage Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, D. M.; Lowry, G. V.; Gregory, K.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration is likely to be part of a comprehensive strategy to minimize the atmospheric release of greenhouse gasses, establishing a concern of sequestered CO2 leakage into overlying potable aquifers. Leaking CO2 may affect existing biogeochemical processes and therefore water quality. There is a critical need to understand the evolution of CO2 exposed microbial communities that influence the biogeochemistry in these freshwater aquifers. The evolution of microbial ecology for different CO2 exposure concentrations was investigated using fluid-slurry samples obtained from a shallow freshwater aquifer (55 m depth, 0.5 MPa, 22 °C, Escatawpa, MS). The microbial community of well samples upstream and downstream of CO2 injection was characterized. In addition, batch vessel experiments were conducted with the upstream aquifer samples exposed to varying pCO2 from 0% to 100% under reservoir temperature and pressure for up to 56 days. The microbial community of the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment were analyzed with 16S rRNA clone libraries and qPCR. In both the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment, DNA concentration did not correlate with CO2 exposure. Both the in situ experiment and the batch reactors displayed a changing microbial community with increased CO2 exposure. The well water isolate, Curvibacter, appeared to be the most tolerant genus to high CO2 concentrations in the in situ experiments and to mid-CO2 concentrations in the batch reactors. In batch reactors with pCO2 concentrations higher than experienced in situ (pCO2 = 0.5 MPa), Pseudomonas appeared to be the most tolerant genus. Findings provide insight into a dynamic biogeochemical system that will alter with CO2 exposure. Adapted microbial populations will eventually give rise to the community that will impact the metal mobility and water quality. Knowledge of the surviving microbial populations will enable improved models for predicting the fate of CO2

  5. Macroalgal Performance and Competition under Elevated CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Laurie Carol

    2012-01-01

    Since the industrial revolution, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have been increasing, and the surface waters of the global oceans have absorbed 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 released into the atmosphere. A higher CO2 concentration in surface ocean waters shifts the carbon chemistry, resulting in higher concentrations of bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) and protons (H ) and lower concentrations of carbonate ions (CO32-). Such a shift in ocean carbon chemistry decreases the pH and the s...

  6. On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hirsch

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of its ubiquitous release on land and well-characterized atmospheric loss, radon-222 has been very useful for deducing fluxes of greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, and N2O. It is shown here that the radon-tracer method, used in previous studies to calculate regional-scale greenhouse gas fluxes, returns a weighted-average flux (the flux field F weighted by the sensitivity of the measurements to that flux field, f rather than an evenly-weighted spatial average flux. A synthetic data study using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model and modeled CO2 fluxes suggests that the discrepancy between the sensitivity-weighted average flux and evenly-weighted spatial average flux can be significant in the case of CO2, due to covariance between F and f for biospheric CO2 fluxes during the growing season and also for anthropogenic CO2 fluxes in general. A technique is presented to correct the radon-tracer derived fluxes to yield an estimate of evenly-weighted spatial average CO2 fluxes. A new method is also introduced for correcting the CO2 flux estimates for the effects of radon-222 radioactive decay in the radon-tracer method.

  7. On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hirsch

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of its ubiquitous release on land and well-characterized atmospheric loss, radon-222 has been very useful for deducing fluxes of greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, and N2O. It is shown here that the radon-tracer method, used in previous studies to calculate regional-scale greenhouse gas fluxes, returns a weighted-average flux (the flux field F weighted by the sensitivity of the measurements to that flux field, f rather than an evenly-weighted spatial average flux. A synthetic data study using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model and modeled CO2 fluxes suggests that the discrepancy between the sensitivity-weighted average flux and evenly-weighted spatial average flux can be significant in the case of CO2, due to covariance between F and f for biospheric CO2 fluxes during the growing season and also for anthropogenic CO2 fluxes in general. A technique is presented to correct the radon-tracer derived fluxes to yield an estimate of evenly-weighted spatial average CO2 fluxes. A new method is also introduced for correcting the CO2 flux estimates for the effects of radon-222 radioactive decay in the radon-tracer method.

  8. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agustí-Panareda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate – Interim Implementation (MACC-II service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they

  9. Effects of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment on Soil CO2 Efflux in a Young Longleaf Pine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brett Runion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The southeastern landscape is composed of agricultural and forest systems that can store carbon (C in standing biomass and soil. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 on terrestrial C dynamics including CO2 release back to the atmosphere and soil sequestration. Longleaf pine savannahs are an ecologically and economically important, yet understudied, component of the southeastern landscape. We investigated the effects of ambient and elevated CO2 on soil CO2 efflux in a young longleaf pine system using a continuous monitoring system. A significant increase (26.5% in soil CO2 efflux across 90 days was observed under elevated CO2; this occurred for all weekly and daily averages except for two days when soil temperature was the lowest. Soil CO2 efflux was positively correlated with soil temperature with a trend towards increased efflux response to temperature under elevated CO2. Efflux was negatively correlated with soil moisture and was best represented using a quadratic relationship. Soil CO2 efflux was not correlated with root biomass. Our data indicate that, while elevated CO2 will increase feedback of CO2 to the atmosphere via soil efflux, terrestrial ecosystems will remain potential sinks for atmospheric CO2 due to greater biomass production and increased soil C sequestration.

  10. India Co2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    created a balance in between the “developed” and developing countries. If India was producing the same amounts of emissions per capita as the it would have a total of 20 billion metric tons of CO2 emissions annually.

  11. Methanol from CO2 by organo-cocatalysis: CO2 capture and hydrogenation in one process step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Christian; Pöge, Matthias; Lißner, Andreas; Mertens, Florian O R L

    2014-12-16

    Carbon dioxide chemically bound to alcohol-amines was hydrogenated to methanol under retrieval of these industrially used CO2 capturing reagents. The energetics of the process can be seen as a partial cancellation of the exothermic heat of reaction of the hydrogenation with the endothermic one of the CO2 release from the capturing reagent. The process provides a means to significantly improve the energy efficiency of CO2 to methanol conversions.

  12. CO2 as a refrigerant

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    A first edition, the IIR guide “CO2 as a Refrigerant” highlights the application of carbon dioxide in supermarkets, industrial freezers, refrigerated transport, and cold stores as well as ice rinks, chillers, air conditioning systems, data centers and heat pumps. This guide is for design and development engineers needing instruction and inspiration as well as non-technical experts seeking background information on a specific topic. Written by Dr A.B. Pearson, a well-known expert in the field who has considerable experience in the use of CO2 as a refrigerant. Main topics: Thermophysical properties of CO2 – Exposure to CO2, safety precautions – CO2 Plant Design – CO2 applications – Future prospects – Standards and regulations – Bibliography.

  13. Forecasting CO2 emissions in the Persian Gulf States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Olabemiwo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Persian Gulf States (Bahrain. Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and United Arab Emirate have dominated the oil and gas sector since the discovery of oil in the region. They are the world largest producers of crude oil, producing about 35 and 25 percent of the world natural gas and crude oil respectively. The use of fossil fuels is directly linked to the release of CO2 into the environment. CO2 accounts for 58.8 percent of all greenhouse gases released via human activities, consequently, presenting a malign impact on the environment through climate change, global warming, biodiversity, acid rain and desertification among others. Due to its importance, the data on CO2 emission obtained from US EIA from 1980 – 2010 was regressed using least square techniques and projections were made to the year 2050. Results indicated that each country’s p-value was less than 0.05 which implies that the models can be used for predicting CO2 emissions into the future. The data shows the emission of CO2 by countries from the highest to the lowest in 2016 as: Iran (590.72 Mtonnes; 7.58 tonnes of CO2/person > Saudi Arabia (471.82 Mtonnes; 18 tonnes of CO2/person > UAE (218.58 Mtonnes; 41.31 tonnes of CO2/person > Iraq (114.01 Mtonees; 3.71 tonnes of CO2/person > Kuwait (92.58 Mtonnes; 36.31 tonnes of CO2/person > Qatar (68.26 Mtonnes; 37 tonnes of CO2/person > Bahrain (33.16 Mtonnes; 27.5 tonnes of CO2/person". The sequence from the country with highest emission (Iran to the country with lowest emission (Bahrain will remain the same until 2050. A projection depicting a 7.7 percent yearly increase in CO2 emission in the Persian Gulf States.

  14. Electric field controlled CO2 capture and CO2/N2 separation on MoS2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiao; Qin, Gangqiang; Ma, Yingying; Wang, Weihua; Li, Ping; Du, Aijun; Li, Zhen

    2017-01-07

    Developing new materials and technologies for efficient CO2 capture, particularly for separation of CO2 post-combustion, will significantly reduce the CO2 concentration and its impacts on the environment. A challenge for CO2 capture is to obtain high performance adsorbents with both high selectivity and easy regeneration. Here, CO2 capture/regeneration on MoS2 monolayers controlled by turning on/off external electric fields is comprehensively investigated through a density functional theory calculation. The calculated results indicate that CO2 forms a weak interaction with MoS2 monolayers in the absence of an electric field, but strongly interacts with MoS2 monolayers when an electric field of 0.004 a.u. is applied. Moreover, the adsorbed CO2 can be released from the surface of MoS2 without any energy barrier once the electric field is turned off. Compared with the adsorption of CO2, the interactions between N2 and MoS2 are not affected significantly by the external electric fields, which indicates that MoS2 monolayers can be used as a robust absorbent for controllable capture of CO2 by applying an electric field, especially to separate CO2 from the post-combustion gas mixture where CO2 and N2 are the main components.

  15. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim......The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  16. CO2 Sequestration short course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  17. CO2 Efflux from Shrimp Ponds in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Frida; Lovelock, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored ‘blue’ carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO2 efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO2 efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO2 m−2 y−1 from the walls and 1.60 kg CO2 m−2 y−1 from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y−1. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO2 emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO2 released to atmosphere. PMID:23755306

  18. Density-driven enhanced dissolution of injected CO2 during long-term CO2 geological storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations is increasingly seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, possible leakage of injected CO2 from the storage formation through vertical pathways such as fractures, faults and abandoned wells is a huge challenge for CO2 geological storage projects. Thus, the density-driven fluid flow as a process that can accelerate the phase change of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase is receiving more and more attention. In this paper, we performed higher-resolution reactive transport simulations to investigate the possible density-driven fluid flow process under the ‘real’ condition of CO2 injection and storage. Simulation results indicated that during CO2 injection and geological storage in deep saline formations, the higher-density CO2-saturated aqueous phase within the lower CO2 gas plume migrates downward and moves horizontally along the bottom of the formation, and the higher-density fingers within the upper gas plume propagate downward. These density-driven fluid flow processes can significantly enhance the phase transition of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase, consequently enhancing the effective storage capacity and long-term storage security of injected CO2 in saline formations.

  19. Connecting CO2. Feasibility study CO2 network Southwest Netherlands; Connecting CO2. Haalbaarheidsstudie CO2-netwerk Zuidwest-Nederland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, M.

    2009-06-10

    An overview is given of supply and demand of CO2 in the region Southwest Netherlands and the regions Antwerp and Gent in Belgium. Also attention is paid to possible connections between these regions [Dutch] Een inventarisatie wordt gegeven van vraag en aanbod van CO2 in de regio Zuidwest- Nederland en de regios Antwerpen en Gent in Belgie. Ook worden mogelijke koppelingen tussen de regios besproken.

  20. Hazardous indoor CO2 concentrations in volcanic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, Fátima; Gaspar, João L; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the main soil gases released silently and permanently in diffuse degassing areas, both in volcanic and non-volcanic zones. In the volcanic islands of the Azores (Portugal) several villages are located over diffuse degassing areas. Lethal indoor CO2 concentrations (higher than 10 vol %) were measured in a shelter located at Furnas village, inside the caldera of the quiescent Furnas Volcano (S. Miguel Island). Hazardous CO2 concentrations were detected not only underground, but also at the ground floor level. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to the CO2 and environmental time series recorded between April 2008 and March 2010 at Furnas village. The results show that about 30% of the indoor CO2 variation is explained by environmental variables, namely barometric pressure, soil water content and wind speed. The highest indoor CO2 concentrations were recorded during bad weather conditions, characterized by low barometric pressure together with rainfall periods and high wind speed. In addition to the spike-like changes observed on the CO2 time series, long-term oscillations were also identified and appeared to represent seasonal variations. In fact, indoor CO2 concentrations were higher during winter period when compared to the dry summer months. Considering the permanent emission of CO2 in various volcanic regions of the world, CO2 hazard maps are crucial and need to be accounted by the land-use planners and authorities.

  1. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  2. Silicon microring refractometric sensor for atmospheric CO(2) gas monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Guangcan; Horvath, Cameron; Aktary, Mirwais; Van, Vien

    2016-01-25

    We report a silicon photonic refractometric CO(2) gas sensor operating at room temperature and capable of detecting CO(2) gas at atmospheric concentrations. The sensor uses a novel functional material layer based on a guanidine polymer derivative, which is shown to exhibit reversible refractive index change upon absorption and release of CO(2) gas molecules, and does not require the presence of humidity to operate. By functionalizing a silicon microring resonator with a thin layer of the polymer, we could detect CO(2) gas concentrations in the 0-500ppm range with a sensitivity of 6 × 10(-9) RIU/ppm and a detection limit of 20ppm. The microring transducer provides a potential integrated solution in the development of low-cost and compact CO(2) sensors that can be deployed as part of a sensor network for accurate environmental monitoring of greenhouse gases.

  3. Numerical simulation of CO2 dispersion from punctures and ruptures of buried high-pressure dense phase CO2 pipelines with experimental validation

    OpenAIRE

    Wareing, CJ; Fairweather, M.; Woolley, RM; Falle, SAEG

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) presents an option for significantly reducing the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere and mitigating the effects of climate change. Pipelines are considered to be the most likely method for transporting captured CO2 and their safe operation is of paramount importance as their contents are likely to be in the region of several thousand tonnes and CO2 poses a number of concerns upon release due to its unusual physical properties. To this ...

  4. 水稻秸秆生物炭对耕地土壤有机碳及其CO2释放的影响%Impacts of Rice Straw Biochar on Organic Carbon and CO2 Release in Arable Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯跃进; 胡学玉; 易卿; 余忠

    2014-01-01

    为探究生物炭自身稳定性及其输入土壤后对于土壤本体有机碳的影响,本研究模拟自然条件,分别将500℃和700℃裂解的水稻秸秆生物炭(RBC500和RBC700)以0%(空白土壤)、3%、6%和100%(纯生物炭)的比例添加至耕地土壤进行室内培养实验,观测总有机碳(TOC)与易氧化态碳(EOC)含量的变化及CO2排放特征.结果表明,与空白土壤处理相比,土壤TOC、EOC含量均随水稻秸秆生物炭添加量的增加而升高;相同添加量条件下,RBC500对土壤TOC与EOC增加的贡献均高于RBC700.各处理土壤TOC含量在前30 d内均降低(最大降幅为15.8%),并于培养后期趋于稳定;土壤EOC含量在培养初30 d内均降低,当生物炭添加比例为3%和6%时,RBC500使土壤的EOC含量降幅分别为72.4%和81.7%,大于RBC700的61.3%和69.8%;培养结束时,添加相同裂解温度生物炭的土壤EOC值相近.培养前期土壤中EOC含量的下降可能与生物炭中易分解组分引起的矿化作用有关.在130 d培养期内,CO2累计排放量大小顺序为:土壤+生物炭混合处理<纯土壤处理<纯生物炭处理,可见,生物炭的土壤处理可以减少土壤CO2的排放,最大减排率可达41.05%.在一个长的时间尺度内,生物炭的土壤处理有利于土壤碳的固定.生物炭施用于土壤可作为碳储存载体.

  5. The CO2nnect activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  6. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  7. Monitoring subsurface CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthaegen, P.; Arts, R.; Schroot, B.M.

    2005-01-01

    An overview is given of various currently applied monitoring techniques for CO2 storage. Techniques are subdivided in correspondence to their applicability for monitoring three distinct realms. These are: - the atmosphere and the near-surface; - the overburden (including faults and wells); - the

  8. Energy from CO2 using capacitive electrodes – Theoretical outline and calculation of open circuit voltage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Par-Garcia, J.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a new technology has been proposed for the utilization of energy from CO2 emissions (Hamelers et al., 2014). The principle consists of controlling the dilution process of CO2–concentrated gas (e.g., exhaust gas) into CO2–dilute gas (e.g., air) thereby extracting a fraction of the released

  9. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  10. An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, D [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mills, R [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gregg, J [University of Maryland; Blasing, T J [ORNL; Hoffman, F [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Devries, M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Zhu, Z [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Kawa, S [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    2008-01-01

    Monthly estimates of the global emissions of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series with coefficients as a function of latitude, the annual fluxes are decomposed into monthly flux estimates based on data for the United States and applied globally. These monthly anthropogenic CO2 flux estimates are then used to model atmospheric CO2 concentrations using meteorological fields from the NASA GEOS-4 data assimilation system. We find that the use of monthly resolved fluxes makes a significant difference in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 in and near those regions where anthropogenic CO2 is released to the atmosphere. Local variations of 2-6 ppmv CO2 in the seasonal cycle amplitude are simulated; larger variations would be expected if smaller source-receptor distances could be more precisely specified using a more refined spatial resolution. We also find that in the midlatitudes near the sources, synoptic scale atmospheric circulations are important in the winter and that boundary layer venting and diurnal rectifier effects are more important in the summer. These findings have implications for inverse-modeling efforts that attempt to estimate surface source/sink regions especially when the surface sinks are colocated with regions of strong anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  11. Experimental evaluation of in situ CO2-water-rock reactions during CO2 injection in basaltic rocks: Implications for geological CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Juerg M.; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2007-02-01

    Deep aquifers are potential long-term storage sites for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The retention time and environmental safety of the injected CO2 depend on geologic and physical factors and on the chemical reactions between the CO2, the aquifer water, and the host rocks. The pH buffer capacity of the aquifer water and the acid neutralization potential of the host rocks are important factors for the permanent stabilization of the injected CO2. Mafic rocks, such as basalt, which primarily consists of Ca, Mg silicate minerals, have a high acid neutralization capacity by providing alkaline earth elements that form stable carbonate minerals. The carbonate minerals formed thus sequester CO2 in a chemically stable and environmentally benign form. In this study, we present results from a small-scale CO2 injection test in mafic and metasedimentary rocks. The injection test was conducted using a single-well push-pull test strategy. CO2 saturated water (pH = 3.5) was injected into a hydraulically isolated and permeable aquifer interval to study the acid neutralization capacity of Ca, Mg silicate rocks and to estimate in situ cation release rates. Release rates for Ca, Mg, and Na were calculated by use of solute compositions of water samples retrieved after the CO2 injection, the incubation time of the injected solution within the aquifer, and geometric estimates of the reactive surface area of the host rocks. Our results confirm rapid acid neutralization rates and water-rock reactions sufficient for safe and permanent storage of CO2. Carbonic acid was neutralized within hours of injection into a permeable mafic aquifer by two processes: mixing between the injected solution and the aquifer water, and water-rock reactions. Calculated cation release rates decrease with increasing pH that is confirmed by laboratory-based experiments. Large differences between release rates obtained from the field and laboratory experiments may be mainly due to uncertainties in the estimation

  12. Fang CO2 med Aminosyrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    2010-01-01

    Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer.......Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer....

  13. Quantifying fossil fuel CO2 from continuous measurements of APO: a novel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickers, Penelope; Manning, Andrew C.; Forster, Grant L.; van der Laan, Sander; Wilson, Phil A.; Wenger, Angelina; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Oram, David E.; Sturges, William T.

    2016-04-01

    Using atmospheric measurements to accurately quantify CO2 emissions from fossil fuel sources requires the separation of biospheric and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. The ability to quantify the fossil fuel component of CO2 (ffCO2) from atmospheric measurements enables more accurate 'top-down' verification of CO2 emissions inventories, which frequently have large uncertainty. Typically, ffCO2 is quantified (in ppm units) from discrete atmospheric measurements of Δ14CO2, combined with higher resolution atmospheric CO measurements, and with knowledge of CO:ffCO2 ratios. In the United Kingdom (UK), however, measurements of Δ14CO2 are often significantly biased by nuclear power plant influences, which limit the use of this approach. We present a novel approach for quantifying ffCO2 using measurements of APO (Atmospheric Potential Oxygen; a tracer derived from concurrent measurements of CO2 and O2) from two measurement sites in Norfolk, UK. Our approach is similar to that used for quantifying ffCO2 from CO measurements (ffCO2(CO)), whereby ffCO2(APO) = (APOmeas - APObg)/RAPO, where (APOmeas - APObg) is the APO deviation from the background, and RAPO is the APO:CO2 combustion ratio for fossil fuel. Time varying values of RAPO are calculated from the global gridded COFFEE (CO2 release and Oxygen uptake from Fossil Fuel Emission Estimate) dataset, combined with NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) transport model footprints. We compare our ffCO2(APO) results to results obtained using the ffCO2(CO) method, using CO:CO2 fossil fuel emission ratios (RCO) from the EDGAR (Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research) database. We find that the APO ffCO2 quantification method is more precise than the CO method, owing primarily to a smaller range of possible APO:CO2 fossil fuel emission ratios, compared to the CO:CO2 emission ratio range. Using a long-term dataset of atmospheric O2, CO2, CO and Δ14CO2 from Lutjewad, The Netherlands, we examine the

  14. Environmental potential of the use of CO2 from alcoholic fermentation processes. The CO2-AFP strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Moreno, Carlos; García-Yuste, Santiago

    2016-10-15

    A novel Carbon Dioxide Utilization (CDU) approach from a relatively minor CO2 emission source, i.e., alcoholic fermentation processes (AFP), is presented. The CO2 produced as a by-product from the AFP is estimated by examining the EtOH consumed per year reported by the World Health Organization in 2014. It is proposed that the extremely pure CO2 from the AFP is captured in NaOH solutions to produce one of the Top 10 commodities in the chemical industry, Na2CO3, as a good example of an atomic economy process. The novel CDU strategy could yield over 30.6Mt of Na2CO3 in oversaturated aqueous solution on using ca. 12.7Mt of captured CO2 and this process would consume less energy than the synthetic methodology (Solvay ammonia soda process) and would not produce low-value by-products. The quantity of Na2CO3 obtained by this strategy could represent ca. 50% of the world Na2CO3 production in one year. In terms of the green economy, the viability of the strategy is discussed according to the recommendations of the CO2Chem network, and an estimation of the CO2negative emission achieved suggests a capture of around 280.0Mt of CO2 from now to 2020 or ca. 1.9Gt from now to 2050. Finally, the results obtained for this new CDU proposal are discussed by considering different scenarios; the CO2 production in a typical winemaking corporation, the CO2 released in the most relevant wine-producing countries, and the use of CO2 from AFP as an alternative for the top Na2CO3-producing countries.

  15. Numerical and analogue modelling of the propagation and dissolution of CO2 into reservoir brines: implications for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K.; Bickle, M.; Neufeld, J. A.; Waterton, P.; Kampman, N.; Maskell, A.; Chapman, H.

    2013-12-01

    The release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is recognised as the principal cause of the current changes observed in the Earth's climate. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) within reservoirs is seen as a solution to combat these changes through long-term and secure geological storage of CO2. The viability of long-term storage however, is reliant on an accurate knowledge of CO2 trapping mechanisms, as well as an understanding of the effect of the injected supercritical CO2 on the reservoir formations themselves. One prospective stable trapping mechanism is the dissolution of CO2 into ambient reservoir brine. Developing a greater understanding of the flow of CO2 through reservoir rocks and the associated reactions between the host rock formation and the fluid is therefore of great importance to understanding whether a CO2 storage site will succeed. This study examines the enhanced rates of dissolution found during injection into a layered, heterogeneous formation through analogue experiments and numerical modelling. The analogue experiments are designed to approximate an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) setting and show that during fluid propagation, pore-scale viscous fingers grow and retreat. This will provide an increased surface area between the flow and the ambient reservoir fluid which is likely to enhance the dissolution of CO2 in reservoir brines. The numerical simulations provide a useful comparison with the analogue experiments and give constraints on the timescales and magnitude of CO2 dissolution and the resultant fluid-mineral reactions in a heterogeneous reservoir. The study begins to address whether the dissolution of carbonate or silicate minerals can provide the CO2 with a leakage pathway through corroded caprocks and fault seals, or help with pathway sealing.

  16. CO2capture by Li-functionalized silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2016-05-18

    CO2 capture and storage technology is of key importance to reduce the greenhouse effect. By its large surface area and sp3 hybridization, Li-functionalized silicene is demonstrated to be a promising CO2 absorbent that is stable up to at least 500 K and has a very high storage capacity of 28.6 mol/kg (55.7 wt%). The adsorption energy of CO2 on Li-functionalized silicene is enhanced as compared to pristine silicene, to attain an almost ideal value that still facilitates easy release. In addition, the band gap is found to change sensitively with the CO2 coverage. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  17. Study of the thermohydraulics of CO2 discharge from a high pressure reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, M.; Osch, M.B.V.; Buit, L.; Florisson, O.; Hulsbosch-Dam, C.; Spruijt, M.; Davolio, F.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental test set up has been constructed to carry out controlled CO2 release experiments from a high pressure vessel. The test set up is made up of a 500l stainless steel vessel where CO2 can be introduced up to high pressures and where controlled releases can be conducted. The work objectiv

  18. RODZAJE METOD SEKWESTRACJI CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia LUBAŃSKA

    Full Text Available Z pojęciem ochrony środowiska wiąże się bardzo szeroko w ostatnim czasie omawiane zagadnienie dotyczące ograniczenia emisji CO2. Konsekwencją globalnych zmian klimatu wywołanego przez ludzi jest wzrost stężenia atmosferycznego gazów cieplarnianych, które powodują nasilający się efekt cieplarniany. Wzrasta na świecie liczba ludności, a co za tym idzie wzrasta konsumpcja na jednego mieszkańca, szczególnie w krajach szeroko rozwiniętych gospodarczo. Protokół z Kioto ściśle określa działania jakie należy podjąć w celu zmniejszenia stężenia dwutlenku węgla w atmosferze. Pomimo maksymalnej optymalizacji procesu spalania paliw kopalnianych wykorzystywanych do produkcji energii, zastosowania odnawialnych źródeł energii zmiana klimatu jest nieunikniona i konsekwentnie będzie postępować przez kolejne dekady. Prognozuje się, że duże znaczenie odegra nowoczesna technologia, która ma za zadanie wychwycenie CO2 a następnie składowanie go w odpowiednio wybranych formacjach geologicznych (CCS- Carbon Capture and Storage. Eksperci są zgodni, że ta technologia w niedalekiej przyszłości stanie się rozwiązaniem pozwalającym ograniczyć ogromną ilość emisji CO2 pochodzącą z procesów wytwarzania energii z paliw kopalnych. Z analiz Raportu IPCC wynika, iż technologia CSS może się przyczynić do ok. 20% redukcji emisji dwutlenku węgla przewidzianej do 2050 roku [3]. Zastosowanie jej napotyka na wiele barier, nie tylko technologicznych i ekonomicznych, ale także społecznych. Inną metodą dającą ujemne źródło emisji CO2 jest możliwość wykorzystania obszarów leśnych o odpowiedniej strukturze drzewostanu. Środkiem do tego celu, oprócz ograniczenia zużycia emisjogennych paliw kopalnych (przy zachowaniu zasad zrównoważonego rozwoju może być intensyfikacja zalesień. Zwiększanie lesistości i prawidłowa gospodarka leśna należy do najbardziej efektywnych sposobów kompensowania

  19. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  20. Shocking Results on the Adverse Effects of CO2 Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is released in large quantities from humans while they live and work in spacecraft or work outside the spacecraft during extravehicular activity (EVA). Removal of this anthropogenic pollutant requires major resources, and these resources increase dramatically as the levels of CO2 set to protect human health and performance are reduced. The current Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration of CO2 aboard the ISS is 0.7% or 5.3 mmHg; however, according to Chits (mission action requests), NASA and its international partners have agreed to control CO2 levels to less than 4 mmHg. In the meantime, retrospective investigations attempting to associate crew symptoms with elevated CO2 levels over the life if the International Space Station (ISS) are underway to determine if this level is sufficient to protect against health and performance decrements. Anecdotal reports suggest that crewmembers are not able to perform complex tasks as readily in spaceflight as they were able during ground-based training. While physiological effects of CO2 have been studied for many decades, it is only recently that the effects of CO2 on higher reasoning capabilities have been studied. The initial results are shocking. For example, one study published in the respected journal Environmental Health Perspectives showed obvious adverse effects of CO2 exposures on higher reasoning at 1.9 mmHg. The implications and limitations of this study are paramount in determining future CO2 SMACs for human spaceflight, both aboard the ISS and in exploration-class missions. Key Words: carbon dioxide, spacecraft, air quality, toxic effects

  1. Borophene as a Promising Material for Charge-Modulated Switchable CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2017-06-14

    Ideal carbon dioxide (CO2) capture materials for practical applications should bind CO2 molecules neither too weakly to limit good loading kinetics nor too strongly to limit facile release. Although charge-modulated switchable CO2 capture has been proposed to be a controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO2 capture strategy, the development of a practical gas-adsorbent material remains a great challenge. In this study, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have examined the possibility of conductive borophene nanosheets as promising sorbent materials for charge-modulated switchable CO2 capture. Our results reveal that the binding strength of CO2 molecules on negatively charged borophene can be significantly enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged borophene achieves CO2 capture capacities up to 6.73 × 10(14) cm(-2). In contrast to the other CO2 capture methods, the CO2 capture/release processes on negatively charged borophene are reversible with fast kinetics and can be easily controlled via switching on/off the charges carried by borophene nanosheets. Moreover, these negatively charged borophene nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2, and/or N2. This theoretical exploration will provide helpful guidance for identifying experimentally feasible, controllable, highly selective, and high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  2. CyclicCO2R: production of cyclic carbonates from CO2 using renewable feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Håkonsen, S.F.; Heyn, R.; Offermans, W.; Leitner, W.; Ostapowicz, T.; Müller, T. E.; Mul, G.; North, M.; Ngomsik-Fanselow, A.F.; Sarron, E.; Sigurbjörnsson, O.; Schäffner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The consortium behind CyclicCO2R wants to kick-start the implementation of CO2 utilization technologies by converting CO2 into a high value-added product, thus providing a showcase that inspires industry to further develop technologies utilizing CO2 as a sustainable raw material and valorizing CO2

  3. CyclicCO2R: production of cyclic carbonates from CO2 using renewable feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Håkonsen, S.F.; Heyn, R.; Offermans, W.; Leitner, W.; Ostapowicz, T.; Müller, T. E.; Mul, G.; North, M.; Ngomsik-Fanselow, A.F.; Sarron, E.; Sigurbjörnsson, O.; Schäffner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The consortium behind CyclicCO2R wants to kick-start the implementation of CO2 utilization technologies by converting CO2 into a high value-added product, thus providing a showcase that inspires industry to further develop technologies utilizing CO2 as a sustainable raw material and valorizing CO2 i

  4. PEAT-CO2. Assessment of CO2 emissions from drained peatlands in SE Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooijer, A.; Silvius, M.; Woesten, H.; Page, S.

    2006-12-15

    Forested tropical peatlands in SE Asia store at least 42,000 Megatonnes of soil carbon. This carbon is increasingly released to the atmosphere due to drainage and fires associated with plantation development and logging. Peatlands make up 12% of the SE Asian land area but account for 25% of current deforestation. Out of 27 million hectares of peatland, 12 million hectares (45%) are currently deforested and mostly drained. One important crop in drained peatlands is palm oil, which is increasingly used as a biofuel in Europe. In the PEAT-CO2 project, present and future emissions from drained peatlands were quantified using the latest data on peat extent and depth, present and projected land use and water management practice, decomposition rates and fire emissions. It was found that current likely CO2 emissions caused by decomposition of drained peatlands amounts to 632 Mt/y (between 355 and 874 Mt/y). This emission will increase in coming decades unless land management practices and peatland development plans are changed, and will continue well beyond the 21st century. In addition, over 1997-2006 an estimated average of 1400 Mt/y in CO2 emissions was caused by peatland fires that are also associated with drainage and degradation. The current total peatland CO2 emission of 2000 Mt/y equals almost 8% of global emissions from fossil fuel burning. These emissions have been rapidly increasing since 1985 and will further increase unless action is taken. Over 90% of this emission originates from Indonesia, which puts the country in 3rd place (after the USA and China) in the global CO2 emission ranking. It is concluded that deforested and drained peatlands in SE Asia are a globally significant source of CO2 emissions and a major obstacle to meeting the aim of stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions, as expressed by the international community. It is therefore recommended that international action is taken to help SE Asian countries, especially Indonesia, to better conserve

  5. Potential environmental impacts of offshore UK geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Kit; Wilkinson, Mark; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-04-01

    . The origin of the increased trace element concentrations was investigated using sequential leaching experiments. The analysis of the experimental results showed that prediction of trace element release from sandstones with weak CO2-acid leaching is difficult. However, the experiments did show that carbonate and feldspar mineral dissolution was a primary source of these elements, where mobilised, regardless of their abundance within the sandstone. While the environmental risks associated with future offshore CO2 storage are considered to be comparable with existing oil and gas operations, treatment of produced waters may be required to reduce the trace element load and should be assessed on a field-by-field basis.

  6. Alleged Leakage of CO2 from the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project: Preliminary Findings from Implementation of the IPAC-CO2 Incident Response Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherk, G. W.; Romanak, K.; Gilfillan, S. M.; Dale, J. E.; Wolaver, B. D.; Yang, C.

    2011-12-01

    In January of 2011, the owners of property located in the southwest portion of the Weyburn-Midale Unit in Saskatchewan, Canada, alleged that CO2 injected as part of the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project was leaking from their property. Prior to the property owners' allegations, the International Performance Assessment Centre for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (IPAC-CO2) had initiated development of an incident response protocol to be implemented when allegations arose of unintentional releases of anthropogenic CO2 from carbon capture and storage projects. IPAC-CO2 implemented this protocol to determine if CO2 concentrations as high as 11% result from an unintentional release of anthropogenic CO2 or if they form naturally from microbial CO2 production in the organic-rich wet environment that characterizes the property. This paper presents preliminary findings resulting from implementation of the IPAC-CO2 incident response protocol. Particular attention is paid to the results of both soil-gas and noble gas analyses.

  7. CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CO2 Virtual Data Environment is a comprehensive effort at bringing together the models, data, and tools necessary to perform research on atmospheric CO2.This...

  8. Why capture CO2 from the atmosphere?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, David W

    2009-01-01

    Air capture is an industrial process for capturing CO2 from ambient air; it is one of an emerging set of technologies for CO2 removal that includes geological storage of biotic carbon and the acceleration of geochemical weathering...

  9. Modeling Atmospheric CO2 Processes to Constrain the Missing Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Denning, A. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Collatz, J. C.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a NASA supported modeling effort to reduce uncertainty in carbon cycle processes that create the so-called missing sink of atmospheric CO2. Our overall objective is to improve characterization of CO2 source/sink processes globally with improved formulations for atmospheric transport, terrestrial uptake and release, biomass and fossil fuel burning, and observational data analysis. The motivation for this study follows from the perspective that progress in determining CO2 sources and sinks beyond the current state of the art will rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. The major components of this effort are: 1) Continued development of the chemistry and transport model using analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, with comparison to real time data in both forward and inverse modes; 2) An advanced biosphere model, constrained by remote sensing data, coupled to the global transport model to produce distributions of CO2 fluxes and concentrations that are consistent with actual meteorological variability; 3) Improved remote sensing estimates for biomass burning emission fluxes to better characterize interannual variability in the atmospheric CO2 budget and to better constrain the land use change source; 4) Evaluating the impact of temporally resolved fossil fuel emission distributions on atmospheric CO2 gradients and variability. 5) Testing the impact of existing and planned remote sensing data sources (e.g., AIRS, MODIS, OCO) on inference of CO2 sources and sinks, and use the model to help establish measurement requirements for future remote sensing instruments. The results will help to prepare for the use of OCO and other satellite data in a multi-disciplinary carbon data assimilation system for analysis and prediction of carbon cycle changes and carbodclimate interactions.

  10. Calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, B. van der; Egberts, P.

    2008-01-01

    Often we need to know how much CO2 we can store in a certain underground space, or how much such space we need to store a given amount of CO2. In a recent attempt (Bradshaw et al., 2006) to list various regional and global estimates of CO2 storage capacity (Figure 1), the estimates reported are ofte

  11. Calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, B. van der; Egberts, P.

    2008-01-01

    Often we need to know how much CO2 we can store in a certain underground space, or how much such space we need to store a given amount of CO2. In a recent attempt (Bradshaw et al., 2006) to list various regional and global estimates of CO2 storage capacity (Figure 1), the estimates reported are

  12. Time-dependent CO2 variations in Lake Albano associated with seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G.; Tassi, F.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Vaselli, O.; Rouwet, D.

    2012-05-01

    Lake Albano (Alban Hills volcanic complex, Central Italy) is located in a densely populated area near Rome. The deep lake waters have significant dissolved CO2 concentrations, probably related to sub-lacustrine fluid discharges fed by a pressurized CO2-rich reservoir. The analytical results of geochemical surveys carried out in 1989-2010 highlight the episodes of CO2 removal from the lake. The total mass of dissolved CO2 decreased from ˜5.8 × 107 kg in 1989 to ˜0.5 × 107 kg in 2010, following an exponential decreasing trend. Calculated values of both dissolved inorganic carbon and CO2 concentrations along the vertical profile of the lake indicate that this decrease is caused by CO2 release from the epilimnion, at depth Albano was affected by a large CO2 input that coincided with the last important seismic swarm at Alban Hills in 1989, suggesting an intimate relationship between the addition of deep-originated CO2 to the lake and seismic activity. In the case of a CO2 degassing event of an order of magnitude larger than the one that occurred in 1989, the deepest part of Lake Albano would become CO2-saturated, resulting in conditions compatible with the occurrence of a gas outburst. These results reinforce the idea that a sudden CO2 input into the lake may cause the release of a dense gas cloud, presently representing the major volcanic threat for this densely populated area.

  13. Thermochemistry of a Biomimetic and Rubisco-Inspired CO2 Capture System from Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Muelleman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In theoretical studies of chemical reactions the reaction thermochemistry is usually reported for the stoichiometric reaction at standard conditions (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS°. We describe the computation of the equilibrium concentrations of the CO2-adducts for the general capture reaction CO2 + Capture System ⇆ CO2-adduct (GCR and the rubisco-type capture reaction CO2 + Capture System ⇆ CO2-adduct + H2O (RCR with consideration of the reaction CO2(g ⇆ CO2(aq via Henry’s law. The resulting equations are evaluated and graphically illustrated as a function of atmospheric CO2 concentration and as a function of temperature. The equations were applied to the thermochemistry of small molecule rubisco-model reactions and series of additional model reactions to illustrate the range of the Gibbs free enthalpy for the effective reversible capture and of the reaction entropy for economic CO2 release at elevated temperature. A favorable capture of free enthalpy is of course a design necessity, but not all exergonic reactions are suitable CO2 capture systems. Successful CO2 capture systems must allow for effective release as well, and this feature is controlled by the reaction entropy. The principle of using a two-pronged capture system to ensure a large negative capture entropy is explained and highlighted in the graphical abstract. It is hoped that the presentation of the numerical examples provides useful guidelines for the design of more efficient capture systems.

  14. The temperature response of CO2 assimilation, photochemical activities and Rubisco activation in Camelina sativa, a potential bioenergy crop with limited capacity for acclimation to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E

    2012-11-01

    The temperature optimum of photosynthesis coincides with the average daytime temperature in a species' native environment. Moderate heat stress occurs when temperatures exceed the optimum, inhibiting photosynthesis and decreasing productivity. In the present study, the temperature response of photosynthesis and the potential for heat acclimation was evaluated for Camelina sativa, a bioenergy crop. The temperature optimum of net CO(2) assimilation rate (A) under atmospheric conditions was 30-32 °C and was only slightly higher under non-photorespiratory conditions. The activation state of Rubisco was closely correlated with A at supra-optimal temperatures, exhibiting a parallel decrease with increasing leaf temperature. At both control and elevated temperatures, the modeled response of A to intercellular CO(2) concentration was consistent with Rubisco limiting A at ambient CO(2). Rubisco activation and photochemical activities were affected by moderate heat stress at lower temperatures in camelina than in the warm-adapted species cotton and tobacco. Growth under conditions that imposed a daily interval of moderate heat stress caused a 63 % reduction in camelina seed yield. Levels of cpn60 protein were elevated under the higher growth temperature, but acclimation of photosynthesis was minimal. Inactivation of Rubisco in camelina at temperatures above 35 °C was consistent with the temperature response of Rubisco activase activity and indicated that Rubisco activase was a prime target of inhibition by moderate heat stress in camelina. That photosynthesis exhibited no acclimation to moderate heat stress will likely impact the development of camelina and other cool season Brassicaceae as sources of bioenergy in a warmer world.

  15. Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

    2009-04-01

    for public, press, NGOs,…). - being open for visitors (first of all for the local!) often we informed the public together with the mining authorities - being open for podium discussions and presentation etc. - organized by NGOs, Student groups, press, politics, scientific meetings… Since people usually trust scientists more than politicians and companies, scientists have an enhanced responsibility while informing the public. Once again - always tell the truth and take care of your credibility! In this case, it was most helpful that the project was embedded in the broad scientific activity of research centre which seems to have given the project a positive neutral background. As many people have an undefined fear of all operations in the underground, we tried to address all issues related to storage. Ranging from the transport, injection facility, technical installation, safety of the storage site, the wells, hydraulic system, chemical reactions etc.. When addressing all major concerns before people ask, confidence to the scientists is kept high. We never said that there is absolutely no risk (by the way, nobody would believe that!) we weighted the risk with respect to health, safety and environmental HSE issues. We explained in detail the different trapping mechanisms of the storage operation. This has to be done according to the social groups involved. For the broad public common analogues were helpful: - Trapping in the pore space - a sponge - Trapping through a tight cap rock - a bottle of mineral water with a crown cap as seal - Chemical Trapping - opening of a bottle of mineral water - Well bore integrity - problem of retightening of a bottle with a crown cap - Sucking in of fluid -instead of releasing a sandstone sample standing partly in water - Injecting of CO2 - using a soda machine - Often the concern of burning gas is addressed - showing a CO2 fire extinguisher -CO is poisonous, CO2 not: - drinking soda or even better? champaigne Beyond information of

  16. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Production of cement is an energy intensive process and is the source of considerable CO2emissions. Itis estimated that the cement industry contributes around 8% of total global CO2emissions. CO2is oneof the major greenhouse gases. In the atmosphere, the CO2concentration has increased from 310 ppmvin 1960 to 390 ppmv in 2012, probably due to human activity. A lot of research is being carried out forreducing CO2emissions from large stationary sources. Ofwhich, the carbonate looping process is ...

  17. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  18. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  19. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases.

  20. Amine scrubbing for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Gary T

    2009-09-25

    Amine scrubbing has been used to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from natural gas and hydrogen since 1930. It is a robust technology and is ready to be tested and used on a larger scale for CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. The minimum work requirement to separate CO2 from coal-fired flue gas and compress CO2 to 150 bar is 0.11 megawatt-hours per metric ton of CO2. Process and solvent improvements should reduce the energy consumption to 0.2 megawatt-hour per ton of CO2. Other advanced technologies will not provide energy-efficient or timely solutions to CO2 emission from conventional coal-fired power plants.

  1. Capture CO2 from Ambient Air Using Nanoconfined Ion Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoyang; Xiao, Hang; Lackner, Klaus S; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-14

    Water confined in nanoscopic pores is essential in determining the energetics of many physical and chemical systems. Herein, we report a recently discovered unconventional, reversible chemical reaction driven by water quantities in nanopores. The reduction of the number of water molecules present in the pore space promotes the hydrolysis of CO3(2-) to HCO3(-) and OH(-). This phenomenon led to a nano-structured CO2 sorbent that binds CO2 spontaneously in ambient air when the surrounding is dry, while releasing it when exposed to moisture. The underlying mechanism is elucidated theoretically by computational modeling and verified by experiments. The free energy of CO3 (2-) hydrolysis in nanopores reduces with a decrease of water availability. This promotes the formation of OH(-), which has a high affinity to CO2 . The effect is not limited to carbonate/bicarbonate, but is extendable to a series of ions. Humidity-driven sorption opens a new approach to gas separation technology.

  2. The CO2 footprint of new nitrogen creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, B. Z.

    2012-12-01

    For billions of years, in the absence of substantial human influence, the essential nutrient nitrogen (N) entered terrestrial ecosystems at naturally low rates. Today, human actions (i.e., Haber-Bosch fertilizer production, fossil fuel combustion) have dramatically reshaped the N cycle from its background state, more than doubling terrestrial N circulation, resulting in large increases in anthropogenic N deposition inputs to ecosystems globally. While producing many unwanted side-effects, increased N in both rain water and dry particulate matter has been purported in accelerated rates of forest CO2 uptake, thus slowing the pace of climate change. However, this perspective does not consider the amount of CO2 released to the atmosphere during new N creation. Here I analyze the gross CO2 footprint of N input pathways, including the CO2 released during N fixation vs. that which is consumed by forest vegetation per unit of N input. This analysis indicates the following C/N conversion efficiencies during fixation: lightening = 0; Haber-Bosch = 0.49; symbiotic fixation = 10; asymbiotic fixation = 50; fossil fuel fixation = 220. Thus, lightening envisions the highest forest CO2 uptake return (100 %) followed by Haber-Bosch N (99), symbiotic N fixation (88) and asymbiotic N fixation (neutral), and lastly, fossil fuel fixation (-279). In addition, widespread and well-documented negative interactions between excess N and biological N fixation further undermine any potential positive effects of fossil-fuel N deposition on terrestrial C storage. Thus, recapturing Haber-Bosch N by natural vegetation combined with policies that target reductions in fossil fuel N sources are proposed as the most effective means for maximizing the positive benefits of anthropocene N on terrestrial CO2 uptake and storage.

  3. In situ synthesis of polymer-modified mesoporous carbon CMK-3 composites for CO2 sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Jin, Zhong; Lu, Wei; Sun, Zhengzong; Alemany, Lawrence B; Lomeda, Jay R; Tour, James M

    2011-12-01

    Here we report carbon-based composites polyethylenimine-mesocarbon (PEI-CMK-3) and polyvinylamine-mesocarbon (PVA-CMK-3) that can be used to capture and rapidly release CO(2). CO(2) uptake by the synthesized composites was determined using a gravimetric method at 30 °C and 1 atm; the 39% PEI-CMK-3 composite had ~12 wt % CO(2) uptake capacity and the 37% PVA-CMK-3 composite had ~13 wt % CO(2) uptake capacity. A desorption temperature of 75 °C was sufficient for regeneration. The CO(2) uptake was the same when using 10% CO(2) in a 90% CH(4), C(2)H(6), and C(3)H(8) mixture, underscoring this composite's efficacy for CO(2) sequestration from natural gas.

  4. Kinetic analysis of an anion exchange absorbent for CO2 capture from ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoyang; Li, Qibin; Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S

    2017-01-01

    This study reports a preparation method of a new moisture swing sorbent for CO2 capture from air. The new sorbent components include ion exchange resin (IER) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as a binder. The IER can absorb CO2 when surrounding is dry and release CO2 when surrounding is wet. The manuscript presents the studies of membrane structure, kinetic model of absorption process, performance of desorption process and the diffusivity of water molecules in the CO2 absorbent. It has been proved that the kinetic performance of CO2 absorption/desorption can be improved by using thin binder and hot water treatment. The fast kinetics of P-100-90C absorbent is due to the thin PVC binder, and high diffusion rate of H2O molecules in the sample. The impressive is this new CO2 absorbent has the fastest CO2 absorption rate among all absorbents which have been reported by other up-to-date literatures.

  5. Microfluidic study for investigating migration and residual phenomena of supercritical CO2 in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyuryeong; Wang, Sookyun; Lee, Minhee; Um, Jeong-Gi; Kim, Seon-Ok

    2017-04-01

    The storage of CO2 in underground geological formation such as deep saline aquifers or depleted oil and gas reservoirs is one of the most promising technologies for reducing the atmospheric CO2 release. The processes in geological CO2 storage involves injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into porous formations saturated with brine and initiates CO2 flooding with immiscible displacement. The CO2 migration and porewater displacement within geological formations, and , consequentially, the storage efficiency are governed by the interaction of fluid and rock properties and are affected by the interfacial tension, capillarity, and wettability in supercritical CO2-brine-mineral systems. This study aims to observe the displacement pattern and estimate storage efficiency by using micromodels. This study aims to conduct scCO2 injection experiments for visualization of distribution of injected scCO2 and residual porewater in transparent pore networks on microfluidic chips under high pressure and high temperature conditions. In order to quantitatively analyze the porewater displacement by scCO2 injection under geological CO2 storage conditions, the images of invasion patterns and distribution of CO2 in the pore network are acquired through a imaging system with a microscope. The results from image analysis were applied in quantitatively investigating the effects of major environmental factors and scCO2 injection methods on porewater displacement process by scCO2 and storage efficiency. The experimental observation results could provide important fundamental information on capillary characteristics of reservoirs and improve our understanding of CO2 sequestration progress.

  6. Extraction of stevia glycosides with CO2 + water, CO2 + ethanol, and CO2 + water + ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pasquel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Stevia leaves are an important source of natural sugar substitute. There are some restrictions on the use of stevia extract because of its distinctive aftertaste. Some authors attribute this to soluble material other than the stevia glycosides, even though it is well known that stevia glycosides have to some extent a bitter taste. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to develop a process to obtain stevia extract of a better quality. The proposed process includes two steps: i Pretreatment of the leaves by SCFE; ii Extraction of the stevia glycosides by SCFE using CO2 as solvent and water and/or ethanol as cosolvent. The mean total yield for SCFE pretreatment was 3.0%. The yields for SCFE with cosolvent of stevia glycosides were below 0.50%, except at 120 bar, 16°C, and 9.5% (molar of water. Under this condition, total yield was 3.4%. The quality of the glycosidic fraction with respect to its capacity as sweetener was better for the SCFE extract as compared to extract obtained by the conventional process. The overall extraction curves were well described by the Lack extended model.

  7. CO2 Fixation by Membrane Separated NaCl Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Sic Park

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2, a major cause of global warming, have been rising due to industrial development. Carbon capture and storage (CCS, which is regarded as the most effective way to reduce such atmospheric CO2 concentrations, has several environmental and technical disadvantages. Carbon capture and utilization (CCU, which has been introduced to cover such disadvantages, makes it possible to capture CO2, recycling byproducts as resources. However, CCU also requires large amounts of energy in order to induce reactions. Among existing CCU technologies, the process for converting CO2 into CaCO3 requires high temperature and high pressure as reaction conditions. This study proposes a method to fixate CaCO3 stably by using relatively less energy than existing methods. After forming NaOH absorbent solution through electrolysis of NaCl in seawater, CaCO3 was precipitated at room temperature and pressure. Following the experiment, the resulting product CaCO3 was analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR; field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM image and X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns were also analyzed. The results showed that the CaCO3 crystal product was high-purity calcite. The study shows a successful method for fixating CO2 by reducing carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere while forming high-purity CaCO3.

  8. Covalent Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongfei; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-20

    As an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are excellent candidates for various applications. In particular, they can serve as ideal platforms for capturing CO2 to mitigate the dilemma caused by the greenhouse effect. Recent research achievements using COFs for CO2 capture are highlighted. A background overview is provided, consisting of a brief statement on the current CO2 issue, a summary of representative materials utilized for CO2 capture, and an introduction to COFs. Research progresses on: i) experimental CO2 capture using different COFs synthesized based on different covalent bond formations, and ii) computational simulation results of such porous materials on CO2 capture are summarized. Based on these experimental and theoretical studies, careful analyses and discussions in terms of the COF stability, low- and high-pressure CO2 uptake, CO2 selectivity, breakthrough performance, and CO2 capture conditions are provided. Finally, a perspective and conclusion section of COFs for CO2 capture is presented. Recent advancements in the field are highlighted and the strategies and principals involved are discussed.

  9. Porous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Baiyang

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has long been regarded as the major greenhouse gas, which leads to numerous negative effects on global environment. The capture and separation of CO2 by selective adsorption using porous materials proves to be an effective way to reduce the emission of CO2 to atmosphere. Porous organic polymers (POPs) are promising candidates for this application due to their readily tunable textual properties and surface functionalities. The objective of this thesis work is to develop new POPs with high CO2 adsorption capacities and CO2/N2 selectivities for post-combustion effluent (e.g. flue gas) treatment. We will also exploit the correlation between the CO2 capture performance of POPs and their textual properties/functionalities. Chapters Two focuses on the study of a group of porous phenolic-aldehyde polymers (PPAPs) synthesized by a catalyst-free method, the CO2 capture capacities of these PPAPs exceed 2.0 mmol/g at 298 K and 1 bar, while keeping CO2/N2 selectivity of more than 30 at the same time. Chapter Three reports the gas adsorption results of different hyper-cross-linked polymers (HCPs), which indicate that heterocyclo aromatic monomers can greatly enhance polymers’ CO2/N2 selectivities, and the N-H bond is proved to the active CO2 adsorption center in the N-contained (e.g. pyrrole) HCPs, which possess the highest selectivities of more than 40 at 273 K when compared with other HCPs. Chapter Four emphasizes on the chemical modification of a new designed polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM) with high CO2/N2 selectivity (50 at 273 K), whose experimental repeatability and chemical stability prove excellent. In Chapter Five, we demonstrate an improvement of both CO2 capture capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity by doping alkali metal ions into azo-polymers, which leads a promising method to the design of new porous organic polymers.

  10. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  11. Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 sorbent for highly selective CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuwu; Zhai, Xinru; Liu, Dongyang; Sun, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 materials are used as CO2 sorbent to improve the selectivity of CH4/CO2 separation. The SBA-15 sorbents modified by physical CO2 absorbents are very limited to increasing CO2 adsorption and present poor selectivity. However, the SBA-15 sorbents modified by chemical CO2 absorbents increase CO2 adsorption capacity obviously. The separation coefficients of CO2/CH4 increase in this case. The adsorption and regeneration properties of the SBA-15 sorbents modified by TEA, MDEA and DIPA have been compared. The SBA-15 modified by triethanolamine (TEA) presents better CO2/CH4 separation performance than the materials modified by other CO2 absorbents.

  12. Sorption of methane and CO2 for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon dioxide seauestration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basanta Kumar Prusty

    2008-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in deep and unmineable coal seams is one of the attractive alternatives to reduce its atmospheric concentration. Injection of CO2 in coal seams may help in enhancing the recovery of coalbed methane. An experimental study has been carried out using coal samples from three different coal seams, to evaluate the enhanced gas recovery and sequestration potential of these coals. The coals were first saturated with methane and then by depressurization some of the adsorbed methane was desorbed. After partial desorption, CO2 was injected into the coals and subsequently they were depressurized again. Desorption of methane after the injections was studied, to investigate the ability of CO2 to displace and enhance the recovery of methane from the coals. The coals exhibited varying behavior of adsorption of CO2 and release of methane. For one coal, the release of methane was enhanced by injection of CO2, suggesting preferential adsorption of CO2 and desorption of methane. For the other two coals, CO2 injection did not produce incremental methane initially, as there was initial resistance to methane release. However with continued CO2 injection, most of the remaining methane was produced. The study suggested that preferential sorption behavior of coal and enhanced gas recovery pattern could not be generalized for all coals.

  13.  Winter time burst of CO2 from the High Arctic soils of Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Thomas; Hansen, Birger; Elberling, Bo;

    of relatively few measurements which appear to give small and constant emission rates. Further, most studies of the processes behind winter time emission of CO2 conclude that the flux during this time of year can be linked to the respiratory release of CO2 from soil micro organisms, which is temperature...

  14. Advanced technology development reducing CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sup

    2010-09-15

    Responding to Korean government policies on green growth and global energy/ environmental challenges, SK energy has been developing new technologies to reduce CO2 emissions by 1) CO2 capture and utilization, 2) efficiency improvement, and 3) Li-ion batteries. The paper introduces three advanced technologies developed by SK energy; GreenPol, ACO, and Li-ion battery. Contributing to company vision, a more energy and less CO2, the three technologies are characterized as follows. GreenPol utilizes CO2 as a feedstock for making polymer. Advanced Catalytic Olefin (ACO) reduces CO2 emission by 20% and increase olefin production by 17%. Li-ion Batteries for automotive industries improves CO2 emission.

  15. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  16. CO2 Allowance and Electricity Price Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    With the introduction of CO2 emission constraints on power generators in the European Union, climate policy is starting to have notable effects on energy markets. This paper sheds light on the links between CO2 prices, electricity prices, and electricity costs to industry. It is based on a series of interviews with industrial and electricity stakeholders, as well as a rich literature seeking to estimate the exact effect of CO2 prices on electricity prices.

  17. [A new colorimetric CO2 indicator Colibri].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, T; Hanaoka, K

    1996-06-01

    A new colorimetric carbon dioxide (CO2) indicator Colibri is a disposable, compact and light weighted device. Colibri does not need to be calibrated and is easily usable in an emergency. It indicates blue with CO2 below 4 mmHg and becomes yellow with CO2 above 40 mmHg. In comparison with EASY CAP, Colibri functions for a longer period and it has a humidifier and a bacterial filter. Colibri is useful for emergency situations and anesthetic care.

  18. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  19. Synthetic biology for CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals is a potential approach to reduce CO2 emission and fossil-fuel consumption. Autotrophic microbes can utilize energy from light, hydrogen, or sulfur to assimilate atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds at ambient temperature and pressure. This provides a feasible way for biological production of fuels and chemicals from CO2 under normal conditions. Recently great progress has been made in this research area, and dozens of CO2-derived fuels and chemicals have been reported to be synthesized by autotrophic microbes. This is accompanied by investigations into natural CO2-fixation pathways and the rapid development of new technologies in synthetic biology. This review first summarizes the six natural CO2-fixation pathways reported to date, followed by an overview of recent progress in the design and engineering of CO2-fixation pathways as well as energy supply patterns using the concept and tools of synthetic biology. Finally, we will discuss future prospects in biological fixation of CO2.

  20. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    performed recently has focused on CO2capture from fossil fuel-based power plants. Inherently,this process is especially suitablefor cement plants, as CaO used for CO2capture is also a majoringredient for clinker production. Thus, a detailed investigation was carried outto study the applicationof......% of the inlet CO2 was captured by highly deactivated limestone, which had a maximum CO2 capture capacity of 11.5%, with an inlet Ca/C ratio of 13. So, the performance of the carbonator can be defined by the inlet Ca/C ratio, which can be estimated if the maximum capture capacity of limestone is known...

  1. Modelling ruptures of buried high pressure dense phase CO2 pipelines in carbon capture and storage applications - Part I. Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Wareing, CJ; Fairweather, M.; Falle, SAEG; Woolley, RM

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage presents a short-term option for significantly reducing the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere and mitigating the effects of climate change. To this end, National Grid initiated the COOLTRANS research programme to consider the pipeline transportation of high pressure dense phase CO2, including the development and application of a mathematical model for predicting the sonic near-field dispersion of pure CO2 following the venting or failure of su...

  2. Solvent Effects on the Photothermal Regeneration of CO2 in Monoethanolamine Nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Du; Stolaroff, Joshuah; Esser-Kahn, Aaron

    2015-11-25

    A potential approach to reduce energy costs associated with carbon capture is to use external and renewable energy sources. The photothermal release of CO2 from monoethanolamine mediated by nanoparticles is a unique solution to this problem. When combined with light-absorbing nanoparticles, vapor bubbles form inside the capture solution and release the CO2 without heating the bulk solvent. The mechanism by which CO2 is released remained unclear, and understanding this process would improve the efficiency of photothermal CO2 release. Here we report the use of different cosolvents to improve or reduce the photothermal regeneration of CO2 captured by monoethanolamine. We found that properties that reduce the residence time of the gas bubbles (viscosity, boiling point, and convection direction) can enhance the regeneration efficiencies. The reduction of bubble residence times minimizes the reabsorption of CO2 back into the capture solvent where bulk temperatures remain lower than the localized area surrounding the nanoparticle. These properties shed light on the mechanism of release and indicated methods for improving the efficiency of the process. We used this knowledge to develop an improved photothermal CO2 regeneration system in a continuously flowing setup. Using techniques to reduce residence time in the continuously flowing setup, such as alternative cosolvents and smaller fluid volumes, resulted in regeneration efficiency enhancements of over 200%.

  3. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  4. CO2 Interaction with Geomaterials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, V.; Howard, B. H.; Lynn, R. J.; Warzinski, R. P.; Hur, T.; Myshakin, E. M.; Lopano, C. L.; Voora, V. K.; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Jordan, K. D.; Cygan, R. T.; Guthrie, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas #3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or “geopolymer”) theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  5. CO2 and sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    There is considerable discussion currently about the potential effects of carbon dioxide build-up in the atmosphere over the next several decades. The sources of information are two Government funded reports, one by the National Research Council (NRC), the other by the Environment Protection Agency (EPA), both were released within the last five months. The reports were described recently as being conservative, although the consequences of the resulting greenhouse effects are deemed inevitable. Atmospheric warming on a global scale of as much as 5°C cannot be avoided, only perhaps delayed by a few years at best (Environ. Sci. Technol, 18, 45A-46A, 1984). The cause is the burning of fossil fuels. Oil will not be too important because its supplies are predictably exhausted on the time scale of 50-100 years. Coal burning is considered as the main source of carbon dioxide. Among the more spectacular results of a global temperature rise over the next 100 years is the expected rise in sea level of a minimum of 70 cm (Oceanus, Winter, 1983/84). If the West Antarctic Ice Sheet breaks up and melts, the rise could be in the several meter range. Sea level rose only 15 cm in the past century.

  6. A Review of Human Health and Ecological Risks due to CO2 Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepple, R. P.; Benson, S. M.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the human health and ecological consequences of exposure to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the context of geologic carbon sequestration. The purpose of this effort is to provide a baseline of information to guide future efforts in risk assessment for CO2 sequestration. Scenarios for hazardous CO2 exposure include surface facility leaks, leaks from abandoned or aging wells, and leakage from geologic CO2 storage structures. Amounts of carbon in various reservoirs, systems, and applications were summarized, and the levels of CO2 encountered in nature and everyday life were compared along with physiologically relevant concentrations. Literature pertaining to CO2 occupational exposure limits, regulations, monitoring, and ecological consequences was reviewed. The OSHA, NIOSH, and ACGIH occupational exposure standards are 0.5% CO2 averaged over a 40 hour week, 3% average for a short-term (15 minute) exposure, and 4% as the maximum instantaneous limit considered immediately dangerous to life and health. All three conditions must be satisfied at all times. Any detrimental effects of low-level CO2 exposure are reversible, including the long-term metabolic compensation required by chronic exposure to 3% CO2. Breathing rate doubles at 3% CO2 and is four times the normal rate at 5% CO2. According to occupational exposure and controlled atmosphere research into CO2 toxicology, CO2 is hazardous via direct toxicity at levels above 5%, concentrations not encountered in nature outside of volcanic settings and water-logged soils. Small leaks do not present any danger to people unless the CO2 does not disperse quickly enough through atmospheric mixing but accumulates instead in depressions and confined spaces. These dangers are the result of CO2 being more dense than air. Carbon dioxide is regulated for diverse purposes but never as a toxic substance. Catastrophic incidents involving large amounts and/or rapid release of CO2 such as Lake

  7. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...

  8. Monitoring Options for CO2 Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, R.; Winthaegen, P.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of various monitoring techniques for CO2 storage that is structured into three categories-instrumentation in a well (monitoring well); instrumentation at the (near) surface (surface geophysical methods); and sampling at the (near) surface measuring CO2 concentration

  9. CO2 capture research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerman, J.C.; Kuramochi, T.; Egmond, S. van

    2008-01-01

    The global climate is changing due to human activities. This human‑induced climate change is mainly caused by global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Most scientists agree that in order to mitigate climate change, by 2050, global CO2 emissions must be reduced by at least 50% co

  10. Photocatalytic CO2 Activation by Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Chieh-Chao

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic activation of CO2 and water has potential for producing fuels by conversion of photon energy. However, the low productivity still limits practical application. In this study, the goal was to gain more fundamental insight in CO2 activation, and to provide guidelines for rational design

  11. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  12. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team members expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  13. CO2 Rekentool voor Tuinbouw: Handleiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiller, S.R.C.H.; Danse, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Dit document is een handleiding bij de online CO2 Rekentool voor Tuinbouw Ketens. De CO2 tool is mogelijk gemaakt door de financiële bijdrage van Productschap Tuinbouw en het Ministerie van Landbouw, Natuur en Voedselkwaliteit (LNV). De tool is ontwikkeld door het onderzoeksconsortium WUR, BMA en AI

  14. CO2 capture, transport, storage and utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing CO2 emissions requires an integrated CO2 management approach. The dependency between the different industry sectors is higher than commonly acknowledged and covers all areas; capture, transport, storage and utilisation. TNO is one of Europe’s largest independent research organisations and p

  15. Improved Criteria for Increasing CO2 Storage Potential with CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, J.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been found that deployment of CO2 capture and storage technology at large scales will be difficult without significant incentives. One of the technologies that has been a focus in recent years is CO2 enhanced oil/gas recovery, where additional hydrocarbon recovery provides an economic incentive for deployment. The way CO2 EOR is currently deployed, maximization of additional oil production does not necessarily lead to maximization of stored CO2, though significant amounts of CO2 are stored regardless of the objective. To determine the potential of large-scale CO2 storage through CO2 EOR, it is necessary to determine the feasibility of deploying this technology over a wide range of oil/gas field characteristics. In addition it is also necessary to accurately estimate the ultimate CO2 storage potential and develop approaches that optimize oil recovery along with long-term CO2 storage. This study uses compositional reservoir simulations to further develop technical screening criteria that not only improve oil recovery, but maximize CO2 storage during enhanced oil recovery operations. Minimum miscibility pressure, maximum oil/ CO2 contact without the need of significant waterflooding, and CO2 breakthrough prevention are a few key parameters specific to the technical aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery that maximize CO2 storage. We have developed reduced order models based on simulation results to determine the ultimate oil recovery and CO2 storage potential in these formations. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that can be used to determine feasibility and long-term CO2 storage potential of CO2 EOR technology.

  16. Charge-controlled switchable CO2 capture on boron nitride nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Searles, Debra J; Chen, Ying; Lu, Gaoqing Max; Du, Aijun

    2013-06-05

    Increasing concerns about the atmospheric CO2 concentration and its impact on the environment are motivating researchers to discover new materials and technologies for efficient CO2 capture and conversion. Here, we report a study of the adsorption of CO2, CH4, and H2 on boron nitride (BN) nanosheets and nanotubes (NTs) with different charge states. The results show that the process of CO2 capture/release can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charges carried by BN nanomaterials. CO2 molecules form weak interactions with uncharged BN nanomaterials and are weakly adsorbed. When extra electrons are introduced to these nanomaterials (i.e., when they are negatively charged), CO2 molecules become tightly bound and strongly adsorbed. Once the electrons are removed, CO2 molecules spontaneously desorb from BN absorbents. In addition, these negatively charged BN nanosorbents show high selectivity for separating CO2 from its mixtures with CH4 and/or H2. Our study demonstrates that BN nanomaterials are excellent absorbents for controllable, highly selective, and reversible capture and release of CO2. In addition, the charge density applied in this study is of the order of 10(13) cm(-2) of BN nanomaterials and can be easily realized experimentally.

  17. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  18. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  19. Electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture: first principle computational exploration of carbon nanotubes with pyridinic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Smith, Sean C; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes with specific nitrogen doping are proposed for controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO2 capture. Using density functional theory incorporating long-range dispersion corrections, we investigated the adsorption behavior of CO2 on (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with several nitrogen doping configurations and varying charge states. Pyridinic-nitrogen incorporation in CNTs is found to induce an increasing CO2 adsorption strength with electron injecting, leading to a highly selective CO2 adsorption in comparison with N2 . This functionality could induce intrinsically reversible CO2 adsorption as capture/release can be controlled by switching the charge carrying state of the system on/off. This phenomenon is verified for a number of different models and theoretical methods, with clear ramifications for the possibility of implementation with a broader class of graphene-based materials. A scheme for the implementation of this remarkable reversible electrocatalytic CO2 -capture phenomenon is considered.

  20. CO2 Capture from Ambient Air by Crystallization with a Guanidine Sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipp, Charles A; Williams, Neil J; Kidder, Michelle K; Custelcean, Radu

    2017-01-19

    Carbon capture and storage is an important strategy for stabilizing the increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2 and the global temperature. A possible approach toward reversing this trend and decreasing the atmospheric CO2 concentration is to remove the CO2 directly from air (direct air capture). Herein we report a simple aqueous guanidine sorbent that captures CO2 from ambient air and binds it as a crystalline carbonate salt by guanidinium hydrogen bonding. The resulting solid has very low aqueous solubility (Ksp =1.0(4)×10(-8) ), which facilitates its separation from solution by filtration. The bound CO2 can be released by relatively mild heating of the crystals at 80-120 °C, which regenerates the guanidine sorbent quantitatively. Thus, this crystallization-based approach to CO2 separation from air requires minimal energy and chemical input, and offers the prospect for low-cost direct air capture technologies.

  1. CO2 – intrinsic product, essential substrate and regulatory trigger of microbial and mammalian production processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian eBlombach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide formation mirrors the final carbon oxidation steps of aerobic metabolism in microbial and mammalian cells. As a consequence CO2/HCO3- dissociation equilibria arise in fermenters by the growing culture. Anaplerotic reactions make use of the abundant CO2/HCO3- levels for refueling citric acid cycle demands and for enabling oxaloacetate derived products. At the same time CO2 is released manifold in metabolic reactions via decarboxylation activity. The levels of extracellular CO2/HCO3- depend on cellular activities and physical constraints such like hydrostatic pressures, aeration and the efficiency of mixing in large-scale bioreactors. Besides, local CO2/HCO3- levels might also act as metabolic inhibitors or transcriptional effectors triggering regulatory events inside the cells. This review gives an overview about fundamental physicochemical properties of CO2/HCO3- in microbial and mammalian cultures effecting cellular physiology, production processes, metabolic activity and transcriptional regulation.

  2. CO2 deserts: implications of existing CO2 supply limitations for carbon management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Richard S; Clarens, Andres F; Liu, Xiaowei; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change will require deep reductions in anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the scale of gigatonnes per year. CO2 capture and utilization and/or storage technologies are a class of approaches that can substantially reduce CO2 emissions. Even though examples of this approach, such as CO2-enhanced oil recovery, are already being practiced on a scale >0.05 Gt/year, little attention has been focused on the supply of CO2 for these projects. Here, facility-scale data newly collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was processed to produce the first comprehensive map of CO2 sources from industrial sectors currently supplying CO2 in the United States. Collectively these sources produce 0.16 Gt/year, but the data reveal the presence of large areas without access to CO2 at an industrially relevant scale (>25 kt/year). Even though some facilities with the capability to capture CO2 are not doing so and in some regions pipeline networks are being built to link CO2 sources and sinks, much of the country exists in "CO2 deserts". A life cycle analysis of the sources reveals that the predominant source of CO2, dedicated wells, has the largest carbon footprint further confounding prospects for rational carbon management strategies.

  3. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs.

  4. Effects of CO2 leakage on soil bacterial communities from simulated CO2-EOR areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Yang, Yongjun; Ma, Yanjun; Hou, Huping; Zhang, Shaoliang; Ma, Jing

    2016-05-18

    CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) has been proposed as a viable option for flooding oil and reducing anthropogenic CO2 contribution to the atmospheric pool. However, the potential risk of CO2 leakage from the process poses a threat to the ecological system. High-throughput sequencing was used to investigate the effects of CO2 emission on the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities. The diversity of bacterial communities notably decreased with increasing CO2 flux. The composition of bacterial communities varied along the CO2 flux, with increasing CO2 flux accompanied by increases in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla, but decreases in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi phyla. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the genus Lactobacillus increased sharply when the CO2 flux was at its highest point. Alpha and beta diversity analysis revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by CO2 flux. The redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by soil pH values which related to CO2 flux. These results could be useful for evaluating the risk of potential CO2 leakages on the ecosystems associated with CO2-EOR processes.

  5. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  6. Elevated CO2 and Soil Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K.; Schlesinger, W.

    2002-12-01

    Although forests can be large terrestrial carbon sinks, soil fertility can limit carbon sequestration in response to increased atmospheric CO2. During five years of CO2 fertilization (ambient + 200ppm) at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, net primary production increased significantly by an average of 25% in treatment plots. Total nitrogen in the foliar canopy increased by 16%, requiring an additional 1.3 g N m-2yr-1 to be taken up from soils under elevated CO2. Mechanisms supporting increased nitrogen acquisition have not been identified. Here we report on biological N-fixation rates, using the acetylene reduction assay, in litter and mineral soil during three years of the CO2 enrichment experiment. Lack of a significant CO2 treatment effect on acetylene reduction indicates that carbon is not directly limiting biological N fixation. Nutrient addition experiments using a complete block design with glucose, Fe, Mo and P indicate biological N fixation is co-limited by molybdenum and carbon. These results suggest even if elevated atmospheric CO2 enhances below-ground carbon availability via root exudation, biological nitrogen fixation may not be stimulated due to micronutrient limitations. Assessment of future carbon sequestration by forest stands must consider limitations imposed by site fertility, including micronutrients.

  7. CO2 laser in vitreoretinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlin, D.B.; Patel, C.K.; Wood, O.R.; Llovera, I.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation from a CO2 laser has the dual effect of phototransection and photocoagulation. Incisions have been made in scleral-chorioretinal tissue, lens tissue, and the vitreous body (with and without membrane formation). Results indicate that the CO2 laser may be useful in intravitreal surgery. Its simultaneous cutting and coagulating properties may make the experimental transvitreal chorioretinal biopsy and the full-thickness ocular wall resection for small melanosarcomas of the choroid clinical possibilities in the not too distant future. Finally, the effects of CO2 laser radiation on the normal human lens suggests the possibility of the dissolution of cataracts by laser irradiation.

  8. Spin polarization effect for Co2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Bao Wen-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT)(b3p86) of Gaussian 03 has been used to optimize the structure of the Co2molecule, a transition metal element molecule. The result shows that the ground state for the Co2 molecule is a 7-multiple state, indicating a spin polarization effect in the Co2 molecule. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state is not mingled with wavefunctions of higher-energy states. So for the ground state of Co2 molecule to be a 7-multiple state is the indicative of spin polarization effect of the Co2molecule, that is, there exist 6 parallel spin electrons in a Co2 molecule. The number of non-conjugated electrons is the greatest. These electrons occupy different spacial orbitals so that the energy of the Co2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Co2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule,which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and the other states of the Co2 molecule are derived. The dissociation energy De for the ground state of Co2 molecule is 4.0489eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2061 nm, and vibration frequency 11.2222 aJ.nm-4respectively(1 a.J=10-18 J). The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Co2 molecule ωexe,Be, and αe are 0.7202 cm-1, 0.1347 cm-1, and 2.9120× 10-1 cm-1 respectively. And ωexe is the non-syntonic part of frequency, Be is the rotational constant, αe is revised constant of rotational constant for non-rigid part of Co2 molecule.

  9. Structurally simple complexes of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Luke J.; Robertson, Katherine N.; Richard A. Kemp; TUONONEN, Heikki; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added p...

  10. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective...... control which can solve future global environmental problems. The economic gains from 'hot air' distributions of permits and CO2 trade make the system politically attractive to potential participants. For example, vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe are to be expected. It will probably...

  11. An improved approach for measuring the impact of multiple CO2 conductances on the apparent photorespiratory CO2 compensation point through slope-intercept regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Berkley J; Skabelund, Dane C; Busch, Florian A; Ort, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis, which are essential for understanding the impact of photosynthesis to changing environments, depend on accurate parameterizations. One such parameter, the photorespiratory CO2 compensation point can be measured from the intersection of several CO2 response curves measured under sub-saturating illumination. However, determining the actual intersection while accounting for experimental noise can be challenging. Additionally, leaf photosynthesis model outcomes are sensitive to the diffusion paths of CO2 released from the mitochondria. This diffusion path of CO2 includes both chloroplastic as well as cell wall resistances to CO2 , which are not readily measurable. Both the difficulties of determining the photorespiratory CO2 compensation point and the impact of multiple intercellular resistances to CO2 can be addressed through application of slope-intercept regression. This technical report summarizes an improved framework for implementing slope-intercept regression to evaluate measurements of the photorespiratory CO2 compensation point. This approach extends past work to include the cases of both Rubisco and Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)-limited photosynthesis. This report further presents two interactive graphical applications and a spreadsheet-based tool to allow users to apply slope-intercept theory to their data.

  12. Total (fumarolic + diffuse soil) CO2 output from Furnas volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedone, M; Viveiros, F; Aiuppa, A; Giudice, G; Grassa, F; Gagliano, A L; Francofonte, V; Ferreira, T

    Furnas volcano, in São Miguel island (Azores), being the surface expression of rising hydrothermal steam, is the site of intense carbon dioxide (CO2) release by diffuse degassing and fumaroles. While the diffusive CO2 output has long (since the early 1990s) been characterized by soil CO2 surveys, no information is presently available on the fumarolic CO2 output. Here, we performed (in August 2014) a study in which soil CO2 degassing survey was combined for the first time with the measurement of the fumarolic CO2 flux. The results were achieved by using a GasFinder 2.0 tunable diode laser. Our measurements were performed in two degassing sites at Furnas volcano (Furnas Lake and Furnas Village), with the aim of quantifying the total (fumarolic + soil diffuse) CO2 output. We show that, within the main degassing (fumarolic) areas, the soil CO2 flux contribution (9.2 t day(-1)) represents a minor (~15 %) fraction of the total CO2 output (59 t day(-1)), which is dominated by the fumaroles (~50 t day(-1)). The same fumaroles contribute to ~0.25 t day(-1) of H2S, based on a fumarole CO2/H2S ratio of 150 to 353 (measured with a portable Multi-GAS). However, we also find that the soil CO2 contribution from a more distal wider degassing structure dominates the total Furnas volcano CO2 budget, which we evaluate (summing up the CO2 flux contributions for degassing soils, fumarolic emissions and springs) at ~1030 t day(-1).

  13. Limits to CO2-Neutrality of Burning Wood. (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolins, J.; Gravitis, J.

    2016-08-01

    Consumption of wood as a source of energy is discussed with respect to efficiency and restraints to ensure sustainability of the environment on the grounds of a simple analytical model describing dynamics of biomass accumulation in forest stands - a particular case of the well-known empirical Richards' equation. Amounts of wood harvested under conditions of maximum productivity of forest land are presented in units normalised with respect to the maximum of the mean annual increment and used to determine the limits of CO2-neutrality. The ecological "footprint" defined by the area of growing stands necessary to absorb the excess amount of CO2 annually released from burning biomass is shown to be equal to the land area of a plantation providing sustainable supply of fire-wood.

  14. Ultrafast Dissociation of Metastable CO2 + in a Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Haertelt, M.; Schlauderer, S.; Schuurman, M. S.; Naumov, A. Yu.; Villeneuve, D. M.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2017-04-01

    We triply ionize the van der Waals bound carbon monoxide dimer with intense ultrashort pulses and study the breakup channel (CO )23 +→C++O++CO+ . The fragments are recorded in a cold target recoil ion momentum spectrometer. We observe a fast CO2 + dissociation channel in the dimer, which does not exist for the monomer. We found that a nearby charge breaks the symmetry of a X3Π state of CO2 + and induces an avoided crossing that allows a fast dissociation. Calculation on the full dimer complex shows the coupling of different charge states, as predicted from excimer theory, gives rise to electronic state components not present in the monomer, thereby enabling fast dissociation with higher kinetic energy release. These results demonstrate that the electronic structure of molecular cluster complexes can give rise to dynamics that is qualitatively different from that observed in the component monomers.

  15. CO2 emissions in the steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kundak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Global CO2 emissions caused by the burning of fossil fuels over the past century are presented. Taking into consideration the total world production of more than 1,3 billion tons of steel, the steel industry produces over two billion tons of CO2. Reductions in CO2 emissions as a result of technological improvements and structural changes in steel production in industrialized countries during the past 40 years are described. Substantial further reductions in those emissions will not be possible using conventional technologies. Instead, a radical cutback may be achieved if, instead of carbon, hydrogen is used for direct iron ore reduction. The cost and the ensuing CO2 generation in the production of hydrogen as a reducing agent from various sources are analysed.

  16. Hoeveel CO2 kostte deze paprika?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.X.

    2011-01-01

    Ondernemers in de tuinbouwsector kunnen dankzij een nieuw protocol de CO2-voetafdruk van hun product van zaaigoed tot supermarktschap berekenen. Daarbij zit een tool die de telers, handelaren en transporteurs kan laten zien waar de uitstoot plaatsvindt.

  17. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  18. Translucent CO2 ice on Mars ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frederic; Andrieu, Francois; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate is driven by the condensation/sublimation of CO2 representing 95% of the atmosphere. Many active surface features (such dark spot, dark flows), have been potentially linked to CO2 exchange. Understanding the surface/atmosphere interactions is a major issue, for both atmospheric but also surface science. This study aims at estimating the physical properties of the seasonal CO2 ice deposits. Are these deposits granular or compact? What is the thickness of the ice? How much impurities are included within the ice? These questions have been highly debated in the literature, in particular the presence of a translucent slab ice, the link with the H2O cycle. In particular the cold jet geyser model requires translucent CO2 ice. We use radiative transfer models to simulate spectroscopic data from the CRISM instrument and perform an inversion to estimate model's parameters though time. We then discuss the consistency of the results with other datasets.

  19. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  20. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Atlas Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  1. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  2. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 control for during ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on mars is challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable...

  3. CO2 phytotron established in Ailaoshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Understanding the Uinteractions between ecological systems and the environment is a priority for the studies of global change, evolutionary biology, and functional genomics.Controlled environment facilities,like CO2 phytotrons, are necessary for acquiring such an understanding.

  4. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A practical CO2 control system for ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on Mars have not yet been developed. TDA Research, Inc. proposes to develop a durable,...

  5. CO2 fluxes from a tropical neighborhood: sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S.; Quak, M.; Britter, R.; Norford, L.

    2011-12-01

    Cities are the main contributors to the CO2 rise in the atmosphere. The CO2 released from the various emission sources is typically quantified by a bottom-up aggregation process that accounts for emission factors and fossil fuel consumption data. This approach does not consider the heterogeneity and variability of the urban emission sources, and error propagation can result in large uncertainties. In this context, direct measurements of CO2 fluxes that include all major and minor anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks from a specific district can be used to evaluate emission inventories. This study reports and compares CO2 fluxes measured directly using the eddy covariance method with emissions estimated by emissions factors and activity data for a residential neighborhood of Singapore, a highly populated and urbanized tropical city. The flux measurements were conducted during one year. No seasonal variability was found as a consequence of the constant climate conditions of tropical places; but a clear diurnal pattern with morning and late afternoon peaks in phase with the rush-hour traffic was observed. The magnitude of the fluxes throughout daylight hours is modulated by the urban vegetation, which is abundant in terms of biomass but not of land-cover (15%). Even though the carbon uptake by vegetation is significant, it does not exceed the anthropogenic emissions and the monitored district is a net CO2 source of 20.3 ton km-2 day-1 on average. The carbon uptake by vegetation is investigated as the difference between the estimated emissions and the measured fluxes during daytime.

  6. Combustion of hythane diluted with CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hraiech Ibtissem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing concern about energy shortage and environmental protection, improving engine fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions have become major research topics in combustion and engine development. Hythane (a blend of hydrogen H2 and natural gas NG has generated a significant interest as an alternative fuel for the future. This paper describes an experimental study of the effects of CO2 addition on the stability of a turbulent jet diffusion NG-H2 flame. The mole fraction of hydrogen (% H2 in NG-H2 mixture was varied from 0% to 50%. The equivalence ratio of the hythane/CO2/air mixture was kept at stoichiometry. The results show that the lift-off height increases with the addition of CO2 at various % H2 content in hythane. However, we observe that with 20% H2, we can obtain a stable flame diluted with 40% CO2, while for 0% H2, the flame is blown out above 20% CO2. This means that the limits of flame blowing out are pushed with the additions of H2. Moreover, the results show that for %H2 content in NG-H2 fuel up to 10%, the addition of CO2 could produce lifted flame if the % CO2 is low. At higher % CO2 dilution, flame would remain attached until blow-out. This is mainly due to the fact that the dilution leads to ejection velocities very high but reactivity of the mixture does not change so the flame tends to stretch.

  7. Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan

    Denne rapport indeholder en beskrivelse af arbejdet udført i og resultaterne af forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ” Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur” og udgør slutrapportering for dette projekt.......Denne rapport indeholder en beskrivelse af arbejdet udført i og resultaterne af forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ” Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur” og udgør slutrapportering for dette projekt....

  8. The Twelve Principles of CO2 CHEMISTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emilia S

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  9. The twelve principles of CO2 Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emelia S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  10. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-07

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  11. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    GÜVENÇ, A.; MEHMETOĞLU, Ü.; ÇALIMLI, A.

    1999-01-01

    Extraction of ethanol was studied from both synthetic ethanol solution and fermentation broth using supercritical CO2 in an extraction apparatus in ranges of 313 to 333 K and 80 to 160 atmospheres, for varying extraction times. The experimental system consists mainly of four parts: a CO2 storage system, a high-pressure liquid pump, an extractor and a product collection unit. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Effects of temperature, pressure, extraction time, initial ethan...

  12. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  13. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  14. Reducing CO2 emission from bitumen upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of sand oil can result in significant CO2 emission. Ceramatec Inc. has developed a technology to reduce the emission of CO2 during the upgrading of feedstocks bearing heteroatoms. This technology can be applied to kerogen derived oil (shale oil) and heavy oil as well as to bitumen from oil sands. Metallic sodium is used as the reducing and heteroatom scavenging agent. Hydrogen, methane or other hydrocarbons may be used to cap radicals formed in the process. But using methane can lead to lower material and capital costs, greater product yield, and lower CO2 emission. During the upgrading process, the aromatic constituents remain in the product, after treatment with sodium and removal of sulphur, nitrogen and metals. Aromatic saturation is not required with sodium, so less hydrogen is needed which leads to reduced CO2 emission. The reason is that CO2 is emitted in the steam methane reforming (SMR) process where hydrogen is produced. An example is introduced to demonstrate the reduction of CO2 emission from hydrogen production. Another advantage of the sodium/methane upgrading process is the incorporation of methane into the fuel. In addition, the total acid number, TAN, becomes negligible in the sodium upgrading processes. Ceramatec has also developed a process for the recovery of sodium from the sodium salts generated in the sodium/methane upgrading process.

  15. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  16. On the Vertical Gradient in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, A. R.; Fung, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Attempts to constrain surface fluxes of carbon from atmospheric measurements of carbon dioxide have primarily focused on surface boundary layer measurements, because information about surface fluxes is least diluted close to the locations where the fluxes occur. However, errors in model ventilation of air in the vertical can be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes. Satellites which measure column integrated CO2 are expected to represent a major advance in part because they observe the entire atmospheric column. Recent work has highlighted the fact that vertical gradients in carbon concentrations can give us information about where vertical mixing errors are likely to be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes, but passive tracer evidence suggests that models that capture vertical profiles on the ocean do poorly on the land (and vice versa), suggesting that the problem of correctly treating vertical mixing in inverse studies is more fundamental than picking the "best" model. We consider observations of the vertical gradient in CO2 from aircrafts and from a comparison of satellites that observe in the near infrared (which observe the column integrated CO2 field) and the thermal infrared (which observe the upper troposphere). We evaluate the feasibility of using these satellites for determining the vertical gradient in CO2. We examine how observations of the vertical gradient of CO2 allow us to differentiate the imprint of vertical mixing and the imprint in surface fluxes on the observed field of atmospheric CO2.

  17. CO2 efflux from cleared mangrove peat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Lovelock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CO(2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2 efflux. CO(2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10,600 tonnes km(-2 year(-1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km(2 year(-1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO(2 efflux (27 umol m(-2 s(-1, but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO(2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks.

  18. Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-28

    The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits

  19. CO2 Emission Factors for Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Orlović-Leko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors are used in greenhouse gas inventories to estimate emissions from coal combustion. In the absence of direct measures, emissions factors are frequently used as a quick, low cost way to estimate emissions values. Coal combustion has been a major contributor to the CO2 flux into the atmosphere. Nearly all of the fuel carbon (99 % in coal is converted to CO2 during the combustion process. The carbon content is the most important coal parameter which is the measure of the degree of coalification (coal rank. Coalification is the alteration of vegetation to form peat, succeeded by the transformation of peat through lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous to anthracite coal. During the geochemical or metamorphic stage, the progressive changes that occur within the coal are an increase in the carbon content and a decrease in the hydrogen and oxygen content resulting in a loss of volatiles. Heterogeneous composition of coal causes variation in CO2 emission from different coals. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has produced guidelines on how to produce emission inventories which includes emission factors. Although 2006 IPCC Guidelines provided the default values specified according to the rank of the coal, the application of country-specific emission factors was recommended when estimating the national greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses the differences between country-specific emission factors and default IPCC CO2 emission factors, EF(CO2, for coals. Also, this study estimated EF(CO2 for two different types of coals and peat from B&H, on the basis fuel analyses. Carbon emission factors for coal mainly depend on the carbon content of the fuel and vary with both rank and geographic origin, which supports the idea of provincial variation of carbon emission factors. Also, various other factors, such as content of sulphur, minerals and macerals play an important role and influence EF(CO2 from coal. Carbonate minerals

  20. Net ecosystem production, calcification and CO2 fluxes on a reef flat in Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhini, Cybelle M.; Souza, Marcelo F. L.; Silva, Ananda M.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon cycle in coral reefs is usually dominated by the organic carbon metabolism and precipitation-dissolution of CaCO3, processes that control the CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in seawater and the CO2 fluxes through the air-sea interface. In order to characterize these processes and the carbonate system, four sampling surveys were conducted at the reef flat of Coroa Vermelha during low tide (exposed flat). Net ecosystem production (NEP), net precipitation-dissolution of CaCO3 (G) and CO2 fluxes across the air-water interface were calculated. The reef presented net autotrophy and calcification at daytime low tide. The NEP ranged from -8.7 to 31.6 mmol C m-2 h-1 and calcification from -13.1 to 26.0 mmol C m-2 h-1. The highest calcification rates occurred in August 2007, coinciding with the greater NEP rates. The daytime CO2 fluxes varied from -9.7 to 22.6 μmol CO2 m-2 h-1, but reached up to 13,900 μmol CO2 m-2 h-1 during nighttime. Carbon dioxide influx to seawater was predominant in the reef flat during low tide. The regions adjacent to the reef showed a supersaturation of CO2, acting as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere (from -22.8 to -2.6 mol CO2 m-2 h-1) in the reef flat during ebbing tide. Nighttime gas release to the atmosphere indicates a net CO2 release from the Coroa Vermelha reef flat within 24 h, and that these fluxes can be important to carbon budget in coral reefs.

  1. CO2-based Flows on Ancient and Modern Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N.

    2002-12-01

    Outburst flood channels from the Hesperian and Amazonian Epochs of Mars have conventionally been interpreted as evidence for catastrophic release of groundwater and surface floods akin to jokulhlaups. The Channeled Scablands of Washington state, USA are a type example of this mechanism. However, on Mars there are problems with storage of the large volumes of water in the subsurface, and little evidence for surface impoundments. To explain the volume of erosion requires multiple floods from each source area, which leads to problems of recharge on a cryogenic planet. An alternative model for the floods has been developed in the last few years that explains the outbursts as the violent escape of pressurized liquid CO2, rather than liquid water. The CO2 is trapped underground beneath frozen icy regolith (permafrost) up to 1 km thick, which provides an effective topseal. When the outburst begins, explosive degassing generates a debris cloud akin to a volcanic pyroclastic flow, but at cryogenic temperature. The cloud flows downhill as a density flow, and could potentially erode the observed channels on Mars. Other terrestrial analogues include submarine density flows, which display considerable morphological similarities to Martian channels. There remain some significant problems with CO2-based flow models. To date, no numerical flow model has been offered to support the intuitive conceptual model, and the degree of erosion vs deposition does not match expectation from small-scale flows on Earth. Progress on a numerical flow model will be discussed briefly, as well as scaling relationships that may explain the degree of erosion seen in the channels of Mars. Acknowledging these shortcomings, we nonetheless suggest that the implications of a cold, dry, CO2-based flow model are so significant that the model deserves more attention from the geophysical and planetary science communities. If the model is sustainable, then the implications for the volatile history and thermal

  2. Application of CO2 in BOF%转炉应用CO2技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万雪峰; 曹东; 刘祥; 朱晓雷; 廖相巍

    2015-01-01

    By the thermodynamic analysis of top blowing CO2 in the converter,combined with laboratory simulation re-sult of top blowing O2+CO2 mixture gas in converter,some key parameters of CO2 used in converter were established. It is concluded that although pure CO2 injected in the converter could achieve decarburize,the drop of temperature was rath-er large. When the CO2 supplying intensity was 3.0 m3/(t·min),the reduction of temperature was 15.1℃/min;By blow-ing O2+CO2 mixture gas,temperature balance could be realized,but the largest theoretical proportion of CO2 in mixture gas was 79.1%;with the increase of CO2 proportion,the carbon and oxygen product of molten steel at the blowing end was reduced,under the condition of φ(CO2)∶φ(O2)=1∶1,the carbon and oxygen product could be controlled in the range of (25~32)×10-8.%通过对转炉顶吹CO2的热力学分析,结合实验室模拟转炉顶吹O2+CO2混合气体试验结果,确立了CO2在转炉中应用的关键参数。得出在转炉中顶吹纯CO2虽可脱碳,但温降较大,顶吹CO2供气强度为3.0 m3/(t·min)时,钢液温降速率为15.1℃/min;通过喷吹O2+CO2混合气体可实现温度平衡,但CO2配比的最大理论比例为79.1%;随着混合气体中CO2比例增大,吹炼终点钢液碳氧积降低,当φ(CO2)∶φ(O2)=1∶1时可控碳氧积为(25~32)×10-8。

  3. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  4. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 nanosheets can be dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets achieve CO2 capture capacities up to 73.9 × 10(13) cm(-2) or 42.3 wt%. In contrast to other CO2 capture approaches, the process of CO2 capture/release occurs spontaneously without any energy barriers once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled and reversed by switching on/off the charging voltage. In addition, these negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2 and/or N2. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of experimentally feasible high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  5. Kinetics of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from champagne glasses in tasting conditions: the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Cilindre, Clara; Jeandet, Philippe

    2009-03-11

    Measurements of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from a flute poured with a standard Champagne wine initially holding about 11 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2) were presented, in tasting conditions, all along the first 10 min following the pouring process. Experiments were performed at three sets of temperature, namely, 4 degrees C, 12 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively. It was demonstrated that the lower the champagne temperature, the lower CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute. Therefore, the lower the champagne temperature, the lower its progressive loss of dissolved CO(2) concentration with time, which constitutes the first analytical proof that low champagne temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps retains its effervescence. A correlation was also proposed between CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute poured with champagne and its continuously decreasing dissolved CO(2) concentration. Finally, the contribution of effervescence to the global kinetics of CO(2) release was discussed and modeled by the use of results developed over recent years. The temperature dependence of the champagne viscosity was found to play a major role in the kinetics of CO(2) outgassing from a flute. On the basis of this bubbling model, the theoretical influence of champagne temperature on CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from a flute was discussed and found to be in quite good accordance with our experimental results.

  6. Decade-long soil nitrogen constraint on the CO2 fertilization of plant biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter B.; Hobbie, Sarah E.

    2013-03-01

    The stimulation of plant growth by elevated CO2 concentration has been widely observed. Such fertilization, and associated carbon storage, could dampen future increases in atmospheric CO2 levels and associated climate warming. However, the CO2 fertilization of plant biomass may be sensitive to nitrogen supply. Herein we show that in the latest decade of a long-term perennial grassland experiment, low ambient soil nitrogen availability constrained the positive response of plant biomass to elevated CO2, a result not seen in the first years (1998-2000) of the study. From 2001 to 2010, elevated CO2 stimulated plant biomass half as much under ambient as under enriched nitrogen supply, an effect mirrored over this period by more positive effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen supply (net nitrogen mineralization) and plant nitrogen status under enriched than ambient nitrogen supply. The results did not strongly support either the progressive nitrogen limitation hypothesis, or the alternative hypothesis of priming of soil nitrogen release by elevated CO2. As nitrogen limitation to productivity is widespread, persistent nitrogen constraints on terrestrial responses to rising CO2 are probably pervasive. Further incorporation of such interactions into Earth system models is recommended to better predict future CO2 fertilization effects and impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  7. Fungal Community Responses to Past and Future Atmospheric CO2 Differ by Soil Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. Christopher; Fay, Philip A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Jackson, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Soils sequester and release substantial atmospheric carbon, but the contribution of fungal communities to soil carbon balance under rising CO2 is not well understood. Soil properties likely mediate these fungal responses but are rarely explored in CO2 experiments. We studied soil fungal communities in a grassland ecosystem exposed to a preindustrial-to-future CO2 gradient (250 to 500 ppm) in a black clay soil and a sandy loam soil. Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing of the rRNA gene cluster revealed that fungal community composition and its response to CO2 differed significantly between soils. Fungal species richness and relative abundance of Chytridiomycota (chytrids) increased linearly with CO2 in the black clay (P 0.7), whereas the relative abundance of Glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) increased linearly with elevated CO2 in the sandy loam (P = 0.02, R2 = 0.63). Across both soils, decomposition rate was positively correlated with chytrid relative abundance (r = 0.57) and, in the black clay soil, fungal species richness. Decomposition rate was more strongly correlated with microbial biomass (r = 0.88) than with fungal variables. Increased labile carbon availability with elevated CO2 may explain the greater fungal species richness and Chytridiomycota abundance in the black clay soil, whereas increased phosphorus limitation may explain the increase in Glomeromycota at elevated CO2 in the sandy loam. Our results demonstrate that soil type plays a key role in soil fungal responses to rising atmospheric CO2. PMID:25239904

  8. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket".

  9. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  10. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags using CO2 diluted sources: CO2 uptakes and energy requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato eBaciocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of carbonation experiments performed on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF steel slag samples employing gas mixtures containing 40 and 10% CO2 vol. simulating the gaseous effluents of gasification and combustion processes respectively, as well as 100% CO2 for comparison purposes. Two routes were tested, the slurry phase (L/S=5 l/kg, T=100 °C and Ptot=10 bar and the thin film (L/S =0.3-0.4 l/kg, T=50 °C and Ptot=7-10 bar routes. For each one, the CO2 uptake achieved as a function of the reaction time was analyzed and on this basis the energy requirements associated to each carbonation route and gas mixture composition were estimated considering to store the CO2 emissions of a medium size natural gas fired power plant (20 MW. For the slurry phase route, maximum CO2 uptakes ranged from around 8% at 10% CO2, to 21.1% (BOF-a and 29.2% (BOF-b at 40% CO2 and 32.5% (BOF-a and 40.3% (BOF-b at 100% CO2. For the thin film route, maximum uptakes of 13% (BOF-c and 19.5% (BOF-d at 40% CO2, and 17.8% (BOF-c and 20.2% (BOF-d at 100% were attained. The energy requirements of the two analyzed process routes appeared to depend chiefly on the CO2 uptake of the slag. For both process route, the minimum overall energy requirements were found for the tests with 40% CO2 flows (i.e. 1400-1600 MJ/t CO2 for the slurry phase and 2220-2550 MJ/t CO2 for the thin film route.

  11. TiO(OH)2 - highly effective catalysts for optimizing CO2 desorption kinetics reducing CO2 capture cost: A new pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongbao; Toan, Sam; Huang, Liang; Fan, Maohong; Wang, Yujun; Russell, Armistead G; Luo, Guangsheng; Fei, Weiyang

    2017-06-07

    The objective is to find a new pathway for significant reduction in CO2 capture energy consumption. Specifically, nanoporous TiO(OH)2 was used to realize the objective, which was desired as a catalyst to significantly accelerate the decomposition of aqueous NaHCO3, essentially CO2 desorption - the key step of Na2CO3/NaHCO3 based CO2 capture technologies from overall CO2 energy consumption perspective. Effects of several important factors on TiO(OH)2-catalyzed NaHCO3 decomposition were investigated. The quantity of CO2 generated from 0.238 mol/L NaHCO3 at 65 °C with catalyst is ~800% of that generated without the presence of catalyst. When a 12 W vacuum pump was used for carrying the generated CO2 out of reactor, the total amount of CO2 released was improved by ~2,500% under the given experimental conditions. No significant decrease in the catalytic effect of TiO(OH)2 was observed after five cyclic CO2 activated tests. In addition, characterizations with in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravity analysis and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller of TiO(OH)2 indicate that TiO(OH)2 is quite stable. The discovery in this research could inspire scientists' interests in starting to focus on a new pathway instead of making huge effort or investment in designing high-capacity but expensive CO2 sorbent for developing practical or cost-effective CO2 technologies.

  12. Evolutionary adaptation of the sensitivity of connexin26 hemichannels to CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Elizabeth; Cook, Jonathan; Dale, Nicholas

    2017-02-08

    CO2 readily combines with H2O to form [Formula: see text] and H(+) Because an increase of only 100 nM in the concentration of H(+) (a decrease of 0.1 unit of pH) in blood can prove fatal, the regulated excretion of CO2 during breathing is an essential life-preserving process. In rodents and humans, this vital process is mediated in part via the direct sensing of CO2 via connexin26 (Cx26). CO2 binds to hemichannels of Cx26 causing them to open and allow release of the neurotransmitter ATP. If Cx26 were to be a universal and important CO2 sensor across all homeothermic animals, then a simple hypothesis would posit that it should exhibit evolutionary adaptation in animals with different homeostatic set points for the regulation of partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2). In humans and rats, PaCO2 is regulated around a set point of 40 mmHg. By contrast, birds are able to maintain cerebral blood flow and breathing at much lower levels of PaCO2 Fossorial mammals, such as the mole rat, live exclusively underground in burrows that are both hypoxic and hypercapnic and can thrive under very hypercapnic conditions. We have therefore compared the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 from human, chicken, rat and mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber). We find that both the affinity and cooperativity of CO2 binding to Cx26 have been subjected to evolutionary adaption in a manner consistent with the homeostatic requirements of these four species. This is analogous to the evolutionary adaptation of haemoglobin to the needs of O2 transport across the animal kingdom and supports the hypothesis that Cx26 is an important and universal CO2 sensor in homeotherms.

  13. CO2-Water-Rock Wettability: Variability, Influencing Factors, and Implications for CO2 Geostorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-05-16

    Carbon geosequestration (CGS) has been identified as a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and thus significantly mitigate climate change. In CGS, CO2 is captured from large point-source emitters (e.g., coal fired power stations), purified, and injected deep underground into geological formations for disposal. However, the CO2 has a lower density than the resident formation brine and thus migrates upward due to buoyancy forces. To prevent the CO2 from leaking back to the surface, four trapping mechanisms are used: (1) structural trapping (where a tight caprock acts as a seal barrier through which the CO2 cannot percolate), (2) residual trapping (where the CO2 plume is split into many micrometer-sized bubbles, which are immobilized by capillary forces in the pore network of the rock), (3) dissolution trapping (where CO2 dissolves in the formation brine and sinks deep into the reservoir due to a slight increase in brine density), and (4) mineral trapping (where the CO2 introduced into the subsurface chemically reacts with the formation brine or reservoir rock or both to form solid precipitates). The efficiency of these trapping mechanisms and the movement of CO2 through the rock are strongly influenced by the CO2-brine-rock wettability (mainly due to the small capillary-like pores in the rock which form a complex network), and it is thus of key importance to rigorously understand CO2-wettability. In this context, a substantial number of experiments have been conducted from which several conclusions can be drawn: of prime importance is the rock surface chemistry, and hydrophilic surfaces are water-wet while hydrophobic surfaces are CO2-wet. Note that CO2-wet surfaces dramatically reduce CO2 storage capacities. Furthermore, increasing pressure, salinity, or dissolved ion valency increases CO2-wettability, while the effect of temperature is not well understood. Indeed theoretical understanding of CO2-wettability and the ability to

  14. Carbon Dioxide Clusters: (CO_2)_6 to (CO_2)13

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2011-06-01

    We recenty reported assignments of specific infrared bands in the CO_2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn) to (CO_2)_6, (CO_2)_7, (CO_2)_9, (CO_2)10, (CO_2)11, (CO_2)12, and (CO_2)13. Spectra are obtained by direct absorption using a rapid-scan tuneable diode laser spectrometer to probe a pulsed supersonic slit-jet expansion and assignments are facilitated by recent calculations of Takeuchi based on the Murthy potential. (CO_2)_6 is a symmetric top with S_6 point group symmetry which can be thought of as a stack of two planar cyclic trimers. (CO_2)13 is also an S_6 symmetric top, and consists of a single CO_2 monomer surrounded by an slightly distorted icosahedral cage. The remaining clusters are asymmetric tops without symmetry. Here we report additional CO_2 cluster results. Calculations based on the SAPT-s potential indicate that the structure of (CO_2)10 may be slightly different from that given by Takeuchi/Murthy. An additional band is observed for each of (CO_2)13 and (CO_2)10. A feature observed at 2378.2 wn is assigned as a (CO_2)_6 parallel combination band involving the sum of a fundamental and a low-lying intermolecular vibration. Most significantly, two bands are assigned to a second isomer of (CO_2)_6. This is also a symmetric top, but now with S_4 symmetry. The two symmetric hexamer isomers observed spectroscopically correspond well with the lowest energy structures given by both the SAPT-s and Murthy intermolecular potentials. [1] J. Norooz Oliaee, M. Dehgany, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A.R.W. McKellar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 1297 (2011). [2] H. Takeuchi, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 5703 (2008); C.S. Murthy, S.F. O'Shea, and I.R. McDonald, Mol. Phys. 50, 531 (1983). [3] R. Bukowski, J. Sadlej, B. Jeziorski, P. Jankowski, K. Szalewicz, S.A. Kucharski, H.L. Williams, and B.M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)

  15. Involvement of respiratory processes in the transient knockout of net CO2 uptake in Mimosa pudica upon heat stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautner, Silke; Stummer, Michaela; Matyssek, Rainer; Fromm, Jörg; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2014-01-01

    Leaf photosynthesis of the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica displays a transient knockout in response to electrical signals induced by heat stimulation. This study aims at clarifying the underlying mechanisms, in particular, the involvement of respiration. To this end, leaf gas exchange and light reactions of photosynthesis were assessed under atmospheric conditions largely eliminating photorespiration by either elevated atmospheric CO2 or lowered O2 concentration (i.e. 2000 μmol mol(-1) or 1%, respectively). In addition, leaf gas exchange was studied in the absence of light. Under darkness, heat stimulation caused a transient increase of respiratory CO2 release simultaneously with stomatal opening, hence reflecting direct involvement of respiratory stimulation in the drop of the net CO2 uptake rate. However, persistence of the transient decline in net CO2 uptake rate under illumination and elevated CO2 or 1% O2 makes it unlikely that photorespiration is the metabolic origin of the respiratory CO2 release. In conclusion, the transient knockout of net CO2 uptake is at least partially attributed to an increased CO2 release through mitochondrial respiration as stimulated by electrical signals. Putative CO2 limitation of Rubisco due to decreased activity of carbonic anhydrase was ruled out as the photosynthesis effect was not prevented by elevated CO2 . © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  17. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...... profitable trade. Also, a periodical renewal of permits makes it possible to tighten target levels in the future.......The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost......-effective control which can solve future global environmental problems. The gains from CO2 trade may give vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe, for example, and it will probably not pay to cheat if quotas are renewed periodically by the UN. Cheating countries are then to be excluded from further...

  18. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...... not pay to cheat if quotas are renewed periodically by the UN. Cheating countries are then to be excluded from further profitable trade. Also, a periodical renewal of permits makes it possible to tighten target levels in the future.......The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost......-effective control which can solve future global environmental problems. The economic gains from 'hot air' distributions of permits and CO2 trade make the system politically attractive to potential participants. For example, vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe are to be expected. It will probably...

  19. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    by the Ministry of Transport, with the Technical University of Denmark as one of the main contributors. The CO2-strategy was to be based on the principle of cost-effectiveness. A model was set up to assist in the assessment. The model consists of a projection of CO2-emissions from road and rail modes from 2020...... are evaluated according to CO2 reduction potential and according to the ‘shadow price’ on a reduction of one ton CO2. The shadow price reflects the costs (and benefits) of the different measures. Comparing the measures it is possible to identify cost effective measures, but these measures are not necessarily......, a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...

  20. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of CO2-HX complexes using the CO2 asymmetric stretch chromophore: CO2HF(DF) and CO2HCl(DCl) linear and CO2HBr bent equilibrium geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, S. W.; Zeng, Y. P.; Wittig, C.; Beaudet, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra associated with the CO2 asymmetric stretch vibration have been recorded for weakly bonded gas-phase complexes of CO2 with HF, DF, HCl, DCl, and HBr, using tunable diode laser spectroscopy and a pulsed slit expansion (0.15×38 mm2) that provides >20 MHz overall resolution. Results obtained with CO2-HF are in agreement with earlier studies, in which the HF-stretch region near 3900 cm-1 was examined. In both cases, broad linewidths suggest subnanosecond predissociation. With CO2-DF, the natural linewidths are markedly narrower than with CO2-HF (e.g., 28 vs 182 MHz), and this difference is attributed to slower predissociation, possibly implicating resonances in the case of CO2-HF. Both CO2-HF and CO2-DF exhibited overlapping features: simple P and R branches associated with a linear rotor, and P and R branches containing doublets. As in earlier studies, the second feature can be assigned to either a slightly asymmetric rotor with Ka=1, or a hot band involving a low-frequency intermolecular bend mode. Results obtained with CO2-HCl are in excellent agreement with earlier microwave measurements on the ground vibrational state, and the vibrationally excited state is almost identical to the lower state. Like CO2-DF, linewidths of CO2-HCl and CO2-DCl are much sharper than those of CO2-HF, and in addition, CO2-HCl and CO2-DCl exhibited weak hot bands, as were also evident with CO2-HF and CO2-DF. Upon forming complexes with either HF or HCl, the asymmetric stretch mode of CO2 underwent a blue shift relative to uncomplexed CO2. This can be understood in terms of the nature of the hydrogen bonds, and ab initio calculations are surprisingly good at predicting these shifts. Deuteration of both HF and HCl resulted in further blue shifts of the band origins. These additional shifts are attributed to stronger intermolecular interactions, i.e., deuteration lowers the zero-point energy, and in a highly anharmonic field this results in a more compact average

  1. Alternative synthetic route for the heterometallic CO-releasing [Sb@Rh12(CO27]3− icosahedral carbonyl cluster and synthesis of its new unsaturated [Sb@Rh12(CO24]4− and dimeric [{Sb@Rh12Sb(CO25}2Rh(CO2PPh3]7− derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Femoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The hetero-metallic [Sb@Rh12(CO27]3− cluster has been known as for over three decades thanks to Vidal and co-workers, and represents the first example of an E-centered (E=heteroatom icosahedral rhodium carbonyl cluster. However, its synthesis required high temperature (140–160 °C and elevated CO pressure (400 atm. Applying the redox condensation method for cluster preparation, we herein report a new synthetic, high-yield route for preparing [Sb@Rh12(CO27]3− under much milder conditions of temperature and pressure. Notably, when the same synthesis was carried out under N2 instead of CO atmosphere, the new isostructural but unsaturated derivative [Sb@Rh12(CO24]4− was obtained, for which we report the full X-ray structural characterization. This species represents one of the few examples of an icosahedral cluster disobeying the electron-counting Wade-Mingos rules, possessing less than the expected 170 cluster valence electrons (CVEs. Judging from IR monitoring, the two species can be obtained one from the other by switching between N2 and CO atmosphere, making [Sb@Rh12(CO27]3− a spontaneous CO-releasing molecule. Finally, the study of the chemical reactivity of [Sb@Rh12(CO27]3− with PPh3 allowed us to obtain the new [{Sb@Rh12Sb(CO25}2Rh(CO2PPh3]7− dimeric compound, for which we herein report the full X-ray structural and 31P NMR analyses.

  2. Alternative synthetic route for the heterometallic CO-releasing [Sb@Rh12(CO)27]3-icosahedral carbonyl cluster and synthesis of its new unsaturated [Sb@Rh12(CO)24]4-and dimeric [{Sb@Rh12Sb(CO)25}2Rh(CO)2PPh3]7-derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Femoni; Iacopo Ciabatti; Maria Carmela Iapalucci; Silvia Ruggieri; Stefano Zacchini

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-metallic [Sb@Rh12(CO)27]3−cluster has been known as for over three decades thanks to Vidal and co-workers, and represents the first example of an E-centered (E=heteroatom) icosahedral rhodium carbonyl cluster. However, its synthesis required high temperature (140–160 °C) and elevated CO pressure (400 atm). Applying the redox condensation method for cluster preparation, we herein report a new synthetic, high-yield route for preparing [Sb@Rh12(CO)27]3−under much milder conditions of temperature and pressure. Notably, when the same synthesis was carried out under N2 instead of CO atmosphere, the new isostructural but unsaturated derivative [Sb@Rh12(CO)24]4− was obtained, for which we report the full X-ray structural characterization. This species represents one of the few examples of an icosahedral cluster disobeying the electron-counting Wade-Mingos rules, possessing less than the expected 170 cluster valence electrons (CVEs). Judging from IR monitoring, the two species can be obtained one from the other by switching between N2 and CO atmosphere, making [Sb@Rh12(CO)27]3− a spontaneous CO-releasing molecule. Finally, the study of the chemical reactivity of [Sb@Rh12(CO)27]3− with PPh3 allowed us to obtain the new [{Sb@Rh12Sb(CO)25}2Rh(CO)2PPh3]7− dimeric compound, for which we herein report the full X-ray structural and 31P NMR analyses.

  3. Lagrangian simulation of deposition of CO2 gas-solid sudden expansion flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Freezing and blockage resulting from the deposition of solid CO2 formed because of sudden expansion of the downstream pipe during the release of CO2 through safety valves,will endanger the protected equipment.To overcome this problem,the characteristics of the CO2 gas-solid sudden expansion flow are studied by using the disperse Lagrangian model.A comparison of the calculated deposition of the solid CO2 with the experimental results shows that they are in reasonable agreement.The simulation results show that the size of the solid CO2 formed should not be in the range of 0.04-0.07 mm (St number 3.2-9.8).This can be achieved by using an appropriate flow cross section of the safety valve.

  4. Investigation into optimal CO2 concentration for CO2 capture from aluminium production

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Anette; Sørensen, Henriette; Melaaen, Morten Christian; Müller, Gunn-Iren

    2013-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from aluminum production has been simulated using Aspen Plus and Aspen Hysys. The technology used for aluminum production is the Hall-Héroult and the current cell design necessitates that large amounts of false air is supplied to the cells. This results in a CO2 concentration in the process gas at around 1 vol%, which is considered uneconomical for CO2 capture. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to evaluate the CO2 capture from aluminum production when the process g...

  5. Measuring Nitrous Oxide Mass Transfer into Non-Aqueous CO2BOL CO2 Capture Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zwoster, Andy; Heldebrant, David J.

    2016-03-28

    This paper investigates CO2 absorption behavior in CO2BOL solvents by decoupling the physical and chemical effects using N2O as a non-reactive mimic. Absorption measurements were performed using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed using a “first generation” CO2 binding organic liquid (CO2BOL), comprised of an independent base and alcohol. Measurements were made with N2O at a lean (0.06 mol CO2/mol BOL) and rich (0.26 mol CO2/mol BOL) loading, each at three temperatures (35, 45 and 55 °C). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (kg') were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance – determined from a correlation from literature – from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting kg' values for N2O in CO2BOLs were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous MEA under comparable conditions, which is supported by published measurements of Henry’s coefficients for N2O in various solvents. These results suggest that the physical solubility contribution for CO2 absorption in CO2BOLs is greater than that of aqueous amines, an effect that may pertain to other non-aqueous solvents.

  6. Behavior of CO2/water flow in porous media for CO2 geological storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Yu, Minghao; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Ziqiu; Suekane, Tetsuya; Song, Yongchen

    2017-04-01

    A clear understanding of two-phase fluid flow properties in porous media is of importance to CO2 geological storage. The study visually measured the immiscible and miscible displacement of water by CO2 using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and investigated the factor influencing the displacement process in porous media which were filled with quartz glass beads. For immiscible displacement at slow flow rates, the MR signal intensity of images increased because of CO2 dissolution; before the dissolution phenomenon became inconspicuous at flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). For miscible displacement, the MR signal intensity decreased gradually independent of flow rates, because supercritical CO2 and water became miscible in the beginning of CO2 injection. CO2 channeling or fingering phenomena were more obviously observed with lower permeable porous media. Capillary force decreases with increasing particle size, which would increase permeability and allow CO2 and water to invade into small pore spaces more easily. The study also showed CO2 flow patterns were dominated by dimensionless capillary number, changing from capillary finger to stable flow. The relative permeability curve was calculated using Brooks-Corey model, while the results showed the relative permeability of CO2 slightly decreases with the increase of capillary number.

  7. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: a Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, A.; Sasselov, D.; Podolak, M.

    2017-03-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction large enough to form an external mantle composed of high-pressure water-ice polymorphs and also lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone, so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global, deep, liquid ocean. For these ocean planets, we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2, the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that, in a steady state, the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is established. The exact value depends on the subpolar surface temperature. Our results suggest the possibility of a negative feedback mechanism, unique to water planets, where a reduction in the subpolar temperature drives more CO2 into the atmosphere to increase the greenhouse effect.

  8. Metal-CO2 Batteries on the Road: CO2 from Contamination Gas to Energy Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhang; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-01-20

    Rechargeable nonaqueous metal-air batteries attract much attention for their high theoretical energy density, especially in the last decade. However, most reported metal-air batteries are actually operated in a pure O2 atmosphere, while CO2 and moisture in ambient air can significantly impact the electrochemical performance of metal-O2 batteries. In the study of CO2 contamination on metal-O2 batteries, it has been gradually found that CO2 can be utilized as the reactant gas alone; namely, metal-CO2 batteries can work. On the other hand, investigations on CO2 fixation are in focus due to the potential threat of CO2 on global climate change, especially for its steadily increasing concentration in the atmosphere. The exploitation of CO2 in energy storage systems represents an alternative approach towards clean recycling and utilization of CO2 . Here, the aim is to provide a timely summary of recent achievements in metal-CO2 batteries, and inspire new ideas for new energy storage systems. Moreover, critical issues associated with reaction mechanisms and potential directions for future studies are discussed.

  9. Sublimation of the Martian CO2 Seasonal South Polar Cap

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Frederic; Doute, Sylvain; Forget, Francois; Jian, Jeng-Jong; Martin, Patrick; Langevin, Yves; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The polar condensation/sublimation of CO2, that involve about one fourth of the atmosphere mass, is the major Martian climatic cycle. Early observations in visible and thermal infrared have shown that the sublimation of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. Here we use observations by OMEGA/Mars Express in the near-infrared to detect unambiguously the presence of CO2 at the surface, and to estimate albedo. Second, we estimate the sublimation of CO2 released in the atmosphere and show that there is a two-step process. From Ls=180^\\circ to 220^\\circ, the sublimation is nearly symmetric with a slight advantage for the cryptic region. After Ls=220^\\circ the anti-cryptic region sublimation is stronger. Those two phases are not balanced such that there is 22%\\pm9 more mass the anti-cryptic region, arguing for more snow precipitation. We compare those results with the MOLA height measurements. Finally we discuss implications for the Martian atmosphere about general ci...

  10. Preliminary assessment of CO2 injectivity in carbonate storage sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Raza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Depleted gas reservoirs are used for a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2 storage and reduction of the greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. To identify a suitable depleted reservoir, it is essential to do a preliminary and comprehensive assessment of key storage factors such as storage capacity, injectivity, trapping mechanisms, and containment. However, there are a limited number of studies providing a preliminary assessment of CO2 injectivity potential in depleted gas reservoirs prior to a CO2 storage operation. The aim of this study is to provide a preliminary assessment of a gas field located in Malaysia for its storage potential based on subsurface characterization prior to injection. Evaluation of the reservoir interval based on the facies, cores, and wireline log data of a well located in the field indicated that the pore type and fabrics analysis is very beneficial to identify suitable locations for a successful storage practice. Although the results obtained are promising, it is recommended to combine this preliminary assessment with the fluid-mineral interactions analysis before making any judgment about reliability of storage sites.

  11. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  12. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity.

  13. Membraneless water filtration using CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Shardt, Orest; Warren, Patrick; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Water purification technologies such as ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis utilize porous membranes to remove suspended particles and solutes. These membranes, however, cause many drawbacks such as a high pumping cost and a need for periodic replacement due to fouling. Here we show an alternative membraneless method for separating suspended particles by exposing the colloidal suspension to CO2. Dissolution of CO2 into the suspension creates solute gradients that drive phoretic motion of particles, or so-called diffusiophoresis. Due to the large diffusion potential built up by the dissociation of carbonic acid, colloidal particles move either away from or towards the gas-liquid interface depending on their surface charge. Our findings suggest a means to separate particles without membranes or filters, thus reducing operating and maintenance costs. Using the directed motion of particles induced by exposure to CO2, we demonstrate a scalable, continuous flow, membraneless particle filtration process that exhibits very low pressure drop and is essentially free from fouling.

  14. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlaat, B.; Ostrega, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Bortolin, C.; Vogt, S.; Godlewski, J.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Van Overbeek, M.; Blaszcyk, T.

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra pixel layer in the space obtained by a smaller radius beam pipe. This new pixel layer called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) was installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the expected high radiation dose received at an integrated luminosity of 550 fb1. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  15. Upscaling of enzyme enhanced CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne Berthold

    the mass transfer of CO2 with slow-capturing but energetically favorable solvents can open up a variety of new process options for this technology. The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which enhances the mass transfer of CO2 in the lungs by catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2, is one very...... promising mass transfer rate promoter for CCS. This process has been previously been tested successfully in lab scale and in some rare cases in pilot scale, but no validated process model for this technology has been published yet. This PhD thesis presents an investigation of the feasibility of enzyme...... enzyme kinetic model and validating it against in-house pilot plant experiments. The work consisted of identifying a suitable enzyme-solvent system and the ideal process conditions by comparing mass transfer rates of different solvents and enzyme enhanced solvents in a lab scale wetted wall column...

  16. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...... monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated...

  17. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  18. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  19. Local CO2-induced swelling of shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2017-04-01

    In heterogeneous shale rocks, CO2 adsorbs more strongly to organic matter than to the other components. CO2-induced swelling of organic matter has been shown in coal, which is pure carbon. The heterogeneity of the shale matrix makes an interesting case study. Can local swelling through adsorption of CO2 to organic matter induce strain in the surrounding shale matrix? Can fractures close due to CO2-induced swelling of clays and organic matter? We have developed a new generation of microfluidic high pressure cells (up to 100 bar), which can be used to study flow and adsorption phenomena at the microscale in natural geo-materials. The devices contain one transparent side and a shale sample on the other side. The shale used is the Pomeranian shale, extracted from 4 km depth in Poland. This formation is a potential target of a combined CO2-storage and gas extraction project. To answer the first question, we place the pressure cell under a Veeco NT1100 Interferometer, operated in Vertical Scanning Interferometry mode and equipped with a Through Transmissive Media objective. This allows for observation of local swelling or organic matter with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution. We expose the sample to CO2 atmospheres at different pressures. Comparison of the interferometry data and using SEM-EDS maps plus optical microscopy delivers local swelling maps where we can distinguish swelling of different mineralogies. Preliminary results indicate minor local swelling of organic matter, where the total amount is both time- and pressure-dependent.

  20. Do Tree Stems Recapture Respired CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilman, B.; Angert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Tree stem respiration is an important, yet not well understood, component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Predicting how trees as whole organisms respond to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 requires understanding of the variability in the fraction of assimilated carbon allocated to respiration, versus the allocation to growth, damage repair, and to rhizosphere symbionts. Here we used the ratio of CO2 efflux/O2 influx (Apparent Respiratory Quotient, ARQ) to study stem respiration. The ARQ in trees stems is predicted to be 1.0, as a result of carbohydrates metabolism. Lower than 1.0 ARQ values may indicate a local assimilation of respired CO2, or dissolution and transport of CO2 in the xylem stream. We measured stems ARQ in 16 tree species at tropical, Mediterranean and temperate ecosystems using stem chambers and in-vitro incubations. The CO2 and O2 were measured by a system we developed, which is based on an IRGA and a Fuel-cell O2 analyzer (Hilman and Angert 2016). We found typical values of ARQ in the range of 0.4-0.8. Since incubations of detach stem tissues yielded similar ARQ values, and since the influence of natural variations in the transpiration stream on ARQ was found to be small, we conclude that the removal of the respired CO2 is not via dissolution in the xylem stream. Using 13C labeling, dark fixation of stem tissues was detected, which is most probably phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) mediated. Hence, we suggest that in-stem dark fixation of respired CO2 to organic acids (e.g. malate) affects the outgoing efflux. Further research should determine if these organic acids are transported to the canopy, stored in the stem, or transported to the roots to serve as exudates. Hilman B, Angert A (2016) Measuring the ratio of CO2 efflux to O2 influx in tree stem respiration. Tree Physiol 2016, doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpw057

  1. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...... concerns of the potential measures within those intervention areas: • Reductions in the need to travel • Improved efficiency of the transport system • Improved fuel efficiency of transport activities • Reduced CO2 intensity of the fuels Within each area a number of measures were analysed. The measures...

  2. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late

  3. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...... perspectives for decreasing the heat requirement. However, a scientific understanding of the processes is required. The thermodynamic properties of the NH3–CO2–H2O system were described using the extended UNIQUAC electrolyte model developed by Thomsen and Rasmussen in a temperature range from 0 to 110°C...

  4. Leak Path Development in CO2 Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsater, M.; Todorovic, J.; Opedal, N.; Lavrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wells have in numerous scientific works been denoted the "weak link" of safe and cost-efficient CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Whether they are active or abandoned, all wells are man-made intrusions into the storage reservoir with sealing abilities depending on degradable materials like steel and cement. If dense CO2 is allowed to expand (e.g. due to leakage) it will cool down its surroundings and cause strong thermal and mechanical loading on the wellbore. In addition, CO2 reacts chemically with rock, cement and steel. To ensure long-term underground containment, it is therefore necessary to study how, why, where and when leakage occurs along CO2wells. If cement bonding to rock or casing is poor, leak paths can form already during drilling and completion of the well. In the present work, we have mapped the bonding quality of cement-rock and cement-steel interfaces - and measured their resistance towards CO2 flow. This involved a large experimental matrix including different rocks, steels, cement types and well fluids. The bonding qualities were measured on composite cores using micro computed tomography (µ-CT), and CO2 was flooded through the samples to determine leakage rates. These were further compared to numerical simulations of leakage through the digitalized µ-CT core data, and CO2chemical interactions with the materials were mapped using electron microscopy. We also present a new laboratory set-up for measuring how well integrity is affected by downhole temperature variations - and we showcase some initial results. Our work concludes that leak path development in CO2 wells depends critically on the drilling fluids and presflushes/spacers chosen already during drilling and completion of a well. Fluid films residing on rock and casing surfaces strongly degrade the quality of cement bonding. The operation of the well is also important, as even slight thermal cycling (between 10°C and 95°C on casing) leads to significant de-bonding of the annular cement.

  5. Toxic emissions and devaluated CO2-neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    with a climate policy whose goals of CO2-reduction were made operational by green-wash. Arguments are given for the devaluation of CO2- neutrality in case of burning wood. Alternative practices as storing C in high quality wood products and/or leaving wood in the forest are recommended. A counter......-productive effect of dioxin formation in the cooling phase of wood burning appliances has been registered akin to de-novo-synthesis in municipal solid waste incinerators. Researchers, regulators and the public are, however, still preoccupied by notions of oven design and operation parameters, assuming that dioxin...

  6. Carbon monoxide : A quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamnitzer, Ulrike; Karstens, Ute; Kromer, Bernd; Neubert, Rolf E. M.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Schroeder, Hartwig; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and radiocarbon ((CO2)-C-14) measurements have been made in Heidelberg from 2001 to 2004 in order to determine the regional fossil fuel CO2 component and to investigate the application of CO as a quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2 (CO2(foss)). The obs

  7. Modeling CO2 air dispersion from gas driven lake eruptions (Invited)

    OpenAIRE

    Chiodini, G.(INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce, Italy); COSTA, A.; Rouwet, D; F. Tassi

    2010-01-01

    The most tragic event of gas driven lake eruption occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) on 21 August 1986, when a dense cloud of CO2 suffocated more than 1700 people and an uncounted number of animals in just one night. The event stimulated a series of researches aimed to understand gas origins, gas release mechanisms and strategies for gas hazard mitigation. Very few studies have been carried out for describing the transport of dense CO2 clouds in the atmosphere. Although from a...

  8. Quantifying the magnitude, spatiotemporal variation and age of aquatic CO2 fluxes in western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, H. E.; Waldron, S.; Hoey, T.; Garnett, M.; Newton, J.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude regions are experiencing accelerated atmospheric warming, and understanding the terrestrial response to this is of crucial importance as: a) there is a large store of carbon (C) in permafrost soils which may be released and feedback to climate change; and, b) ice sheet melt in this region is accelerating, and whilst this will cause albedo and heat flux changes, the role of this in atmospheric gas release is poorly known. To understand how sensitive arctic environments may respond to future warming, we need measurements that document current C flux rates and help to understand C cycling pathways. Although it has been widely hypothesised that arctic regions may become increasingly significant C sources, the contribution of aquatic C fluxes which integrate catchment-wide sources has been little studied. Using a floating chamber method we directly measured CO2 fluxes from spatially distributed freshwaters (ice sheet melt, permafrost melt, and lakes/ponds) in the Kangerlussuaq region of western Greenland during the early part of the summer 2014 melt season. Fluxes from freshwaters with permafrost sources were in the range -3.15 to +1.28 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Fluxes from a river draining the ice sheet and the Russell Glacier were between -2.19 and +4.31 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. These ranges show the systems can be both sources (efflux) and sinks (influx) of CO2. Most freshwater data worldwide shows CO2 efflux and so recording aquatic systems being a CO2­ ­sink is unusual. Our data show spatial and temporal variations that are related to hydraulic as well as biogeochemical processes. Additionally, where we recorded CO2 efflux we collected effluxed CO2 for radiocarbon analysis. The measured age of the released gas will help to identify the sources and dominant transport processes of CO­2 (e.g. entrained modern atmospheric CO2, or old CO2 trapped during ice formation released through ice melt, or CO2 derived from respiration of soil and sediment organic matter

  9. Plant nutrient mobilization in temperate heathland responds to elevated CO2, temperature and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven

    2010-01-01

    when combined with CO2 and drought. Below Deschampsia, the net nitrification rate decreased in response to drought and, while phosphorus availability and microbial P immobilization decreased, but nitrification increased in response to elevated CO2. Furthermore, leaf litter decomposition of both species...... decreased in response to drought. These complex changes in availability and release of nutrients from soil organic matter turnover and mineralization in response to elevated CO2 and climate change may influence the future plant carbon sequestration and species composition at temperate heathlands....

  10. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the inferr

  11. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the inferr

  12. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: A Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Amit; Podolak, Morris

    2016-01-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction that is large enough to form an external mantle composed of high pressure water ice polymorphs and that lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global deep liquid ocean. For these ocean planets we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2; the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that in steady state the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When the wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is esta...

  13. Evidence of wintertime CO2 emission from snow-covered grounds in high latitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方精云; 唐艳鸿KOIZUMI; Hiroshi(Division; of; Plant; Ecology; National; Institute; of; Agro-Environmental; Sciences; Tsukuba; 305; Japan)BEKKU; Yukiko(National; Polar; Institute; Tokyo; 192; Japan)

    1999-01-01

    In order to measure CO2 flux in wintertime arctic ecosystems, CO2 gas was sampled from various snow-covered grounds by using a closed chamber method during the First China Arctic Scientific Expedition from March to May in 1995. The CO2 gas samples were measured by using an infra-red analyzer (IRGA). The results showed that (ⅰ) CO2 emission was detected from all kinds of the snow-covered grounds, which provides direct evidence that the arctic tundra is functioning as a source of atmospheric CO2; (ⅱ) CO2 release was also detected from the permanent ice profile and icecap, and (ⅲ) CO2 evolution from terrestrial ecosystems in higher latitudes increased with an increase of surface temperature in accordance with the exponential function. This indicates a close coincidence with that under normal temperature conditions, and provides a useful method for predicting change in CO2 flux in the arctic ecosystems with the global climate change.

  14. Dynamics of global atmospheric CO2 concentration from 1850 to 2010: a linear approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Nemani, R.

    2014-09-01

    The increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions largely followed an exponential path between 1850 and 2010, and the corresponding increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration were almost constantly proportional to the emissions by the so-called "airborne fraction". These observations suggest that the dynamics of atmospheric CO2 concentration through this time period may be properly approximated as a linear system. We demonstrate this hypothesis by deriving a linear box-model to describe carbon exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface reservoirs under the influence of disturbances such as anthropogenic CO2 emissions and global temperature changes. We show that the box model accurately simulates the observed atmospheric CO2 concentrations and growth rates across interannual to multi-decadal time scales. The model also allows us to analytically examine the dynamics of such changes/variations, linking its characteristic disturbance-response functions to bio-geophysically meaningful parameters. In particular, our results suggest that the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations have significantly promoted the gross carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere. However, such "fertilization" effects are partially offset by enhanced carbon release from surface reservoirs promoted by warmer temperatures. The result of these interactions appears to be a decline in net efficiency in sequestering atmospheric CO2 by ∼30% since 1960s. We believe that the linear modeling framework outlined in this paper provides a convenient tool to diagnose the observed atmospheric CO2 dynamics and monitor their future changes.

  15. Energy and material balance of CO2 capture from ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Frank

    2007-11-01

    Current Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies focus on large, stationary sources that produce approximately 50% of global CO2 emissions. We propose an industrial technology that captures CO2 directly from ambient air to target the remaining emissions. First, a wet scrubbing technique absorbs CO2 into a sodium hydroxide solution. The resultant carbonate is transferred from sodium ions to calcium ions via causticization. The captured CO2 is released from the calcium carbonate through thermal calcination in a modified kiln. The energy consumption is calculated as 350 kJ/mol of CO2 captured. It is dominated by the thermal energy demand of the kiln and the mechanical power required for air movement. The low concentration of CO2 in air requires a throughput of 3 million cubic meters of air per ton of CO2 removed, which could result in significant water losses. Electricity consumption in the process results in CO2 emissions and the use of coal power would significantly reduce to net amount captured. The thermodynamic efficiency of this process is low but comparable to other "end of pipe" capture technologies. As another carbon mitigation technology, air capture could allow for the continued use of liquid hydrocarbon fuels in the transportation sector.

  16. Nanodeserts: A Conjecture in Nanotechnology to Enhance Quasi-Photosynthetic CO2 Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper advances “nanodeserts” as a conjecture on the possibility of developing the hierarchical structured polymeric nanomaterials for enhancing abiotic CO2 fixation in the soil-groundwater system beneath deserts (termed as quasi-photosynthetic CO2 absorption. Arid and semiarid deserts ecosystems approximately characterize one-third of the Earth’s land surface but play an unsung role in the carbon cycling, considering the huge potentials of such CO2 absorption to expand insights to the long-sought missing CO2 sink and the naturally unneglectable turbulence in temperature sensitivities of soil respiration it produced. “Nanodeserts” as a reconciled concept not only indicate a conjecture in nanotechnology to enhance quasi-photosynthetic CO2 absorption, but also aim to present to the desert researchers a better understanding of the footprints of abiotic CO2 transport, conversion, and assignment in the soil-groundwater system beneath deserts. Meanwhile, nanodeserts allow a stable temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in deserts by largely reducing the CO2 release above the deserts surface and highlighting the abiotic CO2 fixation beneath deserts. This may be no longer a novelty in the future.

  17. Projecting human development and CO2 emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2012-01-01

    We estimate cumulative CO2 emissions during the period 2000 to 2050 from developed and developing countries based on the empirical relationship between CO2 per capita emissions (due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production) and corresponding HDI. In order to project per capita emissions of individual countries we make three assumptions which are detailed below. First, we use logistic regressions to fit and extrapolate the HDI on a country level as a function of time. This is mainly motivated by the fact that the HDI is bounded between 0 and 1 and that it decelerates as it approaches 1. Second, we employ for individual countries the correlations between CO2 per capita emissions and HDI in order to extrapolate their emissions. This is an ergodic assumption. Third, we let countries with incomplete data records evolve similarly as their close neighbors (in the emissions-HDI plane, see Fig. 1 in the main text) with complete time series of CO2 per capita emissions and HDI. Country-based emissions estimates a...

  18. The mechanical impact of CO2 injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Schroot, B.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical impact of CO2 injection into a depleted hydrocarbon field or aquifer is caused by changes in the stress field, resulting from changes in the pore pressure and volume of the rock. Mechanical processes can lead to the loss of reservoir and caprock integrity, and the reactivation of exis

  19. 50 years of CO2 experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyree, L. Jr [Liquid Carbonic Corp., PRAXAIR Inc., Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An overview is given of the experiences with the use of CO2 as a refrigerant at the Liquid Carbonic Corporation, now owned by PRAXAIR Inc. The overview is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets, presented in Session 2 on Applications

  20. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  1. Kosten en baten CO2-emissiereductie maatregelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, B.; Tieben, B.; Weda, J.; Hekkenberg, M.; Smekens, K.; Vethman, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment has requested the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) and SEO Economic Research (SEO) to investigate the costs and benefits of a broad range of technical measures to realise CO2 emission reductions. The research aims to identify th

  2. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  3. Warming the early Earth - CO2 reconsidered

    CERN Document Server

    Von Paris, P; Grenfell, L; Patzer, B; Hedelt, P; Stracke, B; Trautmann, T; Schreier, F

    2008-01-01

    Despite a fainter Sun, the surface of the early Earth was mostly ice-free. Proposed solutions to this so-called "faint young Sun problem" have usually involved higher amounts of greenhouse gases than present in the modern-day atmosphere. However, geological evidence seemed to indicate that the atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Archaean and Proterozoic were far too low to keep the surface from freezing. With a radiative-convective model including new, updated thermal absorption coefficients, we found that the amount of CO2 necessary to obtain 273 K at the surface is reduced up to an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. For the late Archaean and early Proterozoic period of the Earth, we calculate that CO2 partial pressures of only about 2.9 mb are required to keep its surface from freezing which is compatible with the amount inferred from sediment studies. This conclusion was not significantly changed when we varied model parameters such as relative humidity or surface albedo, obtaining CO2 ...

  4. Agriculture waste and rising CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there are many uncertainties concerning agriculture’s role in global environmental change including the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. A viable and stable world food supply depends on productive agricultural systems, but environmental concerns within agriculture have to...

  5. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  6. Sustainable Process Networks for CO2 Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Kongpanna, P.; Pavarajam, V.

    carbonate and ethylene carbonate are just some of the possible products that can be formed. Each of these involves CO2 and a co-reactant, such as hydrogen, which may also be captured from process purge streams. The process network evolves as some of the reactions involve products from other reactions...

  7. Economic optimization of CO2 pipeline configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M.M.J.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an economic optimization tool is developed taking into account different steel grades, inlet pressure, diameter and booster stations for point-to-point pipelines as well as for simple networks. Preliminary results show that gaseous CO2 transport is cost effective for relatively smal

  8. Cutting weeds with a CO2 laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    treatment. The relationship between dry weight and laser energy was analysed using a non-linear dose-response regression model. The regression parameters differed significantly between the weed species. At all growth stages and heights S. arvensis was more difficult to cut with a CO2 laser than C. album...

  9. Rhizosphere Responses to Elevated CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drigo, B.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; de Bruijn, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to have major consequences on C cycling and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Experimentation during the last two to three decades using a large variety of approaches have provided sufficient information to conclude that the enrichment of atmosphe

  10. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ammoura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical

  11. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  12. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH) at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical transport, or in

  13. Influence of SO2 in incineration flue gas on the sequestration of CO2 by municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Jiang; Sicong Tian; Chang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The influence of CO2 content and presence of SO2 on the sequestration of CO2 by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash was studied by investigating the carbonation reaction of MSWI fly ash with different combinations of simulated flue gas.The reaction between fly ash and 100% CO2 was relatively fast; the uptake of CO2 reached 87 g CO2/kg ash,and the sequestered CO2 could be entirely released at high temperatures.When CO2 content was reduced to 12%,the reaction rate decreased; the uptake fell to 41 g CO2/kg ash,and 70.7% of the sequestered CO2 could be released.With 12% CO2 in the presence of SO2,the reaction rate significantly decreased; the uptake was just 17 g CO2/kg ash,and only 52.9% of the sequestered CO2 could be released.SO2 in the simulated gas restricted the ability of fly ash to sequester CO2 because it blocked the pores of the ash.

  14. The Li–CO2 battery: a novel method for CO2 capture and utilization

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Shaomao

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel primary Li-CO2 battery that consumes pure CO2 gas as its cathode. The battery exhibits a high discharge capacity of around 2500 mA h g-1 at moderate temperatures. At 100 °C the discharge capacity is close to 1000% higher than that at 40 °C, and the temperature dependence is significantly weaker for higher surface area carbon cathodes. Ex-situ FTIR and XRD analyses convincingly show that lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) is the main component of the discharge product. The feasibility of similar primary metal-CO2 batteries based on earth abundant metal anodes, such as Al and Mg, is demonstrated. The metal-CO2 battery platform provides a novel approach for simultaneous capturing of CO2 emissions and producing electrical energy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  16. Extraction of lipids from microalgae using CO2-expanded methanol and liquid CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Ashok; Jessop, Michael J; Stubbins, Spencer H; Champagne, Pascale; Jessop, Philip G

    2015-05-01

    The use of CO2-expanded methanol (cxMeOH) and liquid carbon dioxide (lCO2) is proposed to extract lipids from Botryococcus braunii. When compressed CO2 dissolves in methanol, the solvent expands in volume, decreases in polarity and so increases in its selectivity for biodiesel desirable lipids. Solid phase extraction of the algal extract showed that the cxMeOH extracted 21 mg of biodiesel desirable lipids per mL of organic solvent compared to 3mg/mL using either neat methanol or chloroform/methanol mixture. The non-polar lCO2 showed a high affinity for non-polar lipids. Using lCO2, it is possible to extract up to 10% neutral lipids relative to the mass of dry algae. Unlike extractions using conventional solvents, these new methods require little to no volatile, flammable, or chlorinated organic solvents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A cross-association model for CO2-methanol and CO2-ethanol mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-association model was proposed for CO2-alcohol mixtures based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT).CO2 was treated as a pseudo-associating molecule and both the self-association between alcohol hydroxyls and the cross-association between CO2 and alcohol hydroxyls were considered.The equilibrium properties from low temperature-pressure to high temperature-pressure were investigated using this model.The calculated p-x and p-p diagrams of CO2-methanol and CO2-ethanol mixtures agreed with the experimental data.The results showed that when the cross-association was taken into account for Helmholtz free energy,the calculated equilibrium properties could be significantly improved,and the error prediction of the three phase equilibria and triple points in low temperature regions could be avoided.

  18. Sustained effects of atmospheric [CO2] and nitrogen availability on forest soil CO2 efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, A Christopher; Palmroth, Sari; Johnsen, Kurt H; McCarthy, Heather R; Oren, Ram

    2014-04-01

    Soil CO2 efflux (Fsoil ) is the largest source of carbon from forests and reflects primary productivity as well as how carbon is allocated within forest ecosystems. Through early stages of stand development, both elevated [CO2] and availability of soil nitrogen (N; sum of mineralization, deposition, and fixation) have been shown to increase gross primary productivity, but the long-term effects of these factors on Fsoil are less clear. Expanding on previous studies at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, we quantified the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil using daily measurements from automated chambers over 10 years. Consistent with previous results, compared to ambient unfertilized plots, annual Fsoil increased under elevated [CO2] (ca. 17%) and decreased with N (ca. 21%). N fertilization under elevated [CO2] reduced Fsoil to values similar to untreated plots. Over the study period, base respiration rates increased with leaf productivity, but declined after productivity saturated. Despite treatment-induced differences in aboveground biomass, soil temperature and water content were similar among treatments. Interannually, low soil water content decreased annual Fsoil from potential values - estimated based on temperature alone assuming nonlimiting soil water content - by ca. 0.7% per 1.0% reduction in relative extractable water. This effect was only slightly ameliorated by elevated [CO2]. Variability in soil N availability among plots accounted for the spatial variability in Fsoil , showing a decrease of ca. 114 g C m(-2) yr(-1) per 1 g m(-2) increase in soil N availability, with consistently higher Fsoil in elevated [CO2] plots ca. 127 g C per 100 ppm [CO2] over the +200 ppm enrichment. Altogether, reflecting increased belowground carbon partitioning in response to greater plant nutritional needs, the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil in this stand are sustained beyond the early stages of stand development and

  19. CO2 acquisition in Chlamydomonas acidophila is influenced mainly by CO2, not phosphorus, availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijkerman, Elly; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Beardall, John

    2014-09-01

    The extremophilic green microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila grows in very acidic waters (pH 2.3-3.4), where CO2 is the sole inorganic carbon source. Previous work has revealed that the species can accumulate inorganic carbon (Ci) and exhibits high affinity CO2 utilization under low-CO2 (air-equilibrium) conditions, similar to organisms with an active CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), whereas both processes are down-regulated under high CO2 (4.5 % CO2) conditions. Responses of this species to phosphorus (Pi)-limited conditions suggested a contrasting regulation of the CCM characteristics. Therefore, we measured external carbonic anhydrase (CAext) activities and protein expression (CAH1), the internal pH, Ci accumulation, and CO2-utilization in cells adapted to high or low CO2 under Pi-replete and Pi-limited conditions. Results reveal that C. acidophila expressed CAext activity and expressed a protein cross-reacting with CAH1 (the CAext from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Although the function of this CA remains unclear, CAext activity and high affinity CO2 utilization were the highest under low CO2 conditions. C. acidophila accumulated Ci and expressed the CAH1 protein under all conditions tested, and C. reinhardtii also contained substantial amounts of CAH1 protein under Pi-limitation. In conclusion, Ci utilization is optimized in C. acidophila under ecologically relevant conditions, which may enable optimal survival in its extreme Ci- and Pi-limited habitat. The exact physiological and biochemical acclimation remains to be further studied.

  20. Sensitivity of simulated CO2 concentration to regridding of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Errors in the specification or utilization of fossil fuel CO2 emissions within carbon budget or atmospheric CO2 inverse studies can alias the estimation of biospheric and oceanic carbon exchange. A key component in the simulation of CO2 concentrations arising from fossil fuel emissions is the spatial distribution of the emission near coastlines. Finite grid resolution can give rise to mismatches between the emissions and simulated atmospheric dynamics which differ over land or water. We test these mismatches by examining simulated global atmospheric CO2 concentration driven by two different approaches to regridding fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The two approaches are: (1 a commonly-used method that allocates emissions to gridcells with no attempt to ensure dynamical consistency with atmospheric transport; (2 an improved method that reallocates emissions to gridcells to ensure dynamically consistent results. Results show large spatial and temporal differences in the simulated CO2 concentration when comparing these two approaches. The emissions difference ranges from −30.3 Tg C gridcell−1 yr−1 (−3.39 kg C m−2 yr−1 to +30.0 Tg C gridcell−1 yr−1 (+2.6 kg C m−2 yr−1 along coastal margins. Maximum simulated annual mean CO2 concentration differences at the surface exceed ±6 ppm at various locations and times. Examination of the current CO2 monitoring locations during the local afternoon, consistent with inversion modeling system sampling and measurement protocols, finds maximum hourly differences at 38 stations exceed ±0.10 ppm with individual station differences exceeding −32 ppm. The differences implied by not accounting for this dynamical consistency problem are largest at monitoring sites proximal to large coastal urban areas and point sources. These results suggest that studies comparing simulated to observed atmospheric CO2 concentration, such as atmospheric CO2 inversions, must take measures to correct for this potential

  1. Explaining Dutch emissions of CO2; a decomposition analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Hoen; Machiel Mulder

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of CO2 data of the Netherlands shows that much progress has been made with reduction of CO2 emissions by changing to less CO2 intensive technologies. Moreover, demand shifted to products that are produced with less CO2 emission. Further, shifts in the inputs needed in the production process also managed to decrease the CO2 emissions. These effects, however, were more than compensated by increased CO2 emission due to economic growth. Especially growth in exports led to substantia...

  2. Final Progress Report: Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James P. Barry; Peter G. Brewer

    2004-05-25

    OAK-B135 This report summarizes activities and results of investigations of the potential environmental consequences of direct injection of carbon dioxide into the deep-sea as a carbon sequestration method. Results of field experiments using small scale in situ releases of liquid CO2 are described in detail. The major conclusions of these experiments are that mortality rates of deep sea biota will vary depending on the concentrations of CO2 in deep ocean waters that result from a carbon sequestration project. Large changes in seawater acidity and carbon dioxide content near CO2 release sites will likely cause significant harm to deep-sea marine life. Smaller changes in seawater chemistry at greater distances from release sites will be less harmful, but may result in significant ecosystem changes.

  3. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  4. Reducing CO2 emissions from drained peatlands : The Kyoto Protocol as a solution? The Republic of Belarus as a case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volders, Evelien

    2008-01-01

    The drainage of peatlands leads to the oxidation of the upper peat layer. As a result, green-house gas carbon dioxide (CO2) is emitted into the atmosphere. Worldwide the drainage of peatlands results in the release of 800 million tons of CO2 per year, thu

  5. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lac

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is a challenging and interesting task needed to be performed in order to utilise CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework and to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town Energy Balance (TEB urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 modelling between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the urban heat island (UHI with stronger urban–rural contrasts on temperature at night than during the day by up to 7 °C. Boundary layer heights (BLH have been evaluated on urban, suburban and rural sites during the campaign, and also on a suburban site over 1 yr. The diurnal cycles of the BLH are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, which are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. The main discrepancy is a small negative bias over urban and suburban sites during nighttime (respectively 45 m and 5 m, leading to a few overestimations of nocturnal CO2 mixing ratios at suburban sites and a bias of +5 ppm. The diurnal CO2 cycle is generally well captured for all the sites. At the Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL growth reaches the measurement height. At suburban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a strong spatio-temporal variability. A

  6. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Riette, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is a challenging and interesting task needed to be performed in order to utilise CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework and to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 modelling between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the urban heat island (UHI) with stronger urban-rural contrasts on temperature at night than during the day by up to 7 °C. Boundary layer heights (BLH) have been evaluated on urban, suburban and rural sites during the campaign, and also on a suburban site over 1 yr. The diurnal cycles of the BLH are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, which are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. The main discrepancy is a small negative bias over urban and suburban sites during nighttime (respectively 45 m and 5 m), leading to a few overestimations of nocturnal CO2 mixing ratios at suburban sites and a bias of +5 ppm. The diurnal CO2 cycle is generally well captured for all the sites. At the Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. At suburban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a strong spatio-temporal variability. A sensitivity test without

  7. Antibacterial and Odontogenesis Efficacy of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Combined with CO2 Laser Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Yeh, Chia-Hung; Kao, Chia-Tze; Chen, Yi-Wen; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-07-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been successfully used in clinical applications in endodontics. Studies show that the antibacterial effects of CO2 laser irradiation are highly efficient when bacteria are embedded in biofilm because of a photothermal mechanism. The aim of this study was to confirm the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on MTA with regard to both material characterization and cell viability. MTA was irradiated with a dental CO2 laser using directly mounted fiber optics in the wound healing mode with a spot area of 0.25 cm(2) and then stored in an incubator at 100% relative humidity and 37°C for 1 day to set. The human dental pulp cells cultured on MTA were analyzed along with their proliferation and odontogenic differentiation behaviors. The results indicate that the setting time of MTA after irradiation by the CO2 laser was significantly reduced to 118 minutes rather than the usual 143 minutes. The maximum diametral tensile strength and x-ray diffraction patterns were similar to those obtained without CO2 laser irradiation. However, the CO2 laser irradiation increased the amount of Ca and Si ions released from the MTA and regulated cell behavior. CO2 laser-irradiated MTA promoted odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, with the increased formation of mineralized nodules on the substrate's surface. It also up-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenic and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. The current study provides new and important data about the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on MTA with regard to the decreased setting time and increased ion release. Taking cell functions into account, the Si concentration released from MTA with laser irradiation may be lower than a critical value, and this information could lead to the development of new regenerative therapies for dentin and periodontal tissue. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CO2-helium and CO2-neon mixtures at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, B; Ninet, S; Le Marchand, G; Munsch, P; Datchi, F

    2013-01-28

    The properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with helium or neon have been investigated as a function of CO(2) concentration and pressure up to 30 GPa at room temperature. The binary phase diagrams of these mixtures are determined over the full range of CO(2) concentrations using visual observations and Raman scattering measurements. Both diagrams are of eutectic type, with a fluid-fluid miscibility gap for CO(2) concentrations in the range [5, 75] mol. % for He and [8, 55] mol. % for Ne, and a complete separation between the two components in the solid phase. The absence of alloys or stoichiometric compounds for these two binary systems is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules of hard sphere mixtures. The Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns of solid CO(2) embedded in He or Ne for various initial concentrations have been measured up to 30 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively. The frequencies of the Raman modes and the volume of solid phase I are identical, within error bars, to those reported for 100% CO(2) samples, thus confirming the total immiscibility of CO(2) with He and Ne in the solid phase. These results demonstrate the possibility to perform high-pressure experiments on solid CO(2) under (quasi-)hydrostatic conditions using He or Ne as pressure transmitting medium.

  9. Pruning removal from orchards for energetic use: impacts on SOC and CO2-emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Sonja; Lanza, Giacomo; Schleicher, Sarah; Bischoff, Wolf-Anno; Gomez Palermo, Maider; Nogues, Fernando Sebastian; Kern, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Prunings of orchards are usually burnt or left on the soil for nutrient and organic carbon recycling. Recently the interest rose to remove prunings for energetic use. Effects of pruning removal on soil physical and chemical characteristics are expected rather in the long term. Under certain circumstances, however, soil characteristics as organic carbon content and greenhouse gas emissions might change on the short term as our literature review revealed. The main objective of this research was to determine if pruning removal from orchards changes soil organic carbon content and CO2-emission from soils in the short-term. We compared six different study sites in Spain, France and Germany in terms of impacts on soil chemistry (total and organic carbon) and four sites for impacts on CO2-emissions during 2 years. A block design was set up over two rows each with two parcels where we removed prunings and two parcels where prunings were chipped and left on the soil (n=4). As soil characteristics may vary between tree rows and interrows of orchards, we sampled both positions separately. To assess the relative contribution of CO2 emissions from carbonate and organic material, the isotopic signature of CO2 (δ 13CO_2) was analyzed for one orchard. Our results show that pruning removal could significantly decrease soil organic carbon in the tree row after 2 years of pruning removal, as found for one German orchard. No treatment effects were detected on CO2-emissions. We found, however, differences in CO2 emissions according to the sampling position in tree rows and interrows. More CO2 emission was found for that row position per orchard with higher soil organic carbon. Isotopic CO2 signature indicated that elevated CO2 emissions were rather linked to higher microbial decomposition or root respiration than to the release from carbonates. As no pruning wood decomposition effect on CO2 emissions were apparent, but soil with higher organic carbon released more CO2, it is expected

  10. CO2驱油与埋存研究进展%Advances in CO2 Displacing Oil and CO2 Sequestrated Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欢庆; 胡永乐; 田昌炳

    2012-01-01

    The current situation of CO2 displacing oil and CO2 sequestrated researches was reviewed. Nowadays, CO2 displacing oil had got good economic benefits outside and was carried out oil field experiment inside. And CO2 sequestrated researches were in exploring stage all over the world. The key problems in CO2 displacing oil and CO2 sequestrated researches contained five parts, such as enlarging sweep volume of EOR, carrier and medium choice of CO2 sequestrated, the formation damage in the process of CO2 displacing oil, air source, industrial coordination and overall planning. Finally, several development directions of CO2 displacing oil and CO2 sequestrated researches were proposed.%详细介绍了CO2驱油与埋存研究的现状。目前CO2驱油在国外已取得较好的经济效益,在国内正在进行矿场先导试验。而CO2埋存在国内外均处于探索阶段。CO2驱油与埋存研究中存在的问题主要包括提高采收率方面的扩大波及体积等关键问题、CO2埋存介质和方法的选择、CO2驱油对地层的伤害、CO2驱油与埋存的气源问题、CO2驱油与埋存产业协调和整体规划5大方面。指出了该项研究的发展趋势。图2表2参38

  11. Global CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total column CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present one of the first estimates of the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes using total column CO2 measurements retrieved by the SRON-KIT RemoTeC algorithm from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. We derive optimized fluxes from June 2009 to December 2010. We estimate fluxes from surface CO2 measurements to use as baselines for comparing GOSAT data-derived fluxes. Assimilating only GOSAT data, we can reproduce the observed CO2 time series at surface and TCCON sites in the tropics and the northern extra-tropics. In contrast, in the southern extra-tropics GOSAT XCO2 leads to enhanced seasonal cycle amplitudes compared to independent measurements, and we identify it as the result of a land–sea bias in our GOSAT XCO2 retrievals. A bias correction in the form of a global offset between GOSAT land and sea pixels in a joint inversion of satellite and surface measurements of CO2 yields plausible global flux estimates which are more tightly constrained than in an inversion using surface CO2 data alone. We show that assimilating the bias-corrected GOSAT data on top of surface CO2 data (a reduces the estimated global land sink of CO2, and (b shifts the terrestrial net uptake of carbon from the tropics to the extra-tropics. It is concluded that while GOSAT total column CO2 provide useful constraints for source–sink inversions, small spatiotemporal biases – beyond what can be detected using current validation techniques – have serious consequences for optimized fluxes, even aggregated over continental scales.

  12. Global CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total column CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Torn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present one of the first estimates of the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes using total column CO2 measurements retrieved from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. We derive optimized fluxes from June 2009 to December 2010. We estimate fluxes from surface CO2 measurements to use as baselines for comparing GOSAT data-derived fluxes. Assimilating only GOSAT data, we can reproduce the observed CO2 time series at surface and TCCON sites in the tropics and the northern extra-tropics. In contrast, in the southern extra-tropics GOSAT XCO2 leads to enhanced seasonal cycle amplitudes compared to independent measurements, and we identify it as the result of a land-sea bias in our GOSAT XCO2 retrievals. A bias correction in the form of a global offset between GOSAT land and sea pixels in a joint inversion of satellite and surface measurements of CO2 yields plausible global flux estimates which are more tightly constrained than in an inversion using surface CO2 data alone. We show that assimilating the bias-corrected GOSAT data on top of surface CO2 data (a reduces the estimated global land sink of CO2, and (b shifts the terrestrial net uptake of carbon from the tropics to the extra-tropics. It is concluded that while GOSAT total column CO2 provide useful constraints for source-sink inversions, small spatiotemporal biases – beyond what can be detected using current validation techniques – have serious consequences for optimized fluxes, even aggregated over continental scales.

  13. The Relationship Between CO2 Levels and CO2 Related Symptoms Reported on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBaalen, M.; Law, J.; Foy, M.; Wear, M. L.; Mason, S.; Mendez, C.; Meyers, V.

    2014-01-01

    Medical Operations, Toxicology, and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health collaborated to assess the association of CO2 levels on board the International Space Station and USOS crew reported symptoms inflight, i.e. headache and vision changes. Private Medical Conference (PMC) documents and the weekly Space Medicine Operations Team (SMOT) Notes were used to provide a robust data set of inflight medical events. All events and non-events were documented independent of CO2 levels and other potential contributors. Average (arithmetic mean) and single point maximum ppCO2 was calculated for the 24 hours and 7 days prior to the PMC or SMOT date and time provided by LSAH. Observations falling within the first 7 days of flight (147) were removed from the datasets analyzed to avoid confounding with Space Adaptation Syndrome. The final analysis was based on 1716 observations. For headache, 46 headaches were observed. CO2 level, age at launch, time inflight, and data source were all significantly associated with headache. In particular, for each 1 mmHg increase in CO2, the odds of a crewmember reporting a headache doubled. For vision changes, 29 reports of vision changes were observed. These observations were not found to be statistically associated with CO2 levels as analyzed. While the incidence of headache has was not high (3%), headaches may be an indicator of underlying increases in intracranial pressure, which may result likely from the synergy between CO2-induced cerebral vasodilatation and decreased venous drainage in microgravity. Vision changes were inconsistently reported and as a result did not align appropriately with the CO2 levels. Further analysis is needed. Our results support ongoing efforts to lower the CO2 exposure limits in spacecraft.

  14. CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques

    OpenAIRE

    Bouallou, Chakib

    2010-01-01

    PDF file available for free at http://pubs.ub.ro/?pg=revues&rev=cscc6&num=201011&vol=1&aid=2975; International audience; This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give so...

  15. CO2 mineralization-bridge between storage and utilization of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, Hans; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2013-01-01

    CO2 mineralization comprises a chemical reaction between suitable minerals and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The CO2 is effectively sequestered as a carbonate, which is stable on geological timescales. In addition, the variety of materials that can be produced through mineralization could find applications in the marketplace, which makes implementation of the technology more attractive. In this article, we review recent developments and assess the current status of the CO2 mineralization field. In an outlook, we briefly describe a few mineralization routes, which upon further development have the potential to be implemented on a large scale.

  16. High-Flux Solar-Driven Thermochemical Dissociation of CO2 and H2O Using Nonstoichiometric Ceria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William C. Chueh; Christoph Falter; Mandy Abbott; Danien Scipio; Philipp Furler; Sossina M. Haile; Aldo Steinfeld

    2010-01-01

    .... By using a solar cavity-receiver reactor, we combined the oxygen uptake and release capacity of cerium oxide and facile catalysis at elevated temperatures to thermochemically dissociate CO 2 and H 2...

  17. Modeling CO2 air dispersion from gas driven lake eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco

    2016-04-01

    The most tragic event of gas driven lake eruption occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) on 21 August 1986, when a dense cloud of CO2 suffocated more than 1700 people and an uncounted number of animals in just one night. The event stimulated a series of researches aimed to understand gas origins, gas release mechanisms and strategies for gas hazard mitigation. Very few studies have been carried out for describing the transport of dense CO2 clouds in the atmosphere. Although from a theoretical point of view, gas dispersion can be fully studied by solving the complete equations system for mass, momentum and energy transport, in actual practice, different simplified models able to describe only specific phases or aspects have to be used. In order to simulate dispersion of a heavy gas and to assess the consequent hazard we used a model based on a shallow layer approach (TWODEE2). This technique which uses depth-averaged variables to describe the flow behavior of dense gas over complex topography represents a good compromise between the complexity of computational fluid dynamic models and the simpler integral models. Recently the model has been applied for simulating CO2 dispersion from natural gas emissions in Central Italy. The results have shown how the dispersion pattern is strongly affected by the intensity of gas release, the topography and the ambient wind speed. Here for the first time we applied TWODEE2 code to simulate the dispersion of the large CO2 clouds released by limnic eruptions. An application concerns the case of the 1986 event at lake Nyos. Some difficulties for the simulations were related to the lack of quantitative information: gas flux estimations are not well constrained, meteorological conditions are only qualitatively known, the digital model of the terrain is of poor quality. Different scenarios were taken into account in order to reproduce the qualitative observations available for such episode. The observations regard mainly the effects of gas on

  18. Dynamic breathing of CO2 by hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shinsuke; Sahoo, Pathik; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Labuta, Jan; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Watanabe, Ken; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Suehara, Shigeru; Iyi, Nobuo

    2013-12-04

    The carbon cycle of carbonate solids (e.g., limestone) involves weathering and metamorphic events, which usually occur over millions of years. Here we show that carbonate anion intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH), a class of hydrotalcite, undergoes an ultrarapid carbon cycle with uptake of atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by IR spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. Exchange is promoted by conditions of low humidity with a half-life of exchange of ~24 h. Since hydrotalcite-like clay minerals exist in Nature, our finding implies that the global carbon cycle involving exchange between lithosphere and atmosphere is much more dynamic than previously thought.

  19. Thermodynamic modeling of CO2 mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Martin Gamel

    performed satisfactorily and predicted the general behavior of the systems, but qCPA used fewer adjustable parameters to achieve similar predictions. It has been demonstrated that qCPA is a promising model which, compared to CPA, systematically improves the predictions of the experimentally determined phase......, accurate predictions of the thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of mixtures containing CO2 are challenging with classical models such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state (EoS). This is believed to be due to the fact, that CO2 has a large quadrupole moment which the classical models...... do not explicitly account for. In this thesis, in an attempt to obtain a physically more consistent model, the cubicplus association (CPA) EoS is extended to include quadrupolar interactions. The new quadrupolar CPA (qCPA) can be used with the experimental value of the quadrupolemoment...

  20. Streamer parameters and breakdown in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Avaheden, J.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Votteler, T.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is a promising gas for the replacement of SF6 in high-voltage transmission and distribution networks due to its lower environmental impact. The insulation properties of CO2 are, therefore, of great interest. For this, the properties of streamers are important, since they determine the initial discharge propagation and possibly the transition to a leader. The present experimental investigation addresses the streamer inception and propagation at ambient temperature in the pressure range 0.05-0.5 MPa at both polarities. Streamer parameters, namely the stability field, radius and velocity, were deduced in uniform and in strongly non-uniform background fields. The measured breakdown fields can then be understood by streamer propagation and streamer-to-leader transition.

  1. CO2 Impacts on the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael; Bauer, James; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony; Stevenson, Rachel; Yelle, Roger

    2014-09-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass Mars at the extremely close distance of 140,000 km on 2014 Oct 19. This encounter is unique---a record close approach to a planet with spacecraft that can observe its passage---and currently, all 5 Mars orbiters have plans to observe the comet and/or its effects on the planet. Gas from the comet's coma is expected to collide with the Martian atmosphere, altering the abundances of some species and producing significant heating, inflating the upper atmosphere. We propose DDT observations with Spitzer/IRAC to measure the comet's CO2+CO coma (observing window Oct 30 - Nov 20), to use these measurements to derive the coma's CO2 density at Mars during the closest approach, and to aid the interpretation of any observed effects or changes in the Martian atmosphere.

  2. Changes in annual CO2 fluxes estimated from inventory data in South Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee; Dowon; Yook; Keun; Hyung; Lee; Dongseon; Kang; Sinkyu; Kang; Hojeong; Lim; Jong; Hwan; Lee; Kyeong; Hak

    2002-01-01

    Using a slightly modified IPCC method, we examined changes in annual fluxes of CO2 and contributions of energy consumption, limestone use, waste combustion, land-use change, and forest growth to the fluxes in South Korea from 1990to 1997. Our method required less data and resulted in a larger estimate of CO2released by industrial processes, comparing with the original IPCC guideline. However, net CO2 emission is not substantially different from the estimates of IPCC and modified methods. Net CO2 emission is intimately related to GDP as Koreaneconomy has heavily relied on energy consumption and industrial activities, which are major sources of CO2. Total efflux of CO2 was estimated to be 63.6 Tg C/ain 1990 and amounted to 112.9 Tg C/a in 1997. Land-use change contributed to annual budget of CO2 in a relatively small portion. Carbon dioxide was sequesteredby forest biomass at the rate of 6.5 Tg C/a in 1990 and 8.5 Tg C/a in 1997. Although CO2 storage in the forests increased, the sink effect was overwhelmed by extensive energy consumption, suggesting that energy-saving strategies will be more effective in reducing CO2 emission in Korea than any other practices. It is presumed that plant uptake of CO2 is underestimated as carbon contained in plant detritus and belowground living biomass were not fully considered. Furthermore, the soil organic carbon stored in forest decomposes in various ways in rugged mountains depending on their conditions, such as slope, aspect and elevation, which could have an effect on decomposition rate and carbon stores in soils. Thus, carbon sequestration of forests deserves further attention.

  3. On the Role of Multi-Scale Processes in CO2 Storage Security and Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruess, K.; Kneafsey, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    Consideration of multiple scales in subsurface processes is usually referred to the spatial domain, where we may attempt to relate process descriptions and parameters from pore and bench (Darcy) scale to much larger field and regional scales. However, multiple scales occur also in the time domain, and processes extending over a broad range of time scales may be very relevant to CO2 storage and containment. In some cases, such as in the convective instability induced by CO2 dissolution in saline waters, space and time scales are coupled in the sense that perturbations induced by CO2 injection will grow concurrently over many orders of magnitude in both space and time. In other cases, CO2 injection may induce processes that occur on short time scales, yet may affect large regions. Possible examples include seismicity that may be triggered by CO2 injection, or hypothetical release events such as "pneumatic eruptions" that may discharge substantial amounts of CO2 over a short time period. This paper will present recent advances in our experimental and modeling studies of multi-scale processes. Specific examples that will be discussed include (1) the process of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC), that can greatly accelerate the rate at which free-phase CO2 is stored as aqueous solute; (2) self- enhancing and self-limiting processes during CO2 leakage through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells; and (3) porosity and permeability reduction from salt precipitation near CO2 injection wells, and mitigation of corresponding injectivity loss. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and by the Zero Emission Research and Technology project (ZERT) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None listed

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  5. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  6. CO2 enhanced oil recovery economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Realistic estimates of potential enhanced oil recovery (EOR) reserve additions range from 15 to 50 billion bbl. Oil price, technical advancements, and taxation will strongly influence how much of this potential can be realized. EOR can be implemented on a large scale in the near term, and can contribute significantly to domestic oil production by the late 1980s. The contribution of CO2 injection recovery processes to this enhancement of oil reserves is examined with regard to economics and technology.

  7. Inbound Logistics Cost and CO2 Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Kökler, Cihan

    2010-01-01

    Business has globalized rapidly during the last decades. Distances between point of origin and point of consumption have increased as a result of globalization. Today’s increased distances mean that companies require faster logistic responses. Air transportation is preferred because it’s worldwide lead-time, of just 1-2 day, fulfill business expectations. However, transportation operation costs have risen dramatically and there are growing concerns about the high CO2 emission levels associate...

  8. Pulpotomies with CO2 laser in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Jose A. P.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Gioso, Marco A.; Pesce, Hildeberto F.; Jatene, Adib D.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of dental pulps submitted to shallow pulpotomy followed by CO2 laser radiation at five different procedures. For this purpose, initially 66 dogs' teeth were opened and about 2 or 3 mm of coronal dental pulp was removed. Continuous irrigation with saline solution was implemented. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 11 each. After cessation of bleeding, in group I, CO2 laser (Xanar-20, USA) was irradiated for 1 second at a power of 5 watts; in group II, 2 seconds at 3 watts; in Group III, 2 seconds at 5 watts; in Group IV, 1 second at 3 watts; in Group V, a continuous mode at 3 watts; Group VI served as a control, with no laser irradiation. The results showed no clinical differences between the 3 W and 5 W powers. Time period of irradiation exposition influenced definitively the clinical appearance of the dental pulps. Groups I and IV (1 second) were unable to stop the bleeding, which persisted over 15 minutes for all teeth. This may be due to the intense heat generated by CO2 laser, causing vasodilatation. Groups II and III displayed a similar appearance, but bleeding stopped in about 10 minutes. Group V (continuous mode) had no bleeding after irradiation, but a plasma-like liquid would come out for almost 2 minutes. When comparing to the control (Group VI), all the pulps would assume a jelly-like aspect, with black granulated tissue on the surface, covering totally the pulps of Group V and partially the other groups. The histological results will be discussed in a further study. From the data obtained, it seems that CO2 laser irradiation for pulpotomies should be done in a continuous mode, for clinical convenience in terms of time taken and effective irradiation.

  9. CO2 cooling for HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat; Van Lysebetten, A

    2008-01-01

    The new generation silicon detectors require more efficient cooling of the front-end electronics and the silicon sensors themselves. To minimize reverse annealing of the silicon sensors the cooling temperatures need to be reduced. Other important requirements of the new generation cooling systems are a reduced mass and a maintenance free operation of the hardware inside the detector. Evaporative CO2 cooling systems are ideal for this purpose as they need smaller tubes than conventional systems. The heat transfer capability of evaporative CO2 is high. CO2 is used as cooling fluid for the LHCb-VELO and the AMS-Tracker cooling systems. A special method for the fluid circulation is developed at Nikhef to get a very stable temperature of both detectors without any active components like valves or heaters inside. This method is called 2-phase Accumulator Controlled Loop (2PACL) and is a good candidate technology for the design of the future cooling systems for the Atlas and CMS upgrades.

  10. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  11. CO2 flux geothermometer for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Fridriksson, T.; Oladottir, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A new geothermometer (TCO2 Flux) is proposed based on soil diffuse CO2 flux and shallow temperature measurements made on areas of steam heated, thermally altered ground above active geothermal systems. This CO2 flux geothermometer is based on a previously reported CO2 geothermometer that was designed for use with fumarole analysis. The new geothermometer provides a valuable additional exploration tool for estimating subsurface temperatures in high-temperature geothermal systems. Mean TCO2 Flux estimates fall within the range of deep drill hole temperatures at Wairakei (New Zealand), Tauhara (New Zealand), Rotokawa (New Zealand), Ohaaki (New Zealand), Reykjanes (Iceland) and Copahue (Argentina). The spatial distribution of geothermometry estimates is consistent with the location of major upflow zones previously reported at the Wairakei and Rotokawa geothermal systems. TCO2 Flux was also evaluated at White Island (New Zealand) and Reporoa (New Zealand), where limited sub-surface data exists. Mode TCO2 Flux at White Island is high (320 °C), the highest of the systems considered in this study. However, the geothermometer relies on mineral-water equilibrium in neutral pH reservoir fluids, and would not be reliable in such an active and acidic environment. Mean TCO2 Flux at Reporoa (310 °C) is high, which indicates Reporoa has a separate upflow from the nearby Waiotapu geothermal system; an outflow from Waiotapu would not be expected to have such high temperature.

  12. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  13. Monitoring CO2 sequestration with a network inversion InSAR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, B.; Ghuman, P.; MacDonald, B.

    2009-05-01

    The capture, containment and long-term storage of CO2 is increasingly discussed as an important means to counter climate change resulting from the ongoing release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This CO2 sequestration often requires the pumping of the gas into deep saline aquifers. However, before sequestration can be regarded as a longterm solution it is necessary to investigate under which conditions permanent and leakless capture of the CO2 is achieved in the substrate. We demonstrate that a combination of spaceborne synthetic aperture interferometry (InSAR) and ground based measurements of ground uplift caused by the underground release and spreading of the CO2 can be forged into a powerful tool to monitor sequsetration. We use a novel InSAR approach, which combines the benefits of a point-based persistent scatterer algorithm with a network inversion approach, and an additional temporal filter to remove atmospheric disturbances also at smaller scales down to 1 km and less. Using case studies from several injection wells we show that InSAR and ground based data in conjunction with geological and structural information above the aquifer, as well as detailed injection logs, allow to monitor the volumetric spread of CO2 at the mm per year level. For the majority of the studied wells CO2 appears to approach a stable sequestration state, however, in at least one case our results suggest leakage outside the aquifer.

  14. CO2-neutral cities. Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard, Tilburg [Netherlands]; CO2-neutrale steden. Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard, Tilburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, J.; Braber, K.; Voskuilen, Th.; Manders, H.; Rovers, V.

    2007-11-16

    The three Dutch cities of Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard and Tilburg asked BuildDesk to undertake a survey of the options for realizing a CO2 neutral energy supply in their cities. In principle, this entails direct energy consumption for living, working (incl. industry) and mobility. With the developed 'Road maps towards CO2 neutral' each city holds their own guideline with which they can suit the action to the word. [mk]. [Dutch] De drie steden Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard en Tilburg hebben BuildDesk de opdracht gegeven een verkenning uit te voeren naar de mogelijkheid om een CO2-neutrale energievoorziening in hun stad te realiseren. Daarbij gaat het in principe om het directe energiegebruik voor wonen, werken (incl. industrie) en mobiliteit. Met de ontwikkelde 'Roadmaps naar CO2-neutraal' heeft elke stad een eigen richtsnoer in handen waarmee ze actief de daad bij het woord kan voegen.

  15. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  16. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-02-23

    Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture

  17. Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A. E.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design A. Andrews, T. Ryerson, J. Peischl, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, P. Tans An extensive dataset of CO2 concentrations including enhancements in point and area source plumes is available from in situ measurements collected using the NOAA P-3 and NCAR Electra research aircraft during seven major field projects from 1999 through 2010. Research flights sampled emission plumes from coal-, oil-, and natural gas-fired electric utility power plants, industrial facilities, and urban areas. Plume sampling often included horizontal transects at several altitudes and multiple distances downwind. CO2 data from crosswind transects upwind and downwind, coupled with ancillary measurements of co-emitted nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, along with plume location, and wind speed and direction permit unambiguous attribution and quantification of atmospheric plumes from individual sources. Certain point sources were revisited on multiple flights over the course of 1-2 month long field projects and on successive field projects spanning several years. Sampling occurred primarily in the summertime, daytime continental boundary layer, with some plume studies performed after dark and in the spring, fall, and winter seasons. The data provide rigorously calibrated, measurement-based constraints on the expected range of atmospheric CO2 plume enhancements that can be used to assess satellite sensor concepts. Crosswind near-field (~5 km) transects in the summer daytime mixed-layer downwind of the strongest point sources were characterized by peak plume CO2 mixing ratio enhancements >100 ppm above background for the 100-m spatial averages reported from the moving aircraft. On many flights, the aircraft tracked such emissions plumes beyond 150 km downwind, or up to 10 hours of transport time, until plume enhancements were indistinguishable from background variability in CO2

  18. Natural Analogues of CO2 Geological Storage; Analogos Naturales del Almacenamiento Geologico de CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Recreo, F.

    2007-07-20

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide is nowadays, internationally considered as the most effective method for greenhouse gas emission mitigation, in order to minimize the global climate change universally accepted. Nevertheless, the possible risks derived of this long-term storage have a direct influence on its public acceptance. Among the favourable geological formations to store CO2, depleted oil and gas fields, deep saline reservoirs, and unamiable coal seams are highlighted. One of the most important objectives of the R and D projects related to the CO2 geological storage is the evaluation of the CO2 leakage rate through the above mentioned geological formations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to increase our knowledge on the interaction among CO2, storage and sealing formations, as well as on the flow paths and the physical resistance of the sealing formation. The quantification of the CO2 leakage rate is essential to evaluate the effects on the human and animal health, as well as for the ecosystem and water quality. To achieve these objectives, the study of the natural analogues is very useful in order to know the natural leakage rate to the atmosphere, its flow paths, the physical, chemical and mineralogical modifications due to the long term interaction processes among the CO2 and the storage and sealing formations, as well as the effects on the groundwaters and ecosystems. In this report, we have tried to summarise the main characteristics of the natural reservoirs and surficial sources of CO2, which are both natural analogues of the geological storage and CO2 leakage, studied in EEUU, Europe and Australia. The main objective of this summary is to find the possible applications for long-term risk prediction and for the performance assessment by means of conceptual and numerical modelling, which will allow to validate the predictive models of the CO2 storage behaviour, to design and develop suitable monitoring techniques to control the CO2 behaviour

  19. Entornos Agroambientales: Almacenes Naturales De Co2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Isidro Sánchez Leyva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivos únicos eternos y la extinción de especies; contaminaciones atmosféricas, edáficas e hídricas; la ampliación del agujero de la capa de Ozono, etc. unido al mal uso de la tierra contribuyen al empobrecimiento de comunidades y naciones. Se evaluaron sistemas de cultivos múltiples como sumideros naturales o bancos de CO2. Y se intercalaron leguminosas por sus conocidos y probados beneficios y otras especies anuales en árboles y arbustos conducidos desde 1988-90 en el macizo montañoso Sagüa-Baracoa, Gran Tierra de Sabaneta, El Salvador y valle Guaso provincia Guantánamo; Calabaza de Sagüa de Tánamo y Mayarí, Holguín. Diseñándose 3 ó 4 réplicas según las variantes y laderas y utilizados rangos múltiples de Newman-Kell (P<1%. Para el cálculo de biomasa vegetal se aplicaron fórmulas midiéndose la necromasa bajo el arbolado y el C orgánico edáfico. Se determinó el valor o índice relativo de biomasa, el índice relativo de banco de CO2 y el potencial mínimo de retención del CO2 en el sistema según la edad del cultivo; observándose el suelo erosionado en el predio mediante simple fórmula propuesta. Se observaron formas ecológicas de labor y cultivo. La canavalia fue el cultivo más efectivo considerando la respuesta del C edáfico. Se tuvo en cuenta la productividad y el banco de CO2 por el efecto positivo de ambos factores sobre el medio y dada la relevancia creciente de la reducción de las emisiones de CO2, a la vez que se evita la sobre-explotación y la deforestación. Se significó la necesidad de fajas interarboladas en monocultivos anuales.

  20. Strategies for CO2 capture from different CO2 emission sources by vacuum swing adsorption technology☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghua Ling; Penny Xiao; Augustine Ntiamoah; Dong Xu; Paul Webley; Yuchun Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Different VSA (Vacuum Swing Adsorption) cycles and process schemes have been evaluated to find suitable process configurations for effectively separating CO2 from flue gases from different industrial sectors. The cycles were studied using an adsorption simulator developed in our research group, which has been suc-cessfully used to predict experimental results over several years. Commercial zeolite APGIII and granular ac-tivated carbon were used as the adsorbents. Three-bed VSA cycles with-and without-product purge and 2-stage VSA systems have been investigated. It was found that for a feed gas containing 15%CO2 (representing flue gas from power plants), high CO2 purities and recoveries could be obtained using a three-bed zeolite APGIII VSA unit for one stage capture, but with more stringent conditions such as deeper vacuum pressures of 1–3 kPa. 2-stage VSA process operated in series allowed us to use simple process steps and operate at more realistic vacuum pressures. With a vacuum pressure of 10 kPa, final CO2 purity of 95.3%with a recov-ery of 98.2%were obtained at specific power consumption of 0.55 MJ·(kg CO2)−1 from feed gas containing 15%CO2. These numbers compare very well with those obtained from a single stage process operating at 1 kPa vacuum pressure. The feed CO2 concentration was very influential in determining the desorption pressure necessary to achieve high separation efficiency. For feed gases containing N30%CO2, a single-stage VSA capture process operating at moderate vacuum pressure and without a product purge, can achieve very high product purities and recoveries.

  1. CO2 for enhanced oil recovery and secure storage of CO2 in reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yunhang

    2015-01-01

    CO2-EOR(Enhanced Oil Recovery) is an effective and useful technology that can not only increase the oil production to meet the increasing need for energy around the world, but also mitigate the negtive influence of global green house effect. Different categories of oil recovery methods including primary recovery, secondary recovery, and EOR technologies are introduced at first. Then the history, global distribution, screening criteria, mechanisms, advantages and disadvantages of CO2-EOR are d...

  2. CO2 Sequestration within Spent Oil Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, H.; Worrall, F.; Gluyas, J.; Morgan, C.; Fraser, J.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide deposits of oil shales are thought to represent ~3 trillion barrels of oil. Jordanian oil shale deposits are extensive and of high quality, and could represent 100 billion barrels of oil, leading to much interest and activity in the development of these deposits. The exploitation of oil shales has raised a number of environmental concerns including: land use, waste disposal, water consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. The dry retorting of oil shales can overcome a number of the environmental impacts, but this leaves concerns over management of spent oil shale and CO2 production. In this study we propose that the spent oil shale can be used to sequester CO2 from the retorting process. Here we show that by conducting experiments using high pressure reaction facilities, we can achieve successful carbonation of spent oil shale. High pressure reactor facilities in the Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, are capable of reacting solids with a range of fluids up to 15 MPa and 350°C, being specially designed for research with supercritical fluids. Jordanian spent oil shale was reacted with high pressure CO2 in order to assess whether there is potential for sequestration. Fresh and reacted materials were then examined by: Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. Jordanian spent oil shale was found to sequester up to 5.8 wt % CO2, on reacting under supercritical conditions, which is 90% of the theoretical carbonation. Jordanian spent oil shale is composed of a large proportion of CaCO3, which on retorting decomposes, forming CaSO4 and Ca-oxides which are the focus of carbonation reactions. A factorially designed experiment was used to test different factors on the extent of carbonation, including: pressure; temperature; duration; and the water content. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques were then used to determine the significance of

  3. Pressure-induced alteration in effects of high CO2 on marine bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N.; Tsukasaki, A.; Tsurushima, N.; Suzumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a key mitigation technology to reduce the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Current CCS research is dominated by improvements of the efficiency of the capturing, transport or storage of CO2. Also, it is important to estimate potential impacts on marine environments related to potential CO2 leakage. It has been demonstrated that seawater acidification effects on marine community structure and food chains. Bacteria are the basis of marine microbial food web and responsible for a significant part of marine biogeochemical cycles in both water column and bottom sediments. We used a high pressure incubation system which is composed of an HPLC pump and stainless-steel pressure vessels. The system could maintain stably the pressure up to 30 MPa. Using the system, we investigated the effects of high CO2 concentration on a deep-sea bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp., isolated from the western North Pacific Ocean. The isolate was incubated in acidified seawaters at various CO2 concentrations under simulated pressure conditions between 0.1 MPa and 30 MPa. We determined bacterial growth rate and live/dead cell viability. It was found that both CO2 concentration and pressure influenced substantially the growth rate of the isolate. In order to assess potential effects of leaked CO2 on microbial assemblages in marine environments, it was suggested that hydraulic pressure is one essential variable to be considered.

  4. Seasonal variation of CO2 saturation in the Gulf of Bothnia: Indications of marine net heterotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algesten, Grete; Wikner, Johan; Sobek, Sebastian; Tranvik, Lars J.; Jansson, Mats

    2004-12-01

    Seasonal variation of pCO2 and primary and bacterioplankton production were measured in the Gulf of Bothnia during an annual cycle. Surface water was supersaturated with CO2 on an annual basis, indicating net heterotrophy and a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, the Gulf of Bothnia oscillated between being a sink and a source of CO2 over the studied period, largely decided by temporal variation in bacterial respiration (BR) and primary production (PP) in the water column above the pycnocline. The calculated annual respiration-production balance (BR-PP) was very similar to the estimated CO2 emission from the Gulf of Bothnia, which indicates that these processes were major determinants of the exchange of CO2 between water and atmosphere. The southern basin (the Bothnian Sea) had a lower net release of CO2 to the atmosphere than the northern Bothnian Bay (7.1 and 9.7 mmol C m-2 d-1, respectively), due to higher primary production, which to a larger extent balanced respiration in this basin.

  5. Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Lawrence, Rick; Nugent, Paul W.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Spangler, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    The commercial development of uncooled-microbolometer, long-wave infrared (LWIR) imagers, combined with advanced radiometric calibration methods developed at Montana State University, has led to new uses of thermal imagery in remote sensing applications. One specific novel use of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period in the summer of 2011, a CO2 leak was simulated in a test field run by the Zero Emissions Research and Technology Center in Bozeman, Montana. An LWIR imager was deployed on a scaffold before and during the CO2 release, viewing a vegetation test area that included regions of high and low CO2 flux. Increased root-level CO2 concentration caused plant stress that led to reduced thermal regulation of the vegetation, which was consistent with increased diurnal variation of IR emission observed in this study. In a linear regression, the IR data were found to have a strong relationship to the CO2 emission and to be consistent with the location of leaking CO2 gas. Reducing the continuous data set to one image per day weakened the regression fit, but maintained sufficient significance to indicate that this method could be implemented with once-daily airborne images.

  6. Reducing the cost of Ca-based direct air capture of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Frank

    2014-10-07

    Direct air capture, the chemical removal of CO2 directly from the atmosphere, may play a role in mitigating future climate risk or form the basis of a sustainable transportation infrastructure. The current discussion is centered on the estimated cost of the technology and its link to "overshoot" trajectories, where atmospheric CO2 levels are actively reduced later in the century. The American Physical Society (APS) published a report, later updated, estimating the cost of a one million tonne CO2 per year air capture facility constructed today that highlights several fundamental concepts of chemical air capture. These fundamentals are viewed through the lens of a chemical process that cycles between removing CO2 from the air and releasing the absorbed CO2 in concentrated form. This work builds on the APS report to investigate the effect of modifications to the air capture system based on suggestions in the report and subsequent publications. The work shows that reduced carbon electricity and plastic packing materials (for the contactor) may have significant effects on the overall price, reducing the APS estimate from $610 to $309/tCO2 avoided. Such a reduction does not challenge postcombustion capture from point sources, estimated at $80/tCO2, but does make air capture a feasible alternative for the transportation sector and a potential negative emissions technology. Furthermore, air capture represents atmospheric reductions rather than simply avoided emissions.

  7. A possible important CO2 sink by the global water cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZaiHua; Wolfgang DREYBRODT; WANG HaiJing

    2008-01-01

    The locations, magnitudes, variations and mechanisms responsible for the global CO2 sink are uncer-tain and under debate. Here, we show, based on theoretical calculations and evidences from field monitoring results, that there is a possible important CO2 sink (as DIC-dissolved inorganic carbon) by the global water cycle. The sink constitutes up to 0.8013 Pg C/a (or 10.1% of the total anthropogenic CO2 emission, or 28.6% of the missing CO2 sink), and is formed by the CO2 absorption of water and subsequent enhanced consumption by carbonate dissolution and aquatic plant photosynthesis. Of the sink, 0.5188 Pg C/a goes to sea via precipitation over sea (0.2748 Pg C/a) and continental rivers (0.244 Pg C/a), 0.158 Pg C/a is released to the atmosphere again, and 0.1245 Pg C/a is stored in the continental aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, the net sink could be 0.6433 Pg C/a. This sink may increase with the global-warming-intensified global water cycle, the increase in CO2 and carbonate dust in atmosphere, and reforestation/afforestation, the latter increasing soil CO2, and thus the concentration of the DIC in water.

  8. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work, th...

  9. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work...

  10. Recycling CO 2 ? Computational Considerations of the Activation of CO 2 with Homogeneous Transition Metal Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Drees, Markus

    2012-08-10

    Faced with depleting fossil carbon sources, the search for alternative energy carriers and energy storage possibilities has become an important issue. Nature utilizes carbon dioxide as starting material for storing sun energy in plant hydrocarbons. A similar approach, storing energy from renewable sources in chemical bonds with CO 2 as starting material, may lead to partial recycling of CO 2 created by human industrial activities. Unfortunately, currently available routes for the transformation of CO 2 involve high temperatures and are often not selective. With the development of more sophisticated methods and better software, theoretical studies have become both increasingly widespread and useful. This concept article summarizes theoretical investigations of the current state of the feasibility of CO 2 activation with molecular transition metal catalysts, highlighting the most promising reactions of CO 2 with olefins to industrially relevant acrylic acid/acrylates, and the insertion of CO 2 into metal-element bonds, particularly for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates and polymers. Rapidly improving computational power and methods help to increase the importance and accuracy of calculations continuously and make computational chemistry a useful tool helping to solve some of the most important questions for the future. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Potential Improvements of Supercritical CO2 Brayton Cycle by Modifying Critical Point of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Seok; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is one of strong candidates for a next generation nuclear reactor. However, the conventional design of a SFR concept with an indirect Rankine cycle is subjected to a sodium water reaction, which can deteriorate the safety of a SFR. To prevent any hazards from sodium-water reaction, a SFR with the Brayton cycle using Helium or Supercritical Carbon dioxide (S-CO2) as working fluids can be an alternative approach to improve the current SFR design. As in a helium cycle, there has been an investigation to modify thermo-physical properties to increase the efficiency of the cycle and reduce the size of turbomachineries. Particularly, He-Xe or He-N2 binary mixture were successful to decrease the stages of turbomachines due to the increment of molecular weight of gas mixture than that of pure helium. Similar to the case of helium, CO2 has a potential to modify its thermo-physical properties by mixing with other gases. For instance, it was reported that critical point of CO2 can be shifted by mixing with different gases. Since, the efficiency of a S-CO2 cycle is limited to the critical point of CO2, the shift in critical point implies that there is a possibility of improving the cycle efficiency than the current design. This paper presents the results of a preliminary analysis to identify the effects of CO2 critical point modification on the Brayton cycle performance.

  12. CO2 transport in normovolemic anemia: complete compensation and stability of blood CO2 tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, S; Alberts, M K; Bishop, M J; Bidani, A; Swenson, E R

    1997-07-01

    Isovolemic hemodilution does not appear to impair CO2 elimination nor cause CO2 retention despite the important role of red blood cells in blood CO2 transport. We studied this phenomenon and its physiological basis in eight New Zealand White rabbits that were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated at a fixed minute ventilation. Isovolemic anemia was induced by simultaneous blood withdrawal and infusion of 6% hetastarch in sequential stages; exchange transfusions ranged from 15-30 ml in volume. Variables measured after each hemodilution included hematocrit (Hct), arterial and venous blood gases, mixed expired PCO2 and PO2, and blood pressure; also, O2 consumption, CO2 production, cardiac output (Q), and physiological dead space were calculated. Data were analyzed by comparison of changes in variables with changes in Hct and by using the model of capillary gas exchange described by Bidani (J. Appl. Physiol. 70: 1686-1699, 1991). There was complete compensation for anemia with stability of venous and arterial PCO2 between Hct values of 36 +/- 3 and 12 +/- 1%, which was predicted by the mathematical model. Over this range of hemodilution, Q rose 50%, and the O2 extraction ratio increased 61% without a decline in CO2 production or a rise in alveolar ventilation. The dominant compensations maintaining CO2 transport in normovolemic anemia include an increased Q and an augmented Haldane effect arising from the accompanying greater O2 extraction.

  13. CO2-Responsive Polymer-Functionalized Au Nanoparticles for CO2 Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Promthaveepong, Kittithat; Li, Nan

    2016-08-16

    Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) coated with stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) exhibit tunable optical properties responding to external stimuli and show promising sensing applications. We present a new CO2-responsive polymer, poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), coated gold NPs (AuNPs) synthesized by directly reducing HAuCl4 with a CO2-responsive monomer N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN). The amidine group of PNAAN can be protonated into a hydrophilic amidinium group by dissolved CO2 (dCO2). This induces the PNAAN to swell and detach from the AuNP surface, resulting in AuNP aggregation and color change. By monitoring the UV absorbance change of AuNPs, a sensitive dCO2 sensor with a linear range of 0.0132 to 0.1584 hPa and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0024 hPa is developed. This method shows dramatic improvement in sensitivity and convenience of sample preparation compared with the previously reported dCO2 sensor.

  14. A Systematic Review of CO2 Absorption Using Amine%有机胺溶液吸收CO2的研究现状及进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕碧洪; 金佳佳; 张莉; 李伟

    2011-01-01

    The globe climate change caused by greenhouse gas has become world wide concerned issue. As one of the most important greenhouse gas, CO2 capture and sequestration to reduce its release to atmosphere is of critical importance. This paper reviewed the current status of the development of CO2 capture technology, summarized CO2 absorption into common organic amine, e. G. , monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, 2-amino-2-methyl-l-propanol and the mixture solution. The reaction mechanism and kinetics of CO2 absorption into amines were also described. And the present situation of application was introduced. Finally, it was predicted that the complex system by organic amines and other absorbent may be the trend of CO2 absorption in future.%温室气体引起的全球气候变暖已成为国际社会关注的焦点.而CO2作为最主要的温室气体之一,它的减排与控制刻不容缓.综述了国内外CO2捕集技术中有机胺溶液吸收法的研究现状,概述了常用的一乙醇胺、二乙醇胺、N-甲基二乙醇胺、2-氨基-2-甲基-1-丙醇等有机胺溶液吸收法,以及有机胺与其他溶剂混合吸收CO2的研究现状及进展;简要阐述了有机胺溶液吸收CO2的反应机理及反应动力学研究;介绍了国内外CO2捕集与封存技术的应用现状,并预测了有机胺溶液与其他溶剂混合吸收CO2的方法将是该方法的研究趋势之一.

  15. Abiotic and seasonal control of soil-produced CO2 efflux in karstic ecosystems located in Oceanic and Mediterranean climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Anton, Elena; Cuezva, Soledad; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Alvarez-Gallego, Miriam; Pla, Concepcion; Benavente, David; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio

    2017-09-01

    enough important during this season to modify the isotopic ratio of soil produced CO2 (3-6‰ heavier). Drought induces release of CO2 with an isotopic ratio heavier than produced by organic sources. Consequently, climatic conditions drive abiotic processes that turn regulate a seasonal storage of soil-produced CO2 within soil and underground systems. The results here obtained imply that abiotic emissions of soil-produced CO2 must be an inherent consequence of droughts, which intensification has been forecasted at global scale in the next 100 years.

  16. Energy from CO2 using capacitive electrodes--theoretical outline and calculation of open circuit voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Garcia, J M; Schaetzle, O; Biesheuvel, P M; Hamelers, H V M

    2014-03-15

    Recently, a new technology has been proposed for the utilization of energy from CO2 emissions (Hamelers et al., 2014). The principle consists of controlling the dilution process of CO2-concentrated gas (e.g., exhaust gas) into CO2-dilute gas (e.g., air) thereby extracting a fraction of the released mixing energy. In this paper, we describe the theoretical fundamentals of this technology when using a pair of charge-selective capacitive electrodes. We focus on the behavior of the chemical system consisting of CO2 gas dissolved in water or monoethanolamine solution. The maximum voltage given for the capacitive cell is theoretically calculated, based on the membrane potential. The different aspects that affect this theoretical maximum value are discussed.

  17. Defoliation reduces soil biota - and modifies stimulating effects of elevated CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Marie; Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    defoliation increased activity and biomass of soil biota and more so at elevated CO2. Based on soil biota responses, plants defoliated in active growth therefore conserve resources, whereas defoliation after termination of growth results in release of resources. This result challenges the idea that plants via...... to experimental climate and atmospheric factors based on prognoses for year 2075 and further exposed to defoliation. By defoliating plants, we were able to study how global change modifies the interactions of the plant-soil system. Shoot production, root biomass, microbial biomass, and nematode abundance were...... on microbial biomass that was not apparently affected by global change. The negative effect of defoliation cascades through to soil nematodes as dependent on CO2 and drought. At ambient CO2, drought and defoliation each reduced nematodes. In contrast, at elevated CO2, a combination of drought and defoliation...

  18. Carbon Sequestration: Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The concentration CO2 gas has become a great worldwide challenge because CO2 is considered as an important counterpart of greenhouse gases. The tremendous increase in the concentration of CO2 gas, elevated the worldwide temperature as well as it altered the climatic changes. Various physiochemical approached have been reported to trap the CO2 gas and the chemical conversion of CO2 to useful chemicals is one of them. This review covers the conversion of CO2 gas to formic acid. In this CO2 hydr...

  19. Carbon Sequestration: Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyay Praveenkumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration CO2 gas has become a great worldwide challenge because CO2 is considered as an important counterpart of greenhouse gases. The tremendous increase in the concentration of CO2 gas, elevated the worldwide temperature as well as it altered the climatic changes. Various physiochemical approached have been reported to trap the CO2 gas and the chemical conversion of CO2 to useful chemicals is one of them. This review covers the conversion of CO2 gas to formic acid. In this CO2 hydrogenation reaction, both the homogeneous as well as heterogeneous catalytic systems were discussed along with the effect of solvent systems on reaction kinetics.

  20. A new set-up for simultaneous high-precision measurements of CO2, δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 on small ice core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenk, Theo Manuel; Rubino, Mauro; Etheridge, David; Ciobanu, Viorela Gabriela; Blunier, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Palaeoatmospheric records of carbon dioxide and its stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) obtained from polar ice cores provide important constraints on the natural variability of the carbon cycle. However, the measurements are both analytically challenging and time-consuming; thus only data exist from a limited number of sampling sites and time periods. Additional analytical resources with high analytical precision and throughput are thus desirable to extend the existing datasets. Moreover, consistent measurements derived by independent laboratories and a variety of analytical systems help to further increase confidence in the global CO2 palaeo-reconstructions. Here, we describe our new set-up for simultaneous measurements of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios and atmospheric δ13C and δ18O-CO2 in air extracted from ice core samples. The centrepiece of the system is a newly designed needle cracker for the mechanical release of air entrapped in ice core samples of 8-13 g operated at -45 °C. The small sample size allows for high resolution and replicate sampling schemes. In our method, CO2 is cryogenically and chromatographically separated from the bulk air and its isotopic composition subsequently determined by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). In combination with thermal conductivity measurement of the bulk air, the CO2 mixing ratio is calculated. The analytical precision determined from standard air sample measurements over ice is ±1.9 ppm for CO2 and ±0.09 ‰ for δ13C. In a laboratory intercomparison study with CSIRO (Aspendale, Australia), good agreement between CO2 and δ13C results is found for Law Dome ice core samples. Replicate analysis of these samples resulted in a pooled standard deviation of 2.0 ppm for CO2 and 0.11 ‰ for δ13C. These numbers are good, though they are rather conservative estimates of the overall analytical precision achieved for single ice sample measurements. Facilitated by the small sample requirement

  1. Process-dependent residual trapping of CO2 in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the nature and extent of residual CO2 trapping depend on the process by which the CO2 phase is introduced into the rock. We compare residual trapping of CO2 in Berea Sandstone by imbibing water into a core containing either exsolved CO2 or CO2 introduced by drainage. X-ray computed tomography measurements are used to map the spatial distribution of CO2 preimbibition and postimbibition. Unlike during drainage where the CO2 distribution is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the rock, the distribution of exsolved CO2 is comparatively uniform. Postimbibition, the CO2 distribution retained the essential features for both the exsolved and drainage cases, but twice as much residual trapping is observed for exsolved CO2 even with similar preimbibition gas saturations. Residually trapped exsolved gas also disproportionately reduced water relative permeability. Development of process-dependent parameterization will help better manage subsurface flow processes and unlock benefits from gas exsolution.

  2. The Werkendam natural CO2 accumulation: An analogue for CO2 storage in depleted oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Hangx, Suzanne; Kampman, Niko; Nover, Georg; Stanjek, Helge; Weniger, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    The Werkendam natural CO2 accumulation is hosted in the Röt (Early Triassic) sandstone of the West Netherlands Basin, at a depth of 2.8 km, about 20 km south-east of Rotterdam (NL). This reservoir, in a fault-bound structure, was oil-filled prior to charging with magmatic CO2 in the early Cretaceous. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to study long-term CO2-water-rock interactions in the presence of oil. This contribution will present the results of a detailed mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of core sections from the Werkendam CO2 reservoir and an adjacent, stratigraphically equivalent aquifer. X-ray diffraction combined with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry revealed that the reservoir samples contain substantially more feldspar and more barite and siderite than those from the aquifer, while the latter have higher hematite contents. These differences are attributed to the effects hydrocarbons and related fluids on diagenesis in the closed system of the CO2 reservoir versus the open-system of the aquifer. Petrophysical analyses yielded overall higher and more anisotropic permeability for the reservoir samples, while the porosity is overall not significantly different from that of their aquifer equivalents. The differences are most pronounced in coarse-grained sandstones. These have low anhydrite contents and contain traces of calcite, while all other analyzed samples contain abundant anhydrite, dolomite/ankerite and siderite, but no calcite. Detailed petrography revealed mm-sized zones of excessive primary porosity. These are attributed to CO2-induced dissolution of precompactional, grain-replacive anhydrite cement. Diagenetic dolomite/ankerite crystals are covered by anhedral, epitaxial ankerite, separated from the crystals by bitumen coats. Since these carbonates were oil-wet before CO2-charging, the overgrowths are interpreted to have grown after CO2-charging. Their anhedral habit suggests growth in a 2-phase water-CO2 system. Isotopic

  3. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF CO2 DIRECT HYDROGENATION REACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Fahai; Liu Dianhua; Hou Qiushi; Fang Dingye

    2001-01-01

    CO2 hydrogenation is one of important routes for the activation and effective utilization of CO2. In this paper, eighteen CO2 direct hydrogenation reactions are listed and their reaction heats and equilibrium constants are calculated. On the assumption that the reactions of CO2 and H2 are in stoichiometric ratio and the amount of whole reactants is one mole, the equilibrium conversions of CO2 are obtained.

  4. Secondary production, calcification and CO2 fluxes in the cirripedes Chthamalus montagui and Elminius modestus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golléty, Claire; Gentil, Franck; Davoult, Dominique

    2008-02-01

    Calcification, a process common to numerous marine taxa, has traditionally been considered to be a significant source of CO(2) in tropical waters only. A number of relatively recent studies, however, have shown that significant amounts of CO(2) are also produced in temperate waters, although none of these studies was carried out on rocky shores, which are considered to be very productive systems. We compared the CO(2) fluxes due to respiration and calcification in two temperate species, the cirripedes Chthamalus montagui and Elminius modestus. The population dynamics of both species were estimated at two sites during a 1-year experimental period in order to establish mean organic (ash-free dry weight) and CaCO(3) (dry shell weight) production. Based on these parameters, we estimated the CO(2) fluxes due to respiration and calcification. CaCO(3) production was estimated to be 481.0 and 1,803.9 g(CaCO3) m(-2) year(-1) at each site, representing 3.4 and 12.7 mol(CO2) m(-2) year(-1) respectively, of released CO(2). These fluxes represent each 47% of the CO(2) released as a result of respiration and calcification. The production of CaCO(3) at the high-density site was: (1) among the highest values obtained for temperate organisms, and (2) comparable to the estimated CO(2) fluxes for coral reefs. As calcifying organisms are well represented in temperate ecosystems in terms of both density and biomass, our results provide clear evidence that calcification of temperate organisms should not be underestimated. Additional studies on other rocky shore taxa are needed before the relative importance of calcification in rocky intertidal carbon budgets can be generalized.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of CO2 formation in interstellar ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, C.; Andersson, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kroes, G. J.

    2011-05-01

    In dense interstellar clouds where new stars and planets are formed, small dust particles of micrometer silicates are covered by ice mantles, mainly consisting of H2O and also of CO, CO2, CH4 and other molecules. A high flux of UV photons can produce several photodissociative events. Previous MD calculations of H2O ice at Tice=10-90 K show that the photodesorption of H while OH remains trapped is the main outcome following photoexcitation in the first three monolayers (MLs). On the other hand, the H and OH photofragments released following photoexcitation deeper in the ice recombine or are trapped at separate positions, and can then react with other species in the ice. We hope to present results of MD calculations performed to study the photoinduced reaction of OH with CO through photodissociation of H2O in an amorphous COad - H2O ice at 10 K. This reaction pathway is supposed to be a principle route to form CO2 in interstellar ices.

  6. Air–sea exchanges of CO2 in the world's coastal seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-T. A. Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The air–sea exchanges of CO2 in the world's 165 estuaries and 87 continental shelves are evaluated. Generally and in all seasons, upper estuaries with salinities of less than two are strong sources of CO2 (39 ± 56 mol C m−2 yr−1, positive flux indicates that the water is losing CO2 to the atmosphere; mid-estuaries with salinities of between 2 and 25 are moderate sources (17.5 ± 34 mol C m−2 yr−1 and lower estuaries with salinities of more than 25 are weak sources (8.4 ± 14 mol C m−2 yr−1. With respect to latitude, estuaries between 23.5 and 50° N have the largest flux per unit area (63 ± 101 mmol C m−2 d−1; these are followed by lower-latitude estuaries (23.5–0° S: 44 ± 29 mmol C m−2 d−1; 0–23.5° N: 39 ± 55 mmol C m−2 d−1, and then regions north of 50° N (36 ± 91 mmol C m−2 d−1. Estuaries south of 50° S have the smallest flux per unit area (9.5 ± 12 mmol C m−2 d−1. Mixing with low-pCO2 shelf waters, water temperature, residence time and the complexity of the biogeochemistry are major factors that govern the pCO2 in estuaries, but wind speed, seldom discussed, is critical to controlling the air–water exchanges of CO2. The total annual release of CO2 from the world's estuaries is now estimated to be 0.10 Pg C yr−1, which is much lower than published values mainly because of the contribution of a considerable amount of heretofore unpublished or new data from Asia and the Arctic. The Asian data, although indicating high pCO2, are low in sea-to-air fluxes because of low wind speeds. Previously determined flux values rely heavily on data from Europe and North America, where pCO2 is lower but wind speeds are much higher, such that the CO2 fluxes are higher than in Asia. Newly emerged CO2 flux data in the Arctic reveal that estuaries there mostly absorb rather than release CO2. Most continental shelves, and especially those at high latitude, are undersaturated in terms of CO2 and absorb CO2 from the

  7. Review of the impacts of leaking CO 2 gas and brine on groundwater quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bacon, Diana H.; Zheng, Liange; Kyle, Jennifer; Brown, Christopher F.

    2017-06-01

    This review paper provides a synthetic view of the existing knowledge and summarizes data and findings of the recent literature on the subject of the potential leaking of CO2 from the deep subsurface storage reservoirs and the effects on aquifer quality. New ideas and concepts are developed and insights are also provided. The objectives of this paper are to: 1) present and discuss potential risks for groundwater degradation due to CO2 gas and brine exposure; 2) identify the set of geochemical data required to assess and predict aquifer responses to CO2 and brine leakage. Specifically, this paper will discuss the following issues: 1) Aquifer responses (such as changes in aqueous phase/groundwater chemical composition; changes in solid phase chemistry and mineralogy; changes in the extent and rate of reactions and processes and possible establishment of a new network of reactions and processes affecting or controlling overall mobility of major, minor, and trace elements; development of conceptual and reduced order models (ROMs) to describe and predict aquifer responses); 2) The degree of impact such as significant or insignificant changes in pH and major, minor, and trace element release that depend on the following controlling variables; the effect of leaking plume characteristics (gas composition, pure CO2 and/or CO2 -CH4 -H2S mixtures and brine concentration and composition (trace metals); aquifer properties [such as initial aqueous phase conditions and mineralogy: minerals controlling sediments’ response (e.g., calcite, Si bearing minerals, etc.)]; overview of relevant hydrogeological and geochemical processes related to the impact of CO2 gas and brine on groundwater quality; the fate of the elements released from sediments or transported with brine (such as precipitation/incorporation into minerals (calcite and other minerals), adsorption, electron transfer reactions, the role of natural attenuation; whether or not the release of metals following exposure to

  8. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, developing regulations and guidance throughout the world (e.g. the EC Directive and the USEPA Vulnerability Evaluation Framework) recognize the importance of assessing the potential for environmental impacts from CO2 storage. RISCS, a European (FP7) project, aims to improve understanding of those impacts that could plausibly occur in the hypothetical case that unexpected leakage occurs. As part of the RISCS project the potential impacts that an unexpected CO2 leaks might have on a cropland ecosystems was investigated. A CO2 exposure field experiment based on CO2 injection at 85 cm depth under an oats culture was designed. To facilitate the characterization of the simulated leaking zone the gas used for injection was produced from natural gas and had a δ13C of -46‰. The aim of the present communication is to depict how the injected gas was traced within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum using 13CO2 continuous cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS). Four subsurface experimental injection plots (6m x 3m) were set up. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, the field experiment was designed as to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient for each plot. For this purpose gas supply pipes were inserted at one extremity of each plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under the clayey plough layer of Norwegian moraine soils. Soil CO2 concentration and isotopic signature were punctually recorded: 1) in the soil at 20 cm depth at 6 positions distributed on the central transect, 2) at the surface following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern, and 3) in the canopy atmosphere at 10, 20, 30 cm along three longitudinal transects (seven sampling point per transect). Soil CO2 fluxes and isotopic signature were finally

  9. Using hyperspectral plant signatures for CO2 leak detection during the 2008 ZERT CO2 sequestration field experiment in Bozeman, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Male, E.J.; Pickles, W.L.; Silver, E.A.; Hoffmann, G.D.; Lewicki, J.; Apple, M.; Repasky, K.; Burton, E.A.

    2009-11-01

    Hyperspectral plant signatures can be used as a short-term, as well as long-term (100-yr timescale) monitoring technique to verify that CO2 sequestration fields have not been compromised. An influx of CO2 gas into the soil can stress vegetation, which causes changes in the visible to nearinfrared reflectance spectral signature of the vegetation. For 29 days, beginning on July 9th, 2008, pure carbon dioxide gas was released through a 100-meter long horizontal injection well, at a flow rate of 300 kg/day. Spectral signatures were recorded almost daily from an unmown patch of plants over the injection with a ''FieldSpec Pro'' spectrometer by Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc. Measurements were taken both inside and outside of the CO2 leak zone to normalize observations for other environmental factors affecting the plants.

  10. Anthropogenic CO2 emissions in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Houghton

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the regional contributions and trends of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions is critical to design mitigation strategies aimed at stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gases. Here we report CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and land use change in Africa for various time periods. Africa was responsible for an average of 500 TgC y−1 for the period 2000–2005. These emissions resulted from the combustion of fossil fuels (260 TgC y−1 and land use change (240 TgC y−1. Over this period, the African share of global emissions from land use change was 17%. For 2005, the last year reported in this study, African fossil fuel emissions were 285 TgC accounting for 3.7% of the global emissions. The 2000–2005 growth rate in African fossil fuel emissions was 3.2% y−1, very close to the global average. Fossil fuel emissions per capita in Africa are among the lowest in the world, at 0.32 tC y−1 compared to the global average of 1.2 tC y−1. The average amount of carbon (C emitted as CO2 to produce 1 US $ of Gross Domestic Product (GDP in Africa in 2005 was 187 gC/$, close to the world average of 199 gC/$. With the fastest population growth in the world and rising per capita GDP, Africa is likely to increase its share of global emissions over the coming decades although emissions from Africa will remain low compared to other continents.

  11. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O' Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  12. Primary Study on the Characteristics of Soil CO2 Emission in Oasis Farmland in Summer of North Xinjiang%北疆绿洲农田夏季土壤CO2排放特征初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱新萍; 贾宏涛; 高文伟; 李丽君; 陆纪春

    2011-01-01

    The PP-system Soil CO2 Respiration made in England was used to measure and study the daily variation of soil CO2 respiration of farmland crops such as cotton, wheat and corn from the typical oasis farmland in North Xinjiang. The results indicated that the systematic soil CO2 emission of wheat, corn and cotton had obvious daily variation law,which showed that the emission amount of beforenoon were greater than that of afternoon, and the dynamic systematic soil CO2 emission of wheat and corn tended to gentle curve,the curve variation released from soil CO2 of cotton dynamic system were greater;From the general view, the total emission released from cotton dynanmic system in summer were the greatest: 30. 98 g CO2/(m2 · d),followed by wheat and corn dynamic system, which were 8. 04 g CO2/(mz · d) and 23.92 g CO2/(m2 · d) respectively; The soil emission and the temperature tended to obviously positive correlation,the correlation coefficient was 0. 339 6.%利用英国PP-system土壤呼吸测定仪对北疆典型绿洲农田作物棉花、小麦与玉米生态系统的土壤CO2释放日变化进行了研究.结果表明,小麦、玉米和棉花生态系统的土壤CO2排放均具有明显的日变化规律,均为午前大于午后,且小麦与玉米生态系统土壤CO2排放呈平缓曲线,棉花生态系统土壤CO2释放曲线变化较为剧烈;从土壤CO2排放总量来看,夏季日棉花生态系统的土壤排放总量最大,为30.98 g CO2/(m2·d),其次为小麦和玉米生态系统,分别为8.04 g CO2/(m2·d)和23.92 g CO2/(m2·d);土壤CO2排放与气温呈明显正相关,相关系数为0.339 6.

  13. CO2刺激响应聚合物%CO2-Stimuli Responsive Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯岸超; 闫强; 袁金颖

    2012-01-01

    CO2刺激响应性聚合物是新近发展起来的一类智能型刺激响应聚合物,是指在通入和排出CO2后,聚合物性质能够发生可逆性变化的新型聚合物。由于调控过程中仅仅涉及CO2以及一些惰性气体而不引入其他杂质,因此具有多方面的潜在应用价值。本文调研了这方面的工作,综述了几类CO2刺激响应聚合物的合成及其自组装,并指出了CO2刺激响应聚合物的应用前景和发展方向。%CO2-stimuli responsive polymers are a class of newly developed smart stimuli responsive polymers, which usually refers to the polymers possessing reversible changes upon admission and emission of C02. Since the regulation process only involves CO2 and inert gases, without the introduction of other impurities, there are many potential applications in this field. This article summarized recent research progress on the preparation of C02- stimuli responsive polymers, followed by the discussion of their self-assembly, classifying in accordance with the C02-switchable groups, such as primary amine, amide and some specific polymer chains. The development prospect of this research field and its potential applications are also discussed.

  14. Sea ice contribution to the air-sea CO(2) exchange in the Arctic and Southern Oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard...[], Søren; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Delille, B.

    2011-01-01

    Although salt rejection from sea ice is a key process in deep-water formation in ice-covered seas, the concurrent rejection of CO(2) and the subsequent effect on air-sea CO(2) exchange have received little attention. We review the mechanisms by which sea ice directly and indirectly controls the a......-sea CO(2) exchange during winter, and (3) release of CO(2)-depleted melt water with excess total alkalinity during sea-ice decay and (4) biological CO(2) drawdown during primary production in sea ice and surface oceanic waters.......Although salt rejection from sea ice is a key process in deep-water formation in ice-covered seas, the concurrent rejection of CO(2) and the subsequent effect on air-sea CO(2) exchange have received little attention. We review the mechanisms by which sea ice directly and indirectly controls the air......-sea CO(2) exchange and use recent measurements of inorganic carbon compounds in bulk sea ice to estimate that oceanic CO(2) uptake during the seasonal cycle of sea-ice growth and decay in ice-covered oceanic regions equals almost half of the net atmospheric CO(2) uptake in ice-free polar seas. This sea-ice...

  15. 3-D loaded scaffolds obtained by supercritical CO2 assisted process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardea, S.; Reverchon, E.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) drying process for the formation of 3-D PVDF-HFP loaded scaffolds was tested. Experiments at pressures ranging between 150 and 250 bar and at temperatures ranging between 35 and 55°C were performed. The PVDF-HFP- acetone-ethanol solution at 15% w/w polymer was selected as the base case. The drug (amoxicillin) concentration was varied from 20 to 30% w/w with respect to PVDF-HFP. SC- CO2 drying process was confirmed to be a valid alternative to generate loaded structures; indeed, scaffolds characterized by nanometric networks (with mean pore diameter of about 300 nm) with a homogeneous drug distribution were obtained. Drug controlled release experiments were also performed and a quasi-zero order release kinetic was observed.

  16. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    amount are sensitive to increased atmospheric CO2. We conclude that the more abundant available organics released by roots at elevated CO2 altered the ecological strategy of the soil microbial community specifically a shift to a higher contribution of fast-growing r-selected species was observed. These changes in functional structure of the soil microbial community may counterbalance higher C input into the soil under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  17. Numerical modelling of particle-laden sonic CO2 jets with experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareing, C. J.; Fairweather, M.; Peakall, J.; Keevil, G.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Woolley, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    The characteristics of the particle distribution, evolution and movement in a sonic jet release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a high pressure reservoir are investigated. The motivation is to numerically model the sonic jet with particles, using the hitherto unknown initial particle distribution measured herein, and hence understand and numerically reproduce the experimentally observedparticle behaviour downstream of the Mach shock, including turbulence characteristics and level of agglomeration. We employ a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes scheme with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), combined with a Lagrangian particle tracker and particle distribution function. The model is seeded at the nozzle with the experimentally measured particle distribution and exploited to reproduce the observed characteristics of the jet. These releases are designed to be representative of a sonic CO2 release into the atmosphere and so provide data to help interpret how accidental or operational releases from the transport aspect of a carbon capture and storage chain might behave.

  18. Vertical gradients and seasonal variation in stem CO2 efflux within a Norway spruce stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Räntfors, Mats; Wallin, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Stem CO2 efflux is known to vary seasonally and vertically along tree stems. However, annual tree- and stand-scale efflux estimates are commonly based on measurements made only a few times a year, during daytime and at breast height. In this study, the effect of these simplifying assumptions on annual efflux estimates and their influence on the estimates of the importance of stems in stand-scale carbon cycling are evaluated. In order to assess the strength of seasonal, diurnal and along-stem variability in CO2 efflux, half-hourly measurements were carried out at three heights on three mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees over a period of 3 years. Making the common assumption of breast height efflux rates being representative of the entire stem was found to result in underestimations of 10-17% in the annual tree-scale CO2 efflux. Upscaling using only daytime measurements from breast height increased the underestimation to 15-20%. Furthermore, the results show that the strength of the vertical gradient varies seasonally, being strongest in the early summer and non-existent during the cool months. The observed seasonality in the vertical CO2 efflux gradient could not be explained by variation in stem temperature, temperature response of the CO2 efflux (Q10), outer-bark permeability, CO2 transport in the xylem or CO2 release from the phloem. However, the estimated CO2 concentration immediately beneath the bark was considerably higher in the upper stem during the main period of diameter growth, coinciding with the strongest vertical efflux gradient. These results suggest that higher growth rates in the upper stem are the main cause for the observed vertical variation in the stem CO2 effluxes. Furthermore, the results indicate that accounting for the vertical efflux variation is essential for assessments of the importance of stems in stand-scale carbon cycling.

  19. The role of vegetation in the CO2 flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S. H.; Quak, M.; Nabarro, S. D. A.; Norford, L.

    2013-03-01

    Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO2. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is extensive and/or evergreen. Negative daytime CO2 fluxes, for example have been observed during the growing season at suburban sites characterized by abundant vegetation and low population density. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is difficult due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the CO2 flux from a residential neighbourhood in Singapore using two different approaches. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance are compared with emissions estimated from emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should approximate the biogenic flux. In addition, a tree survey was conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations and an alternative model of the metabolic theory of ecology for tropical forests. Palm trees, banana plants and turfgrass were also included in the survey with their annual CO2 uptake obtained from published growth rates. Both approaches agree within 2% and suggest that vegetation captures 8% of the total emitted CO2 in the residential neighbourhood studied. A net uptake of 1.4 ton km-2 day-1 (510 ton km-2 yr-1 ) was estimated from the difference between the daily CO2 uptake by photosynthesis (3.95 ton km-2 ) and release by respiration (2.55 ton km-2). The study shows the importance of urban vegetation at the local scale for climate change mitigation in the tropics.

  20. CO2 acclimation impacts leaf isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Isoprene is emitted by many plant species as a side-product of photosynthesis. Once in the atmosphere, isoprene exhibits climate forcing through various feedback mechanisms. In order to quantify the climate feedbacks of biogenic isoprene emission it is crucial to establish how isoprene emissions are effected by plant acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. The energetic imbalance is critically related to the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vcmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 growth conditions representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. These plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters Vcmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system. The relationship between photosynthesis and isoprene emissions was measured by coupling the photosynthesis system with a Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. Our empirical results support the LES-model and show that the fractional allocation of carbon to isoprene biosynthesis is reduced in response to both short-term and long-term CO2 increases. In the short term, an increase in CO2 stimulates photosynthesis through an increase in the leaf interior CO2

  1. Disentangling the effects of CO2 and short-lived climate forcer mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogelj, J.; Schaeffer, M.; Meinshausen, M.; Shindell, D.T.; Hare, W.; Klimont, Z.; Velders, G.J.M.; Amann, M.; Schellnhuber, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic global warming is driven by emissions of a wide variety of radiative forcers ranging from very short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), like black carbon, to very long-lived, like CO2. These species are often released from common sources and are therefore intricately linked. However, for r

  2. The Influence of CO2 Solubility in Brine on Simulation of CO2 Injection into Water Flooded Reservoir and CO2 WAG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2010-01-01

    Injection of CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs is not only a traditional way to enhance oil recovery but also a relatively cheaper way to sequester CO2 underground since the increased oil production can offset some sequestration cost. CO2 injection process is often applied to water flooded...... reservoirs and in many situations alternating injection of water and CO2 is required to stabilize the injection front. Both scenarios involve a large amount of water, making CO2 solubility in brine, which is around ten times higher than methane solubility, a non-negligible factor in the relevant reservoir...... simulations. In our previous study, a 1-D slimtube simulator, which rigorously accounts for both CO2 solubility in brine and water content in hydrocarbon phases using the Peng-Robinson EoS modified by Soreide and Whitson, has been used to investigate the influence of CO2 solubility on the simulation...

  3. Translating crustacean biological responses from CO2 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many studies of animal responses to ocean acidification focus on uniformly conditioned age cohorts that lack complexities typically found in wild populations. These studies have become the primary data source for predicting higher level ecological effects, but the roles of intraspecific interactions in re-shaping biological, demographic and evolutionary responses are not commonly considered. To explore this problem, I assessed responses in the mysid Americamysis bahia to bubbling of CO2-enriched and un-enriched air into the seawater supply in flow-through aquariums. I conducted one experiment using isolated age cohorts and a separate experiment using intact populations. The seawater supply was continuously input from Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA). The 28-day cohort study was maintained without resource or spatial limitations, whereas the 5-month population study consisted of stage-structured populations that were allowed to self-regulate. These differences are common features of experiments and were intentionally retained to demonstrate the effect of methodological approaches on perceptions of effect mechanisms. The CO2 treatment reduced neonate abundance in the cohort experiment (24% reduction due to a mean pH difference of −0.27) but not in the population experiment, where effects were small and were strongest for adult and stage 1 survival (3% change due to a mean pH difference of −0.25). I also found evidence of competition in the population exper

  4. The pH and pCO2 dependence of sulfate reduction in shallow-sea hydrothermal CO2 – venting sediments (Milos Island, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eBayraktarov

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial sulfate reduction is a dominant process of organic matter mineralization in sulfate-rich anoxic environments at neutral pH. Recent studies have demonstrated sulfate reduction in low pH environments, but investigations on the microbial activity at variable pH and CO2 partial pressure are still lacking. In this study, the effect of pH and pCO2 on microbial activity was investigated by incubation experiments with radioactive 35S targeting sulfate reduction in sediments from the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent system of Milos, Greece, where pH is naturally decreased by CO2 release. Sediments differed in their physicochemical characteristics with distance from the main site of fluid discharge. Adjacent to the vent site (T ~ 40 – 75 °C, pH ~ 5, maximal sulfate reduction rates were observed between pH 5 – 6. Sulfate reduction in hydrothermally influenced sediments decreased at neutral pH. Sediments unaffected by hydrothermal venting (T ~ 26°, pH ~ 8 expressed the highest sulfate reduction rates between pH 6 – 7. Further experiments investigating the effect of pCO2 on sulfate reduction revealed a steep decrease in activity when the partial pressure increased from 2 to 3 bar. Findings suggest that sulfate reducing microbial communities associated with hydrothermal vent system are adapted to low pH and high CO2, while communities at control sites required a higher pH for optimal activity.

  5. Toward rational design of amines for CO2 capture: Substituent effect on kinetic process for the reaction of monoethanolamine with CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongbin; Wang, Pan; He, Ning; Yang, Xianhai; Chen, Jingwen

    2015-11-01

    Amines have been considered as promising candidates for post-combustion CO2 capture. A mechanistic understanding for the chemical processes involved in the capture and release of CO2 is important for the rational design of amines. In this study, the structural effects of amines on the kinetic competition among three typical products (carbamates, carbamic acids and bicarbonate) from amines+CO2 were investigated, in contrast to previous thermodynamic studies to tune the reaction of amines with CO2 based on desirable reaction enthalpy and reaction stoichiometry. We used a quantum chemical method to calculate the activation energies (Ea) for the reactions of a range of substituted monoethanolamines with CO2 covering three pathways to the three products. The results indicate that the formation of carbamates is the most favorable, among the three considered products. In addition, we found that the Ea values for all pathways linearly correlate with pKa of amines, and more importantly, the kinetic competition between carbamate and bicarbonate absorption pathways varies with pKa of the amines, i.e. stronger basicity results in less difference in Ea. These results highlight the importance of the consideration of kinetic competition among different reaction pathways in amine design.

  6. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  7. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  8. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  9. CO(2) Inhibits Respiration in Leaves of Rumex crispus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, J S; Koch, G W; Bloom, A J

    1992-02-01

    Curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) was grown from seed in a glasshouse at an ambient CO(2) partial pressure of about 35 pascals. Apparent respiration rate (CO(2) efflux in the dark) of expanded leaves was then measured at ambient CO(2) partial pressure of 5 to 95 pascals. Calculated intercellular CO(2) partial pressure was proportional to ambient CO(2) partial pressure in these short-term experiments. The CO(2) level strongly affected apparent respiration rate: a doubling of the partial pressure of CO(2) typically inhibited respiration by 25 to 30%, whereas a decrease in CO(2) elicited a corresponding increase in respiration. These responses were readily reversible. A flexible, sensitive regulatory interaction between CO(2) (a byproduct of respiration) and some component(s) of heterotrophic metabolism is indicated.

  10. Geochemical monitoring of Taal volcano (Philippines) by means of diffuse CO2 degassing studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Arcilla, Carlo; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Lagmay, Alfredo M.; Rodríguez, Fátima; Quina, Gerald; Alonso, Mar; Padilla, Germán D.; Aurelio, Mario A.

    2017-04-01

    Observing changes in the discharge rate of CO2 is an important part of volcanic monitoring programs, because it is released by progressive depressurization of magma during ascent and reach the surface well before their parental magma. Taal Volcano in Southwest Luzon, Philippines, lies between a volcanic arc front facing the subduction zone along the Manila Trench and a volcanic field formed from extension beyond the arc front. Taal Volcano Island is formed by a main tuff cone surrounded by several smaller tuff cones, tuff rings and scoria cones. This island is located in the center of the 30 km wide Taal Caldera, now filled by Taal Lake. To monitor the volcanic activity of Taal volcano is a priority task in the Philippines, because several million people live within a 20-km radius of Taal's caldera rim. During the last period of volcanic unrest from 2010 to 2011, the main crater lake of Taal volcano released the highest diffuse CO2 emission rates through the water surface reported to date by volcanic lakes worldwide. The maximum CO2 emission rate measured in the study period occurred two months before the strongest seismic activity recorded during the unrest period (Arpa et al., 2013, Bull Volcanol 75:747). After the unrest period, diffuse CO2 emission has remained in the range 532-860 t/d in the period 2013-2016. In January 2016, an automatic geochemical station to monitor in a continuous mode the diffuse CO2 degassing in a selected location of Taal, was installed in January 2016 to improve the early warning system at the volcano. The station is located at Daang Kastila, at the northern portion of the main crater rim. It measures hourly the diffuse CO2 efflux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, soil water content and temperature, wind speed and direction, air temperature and humidity, rainfall, and barometric pressure. The 2016 time series show CO2 efflux values in the range 20-690 g m-2 d-1.Soil temperature, heavily influenced by rainfall, ranged between 74 and 96o

  11. Variability of annual CO2 exchange from Dutch Grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schrier-Uijl

    2007-05-01

    2 a−1 (34.8%, respectively. However, the inter-site standard deviation of NEE was similar to the interannual one, amounting to 207 gC m−2 a−1. Large differences occur due to soil type. The grasslands on organic (peat soils show a mean net release of CO2 of 220±90 g C m−2 a−1 while the grasslands on mineral (clay and sand soils show a mean net uptake of CO2 of 90±90 g C m−2 a−1. If a weighing with the fraction of grassland on organic (20% and mineral soils (80% is applied, an average NEE of 28±90 g C m−2 a−1 is found, which means that on average the Dutch grasslands behave like a small sink for CO2. The results from the analysis illustrate the need for regionally specific and spatially explicit CO2 emission estimates from grassland.

  12. Abundance and diversity of CO2-fixing bacteria in grassland soils close to natural carbon dioxide springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videmsek, Urska; Hagn, Alexandra; Suhadolc, Marjetka; Radl, Viviane; Knicker, Heike; Schloter, Michael; Vodnik, Dominik

    2009-07-01

    Gaseous conditions at natural CO2 springs (mofettes) affect many processes in these unique ecosystems. While the response of plants to extreme and fluctuating CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) is relatively well documented, little is known on microbial life in mofette soil. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to investigate the abundance and diversity of CO2-fixing bacteria in grassland soils in different distances to a natural carbon dioxide spring. Samples of the same soil type were collected from the Stavesinci mofette, a natural CO2 spring which is known for very pure CO2 emissions, at different distances from the CO2 releasing vents, at locations that clearly differed in soil CO2 efflux (from 12.5 to over 200 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) yearly average). Bulk and rhizospheric soil samples were included into analyses. The microbial response was followed by a molecular analysis of cbbL genes, encoding for the large subunit of RubisCO, a carboxylase which is of crucial importance for C assimilation in chemolitoautotrophic microbes. In all samples analyzed, the "red-like" type of cbbL genes could be detected. In contrast, the "green-like" type of cbbL could not be measured by the applied technique. Surprisingly, a reduction of "red-like" cbbL genes copies was observed in bulk soil and rhizosphere samples from the sites with the highest CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, the diversity pattern of "red-like" cbbL genes changed depending on the CO(2) regime. This indicates that only a part of the autotrophic CO2-fixing microbes could adapt to the very high CO2 concentrations and adverse life conditions that are governed by mofette gaseous regime.

  13. Reducing CO2 from shipping – do non-CO2 effects matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Eide

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Shipping is a growing sector in the global economy, and it contributions to global CO2 emissions are expected to increase. CO2 emissions from the world shipping fleet will likely be regulated in the near future, and studies have shown that significant emission reductions can be achieved at low cost. Regulations are being discussed for both existing ships as well as for future additions to the fleet. In this study a plausible CO2 emission reduction inventory is constructed for the cargo fleet existing in 2010, as well as for container ships, bulk ships and tankers separately. In the reduction inventories, CO2 emissions are reduced by 25–32% relative to baseline by applying 15 technical and operational emission reduction measures in accordance with a ship-type-specific cost-effectiveness criterion, and 9 other emission compounds are changed as a technical implication of reducing CO2. The overall climate and environmental effects of the changes to all 10 emission components in the reduction inventory are assessed using a chemical transport model, radiative forcing (RF models and a simple climate model. We find substantial environmental and health benefits with up to 5% reduction in surface ozone levels, 15% reductions in surface sulfate and 10% reductions in wet deposition of sulfate in certain regions exposed to heavy ship traffic. The major ship types show distinctly different contributions in specific locations. For instance, the container fleet contributes 50% of the sulfate decline on the west coast of North America. The global radiative forcing from a 1 yr emission equal to the difference between baseline and reduction inventory shows an initial strong positive forcing from non-CO2 compounds. This warming effect is due to reduced cooling by aerosols and methane. After approximately 25 yr, the non-CO2 forcing is balanced by the CO2 forcing. For the global mean temperature change, we find a shift from warming to cooling after approximately 60

  14. CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques

    CERN Document Server

    Bouallou, Chakib

    2010-01-01

    This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

  15. Reducing CO2 from shipping - do non-CO2 effects matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, M. S.; Dalsøren, S. B.; Endresen, Ø.; Samset, B.; Myhre, G.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T.

    2013-04-01

    Shipping is a growing sector in the global economy, and it contributions to global CO2 emissions are expected to increase. CO2 emissions from the world shipping fleet will likely be regulated in the near future, and studies have shown that significant emission reductions can be achieved at low cost. Regulations are being discussed for both existing ships as well as for future additions to the fleet. In this study a plausible CO2 emission reduction inventory is constructed for the cargo fleet existing in 2010, as well as for container ships, bulk ships and tankers separately. In the reduction inventories, CO2 emissions are reduced by 25-32% relative to baseline by applying 15 technical and operational emission reduction measures in accordance with a ship-type-specific cost-effectiveness criterion, and 9 other emission compounds are changed as a technical implication of reducing CO2. The overall climate and environmental effects of the changes to all 10 emission components in the reduction inventory are assessed using a chemical transport model, radiative forcing (RF) models and a simple climate model. We find substantial environmental and health benefits with up to 5% reduction in surface ozone levels, 15% reductions in surface sulfate and 10% reductions in wet deposition of sulfate in certain regions exposed to heavy ship traffic. The major ship types show distinctly different contributions in specific locations. For instance, the container fleet contributes 50% of the sulfate decline on the west coast of North America. The global radiative forcing from a 1 yr emission equal to the difference between baseline and reduction inventory shows an initial strong positive forcing from non-CO2 compounds. This warming effect is due to reduced cooling by aerosols and methane. After approximately 25 yr, the non-CO2 forcing is balanced by the CO2 forcing. For the global mean temperature change, we find a shift from warming to cooling after approximately 60 yr. The major ship

  16. Factors affecting the direct mineralization of CO2 with olivine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soonchul Kwon; Maohong Fan; Herbert F. M. DaCosta; Armistead G. Russell

    2011-01-01

    Olivine,one of the most abundant minerals existing in nature,is explored as a CO2 carbonation agent for direct carbonation of CO2 in flue gas.Olivine based CO2 capture is thermodynamically favorable and can form a stable carbonate for long-term storage.Experimental results have shown that water vapor plays an important role in improving CO2 carbonation rate and capacities.Other operation conditions including reaction temperature,initial CO2 concentration,residence time corresponding to the flow rate of CO2 gas stream,and water vapor concentration also considerably affect the performance of the technology.

  17. Factors affecting the direct mineralization of CO2 with olivine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonchul; Fan, Maohong; DaCosta, Herbert F M; Russell, Armistead G

    2011-01-01

    Olivine, one of the most abundant minerals existing in nature, is explored as a CO2 carbonation agent for direct carbonation of CO2 in flue gas. Olivine based CO2 capture is thermodynamically favorable and can form a stable carbonate for long-term storage. Experimental results have shown that water vapor plays an important role in improving CO2 carbonation rate and capacities. Other operation conditions including reaction temperature, initial CO2 concentration, residence time corresponding to the flow rate of CO2 gas stream, and water vapor concentration also considerably affect the performance of the technology.

  18. CO2 measurements during transcranial Doppler examinations in headache patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    -tidal pCO2 with a capnograph. When patients are nauseated and vomit, as in migraine, the mask or mouthpiece connected to the capnograph represents a problem. We therefore evaluated whether a transcutaneous pCO2 electrode was as useful as the capnograph for pCO2 measurements in TCD examinations. We...... conclude that this is not the case, and recommend capnographic end-tidal pCO2 measurements during TCD examinations. However, transcutaneous pCO2 measurements may represent a supplement to spot measurements of end-tidal pCO2 in stable conditions when long-term monitoring is needed, and the mask...

  19. Supercritical CO2 as a substitute of volatile hydrocarbons; Superkritisch CO2 vervangt vluchtige koolwaterstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, G. (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    In many cases supercritical carbon dioxide can replace volatile hydrocarbons in extraction processes. Currently gaseous or liquid CO2 is already used for industrial purification processes, extraction of caffeine from coffee and as a solvent for paint. Although supercritical extraction s a batch process the technique can be applied as a continuous process. [Dutch] In processen waar vluchtige koolwaterstoffen worden ingezet om stoffen te extraheren, biedt superkritisch CO2 een milieuvriendelijk alternatief. Het koolzuur dat zowel in de vloeistof- als gasfase zit, wordt dan ook steeds meer ingezet in extractieprocessen.

  20. Responses of soil CO2 efflux to changes in plant CO2 uptake and transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, János; de Luca, Giulia; Mészáros, Ádám; Trieber, Júlia; Gecse, Bernadett; Fóti, Szilvia; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Biotic drivers of soil respiration represent a significant supply-side (plant) control of the process. Those biotic drivers that integrate over longer time periods are useful in describing the phenological changes and physiological state of the vegetation, but they are not suitable to explain the diel variability of soil respiration. Two plant physiological processes, acting in opposite directions, could be relevant at diel timescale: (1) photosynthesis, and (2) transpiration. Firstly, it was recently found that photosynthesis has a time-lagged (a few hours) positive effect on the respiration of roots and root-associated microbes. This can be explainedby an increase in easily accessible non-structural hydrocarbon sources for the roots and root-associated organisms within this period. Secondly, it was found that the effect of transpiration could reduce root respiration due to CO2 transport through the transpiration stream, and this effect is expected to be immediate. Removing the effect of the abiotic drivers from the soil efflux signal could help to clarify the role of other driving variables. In the present study, we conducted manipulation measurements in lab environment to be able to detect the effects of the plant physiological variables (CO2 uptake, transpiration) on soil CO2 efflux. Plant individuals were planted into field soil samples in small pots. Transpiration manipulation was done by regulating vapour pressure of the air around the plant canopy and by inhibitors. Photosynthesis manipulation consisted of programmed absence of light. Isotopic signatures of soil respiration were used for estimating the contribution of the autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration components. 13CO2 concentration of the CO2 efflux of the different soil components was measured continuously in open system by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro G1101-i gas analyser). Keeling-plot approach was also used to calculate the isotopic signals of the sources. According to the

  1. Estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions using satellite measurements of "proxy" species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Ciais, Philippe; Broquet, Grégoire; Zhuravlev, Ruslan V.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet

    2016-11-01

    Fossil-fuel (FF) burning releases carbon dioxide (CO2) together with many other chemical species, some of which, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), are routinely monitored from space. This study examines the feasibility of estimation of FF CO2 emissions from large industrial regions by using NO2 and CO column retrievals from satellite measurements in combination with simulations by a mesoscale chemistry transport model (CTM). To this end, an inverse modeling method is developed that allows estimating FF CO2 emissions from different sectors of the economy, as well as the total CO2 emissions, in a given region. The key steps of the method are (1) inferring "top-down" estimates of the regional budget of anthropogenic NOx and CO emissions from satellite measurements of proxy species (NO2 and CO in the case considered) without using formal a priori constraints on these budgets, (2) the application of emission factors (the NOx-to-CO2 and CO-to-CO2 emission ratios in each sector) that relate FF CO2 emissions to the proxy species emissions and are evaluated by using data of "bottom-up" emission inventories, and (3) cross-validation and optimal combination of the estimates of CO2 emission budgets derived from measurements of the different proxy species. Uncertainties in the top-down estimates of the NOx and CO emissions are evaluated and systematic differences between the measured and simulated data are taken into account by using original robust techniques validated with synthetic data. To examine the potential of the method, it was applied to the budget of emissions for a western European region including 12 countries by using NO2 and CO column amounts retrieved from, respectively, the OMI and IASI satellite measurements and simulated by the CHIMERE mesoscale CTM, along with the emission conversion factors based on the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory. The analysis was focused on evaluation of the uncertainty levels for the top-down NOx and CO emission

  2. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    expected to be more efficient in their C use. Decreasing the C/N ratio of roots decreased SOM respiration and increased the efficiency of SOM-consuming microbes. Direct N additions had a similar but stronger effect. Increased C efficiency with greater nutrient availability is consistent with theoretical expectations of C utilization under nutrient limitation. Notably, the response of C use to N treatments occurred only under eCO2 conditions. This functional contrast was supported by differential responses of microbial PLFA profiles to N treatments under CO2 treatments. Together, these results suggest that the eCO2 environment was more conducive to N limitation, via changes in microbial community structure and function. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of plant-mediated alteration of decomposer C efficiency due to changes in atmospheric CO2 and N availability from both plant and soil sources. An increase in SOM-consuming microbes efficiency in an eCO2 world is likely to have important ecosystem-level implications as it could enhance the amount of C that remains in soil relative to the amount released to the atmosphere. The interactive effects of CO2 and N treatments suggest that microbial efficiency will be more sensitive to changes in nutrient status under the future eCO2 atmosphere.

  3. Hydrothermal He and CO2 at Wudalianchi intra-plate volcano, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Zheng, Guodong; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Wakita, Hiroshi; Wang, Xianbin; Guo, Zhengfu

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions have been measured for CO2-rich bubbling gases discharging from cold springs in Wudalianchi intra-plate volcanic area, NE China. Observed 3He/4He ratios (2-3 RA) and δ13C values of CO2 (-5‰ to -3‰) indicate the occurrence of a mantle component released and transferred to the surface by the Cenozoic extension-related magmatic activities. The CO2/3He ratios are in wide range of (0.4-97 × 109). Based on the apparent mixing trend in a 3He/4He and δ13C of CO2 diagram from all published data, the extracted magmatic end-member in the Wudalianchi Volcano has 3He/4He, δ13C and CO2/3He value of ˜3.2 RA, ˜-4.6‰ and ˜6 × 1010, respectively. These values suggest that the volatiles originate from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) in NE China and represent ancient fluids captured by prior metasomatic events, as revealed by geothermal He and CO2 from the adjacent Changbaishan volcanic area.

  4. Mechanisms of low temperature capture and regeneration of CO2 using diamino protic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Tristan J; Verheyen, Thomas; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; Vijayaraghavan, R; Young, Scott; Pearson, Andrew K; Pas, Steven J; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2016-01-14

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) chemical absorption and regeneration was investigated in two diamino carboxylate protic ionic liquids (PILs), dimethylethylenediamine formate (DMEDAH formate) and dimethylpropylenediamine acetate (DMPDAH acetate), using novel calorimetric techniques. The PILs under study have previously been shown to possess a CO2 absorption capacity similar to the industrial standard, 30% aqueous MEA, while requiring much lower temperatures to release the captured CO2. We show that this is in part due to the fact that the PILs exhibit enthalpies of CO2 desorption as low as 40 kJ mol(-1), significantly lower than the 85 kJ mol(-1) required for 30% aqueous MEA. Computational and spectroscopic analyses were used to probe the mechanism of CO2 capture, which was found to proceed via the formation of carbamate moieties on the primary amine of both DMEDAH and DMPDAH. Evidence was also found that weakly acidic counter-ions such as formate and acetate provide, unexpectedly, an additional proton acceptor site in the traditional carbamate mechanism, revealing opportunities to increase CO2 uptake capacity in the future through careful design of the anion and cation used in the PIL capture agent.

  5. Cost structure of a postcombustion CO2 capture system using CaO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanades, J Carlos; Grasa, G; Alonso, M; Rodriguez, N; Anthony, E J; Romeo, L M

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents the basic economics of an emerging concept for CO2 capture from flue gases in power plants. The complete system includes three key cost components: a full combustion power plant, a second power plant working as an oxy-fired fluidized bed calciner, and a fluidized bed carbonator interconnected with the calciner and capturing CO2 from the combustion power plant. The simplicity in the economic analysis is possible because the key cost data for the two major first components are well established in the open literature. It is shown that there is clear scope for a breakthrough in capture cost to around 15 $/t of CO2 avoided with this system. This is mainly because the capture system is generating additional power (from the additional coal fed to the calciner) and because the avoided CO2 comes from the capture of the CO2 generated by the coal fed to the calciner and the CO2 captured (as CaCO3) from the flue gases of the existing power plant, that is also released in the calciner.

  6. Permafrost carbon as a missing link to explain CO 2 changes during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, K. A.; Bouttes, N.; Roche, D. M.; Chappellaz, J.; Krinner, G.

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric concentration of CO2 increased from 190 to 280 ppm between the last glacial maximum 21,000 years ago and the pre-industrial era. This CO2 rise and its timing have been linked to changes in the Earth’s orbit, ice sheet configuration and volume, and ocean carbon storage. The ice-core record of δ13CO2 (refs ,) in the atmosphere can help to constrain the source of carbon, but previous modelling studies have failed to capture the evolution of δ13CO2 over this period. Here we show that simulations of the last deglaciation that include a permafrost carbon component can reproduce the ice core records between 21,000 and 10,000 years ago. We suggest that thawing permafrost, due to increasing summer insolation in the northern hemisphere, is the main source of CO2 rise between 17,500 and 15,000 years ago, a period sometimes referred to as the Mystery Interval. Together with a fresh water release into the North Atlantic, much of the CO2 variability associated with the Bølling-Allerod/Younger Dryas period ~15,000 to ~12,000 years ago can also be explained. In simulations of future warming we find that the permafrost carbon feedback increases global mean temperature by 10-40% relative to simulations without this feedback, with the magnitude of the increase dependent on the evolution of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

  7. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  8. CO2 Sequestration and Recycle by Photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S.C. Chuang

    2004-02-01

    Visible light-photocatalysis could provide a cost-effective route to recycle CO2 to useful chemicals or fuels. Research is planned to study the reactivity of adsorbates, their role in the photosynthesis reaction, and their relation to the nature of surface sites during photosynthesis of methanol and hydrocarbons from CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O. The year two research focus catalyst screening and IR studies. Key research results show Pd/TiO2 exhibits the highest activity for hydrocarbon synthesis from photocatalytic reactions. The in situ IR could successfully monitor the adsorbate hydrocarbon species on Cu/TiO2. Year III research will focus on developing a better understanding of the key factors which control the catalyst activity.

  9. Beam profile analyzer for CO2 lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of an optoelectronic system to analyze the beam intensity profile of CO2 lasers is presented herein. The device collects the beam profile with a LiTaO3 pyroelectric detector and uses a sampling technique based on the acquisition of horizontal sections at different levels. The digital signal processing includes subroutines that drop down two dimensional and three dimensional beam profile displays to determine the laser beam parameters of optical power, peak pixel location, centroid location and width of the laser beam, with algorithms based on the ISO 11146 standard. With the systematic calibration of the analyzer was obtained in the measurement of power an error under 5%, for a 20–200 W range and an error under 1.6% for spatial measurements of a TEM00 laser. By design, the analyzer can be used during the laser process.

  10. Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P; Butler, Harry J; Strong, Craig L; McTainsh, Grant H; Leys, John F; Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A

    2013-10-01

    Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within terrestrial ecosystems, to the atmosphere and oceans. Dust export is an essential component of the carbon (C) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) budget because wind erosion contributes to the C cycle by removing selectively SOC from vast areas and transporting C dust quickly offshore; augmenting the net loss of C from terrestrial systems. However, the contribution of wind erosion to rates of C release and sequestration is poorly understood. Here, we describe how SOC dust emission is omitted from national C accounting, is an underestimated source of CO(2) and may accelerate SOC decomposition. Similarly, long dust residence times in the unshielded atmospheric environment may considerably increase CO(2) emission. We developed a first approximation to SOC enrichment for a well-established dust emission model and quantified SOC dust emission for Australia (5.83 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)) and Australian agricultural soils (0.4 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)). These amount to underestimates for CO(2) emissions of ≈10% from combined C pools in Australia (year = 2000), ≈5% from Australian Rangelands and ≈3% of Australian Agricultural Soils by Kyoto Accounting. Northern hemisphere countries with greater dust emission than Australia are also likely to have much larger SOC dust emission. Therefore, omission of SOC dust emission likely represents a considerable underestimate from those nations' C accounts. We suggest that the omission of SOC dust emission from C cycling and C accounting is a significant global source of uncertainty. Tracing the fate of wind-eroded SOC in the dust cycle is therefore essential to quantify the release of CO(2) from SOC dust to the atmosphere and the contribution of SOC deposition to downwind C sinks.

  11. Different harvest intensity and soil CO2 efflux in sessile oak coppice forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darenova E

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux accounts for about 45-80% of total ecosystem respiration and is therefore an important part of the ecosystem carbon cycle. Soil CO2 efflux has been poorly studied in forests managed in the ancient coppicing manner. In our study, soil CO2 efflux, temperature, and moisture were measured in sessile oak stands with different harvesting intensity (control: 0% intensity; V1: 75%; V2: 80 %; V3: 85%; and V4: 100% during the fifth and sixth years after harvesting. Soil CO2 efflux was in the range 2-8 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 and indicated an increasing pattern with increasing harvesting intensity. The slope of that pattern became less steep from the fifth to the sixth year after harvesting, thus indicating gradual recovery of soil carbon dynamics in the coppiced stand toward the equilibrium state existing before harvesting. Temperature sensitivity of soil CO2 efflux ranged between 2.1 and 2.8, with the lowest values measured in the control stand. Soil CO2 efflux in the control stand was more sensitive to changes in soil moisture than was that on harvested plots. By our calculations, 6.2 tC ha-1 was released from the control stand and 6.2-6.8 tC ha-1 from the harvested stands during the sixth year after harvesting. If mean temperature were to rise by 1 °C, the amount of soil carbon released would increase by 7.7% in the control stand and, depending on harvesting intensity, by 9.0-10.8% in the harvested stands.

  12. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  13. CO2 chemoreception in cardiorespiratory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Robert W

    2010-06-01

    Considerable progress has been made elucidating the cellular signals and ion channel targets involved in the response to increased CO2/H+ of brain stem neurons from chemosensitive regions. Intracellular pH (pHi) does not exhibit recovery from an acid load when extracellular pH (pHo) is also acid. This lack of pHi recovery is an essential but not unique feature of all chemosensitive neurons. These neurons have pH-regulating transporters, especially Na+/H+ exchangers, but some may also contain HCO3--dependent transporters as well. Studies in locus ceruleus (LC) neurons have shown that firing rate will increase in response to decreased pHi or pHo but not in response to increased CO2 alone. A number of K+ channels, as well as other channels, have been suggested to be targets of these pH changes with a fall of pH inhibiting these channels. In neurons from some regions it appears that multiple signals and multiple channels are involved in their chemosensitive response while in neurons from other regions a single signal and/or channel may be involved. Despite the progress, a number of key issues remain to be studied. A detailed study of chemosensitive signaling needs to be done in neurons from more brain stem regions. Fully describing the chemosensitive signaling pathways in brain stem neurons will offer new targets for therapies to alter the strength of central chemosensitivity and will yield new insights into the reason why there are multiple central chemoreceptive sites.

  14. CO2 degassing in the Hartoušov mofette area, western Eger Rift, imaged by CO2 mapping and geoelectrical and gravity surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickschick, Tobias; Kämpf, Horst; Flechsig, Christina; Mrlina, Jan; Heinicke, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Strong, subcontinental mantle-dominated CO2 degassing occurs in the Hartoušov and Bublák mofette fields in the western Eger Rift. The combination of CO2 gas flux and soil gas measurements as well as gravity and geoelectric surveys provides insight into the surface and subsurface of this unique mofette area. CO2 soil gas and gas flux measurements reveal that large amounts of carbon dioxide are released via channels with diameters below 1 m. Carbon dioxide emissions of several tens and up to more than 100 kg day-1 are ejected via these small seeps. Measurements with small spacings are necessary to account for the point like, focused gas discharge in the lesser degassing surrounding. We estimate that between 23 and 97 tons of CO2 are released over an area of about 350,000 m2 each day in the Hartoušov mofette field. The application of widely used geostatistical tools leads to estimations of the CO2 discharge with very high standard deviations due to the strong positive skewness of the data distribution. Geophysical investigations via electrical resistivity tomography and gravity measurements were carried out over areas of strong seepage and reveal distinct anomalies in the subsurface below mofettes, indicating rock and sediment alterations and/or sediment transport by pressurised, ascending CO2 and water mobilised by it. This study reveals that the gas emanations only occur west of a morphological step which is related to a N-S-oriented fault zone, the Počatky-Plesná fault zone. The results of CO2 mapping and the geophysical studies can track the course of this fault zone in this area. Our results fit into a tectonic model in which the mofette fields are in the centres of two independent pull-apart basin-like structures. We hypothesise that the sinistral strike-slip movement of the Počatky-Plesná fault zone leads to a pull-apart basin-like opening, at which the strong, mantle-derived CO2 degassing occurs nowadays. Since the Hartoušov and Bublák mofette fields

  15. Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Ian

    2014-08-31

    The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO₂; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO₂ will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO₂ will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture

  16. 利用赤泥捕获CO2反应特性%Reaction characteristics of CO2 captured by red mud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伊元荣; 韩敏芳; 于立安

    2011-01-01

    中国是世界上最大的煤炭生产国和消费国,煤炭产量占世界总产量的三分之一,也是目前少数几个以煤炭为主要能源的国家之一[1-3].大量煤炭的燃烧导致我国CO2排放量急剧增加,根据世界银行数据库估计,2000~2008年中国CO2年排放总量从27亿吨提高到70亿吨,年平均增长率为12.28%,其累计排放量为415亿吨碳当量[4].在我国煤炭燃烧排放的CO2中,电站锅炉和工业锅炉(包括工业炉窑)是主要的污染源[5].随着人们对资源短缺、温室效应问题的重视,作为废气排放的CO2,其回收、固定、利用及再生资源化问题引起世界各国特别是排放量较大的工业国家的普遍关注,围绕CO2相关研究也不断深入[6].%Red mud is an alkaline solid waste released from A12O3 smelting and can be used as capture agent to absorb CO2 in fume. In this paper, red mud from Bayer process of China Aluminum Corporation was selected and used, and the effect of reaction temperature, time, and ratio of solid to liquid, agitation speed and CO2 flow rate on absorbing efficiency of red mud was investigated to obtain the best process parameters and conditions. The results show that one gram fluidic red mud containing 44.12% (mass) water can capture 0. 11-0. 12 g CO2 at 40'C , under the ratio of solid to liquid of 1 ! 10, the reaction time of 120 min, the agitation speed of 700 r ? Min"1 and the CO2 gas flow rate of 0. 25 L * min"1. The properties of red mud before and after absorbing CO2 were characterized by XRD, SEM, BET, and FT-IR. The data from XRD show that main components of red mud are Ca2Si04, CaCO3, Na2Si2O5, CaTiO3, Ca3Si2O5, Ca3 Al2 O6, and NaCO3, after the reaction with CO2, the peaks of Ca2 SiC>4, Na2 Si2 O5 and Na2 CO3 in XRD pattern disappear. Furthermore, owing to the alkaline substances in red mud can react with CO2 to get carbonates; some new phases can be found in the XRD spectrum. The analysis by SEM, BET and FT-IR imply that the

  17. Enhanced transport phenomena in CO2 sequestration and CO2 EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this thesis give insight into the (mass)-transfer during flow of gases, especially CO2, in various gas-liquid systems. A number of experiments was performed to investigate the transport phenomena through interfaces with and without surfactant monolayers. The observed phenomena have be

  18. Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.

    2011-06-08

    This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

  19. CO2-ECBM and CO2 Sequestration in Polish Coal Seam – Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Baran

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: The results indicate successful sorption of carbon dioxide in each experiment. This provides the rationale to study the application of the coal tested to obtain methane genetic origin genetic methane with the use of the CO2 injection.

  20. Enhanced transport phenomena in CO2 sequestration and CO2 EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this thesis give insight into the (mass)-transfer during flow of gases, especially CO2, in various gas-liquid systems. A number of experiments was performed to investigate the transport phenomena through interfaces with and without surfactant monolayers. The observed phenomena have be

  1. Enhanced transport phenomena in CO2 sequestration and CO2 EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this thesis give insight into the (mass)-transfer during flow of gases, especially CO2, in various gas-liquid systems. A number of experiments was performed to investigate the transport phenomena through interfaces with and without surfactant monolayers. The observed phenomena have

  2. Novel Long-Term CO2 Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current Technology for CO2 removal from enclosed air of spacecraft utilizes LiOH canisters for CO2 absorption. This absorption is irreversible so longer flights...

  3. Monitoring solid oxide CO2 capture sorbents in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keturakis, Christopher J; Ni, Fan; Spicer, Michelle; Beaver, Michael G; Caram, Hugo S; Wachs, Israel E

    2014-12-01

    The separation, capture, and storage of CO2 , the major greenhouse gas, from industrial gas streams has received considerable attention in recent years because of concerns about environmental effects of increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. An emerging area of research utilizes reversible CO2 sorbents to increase conversion and rate of forward reactions for equilibrium-controlled reactions (sorption-enhanced reactions). Little fundamental information, however, is known about the nature of the sorbent surface sites, sorbent surface-CO2 complexes, and the CO2 adsorption/desorption mechanisms. The present study directly spectroscopically monitors Na2 O/Al2 O3 sorbent-CO2 surface complexes during adsorption/desorption with simultaneous analysis of desorbed CO2 gas, allowing establishment of molecular level structure-sorption relationships between individual surface carbonate complexes and the CO2 working capacity of sorbents at different temperatures.

  4. Understanding and predicting trends in north Atlantic CO2 uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Paul; Lebehot, Alice; Watson, Andy; McNeall, Doug; Ford, David; Schuster, Ute

    2017-04-01

    To determine the maximum carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions society must commit to, to remain below a given atmospheric CO2 threshold, the scientific community must robustly quantify what proportion of human emitted CO2 will be taken up by the land and marine carbon reservoirs. The North Atlantic Ocean is the most intense marine sink of anthropogenic CO2 on the planet, accounting for about a fifth of the global oceanic anthropogenic CO2 uptake, despite covering just 15% of the global ocean area. Carefully assessing uncertainties, we quantify the real-world trend in North Atlantic CO2 uptake over the past two decades. Comparing this to results from state-of-the-art climate models, we find that models are systematically underestimating the observed CO2 uptake trend. By performing a set of targeted climate model simulations, we diagnose and account for this bias, and produce the first set of observation-informed future ocean CO2 uptake predictions.

  5. Quantification of the advected CO2 concentration due to upstream surface fluxes in aircraft vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, A.; Morguí, J.-A.; Curcoll, R.; Rodó, X.

    2009-04-01

    A model framework which couples the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART (LPDM) with the new global surface flux inversion CarbonTracker from NOAA-ESRL (2007B release) is used to quantify the advected CO2 concentration from outbound surface fluxes to measured vertical profiles carried out during different seasons in 2006 at La Muela site in Spain (LMU; 41.60°N, 1.1°W). The Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART (LPDM) calculates the influence of surface CO2 fluxes upwind of the study area, allowing us to identify those sources or sink areas that strongly modify the CO2 content of air masses that arrives at different altitudes of measured profiles. CarbonTracker is a new assimilation system that informs of global carbon fluxes at 1°x1° at 3 hours resolution. Coupling LPDM results with surface fluxes allows assessing the net CO2 contribution of identified areas to measured concentrations along the profiles above a reference or background concentration. Furthermore, it allows the quantification of the percentage of each component flux (biospheric, anthropogenic and oceanic) to each vertical layer. At LMU, biospheric fluxes account ~70% of total CO2 advection; fossil fuel ~25%; and ~5% is attributed to the oceanic ones. By far, late spring and summer profiles are largely influence by the biospheric component (~90%). Finally, the CO2 concentration above the background value of profiles measured on 22nd February, 13th October and 30th November 2006 are well explained by the advection of upstream surface fluxes. In other profiles examined, the variation of CO2 along the profile is partially explained by the advection of CO2 outbound fluxes.

  6. Sediment CO2 efflux from cleared and intact temperate mangroves and tidal flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, R. H.; Schwendenmann, L.; Lundquist, C. J.

    2015-02-01

    Temperate mangroves in Southern Australia and New Zealand have been increasing in area over the past 50 years, whereas tropical mangroves have declined by 30-50% over a similar time frame. Tropical mangroves are understood to be an important carbon sink and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions following clearance are estimated to be comparable or greater than CO2 emissions following the clearance of many terrestrial forest systems. Recreational and amenity values or perceived loss of other estuarine habitats due to expanding temperate mangrove forests have resulted in clearing of temperate mangroves. In this study, we investigated the impact of temperate mangrove clearance on CO2 efflux from the sediment to the atmosphere along with a range of other biotic and abiotic factors. Significantly higher CO2 efflux rates were measured in cleared (1.34 ± 0.46 μmol m2 s-1) and intact mangrove sites (2.31 ± 0.72 μmol m2 s-1) than in tidal flats (-0.23 ± 0.27 μmol m2 s-1). Site and sediment characteristics such as sediment carbon and nitrogen concentration, chlorophyll α concentration, grain size, mangrove height, macrofaunal abundance, sediment temperature and moisture were strongly correlated with sediment CO2 efflux. Our results suggest that carbon stored within temperate mangrove sediment is released over a period of years to decades after mangrove clearance. CO2 efflux from intact and cleared temperate mangroves was found to be comparable to rates observed in the tropics. Disturbance of the surface biofilm resulted in elevated CO2 efflux across all habitats, suggesting the important role of surface biofilm communities in mediating CO2 efflux.

  7. The role of vegetation in the CO2 flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S. H.; Quak, M.; Nabarro, S. D. A.; Norford, L.

    2013-10-01

    Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO2. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is extensive and/or evergreen. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is difficult due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the CO2 flux from a residential neighbourhood in Singapore using two different approaches. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance are compared with emissions estimated from emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should approximate the flux associated with the aboveground vegetation. In addition, a tree survey was conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations and an alternative model of the metabolic theory of ecology for tropical forests. Palm trees, banana plants and turfgrass were also included in the survey with their annual CO2 uptake obtained from published growth rates. Both approaches agree within 2% and suggest that vegetation sequesters 8% of the total emitted CO2 in the residential neighbourhood studied. An uptake of 1.4 ton km-2 day-1 (510 ton km-2 yr-1) was estimated as the difference between assimilation by photosynthesis minus the aboveground biomass respiration during daytime (4.0 ton km-2 day-1) and release by plant respiration at night (2.6 ton km-2 day-1). However, when soil respiration is added to the daily aboveground flux, the biogenic component becomes a net source amounting to 4% of the total CO2 flux and represents the total contribution of urban vegetation to the carbon flux to the atmosphere.

  8. Lipid accumulation and CO2 utilization of Nannochloropsis oculata in response to CO2 aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Chien-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Ta; Ong, Seow-Chin; Chen, Chiun-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    In order to produce microalgal lipids that can be transformed to biodiesel fuel, effects of concentration of CO(2) aeration on the biomass production and lipid accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata in a semicontinuous culture were investigated in this study. Lipid content of N. oculata cells at different growth phases was also explored. The results showed that the lipid accumulation from logarithmic phase to stationary phase of N. oculata NCTU-3 was significantly increased from 30.8% to 50.4%. In the microalgal cultures aerated with 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% CO(2), the maximal biomass and lipid productivity in the semicontinuous system were 0.480 and 0.142 g L(-1)d(-1) with 2% CO(2) aeration, respectively. Even the N. oculata NCTU-3 cultured in the semicontinuous system aerated with 15% CO(2), the biomass and lipid productivity could reach to 0.372 and 0.084 g L(-1)d(-1), respectively. In the comparison of productive efficiencies, the semicontinuous system was operated with two culture approaches over 12d. The biomass and lipid productivity of N. oculata NCTU-3 were 0.497 and 0.151 g L(-1)d(-1) in one-day replacement (half broth was replaced each day), and were 0.296 and 0.121 g L(-1)d(-1) in three-day replacement (three fifth broth was replaced every 3d), respectively. To optimize the condition for long-term biomass and lipid yield from N. oculata NCTU-3, this microalga was suggested to grow in the semicontinuous system aerated with 2% CO(2) and operated by one-day replacement.

  9. CO2 emissions from Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    rise to a substantial reduction of the CO2 emission in the construction phase. The present paper describes how the CO2 emission is reduced when using Super-light technology instead of traditional structural components. Estimations of the CO2 emissions from a number of projects using various...... construction methods suggest that building with Super-light structures may cut the CO2 emission in half, compared to traditional concrete structures, and reduce it to 25% compared to traditional steel structures....

  10. Simulation of CO2-Distribution in Fractured Oil Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Furuvik, Nora; Halvorsen, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Deep geologic injections and storage of Carbon dioxide (CO2) for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are an upcoming combination due to the potential for increased oil production from depleted oilfields at the same time reducing the carbon footprint from industrial sources. CO2-EOR refers to a technique for injection of supercritical-dense CO2 into an oil reservoir. Remaining oil, not producible by primary and secondary techniques, has been successfully produced using EOR with CO2 since early 1970??....

  11. CO2-switchable fluorescence of a dendritic polymer and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunmei; Lü, Shaoyu; Liu, Mingzhu; Wu, Can; Xiong, Yun

    2016-01-14

    The synthesis and properties of CO2 responsive and fluorescent dendritic polymers, poly(amido amine)/Pluronic F127 (PAMAM/F127), are reported in this paper. The morphologies and sizes of PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers showed unimolecular micelle morphologies at low concentrations, and changed to multimolecular micelles at higher concentrations. Additionally, fluorescence spectra and confocal laser scanning microscopy images showed that PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers exhibited a fluorescent enhancement response to the presence of CO2. Apart from that, the release behavior of PAMAM/F127 gels under simulated body fluids was investigated by choosing curcumin as the hydrophobic drug. The results indicated that PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers can be used to improve the solubility of curcumin, and the drug released faster in the presence of CO2. Such CO2 responsive fluorescent dendritic polymers are potentially applicable in cellular imaging or drug controlled release.

  12. Time-course of ventilation, arterial and pulmonary CO(2) tension during CO (2) increase in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Toru; Okada, Yasumasa; Hara, Yasushi; Sakamaki, Fumio; Kyotani, Shingo; Tomita, Takeshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi; Nakanishi, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    A change of ventilation (VE), PaCO( 2 ) (arterial CO( 2 ) tension) and PvCO( 2 ) (pulmonary arterial CO( 2 ) tension) with time was not evaluated precisely during exercise or CO( 2 ) rebreathing in humans. In this study, changes of these variables with time were fitted to exponential curves {y = Exp ( x/ T + A ) + k} and compared. When exercise pulmonary hemodynamics was examined in 15 cardiac patients to decide therapies, we asked the patients to undergo CO( 2 ) rebreathing using air with supplementation of consumed O( 2 ). Arterial and pulmonary blood was drawn every minute. During exercise, T was 28.2 ± 8.4 and 26.8 ± 12.4, and A was 0.80 ± 0.50 and 0.50 ± 0.90 in VE and PvCO( 2 ), respectively, with no statistical differences. During CO( 2 ) rebreathing, T was 18.6 ± 5.8, 41.8 ± 38.0 and 21.6 ± 9.7 and A was 0.39 ± 0.67, 1.64 ± 1.35 and 0.17 ± 0.83 in VE, PaCO( 2 ) and PvCO( 2 ), respectively, with statistical difference of PaCO( 2 ) from other variables, suggesting that VE and PvCO( 2 ) showed same mode of change according to time but PaCO( 2 ) did not.

  13. CO2-adapted legumes ameliorate but do not prevent the negative effect of elevated CO2 on nitrogen fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, P.; Bowatte, S.; Lieffering, M.; Li, F.

    2015-12-01

    The response of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to climate and elevated CO2 (eCO2) is a key uncertainty in modelling C cycle projections. In addition, as BNF provides 50% of the nitrogen (N) input to agricultural production and as ecosystem responses to eCO2 are strongly influenced by N availability then the eCO2 impact on BNF is central to modelling legume-based system responses to climate change. Greater photoassimilate production under eCO2 should lead to enhanced BNF and this response is a feature of ecosystem models thus providing the N inputs necessary to provide continuing stimulation of NPP. FACE experiments provide a 'realistic' environment for eCO2 studies; however, even if run for multiple years, they still may not capture adaptation to eCO2 particularly in ecosystems dominated by perennial species. We tested the effect of eCO2 on BNF and the potential importance of adaption by growing legumes that had been exposed to high or ambient CO2 concentrations at a natural CO2 spring in a long-running (16 year) FACE experiment on grassland. BNF was significantly lower under eCO2 but the reduction was less marked where plants had originated in a high CO2 environment. An ecosystem model run with reduced BNF proved a better fit to the experimental data for the FACE experiment than where BNF was enhanced or unchanged under eCO2.

  14. Environmental Assessment for Potential Impacts of Ocean CO2 Storage on Marine Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N.; Tsurushima, N.; Suzumura, M.; Shibamoto, Y.; Harada, K.

    2008-12-01

    Ocean CO2 storage that actively utilizes the ocean potential to dissolve extremely large amounts of CO2 is a useful option with the intent of diminishing atmospheric CO2 concentration. CO2 storage into sub-seabed geological formations is also considered as the option which has been already put to practical reconnaissance in some projects. Direct release of CO2 in the ocean storage and potential CO2 leakage from geological formations into the bottom water can alter carbonate system as well as pH of seawater. It is essential to examine to what direction and extent chemistry change of seawater induced by CO2 can affect the marine environments. Previous studies have shown direct and acute effects by increasing CO2 concentrations on physiology of marine organisms. It is also a serious concern that chemistry change can affect the rates of chemical, biochemical and microbial processes in seawater resulting in significant influences on marine biogeochemical cycles of the bioelements including carbon, nutrients and trace metals. We, AIST, have conducted a series of basic researches to assess the potential impacts of ocean CO2 storage on marine biogeochemical processes including CaCO3 dissolution, and bacterial and enzymatic decomposition of organic matter. By laboratory experiments using a special high pressure apparatus, the improved empirical equation was obtained for CaCO3 dissolution rate in the high CO2 concentrations. Based on the experimentally obtained kinetics with a numerical simulation for a practical scenario of oceanic CO2 sequestration where 50 Mton CO2 per year is continuously injected to 1,000-2,500 m depth within 100 x 333 km area for 30 years, we could illustrate precise 3-D maps for the predicted distributions of the saturation depth of CaCO3, in situ Ω value and CaCO3 dissolution rate in the western North Pacific. The result showed no significant change in the bathypelagic CaCO3 flux due to chemistry change induced by ocean CO2 sequestration. Both

  15. Activation of CO2 by phosphinoamide hafnium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgro, Michael J; Stephan, Douglas W

    2013-04-04

    Hf-phosphinoamide cation complexes behave as metal-based frustrated Lewis pairs and bind one or two equivalent of CO2 and in as well can activate CO2 in a bimetallic fashion to give a pseudo-tetrahedral P2CO2 fragment linking two Hf centres.

  16. A general method for calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, L.G.H. van der; Egberts, P.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    In the past, lists of potential CO2 storage locations have been compiled purely on the basis of the capacity of the locations in terms of their CO2 solubility. However, in some of these locations, the injection of CO2 is commercially unfeasible because of their small average permeability. During the

  17. A liquid CO2-compatible hydrocarbon surfactant: experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants soluble in liquid CO2 are rare and knowledge on interfacial and self-assembly behaviour is fragmented. We found that polyoxyethylene (5) isooctylphenyl ether is interfacially active at the water–liquid CO2 interface. Water–liquid CO2 interfacial tension was measured at various surfactant

  18. Impacts: economic trade-offs for CO2 impurity specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eickhoff, C.; Neele, F.P.; Hammer, M.; DiBiagio, M.; Hofstee, C.; Koenen, M.; Fischer, S.; Isaenko, A.; Brown, A.; Kovacs, T.

    2014-01-01

    The IMPACTS project has a stated broad objective to develop the knowledge base of CO2 quality required for establishing norms and regulations to ensure safe and reliable design, construction and operation of CO2 pipelines and injection equipment, and safe long-term geological storage of CO2. More sp

  19. Suppression of CO2-plasticization by semiinterpenetrating polymer network formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Pünt, I.G.M.; Wessling, M.; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    CO2-induced plasticization may significantly spoil the membrane performance in high-pressure CO2/CH4 separations. The polymer matrix swells upon sorption of CO2, which accelerates the permeation of CH4. The polymer membrane looses its selectivity. To make membranes attractive for, for example, natur

  20. Suppression of CO2-plasticization by semiinterpenetrating polymer network formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    CO2-induced plasticization may significantly spoil the membrane performance in high-pressure CO2/CH4 separations. The polymer matrix swells upon sorption of CO2, which accelerates the permeation of CH4. The polymer membrane looses its selectivity. To make membranes attractive for, for example, natur

  1. Modeling of CO2 absorber using an AMP solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Jostein; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: An explicit model for carbon dioxide (CO2) solubility in an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) has been proposed and an expression for the heat of absorption of CO2 has been developed as a function of loading and temperature. A rate-based steady-state model for CO2 ab...

  2. A general method for calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, L.G.H. van der; Egberts, P.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    In the past, lists of potential CO2 storage locations have been compiled purely on the basis of the capacity of the locations in terms of their CO2 solubility. However, in some of these locations, the injection of CO2 is commercially unfeasible because of their small average permeability. During the

  3. Suppression of CO2-plasticization by semiinterpenetrating polymer network formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    CO2-induced plasticization may significantly spoil the membrane performance in high-pressure CO2/CH4 separations. The polymer matrix swells upon sorption of CO2, which accelerates the permeation of CH4. The polymer membrane looses its selectivity. To make membranes attractive for, for example,

  4. Ventilation in Sewers Quantified by Measurements of CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Emil Dietz; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2012-01-01

    H, alkalinity and sewer-air CO2 concentrations. An intercepting sewer was studied and an average sewer-air retention time of approximately 1.5-2.5 hours was found at CO2 levels around 4-6 times the natural background. Also an upstream sub-catchment was studied. In this part of the sewer system the level of CO2...

  5. Applied stress reduces the CO2 sorption capacity of coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, S.; Peach, C.J.; Spiers, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Though the adsorption of CO2 by coal has been extensively studied in experiments, few systematic studies have been done on the effects of the stress state within the coal on CO2 sorption. To investigate whether or not the CO2 sorption capacity of coal is influenced by the application of an effective

  6. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 STORAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of the...

  7. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of t...

  8. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 SEQUESTRATION (PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of the...

  9. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  10. The abiotic contribution to total CO2 flux for soils in arid zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As an important component of ecosystem carbon budgets, soil carbon dioxide (CO2 flux is determined by a combination of a series of biotic and abiotic processes. Although there is evidence that the abiotic component can be important in total soil CO2 flux, its relative importance has never been systematically assessed. In this study, the total soil CO2 flux (Rtotal was partitioned into biotic (Rbiotic and abiotic (Rabiotic components over eight typical landscapes in a desert–oasis ecotone, including cotton field, hops field, halophyte garden, reservoir edge, native saline desert, alkaline soil, dune crest and interdune lowland in the Gurbantunggut Desert, and the relative importance of these two components was analyzed. Results showed that Rabiotic always contributed to Rtotal for the eight landscapes, but the degree of contribution varied greatly. In the cotton and hops fields, the ratio of Rabiotic to Rtotal was extremely low (Rabiotic was dominant in the alkaline soil and dune crest. Statistically, Rabiotic/Rtotal decreased logarithmically with rising Rbiotic, suggesting that Rabiotic strongly affected Rtotal when Rbiotic was low. This pattern confirms that soil CO2 flux is predominantly biological in most ecosystems, but Rabiotic can dominate when biological processes are weak. On a diurnal basis, Rabiotic resulted in no net gain or loss of carbon but its effect on instantaneous CO2 flux was significant. Temperature dependence of Rtotal varied among the eight landscapes, determined by the predominant components of CO2 flux: with Rbiotic driven by soil temperature and Rabiotic regulated by the rate of change in temperature. Namely, declining temperature resulted in negative Rabiotic (CO2 went into soil, while rising temperature resulted in a positive Rabiotic (CO2 released from soil. Furthermore, without recognition of Rabiotic, Rbiotic would have been either overestimated (for daytime or underestimated (for nighttime. Thus, recognition that

  11. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970

  12. CO2 (dry ice) cleaning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Donald M.

    1995-03-01

    Tomco Equipment Company has participated in the dry ice (solid carbon dioxide, CO2) cleaning industry for over ten years as a pioneer in the manufacturer of high density, dry ice cleaning pellet production equipment. For over four years Tomco high density pelletizers have been available to the dry ice cleaning industry. Approximately one year ago Tomco introduced the DI-250, a new dry ice blast unit making Tomco a single source supplier for sublimable media, particle blast, cleaning systems. This new blast unit is an all pneumatic, single discharge hose device. It meters the insertion of 1/8 inch diameter (or smaller), high density, dry ice pellets into a high pressure, propellant gas stream. The dry ice and propellant streams are controlled and mixed from the blast cabinet. From there the mixture is transported to the nozzle where the pellets are accelerated to an appropriate blasting velocity. When directed to impact upon a target area, these dry ice pellets have sufficient energy to effectively remove most surface coatings through dry, abrasive contact. The meta-stable, dry ice pellets used for CO2 cleaning, while labeled 'high density,' are less dense than alternate, abrasive, particle blast media. In addition, after contacting the target surface, they return to their equilibrium condition: a superheated gas state. Most currently used grit blasting media are silicon dioxide based, which possess a sharp tetrahedral molecular structure. Silicon dioxide crystal structures will always produce smaller sharp-edged replicas of the original crystal upon fracture. Larger, softer dry ice pellets do not share the same sharp-edged crystalline structures as their non-sublimable counterparts when broken. In fact, upon contact with the target surface, dry ice pellets will plastically deform and break apart. As such, dry ice cleaning is less harmful to sensitive substrates, workers and the environment than chemical or abrasive cleaning systems. Dry ice cleaning system

  13. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  14. CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water-rock interaction assessment and development of sensitive monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Audigane, Pascal; Lions, Julie; Négrel, Philippe; Lagneau, Vincent

    2010-05-01

    The assessment of environmental impacts of carbon dioxide storage in geological repository requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakage back into fresh groundwater, particularly with respect to protected groundwater reserves. We are starting a new project with the aims of developing sensitive monitoring techniques in order to detect potential CO2 leaks and their magnitude as well as their geochemical impacts on the groundwater. In a predictive approach goal, a modelling study of the geochemical impact on fresh groundwaters of a CO2 intrusion during geological storage was performed and serves as a basis for the development of sensitive monitoring techniques (e.g. isotope tracing). Then, isotopic monitoring opportunities will be explored. A modeling study of the geochemical impact on fresh groundwaters of the ingress of CO2 during geological storage was conducted. The 3D model includes (i) storage saline aquifer, (ii) impacted overlying aquifer containing freshwater and (iii) a leakage path way up through an abandoned well represented as 1D porous medium and corresponding to the cement-rock formation interface. This model was used to simulate the supercritical CO2 migration path and the interaction between the fluid and the host rock. The model uses the carbonate saline Dogger aquifer in the Paris Basin as the storage reservoir and the Albian formation (located above the Dogger) as the fresh groundwater aquifer. The principal geochemical process simulated is the acidification of groundwaters due to CO2 dissolution, inducing the dissolution of minerals in the Albian formation. Knowing the mineralogical composition of the impacted aquifer is therefore crucial if we are to correctly determine which elements might be release during the arrival of CO2 in freshwater. Estimates of increases in element concentrations are proposed along with a direct control of the injection procedure. This predictive modeling approach impact of CO2 intrusion to fresh groundwaters

  15. An experimental study of basaltic glass-H2O-CO2 interaction at 22 and 50 °C: Implications for subsurface storage of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeczka, Iwona; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Oelkers, Eric H.; Gislason, Sigurdur R.

    2014-02-01

    A novel high pressure column flow reactor was used to investigate the evolution of solute chemistry along a 2.3 m flow path during pure water- and CO2-charged water-basaltic glass interaction experiments at 22 and 50 °C and 10-5.7 to 22 bars partial pressure of CO2. Experimental results and geochemical modelling showed the pH of injected pure water evolved rapidly from 6.7 to 9-9.5 and most of the iron released to the fluid phase was subsequently consumed by secondary minerals, similar to natural meteoric water-basalt systems. In contrast to natural systems, however, the aqueous aluminium concentration remained relatively high along the entire flow path. The aqueous fluid was undersaturated with respect to basaltic glass and carbonate minerals, but supersaturated with respect to zeolites, clays, and Fe hydroxides. As CO2-charged water replaced the alkaline fluid within the column, the fluid briefly became supersaturated with respect to siderite. Basaltic glass dissolution in the column reactor, however, was insufficient to overcome the pH buffer capacity of CO2-charged water. The pH of this CO2-charged water rose from an initial 3.4 to only 4.5 in the column reactor. This acidic reactive fluid was undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals but supersaturated with respect to clays and Fe hydroxides at 22 °C, and with respect to clays and Al hydroxides at 50 °C. Basaltic glass dissolution in the CO2-charged water was closer to stoichiometry than in pure water. The mobility and aqueous concentration of several metals increased significantly with the addition of CO2 to the inlet fluid, and some metals, including Mn, Cr, Al, and As exceeded the allowable drinking water limits. Iron became mobile and the aqueous Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio increased along the flow path. Although carbonate minerals did not precipitate in the column reactor in response to CO2-charged water-basaltic glass interaction, once this fluid exited the reactor, carbonates precipitated as the fluid

  16. CO2 storage capacity estimation: Methodology and gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachu, S.; Bonijoly, D.; Bradshaw, J.; Burruss, R.; Holloway, S.; Christensen, N.P.; Mathiassen, O.M.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of CO2 capture and geological storage (CCGS) technology at the scale needed to achieve a significant and meaningful reduction in CO2 emissions requires knowledge of the available CO2 storage capacity. CO2 storage capacity assessments may be conducted at various scales-in decreasing order of size and increasing order of resolution: country, basin, regional, local and site-specific. Estimation of the CO2 storage capacity in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is straightforward and is based on recoverable reserves, reservoir properties and in situ CO2 characteristics. In the case of CO2-EOR, the CO2 storage capacity can be roughly evaluated on the basis of worldwide field experience or more accurately through numerical simulations. Determination of the theoretical CO2 storage capacity in coal beds is based on coal thickness and CO2 adsorption isotherms, and recovery and completion factors. Evaluation of the CO2 storage capacity in deep saline aquifers is very complex because four trapping mechanisms that act at different rates are involved and, at times, all mechanisms may be operating simultaneously. The level of detail and resolution required in the data make reliable and accurate estimation of CO2 storage capacity in deep saline aquifers practical only at the local and site-specific scales. This paper follows a previous one on issues and development of standards for CO2 storage capacity estimation, and provides a clear set of definitions and methodologies for the assessment of CO2 storage capacity in geological media. Notwithstanding the defined methodologies suggested for estimating CO2 storage capacity, major challenges lie ahead because of lack of data, particularly for coal beds and deep saline aquifers, lack of knowledge about the coefficients that reduce storage capacity from theoretical to effective and to practical, and lack of knowledge about the interplay between various trapping mechanisms at work in deep saline aquifers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd

  17. CO 2 Capture Rate Sensitivity Versus Purchase of CO 2 Quotas. Optimizing Investment Choice for Electricity Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Coussy Paula; Raynal Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Carbon capture technology (and associated storage), applied to power plants, reduces atmospheric CO2 emissions. This article demonstrates that, in the particular case of the deployment phase of CO2 capture technology during which CO2 quota price may be low, capturing less than 90% of total CO2 emissions from power plants can be economically attractive. Indeed, for an electric power company capture technology is interesting, only if the discounted marginal cost of captu...

  18. On the proportionality between global temperature change and cumulative CO2 emissions during periods of net negative CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickfeld, Kirsten; MacDougall, Andrew H.; Damon Matthews, H.

    2016-05-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that global mean surface air warming is approximately proportional to cumulative CO2 emissions. This proportional relationship has received considerable attention, as it allows one to calculate the cumulative CO2 emissions (‘carbon budget’) compatible with temperature targets and is a useful measure for model inter-comparison. Here we use an Earth system model to explore whether this relationship persists during periods of net negative CO2 emissions. Negative CO2 emissions are required in the majority of emissions scenarios limiting global warming to 2 °C above pre-industrial, with emissions becoming net negative in the second half of this century in several scenarios. We find that for model simulations with a symmetric 1% per year increase and decrease in atmospheric CO2, the temperature change (ΔT) versus cumulative CO2 emissions (CE) relationship is nonlinear during periods of net negative emissions, owing to the lagged response of the deep ocean to previously increasing atmospheric CO2. When corrected for this lagged response, or if the CO2 decline is applied after the system has equilibrated with the previous CO2 increase, the ΔT versus CE relationship is close to linear during periods of net negative CO2 emissions. A proportionality constant—the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions (TCRE)- can therefore be calculated for both positive and net negative CO2 emission periods. We find that in simulations with a symmetric 1% per year increase and decrease in atmospheric CO2 the TCRE is larger on the upward than on the downward CO2 trajectory, suggesting that positive CO2 emissions are more effective at warming than negative emissions are at subsequently cooling. We also find that the cooling effectiveness of negative CO2 emissions decreases if applied at higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  19. A Quantitative Investigation of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Muneer; Ehsani, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have led to a substantial increase in carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas (GHG), contributing to heightened concerns of global warming. In the last decade alone CO2 emissions increased by 2.0 ppm/yr. globally. In the year 2009, United States and China contributed up to 43.4% of global CO2 emissions. CO2 capture and sequestration have been recognized as promising solutions to mitigate CO2 emissions from fossil fuel based power plants. Typical techniques for carbon c...

  20. El CO2 como disolvente y como reactivo

    OpenAIRE

    La Franca Pitarresi, Vincenzo Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Existen numerosas ventajas asociada con el uso de CO2 , tanto como disolvente que como reactivo, y todas se pueden resumir en cuatro categorías generales: beneficios ambiental, beneficios de salud y seguridad, beneficios en el procedimiento y beneficios químicos. Los procesos que implican el CO2 como disolvente no aumentaría las emisiones de CO2, más bien proporcionaría una oportunidad para el reciclaje de CO2 residual. Además, los esfuerzos para secuestrar el CO2 producido de los gases de co...