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Sample records for nonpersistent anemia characterized

  1. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hemolytic anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia Causes Although many parts of the ... anemia Immune hemolytic anemia Iron deficiency anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia Review Date 2/ ...

  2. Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia.

  3. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of inherited hemolytic anemias include some types of thalassemia and low levels of enzymes such as glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. The treatment will depend on the cause. Sickle cell anemia ...

  4. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are affected. Low levels of red blood cells leads to anemia. With low levels of white blood cells, the ... foods they eat. Food fads and dieting can lead to anemia. Talk to your doctor about taking iron pills ( ...

  5. Lactose nutrition in lactase nonpersisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Lactose handling by the human gut by most people, beyond being breast-fed, has been considered a disorder rather than physiological. A non-human mammalian milk source is novel for the majority. During the first 6 months of life, when neonates and infants are best breast-fed, lactose along with other macronutrients, provides energy, but may have other functions as well. At birth, babies are endowed with their mother's vaginal microbiome, but not if they are born by Caesarean section. How much maternal milk lactose survives the infant's small intestine and is processed by this unique gut microbiome and to what end is still uncertain, but no lactose or galactose appears in the faeces. Once intestinal lactase activity declines in most infants, lactose may enhance innate immunity through the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), which is best achieved by lactose synergy with other colonic fermentation metabolites such as butyrate. It is of interest whether this lactose function or a variant of it persists. It might not be evident when lactase is persistent, as it is in most people of northern European ancestry. Population genomics indicate that lactase persistence became prevalent only about 3000-1000 BC, the Bronze Age of Eurasia. Gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) in lactase nonpersisters who consume dairy foods are partly dose dependent and not usually evident with single lactose intakes≤25 g per day. Spreading intake across the day reduces the risk as can various dietary patterns. Nevertheless, individual differences in GIS lactose sensitivity may merit public health and clinical consideration.

  6. Human urinary excretion of non-persistent environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Several non-persistent industrial chemicals have shown endocrine disrupting effects in animal studies and are suspected to be involved in human reproductive disorders. Among the non-persistent chemicals that have been discussed intensively during the past years are phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA...

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF ANEMIA IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA WITH THE HELP OF ERYTHROCYTE CONSTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Bularda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to shed extra light on different types of anemia as caused by multiple myeloma in patients registered at “ Elena Beldiman” Municipal Emergency Hospital from Barlad, between 2001-1012. In order to complete this characterization, the values of derived erythrocyte constants have been used: the average volume of erythrocytes (VEM; mean erythrocyte hemoglobin (HEM and the average concentration of erythrocyte hemoglobin (CHEM. Moreover, this paper aims to compare the different types of anemia in patients with multiple myeloma, according to their gender and age. The 34 identified patients were divided into four study groups, men and women aged under 60, respectively over 60 years.         It has been noticed that the incidence of macrocytic anemia (increased VEM coexists with hypochromia (decreased CHEM, and the values from the four study groups are comparable, both types of anemia having mollified levels of severity, both in male patients and female patients.

  8. Characterization of isolates of equine infectious anemia virus in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigre, Dellane Martins; Brandão, Camila Fonseca Lopes; de Paula, Fabiana Lopes; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Campos, Gubio Soares; Sardi, Silvia Ines

    2017-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an important infectious disease that affects equids worldwide. Control of the disease is currently based on detection of anti-p26 EIAV by Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID). In this work, 62 animals were examined by AGID and nested-PCR using primers for the gag gene. Fifty-three samples (85.5%) were positive by nested-PCR, whereas only 33 samples (53%) were positive for AGID. Fifteen amplicons obtained by nested-PCR were sequenced and the aligned results subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The analysis suggests that the Brazilian EIAV form a cluster with WSU5, EIAVUK and Wyoming strains from United States.

  9. Development and characterization of an equine infectious anemia virus Env-pseudotyped reporter virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallmadge, R L; Brindley, M A; Salmans, J; Mealey, R H; Maury, W; Carpenter, S

    2008-07-01

    We developed a replication-defective reporter virus pseudotyped with the envelope glycoprotein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). The in vitro host range and neutralization phenotype of EIAV Env-pseudotyped virus were similar to those of replication-competent virus. An EIAV Env pseudovirus will improve antigenic characterization of viral variants and evaluation of lentivirus vaccines.

  10. Multiple chronic non-specific ulcer of small intestine characterized by anemia and hypoalbuminemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A female patient with anemia and hypoalbuminemia was admitted to our hospital due to an over 20-year history of recurrent dizziness,fatigue and ankle edema.She was diagnosed as multiple chronic nonspecific ulcer of the small intestine characterized by non-specific histology and persistent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Lactase non-persistence and milk consumption in Estonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Margus Lember; Suvi Torniainen; Mart Kull; Riina Kallikorm; Peeter Saadla; Tarvo Rajasalu; Hanna Komu; Irma J(a)rvel(a)

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To define the frequency of the C/T-13910 variant associated with lactase persistence/non-persistence trait and to analyze the milk consumption of lactase non-persistent subjects in Estonia.METHODS: We genotyped 355 Estonians by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Milk consumption was analyzed by a questionnaire, specially developed to analyze milk consumption and abdominal complaints.RESULTS: The frequency of the genotype of the C/C-13910 (lactase non-persistence) was found to be24.8% in native Estonians. No other single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region of 400 bp adjacent to the C/T-13910 variant were found. Lactase non-persistence subjects were found to consume less milk than lactase persistence subjects.CONCLUSION: The frequency of lactase nonpersistence defined by the C/C-13910 genotype confirms the results of the previous studies based on indirect methods of determining hypolactasia. Milk consumption of lactase non-persistence subjects is consistent with previously reported figures of adult-type hypolactasia in Estonia. However, lactase non-persistence does not prevent the intake of milk in many adults.

  12. Causes and consequences of nonpersistence with heart failure medication.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mockler, Mary

    2012-02-01

    Persistence with therapy may be more easily and objectively identified in the clinical setting than compliance and recent work has shown it to be linked to mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to determine the extent, causes, and clinical impact of nonpersistence with disease-modifying therapy in a retrospective cohort study of 183 patients with systolic HF participating in a disease management program. The main outcome measurements were reasons\\/determinants of nonpersistence and its impact on hospitalizations. Fifty-three patients (29%) had 74 separate occurrences of nonpersistence with disease-modifying therapy. There was no medical reason for discontinuing medications in 50% of occurrences, whereas medication was discontinued for an adverse reaction in 30% and for a justified medical reason in 15% of occurrences. Nonpersistence was a significant predictor of all-cause readmission (hazard ratio 3.20, 95% confidence interval 1.74 to 11.37) and cardiovascular readmission (hazard ratio 4.45, 95% confidence interval 1.74 to 11.37). In the adjusted model, there was no significantly increased risk of HF readmission (hazard ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 6.62). In conclusion, nonpersistence with HF therapy is common, is often not medically justified, and is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization.

  13. Molecular characterization of chicken infectious anemia viruses detected from breeder and broiler chickens in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H-R; Kwon, Y-K; Bae, Y-C; Oem, J-K; Lee, O-S

    2010-11-01

    In South Korea, 32 sequences of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) from various flocks of breeder and commercial chickens were genetically characterized for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral protein 1 gene, including a hypervariable region of the CIAV genome, indicated that Korean CIAV strains were separated into groups II, IIIa, and IIIb. Strains were commonly identified in great-grandparent and grandparent breeder farms as well as commercial chicken farms. In the field, CIAV strains from breeder farms had no clinical effects, but commercial farm strains were associated with depression, growth retardation, and anemia regardless of the group from which the strain originated. In addition, we identified 7 CIAV genomes that were similar to vaccine strains from vaccinated and unvaccinated breeder flocks. These data suggest that further studies on pathogenicity and vaccine efficacy against the different CIAV group are needed, along with continuous CIAV surveillance and genetic analysis at breeder farms.

  14. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malabsorption); Anemia - intrinsic factor; Anemia - IF; Anemia - atrophic gastritis ... of pernicious anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune ...

  15. An Examination of Academic Nonpersistence Decisions of Latino Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Lopez, Ambrocia G.; Rosales, Rocio

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which university comfort, social support, and self-beliefs were interrelated and subsequently predictive of academic nonpersistence decisions for 99 Latina/o undergraduates. The majority of the sample was female, traditional college aged, second generation, and of Mexican heritage. Previously used or specifically…

  16. Molecular detection, epidemiology, and genetic characterization of novel European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cook, Frank R; Felicetti, Michela; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Coppola, Giacomo; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The application of molecular diagnostic techniques along with nucleotide sequence determination to permit contemporary phylogenetic analysis of European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has not been widely reported. As a result, of extensive testing instigated following the 2006 outbreak of equine infectious anemia in Italy, 24 farms with a history of exposure to this disease were included in this study. New PCR-based methods were developed, which, especially in the case of DNA preparations from peripheral blood cells, showed excellent correlation with OIE-approved agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests for identifying EIAV-infected animals. In contrast, the OIE-recommended oligonucleotide primers for EIAV failed to react with any of the Italian isolates. Similar results were also obtained with samples from four Romanian farms. In addition, for the first time complete characterization of gag genes from five Italian isolates and one Romanian isolate has been achieved, along with acquisition of extensive sequence information (86% of the total gag gene) from four additional EIAV isolates (one Italian and three Romanian). Furthermore, in another 23 cases we accomplished partial characterization of gag gene sequences in the region encoding the viral matrix protein. Analysis of this information suggested that most Italian isolates were geographically restricted, somewhat reminiscent of the "clades" described for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Collectively this represents the most comprehensive genetic study of European EIAV isolates conducted to date.

  17. Isolation and characterization of renal erythropoietin-producing cells from genetically produced anemia mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Pan

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of renal erythropoietin-producing cells (REPs remains a central challenge for elucidating the mechanisms involved in hypoxia and/or anemia-induced erythropoietin (Epo production in adult mammals. Previous studies have shown that REPs are renal peritubular cells, but further details are lacking. Here, we describe an approach to isolate and characterize REPs. We bred mice bearing an Epo gene allele to which green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter cDNA was knocked-in (Epo(GFP with mice bearing an Epo gene allele lacking the 3' enhancer (Epo(Δ3'E. Mice harboring the mutant Epo(GFP/Δ3'E gene exhibited anemia (average Hematocrit 18% at 4 to 6 days after birth, and this perinatal anemia enabled us to identify and purify REPs based on GFP expression from the kidney. Light and confocal microscopy revealed that GFP immunostaining was confined to fibroblastic cells that reside in the peritubular interstitial space, confirming our previous observation in Epo-GFP transgenic reporter assays. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the GFP fraction constitutes approximately 0.2% of the whole kidney cells and 63% of GFP-positive cells co-express CD73 (a marker for cortical fibroblasts and Epo-expressing cells in the kidney. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed that Epo expression was increased by approximately 100-fold in the purified population of REPs compared with that of the unsorted cells or CD73-positive fraction. Gene expression analyses showed enrichment of Hif2α and Hif3α mRNA in the purified population of REPs. The genetic approach described here provides a means to isolate a pure population of REPs, allowing the analysis of gene expression of a defined population of cells essential for Epo production in the kidney. This has provided evidence that positive regulation by HIF2α and negative regulation by HIF3α might be necessary for correct renal Epo induction.

  18. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Ramaswamy; Ezhilarasi, S; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Rajajee, Sarala

    2009-03-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is a clinical triad characterized by thiamine-responsive anemia, diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness. We report a 4-year-old girl with TRMA whose anemia improved following administration of thiamine and this case report sensitizes the early diagnosis and treatment with thiamine in children presenting with anemia, diabetes and deafness.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Chicken Anemia Virus Circulating in Chicken Flocks in Egypt

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    Mohammed AboElkhair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although many previous studies reported detection of chicken anemia virus (CAV in Egypt since 1990, genomic characterization of this circulating CAV has not been published. In the present study, four nucleotide sequences of detected CAV were genetically characterized. Methods. These nucleotide sequences were obtained from commercial chicken flocks in two different locations of Egypt during 2010. The target region for sequencing was 675 bp nucleotide of partial coding region of VP1 protein. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the detected CAV were aligned and compared to worldwide CAV isolates including commonly used vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences was also carried out. Results. Our results showed that all the Egyptian CAV sequences were grouped in one group with viruses from diverse geographic regions. This group is characterized by amino acids profile 75I, 97L, 139Q, and 144Q in VP1. The phylogenetic and amino acid analyses of deduced amino acid indicated that the detected CAV sequences differ from CAV vaccine strains. Conclusion. This is the first report that describes molecular characterization of circulating CAV in Egypt. The study showed that the detected CAV, in Egypt are field viruses and unrelated to vaccine strains.

  20. Las anemias, sin anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Villamarin V., A.; Villamarin C., Maria José

    2011-01-01

    Estudiando las anemias idiopáticas, encontramos dos tipos: la anemia hipócroma megalocítica u enfermedad de Biermer y la anemia hipócroma microcítica o clorosis; en la mayoría de los casos estos dos tipos, se oponen por su figura hematológica, sus manifestaciones clínicas, su evolución y su terapéutica. La anemia de Biermer, tiene por remedio heroico el hígado a altas dosis; la segunda, el hierro en forma química. Pero debemos reconocer que ciertos síntomas son comunes a las anemias idiopátic...

  1. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  2. Characterization of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Integration in the Horse Genome

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    Qiang Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 has a unique integration profile in the human genome relative to murine and avian retroviruses. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV is another well-studied lentivirus that can also be used as a promising retro-transfection vector, but its integration into its native host has not been characterized. In this study, we mapped 477 integration sites of the EIAV strain EIAVFDDV13 in fetal equine dermal (FED cells during in vitro infection. Published integration sites of EIAV and HIV-1 in the human genome were also analyzed as references. Our results demonstrated that EIAVFDDV13 tended to integrate into genes and AT-rich regions, and it avoided integrating into transcription start sites (TSS, which is consistent with EIAV and HIV-1 integration in the human genome. Notably, the integration of EIAVFDDV13 favored long interspersed elements (LINEs and DNA transposons in the horse genome, whereas the integration of HIV-1 favored short interspersed elements (SINEs in the human genome. The chromosomal environment near LINEs or DNA transposons potentially influences viral transcription and may be related to the unique EIAV latency states in equids. The data on EIAV integration in its natural host will facilitate studies on lentiviral infection and lentivirus-based therapeutic vectors.

  3. Characterization of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Integration in the Horse Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; He, Xi-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-19

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 has a unique integration profile in the human genome relative to murine and avian retroviruses. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another well-studied lentivirus that can also be used as a promising retro-transfection vector, but its integration into its native host has not been characterized. In this study, we mapped 477 integration sites of the EIAV strain EIAVFDDV13 in fetal equine dermal (FED) cells during in vitro infection. Published integration sites of EIAV and HIV-1 in the human genome were also analyzed as references. Our results demonstrated that EIAVFDDV13 tended to integrate into genes and AT-rich regions, and it avoided integrating into transcription start sites (TSS), which is consistent with EIAV and HIV-1 integration in the human genome. Notably, the integration of EIAVFDDV13 favored long interspersed elements (LINEs) and DNA transposons in the horse genome, whereas the integration of HIV-1 favored short interspersed elements (SINEs) in the human genome. The chromosomal environment near LINEs or DNA transposons potentially influences viral transcription and may be related to the unique EIAV latency states in equids. The data on EIAV integration in its natural host will facilitate studies on lentiviral infection and lentivirus-based therapeutic vectors.

  4. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  5. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  6. [Sideroblastic anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, T

    2006-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by the presence of sideroblasts in the bone marrow aspirate. Current classification schemes distinguish between diseases of the heme synthesis pathway and diseases of other mitochondrial pathways which can either be of primary origin (defects in mitochondrial DNA) or of secondary origin (defects in nuclear DNA). Although several distinct hereditary forms exist, sideroblastic anemias are most frequently acquired diseases and belong to the group of myelodysplastic syndromes with the propensity to develop into overt leukemia. Treatment is mainly supportive (vitamins, blood transfusions, cytokines) and only rarely are bone marrow transplantations performed. The molecular defects of a few hereditary forms have already been elucidated, but the genes involved in the acquired forms are still largely unknown.

  7. Molecular characterization of sickle cell anemia in the Northern Brazilian state of Pará.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lemos Cardoso, Greice; Guerreiro, João Farias

    2010-01-01

    To assess alpha+-thalassemia deletion alleles, beta-thalassemia mutations and haplotypes linked to the HBB*S cluster in a sample of 130 unrelated sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients (55% female) from Belém, Pará State, for their possible effects on the patients' survival. -alpha(3.7), -alpha(42), -alpha(20.5), and -(MED) alpha+-thalassemia deletion alleles were investigated using multiplex gap-PCR method. Characterization of beta-thalassemia mutations was made by direct genomic sequencing of the beta-globin gene amplified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Haplotypes were determined by analysis of six polymorphic restriction sites [(1) XmnI-5'gammaG, (2) HindIII-gammaG, (3) HindIII-gammaA, (4) HincII-psibeta, (5) HincII-3'psibeta, and (6) HinfI-5'beta] followed by restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis. Twenty-one patients (16%) presented -alpha3.7 thalassemia. Sixteen of those (76%) were heterozygous (-alpha3.7/alphaalpha) and 5 (24%) were homozygous (-alpha3.7/-alpha3.7). -Alpha(4.2), -alpha(20.5) and -(MED) deletions were not found. Nine cases of sickle cell-beta thalassemia were found and four different beta-thal mutations were identified: beta(+) -88 (C>T), 3.8%; beta(+) codon 24 (T > A), 1.5%; beta(+) IVSI-110 (G > A), 0.7% and beta (IVSI-1 (G > A), 0.7%. No differences according to age were observed in -alpha(3.7) deletion, beta-thalassemia and HHB*S haplotypes distribution. Our results suggest that although alpha- and beta-thalassemia and betaS haplotypes may have modulating effect on clinical expression and hematological parameters of SCA, these genetic variables probably have little influence on the subjects' survival.

  8. Cellular characterization of cells from the Fanconi anemia complementation group, FA-D1/BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godthelp, Barbara C. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Buul, Paul P.W. van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J. [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus University, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Elghalbzouri-Maghrani, Elhaam [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Duijn-Goedhart, Annemarie van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Arwert, Fre [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Joenje, Hans [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands) and Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum, N.Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland)]. E-mail: M.Z.Zdzienicka@LUMC.nl

    2006-10-10

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility disorder, characterized by genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. The discovery of biallelic BRCA2 mutations in the FA-D1 complementation group allows for the first time to study the characteristics of primary BRCA2-deficient human cells. FANCD1/BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts appeared hypersensitive to mitomycin C (MMC), slightly sensitive to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), and like cells derived from other FA complementation groups, not sensitive to X-ray irradiation. However, unlike other FA cells, FA-D1 cells were slightly sensitive to UV irradiation. Despite the observed lack of X-ray sensitivity in cell survival, significant radioresistant DNA synthesis (RDS) was observed in the BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts but also in the FANCA-deficient fibroblasts, suggesting an impaired S-phase checkpoint. FA-D1/BRCA2 cells displayed greatly enhanced levels of spontaneous as well as MMC-induced chromosomal aberrations (Canada), similar to cells deficient in homologous recombination (HR) and non-D1 FA cells. In contrast to Brca2-deficient rodent cells, FA-D1/BRCA2 cells showed normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels, both spontaneous as well as after MMC treatment. Hence, these data indicate that human cells with biallelic BRCA2 mutations display typical features of both FA- and HR-deficient cells, which suggests that FANCD1/BRCA2 is part of the integrated FA/BRCA DNA damage response pathway but also controls other functions outside the FA pathway.

  9. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis ...

  10. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ...

  11. Inborn anemias in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  12. Neonatal anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aher, Sanjay; Malwatkar, Kedar; Kadam, Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Neonatal anemia and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal anemia can be due to blood loss, decreased RBC production, or increased destruction of erythrocytes. Physiologic anemia of the newborn and anemia of prematurity are the two most common causes of anemia in neonates. Phlebotomy losses result in much of the anemia seen in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW). Accepting a lower threshold level for transfusion in ELBW infants can prevent these infants being exposed to multiple donors.

  13. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  14. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  15. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  18. Characterization of direct antiglobulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a study of 154 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamesaki, Toyomi; Toyotsuji, Tomonori; Kajii, Eiji

    2013-02-01

    Direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-negative (DAT-)autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is empirically thought to show the same clinical conditions as DAT-positive (DAT+)AIHA, with the exception of an adequate amount of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin (Ig)G. We investigated the clinical characteristics of DAT-AIHA in comparison with DAT+AIHA. Of the 582 patients referred to our laboratory with undiagnosed hemolytic anemia, AIHA was clinically diagnosed in 216 patients (DAT-AIHA, n = 154; DAT+AIHA, n = 62). The percentage of reticulocytes, mean corpuscular volume, RBC-IgG levels, white blood cell count, and total protein (TP) levels were significantly higher in patients with DAT+AIHA than patients with DAT-AIHA. The hemoglobin level was significantly lower in patients with DAT+AIHA. No significant differences between patients with DAT-AIHA and DAT+AIHA existed with respect to age, gender, idiopathic/secondary nature, complications such as Evans syndrome, effectiveness of steroid treatment, or survival rate at 1 year following diagnosis. Patients with DAT-AIHA required significantly lower doses of steroids for maintenance therapy. Based on multivariate analysis of idiopathic DAT-AIHA (n = 110), TP and Evans syndrome were associated with the effectiveness of steroids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.36/[0.1 g/dl]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.84) and survival at the 1-year follow-up (aOR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.01-0.88). Our results indicate that patients with DAT-AIHA generally suffer milder anemia and hemolysis than patients with DAT+AIHA, respond equally well to steroids, and have comparable survival at 1-year.

  19. Anemia infecciosa equina

    OpenAIRE

    Franco,Marília Masello Junqueira; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Equine Infection Anemia Virus (EIAV) is a chronic disease caused by a virus from the family Retroviridae, genus Lentivirus, limited to horses, donkeys and mules, characterized by periodic episodes of fever, hemolytic anemia, jaundice, depression, edema and weight loss. EIAV generates bans in the transit of horses, in addition to interfere in equestrian sports events, thus taking a considerable economic importance. The agent is transmitted primarily through the bites of tabanídeos (Tabanus sp....

  20. Non-persistence with antiplatelet therapy in elderly patients after a transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawruch, Martin; Zatko, Dusan; Wimmer, Gejza; Luha, Jan; Wimmerova, Sona; Kukumberg, Peter; Murin, Jan; Hloska, Adam; Tesar, Tomas; Shah, Rashmi

    2017-03-11

    Antiplatelet therapy following a transient ischemic attack (TIA) constitutes an important secondary prevention measure. The study was aimed at evaluating the development of non-persistence with antiplatelet therapy in elderly patients after a TIA and identifying patient-related characteristics associated with the probability of non-persistence during the follow-up period. The study cohort (n = 854) was selected from the database of the largest health insurance provider of the Slovak Republic. It included patients aged ≥65 years, in whom antiplatelet medication was initiated following a TIA diagnosis during the period between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2010. Each patient was followed for a period of 3 years from the date of the first antiplatelet medication prescription associated with TIA diagnosis. Patients in whom there was a treatment gap of at least 6 months without antiplatelet medication prescription were defined as "non-persistent". The factors predicting non-persistence were identified in the Cox proportional hazards model. At the end of the follow-up period, 345 (40.4%) patients were non-persistent with antiplatelet medication. Protective factors decreasing a patient´s likelihood of becoming non-persistent were age ≥75 years [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.75], polypharmacy (concurrent use of ≥6 drugs) (HR = 0.79), arterial hypertension (HR = 0.68), diabetes mellitus (HR = 0.74), hypercholesterolemia (HR = 0.75), and antiplatelet medication switching during the follow-up period (HR = 0.73). It is concluded that following a TIA, elderly patients aged <75 years or those with normal serum cholesterol levels, without certain comorbid conditions and polypharmacy may benefit from special counselling to encourage persistence with secondary preventive medication.

  1. Characterization of Putative Erythroid Regulators of Hepcidin in Mouse Models of Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirciov, Cornel S. G.; Wilkins, Sarah J.; Dunn, Linda A.; Anderson, Gregory J.; Frazer, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Iron is crucial for many biological functions, but quantitatively the most important use of iron is in the production of hemoglobin in red blood cell precursors. The amount of iron in the plasma, and hence its availability for hemoglobin synthesis, is determined by the liver-derived iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. When the iron supply to erythroid precursors is limited, as often occurs during stimulated erythropoiesis, these cells produce signals to inhibit hepatic hepcidin production, thereby increasing the amount of iron that enters the plasma. How stimulated erythropoiesis suppresses hepcidin production is incompletely understood, but erythroferrone, Gdf15 and Twsg1 have emerged as candidate regulatory molecules. To further examine the relationship between erythropoiesis and the candidate erythroid regulators, we have studied five mouse models of anemia, including two models of β-thalassemia (Hbbth3/+ and RBC14), the hemoglobin deficit mouse (hbd), dietary iron deficient mice and mice treated with phenylhydrazine to induce acute hemolysis. Hematological parameters, iron status and the expression of Erfe (the gene encoding erythroferrone), Gdf15 and Twsg1 in the bone marrow and spleen were examined. Erfe expression was the most consistently upregulated of the candidate erythroid regulators in all of the mouse models examined. Gene expression was particularly high in the bone marrow and spleen of iron deficient animals, making erythroferrone an ideal candidate erythroid regulator, as its influence is strongest when iron supply to developing erythroid cells is limited. Gdf15 expression was also upregulated in most of the anemia models studied although the magnitude of the increase was generally less than that of Erfe. In contrast, very little regulation of Twsg1 was observed. These results support the prevailing hypothesis that erythroferrone is a promising erythroid regulator and demonstrate that Erfe expression is stimulated most strongly when the iron supply

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  3. Development and Characterization of an In Vivo Pathogenic Molecular Clone of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R. Frank; Leroux, Caroline; Cook, Sheila J.; Berger, Sandra L.; Lichtenstein, Drew L.; Ghabrial, Nadia N.; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Issel, Charles J.

    1998-01-01

    An infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone (19-2-6A) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) was modified by substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment amplified by PCR techniques from a pathogenic variant (EIAVPV) of the cell culture-adapted strain of EIAV (EIAVPR). This substitution consisted of coding sequences for 77 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the integrase, the S1 (encoding the second exon of tat), S2, and S3 (encoding the second exon of rev) open reading frames, the complete env gene (including the first exon of rev), and the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR). Modified 19-2-6A molecular clones were designated EIAVPV3.3, and infection of a single pony (678) with viruses derived from a mixture of five of these molecular clones induced clinical signs of acute equine infectious anemia (EIA) at 23 days postinfection (dpi). As a consequence of this initial study, a single molecular clone, EIAVPV3.3#3 (redesignated EIAVUK), was selected for further study and inoculated into two ponies (613 and 614) and two horses (700 and 764). Pony 614 and the two horses developed febrile responses by 12 dpi, which was accompanied by a 48 to 64% reduction in platelet number, whereas pony 613 did not develop fever (40.6°C) until 76 dpi. EIAV could be isolated from the plasma of these animals by 5 to 7 dpi, and all became seropositive for antibodies to this virus by 21 dpi. Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence demonstrated that the 3.3-kbp 3′ fragment of EIAVUK differed from the consensus sequence of EIAVPV by just a single amino acid residue in the second exon of the rev gene. Complete homology with the EIAVPV consensus sequence was observed in the hypervariable region of the LTR. However, EIAVUK was found to contain an unusual 68-bp nucleotide insertion/duplication in a normally conserved region of the LTR sequence. These results demonstrate that substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment from the EIAVPV strain into the infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone 19-2-6A leads

  4. Exposure to atrazine and selected non-persistent pesticides among corn farmers during a growing season.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakke, B.; de Roos, A.J.; Barr, D.B.; Stewart, P.A.; Blair, A.; Freeman, L.B.; Lynch, C.F.; Allen, R.H.; Alavanja, M.C.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to develop quantitative estimates of farmers' pesticide exposure to atrazine and to provide an overview of background levels of selected non-persistent pesticides among corn farmers in a longitudinal molecular epidemiologic study. The study population consisted of 30 Agricultural Health

  5. Distribution of Non-Persistent Endocrine Disruptors in Two Different Regions of the Human Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Thomas P van der; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Swaab, Dick F; Struik, Dicky; Makris, Konstantinos C; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Frederiksen, Hanne; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V van

    2017-01-01

    Non-persistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (npEDCs) can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. Whether npEDCs can accumulate in the human brain is largely unknown. The major aim of this pilot study was to examine the presence of environmental phenols and parabens in two distinct brain

  6. Distribution of Non-Persistent Endocrine Disruptors in Two Different Regions of the Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Thomas P; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Swaab, Dick F

    2017-01-01

    Non-persistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (npEDCs) can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. Whether npEDCs can accumulate in the human brain is largely unknown. The major aim of this pilot study was to examine the presence of environmental phenols and parabens in two distinct brain...

  7. Onderzoekingen over de biologische overdracht van een non-persistent virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, van H.A.

    1958-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of transmission by aphids of a non-persistent virus, some aspects of this transmission were studied. The structure of the stylets was examined by optical and electron-microscope. Unknown ridges were observed near the apices of the maxillary and mandibulary stylets. The path

  8. Characterization of an equine infectious anemia antigen extracted from infected horse spleen tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, N L; Coggins, L

    1971-11-01

    The spleens of horses infected with equine infectious anemia contain an antigen that is useful for a diagnostic immunodiffusion test. This antigen was extracted from the spleen by homogenization of the tissue, centrifugation, and precipitation from the supernatant fluid at 50% saturation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4). The antigen was purified by subjecting it to two cycles of electrophoresis in a continuous free-flow electrophoresis cell and finally filtering through a column of Sephadex G-200 gel. The antigen was found to be a small protein with a molecular weight of 27,500 and sedimentation coefficient of 2.1S. Its density was about 1.18 and its isoelectric point 5.8. At 45 to 50 C, it coagulated, losing its antigenicity. The antigen was useful for assaying antibody in the serum from infected horses by using the complement fixation test or the immunodiffusion test. Complement-fixing antibodies were found to be more transient than the precipitating antibodies.

  9. Clinical and serological characterization of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen; Wu Bangzhao; Zhou Youning; Wang Wenjuan; Chen Suning; Sun Aining; Wu Depei

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) which has only been reported in a few cases.We here aimed to explore its mechanism.Methods We retrospectively analyzed 296 patients who underwent allo-HSCT in our center from July 2010 to July 2012.Clinical manifestations were carefully reviewed and the response to currently available treatment approaches were evaluated.The survival and risk factors of AIHA patients after allo-HSCT were further analyzed.Results Twelve patients were diagnosed with AIHA at a median time of 100 days (15-720 days) after allo-HSCT.The incidence of AIHA after allo-HSCT was 4.1%.IgG antibody were detected in ten patients and IgM antibody in two patients.The two cold antibody AIHA patients had a better response to steroid corticoid only treatment and the ten warm antibody AIHA patients responded to corticosteroid treatment and adjustment of immunosuppressant therapy.Rituximab was shown to be effective for AIHA patients who failed conventional therapy.Survival analysis showed that the combination of AIHA in allo-HSCT patients hinted at poor survival.Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection,graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch seemed to increase the risk of developing AIHA.Conclusions Patients who develop AIHA after allo-HSCT have poor survival compared to non-AIHA patients.Possible risk factors of AIHA are CMV infection,GVHD,and HLA mismatch.Rituximab is likely to be the effective treatment choice for the refractory patients.

  10. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - immune hemolytic; Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) ... for no reason, the condition is called idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia . The antibodies may also be caused by: Complication ...

  11. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  12. Pernicious Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well, and live normal lives. Without treatment, pernicious anemia can lead to serious problems with the heart, nerves, and other parts of the body. Some of ... INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  13. Nutritional anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oski, F A

    1979-10-01

    The role of the metals, iron and copper, and the vitamins E, folic acid, and B12 in the genesis of nutritional anemias in infancy have been reviewed. All are preventable. The precise requirements for each of these trace elements and vitamins in the small premature infant remain to be defined. The nonhematologic consequences of these nutritional deficiencies require further study. Anemia may prove to be the least important manifestation of the deficiency states.

  14. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Tohru [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Takahashi, Kiwamu [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Ishizawa, Kenichi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Ichinohasama, Ryo [Department of Hematopathology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Nakamura, Yukio [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Harigae, Hideo, E-mail: harigae@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Treatment with ALA induces erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. • Transportation of ALA into erythroid cells occurs predominantly via SLC36A1. • ALA restores defects in ALAS2 in human iPS cell-derived erythroblasts. • ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA caused by ALAS2 mutations. - Abstract: Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly

  15. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: a preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-11-07

    Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly expressed in erythroid cells. Thus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was added to K562 cells to competitively inhibit SLC36A1-mediated transport. GABA treatment significantly impeded the ALA-mediated increase in the number of hemoglobinized cells as well as the induction of HBG, HBA, and HMOX1. Finally, small-interfering RNA

  16. What Is Fanconi Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Congenital Heart Defects ... red blood cells. FA is a type of aplastic anemia . In aplastic anemia, the bone marrow stops making ...

  17. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  18. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  19. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Anemia KidsHealth > For Teens > Anemia Print A A A ... Getting Enough Iron en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  20. What Causes Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  1. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anemia KidsHealth > For Teens > Anemia A A A What's ... Getting Enough Iron en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  2. Special Education: Aplastic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramura; Mizoguchi

    1996-01-01

    WHAT IS HYPOPLASTIC ANEMIA? Aplastic anemia is a hematological disease characterized by pancytopenia and bone marrow hypoplasia. Acquired cases of aplastic anemia are almost all idiopathic and arise from unknown causes. Other cases of aplastic anemia are secondary and are caused by radiation, chemicals or viruses. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY: Aplastic anemia is manifested as a marked reduction in the number of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, but why this occurs is still uncertain. Some of the proposed causes include abnormalities of the hematopoietic stem cells, abnormalities in the hematopoietic microenvironment, and immunologically mediated damage to the hematopoietic stem cells (Figure 1). ABNORMALTIES OF THE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS: Patients with aplastic anemia, and long-term survivors in particular, are at increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute myelocytic leukemia. This suggests that, in at least some of these patients, the hematopoietic stem cells themselves are abnormal. It also suggests that in some of these patients the blood cells are clonal (that is, all the blood cells are derived from a single pluripotent stem cell). In short, what these findings imply is that aplastic anemia may be caused by the emergence of an abnormal clone. Clonal hematopoiesis, however, can also be considered nothing more than a consequence. In other words, it is possible that hematopoiesis in this kind of patient is performed by a lone pluripotent stem cell that somehow managed to survive eradication. No definitive interpretation of clonal hematopoiesis has been agreed upon, and it is still a topic for future research. ABNORMAL HEMATOPOIETIC MICROENVIRONMENT: The presence of stromal cells, which form the microenvironment of bone marrow, is very important in hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells proliferate and differentiate either by adhering to stromal cells or by being stimulated by the various

  3. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  4. Lactase non-persistent genotype influences milk consumption and gastrointestinal symptoms in Northern Russians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khabarova Yulia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk is an important source of nutrients. The consumption of milk, however, may cause abdominal complaints in lactose intolerant individuals. The frequency of -13910C/C genotype is known to be high among Northern Russians, exceeding the prevalence in northern Europe. In our study we tested two hypotheses: 1 subjects with lactase non-persistent genotype (-13910C/C have more gastrointestinal (GI symptoms associated with milk 2 subjects with lactase non-persistence avoid using milk. Methods In total, 518 students aged 17 to 26 years were randomly selected from different departments in the Northern State Medical University (NSMU for genotyping the lactase activity-defining -13910C/T variant. All subjects filled in a questionnaire covering their personal data, self-reported GI symptoms and milk consumption habits. Results Northern Russians consume very small amounts of milk daily. Among carriers of the lactase non-persistent (LNP genotype there were 10 percentage units of milk-consumers fewer than among lactase-persistent (LP subjects (p = 0.03. Complaints of GI disorders caused by milk were different between the genotypes (p = 0.02. Among all types of food analyzed only milk was associated with increased GI symptoms among subjects with the LNP genotype (OR = 1.95, CI 1.03-3.69 Conclusions Subjects with -13910C/C have more GI symptoms from milk. Subjects with lactase non-persistent genotype avoid using milk. In the case of increasing milk consumption symptoms may increase the need for medical consultation. It is thus important either for people themselves or for health care staff to be aware of lactase persistence/non-persistence.

  5. Conceptual model and economic experiments to explain nonpersistence and enable mechanism designs fostering behavioral change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djawadi, Behnud Mir; Fahr, René; Turk, Florian

    2014-12-01

    Medical nonpersistence is a worldwide problem of striking magnitude. Although many fields of studies including epidemiology, sociology, and psychology try to identify determinants for medical nonpersistence, comprehensive research to explain medical nonpersistence from an economics perspective is rather scarce. The aim of the study was to develop a conceptual framework that augments standard economic choice theory with psychological concepts of behavioral economics to understand how patients' preferences for discontinuing with therapy arise over the course of the medical treatment. The availability of such a framework allows the targeted design of mechanisms for intervention strategies. Our conceptual framework models the patient as an active economic agent who evaluates the benefits and costs for continuing with therapy. We argue that a combination of loss aversion and mental accounting operations explains why patients discontinue with therapy at a specific point in time. We designed a randomized laboratory economic experiment with a student subject pool to investigate the behavioral predictions. Subjects continue with therapy as long as experienced utility losses have to be compensated. As soon as previous losses are evened out, subjects perceive the marginal benefit of persistence lower than in the beginning of the treatment. Consequently, subjects start to discontinue with therapy. Our results highlight that concepts of behavioral economics capture the dynamic structure of medical nonpersistence better than does standard economic choice theory. We recommend that behavioral economics should be a mandatory part of the development of possible intervention strategies aimed at improving patients' compliance and persistence behavior. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exposure to non-persistent pesticides and thyroid function: A systematic review of epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Élida; Freire, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Numerous pesticides are recognized for their endocrine-disrupting properties. Non-persistent pesticides such as organophosphates, dithiocarbamates and pyrethroids may interfere with thyroid function as suggested by animal studies. However, the influence of chronic exposure to these compounds on thyroidal functions in humans remains to be determined. The present study aimed to review epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to non-persistent pesticides and circulating levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxin [T4] and triiodothyronine [T3]) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Virtual Health Library (BVS) databases. Articles were limited to original studies and reports published in English, Portuguese or Spanish. Nineteen epidemiological studies were identified, 17 of which were cross-sectional, 14 were of occupationally exposed workers and 11 used exposure biomarkers. Fungicides and organophosphates (OP) insecticides were the most studied pesticides. Although methodological heterogeneity between studies was noted, particularly regarding study design, exposure assessment, and control of confounding, most of them showed associations with changes in T3 and T4, and/or TSH levels, while results from a few of these are consistent with experimental data supporting the findings that non-persistent pesticide exposure exerts hypothyroid-like effects. However, reporting quality was moderate to poor in 50% of the studies, particularly regarding method of selection of participants and discussion of external validity. Overall, current knowledge regarding the impact of non-persistent pesticides on human thyroid function is still limited. Given the widespread use of pesticides, future research should assess effects of exposure to currently-used pesticides in cohort studies combining comprehensive questionnaire-based assessment and biomarkers. Investigators need to pay particular attention to exposure

  7. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  8. Prokaryotic expression of chicken infectious anemia apoptin protein and characterization of its polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shikha; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Singh, Prafull; Chaturvedi, Uttara; Saxena, Lovleen; Kumar, Rajiv; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Doley, Juwar; Rajmani; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Sudesh; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2012-05-01

    In the present study recombinant VP3 (rVP3) was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) (pLysS) and its polyclonal antibodies were characterized. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the expression of recombinant protein was maximum when induced with 1.5 mM IPTG for 6 h at 37 degrees C. The 6xHis-tagged fusion protein was purified on Ni-NTA and confirmed by Western blot using CAV specific antiserum. Rabbits were immunized with purified rVP3 to raise anti-VP3 polyclonal antibodies. Polyclonal serum was tested for specificity and used for confirming expression of VP3 in HeLa cells transfected with pcDNA.cav.vp3 by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), flow cytometry and Western blot. Available purified rVP3 and polyclonal antibodies against VP3 may be useful to understand its functions which may lead to application of VP3 in cancer therapeutics.

  9. Aplastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the number of these blood cell types. Aplastic anemia can be caused by: Use of certain drugs or exposure to toxic chemicals (such as benzene) Exposure to radiation or chemotherapy Autoimmune disorders Pregnancy Viruses Sometimes, the cause is unknown. In this ...

  10. Anemia in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec; Fatma Tuncay Ozgunen; Ismail Cuneyt Evruke; Suleyman Cansun Demir

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don' ... from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers ...

  12. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death some...

  13. Cost of non-persistence with oral bisphosphonates in post-menopausal osteoporosis treatment in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotté François-Emery

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decade, oral bisphosphonates (BP became the most widely prescribed pharmacologic class for post-menopausal osteoporosis. However, many surveys revealed the important issue of poor persistence with those drugs resulting in a failure of treatment to reduce fracture risk sufficiently. Using a published Markov model, this study analyses the economic impact of non-persistence with bisphosphonates in the context of the introduction of generics in France. Methods Direct costs of vertebral, hip and wrist fracture were assessed and included in an existing 10-year Markov model developed to analyse consequences of non-persistence. Three alternatives of comparison were set: no treatment, real-world persistence, and ideal persistence. Simulated patients' characteristics matched those from a French observational study and the real-world adherence alternative employed persistence data from published database analysis. The risk of fracture of menopausal women and the risk reduction associated with the drugs were based on results reported in clinical trials. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs were calculated first between real-world adherence and no treatment alternatives, and second between ideal and real-world persistence alternatives. The cost of non-persistence was defined as the difference between total cost of ideal and real-world persistence alternatives. Results Within fractured women population, mean costs of 10-year management of fracture were significantly different between the three alternatives with €7,239 (± €4,783, €6,711 (± €4,410 and €6,134 (± €3,945 in the no-treatment, the real-world and ideal persistence alternatives, respectively (p Conclusion Within term, improving persistence with oral bisphosphonates should be economically dominant on levels currently known in real-world. Given this potential savings, ambitious adherence-enhancing interventions should be considered in

  14. Differential Life History Trait Associations of Aphids with Nonpersistent Viruses in Cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelella, G M; Egel, D S; Holland, J D; Nemacheck, J A; Williams, C E; Kaplan, I

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of vectors and fleeting nature of virus acquisition and transmission renders nonpersistent viruses a challenge to manage. We assessed the importance of noncolonizing versus colonizing vectors with a 2-yr survey of aphids and nonpersistent viruses on commercial pumpkin farms. We quantified aphid alightment using pan traps, while testing leaf samples with multiplex RT-PCR targeting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Overall, we identified 53 aphid species (3,899 individuals), from which the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, a pumpkin-colonizing species, predominated (76 and 37% of samples in 2010 and 2011, respectively). CMV and ZYMV were not detected, but WMV and PRSV were prevalent, both regionally (WMV: 28/29 fields, PRSV: 21/29 fields) and within fields (infection rates = 69 and 55% for WMV in 2010 and 2011; 28 and 25% for PRSV in 2010 and 2011). However, early-season samples showed extremely low infection levels, suggesting cucurbit viruses are not seed-transmitted and implicating aphid activity as a causal factor driving virus spread. Interestingly, neither noncolonizer and colonizer alightment nor total aphid alightment were good predictors of virus presence, but community analyses revealed species-specific relationships. For example, cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) and spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii Monell f. maculata) were associated with PRSV infection, whereas the oleander aphid (Aphis nerii Bover de Fonscolombe) was associated with WMV spread within fields. These outcomes highlight the need for tailored management plans targeting key vectors of nonpersistent viruses in agricultural systems.

  15. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  16. Anemia and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  17. Living with Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  18. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  19. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  20. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in their lives. Welcome to the Cooley's Anemia Foundation Website The Cooley's Anemia Foundation is dedicated to serving people afflicted with ... major form of this genetic blood disease, Cooley's anemia/thalassemia major. Our mission is advancing the treatment ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  3. High prevalence of lactase non-persistence among indigenous nomadic Nenets, north-west Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Khabarova

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The frequency of adult-type hypolactasia (lactase non-persistence varies widely among different ethnic groups. The cultural historical hypothesis assumes a link between the occurrence of hypolactasia and the distribution of dairy farming. The nomadic Nenets have been reindeer herders for generations and have therefore not consumed any dairy products. The hypotheses here was that the prevalence of lactase non-persistence (−13910 C/C genotype among Nenets people having four Nenets grandparents is high, while the prevalence among Nenets originating from ethnically mixed families is lower. Study design. The material was collected in four typical Nenets settlements in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug in Russia. One-third of the adult Nenets population were invited to answer a questionnaire and to donate buccal samples for genotyping by a doctor from the team of medical professionals who make rounds in this area. The total number of available participants was 177. Methods. Genotyping was performed with the AbiPrism system. We used the method of concordance of grandparents’ national origin to ascribe ethnicity. Results. The prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia (−13910 C/C among Nenets who had four Nenets grandparents was found to be 90%. The figures among others reporting three, two and one grandparent of Nenets origin were 72, 60 and 28%, respectively. Conclusion. The findings are in accord with the cultural historical hypothesis.

  4. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane de Almeida Côbo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S which, when homozygous (Hb SS is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. METHODS: Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. RESULTS: This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. CONCLUSION: The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life.

  5. Emotional and Behavioral Characteristics over a Six-Year Period in Youths with Persistent and Nonpersistent Dyscalculia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Judith G.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Manor, Orly; Shalev, Ruth S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined behavior problems in a matched sample of 58 youths with persistent dyscalculia (PD) and nonpersistent dyscalculia (NPD). Participants were classified as having dyscalculia at age 10-11 years. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist for their children at ages 10-11, 13-14, and 16-17 years, while the youths did so at the…

  6. Significant positive correlation between sunshine and lactase nonpersistence in Europe may implicate both in similarly altering risks for some diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Leighton, Henry; Burstein, Barry; Shrier, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing latitude and increasing frequency of population lactase nonpersistence have been reported to diminish risks for several diseases, but the reason for overlap has not been explained. We evaluate, relationships between calculated national annual ultraviolet light B (UVB) exposure, latitude, and national lactose digestion frequencies. Annual UVB exposure and latitude were based on weighted averages from several cities in different countries. Lactase distribution status was based on published data that have been used previously to derive relations with diseases. We compare univariate regression analyses (r(2)(adj), slope) of percentage of lactase nonpersistence with UVB or latitude. We determine, differences between European and non-European sources by multiregression analysis of independent variables. Correlation between UVB and latitude is high (r(2) = 0.89), and between percentage of lactase nonpersistence and either latitude or UVB the correlation is moderately strong with r(2) = 0.51 and 0.46, respectively, with P ≤ 0.01 for both. A more detailed analysis shows that correlations between percentage of lactase nonpersistence and UVB are only significant in Europe, r(2) = 0.59, P < 0.001, whereas outside Europe: r(2) = 0.06, P = 0.16. These relationships raise hypothetical explanations to account for the observed overlap in similar risk modification by the 2 variables.

  7. Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Amy C; Salt, Elizabeth; Wiggins, Amanda; Crofford, Leslie J; Bush, Heather; Mannino, David M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between smoking and stress with nonpersistent and persistent back pain. Participants included 3703 women who took part in the Kentucky Women's Health Registry in 2008 and 2011. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to examine whether smoking status and stress levels were predictive of nonpersistent and persistent back pain, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Stress level was associated with both nonpersistent and persistent back pain, whereas smoking was associated with only persistent back pain. Current smokers were 1.5 times more likely to report persistent back pain compared with never smokers, controlling for age, race, body mass index, educational attainment, and employment status. Women experiencing large or overwhelming amounts of stress were 1.8 times more likely to have nonpersistent back pain and 1.6 times more likely to report persistent back pain, compared with women experiencing small amounts of stress. This study further substantiates the findings of prior research that describes a significant relationship between back pain, stress, and smoking. Understanding the role of modifiable risk factors (ie, smoking and stress) and their impact on back pain provides an opportunity to offer a comprehensive and tailored treatment plan.

  8. Uplift and subsidence reveal a nonpersistent megathrust rupture boundary (Sitkinak Island, Alaska)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Richard W.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Nelson, Alan R.; Dura, Tina; Kemp, Andrew C.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Corbett, D. Reide; Angster, Stephen J.; Bradley, Lee-Ann

    2014-01-01

    We report stratigraphic evidence of land-level change and tsunami inundation along the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust during prehistoric and historical earthquakes west of Kodiak Island. On Sitkinak Island, cores and tidal outcrops fringing a lagoon reveal five sharp lithologic contacts that record coseismic land-level change. Radiocarbon dates, 137Cs profiles, CT scans, and microfossil assemblages are consistent with rapid uplift ca. 290-0, 520-300, and 1050-790 cal yr BP, and subsidence in AD 1964 and ca. 640-510 cal yr BP. Radiocarbon, 137Cs, and 210Pb ages bracketing a sand bed traced 1.5 km inland and evidence for sudden uplift are consistent with Russian accounts of an earthquake and tsunami in AD 1788. The mixed uplift and subsidence record suggests that Sitkinak Island sits above a non-persistent boundary near the southwestern limit of the AD 1964 Mw 9.2 megathrust rupture.

  9. Sideroblastic anemias: variations on imprecision in diagnostic criteria, proposal for an extended classification of sideroblastic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, S; Harris, J W

    1998-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are caused by a diversity of hereditary, congenital, or acquired disorders. Criteria used in describing sideroblastic anemias vary widely among standard medical textbooks and even so have been imprecisely applied in the literature. Recent discoveries concerning the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms involving the molecular biology of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, erythroid ALA synthase (ALAS-2), and iron transport have made the classification of sideroblastic anemias very complex. We recommend a more precise evaluation and documentation of the components that characterize the sideroblastic abnormality and propose an extended classification of the sideroblastic anemias.

  10. Fanconi Anemia — Case Report of Rare Aplastic Anemia at Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaconu Alina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, defective haematopoiesis, and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and cancers. FA was first described in 1927 by the Swiss pediatrician Guido Fanconi. The diagnosis is based on morphological abnormalities, hematologic abnormalities (pancytopenia, macrocytic anemia and progressive bone marrow failure and genetic tests (cariograma.

  11. Anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Kari M; Ingardia, Charles J; Borgida, Adam F

    2013-06-01

    Hemodynamic changes occur in pregnancy to prepare for expected blood loss at delivery. Physiologic anemia occurs in pregnancy because plasma volume increases more quickly than red cell mass. Anemia is most commonly classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron deficiency anemia accounts for 75% of all anemias in pregnancy. Oral iron supplementation is the recommended treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Parenteral iron and erythropoietin can also be used in severe or refractory cases. Outcomes and treatments for other forms of inherited and acquired anemias in pregnancy vary by disease, and include nutritional supplementation, corticosteroids, supportive transfusions, and splenectomy.

  12. Individual patients hold different beliefs to prescription medications to which they persist vs nonpersist and persist vs nonfulfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A McHorney

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colleen A McHorney, Abhijit S GadkariU.S. Outcomes Research, Merck and Co. Inc., North Wales, PA, USAObjective: Our objective was to explore whether adults hold different beliefs about medications to which they persist vs nonpersist and persist vs nonfulfull.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults with asthma, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, osteoporosis, or other cardiovascular disease from the Harris Interactive Chronic Illness Panel. A quota was set to obtain a sample of respondents who were persistent to a medication for one disease and nonpersistent or nonfulfilling to a medication for a second, different disease. Respondents completed 32 items yielding five multi-item scales: perceived need for medication (k = 12, side-effect concerns (k = 5, medication-safety concerns (k = 5, perceived disease severity (k = 3, and knowledge about the prescribed medication (k = 7. Respondents completed the 32 items twice – once for their persistent medication and a second time for their nonpersistent or nonfulfilling medication. Paired sample t-tests (bivariate and generalized estimating equations (GEE models (multivariate were used to test the study hypotheses.Results: Overall, 178 respondents were sampled for being persistent to one medication and nonpersistent to another, while 48 respondents were persistent to one medication and nonfulfilling to a second. For the medication to which an individual patient was persistent vs nonpersistent, there was significantly higher perceived need, fewer side-effect concerns, higher perceived disease severity, and better knowledge about the medication. For the medication to which an individual patient was persistent vs nonfulfilling, there was significantly higher perceived need, fewer side-effect concerns, and better knowledge about the medication.Conclusion: Individual patients hold different beliefs about medications to which they persist vs nonpersist or nonfulfill. Patients exhibit

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  14. Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... molasses, and raisins. If your child is a vegetarian , make an extra effort to ensure sufficient iron ... About Sickle Cell Anemia? About Anemia Becoming a Vegetarian Blood Blood Transfusions Coping With Common Period Problems ...

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia. Diseases such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia affect the quality and number of red blood ... too soon or very sick and work on preventions. More contact donate © 2017 March of Dimes Foundation ...

  16. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like ... normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also get stuck in blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  19. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor About Emotional Struggles Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD, ... of Prematurity Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  4. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  5. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, ...

  7. The Anemias of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  8. Megaloblastic anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B A

    1995-09-01

    Megaloblastic anemia is one of the acquired nutritional anemias that may complicate pregnancy. It is most often secondary to folic acid deficiency because folate requirements are increased during gestation. When the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia is confirmed, appropriate therapy will initiate a rapid reversal of the anemia process. Because of the association between neural tube defects and folate deficiency, it is recommended that women of reproductive age take folic acid supplementation.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  10. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  14. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Lulu; Narayanadas, K; Sunil, G

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a female child with thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (Rogers syndrome), presenting with anemia and diabetes mellitus responding to thiamine. She also had retinitis pigmentosa. The anemia improved and blood sugar was controlled with daily oral thiamine. Previously unreported olfactory abnormalities, as described in Wolfram syndrome, were also present in our patient.

  15. Generic switching and non-persistence among medicine users: a combined population-based questionnaire and register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jette Rathe

    Full Text Available Generic substitution means that one medicinal product is replaced by another product containing the same active substance. It is strictly regulated with respect to its bioequivalence, and all products must have undergone appropriate studies. Although generic substitution is widely implemented, it still remains to be answered how generic switch influences persistence to long-term treatment, and if it is modified by patients' concerns about medicine and views on generic medicine. This study focuses on users of antidepressants and antiepileptics, and their experience of generic switching.The study was an observational cohort study. By use of a prescription database, we identified patients who had redeemed prescriptions on generically substitutable drugs, and a questionnaire was mailed to them. We analyzed predictors of discontinuation in relation to generic switch and patients' attitudes towards generic medicines and concerns about their medicine.Patients who experience their first-time switch of a specific drug were at higher risk of non-persistence, Hazard Ratio 2.98, 95% CI (1.81;4.89 versus those who have never switched, and 35.7% became non-persistent during the first year of follow-up. Generic switching did not influence persistence considerably in those having previous experience with generic switching of the specific drug. Stratified analyses on users of antidepressants and antiepileptics underpin the results, showing higher risk of non-persistence for first-time switchers for both drug categories.In conclusion, patients who are first-time switchers of a specific drug were at higher risk of non-persistence compared to never switchers and those having experienced previous generic switching.

  16. Polymorphism in the oxytocin promoter region in patients with lactase non-persistence is not related to symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simrén Magnus

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxytocin and the oxytocin receptor have been demonstrated in the gastrointestinal (GI tract and have been shown to exert physiological effects on gut motility. The role for oxytocin in the pathophysiology of GI complaints is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine genetic variations or polymorphism of oxytocin (OXT and its receptor (OXTR genes in patients with GI complaints without visible organic abnormalities. Methods Genetic variants in the OXT promoter region, and in the OXTR gene in DNA samples from 131 rigorously evaluated patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS, 408 homozygous subjects referred for lactase (LCT-13910 C>T, rs4988235 genotyping, and 299 asymptomatic blood donors were compared. One polymorphism related to the OXT gene (rs6133010 A>G and 4 related to the OXTR gene (rs1465386 G>T, rs3806675 G>A, rs968389 A>G, rs1042778 G>T were selected for genotyping using Applied Biosystems 7900 HT allele discrimination assays. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the genotype or allele frequencies in any of the SNPs when IBS patients were compared to healthy controls. Among subjects referred for lactase genotyping, the rs6133010 A>G OXT promoter A/G genotype tended to be more common in the 154 non-persistent (27.3% subjects than in the 254 lactase persistant (18.1% subjects and in the healthy controls (19.4% (p = 0.08. When direct comparing, the A/G genotype was less common in the OXT promoter region in controls (p = 0.09 and in subjects with lactase persistence (p = 0.03 compared to subjects with lactase non-persistence. When healthy controls were viewed according to their own LCT-13910 genotypes, the C/C lactase non-persistent controls had a higher frequency for the OXT promoter A/G genotype than LCT-13910 T/T lactase persistent controls (41.2% vs 13.1%. No significant differences in frequencies of the investigated OXTR SNPs were noted in this study. Conclusion The results suggest

  17. Distribution of Non-Persistent Endocrine Disruptors in Two Different Regions of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Thomas P; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Swaab, Dick F; Struik, Dicky; Makris, Konstantinos C; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Frederiksen, Hanne; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V

    2017-09-13

    Non-persistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (npEDCs) can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. Whether npEDCs can accumulate in the human brain is largely unknown. The major aim of this pilot study was to examine the presence of environmental phenols and parabens in two distinct brain regions: the hypothalamus and white-matter tissue. In addition, a potential association between these npEDCs concentrations and obesity was investigated. Post-mortem brain material was obtained from 24 individuals, made up of 12 obese and 12 normal-weight subjects (defined as body mass index (BMI) > 30 and BMI < 25 kg/m², respectively). Nine phenols and seven parabens were measured by isotope dilution TurboFlow-LC-MS/MS. In the hypothalamus, seven suspect npEDCs (bisphenol A, triclosan, triclocarban and methyl-, ethyl-, n-propyl-, and benzyl paraben) were detected, while five npEDCs (bisphenol A, benzophenone-3, triclocarban, methyl-, and n-propyl paraben) were found in the white-matter brain tissue. We observed higher levels of methylparaben (MeP) in the hypothalamic tissue of obese subjects as compared to controls (p = 0.008). Our findings indicate that some suspected npEDCs are able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Whether the presence of npEDCs can adversely affect brain function and to which extent the detected concentrations are physiologically relevant needs to be further investigated.

  18. Analysis of Non-Persistent CSMA Protocols with Exponential Backoff Scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Dongjie; Lee, Tony T

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the performance of Non-persistent CSMA/CA protocols with K-Exponential Backoff scheduling algorithms. A multi-queue single-server system is proposed to model multiple access networks. The input buffer of each access node is modeled as a Geo/G/1 queue, and the service time distribution of head-of-line packets is derived from the Markov chain of underlying scheduling algorithm. The main results include the complete analysis of the throughput and delay distribution, from which we obtained stable regions with respect to the throughput and bounded mean delay of the Geometric Retransmission and Exponential Backoff schemes. We show that the throughput stable region of Geometric Retransmission will vanish as the number of nodes n \\rightarrow \\infty; thus, it is inherently unstable for large n. In contrast to Geometric Retransmission, the throughput stable region of Exponential Backoff can be obtained for an infinite population. We found that the bounded mean delay region of Geometric Retransmission...

  19. Detection, molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of full-length equine infectious anemia (EIAV) gag genes isolated from Shackleford Banks wild horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capomaccio, S; Willand, Z A; Cook, S J; Issel, C J; Santos, E M; Reis, J K P; Cook, R F

    2012-06-15

    The genetically distinct wild horse herds inhabiting Shackleford Banks, North Carolina are probably the direct descendents of Spanish stock abandoned after failed attempts to settle mid-Atlantic coastal regions of North America in the Sixteenth Century. In a 1996 island survey, 41% of the gathered horses were discovered seropositive for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with additional cases identified in 1997 and 1998. As a result of their unique genetic heritage, EIAV seropositive individuals identified in the two latter surveys were transferred to a quarantine facility on the mainland. In September 2008 two of the horses SB1 and SB2 after 10 and 11 years in quarantine respectively, developed clinical signs of EIA. In the case of SB2 these were so severe that the only humane option was euthanasia. Although SB1, survived it experienced a second clinical episode one month later. In May 2009, a third horse in quarantine, SB3, developed extremely severe clinical EIA and was euthanized. This demonstrates naturally infected long-term inapparent carriers can experience recrudescence of very severe disease many years after initial exposure to EIAV. Phylogenetic analysis of complete EIAV gag gene sequences obtained from each of three Shackleford horses demonstrated they were infected with very closely related viruses. Although these were distinguishable from all other strains examined, they belong to a monophyletic group comprising almost exclusively of New World isolates that is distinct from a number of recently characterized Central European EIAV strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimal management of pernicious anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serraj K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel Andres,1,2 Khalid Serraj31Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetes, and Metabolic Disorders, 2Competence Center of Autoimmune Cytopenias in Adults, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; 3Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Oujda, Oujda, MoroccoAbstract: Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis, predominantly of the fundus, and is responsible for a deficiency in vitamin B12 (cobalamin due to its malabsorption. Its prevalence is 0.1% in the general population and 1.9% in subjects over the age of 60 years. Pernicious anemia represents 20%–50% of the causes of vitamin B12 deficiency in adults. Given its polymorphism and broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, pernicious anemia is a great pretender. Its diagnosis must therefore be evoked and considered in the presence of neurological and hematological manifestations of undetermined origin. Biologically, it is characterized by the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Treatment is based on the administration of parenteral vitamin B12, although other routes of administration (eg, oral are currently under study. In the present update, these various aspects are discussed with special emphasis on data of interest to the clinician.Keywords: anemia, pernicious, autoimmune diseases, gastritis, atrophic, neurologic manifestations, vitamin B12 deficiency

  1. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  2. Diabetic acido-ketosis revealing thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyahia, O; Ouderni, M; Ben Mansour, F; Matoussi, N; Khaldi, F

    2009-12-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus and progressive sensorineural deafness. We report the cases of two infants, aged 4 and 5 months, hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis requiring insulin therapy. Laboratory tests revealed megaloblasic anemia, thrombocytopenia and normal thiamine level. Neurosensorial investigations showed bilateral deafness and ophthalmic involvement. Treatment with oral thiamine normalized hematological disorders and controlled diabetes; however, thiamine therapy had no impact on neurosensorial disorders.

  3. Persistent and non-persistent strains of Listeria monocytogenes: A focus on growth kinetics under different temperature, salt, and pH conditions and their sensitivity to sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, R; Ferreira, V; Brandão, T R S; Palencia, R Casquete; Almeida, G; Teixeira, P

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of different conditions, including temperature (37 °C, 22 °C, and 4 °C), NaCl concentrations (2.5%, 4%, and 8%), and acidity (pH = 5), on the growth response of persistent and non-persistent isolates of Listeria monocytogenes. The resistance to two common sanitizers (benzalkonium chloride and hydrogen peroxide) was also investigated. A selected group of 41 persistent and non-persistent L. monocytogenes isolates recovered from three cheese processing plants during a previous longitudinal study was assembled. Average lag time was similar for persistent and non-persistent isolates grown at 37 °C, 22 °C and 4 °C but significantly shorter (p < 0.05) for persistent isolates grown at 2.5%, 4% and 8% NaCl, and at pH 5. Average growth rates were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for persistent than for non-persistent isolates when grown at 22 °C, 2.5%, 4% and 8% NaCl, and at pH 5. These results suggest that persistent strains may be better adapted to grow under stressful conditions frequently encountered in food processing environments than non-persistent strains. No relation between persistence and resistance to the tested sanitizers was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particul...

  5. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wallerstein, Ralph O.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particul...

  6. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  7. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated? Treatments for aplastic anemia include blood transfusions , blood and marrow stem cell ... a transplant. Removing a known cause of aplastic anemia, such as exposure to a toxin, also may ...

  8. Anemia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of <11 g/dl in the first and third trimester and <10.5 g/dl in second trimester. According to the literature, anemia, particularly severe anemia (Hb<7g/dl is associated with increased risk of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and long term adverse effects in the newborn. The association of hemoglobin levels to perinatal outcome has been shown to be U shaped with both high and low hemoglobin levels being associated adverse perinatal outcome such as low birth weight, increased stillbirths. Anemia in pregnancy is a major public health problem. Ideally a woman should have adequate iron stores when she conceives, in order meet to additional requirements of pregnancy. This review focuses on the occurrence, types, maternal and perinatal outcomes, prevention and treatment of anemia during pregnancy. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 300-316

  9. Anemia in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Sparling, Terence G.

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, increasing attention has become focused on the prevalence of anemia in elderly individuals. Anemia occurs in more than 10% of individuals who are older than the age of 65 years, and it increases to more than 50% in individuals who are older than the age of 80 years. Although the anemia is typically mild and unlikely to result in symptoms, it is uniformly associated with increased morbidity and mortality as assessed in large cohort studies. Anemia is an independent pred...

  10. Body fat and dairy product intake in lactase persistent and non-persistent children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Almon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lactase non-persistent (LNP individuals may be lactose intolerant and therefore on a more restricted diet concerning milk and milk products compared to lactase persistent (LP individuals. This may have an impact on body fat mass. Objective : This study examines if LP and LNP children and adolescents, defined by genotyping for the LCT-13910 C > T polymorphism, differ from each other with regard to milk and milk product intake, and measures of body fat mass. Design : Children (n=298, mean age 9.6 years and adolescents (n=386, mean age 15.6 years, belonging to the Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study, were genotyped for the LCT-13910 C > T polymorphism. Dietary intakes of reduced and full-fat dairy varieties were determined. Results : LNP (CC genotype subjects consumed less milk, soured milk and yoghurt compared to LP (CT/TT genotype subjects (p<0.001. Subsequent partitioning for age group attenuated this observation (p=0.002 for children and p=0.023 in adolescents. Six subjects were reported by parents to be ‘lactose intolerant’, none of whom were LNP. LNP children and adolescents consumed significantly less reduced fat milk and milk products than LP children and adolescents (p=0.009 for children and p = 0.001 for adolescents. Conclusions : We conclude that LP is linked to an overall higher milk and dairy intake, but is not linked to higher body fat mass in children and adolescents.

  11. Lactase non-persistence and general patterns of dairy intake in indigenous and mestizo chilean populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Catalina I; Montalva, Nicolás; Arias, Macarena; Hevia, Macarena; Moraga, Mauricio L; Flores, Sergio V

    2016-01-01

    Lactase persistence (LP) is a genetic trait that has been studied among different countries and ethnic groups. In Latin America, the frequencies of this trait have been shown to vary according to the degree of admixture of the populations. The objective of this study is to better understand the relationship between this genetic trait and dairy intake in a multiethnic context through a synthesis of studies conducted in four regions of Chile. Genotypes frequencies for the SNP LCT-13910C>T (rs4988235) and frequency of dairy consumption were obtained from four populations: Polynesians from Easter Island (Rapanui); Amerindians (Mapuche) and Mestizos from the Araucanía region; urban Mestizos from Santiago; and rural Mestizos from the Coquimbo region. Genetic differentiation and association between milk consumption and genotype frequencies were estimated. Genetic differentiation between Native and Mestizo populations was significant; the LP frequency in Mapuche and Rapanui was 10% and 25%, respectively, whereas among the Mestizos, LP frequency was near 40%. Dairy intake was below the nutritional recommendations for the four groups, and extremely below recommendations among the indigenous populations. Association between milk intake and LP was found in Santiago and Rapanui populations. Although the frequency of LP varies among the populations according to their degree of admixture, dairy consumption was very low across the populations. Given that the association between milk consumption and expected phenotype was found only in two of the populations analyzed, it seems that lactase non-persistence (LNP) is not the only cause for dairy avoidance. Thus, it is suggested that SES and cultural preferences are likely affecting dairy consumption. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  13. Genetic characterization by composite sequence analysis of a new pathogenic field strain of equine infectious anemia virus from the 2006 outbreak in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Michelle; Cook, Frank; Kenna, Rachel; Callinan, John J; Cullinane, Ann

    2013-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the causative agent of equine infectious anaemia (EIA), possesses the least-complex genomic organization of any known extant lentivirus. Despite this relative genetic simplicity, all of the complete genomic sequences published to date are derived from just two viruses, namely the North American EIAV(WYOMING) (EIAV(WY)) and Chinese EIAV(LIAONING) (EIAV(LIA)) strains. In 2006, an outbreak of EIA occurred in Ireland, apparently as a result of the importation of contaminated horse plasma from Italy and subsequent iatrogenic transmission to foals. This EIA outbreak was characterized by cases of severe, sometimes fatal, disease. To begin to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathogenic phenotype, complete proviral genomic sequences in the form of 12 overlapping PCR-generated fragments were obtained from four of the EIAV-infected animals, including two of the index cases. Sequence analysis of multiple molecular clones produced from each fragment demonstrated the extent of diversity within individual viral genes and permitted construction of consensus whole-genome sequences for each of the four viral isolates. In addition, complete env gene sequences were obtained from 11 animals with differing clinical profiles, despite exposure to a common EIAV source. Although the overall genomic organization of the Irish EIAV isolates was typical of that seen in all other strains, the European viruses possessed ≤80 % nucleotide sequence identity with either EIAV(WY) or EIAV(LIA). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Irish EIAV isolates developed independently of the North American and Chinese viruses and that they constitute a separate monophyletic group.

  14. Mitigating epidemics caused by non-persistently transmitted aphid-borne viruses: the role of the pliant environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, M E; Ruesink, W G; Isard, S A; Kampmeier, G E

    2000-11-01

    Using Soybean mosaic virus as a model system, the rate, magnitude and timing of epidemics caused by non-persistently transmitted, aphid-borne viruses are examined under various field conditions. Emphasis is placed on the behavioural responses of vectors to environmental cues, although all three biotic components (host plant, vector and virus) are considered. Both single and double manipulations of the cropping system environment are explored using a computer model developed earlier by Ruesink and Irwin (Plant Virus Epidemics: Monitoring, Modelling and Predicting Outbreaks.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  16. Xiv conferencia : anemias

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes Manrique, Raúl; Camacho Gamba, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    La anemia es la disminución por debajo de lo normal de la Hb. o del número de globulos rojos o del hematocrito, pero es difícil encontrar un cuadro clínico que corresponda a la realidad de la anemia en el cual no estén descendidos los tres elementos.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics Iron-Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  19. Mouse models of anemia of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airie Kim

    Full Text Available Anemia of cancer (AC may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI, with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC.

  20. Mitochondrial iron metabolism and sideroblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftel, Alex D; Richardson, Des R; Prchal, Josef; Ponka, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by mitochondrial iron overload in developing red blood cells. The unifying characteristic of all sideroblastic anemias is the ring sideroblast, which is a pathological erythroid precursor containing excessive deposits of non-heme iron in mitochondria with perinuclear distribution creating a ring appearance. Sideroblastic anemias may be hereditary or acquired. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias are caused by defects in genes present on the X chromosome (mutations in the ALAS2, ABCB7, or GRLX5 gene), genes on autosomal chromosomes, or mitochondrial genes. Acquired sideroblastic anemias are either primary (refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, RARS, representing one subtype of the myelodysplastic syndrome) or secondary due to some drugs, toxins, copper deficiency, or chronic neoplastic disease. The pathogenesis of mitochondrial iron loading in developing erythroblasts is diverse. Ring sideroblasts can develop as a result of a heme synthesis defect in erythroblasts (ALAS2 mutations), a defect in iron-sulfur cluster assembly, iron-sulfur protein precursor release from mitochondria (ABCB7 mutations), or by a defect in intracellular iron metabolism in erythroid cells (e.g. RARS).

  1. Associations of genetic lactase non-persistence and sex with bone loss in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Marika M L; Impivaara, Olli; Sievänen, Harri; Viikari, Jorma S A; Lehtimäki, Terho J; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel J E; Kärkkäinen, Merja U M; Välimäki, Matti; Heikkinen, Jorma; Kröger, Liisa M; Kröger, Heikki P J; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Kähönen, Mika A P; Raitakari, Olli T

    2009-05-01

    Some studies have reported that after attainment of peak bone mass (PBM), slow bone loss may occur in both men and women; however, findings are inconsistent. Genetic factors play a significant role in bone loss, but the available evidence is conflicting. Genetic lactase non-persistence (lactase C/C(-13910) genotype) is suggested to increase risk for inadequate calcium intake predisposing to poorer bone health. We investigated whether this genotype is associated with PBM and bone loss in young Finnish adults. Subjects belong to the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study that is an ongoing multi-centre follow-up of atherosclerosis risk factors. From the original cohort, randomly selected subjects aged 20-29 participated in baseline bone mineral density (BMD) measurements (n=358), and in follow-up measurements 12 years later (n=157). Bone mineral content (BMC) and BMD at lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) were measured at baseline and follow-up with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Lactase C/T(-13910) polymorphism was determined by PCR and allele-specific fluorogenic probes. Information on lifestyle was elicited with questionnaires. During the follow-up, bone loss at both bone sites was greater in males (LS BMD: -1.1%, FN BMD: -5.2%) than in females (LS BMD: +2.1%, FN BMD: -0.7%) (both bone sites p=0.001). Younger age predicted greater loss of FN BMC and BMD in females (p=0.013 and p=0.001, respectively). Increased calcium intake predicted FN BMD gain in both sexes (in females B=0.007 g/cm(2)/mg, p=0.002; in males B=0.006, p=0.045), and increased physical activity LS BMD gain in females (B=0.091 g/cm(2)/physical activity point, p=0.023). PBM did not differ between the lactase genotypes, but males with the CC(-13910) genotype seemed to be prone to greater bone loss during the follow-up (LS BMD: C/C vs. T/T p=0.081). In conclusion, bone loss in young adulthood was more common in males than in females and seemed to occur mainly at the femoral neck. Young

  2. Biofilm Formation and Disinfectant Susceptibility of Persistent and Nonpersistent Listeria monocytogenes Isolates from Gorgonzola Cheese Processing Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Annalisa; Bertolotti, Luigi; Brito, Luisa; Civera, Tiziana

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the biofilm-forming ability and/or the disinfectant susceptibility accounted for the persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in Gorgonzola cheese processing plants. For this purpose, a set of 16 L. monocytogenes isolates collected in the 2004-2007 period was analyzed, including 11 persistent isolates collected in different years, within the collection period, and displaying identical or highly correlated pulsotypes. The evaluation of biofilm-forming ability was assessed using crystal violet (CV) staining and the enumeration of viable cells on stainless steel coupons (SSC). Absorbance values obtained with CV staining for persistent and nonpersistent isolates were not significantly different (rm-ANOVA p > 0.05) and the cell counts from nonpersistent isolates showed to be higher compared with persistent isolates (rm-ANOVA p  0.05). A greater influence of organic matter on MS could explain why P3 was efficient in reducing to effective levels the majority of the isolates at the lowest concentration suggested by the manufacturer (0.2% [v/v]), while the same purpose required a higher concentration (1% [v/v]) of MS. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the persistence of these isolates in Gorgonzola cheese processing plants was linked neither to the biofilm-forming ability nor to their susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants; therefore, other factors should contribute to the persistent colonization of the dairies.

  3. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This ... video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  8. Your Guide to Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in these supplements can quickly cause life-threatening poisoning if your child eats them. This is particularly ... of acquired aplastic anemia include: n High-dose radiation or chemotherapy. These cancer treatments kill cancer cells, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  10. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  11. What Is Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment will depend on the cause of the anemia and how severe it is. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: May 18, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  12. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood and bone marrow diseases, such as aplastic anemia. // Non Object? Updated: August 22, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  13. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants ... November 1, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  14. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood and bone marrow diseases, such as aplastic anemia. // Non Object? Updated: August 22, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ...

  17. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  4. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  5. Nutritional anemia and AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Ruíz, Óscar; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, UNMSM; Díaz, David; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM, y Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo; Castillo, Óscar; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, UNMSM; Reyes, Rafael; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, UNMSM; Marangoni, Manuela; Programa PROCETSS, Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo; Ronceros, Gerardo; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the type of anemia most frequent in patients with AIDS and the various degrees of anemia. Material and methods: One hundred patients 18 to 60 year-old infected with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) with residence in Lima and Callao were studied from January to December 2001 for blood count bone marrow aspiration, serum iron, transferrin, ferritin, folate and vitamin B12 levels. Samples were evaluated at the “Dos de Mayo” Hospital Clinical Pathology Department. Resu...

  6. [Heart failure and anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  7. Anemia carencial y SIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ruiz

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar el tipo mas frecuente de anemia en pacientes con SIDA y el grado de severidad de la anemia. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudió 100 pacientes, entre 18 y 60 años, infectados por virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH en estadio SIDA, de Lima Metropolitana y el Callao, desde enero a diciembre 2001. Se realizó hemograma, mielograma, dosaje sérico de hierro, saturación de transferrina, ferritina, folato y vitamina B12. Las muestras fueron procesadas en el Departamento de Patología Clínica del Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo. RESULTADOS: De los 100 pacientes, 60% presentaron anemia severa, 30% moderada y 10% leve. La tipificación del cuadro anémico fue carencial en 70% y por enfermedad crónica en 30%. En el caso de anemia carencial, 25% fue ferropénica, 30% carencial mixta (ferropénica y megaloblástica y 15% megaloblástica. De los casos con componente megaloblástico, 30 pacientes tuvieron deficiencia de folatos y 15 carencia de vitamina B12. CONCLUSIONES: La anemia prevalente fue la del tipo carencial. El grado de anemia predominante fue el severo.

  8. Transient physical and psychosocial activities increase the risk of nonpersistent and persistent low back pain: a case-crossover study with 12 months follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Gustavo C; Ferreira, Paulo H; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Steffens, Daniel; Koes, Bart W; Li, Qiang; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2016-12-01

    A previous study has shown that transient physical and psychosocial activities increased the risk of developing low back pain. However, the link between these factors in triggering nonpersistent or persistent episodes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the association of transient exposures to physical and psychosocial activities with the development of nonpersistent or persistent low back pain. This was a case-crossover study with 12 months follow-up. We included 999 consecutive participants seeking care for a sudden onset of low back pain. Development of low back pain was the outcome measure. At baseline, participants reported transient exposures to 12 predefined activities over the 4 days preceding pain onset. After 12 months, participants were asked whether they had recovered and the date of recovery. Exposures in the 2-hour period preceding pain onset (case window) were compared with the 2-hour period, 24 hours before pain onset (control window) in a case-crossover design for all participants. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), and interaction analyses were used to compare estimates of nonpersistent (i.e., back pain (back pain, with ORs ranging from 2.9 to 11.7. Overall, the risk of developing a persistent or a nonpersistent episode of low back pain associated with the included physical factors did not differ significantly. Our results revealed that previously identified triggers contribute equally to the development of both nonpersistent and persistent low back pain. Future prevention strategies should focus on controlling exposure to these triggers as they have the potential to decrease the burden associated with both acute and chronic low back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Idiopathic aplastic anemia: diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolberg, Osnat Jarchowsky; Levy, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a disease characterized by pancytopenia and hypoplastic bone marrow caused by the decrease of hematopoietic stem cells. The pathogenesis of AA is complex and involves an abnormal hematopoietic microenvironment, hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell deficiencies and immunity disorders. Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive and biologic drugs, and supportive care. Herein, we will update the main issues concern AA according to our literature review.

  10. Multiple mechanisms for hereditary sideroblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru

    2002-02-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited anemic disorders which is characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, microcytic hypochromic anemia and typically its X-linked inheritance in patients. It has been shown that a deficiency of the erythroid-specific delta-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS-E) activity is responsible for pyridoxine-responsive HSA in many patients, however, the pathogenesis of other types of HSA remains still unknown. In this article, recent evidence suggesting multiple causes for HSA is summarized and discussed.

  11. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2009-10-01

    Inherited sideroblastic anemia comprises several rare anemias due to heterogeneous genetic lesions, all characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow. This morphological aspect reflects abnormal mitochondrial iron utilization by the erythroid precursors. The most common X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA), due to mutations of the first enzyme of the heme synthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), has linked heme deficiency to mitochondrial iron accumulation. The identification of other genes, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette B7 (ABCB7) and glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), has strengthened the role of iron sulfur cluster biogenesis in sideroblast formation and revealed a complex interplay between pathways of mitochondrial iron utilization and cytosolic iron sensing by the iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs). As recently occurred with the discovery of the SLC25A38-related sideroblastic anemia, the identification of the genes responsible for as yet uncharacterized forms will provide further insights into mitochondrial iron metabolism of erythroid cells and the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia.

  12. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  13. Smaller genitals at school age in boys whose mothers were exposed to non-persistent pesticides in early pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veje, Christine Wohlfahrt; Andersen, H R; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are believed to play a role in the development of the testicular dysgenesis syndrome. Many pesticides are known to have endocrine disrupting abilities. In a previous study, sons of women who were occupationally exposed to non-persistent pesticides in early pregnancy...... showed signs of impaired reproductive function (reduced genital size and altered serum hormone concentrations) at three months of age. To assess the possible long-term effects of prenatal pesticide exposure, the boys were re-examined at 6-11 years. The 94 boys (59 exposed, 35 unexposed) underwent genital...... penile length (95% CI: -16.8; -1.1) compared with the unexposed. The testicular volume and penile length at school age could be tracked to measures from the same boys made at 3 months, e.g. those that had small testes at school age also had small testes at 3 months. Pituitary and testicular hormone serum...

  14. THIAMINE RESPONSIVE MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA IN TWO FEMALE SIBLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA is an autosomal recessive disorder, which is caused by loss of function mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. TRMA is characterized by anemia, deafness, and diabetes mellitus. We now report two sisters, the eldest of which presented to a different hospital during childhood with sensorineural deafness, which was treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, megaloblastic anemia. The younger sister is also affected with sensorineural deafness along with diabetes and megaloblastic anemia. Because a diagnosis of TRMA was suspected, therapy with insulin and thiamine was started to which the child is responding. Diabetes associated with deafness and megaloblastic anemia, suggests a diagnosis of TRMA.

  15. Megaloblastic anemia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi,Hirokuni

    1978-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1903, 744 cases of megaloblastic anemia have been reported in Japan: 490 cases of pernicious anemia; 95 cases associated with pregnancy; 66 cases after gastrectomy; 22 cases of megaloblastic anemia of infants; 21 cases of folic acid deficiency other than pregnancy and 19 cases of vitamin B12 malabsorption after ileal resection. It is generally agreed among hematologists in Japan that pernicious anemia is relatively rare, as in other Asian countries. The diagnosis of pernicious anemia in Japan is usually made by stained marrow films, radioisotopic assay of serum vitamin B12, Schilling test and good response to vitamin B12 therapy. Serum folate level, intrinsic factor or its antibody, methylmalonic acid excretion, formiminoglutamic acid excretion and deoxyuridine suppression test are performed only at a small number of laboratories. The drugs of choice are hydroxocobalamin, deoxyadenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin. Cyanocobalamin has nearly disappeared from commercial sources in Japan. Vitamin B12 administration is common in patients with neurological disorders. Megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency is extremely rare in Japan. Low serum folate levels are frequently observed among patients receiving anticonvulsants or in pregnant women, but in such samples megaloblastic anemia is almost never detected. The folic acid content of hospital diets indicates that satisfactory amounts of folate are taken in Japan. The intake of folic acid from rice is well over the minimum daily requirement of folate. Other factors in folic acid deficiency, such as food taboos, severe alcoholism and malabsorption syndrome are not frequently found in Japanese. The inadequate intake of folate was the critical factor in most reported cases.

  16. Optimal management of pernicious anemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andres, Emmanuel; Serraj, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    .... Pernicious anemia represents 20%-50% of the causes of vitamin B12 deficiency in adults. Given its polymorphism and broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, pernicious anemia is a great pretender...

  17. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear ... Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of iron and ...

  18. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  19. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  20. DIAGNOSIS LABORATORIK ANEMIA DEFISIENSI BESI

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Sophia Margina; Sianny Herawati; I W P Sutirta Yasa

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a decreament of iron level in the body. Iron deficiency anemiais oftenly seen, especially in the tropical countries or the third world country thatassociated with social economic rate. Iron deficiency anemia happens in more than onethird world’s population. Iron deficiency anemia can be caused by chronic hemorrhage,low intake of iron, absorption disturbance, and increasement of demand. To diagnose irondeficiency anemia, laboratoric examination is needed. The treatmen...

  1. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  2. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  3. Anemia in People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Managing Cancer-related Side Effects Low Blood Counts Anemia in People With Cancer What is anemia? When you don’t have enough healthy red ... the symptoms that bother people most. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons a person with ...

  4. Severe Anemia in Malawian Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, J.C.J.; Kamija, S.P.; Faragher, E.B.; Brabin, B.J.; Bates, I.; Cuevas, L.E.; Haan, de R.J.; Phiri, A.I.; Malange, P.; Khoka, M.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Lieshout, L.; Beld, M.G.H.M.; Teo, Y.Y.; Rockett, K.A.; Richardson, A.; Kwiatkowski, D.P.; Molyneux, M.E.; Hensbroek, van M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case¿control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration,

  5. Anemia in severe acute malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neha; Chandra, Jagdish; Pemde, Harish; Singh, Varinder

    2014-04-01

    India has the highest prevalence of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Severe anemia is one of the comorbidities responsible for increased mortality in severely malnourished children, yet it has not received the attention it should. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and type of anemia and to evaluate the possible etiologies for severe anemia, in these children. A cross-sectional study of patients with SAM in a tertiary care hospital in northern India over a period of 12 mo from Sept. 1, 2010 to Aug. 31, 2011 was conducted. We observed the prevalence of severe anemia (hemoglobin anemia, number of patients requiring blood transfusion, hematologic profile of mothers, nature of feeding, duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and the demographic profile of these patients. Included in the study were 131 cases of SAM. The age group varied between 6 and to 59 mo. Of patients with SAM, 67.3% had severe anemia; 13.8% had moderate anemia. Of these patients, 25% required packed red blood cell transfusion. The most common type of anemia was microcytic (38.6%) followed by megaloblastic (30.5%). A high incidence of severe anemia in SAM with a large proportion (25%) requiring blood transfusion is a pointer toward nutritional anemia being a very common comorbidity of SAM requiring hospital admission. Because megaloblastic anemia closely followed microcytic anemia, supplementation with vitamin B12 in addition to iron and folic acid would be recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Megaloblastic anemia in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maktouf, Chokri; Bchir, Attouma; Louzir, Hechmi; Mdhaffer, Moez; Elloumi, Moez; Ben Abid, Hela; Meddeb, Balkis; Makni, Faiza; Laatiri, Adnene; Soussi, Taoufik; Hafsia, Aicha; Dellagi, Koussay

    2006-07-01

    We prospectively studied 478 patients with megaloblastic anemia living in Tunisia. Overall, 98% of patients had vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia accounted for most of these cases, and median age at presentation was 45 years. Megaloblastic anemia occurred in 19 subjects under 15 years of age, and of these, nine had the Immerslund-Graesbeck syndrome.

  7. Severe Anemia in Malawian Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, J.C.J.; Kamija, S.P.; Faragher, E.B.; Brabin, B.J.; Bates, I.; Cuevas, L.E.; Haan, de R.J.; Phiri, A.I.; Malange, P.; Khoka, M.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Lieshout, L.; Beld, M.G.H.M.; Teo, Y.Y.; Rockett, K.A.; Richardson, A.; Kwiatkowski, D.P.; Molyneux, M.E.; Hensbroek, van M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case¿control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration,

  8. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  9. Congenital sideroblastic anemia: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sanjeev

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemia, comprising of acquired and congenital forms, is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital sideroblastic anemia is a rare condition which is mostly X-linked, caused by mutations of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2. We describe two cases of congenital sideroblastic anemia, one of them indicating an autosomal recessive inheritance, with their clinico-hematological profile. It is important to recognize this entity early in life as a significant percentage of cases respond to pyridoxine thus avoiding any long-term complications.

  10. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1 with a novel mutation in the CDAN1 gene previously diagnosed as congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Hisanori; Doisaki, Sayoko; Park, Young-Dong; Hama, Asahito; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Sumimoto, Shinichi

    2013-05-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders of red cell production. They are characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and dyserythropoiesis. Here, we present the clinical description and mutation analysis of a Japanese female with CDA type 1. She has long been diagnosed with unclassified congenital hemolytic anemia from the neonatal period. However, bone marrow morphology and genetic testing of the CDAN1 gene at the age of 12 years confirmed the afore-mentioned diagnosis. Thus, we should be aware of the possibility of CDA if the etiology of congenital anemia or jaundice cannot be clearly elucidated.

  11. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak Syst

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  13. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  14. Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rich foods to a child's diet or reducing milk intake. If your teenage daughter is anemic and has heavy or irregular menstrual periods, the doctor may prescribe hormonal treatment to help regulate the bleeding. Folic acid and vitamin B12 supplements may be recommended for anemia due to ...

  15. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak

  16. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  19. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  1. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  2. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease Images Red blood cells, sickle cell Red blood cells, normal Red blood ... multiple sickle cells Red blood cells, sickle cells Red blood cells, sickle and ... Heeney MM, Ware RE. Sickle cell disease. In: Orkin SH, Fisher DE, Ginsburg D, Look ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  4. Evaluation of anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Jennifer; Moerschel, Sarah K

    2010-06-15

    Anemia is defined as a hemoglobin level of less than the 5th percentile for age. Causes vary by age. Most children with anemia are asymptomatic, and the condition is detected on screening laboratory evaluation. Screening is recommended only for high-risk children. Anemia is classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic, based on the mean corpuscular volume. Mild microcytic anemia may be treated presumptively with oral iron therapy in children six to 36 months of age who have risk factors for iron deficiency anemia. If the anemia is severe or is unresponsive to iron therapy, the patient should be evaluated for gastrointestinal blood loss. Other tests used in the evaluation of microcytic anemia include serum iron studies, lead levels, and hemoglobin electrophoresis. Normocytic anemia may be caused by chronic disease, hemolysis, or bone marrow disorders. Workup of normocytic anemia is based on bone marrow function as determined by the reticulocyte count. If the reticulocyte count is elevated, the patient should be evaluated for blood loss or hemolysis. A low reticulocyte count suggests aplasia or a bone marrow disorder. Common tests used in the evaluation of macrocytic anemias include vitamin B12 and folate levels, and thyroid function testing. A peripheral smear can provide additional information in patients with anemia of any morphology.

  5. Differential Gene Expression of Three Gene Targets among Persistent and Nonpersistent Listeria monocytogenes Strains in the Presence or Absence of Benzethonium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Roberta; Mazzette, Rina; McAuliffe, Olivia; Jordan, Kieran; Fox, Edward M

    2015-08-01

    Persistence of Listeria monocytogenes strains in food processing environments remains relatively common but is difficult to control. Understanding the basis for such persistence represents an important step in the potential control or eradication of this pathogen from these environments. In this study, reverse transcription PCR was used to determine the relative and absolute expression of selected gene targets (pocR, eutJ, and qacH) among five persistent and four presumed nonpersistent L. monocytogenes strains. The quantification of these genes as markers for the persistent phenotype and the effect of benzethonium chloride (BZT) on their expression was investigated. Although no markers correlated with the ability of strains to persist in food processing facilities were found, expression of pocR was upregulated in three of the five persistent strains, in contrast to the four presumed nonpersistent strains, which showed down-regulation of this gene. These results provide further knowledge of the differential expression of genes of persistent and presumed nonpersistent strains of L. monocytogenes grown in the presence or absence of BZT and identifies upregulation of pocR as a potential response of persistent strains of L. monocytogenes to exposure to BZT.

  6. Factors influencing the process of medication (non-)adherence and (non-)persistence in breast cancer patients with adjuvant antihormonal therapy: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, M; Verhaeghe, S; Decoene, E; De Baere, S; Vandendorpe, B; Van Hecke, A

    2017-03-01

    Non-adherence and non-persistence in breast cancer patients taking antihormonal therapy (AHT) is common. However, the complex patterns and dynamics of adherence and persistence are still not fully understood. This study aims to give insight into the process of (non-)adherence and (non-)persistence by researching influencing factors and their interrelatedness in breast cancer patients taking AHT by means of a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews. The sample consisted of 31 breast cancer patients treated with AHT. Purposive and theoretical sampling and the constant comparison method based on a grounded theory approach were used. Expectations regarding the impact of AHT, social support from family and friends, and recognition from healthcare professionals were found to influence the process of non-adherence and non-persistence. The results of this study can help healthcare professionals understand why breast cancer patients taking AHT do not always adhere to or persist in taking the therapy and may facilitate patient-tailored interventions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Multidisciplinary approach to anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ghiațău

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present the case of a 65 years- old woman who was admitted with a severe macrocytic anemia Hb= 5.7g/dl and diffuse bone pain. Biologically she has moderate thrombocytopenia 35 000/µl, a hepatic cytolysis and cholestatic syndrome. Material and method: The patient was extensively evaluated before presentation for a mild iron - deficiency anemia for which she underwent endoscopic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract- normal. The bone marrow aspiration on admission revealed a marked hyperplasia of the erythroblastic line with ~50% basophilic erythroblasts suggesting a regenerative erythroid hyperplasia. These changes along with the marked reticulocytosis on the peripheral blood smear oriented us towards a hemolytic anemia; Folic acid, vitamin B12, autoimmune tests and hemolytic tests were all normal. We continued the investigations with a thoraco-abdominopelvic computed tomography which identified diffuse demineralization, vertebral compactation and pelvic stress fractures. The breast examination revealed a right breast nodule, but the breast ultrasonography pleaded for benignity. Lacking a clear definitive diagnosis we decided to perform a bone marrow biopsy. Results: The osteo- medullary biopsy pointed towards a medullar invasion from a lobular mammary carcinoma; In these circumstances we performed an ultrasound guided biopsy of the right mammary lump thus histologically confirming a tumoral invasion of the bone marrow with subsequent anemia. The patient started chemotherapy in the Oncology ward. Conclusion: The particularity of this case consists in the pattern of anemia, which initially seemed iron deficient and afterwards macrocytic – apparently hemolytic and was actually due to the tumoral medullar invasion and also the nonspecific ultrasonographic appearance of the breast tumor.

  8. Using 1-D and 2-D J-resolved 1H-NMR metabolomics to understand the effects of anemia in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a widespread hematological disorder in vertebrates. In channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), anemia is a persistent problem in culture environments, however, its causes and physiological impacts are not well understood. To better understand the symptoms and characterize associated biomark...

  9. Using 1-D 1H and 2-D 1H J-resolved NMR metabolomics to understand the effects of anemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a widespread hematological disorder in vertebrates. In channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), anemia is a persistent problem in culture environments, however, its causes and physiological impacts are not well understood. To better understand the symptoms and characterize associated biomark...

  10. [Exposure to persistent and non-persistent pesticides in a non-occupationally exposed population in Tenerife Island (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; Luzardo, Octavio P; García, Carlos Pérez; Zumbado, Manuel; Yanes, Carmen; Trujillo-Martín, María del Mar; Boada Fernández del Campo, Carlos; Boada, Luis D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to non-persistent pesticides (NPPs) is of concern because these substances have been associated with chronic diseases. However, few studies have addressed chronic exposure to NPPs in Spanish populations. We determined the presence of 24 pesticide residues by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in 363 serum samples obtained from non-occupationally exposed adults from Tenerife island in 2007. Most of the samples (99.45%) showed detectable residues (6 ± 2 pesticides per sample). The most frequently detected pesticides were pyrethrins (96.1%), organophosphates (93.9%) and organochlorines (92.3%). The neurotoxicants bifenthrin and malathion were detected in 81% of the samples and hexachlorobenzene DDT and buprofezin in more than 50%. Malation, an "environmental obesogen", was detected in 82%, and "endocrine disrupter" pesticides were present in 97.2% of the samples. Because there is clear, continuous and inadvertent exposure to NPPs that may be inducing adverse effects on human health, NPPs should be included in biomonitoring studies. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. [Anemia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  12. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz Agladioglu, S; Aycan, Z; Bas, V N; Peltek Kendirci, H N; Onder, A

    2012-01-01

    The thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, megaloblastic anemia and sensorineural hearing loss due to mutations in SLC 19A2 that encodes a thiamine transporter protein. The disease can manifest at any time between infancy and adolescence, and not all cardinal findings are present initially. The anemia typically improves significantly with pharmacological doses of thiamine. Variable improvement in diabetes is also noted. However, the hearing loss is apparently irreversible, although a delay in the onset of deafness may be possible. We present a 2-year old girl with non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus and anemia in whom we found a novelc.95T>A (leu32X) mutation in the SLC19A2 gene in this study.Our patient with this new mutation did not suffer from hearing loss.

  13. Thiamine– Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motavaselian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine Responsive megaloblastic anemia in DIDMOA (Wolfram syndrome has an autosomal- recessive mode of inheritance . Megaloblastic anemia and sideroblastic anemia is accompanied by diabetes insipidus (DI, diabetes mellitus (DM ,optic atrophy (OA and deafness (D. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are also present. We report a 7 month old girl with congenital macrocytic anemia; a rare clinical feature of Wolfram,s syndrome with increased plasma levels of blood glucose, both of which dramatically responded to administration of thiamine in large doses . The patient also had neurosensorial deafness, but no improvement was observed in the deafness. We presented the case because thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is a rare clinical presentation of Wolfram syndrome and after institution of treatment with thiamine, the anemia and hyperglycemia returned to normal.

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity.

  15. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease.

  16. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  17. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  19. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  20. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia A A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  3. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  4. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  5. ANEMIA SEL SABIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Agus Suwiryawan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Anemia is a form of blood disorder most often occurs in the community. Sickle cell anemia is anemia due to hemoglobinopathy caused by a change in the amino acid-6 of the ? globin chain. Sickle cell anemia is common in tropical areas of Africa and some parts of the region Saudi Arabia, India and the Mediterranean as well as black people in America. In addition there are also careers in various European countries. In pathophysiology, there are amino acid change from glutamic acid to valine in the ?-globin chain that causes red blood cells become sickle-shaped when deoxygenatied, but still be able to return to its normal shape when experiencing oxygenation. When the red blood cell membrane have been amended, the polymerization of red blood cells has become irreversible. Clinical picture seen in sickle cell anemia can be divided into two, namely: acute and chronic. Diagnosis can be done is to distinguish between heterozygous or homozygous sickle cell. Treatment provided in accordance with the clinical picture appears. Treatment that can be done is by blood transfusion, bone marrow transplant, anti-sickling drug delivery, and drug delivery to trigger the synthesis of HbF. Treatment still in the development stage is to use stem cells. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  6. Incidence of anemia in patients diagnosed with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy, 2010–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hairong; Xu, Lanfang; Page, John H; Cannavale, Kim; Sattayapiwat, Olivia; Rodriguez, Roberto; Chao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and characterize the risk of anemia during the course of chemotherapy among patients with five common types of solid tumors. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with incident cancers of breast, lung, colon/rectum, stomach, and ovary who received chemotherapy were identified from Kaiser Permanente Southern California Health Plan (2010–2012). All clinical data were collected from the health plan’s electronic medical records. Incidence proportions of patients developing anemia and 95% confidence intervals were calculated overall and by anemia severity and type, as well as by stage at cancer diagnosis, and by chemotherapy regimen and cycle. Results A total of 4,426 patients who received chemotherapy were included. Across cancers, 3,962 (89.5%) patients developed anemia during the course of chemotherapy (normocytic 85%, macrocytic 10%, microcytic 5%; normochromic 47%, hyperchromic 44%, hypochromic 9%). The anemia grades were distributed as follows: 58% were grade 1, 34% grade 2, 8% grade 3, and anemia ranged from 26.3% in colorectal cancer patients to 59.2% in ovarian cancer patients. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia increased from 29% in stage I to 49% in stage IV. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia varied from 18.2% in breast cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide + docetaxel regimen to 59.7% in patients with ovarian cancer receiving carboplatin + paclitaxel regimen. Conclusion The incidence of moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin anemia was greater in patients with distant metastasis. PMID:27186078

  7. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upma; Kumar, Parvinder; Raina, T. R.; Sharma, Kuldeep; Gupta, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes. PMID:20859508

  8. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes.

  9. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders.

  10. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This list is not all-inclusive. Alternative Names Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins References Michel M. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer ...

  11. Fibromuscular Dysplasia Complicated With Cerebral Stroke in a Child With Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Alper; Patiroglu, Turkan; Acer, Hamit; Gumus, Hakan; Senol, Serkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Ozdemir, Mehmet A; Unal, Ekrem

    2016-11-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II belongs to a subtype of bone marrow failure syndrome, which is characterized by monolineage involvement and typical morphologic abnormalities in erythroid precursor cells resulting in different degrees of hyporegenerative anemia. Moreover, reticulocytosis, which is not corresponding to the degree of anemia, with jaundice and splenomegaly are major diagnostic criteria. Causative gene is located at SEC23B. Although stroke among children is rare, it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herein we present a 3-year-old male with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II who presented with stroke-like symptoms, and was diagnosed with fibromuscular dysplasia.

  12. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosse, Wendell F; Hillmen, Peter; Schreiber, Alan D

    2004-01-01

    outlined and the potential of therapy of these diseases by regulation of these receptors is discussed. In Section III, Dr. Wendell Rosse discusses the forms of autoimmune hemolytic anemia characterized by antibodies that react preferentially in the cold-cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH). The former is due to IgM antibodies with a common but particular structure that reacts primarily with carbohydrate or carbohydrate-containing antigens, an interaction that is diminished at body temperature. PCH is a less common but probably underdiagnosed illness due to an IgG antibody reacting with a carbohydrate antigen; improved techniques for the diagnosis of PCH are described. Therapy for the two disorders differs somewhat because of the differences in isotype of the antibody. Since the hemolysis in both is primarily due to complement activation, the potential role of its control, as by the monoclonal antibody described by Dr. Hillmen, is discussed.

  13. Prevalence of Anemia among Adults with Newly Diagnosed HIV/AIDS in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Wang, Zhenyan; Lu, Hongzhou; Wang, Jiangrong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Renfang; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of anemia among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected patients in China has not been well characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of anemia among Chinese adults with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS. Methods One thousand nine hundred and forty-eight newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients in China were selected during 2009 and 2010. Serum samples obtained from each individual were collected to measure hemoglobin levels. Demographics and medical histories were recorded. Factors associated with the presence of anemia were analysed by logistic regression. Results Among the 1948 patients, 75.8% were male. Median age was 40 years (range: 18–80 years). The overall prevalence of anemia among HIV-infected patients was 51.9% (51.5% among men, 53.2% among women). The prevalences of mild anemia, of moderate anemia, of severe anemia were 32.4%, 17.0%, and 2.5%, respectively. The prevalence of anemia was higher among ethnic minority patients than among the Han patients (70.9% versus 45.9%). The prevalence of anemia increased with increasing age (49.6%, 53.5% and 60.1% among patients who were 18–39, 40–59, and ≥60 years of age respectively) and with decreasing CD4 count (14.0%, 22.4%, 50.7%, and 74.6% among patients with CD4 count of ≥350, 200–349, 50–199, and anemia. Conclusions Anemia is highly prevalent among Chinese adults with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS, but severe anemia is less prevalent in this population. Older age, lower CD4 count and minority ethnicity are associated with an increased risk of anemia. PMID:24058490

  14. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  15. Anemia Aplástica e Gravidez: Relato de Caso Aplastic Anemia and Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Alves de Sousa Teles

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A anemia aplástica é distúrbio caracterizado por pancitopenia e medula óssea hipocelular, com substituição gordurosa dos elementos e sem nenhum sinal de transformação maligna ou doença mieloproliferativa. Acomete geralmente adultos jovens e idosos, sem preferência sexual. A maioria dos casos é adquirida, mas pode ocorrer hereditariamente, por distúrbio molecular (anemia de Fanconi. A associação com gravidez é rara, estando relacionada com alta morbidade e mortalidade materna e fetal. Os autores descrevem o caso de uma paciente com anemia aplástica, diagnosticada previamente, cuja gestação complicou com infecção do trato urinário, doença hipertensiva específica da gestação e restrição de crescimento fetal, com parto prematuro eletivo. Apesar das condições adversas na gravidez e parto, mãe e recém-nascido tiveram evolução clínica satisfatória.Aplastic anemia is characterized by a circulating pancytopenia, hypocellularity, and fatty replacement of cellular marrow elements, without evidence of malignant transformation or myeloproliferative disease. It usually affects young and senior adults, without any sexual preference. Most cases of aplastic anemia are acquired, but the disease may also be inherited due to a molecular disorder (Fanconi's anemia. Aplastic anemia in pregnancy is an extremely rare condition with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality rates. The authors describe a case of a patient with previously diagnosed aplastic anemia, whose pregnancy was complicated with urinary tract infection, preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction, with elective preterm birth. In spite of the adverse conditions in pregnancy and delivery, mother and newborn had a satisfactory clinical evolution.

  16. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  17. Post-Babesiosis Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ann E; Montgomery, Mary W; Savage, William J; Achebe, Maureen O; Dunford, Kathleen; Villeda, Sarah; Maguire, James H; Marty, Francisco M

    2017-03-09

    Background Babesiosis, a tickborne zoonotic disease caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus babesia, is characterized by nonimmune hemolytic anemia that resolves with antimicrobial treatment and clearance of parasitemia. The development of warm-antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (also known as warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia [WAHA]) in patients with babesiosis has not previously been well described. Methods After the observation of sporadic cases of WAHA that occurred after treatment of patients for babesiosis, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all the patients with babesiosis who were cared for at our center from January 2009 through June 2016. Data on covariates of interest were extracted from the medical records, including any hematologic complications that occurred within 3 months after the diagnosis and treatment of babesiosis. Results A total of 86 patients received a diagnosis of babesiosis during the 7.5-year study period; 18 of these patients were asplenic. WAHA developed in 6 patients 2 to 4 weeks after the diagnosis of babesiosis, by which time all the patients had had clinical and laboratory responses to antimicrobial treatment of babesiosis, including clearance of Babesia microti parasitemia. All 6 patients were asplenic (Pbabesiosis WAHA in patients who did not have a history of autoimmunity; asplenic patients appeared to be particularly at risk.

  18. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  19. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 May 1977--31 July 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1978-08-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, and the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes. Considerable effort is devoted to perfection of hematologic, cell culture, and transplant methods to make these techniques useful in dealing with special problems associated with abnormal function.

  20. Pseudomoyamoya in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Mercado, R

    1982-12-01

    Sickle cell (drepanocytic) anemia is a hereditary blood disease occurring very rarely in Mexico. A 13-year-old Mexican boy with sickle cell anemia eventually died of a cerebrovascular accident of the brain stem, as shown by computerized tomography (CT). A characteristic moyamoya-like angiographic pattern was demonstrated on bilateral carotid and left vertebral arteriograms. Moyamoya disease has no known etiology, but the characteristic angiographic features of moyamoya have been observed in conjunction with some other disease of known origin (including sickle cell anemia). It is therefore my belief that these latter cases should be referred to as pseudomoyamoya and not true moyamoya.

  1. Anemia in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Andersson, Charlotte; Andell, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    Low hemoglobin concentration is associated with increased mortality, but there is disagreement with regard to the clinical definition of anemia. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical correlates and association with total and cause-specific long-term mortality across the hemoglobin...... distribution and for previously proposed definitions of anemia. Blood hemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular volume was measured in participants of the Malmö diet and cancer study-a prospective cohort study, and related to baseline characteristics and outcomes during follow-up. Primary endpoints were...... of anemia, hazard ratio: 1.36, 1.94 and 2.16 for hemoglobin

  2. Association of persistent organic pollutants and non-persistent pesticides with diabetes and diabetes-related health outcomes in Asia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaacks, Lindsay M; Staimez, Lisa R

    2015-03-01

    Over half of the people with diabetes in the world live in Asia. Emerging scientific evidence suggests that diabetes is associated with environmental pollutants, exposures that are also abundant in Asia. To systematically review the literature concerning the association of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and non-persistent pesticides with diabetes and diabetes-related health outcomes in Asia. PubMed and Embase were searched to identify studies published up to November 2014. A secondary reference review of all extracted articles and the National Toxicology Program Workshop on the association of POPs with diabetes was also conducted. A total of 19 articles met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated in this review. To date, the evidence relating POPs and non-persistent pesticides with diabetes in Asian populations is equivocal. Positive associations were reported between serum concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several organochlorine pesticides (DDT, DDE, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane) with diabetes. PCDD/Fs were also associated with blood glucose and insulin resistance, but not beta-cell function. There were substantial limitations of the literature including: most studies were cross-sectional, few studies addressed selection bias and confounding, and most effect estimates had exceptionally wide confidence intervals. Few studies evaluated the effects of organophosphates. Well-conducted research is urgently needed on these pervasive exposures to inform policies to mitigate the diabetes epidemic in Asia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Chockalingam; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Borah, Basanta K; Resmi, Thulasi R; Turco, Silvia; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2016-09-28

    The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India) greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A.

  4. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chockalingam Karthikeyan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A.

  5. Protecting crops from non-persistently aphid-transmitted viruses: a review on the use of barrier plants as a management tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Cerruti R R; Fereres, Alberto

    2006-09-01

    Barrier plants are a management tool based on secondary plants used within or bordering a primary crop for the purpose of disease control. Aphid-transmitted viruses account for approximately 50% of the 600 known viruses with an invertebrate vector. Barrier plants may act as real natural sinks for non-persistent aphid-transmitted viruses and have proved in the past to be an effective crop management strategy to protect against virus infection. Increasing the knowledge on aphid host seeking and flying behaviour, and on how barrier plants may affect the behaviour of aphids and their natural enemies will allow further development of this environmentally-friendly habitat manipulation strategy. An ideal plant barrier should be a non-host for the virus and the vector, but appealing to aphid landing and attractive to their natural enemies and should allow sufficient residence time to allow aphid probing before taking-off occurs. In this review, we have addressed why aphids are manageable by barrier cropping, the mechanisms by which barrier plants affect the occurrence of non-persistently aphid-transmitted viruses and the limitations of using barrier plants as a virus control strategy. Finally, we have pointed out future directions of research that should be conducted to integrate barrier cropping with other disease management strategies, and optimise and extend the use of barrier plants as a strategy for managing aphid-transmitted virus diseases.

  6. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Chockalingam; Patil, Basavaprabhu L.; Borah, Basanta K.; Resmi, Thulasi R.; Turco, Silvia; Pooggin, Mikhail M.; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2016-01-01

    The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India) greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A. PMID:27690084

  7. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  8. ANEMIA DAN ANEMIA GIZI BESI PADA KEHAMILAN: HUBUNGANNYA DENGAN ASUPAN PROTEIN DAN ZAT GIZI MIKRO

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Handayani Utami; Bunga CH. Rosha

    2015-01-01

    Anemia masih menjadi permasalahan kesehatan pada wanita hamil. Zat besi dianggap sebagai salah satu zat gizi mikro yang berperan terhadap terjadinya anemia. Kekurangan gizi besi dalam tingkat lanjut dapat menyebabkan anemia, yang disebut sebagai anemia gizi besi. Tujuan studi ini adalah untuk menganalisis perbedaan antara asupan protein dan gizi mikro serta menghitung odd ratio (OR) kejadian anemia dan anemia gizi besi akibat asupan protein dan gizi mikro pada wanita hamil di lokasi studi. An...

  9. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  10. Malarial anemia and STAT6

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Kathryn J.H.; Weatherall, David J

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind malarial anemia should lead to new approaches to the management and treatment of children. In this perspective article Drs. Robson and Weatherall examine the pathophysiology of this condition. See related article on page 195.

  11. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia ... Tribute Of Individual Gifts Corporate Sponsorship Invest in Research Diseases Aplastic Anemia Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Types Treatments ...

  12. Unusual cause of childhood anemia: Imerslund grasbeck syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishan Prasad Hosapatna Laxminarayana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imerslund Grasbeck syndrome (IGS is a rare autosomal recessive childhood disorder characterized by selective Vitamin (vit B 12 malabsorption with asymptomatic proteinuria without any structural renal pathology. The patients stay healthy for decades with life-long parenteral vit B12. We report a case of young female who presented with pancytopenia and proteinuria, evaluated in local hospitals as chronic hemolytic anemia (autoimmune cause, finally diagnosed as IGS on complete evaluation. She was treated with injectable vit B12 (1000 μg cyanocobalalmin and showed drastic recovery. IGS should be considered in patients with megaloblastic anemia not responding to oral vit B12 and associated proteinuria.

  13. Mieloma Múltiplo e anemia Multiple Myeloma and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Cançado

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anemia é uma complicação comum em pacientes com mieloma múltiplo (MM e ocorre em mais de 2/3 dos pacientes. Anemia de doença crônica, deficiência de eritropoetina (EPO devido à insuficiência renal e efeito mielossupressivo da quimioterapia são os principais mecanismos patofisiológicos que contribuem para o desenvolvimento de anemia no MM. Nos pacientes que obtêm remissão completa com tratamento quimioterápico, anemia usualmente se normaliza. Nos pacientes que não respondem ou apresentam recaída do mieloma, anemia freqüentemente persiste. As opções de tratamento dos pacientes anêmicos com MM incluem transfusões de hemácias e EPO recombinante humana. Essa proteína é biologicamente equivalente à EPO endógena e sua administração promove aumento dos valores de hemoglobina por tempo mais prolongado sem os riscos das transfusões de sangue. Vários estudos têm relatado melhora significante da eritropoese, redução da necessidade transfusional e melhora da qualidade de vida com o uso da EPO como tratamento a longo prazo da anemia associada ao mieloma. Nesse artigo, propomos o tratamento da anemia do MM baseado nas recomendações propostas pela Sociedade Americana de Hematologia (ASH em conjunto com a Sociedade Americana de Oncologia Clínica (ASCO, pela Organização Européia para Pesquisa e Tratamento do Câncer (EORTC, pelo IMF (Internacional Myeloma Foundation e pelo NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network.Anemia is a common complication in patients with multiple myeloma (MM occurring in more than two thirds of all patients. Anemia of chronic diseases, erythropoietin (EPO deficiency due to renal impairment and the myelosuppressive effect of chemotherapy are the most important pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the development of anemia in MM. In patients who achieve complete remission after chemotherapy, anemia usually normalizes. Non-responders and relapsing myeloma patients often continue to suffer

  14. A 2-year prospective cohort study of antidementia drug non-persistency in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease in Europe : predictors of discontinuation and switch in the ICTUS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardette, V.; Lapeyre-Mestre, M.; Piau, A.; Gallini, A.; Cantet, C.; Montastruc, J.L.; Vellas, B.; Andrieu, S.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on when and how to discontinue cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI). Predictors of non-persistency of antidementia drugs have been poorly investigated, mostly during short-term periods and using administrative data. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate

  15. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4(th) and 7(th) months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study.

  16. Observação de anemia hemolítica auto-imune em artrite reumatóide Observation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. S. Souza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Artrite reumatóide é uma doença difusa do tecido conjuntivo que se caracteriza pelo acometimento articular e sistêmico. Disfunções hematológicas como anemia ocorrem em até 65% dos pacientes, sendo a anemia das doenças crônicas a forma mais comum. A anemia hemolítica auto-imune pode estar associada à difusa do tecido conjuntivo, sendo classicamente associada ao lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e fazendo parte dos seus critérios de classificação. A presença de anemia hemolítica auto-imune em artrite reumatóide é relatada raramente na literatura e os mecanismos etiopatogênicos para o seu desenvolvimento ainda não estão esclarecidos. Descrevemos um caso de artrite reumatóide no adulto e outro de artrite reumatóide juvenil que desenvolveram anemia hemolítica auto-imune e discutimos os prováveis mecanismos etiopatogênicos envolvidos.Rheumatoid arthritis is a connective tissue disease characterized by articular and systemic involvement. Hematological abnormalities such as anemia may occur in up to 65% of the patients, with chronic disease anemia being the commonest form. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia can be associated with different connective tissue diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus and it is part of its classification criteria. On the other hand, the presence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in rheumatoid arthritis has rarely been described in the literature and the pathogenic mechanisms for its development remain unclear. We describe here a case of rheumatoid arthritis and another of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis that developed to autoimmune hemolytic anemia and present the probable etiopathogenic mechanisms.

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. Malaria-related anemia in patients from unstable transmission areas in Colombia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Perez, Mary; Álvarez, Álvaro; Gutierrez, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    Information about the prevalence of malarial anemia in areas of low-malaria transmission intensity, like Latin America, is scarce. To characterize the malaria-related anemia, we evaluated 929 malaria patients from three sites in Colombia during 2011-2013. Plasmodium vivax was found to be the most...... prevalent species in Tierralta (92%), whereas P. falciparum was predominant in Tumaco (84%) and Quibdó(70%). Although severe anemia (hemoglobin anemia were observed in 36.9%of patients. In Tierralta, hemoglobin levels were negatively...... associated with days of illness. Moreover, in Tierralta and Quibdó, the number of previous malaria episodes and hemoglobin levels were positively associated. Both Plasmodium species seem to have similar potential to induce malarial anemia with distinct cofactors at each endemic setting. The target age...

  20. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia: early diagnosis may be effective in preventing deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Hasan; Bariş, Safa; Ozdil, Mine; Yeşil, Gözde; Altun, Gürkan; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Aydin, Ahmet; Celkan, Tiraje

    2009-01-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, megaloblastic anemia and sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the SLC19A2 gene, encoding a high-affinity thiamine transporter protein, THTR-1, are responsible for the clinical features associated with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome in which treatment with pharmacological doses of thiamine correct the megaloblastic anemia and diabetes mellitus. The anemia can recur when thiamine is withdrawn. Thiamine may be effective in preventing deafness if started before two months. Our patient was found homozygous for a mutation, 242insA, in the nucleic acid sequence of exon B, with insertion of an adenine introducing a stop codon at codon 52 in the high-affinity thiamine transporter gene, SLC19A2, on chromosome 1q23.3.

  1. Anemia de Doença Crônica Anemia of chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Cançado

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Anemia de Doença Crônica (ADC é usualmente definida como a anemia que ocorre em distúrbios infecciosos crônicos, inflamatórios ou doenças neoplásicas, e é uma das síndromes clínicas mais comuns na prática clínica. Caracteristicamente, ADC corresponde à anemia normocrômica/normocítica, leve a moderada, e caracteriza-se por hipoferremia na presença de estoques adequados de ferro. Os três principais mecanismos patológicos envolvidos na ADC são: diminuição da sobrevida da hemácia, falha da medula óssea em aumentar a produção de glóbulos vermelhos para compensar o aumento da sua demanda, e distúrbio da mobilização do ferro de depósito do sistema mononuclear fagocitário. O papel central dos monócitos e dos macrófagos e o aumento da produção de citocinas mediadoras da resposta imune ou inflamatória, tais como: TNF alfa, INF gama e IL-1 estão implicados nos três processos envolvidos no desenvolvimento da ADC. O propósito desse artigo é revisar os recentes avanços no entendimento dos aspectos patofisiológico, diagnóstico e terapêutico desta síndrome.The anemia of chronic disease (ACD is usually defined as the anemia occurring in chronic infectious, inflammatory disorders, or neoplastic diseases, and is one of the most common syndromes in the clinical practice. Characteristically, ACD is a mild-to-moderate, normochromic/normocytic anemia, and is characterized by hypoferremia in the presence of adequate iron stores. The three principal pathologic mechanisms involved in ACD are: reduced erythrocyte survival, bone marrow failure to increase red blood cell production to compensate for the increase in its demand, and abnormal mobilization of reticuloendothelial iron stores. The central role of monocytes and macrophages, and the increased production of the cytokines that mediate the immune or inflammatory response, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 and the interferons, are implicated in all three

  2. Fanconi anemia and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Asako; Komatsu, Kenshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1999-09-01

    Aplastic Fanconi anemia (FA) accompanying malformation was firstly reported in 1927. This review concerns the recent findings on FA. FA belongs to the chromosomal instability syndrome and its detailed molecular mechanism is still unknown. The disease has been defined to be highly sensitive to radiation, however, which is quite an important problem since irradiation with a large dose of radiation is required before its radical treatment (bone marrow transplantation). FA cells are also mitomycin C-sensitive and FA patients are said to be the mosaic of the sensitive and normal cells. This enables to classify FA into 8 types of A-H groups, whose genotypes (FAA-FAH, FANCA-FANCH) are becoming clear. However, the intracellular function of the FANC-expressed protein, although known to form a big complex, is not elucidated yet. There is an abnormality in DNA processing such as re-linkage of the double strand-broken DNA in FA cells. FA causal gene FANCG is found identical to XRCC9 which is associated to high sensitivity to radiation. Analysis of FANC genes will provide useful findings on molecular mechanism of DNA-repair. (K.H.)

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  4. Liver congestion in heart failure contributes to inappropriately increased serum hepcidin despite anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yukako; Hanawa, Haruo; Jiao, Shuang; Hayashi, Yuka; Yoshida, Kaori; Suzuki, Tomoyasu; Kashimura, Takeshi; Obata, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Komei; Watanabe, Tohru; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of mammalian iron metabolism and mainly produced by the liver. Hepcidin excess causes iron deficiency and anemia by inhibiting iron absorption from the intestine and iron release from macrophage stores. Anemia is frequently complicated with heart failure. In heart failure patients, the most frequent histologic appearance of liver is congestion. However, it remains unclear whether liver congestion associated with heart failure influences hepcidin production, thereby contributing to anemia and functional iron deficiency. In this study, we investigated this relationship in clinical and basic studies. In clinical studies of consecutive heart failure patients (n = 320), anemia was a common comorbidity (41%). In heart failure patients without active infection and ongoing cancer (n = 30), log-serum hepcidin concentration of patients with liver congestion was higher than those without liver congestion (p = 0.0316). Moreover, in heart failure patients with liver congestion (n = 19), the anemia was associated with the higher serum hepcidin concentrations, which is a type of anemia characterized by induction of hepcidin. Subsequently, we produced a rat model of heart failure with liver congestion by injecting monocrotaline that causes pulmonary hypertension. The monocrotaline-treated rats displayed liver congestion with increase of hepcidin expression at 4 weeks after monocrotaline injection, followed by anemia and functional iron deficiency observed at 5 weeks. We conclude that liver congestion induces hepcidin production, which may result in anemia and functional iron deficiency in some patients with heart failure.

  5. Prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and its effect on neonatal outcomes in Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Reeta; Sable, Corey; Wolfson, Julian; Boro, Kanta; Rao, Raghavendra

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and characterize its effect on neonatal outcome in Northeast India. Four hundred and seventy mothers and their newborn infants during a one month period were included. The association between maternal hemoglobin (Hb) at delivery and neonatal outcomes were determined. Anemia (Hb anemia(Hb neonatal variables, each 10 g/L decrease in maternal Hb was associated with 0.18 week decrease in gestational length (p = 0.003) and 21 g decrease in birth weight (p = 0.093). Severe maternal anemia was associated with 0.63 week (95% CI, 0.03-1.23week) shorter gestation, 481 g (95% CI, 305-658 g) lower birth weight and 89% increased risk of small-for-gestation (OR 1.89, 95% CI, 1.25-2.86)in the offspring, compared with those born to mothers without anemia (p anemia was highly prevalentin this population. Lower gestational age and birth weight, and increased risk of small-for-gestation were associated with maternal anemia, especially when maternal Hb was anemia needs urgent attention to improve neonatal outcome in this population.

  6. Anemia y enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Anemia and inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de la Morena

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available La anemia es una de las complicaciones más comunes de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal. La alta frecuencia de valores bajos de hemoglobina en estos enfermos provoca en muchas ocasiones una infravaloración por parte del médico de esta circunstancia, lo que se traduce en la falta de un tratamiento eficaz. Por otro lado, el carácter complejo de los mecanismos de producción de la anemia en la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal con frecuencia plantea dudas acerca del tratamiento más adecuado. La identificación correcta de los pacientes con anemia así como la instauración del tratamiento más idóneo serán los dos pilares fundamentales para la mejoría de la calidad de vida de los enfermos. El uso correcto de los suplementos de hierro y las nuevas formulaciones de hierro parenteral, con o sin eritropoyetina asociada, han revolucionado nuestro abordaje de esta complicación evolutiva de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinalAnemia is a most common complication of inflammatory bowel disease. A high frequency of low hemoglobin values in these patients often leads physicians to subestimate this condition, which translates into ineffective treatment. On the other hand, the complex nature of anemia-inducing mechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease frequently raises doubt about the most appropriate therapy. A correct identification of patients with anemia, and adequate therapy are the essential pillars for improved quality of life. The right use of iron supplementation, and novel parenteral iron formulations, either with or without associated erythropoietin, have revolutionized our approach of this complication in the course of inflammatory bowel disease

  7. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mahmoud; Jaberian, Sara; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Riazi, Sajedeh; Rangraz, Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber, Somayyeh

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 1252 patients with morbid obesity that randomly selected from all patients referred to Clinic of obesity at Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in 2014. The morbid obesity was defined according to the guideline as body mass index (BMI) equal to or higher than 40 kg/m2. Various laboratory parameters including serum levels of hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, folic acid, and vitamin B12 were assessed using the standard laboratory techniques. BMI was adversely associated with serum vitamin B12, but not associated with other hematologic parameters. The overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.8%. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was independent to patients' age and also to body mass index. The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was totally 20.9%. According to the multivariable logistic regression model, no association was revealed between BMI and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia adjusting gender and age. A similar regression model showed that higher BMI could predict occurrence of vitamin B12 deficiency in morbid obese patients. Although iron deficiency is a common finding among obese patients, vitamin B12 deficiency is more frequent so about one-fifth of these patients suffer vitamin B12 deficiency. In fact, the exacerbation of obesity can result in exacerbation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  8. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-10-07

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time.

  9. [Anemia in congestive heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassade, P; Rabenirina, F; Garcon, P; Antakly, Y; Cador, R

    2009-11-01

    Anemia is a common disorder in congestive heart failure and an independant prognostic factor. The aims of this study are to evaluate the prevalence of anemia among a population of in-hospital congestive heart failure patients, to compare anemic patients (A) with non anemic patients (NA) and to study their cares. One hundred and thirty-two patients, 70 men (53%), et 62 women (47%) are enrolled. Mean age is 76.4+/-13.5 years. The prevalence of anemia (WHO criteria) is 49%. Patients A are older than NA: 79.1+/-13.8 years versus 73.8+/-12.9 years (p=0.025), renal function is more altered in A than in NA, creatinine clearance is 56.5 ml/min (A) versus 76.2 ml/min (NA) (p=0.003). Ejection fraction (EF) is lower in A than in NA: 35.1+/-15.3% versus 50.9+/-15.9%, (pAnemia is less frequent in preserved EF (28%) than in low EF (63%) (pAnemia is frequent in our population, and is associated with others prognostic factors and comorbidity.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  11. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of inherited anemia, such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: May 18, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  12. Undetectable Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Noriyuki; Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakuragi, Shizu; Matsui, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We encountered two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) with undetectable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level at diagnosis. Hemolytic anemia improved by administration of prednisolone (PSL) and HbA1C became measurable after response.

  13. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders of iron and copper metabolism, the sideroblastic anemias, and lead toxicity. In: Orkin SH, Fisher DE, Ginsburg D, ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 455. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ...

  14. A case of successful management with splenectomy of intractable ascites due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type Ⅱ-induced cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Themistoklis Vassiliadis; Ioannis Tsitouridis; Antonios Antoniadis; Panagiotis Semertzidis; Anna Kioumi; Evangelos Premetis; Nikolaos Eugenidis; Vassilia Garipidou; Vassilios Perifanis; Konstantinos Tziomalos; Olga Giouleme; Kalliopi Patsiaoura; Michalis Avramidis; Nikolaos Nikolaidis; Sofia Vakalopoulou

    2006-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias comprise a group of rare hereditary disorders of erythropoiesis,characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis as the predominant mechanism of anemia and by characteristic morphological aberrations of the majority of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type Ⅱ is the most frequent type. All types of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias distinctly share a high incidence of iron loading. Iron accumulation occurs even in untransfused patients and can result in heart failure and liver cirrhosis. We have reported about a patient who presented with liver cirrhosis and intractable ascites caused by congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type Ⅱ. Her clinical course was further complicated by the development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Splenectomy was eventually performed which achieved complete resolution of ascites, increase of hemoglobin concentration and abrogation of transfusion requirements.

  15. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: the puzzling phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshlawi, Ismail; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Bashir, Wafa; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Alrawas, Abdulhakim; Wali, Yasser

    2014-03-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is characterized by a triad of megaloblastic anemia, non-type 1 diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness. Other clinical findings have been described in few cases. The SLC19A2 gene on chromosome 1q 23.3 is implicated in all cases with TRMA. Our aim is to discuss the clinical manifestations of all Omani children diagnosed with TRMA and determine genotype-phenotype relationship. Clinical and laboratory data of all patients diagnosed in Oman were retrospectively collected. Mutation analysis of affected families was conducted using two Microsatellite markers. Genotyping was performed with fluorescent-labeled PCR primers. To define the deletion breakpoint region, PCR reactions were carried out using different primer pairs located at the introns 3 and 3'-untranslated region with Expand Long Template PCR kit. A total of six children have been diagnosed with this syndrome. They were five females and one male. They all presented with sensorineural deafness at birth while the age of anemia presentation ranged between 6 weeks to 19 months. They all belong to same family with complex interfamilial marriages and presented with the typical triad. Of interest is the very rare presentation of one patient with Uhl cardiac anomaly (total absence of right ventricular myocardium with apposition of endocardium and pericardium) that has never been described before in patients with TRMA. All patients have a novel large deletion of 5,224 bp involving exons 4, 5, and 6 of SLC19A2. TRMA is a disease of expanding phenotypic spectrum with poor genotype-phenotype correlation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Impact of persistence and non-persistence in leisure time physical activity on coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality: The Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnohr, Peter; O'Keefe, James H; Lange, Peter; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2017-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of persistence and non-persistence in leisure time physical activity on coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. Methods and results In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we prospectively followed 12,314 healthy subjects for 33 years of maximum follow-up with at least two repeated measures of physical activity. The association between persistence and non-persistence in leisure time physical activity, coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality were assessed by multivariable Cox regression analyses. Coronary heart disease mortality for persistent physical activity in leisure compared to persistent sedentary activity were: light hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.92, moderate HR 0.52; 95% CI 0.41-0.67, and high physical activity HR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.30-0.88. The differences in longevity were 2.8 years for light, 4.5 years for moderate and 5.5 years for high physical activity. A substantial increase in physical activity was associated with lower coronary heart disease mortality (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.52-1.08) corresponding to 2.4 years longer life, whereas a substantial decrease in physical activity was associated with higher coronary heart disease mortality (HR 1.61; 95% CI 1.11-2.33) corresponding to 4.2 years shorter life than the unchanged group. A similar pattern was observed for all-cause mortality. Conclusion We found inverse dose-response relationships between persistent leisure time physical activity and both coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. A substantial increase in physical activity was associated with a significant gain in longevity, whereas a decrease in physical activity was associated with even greater loss of longevity.

  17. Etiological study of microcytic hypochromic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kafle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microcytic hypochromic anemia is a distinct morphologic subtype of anemia with well- de ned etiology and treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and frequency of microcytic hypochromic anemia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital. One hundred cases of microcytic hypochromic anemia were included. Relevant clinical history, hemogram, reticulocyte count, iron pro les were documented in a proforma. Bone marrow aspiration and hemoglobin electrophoresis was conducted when required. Data was analysed by Microsoft SPSS 16 windows. Result: Iron de ciency was the commonest etiology (49%. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (20.8% was the commonest cause of iron de ciency, malignancy (24.3% was the commonest cause of anemia of chronic disease. Mean value of Mean Corpuscular Volume was lowest in hemolytic anemia (71.0 . Mean Red cell Distribution Width was normal (14.0% in hemolytic anemia but was raised in other types. Mean serum iron was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (32.2μg/dl and chronic disease (34.8μg/dl, normal in hemolytic anemia (83μg/dl and raised in sideroblastic anemia (295μg/dl. Mean serum ferritin was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (7.6ng/ml, raised in chronic disease (158.6ng/ml and normal in hemolytic anemia (99.2ng/ml. Serum ferritin was normal in sideroblastic anemia (93ng/ml. Mean Total Iron Binding Capacity was raised in iron de ciency anemia (458μg/dl and normal in other microcytic hypochromic anemias. Conclusion: Diagnosis of microcytic hypochromic anemia requires a standardized approach which includes clinical details, hemogram, peripheral blood smear, reticulocyte count, iron pro le, hemoglobin electrophoresis and bone marrow examination. 

  18. Retkulocyte production index in various anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Setyawati, Setyawati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reticulocyte production index (IPR) is used to determine the classification of functional anemia. More specific laboratory parameters are used in managing patient. There were some inappropriate of IPR correlation with the diagnosis of anemia in clinical practice.Objectives: The study was designed to know normal hematocrit in Sardjito General Hospital, to determine IPR in various anemia and to compare with standard IPR and final diagnosis in anemia. Methods: Observational study was...

  19. Manifestasi Anemia Pernisiosa Di Rongga Mulut

    OpenAIRE

    Nona Aini

    2008-01-01

    Anemia pernisiosa adalah salah satu penyakit kronis berupa berkurangnya produksi sel darah merah akibat defisiensi vitamin 812 dan asam folat, Salah satu fungsi vitamin 812 adalah untuk pembentukan sel darah merah di dalam sum-sum tulang menjadi aktif. Akibat defisiensi vitamin 812 dapat menyebabkan terganggunya sintesa DNA dan RNA. Terganggunya sintesa DNA akan menyebabkan anemia di sum-sum tulang dalam bentuk anemia makrositik dan di dalam darah dalam bentuk anemia megaloblastik. Sedangk...

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  1. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... marker and whether correction of anemia itself results in a better prognosis remain to be determined....

  2. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva; Raj Pal Manchandani; Patricia Oneal

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare.

  3. Anemia in children with chronic renal failure Special attention erythrocyte indices and iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Adi Suryanto B; Partini P Trihono; Agus Firmansyah

    2016-01-01

    Background Anemia in chronic renal failure (CRF) has been proved to influence the quality of life, increasing morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and prompt treatments of anemia are mandatory to manage CRF appopriately. So far data of anemia in CRF in Indonesia is limited. Objective To find out the profile of anemia in children with CRF at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH), Jakarta, with special atten- tion in erythrocyte indices and iron deficiency anemia. Method...

  4. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare.

  5. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  6. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  7. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  8. Clinico-aetiologic profile of macrocytic anemias with special reference to megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Vineetha; Dutta, Tarun Kumar; Badhe, Bhawana A; Bobby, Zachariah; Panigrahi, Ashish K

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to study the clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with macrocytic anemia and to determine the etiology of macrocytic anemia with special reference to megaloblastic anemia. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried over a period of 18 months on 60 adult patients (age ≥13 years) of macrocytic anemia. Macrocytic anemia was identified when peripheral blood examination showed anemia with a mean red blood corpuscular volume of >95 fl. The most common cause of macrocytic anemia was megaloblastic anemia (38.4%). The major causes of nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia were primary bone marrow disorders (35%), liver diseases (15%) and hemolytic anemia (8.3%). There was a significant male preponderance in the study (65%). The megaloblastic anemias observed were due to either vitamin B(12) deficiency (78.3%) or combined B(12) and folate deficiency (21.7%). A significant proportion of non-vegetarians (73.9%) had megaloblastic anemia. Patients with an MCV of >110fl were more likely to have megaloblastic anemia (p value 0.0007). Three patients (mean age 55 years) with a megaloblastic marrow did not respond to vitamin replacement and were found to have myelodysplastic syndrome. Megaloblastic anemia due to Vitamin B(12) or folate deficiency remains the most important cause of macrocytic anemia. In settings with limited laboratory facilities, a therapeutic trial of vitamins B(12) or folic acid is useful in determining the specific vitamin deficiency.

  9. The Role of Histone Demethylase Jmjd3 in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0055 TITLE: The Role of Histone Demethylase Jmjd3 in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yi...Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0055 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yi Zhang 5d... anemia (AA) is a condition of bone marrow failure (BMF) characterized by blood pancytopenia and BM hypoplasia. In most cases, AA is an immune-mediated

  10. A plasma microRNA signature as a biomarker for acquired aplastic anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Feng, Xingmin; Desierto, Marie J.; Fernandez Ibanez, Maria del Pilar; Rios, Olga; Weinstein, Barbara; Scheinberg,Phillip; Townsley, Danielle M.; Young, Neal S.

    2017-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is an acquired bone marrow failure characterized by marrow hypoplasia, a paucity of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and pancytopenia of the peripheral blood, due to immune attack on the bone marrow. In aplastic anemia, a major challenge is to develop immune biomarkers to monitor the disease. We measured circulating microRNAs in plasma samples of aplastic anemia patients in order to identify disease-specific microRNAs. A total of 179 microRNAs were analyzed in 35 plasm...

  11. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  12. Epidemiology of anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W H Wilson; Yeo, P S Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Anemia is being increasingly recognized as an important comorbidity in patients with heart failure. Despite wide variations in defining anemia, approximately one-fifth to one-third of patients with heart failure may experience anemia at a given time. The prevalence may increase to more than half of patients in the setting of severe heart failure, and it may differ with different settings. Meanwhile, up to a fifth of patients may experience new-onset anemia, even though most cases may resolve over time. Different factors contribute to the development of anemia, including increasing age, renal insufficiency, hemodilution, chronic inflammation, and increasing heart failure disease severity.

  13. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  14. Hubungan Anemia Defisiensi Besi Terhadap Gangguan Konsentrasi

    OpenAIRE

    Meutirani, Riska

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is dedecrease in the number of red blood cells caused by too little iron. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia. About 20% of women, 50% of pregnant womenand 3% of men do not have enough iron on their body. Anemia develops slowly after the normal iron stores in the body and bone marrowhave run out. In general, womwn have smaller stores of iron than men because they lose more through menstruation. Iron deficiency anemia may also be caused by poor absor...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... center of the brain (hydrocephalus) or an unusually small head size ( microcephaly ). Individuals with Fanconi anemia have an increased risk of developing a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow called acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or tumors of the head, neck, skin, ...

  16. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  17. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  18. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pochinok, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.Key words: children, iron deficiency anemia, treatment.

  20. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    OpenAIRE

    Upma,; Kumar Parvinder; Raina T; Sharma Kuldeep; Gupta Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background : Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder....

  1. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD.

  2. Aplastic anemia associated to systemic lupus erythematosus in an AIDS patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues; Ferreira, Thaís Camargos; Neves, Fernando de Freitas; Meneses, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by peripheral cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow. Although aplastic anemia is idiopathic in most cases, rheumatic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus are recognized as causes of aplastic anemia, with their possible etiological mechanisms being T and B lymphocyte dysfunction and pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoantibody production directed against bone marrow components. In the course of the human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, the identification of autoantibodies and the occurrence of rheumatic events, in addition to the natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus which is modified by immune changes that are characteristic of human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, make the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus challenging. This study reports the case of a woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treated with a highly active antiretroviral therapy, who had prolonged cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow consistent with aplastic anemia. The clinical picture, high autoantibodies titers, and sustained remission of the patient's hematological status through immunosuppression supported the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus-associated aplastic anemia. This is the first report of aplastic anemia concurrent with systemic lupus erythematosus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, providing additional evidence that immune dysfunction is a key part of the pathophysiological mechanism of aplastic anemia.

  3. Enhanced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death Contributing to Anemia in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Lupescu; Rosi Bissinger; Tobias Goebel; Salker, Madhuri S.; Kousi Alzoubi; Guilai Liu; Liviu Chirigiu; Andreas F Mack; Qadri, Syed M.; Florian Lang

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Anemia, a common condition in the elderly, could result from impaired formation and/or from accelerated loss of circulating erythrocytes. The latter could result from premature suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis characterized by phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increased cytosolic Ca2+-concentration ([Ca2+]i), oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study explored whether eryptosis is altered in elderly individ...

  4. Anemia in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laušević Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A normocytic normochromic anemia is one of the first signs of renal failure. Since anemia increases morbidity and mortality, its elimination is one of the essential objectives of the treatment. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO has changed the therapeutical approach to anemia. The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy of anemia correction in peritoneal dialysis patients depending on treatment and dialysis modality. The study is the retrospective analysis of 64 patients who presented to our Clinic in 2003. Eighteen (28.13% patients were treated with rHuEPO, 14 (28% underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD, 2 (100% - automated peritoneal dialysis (APD and 2 (33.3% - intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD. Mean hemoglobin level was 98.6±17.82 g/l in patients treated with rHuEPO versus 98.81±15.14 g/I in patients without rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin requirements were 3392.85±1211.77 IU/week. AII patients received iron supplementation during rHuEPO therapy. Mean serum ferritin levels were 463.41 ±360 μg/l. Transferrin saturation (TSAT was 0.35±0.16%. No difference of serum iron and TSAT levels was found between CAPD and IPD patients. The degree of anemia significantly differed between CAPD and IPD patients. A total of 17.11% of PD patients were given blood transfusions, most frequently during the first three months after the onset of dialysis. Our conclusion is that the number of patients receiving rHuEPO should be increased, as 50% of our patients should be substituted, while only 28% are being treated. As 50% of patients receiving rHuEPO failed to reach target Hgb levels, higher EPO doses should be considered. Iron stores should be continuously monitored, particularly in patients receiving rHuEPO, since iron deficiency is an important problem for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, especially during erythropoietin therapy. Oral iron supplementation is satisfactory in the majority of patients, and

  5. PERBEDAAN TINGKAT PENGETAHUAN ANEMIA REMAJA PUTRI SEKOLAH MENENGAH UMUM ANEMIA DAN NON ANEMIA DI ENAM DATI II PROPINSI JAWA BARAT

    OpenAIRE

    Edwi Saraswati; Iman Sumarno

    2012-01-01

    Telah dilakukan survei cepat tentang prevalensi anemia dan pengetahuan anemia pada remaja putri SMU di enam Dati II di Propinsi Jawa Barat. Remaja putri merupakan generasi penerus yang perlu diperhatikan, karena kelak menjadi ibu dan atau tenaga pekerja. Terhadap remaja putri sampel dilakukan pemeriksaan Hb dan pengumpulan data mengenai pengetahuan remaja putri tentang anemia. Informasi ini sangat berguna sebagai dasar penetapan prioritas program kesehatan dan gizi pada kelompok remaja putri ...

  6. Fanconi anemia - learning from children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Svahn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomic recessive and X-linked disease with chromosomal instability after exposure to crosslinking agents as the hallmark. Clinical features of FA are somatic malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer proneness, however there is wide clinical heterogeneity. The symptom most frequently and early associated with morbidity and mortality is progressive pancytopenia in the first decade of life although acute myelogenous leukemia (AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS can appear before aplastic anemia. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head-neck, intestinal or genital tract has a very high incidence in FA and can appear at young age. This paper will focus on treatment of bone marrow failure in FA.

  7. Megaloblastic anemia: back in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jagdish

    2010-07-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA), in most instances in developing countries, results from deficiency of vitamin B(12) or folic acid. Over the last two to three decades, incidence of MA seems to be increasing. Of the two micronutrients, folic acid deficiency contributed to MA in a large majority of cases. Now deficiency of B(12) is far more common. In addition to anemia, occurrence of neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia is increasingly being reported. Among cases presenting with pancytopenia, MA stands out as an important (commonest cause in some series) cause. This article focuses on these and certain other aspects of MA. Possible causes of increasing incidence of MA are discussed. Observations on other clinical features like neurocognitive dysfunction, associated hyperhomocysteinemeia and occurrence of tremors and thrombocytosis during treatment are highlighted.

  8. Anemias Hereditárias

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Fátima; Carvalho, Fernanda; Costa, Vítor; Farinha, Nuno; Gil-da-Costa, M.ª João; Norton, Lucília; Reis, Ilidia Lima

    2014-01-01

    Os autores efectuam a revisão das anemias hereditárias da consulta de hematologia pediátrica do Hospital S. João no período compreendido entre 1982 e 1995. Dividem-nas em três grandes grupos: Hemoglobinopatias, Doenças da Membrana do glóbulo rubro e Enzimopatias. Calculam a sua frequência relativa, os parâmetros clínicos e analíticos relevantes no diagnóstico, a abordagem terapêutica e respectiva evolução.Destacam a especificidade desta consulta em que as anemias hereditárias correspondem a 4...

  9. Fetal Outcome pada Kehamilan Aterm Anemia dan Tidak Anemia di RS Achmad Mochtar Bukittinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daulat Azhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakAnemia pada kehamilan merupakan faktor resiko gangguan pada fetal outcome dan memiliki komplikasi yang meningkatkan maternal dan perinatal mortality. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan perbedaan fetal outcome pada kehamilan aterm dengan anemia dan tidak anemia..Penelitian ini menggunakan data sekunder dengan rancangan cross sectional. Total sampel adalah 110 yang terdiri dari 55 ibu hamil aterm dengan anemia dan 55 ibu hamil aterm tidak anemia. Tekhnik pengambilan sampel adalah consecutive sampling dan analisis data menggunakan tes Mann- Whitney. Hasil uji diperoleh rerata berat badan lahir bayi pada ibu hamil aterm anemia adalah 3097,27 gr± 366,93 gr, yang sedikit lebh rendah dibandingkan pada ibu hamil aterm tidak anemia 3200,55 gr± 343,02 gr dengan nilai p= 0,214. Rerata APGAR skor pada menit pertama pada kelompok anemia adalah 7,04± 1,39, yang sedikit lebih rendah jika dibandingkan pada ibu hamil aterm tidak anemia 7.36± 0,65 dengan nilai p= 0,480. Rerata APGAR skor pada menit kelima pada kelompok anemia 8,11± 1,20 sedikit lebih rendah dibandingkan ibu hamil aterm tidak anemia 8,40± 0,62 dengan nilai p= 0,483. Rerata panjang badan lahir pada kelompok anemia adalah 48,58 cm± 1,52 cm hampir tidak memiliki perbedaan dibandingkan ibu hamil aterm tidak anemia 48,89 cm± 1,56 cm  dengan nilai p=0,310. Disimpulkan bahwa tidak ada perbedaan berat badan lahir, APGAR skor menit pertama dan kelima, dan panjang badan lahir pada kehamilan aterm dengan anemia dan tidak anemia.Kata kunci: berat badan lahir, APGAR skor, panjang badan lahir,  wanita hamil aterm dengan anemia AbstractAnemia in pregnancy is a risk factor of fetal outcome disorder and it have complication that increase of matenal and perinatal mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the differences of fetal outcome between aterm pregnant women with anemia and non anemia.This research uses secondary data by using cross sectional study design. Total sample is

  10. Coexistence of megaloblastic anemia and iron deficiency anemia in a young woman with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Chia-Sui; Yang, Chao-Ping; Lo, Fu-Sung; Hsu, Hsun-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Pernicious anemia is a megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and is the end-stage of autoimmune gastritis that typically affects persons older than 60 years. It is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia can also be diagnosed concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. We report the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia in a 22-year-old woman with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis for 10.5 years. Recently, she presented with microcytic anemia, and iron deficiency anemia was diagnosed initially. After administration of ferrous sulfate, macrocytic anemia was revealed and vitamin B12 deficiency was detected. Pernicious anemia was highly suspected because of the endoscopic finding of atrophic gastritis, and high titer of antigastric parietal cell antibody, as well as elevated serum gastrin level. After intramuscular injections of hydroxycobalamine 100 microg daily for 10 days, and monthly later, her blood counts returned to normal.

  11. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kensuke Suzuki; Minehiko Inomata; Shiori Shiraishi; Ryuji Hayashi; Kazuyuki Tobe

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemo...

  12. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children.

  13. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Zuguo Mei; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  14. Estimated red blood cell thickness in microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nAnemia is one of the most common hematological disorders that are still the present in all countries around the world. Microcytic anemia is a specific kind of anemia presenting with small red blood cell. In this paper, the author discusses on the estimated red blood cell thickness, a new proposed parameter, comparing between that of iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia and further extrapolate on the clinical implication.

  15. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Zuguo Mei; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  16. Child with aplastic anemia: Anesthetic management

    OpenAIRE

    Manpreet Kaur; Babita Gupta; Aanchal Sharma; Sanjeev Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare heterogeneous disorder of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia with the depletion of all types of blood cells. This results in anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which pose a challenge to both surgical and anesthetic management of such cases. We report a child with aplastic anemia who sustained traumatic ulcer on the arm and underwent split-thickness skin grafting under general anesthesia. There are only two case reports on anest...

  17. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  18. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, Susan M.; Geary, Denis F.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction wit...

  19. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, Susan M.; Geary, Denis F.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction wit...

  20. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  1. Anemia and transfusion in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal anemia is a frequent occurrence in neonatal intensive care units. Red blood cell transfusion criteria in case of blood loss are clearly defined but optimal hemoglobin or hematocrit thresholds of transfusion for anemia due to decreased production or increased destruction are less evident. This review focuses on the causes of anemia in the newborn period and the most recent evidence-based treatment options, including transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma; Dharma Choudhary; Anil Handoo; Gaurav Dhamija; Gaurav Kharya; Vipin Khandelwal; Mayank Dhamija; Sweta Kothari

    2015-01-01

    The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  3. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About: Coaches Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About Sickle ... stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: in- ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  5. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Operating Room? Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About Sickle ... stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: in- ...

  6. Child with aplastic anemia: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia is a rare heterogeneous disorder of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia with the depletion of all types of blood cells. This results in anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which pose a challenge to both surgical and anesthetic management of such cases. We report a child with aplastic anemia who sustained traumatic ulcer on the arm and underwent split-thickness skin grafting under general anesthesia. There are only two case reports on anesthetic considerations in aplastic anemia patients in the literature. The anesthetic management is challenging because of the rarity of the disease, associated pancytopenia and immunosuppression.

  7. [Anemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, M

    2012-12-01

    One of the most frequent extra-articular organ manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is anemia. As anemia in RA patients may result in severe symptoms and aggravation of other disease manifestations (e.g. arteriosclerosis), the influence on the course of RA is profound. However, the importance of anemia in RA patients is frequently underestimated. The etiology of anemia in RA is complex. Anemia of inflammation (AI) and iron deficiency anemia, alone or in combination are the most frequent forms of anemia in RA. Changes in iron metabolism are the leading causes of anemia in RA patients and mainly induced by the altered synthesis and function of hepcidin and ferroportin. Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver and immunocompetent cells, impairs the expression of ferroportin on iron-secreting cells, thus reducing iron bioavailability. The typical changes of iron metabolism and hepcidin synthesis in RA are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, primarily interleukin-6. Hence, the treatment of RA with cytokine antagonists has significant therapeutic implications on anemia in the context of inflammation and impaired iron metabolism.

  8. Role of Erythropoietin in Renal Anemia Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Chronic renal failure, Renal anemia, Erythropoietin resistance. Tropical Journal of ... gastrointestinal reaction, which can increase the iron utilization and improve iron reserves, overcoming the reticuloendothelial system iron.

  9. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Ali; Keskin, Mehmet; Hizli, Samil; Uygun, Hatice; Dai, Alper; Gumruk, Fatma

    2010-10-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) syndrome usually associated with diabetes mellitus, anemia and deafness, due to mutations in SLC19A2, encoding a thiamine transporter protein. The onset of disease is usually seen during infancy or at early childhood and most of the TRMA patients are originated from consanguineous families. In this case, we report a 5-month-old boy who had diagnosis of TRMA during evaluations for his anemia and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis of TRMA should be kept in mind in differential diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia especially in the populations where the consanguinity is frequent.

  10. Megaloblastic Anemias: Nutritional and Other Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph; Datta Mitra, Ananya

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies are major causes of megaloblastic anemia. Causes of B12 deficiency include pernicious anemia, gastric surgery, intestinal disorders, dietary deficiency, and inherited disorders of B12 transport or absorption. The prevalence of folate deficiency has decreased because of folate fortification, but deficiency still occurs from malabsorption and increased demand. Other causes include drugs and inborn metabolic errors. Clinical features of megaloblastic anemia include anemia, cytopenias, jaundice, and megaloblastic marrow morphology. Neurologic symptoms occur in B12 deficiency, but not in folate deficiency. Management includes identifying any deficiency, establishing its cause, and replenishing B12 or folate parenterally or orally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of persistent and non-persistent generic Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. recovered from a beef packing plant on biofilm formation by E. coli O157.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvalingam, Jeyachchandran; Ells, Timothy C; Yang, Xianqin

    2017-09-25

    To examine the influence of meat plant E. coli and Salmonella sp. isolates on E. coli O157 biofilm formation. Biofilm formation was quantified by crystal violet staining (A570 nm ) and viable cell numbers for up to 6 days at 15°C. All five persistent E. coli genotypes formed strong biofilms when cultured alone or co-cultured with E. coli O157, with A570 nm values reaching ≥4.8 at day 4, while only two of five non-persistent genotypes formed such biofilms. For E. coli O157:H7 co-culture biofilms with E. coli genotypes 136 and 533, its numbers were ≥1.5 and ≥1 log CFU peg(-1) lower than those observed for its mono-culture biofilm at days 2 and 4, respectively. The number of E. coli O157:NM in similar co-culture biofilms was 1 log CFU peg(-1) lower than in its mono-culture biofilm at day 4 and 6, respectively. Salmonella sp. lowered the number of E. coli O157:NM by 0.5 log unit, once, at day 6. Generic E. coli may outcompete E. coli O157 strains while establishing biofilms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia.......Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia....

  13. Imaging Diagnosis of Neonatal Anemia: Report of Two Unusual Etiologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shabnam Grover; G Preethi; Sumita Saluja; Ankit Bhargava

    2013-01-01

      Anemia in neonatal period is rare, with the common causes being Rh and ABO blood group incompatibility, hemorrhagic disease of newborn, congenital hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinopathies, and TORCH...

  14. Risk factors associated with anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in rural Nepali pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Zeina; Taren, Douglas; Duncan, Burris; Pandey, Pooja; Thomson, Cynthia; Winzerling, Joy; Muramoto, Myra; Shrestha, Ram

    2012-05-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study to investigate risk factors associated with severe anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) iron status among Nepali pregnant women. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, health and dietary data were collected from 3,531 women living in the southeastern plains of Nepal. Stool samples were analyzed for intestinal helminthes. Dark adaptation was assessed using the Night Vision Threshold Test (NVTT). Hb levels were measured in all subjects to detect anemia and the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) was measured among a subsample of 479 women. The iron status categories were: 1) normal (Hb> or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR anemia without iron deficiency (Hbiron deficiency without anemia (Hb > or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR>8.5 mg/l); and 4) iron deficiency anemia (IDA): (Hb8.5 mg/l). Factors associated with severe anemia and poor iron status were determined using logistic regression. Hookworm infection increased the risk for developing severe anemia [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.26; 95% CI 1.67-10.89; piron deficiency with and without anemia. Intake of iron supplements as tablets and/or tonic was protective against severe anemia, anemia without iron deficiency and IDA. Dietary heme iron was significantly associated with iron deficiency without anemia (RRR: 0.1; 95% CI 0.02-0.47; panemia and associated nutrient deficiencies.

  15. Clinical, hematological, and molecular characterization of sickle cell anemia pediatric patients from two different cities in Brazil Caracterização clínica, hematológica e molecular de crianças portadoras da anemia falciforme em duas diferentes cidades do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Menezes Lyra

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on clinical, hematological, and molecular aspects of sickle cell anemia pediatric patients from two different cites in Brazil. Seventy-one patients from São Paulo and Salvador, aged 3 to 18 years, were evaluated. Hematological analyses, betaS globin gene haplotypes, and alpha2 3.7kb-thalassemia were performed. Numbers of hospitalizations due to vaso-occlusive crises, infections, stroke, and cholelithiasis were investigated. São Paulo had more hospitalizations from vaso-occlusion, cholelithiasis, and stroke than Salvador. The Ben/CAR genotype predominated in both cities. alpha2 3.7kb-thalassemia had a frequency of 28.2% in Salvador, mostly with Ben/CAR genotype (45.0%, while São Paulo had 22.5% with similar frequencies of the Ben/ CAR and CAR/CAR genotypes. Sickle cell anemia patients from São Paulo also had more episodes of stroke, which was observed among CAR/CAR, atypical, and BEN/CAR haplotypes. In Salvador stroke was only observed in the Ben/CAR genotype. Cholelithiasis had similar frequencies in the two cities. These data suggest a milder phenotype among patients in Salvador, possibly due to genetic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors. Further studies are needed to elucidate modulating factors and phenotype association.O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar aspectos clínicos, hematológicos e moleculares de pacientes pediátricos portadores de anemia falciforme em duas cidades brasileiras: Salvador e São Paulo. Foram estudados 71 pacientes com idades variando entre 3 a 18 anos, analisando-se os seguintes aspectos: perfis hematológicos, haplótipos dos genes da globina beta, presença de talassemia alfa-2(3.7kb, número de internações por vaso-oclusão, infecção, presença de acidente vascular cerebral e litíase biliar. O genótipo Ben/CAR predominou nas duas cidades. Talassemia alfa-2(3.7kb teve freqüência de 28,2% em Salvador e 22,5% em São Paulo. Os pacientes de São Paulo apresentaram um número maior

  16. Caracterización de la anemia en niños menores de cinco años de zonas urbanas de Huancavelica y Ucayali en el Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Elena; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú; Huamán-Espino, Lucio; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima. Perú. Sociólogo; Gutiérrez, César; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Aparco, Juan Pablo; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. nutricionista.; Pillaca, Jenny; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima. Perú. Estadístico

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Characterize anemia in children aged between 12 and 59 months from urban areas in the provinces of Coronel Portillo and Huancavelica in Peru. Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study carried out in two stages: a) population-based study to identify children with anemia using multistage probability sampling, and b) characterization of the serum levels of ferritin, vitamin B12, intraerythrocytic folic acid and presence of parasitosis in children with anemia. For the statistical a...

  17. Caracterización de la anemia en niños menores de cinco años de zonas urbanas de Huancavelica y Ucayali en el Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Elena; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú; Huamán-Espino, Lucio; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Sociólogo.; Gutiérrez, César; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Aparco, Juan Pablo; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. nutricionista.; Pillaca, Jenny; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Characterize anemia in children aged between 12 and 59 months from urban areas in the provinces of Coronel Portillo and Huancavelica in Peru. Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study carried out in two stages: a) population-based study to identify children with anemia using multistage probability sampling, and b) characterization of the serum levels of ferritin, vitamin B12, intraerythrocytic folic acid and presence of parasitosis in children with anemia. For the statistical a...

  18. Anemia in pregnancy:laboratory diagnostic procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is common condition in pregnancy and laboratory diagnostic procedures are essential for its detection and categorization. Complete blood count, serum iron, TIBC and ferritin are basic clinical laboratory parameters that provide information about iron status of mother’s body and possible presence of anemia.

  19. Salmonella osteomyelitis by sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, H.; Tran, V.T.; Boeckmann, U.

    1985-10-01

    Case report of a 28 year old black sickle cell anemia patient with salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius. Aside from sickle cell anemia patients this skeletal complication of enteric salmonellosis is an extreme rarity. Description of the typical roentgenological features includes intracortical fissures and sequestration.

  20. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  1. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  2. Silent Infarcts with Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transfusion therapy on the risk for new silent infarct or stroke in children with sickle cell anemia and abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasonography was determined at the University of Miami, FL, and other centers in the STOP trial (Stroke Prevention in Sickle Cell Anemia.

  3. Case 40. Misdiagnosis of refractory macrocytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Kate; Bain, Barbara

    2008-11-01

    A diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome, refractory anemia subtype, was made in an elderly Indian woman on the basis of a refractory macrocytic anemia with normal vitamin B(12) and folate assays, normal thyroid function, essentially normal liver function and normal cytogenetic analysis. Disease evolution revealed that the diagnosis was erroneous.

  4. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  5. Anemia in Children with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Tenenbaum

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Iron deficiency anemia impacts on cognitive development. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with Down syndrome and identify risk factors for anemia. Methods. We conducted a prolective cross-sectional study of children attending a multidisciplinary Down syndrome medical center. One hundred and forty nine children with Down syndrome aged 0–20 years were enrolled in the study. Information obtained included a medical history, physical and developmental examination, nutritional assessment, and the results of blood tests. Results. Of the patients studied, 8.1% were found to have anemia. Among the 38 children who had iron studies, 50.0% had iron deficiency. In a multivariate analysis, Arab ethnicity and low weight for age were significantly associated with anemia. Gender, height, the presence of an eating disorder, and congenital heart disease were not risk factors for anemia. Conclusions. Children with Down syndrome are at risk for anemia and iron deficiency similar to the general population. Children with Down syndrome should be monitored for anemia and iron deficiency so that prompt intervention can be initiated.

  6. Megaloblastic anemia--a rare cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Sanjib Kr; Aggarwal, Anju; Mittal, Hema

    2011-10-01

    A 2- year- old boy presented with non responsive megaloblastic anemia, growth failure and developmental delay. Blood levels of B(12), folic acid and iron were normal. Tandem mass spectroscopy for common inborn errors of metabolism did not reveal any abnormality. There was an increased excretion of orotic acid in urine. The authors report this as a rare cause of megaloblastic anemia.

  7. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  8. Aplastic anemia as a feature of systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalayer, Émilie; Ffrench, Martine; Cathébras, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral cytopenias are common in systemic lupus erythematosus, but bone marrow involvement is rarely reported. Aplastic anemia is the result of immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and characterized by an empty bone marrow. This rare but serious disease has been described as an unusual manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We reviewed the 25 cases published in the English language literature and discuss the clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology of aplastic anemia as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report here the first case of aplastic anemia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus treated with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Over one half of patients received concomitantly the diagnoses of systemic lupus erythematosus and aplastic anemia. No clinical or histological features can distinguish primary aplastic anemia from aplastic anemia occurring in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The overall mortality is about 15% and corticosteroid-based therapy alone or in combination with other immunomodulatory drugs can restore bone marrow function. Systemic lupus erythematosus may be complicated by bone marrow involvement. The diagnosis of peripheral cytopenias should be confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. All these patients should receive cortisone as a first treatment. Plasma exchanges seem to have some efficacy. Other different immunomodulatory therapies were used with variable results.

  9. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: a novel SLC19A2 compound heterozygous mutation in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzillo, Enza; Melis, Daniela; Falco, Mariateresa; Fattorusso, Valentina; Taurisano, Roberta; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Franzese, Adriana

    2013-08-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by loss of function mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. TRMA is characterized by anemia, deafness, and diabetes. In some cases, optic atrophy or more rarely retinitis pigmentosa is noted. We now report two sisters, the eldest of which presented to a different hospital during childhood with sensorineural deafness, which was treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, optic atrophy, and macrocytic anemia. These features initially suggested a clinical diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome (WS). Therapy with thiamine was initiated which resulted in the resolution of the anemia. The younger sister, who was affected with sensorineural deafness, was referred to our hospital for non-autoimmune diabetes. She was found to have macrocytosis and ocular abnormalities. Because a diagnosis of TRMA was suspected, therapy with insulin and thiamine was started. Sequencing analysis of the SLC19A2 gene identified a compound heterozygous mutation p.Y81X/p.L457X (c.242insA/c.1370delT) in both sisters. Non-autoimmune diabetes associated with deafness and macrocytosis, without anemia, suggests a diagnosis of TRMA. Patients clinically diagnosed with WS with anemia and/or macrocytosis should be reevaluated for TRMA. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Functional and anatomical evidence of cerebral tissue hypoxia in young sickle cell anemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Gazdzinski, Lisa M; Tsui, Albert Ky; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Portnoy, Sharon; Liu, Elaine; Mazer, C David; Hare, Gregory Mt; Kassner, Andrea; Sled, John G

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a significant source of morbidity in children with sickle cell anemia; however, the mechanism of injury is poorly understood. Increased cerebral blood flow and low hemoglobin levels in children with sickle cell anemia are associated with increased stroke risk, suggesting that anemia-induced tissue hypoxia may be an important factor contributing to subsequent morbidity. To better understand the pathophysiology of brain injury, brain physiology and morphology were characterized in a transgenic mouse model, the Townes sickle cell model. Relative to age-matched controls, sickle cell anemia mice demonstrated: (1) decreased brain tissue pO2 and increased expression of hypoxia signaling protein in the perivascular regions of the cerebral cortex; (2) elevated basal cerebral blood flow , consistent with adaptation to anemia-induced tissue hypoxia; (3) significant reduction in cerebrovascular blood flow reactivity to a hypercapnic challenge; (4) increased diameter of the carotid artery; and (5) significant volume changes in white and gray matter regions in the brain, as assessed by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that brain tissue hypoxia contributes to adaptive physiological and anatomic changes in Townes sickle cell mice. These findings may help define the pathophysiology for stroke in children with sickle cell anemia.

  11. [Clinical features and characteristics of community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia in children of pre-school age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiian, O I; Romanova, T O; Vasylyshyn, Kh I; Bynda, T P; Popov, S V; Vasyl'ieva, O H; Lypovs'ka, V V

    2014-01-01

    The most common clinical signs of community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia in children of pre-preschool age are defined. Indicators of immunity cellular link in children with community-acquired pneumonia are studied. It is established that acute illness is characterized by disturbances in cellular immunity that are more expressed in patients with concomitant iron deficiency anemia.

  12. Colonic lymphangiomatosis associated with anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo Chul Chung; Hye-Kang Kim; Jin Young Yoo; Jeong Rok Lee; Kang-Moon Lee; Chang Nyol Paik; U-Im Jang; Jin Mo Yang

    2008-01-01

    lymphangioma is an uncommon malformation of lymphatic system.Multiple colonic lymphangioma named as lymphangiomatosis is considered an extremely rare disease.Although lymphangioma is a benign tumor and most colonic lymphangiomas do not cause symptoms and do not require treatment,resection of lymphangioma is necessary in the presence of symptoms such as abdominal pain,bleeding,intussusceptions.We report a case of colonic lymphangiomatosis in a man who presented with abdominal discomfort and anemia,which was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic snare polyperctomy.

  13. Transplante renal na anemia falciforme

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrisch, Joao Ricardo; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti; Bittar,Christina Matzenbacher; Silla, Lucia Mariano da Rocha

    2003-01-01

    Embora a anemia falciforme e as síndromes falciformes freqüentemente causem várias alterações funcionais renais, não é comum a insuficiência renal terminal. Nestes casos, o transplante renal é uma alternativa que se acompanha de resultados comparáveis aos obtidos em receptores sem hemoglobinopatias. Esta estratégia terapêutica tem sido, no entanto, pouco relatada para portadores de hemoglobinopatia SC. Este relato descreve a evolução de dois pacientes portadores de hemoglobinopatia SC que for...

  14. Unexplained Aspects of Anemia of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Price

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia of inflammation (AI, also known as anemia of chronic inflammation or anemia of chronic disease was described over 50 years ago as anemia in association with clinically overt inflammatory disease, and the findings of low plasma iron, decreased bone marrow sideroblasts and increased reticuloendothelial iron. Pathogenic features underlying AI include a mild shortening of red cell survival, impaired erythropoietin production, blunted responsiveness of the marrow to erythropoietin, and impaired iron metabolism mediated by inflammatory cytokines and the iron regulatory peptide, hepcidin. Despite marked recent advances in understanding AI, gaps remain, including understanding of the pathogenesis of AI associated with “noninflammatory” or mildly inflammatory diseases, the challenge of excluding iron deficiency anemia in the context of concomitant inflammation, and understanding more precisely the contributory role of hepcidin in the development of AI in human inflammatory diseases.

  15. Incidence of anemia in patients diagnosed with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy, 2010–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu H

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hairong Xu,1 Lanfang Xu,2 John H Page,1 Kim Cannavale,2 Olivia Sattayapiwat,2 Roberto Rodriguez,3 Chun Chao2 1Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 2Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena, CA, USA; 3Department of Hematology Oncology, Los Angeles Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Psadena, CA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and characterize the risk of anemia during the course of chemotherapy among patients with five common types of solid tumors. Patients and methods: Patients diagnosed with incident cancers of breast, lung, colon/rectum, stomach, and ovary who received chemotherapy were identified from Kaiser Permanente Southern California Health Plan (2010–2012. All clinical data were collected from the health plan’s electronic medical records. Incidence proportions of patients developing anemia and 95% confidence intervals were calculated overall and by anemia severity and type, as well as by stage at cancer diagnosis, and by chemotherapy regimen and cycle. Results: A total of 4,426 patients who received chemotherapy were included. Across cancers, 3,962 (89.5% patients developed anemia during the course of chemotherapy (normocytic 85%, macrocytic 10%, microcytic 5%; normochromic 47%, hyperchromic 44%, hypochromic 9%. The anemia grades were distributed as follows: 58% were grade 1, 34% grade 2, 8% grade 3, and <1% grade 4. The incidence of grade 2+ anemia ranged from 26.3% in colorectal cancer patients to 59.2% in ovarian cancer patients. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia increased from 29% in stage I to 49% in stage IV. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia varied from 18.2% in breast cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide + docetaxel regimen to 59.7% in patients with ovarian cancer receiving carboplatin + paclitaxel regimen. Conclusion: The incidence of moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL remained considerably

  16. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome associated with patent ductus arteriosus: First case report from Kashmir Valley of the Indian subcontinent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ashraf Ganie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome, an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by a triad of anemia, diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness is caused by a deficiency of a thiamine transporter protein. The disorder is rare and has not been reported from our community which has high background of consanguinity. We report a six years old girl who presented with diabetes mellitus which remitted after thiamine replacement. The girl in addition had sensorineural deafness, reinopathy, atrial septal defect and megaloblastic anemia which responded to high doses of thymine. This is the first case reported from Kashmir valley and third from India. The presentation and management in such cases is discussed.

  17. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome associated with patent ductus arteriosus: First case report from Kashmir Valley of the Indian subcontinent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Ali, Imran; Ahangar, A G; Wani, Mohd Maqbool; Ahmed, Sanjeed; Bhat, Manzoor Ahmed; Seth, Sulaiman; Mudasir, Syed

    2012-07-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome, an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by a triad of anemia, diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness is caused by a deficiency of a thiamine transporter protein. The disorder is rare and has not been reported from our community which has high background of consanguinity. We report a six years old girl who presented with diabetes mellitus which remitted after thiamine replacement. The girl in addition had sensorineural deafness, reinopathy, atrial septal defect and megaloblastic anemia which responded to high doses of thymine. This is the first case reported from Kashmir valley and third from India. The presentation and management in such cases is discussed.

  18. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  19. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials.

  20. Emerging cellular and gene therapies for congenital anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Leif S; Khajuria, Rajiv K; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-12-01

    Congenital anemias comprise a group of blood disorders characterized by a reduction in the number of peripherally circulating erythrocytes. Various genetic etiologies have been identified that affect diverse aspects of erythroid physiology and broadly fall into two main categories: impaired production or increased destruction of mature erythrocytes. Current therapies are largely focused on symptomatic treatment and are often based on transfusion of donor-derived erythrocytes and management of complications. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative option currently available for the majority of congenital anemias. Recent advances in gene therapy and genome editing hold promise for the development of additional curative strategies for these blood disorders. The relative ease of access to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment, as well as the possibility of genetic manipulation ex vivo and subsequent transplantation in an autologous manner, make blood disorders among the most amenable to cellular therapies. Here we review cell-based and gene therapy approaches, and discuss the limitations and prospects of emerging avenues, including genome editing tools and the use of pluripotent stem cells, for the treatment of congenital forms of anemia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  2. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  3. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality i

  4. Anemia in the Neonate: The Differential Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassin, Michele L; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-07-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the neonatal period. Presenting symptoms may suggest numerous possible diagnoses ranging from anemia seen as a normal part of development to anemia due to critical pathology. An illustrative case is presented to highlight the appropriate evaluation of the neonate with significant anemia. Several important features of the evaluation of neonatal anemia are highlighted. The constellation of signs and symptoms that occur in conjunction with the anemia are critical for the evaluation. The evaluation should be performed in a step-wise process that starts by eliminating common causes of anemia. Manual review of the peripheral blood smear with a hematologist can be helpful. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Kurniawan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The numbers of older people in the world have been growing rapidly. Anemia is the most common hematologic problem encountered in older adults. However, anemia should not be accepted as an inevitable consequence of aging. Anemia in the elderly signifies an underlying disease. Iron Defi ciency Anemia (IDA is being one of the most common causes of anemia in older people. IDA in the elderly is often associated with such non specific symptoms. The diagnosis of IDA is typically based on laboratory results. Hence, the utilization of the various laboratory tests plays an important role for the diagnosis of IDA. The presence of IDA in the elderly is usually related with gastrointestinal disorders. Thus,  gastrointestinal evaluation should be contemplated in all patients with IDA unless there is a history of clinically important non gastrointestinal blood loss. Older people with IDA should have iron supplementation both to correct anemia and to replenish body iron stores. However, the underlying cause should always be treated to prevent further iron loss. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:71-7Keywords: anemia, elderly, gastrointestinal, iron deficiency

  6. The cardio-renal anemia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimković Siniša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The problem of anemia in congestive heart failure and chronic kidney disease was thought to be insignificant for a long period of time. Recent investigations pointed out that the problem of anemia should be defined in the context of the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. A positive feedback mechanism indicates that cardio-renal anemia syndrome is due to an interaction between congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure and anemia. The aim of the study was to present the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome, epidemiological characteristics and therapeutic results of the former investigations. Results. The results of the retrospective and prospective controlled trails have shown that management of anemia with subcutaneous administration of recombinant human erythropoietin together with intravenous iron infusion for at least 3-6 months lead to: relief of symptoms (improved NYHA functional class; increased left ventricular ejection fraction; reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; reduced number of rehospitalizations; reduced requirements for usual therapeutic agents (especially diuretics; and improved renal function. Conclusion. In patients with heart and kidney disease anemia should be routinely identified and appropriately treated. Subcutaneous recombinant erythropoietin and intravenous iron may significantly improve overall survival and quality of life of these patients. .

  7. [Sideropenic anemia in infants and toddlers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, G; Votava-Raić, A; Tjesić-Drinković, D; Rajić, L; Femenić-Kes, R; Konja, J; Goluza, I; Bilić, E; Leskovar, V

    2001-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common anemia in infants. In the routine pediatric care this problem is encountered every day. Numerous factors in infancy (low birth weight, rapid growth, insufficient nutrition) are involved in the development of iron-deficiency anemia, and they must be considered when establishing diagnosis, counselling parents, and prescribing oral iron preparations. Data on 119 patients aged up to two years treated in the Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Pediatric Department, University Hospital Centre Zagreb Salata between 1994 and 1999, were analyzed. We were prompted to do so because of great frequency of iron-deficiency anemia as one of associated diagnoses, and unfortunately often the only diagnosis requiring hospitalization. Out of 119 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, nine (7.7%) patients (four premature newborns and three from twin pregnancy) had to receive transfusion of erythrocyte concentrate due to very bad general condition and low red blood count, accompanied by clinical signs of anemic hypoxia. We also analyzed prenatal and perinatal history, socioeconomic living conditions of these children, i.e. their nutrition, and if they had previously received oral iron preparations. Some of the results, such as inadequate alimentation with flour, as well as insufficient prophylaxis of iron deficiency, which were found in most cases of severe anemia, point to the need of paying greater attention to this problem, better parents education, and more adequate screening for iron deficiency anemia.

  8. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nav nav, .header-9#header-section #main-nav, #overlay-menu nav, #mobile-menu, #one-page-nav li . ... How to Care for Your Child’s TeethRead Article >>Dental Hygiene: How to Care for Your Child’s TeethSeptember ...

  9. Inborn anemias in mice. Comprehensive progress report, 1 August 1979-1 June 1982, to accompany twenty-seventh renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.; Barker, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been investigated including four macrocytic anemias, three hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules controlling a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse and by extension to man from an understanding of mammalian mechanisms utilized in the control of erythropoiesis. Each of the different anemias is studied through: (a) biochemical and biophysical characterization of peripheral blood cells; (b) determinations of cellular and organismic radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme biosynthesis; (d) morphological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli and inhibitors; and (g) physiological complementation analysis via transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  10. Correlates of anemia in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Singh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia during pregnancy is a global public health challenge facing the world today. Prevalence of anemia in pregnancy in all the age groups is higher in India as compared to other developing countries. Objective: This study is aimed at determining the magnitude and to explore the socio-demographic and other correlates of anemia among pregnant women. Methodology: This descriptive study with cross-sectional design was conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Pregnant who were attending antenatal clinic for a period of one year were comprised the study material. Correlation between variables was analyzed using the chi-square and odd ratio. Results: Three hundred and thirty eight pregnant women were registered for the present study, whose age ranged from 16 to 45 years with a mean age of 26.08 years. Majority (81.95% participants were found to be anemic. It was observed that anemia was more prevalent in pregnant women age groups i.e. 25-29 years and 30+years i.e. 86.67% and 86.21% respectively. Anemia was 82.92% in women were belonging to Hindu and others religion and 82.24% in women having vegetarian diet. Maximum prevalence (83.93% of anemia was observed in women who were booked for antenatal care in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The prevalence of anemia is higher (>85% in women having parity two or more, but this association was not statistically significant. Very few (6.21% were found to be severely anemic as compared to women who were moderately anemic (43.19%. Multiple logistic regression analysis of these factors showed that possibility of anemia is less in women who belong to rural area and it is highly significant. Analysis further showed significant association between anemia and type of diet and other factors like women having parity 1 and 4. Conclusion: The prevalence of anemia amongst the pregnant participants was very high. The socio-demographic and obstetrics factors were found to be associated with anemia. To prevent

  11. Prevalence of pernicious anemia in patients with macrocytic anemia and low serum B12

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The current research evaluated the prevalence of pernicious anemia (PA) in patients with macrocytic anemia (high MCV) and low serum B12 in Riyadh. Methods: Blood testing was done in 77 patients (males: 45.5%, females: 54.5%) with macrocytic anemia; 84 patients; (males: 23.8%, females: 76.2%) with low serum B12 and 30 healthy subjects. Complete blood count, differential count, folic acid, vitamin B12, intrinsic factor, gastric parietal cell antibodies and holotranscobalamin II were ...

  12. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-09

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients.

  13. A plasma microRNA signature as a biomarker for acquired aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Feng, Xingmin; Desierto, Marie J; Fernandez Ibanez, Maria Del Pilar; Rios, Olga; Weinstein, Barbara; Scheinberg, Phillip; Townsley, Danielle M; Young, Neal S

    2017-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is an acquired bone marrow failure characterized by marrow hypoplasia, a paucity of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and pancytopenia of the peripheral blood, due to immune attack on the bone marrow. In aplastic anemia, a major challenge is to develop immune biomarkers to monitor the disease. We measured circulating microRNAs in plasma samples of aplastic anemia patients in order to identify disease-specific microRNAs. A total of 179 microRNAs were analyzed in 35 plasma samples from 13 aplastic anemia patients, 11 myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and 11 healthy controls using the Serum/Plasma Focus microRNA Polymerase Chain Reaction Panel. Subsequently, 19 microRNAs from the discovery set were investigated in the 108 plasma samples from 41 aplastic anemia patients, 24 myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and 43 healthy controls for validation, confirming that 3 microRNAs could be validated as dysregulated (>1.5-fold change) in aplastic anemia, compared to healthy controls. MiR-150-5p (induction of T-cell differentiation) and miR-146b-5p (involvement in the feedback regulation of innate immune response) were elevated in aplastic anemia plasma, whereas miR-1 was decreased in aplastic anemia. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, we developed a logistic model with these 3 microRNAs that enabled us to predict the probability of a diagnosis of aplastic anemia with an area under the curve of 0.86. Dysregulated expression levels of the microRNAs became normal after immunosuppressive therapy at 6 months. Specifically, miR-150-5p expression was significantly reduced after successful immunosuppressive therapy, but did not change in non-responders. We propose 3 novel plasma biomarkers in aplastic anemia, in which miR-150-5p, miR-146b-5p, and miR-1 can serve for diagnosis and miR-150-5p for disease monitoring. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers:00260689, 00217594, 00961064.

  14. Reduced Hsp70 and Glutamine in Pediatric Severe Malaria Anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempaiah, Prakasha; Dokladny, Karol; Karim, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Severe malarial anemia [SMA, hemoglobin (Hb) SMA was characterized...... in malaria pathogenesis is unexplored, we investigated Hsp70 and molecular pathways in children with SMA. Validation experiments revealed that leukocytic HSP70 transcripts were reduced in SMA relative to non-severe malaria, and that intraleukocytic hemozoin (PfHz) was associated with lower HSP70. HSP70...... was correlated with reticulocyte production and Hb. Since glutamine (Gln) up-regulates Hsp70, modulates NF-κB activation, and attenuates over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, circulating Gln was measured in children with malaria. Reduced Gln was associated with increased risk of developing SMA...

  15. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  16. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prevention website. www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm . Updated August 13, 2012. Accessed July 24, 2013. [3] Besarab A, Coyne DW. Iron supplementation to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. Nature Reviews ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in young children at the time of stroke and in age-matched healthy controls was compared in a case-control study conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

  18. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  19. Interaction between the helicases genetically linked to Fanconi anemia group J and Bloom's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Rawtani, Nina A; Wu, Yuliang

    2011-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are autosomal recessive disorders characterized by cancer and chromosomal instability. BS and FA group J arise from mutations in the BLM and FANCJ genes, respectively, which encode DNA helicases. In this work, FANCJ and BLM were found to interact...

  20. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schmidt, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases, characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur cluster (Fe-S) biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homologue located in the 5q...

  1. Elevated growth differentiation factor 15 expression in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamary, H.; Shalev, H.; Perez-Avraham, G.; Zoldan, M.; Levi, I.; Swinkels, D.W.; Tanno, T.; Miller, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) is a rare group of red blood cell disorders characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and increased iron absorption. To determine whether growth differentation factor 15 (GDF15) hyper-expression is associated with the ineffective erythropoiesis and iron-lo

  2. Methodologic approach for the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namaste, Sorrel Ml; Aaron, Grant J; Varadhan, Ravi; Peerson, Janet M; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2017-07-01

    Background: The Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project is a multiagency and multicountry collaboration that was formed to improve micronutrient assessment and to better characterize anemia.Objectives: The aims of the project were to 1) identify factors associated with inflammation, 2) assess the relations between inflammation, malaria infection, and biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and compare adjustment approaches, and 3) assess risk factors for anemia in preschool children (PSC) and women of reproductive age (WRA).Design: The BRINDA database inclusion criteria included surveys that 1) were conducted after 2004, 2) had target groups of PSC, WRA, or both, and 3) used a similar laboratory methodology for the measurement of ≥1 biomarker of iron [ferritin or soluble transferrin receptor or vitamin A status (retinol-binding protein or retinol)] and ≥1 biomarker of inflammation (α-1-acid glycoprotein or C-reactive protein). Individual data sets were standardized and merged into a BRINDA database comprising 16 nationally and regionally representative surveys from 14 countries. Collectively, the database covered all 6 WHO geographic regions and contained ∼30,000 PSC and 27,000 WRA. Data were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis.Results: The methods that were used to standardize the BRINDA database and the analytic approaches used to address the project's research questions are presented in this article. Three approaches to adjust micronutrient biomarker concentrations in the presence of inflammation and malaria infection are presented, along with an anemia conceptual framework that guided the BRINDA project's anemia analyses.Conclusions: The BRINDA project refines approaches to interpret iron and vitamin A biomarker values in settings of inflammation and malaria infection and suggests the use of a new regression approach as well as proposes an anemia framework to which real

  3. Pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Aessopos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rare anemias encompass a large and markedly heterogeneous group of nearly 90 different conditions, mostly congenital or genetically determined, that, according to the definition of the European Commission, have a global prevalence of less than 5 per 10,000 individuals. However, the geographical distribution of several of those anemias varies considerably and thus their local prevalence may be significantly higher in certain regions...

  4. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia.

  5. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body’s iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear ph...

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  7. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An Approach to Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rasul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia is a common reason for referral to a gastroenterologist. In adult men and postmenopausal women, gastrointestinal tract pathology is often the cause of iron-deficiency anemia, so patients are frequently referred for endoscopic evaluation. Endoscopy may be costly and at times difficult for the patient. Therefore, physicians need to know what lesions can be identified reliably and, more importantly, the importance of ruling out life-threatening conditions such as occult malignancy. Over the past decade, a number of prospective studies have been completed that examined the yield of endoscopy in the investigation of iron-deficiency anemia. The present article provides a broad overview of iron-deficiency anemia, with particular emphasis on hematological diagnosis, etiology, the use of endoscopy in identifying lesions and iron-repletion therapy. Other clinical scenarios, including assessment of patients on anti-inflammatory or anticoagulation therapy and patients with bleeding of obscure origin, are also addressed. The present article provides a diagnostic algorithm to iron-deficiency anemia, which describes a more systematic manner in which to approach iron-deficiency anemia.

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  10. Myocardial disease,anemia and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald S Silverberg; Dov Wexler; Adrian Iaina; Doron Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Many patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) fail to respond to maximal CHF therapy and progress to end stage CHF with many hospitalizations, very poor quality of life, end stage renal failure, or die of cardiovascular complications within a short time. One factor that has generally been ignored in many of these patients is the fact that they are often anemic.The anemia is due mainly to renal failure but also to the inhibitory effects of cytokines on the bone marrow. Anemia itself may further worsen the cardiac function and make the patients resistant to standard CHF therapies. Indeed anemia has been associated with increased severity of CHF, increased hospitalization, worse cardiac function and functional class, higher doses of diuretics,worsening of renal function and reduced quality of life. In both controlled and uncontrolled studies the correction of the anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) and oral or Ⅳ iron is associated with improvement in all these parameters. EPO itself may also play a direct role in improving the heart unrelated to the improvement of the anemia. Anemia may also play a role in the worsening of coronary heart disease even without CHF.

  11. A non-persistently transmitted-virus induces a pull-push strategy in its aphid vector to optimize transmission and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo-Sousa, Michele; Moreno, Aranzazu; Garzo, Elisa; Fereres, Alberto

    2014-06-24

    Plant viruses are known to modify the behaviour of their insect vectors, both directly and indirectly, generally adapting to each type of virus-vector relationship in a way that enhances transmission efficiency. Here, we report results of three different studies showing how a virus transmitted in a non-persistent (NP) manner (Cucumber mosaic virus; CMV, Cucumovirus) can induce changes in its host plant, cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv. Marumba) that modifies the behaviour of its aphid vector (Aphis gossypii Glover; Hemiptera: Aphididae) in a way that enhances virus transmission and spread non-viruliferous aphids changed their alighting, settling and probing behaviour activities over time when exposed to CMV-infected and mock-inoculated cucumber plants. Aphids exhibited no preference to migrate from CMV-infected to mock-inoculated plants at short time intervals (1, 10 and 30 min after release), but showed a clear shift in preference to migrate from CMV-infected to mock-inoculated plants 60 min after release. Our free-choice preference assays showed that A. gossypii alates preferred CMV-infected over mock-inoculated plants at an early stage (30 min), but this behaviour was reverted at a later stage and aphids preferred to settle and reproduce on mock-inoculated plants. The electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique revealed a sharp change in aphid probing behaviour over time when exposed to CMV-infected plants. At the beginning (first 15 min) aphid vectors dramatically increased the number of short superficial probes and intracellular punctures when exposed to CMV-infected plants. At a later stage (second hour of recording) aphids diminished their feeding on CMV-infected plants as indicated by much less time spent in phloem salivation and ingestion (E1 and E2). This particular probing behaviour including an early increase in the number of short superficial probes and intracellular punctures followed by a phloem feeding deterrence is known to enhance the transmission

  12. Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp: A rare cause of iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jin Tak; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Dong Pil; Choi, Seung Hwa; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Park, Jun Kyu; Jang, Sun Hee; Park, Yun Jung; Sung, Ye Gyu; Sul, Hae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp (IHP) is a rare gastric polyp characterized by the downward growth of hyperplastic mucosal components into the submucosal layer. Macroscopically, a gastric IHP resembles a subepithelial tumor (SET); as a result, accurately diagnosing gastric IHP is difficult. This issue has clinical significance because gastric IHP can be misdiagnosed as SET or as malignant neoplasm In addition, adenocarcinoma can accompany benign gastric IHP. Although in most cases, gastric IHPs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally, these polyps may cause anemia secondary to chronic bleeding. Here, we report one case involving gastric IHP accompanied by chronic iron deficiency anemia that was successfully managed using endoscopic submucosal dissection. PMID:27099452

  13. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  14. Cardio-renal-anemia syndrome: A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U H Okafor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKDs and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs present with various degree of anemia. Anemia has been associated with poor outcome in patients with CKD and CVD. CVD is the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. CKD causes anemia and CVD, and this rapidly deteriorates when anemia is not corrected. This triad of CVD, CKD, and anemia has been termed cardio-renal-anemia syndrome. The objec-tive of this study is to highlight the importance of cardio-renal-anemia syndrome, their relation-ship, and management. Three patients with various stages of CKD who presented with anemia and cardiovascular abnormalities are reported. The patients responded well to various interventional measures, with improvement in their clinical and laboratory parameters. Cardio-renal-anemia syndrome is an entity that should be identified. Early and appropriate intervention leads to better outcome.

  15. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  16. Infantile-onset thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome with SLC19A2 mutation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipoğlu, Nagehan; Karapinar, Tuba H; Demir, Korean; Aydin Köker, Sultan; Nalbantoğlu, Özlem; Ay, Yılmaz; Korkmaz, Hüseyin A; Oymak, Yeşim; Yıldız, Melek; Tunç, Selma; Hazan, Filiz; Vergin, Canan; Ozkan, Behzat

    2017-06-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA), also known as Rogers syndrome, is characterized by megaloblastic anemia, sensorineural hearing loss, and diabetes mellitus. Disturbances of the thiamine transport into the cells results from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. We report a girl which presented with sensorineural deafness treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, macrocytic anemia, treated with thiamine (100 mg/day). Hemoglobin level improved to 12.1 g/dl after dose of thiamine therapy increased up to 200 mg/day. Patients with TRMA must be evaluated for megaloblastic anemia, sensorineural hearing loss, and diabetes mellitus. They must be followed for response of hematologic and diabetic after thiamine therapy. It should be kept in mind that dose of thiamine therapy may be increased according to the clinical response. Genetic counseling should be given.

  17. Therapeutic effect of androgen therapy in a mouse model of aplastic anemia produced by short telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Christian; Huber, Nicolas; Beier, Fabian; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-10-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but life-threatening disorder characterized by cytopenia in at least two of the three blood lineages. A frequent feature of patients with aplastic anemia is that they have shorter telomeres than those of age-matched controls. Testosterone has been used for over half a century in the treatment of aplastic anemia. However, although remissions are frequent following hormone therapy, the molecular mechanism underlying the response to treatment has remained unknown. Here we explored the possibility that the recently described regulation of telomerase activity by sex hormones may be the mechanism responsible. To this end, we used a mouse model of aplastic anemia induced by short telomeres in the bone marrow compartment. We found that testosterone therapy results in telomerase up-regulation, improved blood counts, and a significant extension of life-span of these mice. Importantly, longitudinal follow-up studies revealed longer telomeres in peripheral blood in mice subjected to hormone treatment. Our results demonstrate that testosterone-mediated telomerase activation can attenuate or reverse aplastic anemia disease progression associated with the presence of short telomeres.

  18. Telomerase gene therapy rescues telomere length, bone marrow aplasia, and survival in mice with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Christian; Povedano, Juan Manuel; Serrano, Rosa; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Popkes, Miriam; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2016-04-07

    Aplastic anemia is a fatal bone marrow disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The disease can be hereditary or acquired and develops at any stage of life. A subgroup of the inherited form is caused by replicative impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to very short telomeres as a result of mutations in telomerase and other telomere components. Abnormal telomere shortening is also described in cases of acquired aplastic anemia, most likely secondary to increased turnover of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells. Here, we test the therapeutic efficacy of telomerase activation by using adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase Tert gene in 2 independent mouse models of aplastic anemia due to short telomeres (Trf1- and Tert-deficient mice). We find that a high dose of AAV9-Tert targets the bone marrow compartment, including hematopoietic stem cells. AAV9-Tert treatment after telomere attrition in bone marrow cells rescues aplastic anemia and mouse survival compared with mice treated with the empty vector. Improved survival is associated with a significant increase in telomere length in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, as well as improved blood counts. These findings indicate that telomerase gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aplastic anemia provoked or associated with short telomeres.

  19. Anemia Due to Inflammation in an Anti-Coagulated Patient with Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Liberale, Luca; Hussein El-Dib, Nadia; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Dallegri, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a rare disease characterized by vascular malformations mostly involving skin and gastrointestinal tract. This disease is often associated with sideropenic anemia and occult bleeding. We report the case of chronic severe anemia in an old patient under oral anticoagulation treatment for chronic atrial fibrillation. At admission, the patient also presented fever and increased laboratory parameters of systemic inflammation (ferritin 308 mcg/L, C-reactive protein (CRP) 244 mg/L). A small bluish-colored lesion over the left ear lobe was observed. Fecal occult blood test was negative as well as other signs of active bleeding. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed internal hemorrhoids and multiple teleangiectasias that were treated with argon plasma coagulation. Videocapsule endoscopy demonstrated multiple bluish nodular lesions in the small intestine. Unexpectedly, chronic severe anemia due to systemic inflammation was diagnosed in an old anticoagulated patient with BRNBS. The patient was treated with blood transfusions, hydration, antibiotic treatment, and long-acting octreotide acetate, without stopping warfarin. Fever and inflammation disappeared without any acute gastrointestinal bleeding and improvement of hemoglobin levels at three-month follow up. This is the oldest patient presenting with chronic anemia, in which BRNBS was also diagnosed. Surprisingly, anemia was mainly caused by systemic inflammation instead of chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. However, we would recommend investigating this disease also in old subjects with mild signs and symptoms.

  20. [Prevention of mediterranean anemia in Latium: Ida Bianco archives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchetti, Mario; Lupi, Ramona; Ottini, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Mediterranean anemia or beta-thalassemia is a hereditary syndrome characterized by a severe defect in haemoglobin production and an altered morphology of red blood cells. Homozygous condition for beta-thalassemia is characterized by short survival. Heterozygous condition is clinically found in adolescence and is characterized by a less aggressive phenotype. Ida Bianco, with her husband Ezio Silvestroni, has conducted a long struggle for beta-thalassemia prevention in Italy. They were the first to draw up an accurate map of the distribution of thalassemia in Italy and to conceive and implement a campaign against this genetic disease by the development of annual screening on at-school teenagers and pre-marriage prevention. Here we focused on the analysis of Ida Bianco's archives concerning screenings conducted on middle-schools in the Latium by the "Centro Studi della Microcitemia" of Rome from 1975 up to today. The results of the thirty-years prevention work in the Latium will be described.

  1. Progress towards Mechanism-Based Treatment for Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Sjögren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA is a congenital erythroid hypoplastic anemia, characterized by macrocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and severely reduced numbers of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. For more than fifty years, glucocorticoids have remained the main option for pharmacological treatment of DBA. While continuous glucocorticoid administration increases hemoglobin levels in a majority of DBA patients, it also causes severe side effects. There is therefore a great need for more specific and effective treatments to boost or replace the use of glucocorticoids. Over the years, many alternative therapies have been tried out, but most of them have shown to be ineffective. Here we review previous and current attempts to develop such alternative therapies for DBA. We further discuss how emerging knowledge regarding the pathological mechanism in DBA and the therapeutic mechanism of glucocorticoids treatment may reveal novel drug targets for DBA treatment.

  2. Alterações do perfil lipídico nas anemias Alterations of the lipid profile in anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio A. Naoum

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Inúmeros estudos abordam anualmente diversos aspectos relacionados à epidemiologia, etiologia, fisiopatologia, diagnóstico e tratamento dos diferentes tipos de anemias. Com objetivos variados e resultados que promovem um processo contínuo de melhor caracterização dos aspectos fisiopatológicos e terapêuticos relacionados às doenças da série vermelha, tais estudos têm contribuído para melhoria da qualidade de vida dos pacientes bem como para a elucidação do impacto que essas alterações hematológicas exercem sobre as outras faces do metabolismo corporal. Nesse contexto, o presente artigo tem por objetivo contemplar o perfil lipídico nas anemias, que ainda permanece pouco explorado e relatado na literatura científica. Será conferida maior ênfase às alterações do perfil lipídico associadas à anemia falciforme e talassemias, bem como às implicações que o estado hemolítico crônico inerente a essas condições exercem sobre o metabolismo do colesterol.Annually, innumerable studies approach varying aspects regarding the epidemiology, etiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and therapy of the various types of anemia. With variable objectives and results that promote a continuous process to better characterize the physiopathologic and therapeutic aspects related to red blood cell disorders, these studies are contributing to a better quality of life for the patients and to the elucidation of the impact that such hematological changes exert on the whole body metabolism. In this context, the aim of this article is to contemplate the lipid profile in anemic patients, which has not been well explored and reported in scientific literature. This article will focus on changes of the lipid profile in association with sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, as well as on the implication that the presenting chronic hemolytic state in these diseases exert on the cholesterol metabolism.

  3. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1–2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1–2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  4. Treatment of anemia in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Šebeštjen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available h e prevalence of anemia in patients with advanced heart failure is signii cant and is present in more than 50 % of this patient population. h e exact pathophysiologic mechanism of anemia in heart failure is still not known – it could be a direct consequence of the heart failure or it could be caused by some other disease in this population of polymorbid patients. h ere are several mechanisms through which heart failure could contribute to the development of anemia. h e most plausible among them are hemodilution, renal insui ciency, increased proinl ammatory cytokines, malnutrition, decreased erhythropoiesis in bone marrow and heart-failure medications (predominantly ACEI. Anemia is an independant risk factor for recurrent hospitalizations and increased mortality. Several small-scale studies demonstrated that the treatment of anemia in heart-failure patients decreased heart failure signs and symptoms in this patient population. Anemia in heart-failure patients can be treated with: blood transfusion, iron replacement therapy, or with synthetic analogues of erhythropoietin. Before the treatment with synthetic analogues of erhythropoietin. is started, other causes of anemia (gastrointestinal bleeding, malnutrition, renal insui ciency, hematological diseases and malignancies have to be excluded. Iron blood levels, ferritin, transferrin and TIBC also have to be determined. If body iron stores are depleted, iron has to be replaced intravenously, the target levels of ferritin being around 250 ng/mL. If anemia persists at er 2 weeks of iron replacement therapy, treatment with erhythropoietin is indicated. Currently 4 erhythropoietin analogues are available: epoetin α (Eprex®, epoetin β (NeoRecormon®, darbepoetin α (Aranesp® and metoksipolietilenglikol epoetin β (Mircera®. Anemia needs to be treated in all NYHA III and IV heart failure patients and hemoglobin levels below 110 g/dL. h e treatment of anemia with erhythropoietin and the adjustment

  5. Low plasma selenium concentrations, high plasma human immunodeficiency virus load and high interleukin-6 concentrations are risk factors associated with anemia in adults presenting with pulmonary tuberculosis in Zomba district, Malawi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettow, M.H.E. van; West, C.E.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Wieringa, F.; Semba, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although anemia is common among adults with pulmonary tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in sub-Saharan Africa, the factors contributing to its pathogenesis have not been well characterized. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the antioxidant micronutrient status, inter

  6. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  7. Aspectos moleculares da anemia falciforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galiza Neto Gentil Claudino de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente artigo abordaram-se vários aspectos relacionados à natureza molecular da anemia falciforme, desordem hematológica de caráter hereditário que acomete expressivo número de indivíduos em várias regiões do mundo. As pesquisas realizadas em torno desta patologia da hemácia, ao longo de quase um século, a partir de 1910, cooperaram para a criação de um novo e importante segmento da ciência, denominado biologia molecular. A descoberta dos polimorfismos da mutação (GAT->GTG no gene que codifica a cadeia beta da hemoglobina, originando diferentes haplótipos da doença, permitiu um melhor e mais amplo conhecimento em torno da heterogeneidade clínica nos pacientes falcêmicos. Analisando a hemoglobina na sua estrutura normal e mutante, sua produção e evolução, pode-se ter um entendimento mais completo da fisiopatologia desta doença e da sua complexidade clínica.

  8. Anemia in patients with diabetes mellitus

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    Dimković Nada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anemia is more common and pronounced in patients with diabetic, than in patients with non-diabetic renal disease. While several factors contribute to its pathogenesis, the failure of the kidney to increase erythropoietin in response to falling hemoglobin appears to be the dominant factor. The most frequent complications of anemia in diabetic patients include decreased quality of life and work capacity and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional multicenter study included a total of 539 patients with type I (~20% and type II diabetes (~80% classified into five stages according to the glomerular filtration rate. Results Diabetic nephropathy appears in stage I, and progresses in all patients to the stage V (p=0.045. The presence of anemia progressively increased from stage I to stage V (from 60% to 100%, p=0.008. Only 62% of patients with anemia were treated (mainly with iron and only 3.4% received erythropoietin treatment. Hypertension was present in 90% of patients in stage I and in 100% of patients in stage V nephropathy. The presence of heart failure increased from 0% (stage I to 51% (stage IV, p=0.03. Around 62% of patients were referred to a nephrologist, and according to the logistic regression model, renal failure and presence of anemia were significant predictors of patients' referral to nephrologist. Conclusion: In a primary care setting, anemia is a frequent finding, even in the very beginning of diabetic renal disease. Currently available guidelines for management of anemia are not followed; this may explain high percentage of patients with heart failure in pre-dialysis stage. Early referral to a nephrologist and regular follow-up by an endocrinologist and cardiologist are the best way for the prevention of diabetic complications and comorbidity.

  9. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P iron deficiency anemia group (165 ± 103 and 138 ± 39 U/L, respectively; P iron deficiency anemia and control groups (P > .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P deficiency anemia causes important reductions in paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  10. STUDY OF RBC HISTOGRAM IN VARIOUS ANEMIAS

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    Sandhya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years complete blood count (CBC by the automated hematology analyzers and microscopic examination of peripheral smear have complemented each other to provide a comprehensive report on patients’ blood sample. Numerous classifications for anemia have been established and the important parameters involved in the classifications are Hb, HCT, MCV, RDW, MCH, MCHC, reticulocytes and IRF. Many of these values are obtained only by automated heamatology analyzers. One histogram graph is worth 1000 numbers. A large collection of data, displayed as a visual image, can convey information with far more impact than the numbers alone. In hematology, these data take on several forms, one of which is the RBC histogram. Therefore a study of variation in RBC histograms in various anemias. Many times it is seen that histogram patterns show varying features when a simultaneous peripheral smear is reported. It is also seen that there are many limitations when manual peripheral smears reporting is done for example: peripheral smear reports are subjective, labor intensive and statistically unreliable. However microscopic peripheral smear examination also has their advantages. This study intends to create a guide to laboratory personnel and clinicians with sufficient accuracy to presumptively diagnose morphological classes of anemia directly from the automated hematology cell counter forms and correlate with morphological features of peripheral smear examination. OBJECTIVE: 1. The objective of the study is to know the utility and advantage of red cell histograms. 2. To study the automated histogram patterns along with morphological features noticed on peripheral smear examination. SOURCE OF DATA: All anemic patients from Central Diagnostic Laboratory of A.J.IMS. METHOD OF COLLECTION OF DATA: A total of about 100 patients were included in the study. Complete blood count including HB, TC, DC, Platelet count hematocrit value, RBC indices was obtained

  11. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesfin, Firehiwot; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included randomly selected primary school students. Hemoglobin concentration was measured using a Hemocue haemoglobinometer. A child was identified as anemic if the hemoglobin concentration was children (5-11 yrs) and anemia was 27.1% (95% CI: 24.98, 29.14): 13.8% had mild, 10.8% moderate, and 2.3% severe anemia. Children with in the age group of 5-9 years (APR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.044-1.124) were at higher risk for anemia. Paternal education (Illiterate, 1.109; 1.044-1.178) was positively associated with anemia. Children who had irregular legume consumption (APR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.022-1.118) were at higher risk for anemia. About a quarter of school children suffer from anemia and their educational potential is likely to be affected especially for those with moderate and severe anemia. Child age, irregular legume consumption, and low paternal schooling were associated with anemia. Intervention programmes aimed to reduce anemia among school children are crucial to ensure proper growth and development of children.

  12. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  13. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

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    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  14. Anemia among school children in eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Tamang, Man Kumar; Shakya, Prem Raj; Lamsal, Madhab; Baral, Nirmal

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is one of the most common public health problems in developing countries like Nepal. This study was done to find the prevalence of anemia among the children aged 4-13 years in eastern Nepal. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in four districts (Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam) of eastern Nepal to find the prevalence of anemia among the school children of eastern Nepal. Children aged 4-13 years were selected randomly from different schools of above districts and 618 venous blood samples were collected. Hemoglobin level was estimated by using cyanmethemoglobin method. The mean hemoglobin level was 12.2 ± 1.82 gm/dl. About 37.9% (n = 234) children were found anemic. Anemia prevalence was 42.4% (n = 78), 31.6% (n = 60), 45.3% (n = 48) and 34.8% (n = 48) among school children of Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam district, respectively. The study finds anemia as a significant health problem among the school children of eastern Nepal.

  15. Pulmonary functions in pregnancy complicated with anemia

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    Subhalaxmi Dash

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to find out the variation of pulmonary function parameters in different trimesters of pregnancy as well as variation according to severity of anemia in each trimester. Methods: The present case control study was carried out in the post-graduate department of obstetrics and gynecology, M.K.C.G. medical college and hospital, Berhampur, during the period from October 2012 to October 2013. This study entitled and ldquo;Pulmonary functions in pregnancy complicated with anemia and rdquo;, embodies the pulmonary functions of 60 anemic pregnant females (study group and 100 healthy pregnant females (control in different trimesters of pregnancy. The pulmonary function parameters, which were studied, are FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25-75%, PEFR and MVV in both the study and control group. Results: Comparing the variation with advancing gestation in study and control, it was seen that FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75% showed no significant alteration. With increasing severity of anemia compared to controls, FVC, FEV1, PEFR and MVV values reduce significantly. As FEF25-75% is not effort dependent, it shows no significant variation. Conclusion: Thus from this study, it can be concluded that moderate to severe anemia in pregnancy can adversely affect pulmonary functions. Hence nutritional anemia in early pregnancy should be provided with iron supplements in order to prevent adverse obstetric outcomes. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1431-1437

  16. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  17. Neonatal hemolytic anemia due to pyknocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Michel J; Martens, Daniëlle; van de Leur, Sjef J; van Wijk, Richard

    2014-12-01

    A newborn boy was referred to our hospital because of hemolytic anemia and severe hyperbilirubinemia. Extensive investigations aimed at determining the cause of hemolysis was initiated at the time of admission and 3 months after blood transfusion. Notably, no intrinsic erythrocyte abnormalities could be detected. The only possible cause explaining the progressive anemia and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia was the finding of pyknocytes, severely distorted erythrocytes, on the blood film at hospital admission. We propose a role for an increased free fraction of plasma unconjugated bilirubin in the formation of pyknocytes through bilirubin membrane toxicity with subsequent anemia and progressive hyperbilirubinemia. Pyknocytosis is a transitory erythrocyte-related condition which can result in severe anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Recognition of pyknocytes by microscopic analysis of a blood film is essential for a correct diagnosis. Treatment consists of correction of the anemia by top-up blood transfusion and light therapy to prevent toxic bilirubin buildup. High levels of free unconjugated bilirubin could be the underlying cause for the formation of pyknocytes.

  18. HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA IMUNNE-MEDIATED IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Castilho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the reduction in the number of red blood cells, caused by the immune system, the immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA is the most common disease among the hemolytic anemias and occurs more frequently in dogs (Nelson & Couto, 2010, wherein the most affected breeds are Cocker Spaniel, Poodle, Doberman and Collie (ETTINGER; FELDMAN 2004; THRALL et al 2007.. There is no pathognomonic sign for the diagnosis of the immune-mediated hemolytic anemia; however, laboratory findings show regenerative anemia, spherocytosis, positive results in Coombs' test and rarely, monocytes with hemosiderin or erythrocytes phagocytosis, but even with these findings, the primary and secondary IMHA can not be differentiate from each other. Differentiation can only be achieved when there is a deep investigation into the cause of the anemia. The IMHA therapeutics starts with the support treatment and follows with an immunosuppressive therapy. In relation to IMHA Mortality rates, the numbers range from 25% to 50% (Thrall, 2007, or above 70% (CARR; Panciera; Kidd, 2002.

  19. Craving and Chewing Ice: A Sign of Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... constantly craving and chewing ice a sign of anemia? Answers from Ruben A. Mesa, M.D. Possibly. Doctors use the term "pica" ... ice (pagophagia) is often associated with iron deficiency anemia, although the reason is unclear. At least one ...

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  2. Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

    2013-01-01

    .... Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the...

  3. Rates and determinants of peripartum and puerperal anemia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-11

    Dec 11, 2015 ... known about the prevalence of puerperal anemia.[6,9] A ... disorders, sickle cell anemia; comorbidities such as renal diseases ..... Richter C, Weitzel H, Huch A, Huch R. Failure to demonstrate postpartum functional iron ...

  4. Gene Therapy: a Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163849.html Gene Therapy: A Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia? But treatment has only been given to ... gene therapy to treat, or even potentially cure, sickle cell anemia. The findings come from just one patient, ...

  5. Clinical patterns and hematological spectrum in autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanamala Alwar

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion :AIHAs have a female predilection and commonly present with symptoms of anemia. AIHA secondary to other diseases (especially connective tissue disorders is more common. Primary AIHAs presented with severe anemia and laboratory evidence of marked hemolysis.

  6. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  7. Sobre o diagnostico histologico da anemia drepanocytica On the histologic diagnosis of the drepanocytic anemia

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    A. Penna de Azevedo

    1937-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho são descriptas as alterações anatomo-pathologicas do baço na anemia drepanocytica (anemia falciforme, Sicklecell anemia A observação refere-se a um menino de 12 annos de edade, de côr preta, o qual veio a fallecer em consequencia de processo de trombo-phlebite cerebral e de leptomeningite. A doença não foi reconhecida durante a vida e sómente pelo exame dos córtes histologicos do baço é que foi estabelecido o diagnostico de anemia drepanocytica, apresentando o baço as alterações peculiares á doença.In the present paper, the pathologico-anatomical changes of spleen in drepanocytic anemia are described (Sickle-cell anemia. In the case history, a 12 years old negro boy is concerned, who died in consequence of a cerebral thrombophlebitis process and leptomeningitis. The disease had not been recognized during life, and only on examination of the histological sections of the spleen the diagnosis of drepanocytic anemia was made, as this organ presented changes which are peculiar of the disease.

  8. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Firehiwot Mesfin; Yemane Berhane; Alemayehu Worku

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included ran...

  9. Immune Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient with Tuberculous Lymphadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunath Nandennavar; Sanju Cyriac; Krishnakumar,; T G Sagar

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in tuberculosis is usually anemia of chronic disease. Severe hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare in tuberculosis patients. We report a patient diagnosed with tubercular lymphadenitis complicated by Coomb′s positive hemolytic anemia. Patient responded well to antituberculous treatment. Hematological parameters improved after initiation of antituberculosis treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case from India of an adult patient with tuberculous lymphadenitis presen...

  10. Osteopetrosis: A rare cause of anemia - Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja S

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Normocytic anaemia is caused either by hypoproliferation of haemopoietic tissue or increased destruction of red cell. Osteopetrosis is a rare cause of anaemia. The leading clinical features are pallor, growth failure, hepatosplenomegaly.On hematological examination, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leucocytosis and myelophthisic anemia are commonly observed in this disease. We are highlighting osteopetrosis as a rare cause of anemia presenting to us for evaluation of anemia

  11. Fanconi anemia: in all its glory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Rai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting multiple body systems. The diagnosis is based on morphological abnormalities, hematological abnormalities (pancytopenia, macrocytic anemia and progressive bone marrow failure and genetic testing. However, genetic testing is complicated for FA because there are often many genes that are associated with its development, and large duplications, deletions or sequence variations are frequently observed in some of these genes. We report a patient with cytogenetically confirmed Fanconi anemia. Although morphological abnormalities were present from birth, diagnosis was suspected and made at 8 years of age when he presented to us. We report this case to create awareness among clinicians to use modern modalities of diagnosis for such cases in addition to the clinical assessment. This would further help these children reach their adulthood with good quality of life. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 998-1001

  12. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Presenting with Neonatal Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri; Woolfrey, Ann; Fleming, Mark; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  13. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bevacizumab did not reduce the risk of anemia associated with chemotherapy: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuo-Pei; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Bao-Li; Wei, Hai-Tao; Guo, Yong-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    The risk of anemia due to bevacizumab-based chemotherapy has not been well described, and new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been reported in recent years. We therefore conducted an up-to-date meta-analysis of RCTs to fully characterize the risk of anemia with bevacizumab. We carried out an electronic search of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to investigate the effects of RCTs on bevacizumab treatment on cancer patients up to October 2014, and random or fixed-effect meta-analytical models were used to assess the risk ratio (RR) of anemia due to the use of bevacizumab according to the heterogeneity of included studies. A total of 13,173 patients were included in this analysis from 18 RCTs. Among those patients receiving bevacizumab and chemotherapy, the incidences of all-grade and high-grade (grade 3 and above) anemia were 24% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13-41%) and 4.0% (95% CI 3.0-6.0%), respectively. Bevacizumab-containing therapy did not significantly decreased the risk of developing all-grade anemia (RR 0.872, 95% CI 0.739-1.029, P = 0.104) and high-grade anemia (RR 0.850, 95% CI 0.720-1.002, P = 0.053), which is not in agreement with previous meta-analysis. On subgroup analysis, we did not find significant risk differences based on bevacizumab dosage, tumor types, and concomitant drugs. When stratified by dose level, a significantly decreased risk of high-grade anemia with bevacizumab was obtained in a lower dose level (2.5 mg/kg/week, RR 0.773, 95% CI 0.611-0.978, P = 0.031) compared to control group. Bevacizumab did not significantly reduce the risk of anemia with chemotherapy in cancer patients.

  15. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Caroline, E-mail: cjung@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Treszl, András [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.

  16. Castleman-Kojima disease (TAFRO syndrome) : a novel systemic inflammatory disease characterized by a constellation of symptoms, namely, thrombocytopenia, ascites (anasarca), microcytic anemia, myelofibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly : a status report and summary of Fukushima (6 June, 2012) and Nagoya meetings (22 September, 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Takai, Kazue; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Naoya; Aoki, Sadao; Nakamura, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Masaki, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a unique clinicopathologic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) has been identified in Japan. This disease is characterized by a constellation of symptoms, as listed in the title, and multiple lymphadenopathy of mild degree with a pathologic diagnosis of atypical CD, often posing diagnostic and therapeutic problems for pathologists and hematologists, respectively. These findings suggest that this disease represents a novel clinical entity belonging to systemic inflammatory disorders with a background of immunological abnormality beyond the ordinal spectrum of MCD. To define this disorder more clearly, Japanese participants presented clinicopathologic data at the Fukushima and Nagoya meetings. Many of the patients presented by the participants were significantly accompanied by a combination of thrombocytopenia, ascites (anasarca), pleural effusions, microcytic anemia, fever, myelofibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly (TAFRO). Multiple lymphadenopathies were generally of mild degree, less than 1.5 cm in diameter, and consistently featured the histopathology of mixed- or less hyaline vascular-type CD. Autoantibodies were often detected. However, this disease did not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for well-known autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus. Castleman-Kojima disease and TAFRO syndrome (the favored clinical term) were proposed for this disease. The patients were sensitive to steroid and anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab), but some exhibited a deteriorated clinical course despite the treatment. The participants proposed a future nationwide survey and a Japanese consortium to facilitate further clinical and therapeutic studies of this novel disease. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 57-61, 2013].

  17. Hepatitis G Virus associated aplastic anemia: A recent case from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Abrar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aplastic anemia (AA is a serious and rare disorder characterized by a hypocellular bone marrow. Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia (HAAA is a variant of aplastic anemia in which aplastic anemia follows an acute attack of hepatitis. Several reports have noted an association between HGV and hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia besides other hepatitis causing viruses. Case presentation A female girl of age 11 year with a history of loose motion for one month, vomiting for last 15 days and poor oral intake for last few days is reported here. The physical examination presents fever, pallor whereas bleeding, hepatomegaly, Splenomegaly and bruising were absent, abdominal ultrasonography confirmed the absence of hepatomegaly, Splenomegaly and lymphodenopathy. The laboratory investigation parameters were: haemoglobin 6.2 g/L, total leucocytes count 1.51, neutrophils 0.47%, absolute reticulocyte count 0.5%, Monocytes 0.16%, red cell count 3.2 mil/uL, Picked cell volume (PCV 30.13%, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV 78 fL, Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH 26.3 pg. The liver enzymes were alanine aminotransferease (ALT 98 IU/L, aspartate aminotransferase (AST 114 IU/L. Serologic and molecular tests for hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, TTV, B19 were negative, whereas HGV RNA PCR test was found positive for hepatitis G virus. The bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy examination revealed hypo- cellularity, erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Conclusion HAAA is an uncommon but severe condition, which may occur following idiopathic cases of acute hepatitis. Our finding suggests the involvement of HGV in the development of aplastic anemia. In patients presenting with pancytopenia after an episode of acute hepatitis, the definitive diagnosis should be considered and confirmed by RT-PCR and if possible by bone marrow biopsy.

  18. Critical appraisal of discriminant formulas for distinguishing thalassemia from iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrechaga, Eloísa; Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2017-08-28

    Many discriminant formulas have been reported for distinguishing thalassemia trait from iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia. Independent verification of several discriminant formulas is deficient or even lacking. Therefore, we have retrospectively investigated discriminant formulas in a large, well-characterized patient population. The investigational population consisted of 2664 patients with microcytic anemia: 1259 had iron deficiency, 1196 'pure' thalassemia trait (877 β- and 319 α-thalassemia), 150 had thalassemia trait with concomitant iron deficiency or anemia of chronic disease, and 36 had other diseases. We investigated 25 discriminant formulas that only use hematologic parameters available on all analyzers; formulas with more advanced parameters were disregarded. The diagnostic performance was investigated using ROC analysis. The three best performing formulas were the Jayabose (RDW index), Janel (11T), and Green and King formulas. The differences between them were not statistically significant (p>0.333), but each of them had significantly higher area under the ROC curve than any other formula. The Jayabose and Green and King formulas had the highest sensitivities: 0.917 both. The highest specificity, 0.925, was found for the Janel formula, which is a composite score of 11 other formulas. All investigated formulas performed significantly better in distinguishing β- than α-thalassemia from iron deficiency. In our patient population, the Jayabose RDW index, the Green and King formula and the Janel 11T score are superior to all other formulas examined for distinguishing between thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia. We confirmed that all formulas perform much better in β- than in α-thalassemia carriers and also that they incorrectly classify approximately 30% of thalassemia carriers with concomitant other anemia as not having thalassemia. The diagnostic performance of even the best formulas is not high enough for making a final

  19. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sevda Korkmaz,1 Sevler Yildiz,1 Tuba Korucu,1 Burcu Gundogan,1 Zehra Emine Sunbul,1 Hasan Korkmaz,2 Murad Atmaca1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey Purpose: Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency.Methods: All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic.Findings: Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%, followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%. Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients.Results: The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population

  20. An Unusual Cause of Anemia: Cameron Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Aypak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cameron ulcer is a linear gatric ulser on the mucosal folds in patients with a large hiatal hernia. Cameron ulcer could be seen in 5% of patients with hiatal hernia who undergo upper gastrointestinal system (GIS endoscopy examination. The clinical relevance of Cameron ulcer is due to its potential complications such as GIS bleeding and anemia. In this report a case who was applied to Family Medicine outpatient clinics with the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and determined Cameron ulser at upper gastroentestinal endoscopy was presented. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 315-318

  1. Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

    2015-06-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA.

  2. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  3. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed

  4. Analysis of the G2/M Checkpoint in fanconi anemia cells via examinating chromosomal instability during G2-phase and mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Rica

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetical and phenotypical heterogenous disease, characterized through loss of one of the 15 identified genes of the Fanconi anemia pathway what causes congenital anomalies, bone marrow failure and solid tumors. In this work the G2/M checkpoint is analysed by use of the phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A to examine the chromosomal instability, which is typical for fanconi anemia cells, not only in mitoses but also in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. It is proved that the che...

  5. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  6. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia.

  7. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia.

  8. Iron-deficiency anemia caused by a proton pump inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Rintaro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Chonan, Akimichi

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was orally administered rabeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), for gastroesophageal reflux disease, after which he gradually developed iron-deficiency anemia. The anemia did not improve following the administration of ferrous fumarate, and endoscopic screening of the entire gastrointestinal tract, including the small intestine, did not reveal any findings indicating the cause of the anemia. The patient was then switched from rabeprazole to famotidine and the anemia was cured within three months. There is much debate as to whether the long-term use of PPIs causes iron-deficiency. However, this case strongly suggests that PPIs can induce iron-deficiency anemia.

  9. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  10. Refractory pancytopenia and megaloblastic anemia due to falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Maheshwari, Anu; Rath, Bimbadhar; Kumar, Praveen; Basu, Srikanta

    2011-08-01

    Anemia is a common complication in malarial infection. Direct destruction and ineffective erythropoesis does not adequately explain the cause of anemia in malaria. We present a case with refractory megaloblastic anemia with asymptomatic falciparum malaria. We hypothesize that promoter variants in the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene might be the cause of severe refractory megaloblastic anemia and pancytopenia in our patient. Malaria should always be kept in mind as a cause of anemia especially in endemic areas even if the child is asymptomatic or there is no demonstrable parasite on routine smear examination.

  11. The Senegal DNA haplotype is associated with the amelioration of anemia in African-American sickle cell anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, R L; Erlingsson, S; Fabry, M E; Croizat, H; Susuka, S M; Lachman, H; Sutton, M; Driscoll, C; Bouhassira, E; Billett, H H

    1991-03-15

    We have previously determined that in African sickle cell anemia (SS) patients three different beta-like globin gene cluster haplotypes are associated with different percent G gamma (one of the two types of non-alpha chains comprising hemoglobin F [HbF]), mean percent HbF, and percent dense cells. We report now that in adult New York SS patients, the presence of at least one chromosome with the Senegal haplotype is associated with higher Hb levels (1.2 g/dL higher) than is found for any other non-Senegal haplotype (P less than .004). The percent reticulocytes and the serum bilirubin levels were lower in these patients. When the effect of alpha-gene number was analyzed by examining a sample of SS patients with concomitant alpha-thalassemia, the same results were obtained. Because the HbF level is significantly higher among the Senegal haplotype carriers in this sample, the inhibitory effect on sickling of this Hb variant may be one of the reasons for the haplotype effect. We conclude that the Senegal beta-like globin gene cluster haplotype is associated with an amelioration of the hemolytic anemia that characterizes sickle cell disease.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia and Stroke

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA in young children at the time of stroke and in age-matched healthy controls was compared in a case-control study conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  14. [Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: a rare diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem-Jmili, N; Salem, N; Abdelkefi, S; Champ, B Grand; Bekri, S; Sboui, H; Mahjoub, T; Yacoub, S; Kortas, M

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia is a very rare disease recessive and X-linked that affect heme biosynthesis by deficit or decreased of delta aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) activity. We report a case of a six-month-old boy, admitted in the hospital for anemic syndrome. The hemogram showed anemia (hemoglobin: 4.5 g/dL), frankly hypochronic microcytic and a regenerated (mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration: 26 g/dL, mean cell volume: 53 fl, reticulocytes: 10 x 10(9)/L) with red cells morphologic disorders in smears (anisopoikylocytosis) without attack of the other lineages; white blood cells: 11 x 10(9)/L (neutrophils: 64% and lymphocytes: 35%); platelets: 350 x 10(9)/L. Examination of bone marrow showed an important erythroid hyperplasia (about 69%) with dyserythropoiesis. Perls stain revealed intense siderosis with 90% of ringed sideroblasts and a large number of siderocytes. Exploration of ALAS2 and ABC7 genes on the DNA of the infant was not found abnormalities. Treatment with pyridoxine corrects moderately the anemia. By the way, we proposed to remind that iron deficiency, inflammatory syndrome and thalassemia are the common microcytic anemia. However, it's mandatory to explore other causes if diagnosis is not solved.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  16. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: diagnosis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is diagnosed in the presence of anemia, usually macrocytic and of variable intensity, reticulocytosis, and a positive direct and/or indirect antiglobulin test, after ruling out other types of hemolytic anemia. A positive direct antiglobulin test alone is not sufficient to diagnose AIHA and may be positive in many patients without anemia or negative in some patients with AIHA. AIHA may be classified into two major categories according to the optimal temperature of antibody activity: warm-reacting autoantibodies (usually IgG) optimal around 37 degrees C and cold-reacting autoantibodies, optimal at 4 degrees C (usually IgM). This classification guides the selection of tests and treatment. AIHA is widely reported to be associated with a variety of other diseases, although these associations are often fortuitous. A minimal set of useful investigations is appropriate since AIHA may be secondary to viral infections, lymphoid malignancies, or autoimmune disorders such as lupus. Transfusion should remain rare in AHAI, but close contact with the transfusion service is necessary if it is to succeed. As for many autoimmune and/or systemic diseases, numerous types of treatment have been proposed but have not been validated in controlled multicenter studies. These are necessary to improve the management of these rare disorders.

  17. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  18. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

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    Abraham M Ittyachen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  19. Stroke Prevention Trials in Sickle Cell Anemia

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of an International Pediatric Stroke Study launched in 2002, the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP reports a reduction in the number of overt clinical strokes in children with critically high transcranial Doppler velocities (>200 cm/sec who were regularly transfused.

  20. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

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    Dong Gyu Jang, Yun Sung Jo, Sung Jong Lee, Gui Se Ra Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa.Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors.Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11 was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders.Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location.

  1. Managing anemia and blood loss in elective gynecologic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, W A; Meeks, G R

    2001-05-01

    Hysterectomy is the second-most-common surgical procedure among premenopausal women. The conditions that lead to the need for a hysterectomy often are accompanied by chronic blood loss that can lead to anemia. Moreover, hysterectomy and myomectomy may result in significant blood loss, which exacerbates the anemia. The presence of fatigue associated with anemia has a substantially negative impact on quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Options for alleviating perioperative anemia include minimizing surgical blood loss, blood transfusion, supplementation with hematinics, such as iron and folic acid, and treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin. Treating preoperative anemia is expected to help correct anemia prior to surgery and may have a positive impact on anemia-related symptoms and surgical outcomes.

  2. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location. PMID:21960747

  3. Prevalence of Anemia in Renal Transplant Patients in Turkey

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    Alparslan MERDİN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Post-transplant anemia is a common complication in renal allograft recipients. The most common causes are impaired graft function, immunosuppressive drugs, and infections. The aim of our study was to further investigate the prevalence of anemia before and after renal transplantation in renal allograft recipients in Turkey. MATERIAL and METHODS: We assessed 464 patients who received a kidney transplant between the years 2010 and 2012. The prevalence of anemia was evaluated before transplantation and at the 3 rd and at 6th months after transplantation. Our study is a retrospective study. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia at the 6th month after the transplant surgery was 28.8%. The percentage of the patients who did not have anemia prior to the transplant surgery, and who developed anemia after the transplantation was 24.4%. CONCLUSION: Our findings are similar to those found in the literature, and show that anemia is a very common entity after renal transplantation.

  4. Risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location.

  5. Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia due to High-grade non Hodgkin's B cell Lymphoma with Weak Response to Rituximab and Chemotherapy Regimens

    OpenAIRE

    Nazel Khosroshahi, Behzad; Jafari, Mohammad; Vazini, Hossein; Ahmadi, Alireza; Shams, Keivan; Kholoujini, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by shortening of red blood cell (RBC) survival and the presence of autoantibodies directed against autologous RBCs. Approximately 20% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases are associated with cold-reactive antibody. About half of patients with AIHA have no underlying associated disease; these cases are termed primary or idiopathic. Secondary cases are associated with underlying diseases or with certain drugs. We report herein a rare case of c...

  6. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  7. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B; Bishop, David F; Steensma, David P

    2015-04-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5'-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease.

  8. Riscos isolados e agregados de anemia em crianças frequentadoras de berçários de creches Isolated and combined risks for anemia in children attending the nurseries of daycare centers

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    Tulio Konstantyner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar e quantificar os fatores de risco isolados e agregados de anemia, proporcionando visão ampliada quanto à probabilidade da sua ocorrência. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 482 crianças, entre 4 e 29 meses de idade, frequentadoras de berçários de creches públicas e filantrópicas do município de São Paulo (SP, que participaram de dois inquéritos (2004 e 2007. Foram realizadas entrevistas com as mães, coleta de sangue por punção digital e antropometria. Considerou-se anemia, hemoglobina inferior a 11 g/dL. Foi ajustado modelo de regressão logística não-condicional para fatores de risco de anemia, considerando-se estatisticamente significantes associações com p OBJECTIVE: To identify and quantify isolated and combined risk factors for anemia, providing a comprehensive view of the likelihood of its occurrence. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 482 children aged 4 to 29 months attending the nurseries of philanthropic and public daycare centers in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, who participated in two surveys (2004 and 2007. Mothers were interviewed, blood was collected using digital puncture, and anthropometry was performed. Anemia was characterized by hemoglobin levels below 11 g/dL. Unconditional logistic regression was adjusted for anemia risk factors. A value of p < 0.05 indicated statistically significant associations. Post-test odds and likelihood ratios were calculated to define post-test probabilities. Epi-InfoTM 2000 and Stata 10.0 software packages were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Prevalence of anemia was 43.6% (95%CI 39.1-48.1. The final logistic model included five categorical variables: mother's age less than 28 years (OR = 1.50; p = 0.041, per capita income below half a minimum wage (OR = 1.56; p = 0.029, exclusive breastfeeding less than 2 months (OR = 1.71; p = 0.009, decrease in weight/age z score from birth to survey (OR = 1.47; p = 0.050, and age less than 17 months (OR = 2

  9. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

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    Charlotte Hodson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a genetic disorder characterized by the inability of patient cells to repair DNA damage caused by interstrand crosslinking agents. There are currently 14 verified FA genes, where mutation of any single gene prevents repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs. The accumulation of ICL damage results in genome instability and patients having a high predisposition to cancers. The key event of the FA pathway is dependent on an eight-protein core complex (CC, required for the monoubiquitination of each member of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Interestingly, the majority of patient mutations reside in the CC. The molecular mechanisms underlying the requirement for such a large complex to carry out a monoubiquitination event remain a mystery. This paper documents the extensive efforts of researchers so far to understand the molecular roles of the CC proteins with regard to its main function in the FA pathway, the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI.

  10. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  11. Characteristics of anemia in subclinical and overt hypothyroid patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Mehmet, Erdogan; Kösenli, Aybike; Aybike, Kosenli; Ganidagli, Sencer; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Mustafa, Kulaksizoglu

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones stimulate directly or indirectly growth of erythroid colonies through erythropoietin. Anemia is often the first sign of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can cause a wide variety of anemic disorders. Numerous mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of these anemias that can be microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic. We designed this study to investigate the anemia frequency and if present, etiology of anemia in hypothyroid patients. 100 patients with overt hypothyroid, 100 patients with subclinical hypothyroid, and 200 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Overt hypothyroidism diagnosis is done when elevated TSH and low levels of free T4 and/or free T3 have been observed. Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined as elevated serum TSH with normal free T(4) and free T(3) levels. Peripheral smears of the anemic patients were examined. Anemia prevalence was 43% in the overt hypothyroid group, 39% in the subclinical hypothyroid group, and 26% in the control group (p=0.0003 and p=0.021 respectively related to controls). Thus, the frequency of anemia in subclinical hypothyroidism is as high as that in overt hypothyroidism. There was no difference between the hypothyroid groups in terms of anemia. Vitamin B12, Fe, and folic acid were similar between these groups. According to our findings, anemia of chronic disease is the most common type of anemia in hypothyroid patients. Suspicion of hypothyroidism should be considered in anemias with uncertain etiology.

  12. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology.

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    Zachary Gowanlock

    Full Text Available In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of "anemia of unknown etiology" and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders.This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient's anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and Charlson Comorbidity Index.A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities.We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology.

  13. Acute liver failure in a pediatric patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I treated with deferasirox

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    Galina Ling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment.

  14. A case of iron deficiency anemia with co-existing Hb Fontainebleau.

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    Abhishek HL Purohit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hb Fontainebleaue is a rare alpha chain variant in the Indian population which generates an unknown peak on hemoglobin HPLC study and does cause diagnostic difficulty to those who are not acquainted with this entity. We present a case of Hb Fontainebleau, an eighteen year old patient who presented with symptoms related to anemia to our department and unknown peak observed in HPLC plots lead us to family study and molecular characterization for this case.

  15. Paravertebral Mass in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia: Computed Tomographic Findings

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    Juliana França Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extramedullary hematopoiesis is characterized by the presence of hematopoietic tissue outside of the bone marrow and is typically associated with chronic hemolytic anemias. Intrathoracic extramedullary hematopoiesis is a rare and usually asymptomatic condition. The authors report a case of a 57-year-old man with intrathoracic extramedullary hematopoiesis and hereditary spherocytosis. Clinical and laboratory evaluation, together with radiological findings, are described. The diagnosis of the disease was confirmed by tissue biopsy.

  16. Iron status of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus affected by channel catfish anemia and response to parenteral iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Originally reported in 1983, channel catfish anemia (CCA), also ‘white lip’ or ‘no blood,’ is a major idiopathic disease affecting commercial production in the Mississippi Delta region of the USA. Affected individuals are characterized by lethargy, anorexia, extreme pallor, and packed cell volumes o...

  17. Iron Deficiency Anemia Coexists with Cancer Related Anemia and Adversely Impacts Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Sawhney, Ritica; Varghese, Jeeva; Britto, Madonna; Shet, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related anemia (CRA) adversely affects patient Quality of Life (QoL) and overall survival. We prospectively studied the prevalence, etiology and the impact of anemia on QoL in 218 Indian cancer patients attending a tertiary referral hospital. The study used the sTfR/log Ferritin index to detect iron deficiency anemia and assessed patient QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) tool, standardized for language. Mean patient age was 51±13 years and 60% were female. The prevalence of cancer related anemia in this setting was 64% (n = 139). As expected, plasma ferritin did not differ significantly between anemic (n = 121) and non-anemic cancer patients (n = 73). In contrast, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in anemic cancer patients compared to non-anemic cancer patients (31 nmol/L vs. 24 nmol/L, p = 0.002). Among anemic cancer patients, using the sTfR/log Ferritin index, we found that 60% (n = 83) had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Interestingly, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in cancer patients with CRA+IDA (n = 83) compared with patients having CRA (n = 38) alone (39 nmol/L vs. 20 nmol/L, p<0.001). There was a significant linear correlation between Hb and QoL (Spearman ρ = 0.21; p = 0.001) and multivariate regression analysis revealed that every gram rise in Hb was accompanied by a 3.1 unit increase in the QoL score (95% CI = 0.19–5.33; p = 0.003). The high prevalence of anemia in cancer patients, a major portion of which is due to iron deficiency anemia, the availability of sensitive and specific biomarkers of iron status to detect IDA superimposed on anemia of inflammation, suggests an urgent need to diagnose and treat such patients. Despite the potential negative consequences of increasing metabolically available plasma iron in cancer, our clinical data suggest that detecting and treating IDA in anemic cancer patients will have important consequences to their QoL and overall survival. Clinical

  18. Severe fetal and neonatal hemolytic anemia due to a 198 kb deletion removing the complete β-globin gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhovsek, Madeleine; Shah, Nirmish R; Wilcox, Ibifiri; Koenig, Sara C; Barros, Tiago; Thornburg, Courtney D; Steinberg, Martin H; Luo, Hong-yuan; Chui, David H K

    2012-11-01

    Fetal and neonatal hemolytic anemia can be caused by (γδβ)(0)-thalassemia deletions of the β-globin gene cluster. Many of these deletions have not been well characterized, and diagnostic tests are not readily available, thus hampering carrier detection, family counseling, and antenatal diagnosis. We report and define a 198 kb deletion removing the entire β-globin gene cluster, which was found in members of a multigeneration family of Irish/Scottish descent. The proband had life-threatening fetal and neonatal hemolytic anemia which subsided by 1 year of age. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. CLINICO PATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF PATTERNS OF ANEMIA DURING PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamakuri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anemia is defined as haemoglobin level in the blood below the lower extreme of the normal range for the age and sex of the individual. According to WHO, in developing countries the prevalence of anemia among pregnant women averages 60%, ranging between 35 to 100% among different regions of the world. A hemoglobin concentration below 11.0g/dl or packed cell volume (PCV of less than 33.0% is regarded as anemia during pregnancy by the WHO. It occurs in 40 - 80% of the pregnant women. Iron and folic acid defici encies, malaria, intestinal parasitic infections and hemoglobinopathies are the principal causes of anemia in pregnancy. Predisposing factors include young age, grand multiparity, low socioeconomic status, illiteracy, ignorance and short intervals of pregn ancy. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To study various patterns of anemia in pregnant women having haemoglobin level < 11 gm%. 2. To determine the most common pattern of anemia in pregnancy based on red cell morphology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study is a prospe ctive study over a period of one year from September 2014 to August 2015 in the department of pathology, Andhra medical college, Visakhapatnam . The study was conducted on 120 pregnant women whose haemoglobin level is < 11 gm/dl. All the haemotological parameters & peripheral blood smear stained by Leishman’s stain were evaluated. Complete clinical & obstetric history was recorded. Socioeconomic status was also noted. RESULTS: Out of 120 cases of anemia, we found 47 patie nts (39.1% having dimorphic anemia, 36(30% – microcytic hypochromic anemia, 23(19.1% - normocytic hypochromic anemia, 11(9.16% - sickle cell anemia and 1(0.83% case of pancytopenia. Maximum cases were seen in the age group of 21 - 30 years. 52 cases (43. 3% were primigravida and remaining 68 cases (56.6% were gravida two to four. 20 cases (16.6% were diagnosed in the first trimester, 38 cases (31.6% in the second trimester & 62 cases (51.6s% in the

  20. [Sideroblastic anemia after prolonged linezolid therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Tsunayuki; Nakazato, Tomonori; Miura, Reiko; Kurai, Hanako; Yamashita, Daisuke; Sagara, Yuko; Ishida, Akaru

    2008-11-01

    Linezolid is an effective and well-tolerated antibiotic for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens. Some reports have shown that linezolid treatment for more than 2 weeks has been associated with reversible bone marrow suppression, especially thrombocytopenia and anemia. We encountered a case of sideroblastic anemia following prolonged linezolid therapy in a laryngeal cancer patient. He received linezolid therapy for multiple abscesses due to MRSA. Before treatment, the Hb level was 12.5 g/dl and then slowly decreased to 5.9 g/dl for 2 months during treatment. Ringed sideroblasts were detected in the bone marrow. Linezolid was discontinued and the Hb level was slowly increased. This case was considered to reflect a rare complication of linezolid therapy.

  1. Canine autoimmune hemolytic anemia: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swann JW

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available James W Swann,1 Barbara J Skelly2 1Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is one of the most common manifestations of canine immune-mediated disease, yet treatment regimens remain nonstandardized and, in some cases, controversial. The main reason for this, as for most diseases in veterinary medicine, is the lack of large-scale placebo-controlled trials so that the efficacy of one treatment over another can be established. Most of the evidence used for treatment comes from retrospective studies and from personal preference and experience, and because of this, treatment regimens tend to vary among institutions and individual clinicians. Management of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia includes immunosuppression, thromboprophylaxis, and supportive care measures to help prevent and treat concurrent conditions. Keywords: IMHA, canine immune-mediated disease, management regimens

  2. The Rural-Urban Difference in BMI and Anemia among Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yan; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Xia, Shi-Chang; Huang, Li-Chun; Fang, Yue-Qiang; Meng, Jia; Chen, Jiang; Zhang, He-Xiang; Zhou, Biao; Ding, Gang-Qiang

    2016-10-18

    There is growing concern over the double burden of over- and under-nutrition in individuals, especially in children and adolescents, which could dwarf their growth and development. This study aims to explore the rural-urban difference in BMI and anemia among children and adolescents. A stratified cluster sampling technique was employed. Dietary data were collected through interviews, and anthropometric values were measured. There were 1534 children and adolescents who participated in this study, including 775 male and 759 female participants. The prevalence of obesity among children living in a city, township and rural area was 10.3%, 8.5% and 5.5%, and that among adolescents was 1.4%, 2.9% and 2.8%. The prevalence of anemia among children and living in a city, township and rural area was 4.3%, 2.5% and 4.5%, while that among adolescents was 6.1%, 3.7% and 11.3%, respectively, with significant difference (χ² = 10.824, p = 0.004). The prevalence of being overweight, obesity and anemia was significant when comparing children with adolescents (χ² = 37.861, p = 0.000; χ² = 19.832, p = 0.000; χ² = 8.611, p = 0.003). Findings of this study indicate the double burden of malnutrition in Zhejiang province, characterized by a high prevalence of being overweight, obesity and anemia among children and a high prevalence of anemia among adolescents living in townships.

  3. Intestinal HIF2α promotes tissue-iron accumulation in disorders of iron overload with anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik R; Taylor, Matthew; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Martin, Angelical; Xie, Liwei; Bredell, Bryce X; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2013-12-10

    Several distinct congenital disorders can lead to tissue-iron overload with anemia. Repeated blood transfusions are one of the major causes of iron overload in several of these disorders, including β-thalassemia major, which is characterized by a defective β-globin gene. In this state, hyperabsorption of iron is also observed and can significantly contribute to iron overload. In β-thalassemia intermedia, which does not require blood transfusion for survival, hyperabsorption of iron is the leading cause of iron overload. The mechanism of increased iron absorption in β-thalassemia is unclear. We definitively demonstrate, using genetic mouse models, that intestinal hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) are activated early in the pathogenesis of β-thalassemia and are essential for excess iron accumulation in mouse models of β-thalassemia. Moreover, thalassemic mice with established iron overload had significant improvement in tissue-iron levels and anemia following disruption of intestinal HIF2α. In addition to repeated blood transfusions and increased iron absorption, chronic hemolysis is the major cause of tissue-iron accumulation in anemic iron-overload disorders caused by hemolytic anemia. Mechanistic studies in a hemolytic anemia mouse model demonstrated that loss of intestinal HIF2α/DMT1 signaling led to decreased tissue-iron accumulation in the liver without worsening the anemia. These data demonstrate that dysregulation of intestinal hypoxia and HIF2α signaling is critical for progressive iron overload in β-thalassemia and may be a novel therapeutic target in several anemic iron-overload disorders.

  4. Iron deficiency decreases hemolysis in sickle cell anemia Anemia ferropriva diminui hemólise em anemia falciforme

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    Oswaldo Castro

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A woman with homozygous sickle cell disease developed severe iron deficiency due to long-standing uterine bleeding. At this point, the serum lactic dehydrogenase level was normal and the reticulocyte count was only minimally elevated. This suggested that the low red cell hemoglobin concentration that resulted from iron deficiency also decreased Hb S polymerization and lowered the hemolytic rate. Iron replacement led first to a substantially improved hemoglobin concentration with only a minimal increase in the hemolytic rate and secondarily to a modest further improvement in the hemoglobin concentration and a marked increase in the hemolytic rate. The hematologic changes observed in this patient, and those in other iron deficient sickle cell patients reported in the literature, suggest that it may be appropriate to consider the induction of an intermediate iron deficient stage as experimental treatment in adult sickle cell patients.Uma mulher com anemia falciforme homozigose para a Hb S evoluiu com anemia ferropriva grave devido a sangramento uterino prolongado. A dosagem de dehidrogenase lática era normal e a contagem de reticulócitos estava levemente aumentada. Isto sugere que concentrações baixas de hemoglobina, que resulta de anemia ferropriva, também diminuem a polimeração de Hb S e reduz a taxa de hemólise. O complemento de ferro levou, primeiramente, a uma concentração substancialmente maior de hemoglobina com apenas um aumento mínimo na taxa hemolítica e subsequentemente a um aumento leve adicional na concentração da hemoglobina e um aumento notável na taxa hemolítica. As mudanças hematológicas observadas nesta paciente e aquelas em outras pacientes com anemia falciforme e também deficientes de ferro relatadas na literatura sugerem que pode ser interessante considerar a indução de deficiência de ferro como tratamento experimental em pacientes adultos com anemia falciforme.

  5. Clinical heterogeneity and chromosome breakage in Iranian patients suspicious of Fanconi anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Firoozabadi S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fanconi anemia (FA is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, skeletal anomalies, increased incidence of solid tumors and leukemia, and bone marrow failure (aplastic anemia. FA has been reported in all races and ethnic groups and affects men and women in an equal proportion. The frequency of FA has been estimated at approximately 1 per 360,000 live births. In some populations, including Ashkenazi Jews, Turks, Saudi Arabians and Iranians, this frequency appears to be higher, probably as a result of the founder effect and consanguineous marriage. Because of extensive genetic and clinical heterogeneity (the age of onset, clinical manifestations and survival, diagnosis of FA on the basis of clinical data alone is unreliable and its molecular diagnosis is difficult. The diagnosis of FA exploits the hypersensitivity of FA lymphocytes and fibroblasts to bifunctional alkylating agents such as mitomycin C (MMC, diepoxybutane (DEB and nitrogen mustard and differentiates it from idiopathic aplastic anemia. In this study, in addition to the patients' clinical profiles, a cytogenetic test using MMC was implemented for an accurate diagnosis of Fanconi anemia.Methods: In this study, the lymphocytes of 20 patients referred for FA, and those of their normal sex-matched controls, were treated with three different concentrations of mitomycin C (20, 30, 40 ng/ml. Slides were prepared and solid stained. In order to determine the number and kind of chromosome abnormalities, 50 metaphase spreads from each culture were analyzed. Clinical information was obtained from patient files.Results: Five patients manifested increased chromosome breakage with MMC, confirming the FA diagnosis. Two different concentrations of MMC (30, 40 ng/ml were most effective.Conclusion: The chromosomal breakage test is important for the accurate diagnosis of Fanconi anemia. DNA crosslinking agents used to treat idiopathic aplastic anemia may be

  6. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF INFECTIOUS SALMON ANEMIA (ISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Østergaard, Peter

    The first outbreak of ISA on the Faroe Islands was diagnosed in March 2000. Despite intensive surveillance, control and eradication of ISA, the disease has since spread to most of the Faroe Islands affecting about half of the 23 aquaculture farms. Sampling and laboratory diagnosis of ISA is perfo...... characterisation of the virus causing infectious salmon anemia in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L): an orthomyxo-like virus in a teleost....

  7. Pulmonary functions in pregnancy complicated with anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Subhalaxmi Dash; Sudhanshu Sekhara Nanda; Ashok Kumar Behera

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to find out the variation of pulmonary function parameters in different trimesters of pregnancy as well as variation according to severity of anemia in each trimester. Methods: The present case control study was carried out in the post-graduate department of obstetrics and gynecology, M.K.C.G. medical college and hospital, Berhampur, during the period from October 2012 to October 2013. This study entitled and ldquo;Pulmonary functions in pre...

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in infants and toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Keun Young; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ji-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background In Korea, the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among older infants and young children remains high. To detect IDA early and to reduce its adverse impact, we assessed the characteristics of infants and young children who had IDA or were at risk of developing IDA, or who exhibited characteristics associated with severe anemia. Methods Among the 1,782 IDA-affected children aged 6 months to 18 years who visited the hospital, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records and laboratory data of 1,330 IDA-affected children aged 6–23 months who were diagnosed between 1996 and 2013. We excluded patients with a C-reactive protein level ≥5 mg/dL. Results IDA was predominant in boys (2.14:1) during infancy and early childhood. The peak IDA incidence was noted among infants aged 9–12 months. Only 7% patients exhibited symptoms of IDA, while 23.6% patients with severe IDA demonstrated classic symptoms/signs of IDA. Low birth weight (LBW) infants with IDA demonstrated low adherence to iron supplementation. In a multivariate analysis, prolonged breastfeeding without iron fortification (odds ratio [OR] 5.70), and a LBW (OR 6.49) were identified as risk factors of severe anemia. Conclusion LBW infants need more attention in order to increase their adherence to iron supplementation. For the early detection of IDA, nutritional status of all infants, and iron batteries of high-risk infants (LBW infants, infants with prolonged breastfeeding, picky eaters, and/or infants with the presence of IDA symptoms) should be evaluated at their health screening visits. PMID:28090490

  9. Vitamin B12 dan Anemia Megaloblastik

    OpenAIRE

    Harjani, Harjani

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is an essential factor for DNA synthesis, and it is also needed in the reaction for the production of lipoprotein in myelin sheaths of the nerve system.It is known that vitamin B12 deficiency causes.among others disturbances in the nucleus formation and leads to megaloblastic anemias, with or without disturbances of the peripheral nerve system. Disturbances in the nucleus formation affect cells of tissues which have a relatively rapid turnover such as hemopoiedc precursors in the ...

  10. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) ... Anémie - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Anemia हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF ...

  11. Diaminodiphenyl Sulfone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia and Alopecia in a Case of Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Eijiro; Kayo, Sato-Jin; Nakano, Hajime; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sawamura, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease characterized by subepidermal blistering induced by IgA autoantibodies against several autoantigens in the basal membranous zone of the skin and mucosal tissue. Although diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), also known as dapsone, is generally recognized as the first-line therapy for LABD, DDS can induce several severe side effects. We present a Japanese case of LABD with DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and alopecia. In the present case, the DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and hair loss made the DDS monotherapy difficult. When DDS is used in LABD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), hemolytic anemia is concealed by IDA. It is thus necessary to carefully and frequently examine the laboratory data to find the signs of DDS-induced hemolytic anemia. Even though there is no literature on DDS-induced alopecia, alopecia was reported as one of the side effects of DDS in an FDA report, and, in our case, hair loss was improved after reducing its dosage. We have to recognize that alopecia is one of the side effects of DDS and that careful management is needed in order not to overlook the adverse side effects of DDS when treating LABD patients.

  12. Diaminodiphenyl Sulfone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia and Alopecia in a Case of Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Akasaka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease characterized by subepidermal blistering induced by IgA autoantibodies against several autoantigens in the basal membranous zone of the skin and mucosal tissue. Although diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS, also known as dapsone, is generally recognized as the first-line therapy for LABD, DDS can induce several severe side effects. We present a Japanese case of LABD with DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and alopecia. In the present case, the DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and hair loss made the DDS monotherapy difficult. When DDS is used in LABD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA, hemolytic anemia is concealed by IDA. It is thus necessary to carefully and frequently examine the laboratory data to find the signs of DDS-induced hemolytic anemia. Even though there is no literature on DDS-induced alopecia, alopecia was reported as one of the side effects of DDS in an FDA report, and, in our case, hair loss was improved after reducing its dosage. We have to recognize that alopecia is one of the side effects of DDS and that careful management is needed in order not to overlook the adverse side effects of DDS when treating LABD patients.

  13. Severe Respiratory Distress in a Child with Pulmonary Idiopathic Hemosiderosis Initially Presenting with Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potalivo, A.; Finessi, L.; Facondini, F.; Lupo, A.; Andreoni, C.; Giuliani, G.; Cavicchi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage in children but should be considered in children with anemia of unknown origin who develop respiratory complications. It is commonly characterized by the triad of recurrent hemoptysis, diffuse parenchymal infiltrates, and iron-deficiency anemia. Pathogenesis is unclear and diagnosis may be difficult along with a variable clinical course. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with a severe iron-deficiency anemia, but he later developed severe acute respiratory failure and hemoptysis requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The suspicion of IPH led to the use of immunosuppressive therapy with high dose of corticosteroids with rapid improvement in clinical condition and discharge from hospital. PMID:26634166

  14. Severe Respiratory Distress in a Child with Pulmonary Idiopathic Hemosiderosis Initially Presenting with Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Potalivo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage in children but should be considered in children with anemia of unknown origin who develop respiratory complications. It is commonly characterized by the triad of recurrent hemoptysis, diffuse parenchymal infiltrates, and iron-deficiency anemia. Pathogenesis is unclear and diagnosis may be difficult along with a variable clinical course. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with a severe iron-deficiency anemia, but he later developed severe acute respiratory failure and hemoptysis requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The suspicion of IPH led to the use of immunosuppressive therapy with high dose of corticosteroids with rapid improvement in clinical condition and discharge from hospital.

  15. Severe Respiratory Distress in a Child with Pulmonary Idiopathic Hemosiderosis Initially Presenting with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potalivo, A; Finessi, L; Facondini, F; Lupo, A; Andreoni, C; Giuliani, G; Cavicchi, C

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage in children but should be considered in children with anemia of unknown origin who develop respiratory complications. It is commonly characterized by the triad of recurrent hemoptysis, diffuse parenchymal infiltrates, and iron-deficiency anemia. Pathogenesis is unclear and diagnosis may be difficult along with a variable clinical course. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with a severe iron-deficiency anemia, but he later developed severe acute respiratory failure and hemoptysis requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The suspicion of IPH led to the use of immunosuppressive therapy with high dose of corticosteroids with rapid improvement in clinical condition and discharge from hospital.

  16. [Anemia and limping in a vegetarian adolescent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiron, R; Dabadie, A; Gandemer-Delignieres, V; Balençon, M; Legall, E; Roussey, M

    2001-01-01

    A vegan diet in the child and adolescent can induce severe bone sequelae by rickets and osteomalacia and megaloblastic anemia by cobalamin deficiency. A 15-year-old adolescent was hospitalized because of lameness and pallor. The lameness was explained by femoral epiphysiolysis caused by rickets with severe hypocalcemia. The pallor, jaundice and splenomegalia were due to cobalamin-deficiency megaloblastic anemia. A prolonged supplemental diet with calcium, vitamins D and B12 as well as orthopedic treatment stabilized the bone lesions. The megaloblastic anemia was cured by parenteral cobalamin. The adolescent and his brother were victims of a diet imposed by a cult and a lack of care due to their parents refusing that a vegan diet was the cause of the deficient pathology. Penal proceedings led to the incarceration of the parents and to the placement of the children. Deficiencies in calcium and vitamins D and B12 may be severe in a child's development with a vegan diet. This case report reveals the social and legal problems of an inappropriate diet in infancy imposed by parents who are followers of a fundamentalist church. Beyond the management of children in cults, health professionals have to prevent, screen and supplement the deficient diet.

  17. Unusual case of thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsa, Faten; Ben Amor, Saadia; Kaabachi, Naziha; Ben Lasouad, Mehdi; Boussetta, Khadija; Bousnina, Souad

    2009-02-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder defined by the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and neurosensoriel deafness, responding in varying degrees to thiamine treatment. Report an unusual case of this rare disorder We report the case of a four-year-old boy who presented unusual features of thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia. In addition to the typical triad of the syndrome, he presented leuconeutropenia, hepatosplenomegalia, cardiac abnormalities including absent P waves, mitral and tricuspid insufficiency, retinitis pigmentosa, nystagmus, developmental delay and a brain Magnetic resonance imaging ischemic lesion. Lactate levels in serum and the lactate/pyruvate ratio were increased. The mitochondrial mutation m.3243A > G located in MTTL1 gene encoding for transfer RNA leucine (tRNALeu(UUR)) was not found. Treatment with thiamine resulted in normalisation of the haemoglobin level, white cell count, and glucose and lactate levels. On three years follow up, the patient did not need insulinotherapy. These data sign the crucial role that thiamine plays for many cells and tissues and its importance in the activity of the respiratory chain.

  18. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Microcytic anemia factor no estudo das anemias microcíticas

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Joana; Barros, Clara

    2010-01-01

    A anemia ferropénica e a β-Talassemia menor são as anemias microcíticas mais frequentes na prática laboratorial, sendo o seu diagnóstico de extrema importância clínica. O objectivo deste estudo consistiu na análise do poder discriminatório do MAF na caracterização destas anamias. Foi desenvolvido um estudo caso-controlo, tendo sido analisados os hemogramas de um grupo de 47 indivíduos com anemia ferropénica e 37 com β-talassemia, e de um grupo controlo constituído por 58 indivíduos saudáve...

  20. Gambaran Radiografi Rongga Mulut Pada Penderita Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Amri

    2008-01-01

    Eritrosit yang tidak normal ( hemoglobin S ) tidak larut pada tegangan oksigen rendah yang akan mengakibatkan eritrosit berbentuk bulan sabit. Eritrosit berbentuk bulan sabit ini mengalami hemolisis sehingga menyebabkan anemia berat yang dikenal sebagia anemia sel sabit atau sickle cell anemia. Gen sel sabit adalah salah satu contoh dari suatu gen yang bertahan dan menyebar di dalam populasi yang berasal dari penduduk kulit hitam Afrika. Keuntungan dari gen ini adalah dapat memberikan res...