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Sample records for nonpeptidic protease inhibitor

  1. From nonpeptide toward noncarbon protease inhibitors: Metallacarboranes as specific and potent inhibitors of HIV protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cígler, Petr; Kožíšek, Milan; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Otwinowski, Z.; Pokorná, Jana; Plešek, Jaromír; Grüner, Bohumír; Marešová, Lucie; Máša, Martin; Sedláček, Juraj; Bodem, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.; Král, V.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 43 (2005), s. 15394-15399 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0508; GA MŠk(CZ) LC523 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : carboranes * HIV protease * X-ray structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 10.231, year: 2005

  2. Novel nonpeptidic inhibitors of peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekera, M M; Kendall, A; Shammas, R; Dermyer, M; Tomala, M; Shapiro, M A; Holler, T P

    2000-09-15

    A novel series of nonpeptidic compounds structurally related to the known anticholesteremic thyropropic acid were found to inhibit Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF), with IC50 values in the low-micromolar range. Kinetic analysis of [4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-3,5-diiodophenyl]acetic acid reveals competitive inhibition, with a Ki value of 0.66 +/- 0.007 microM. A structure-activity relationship study demonstrates that the carboxylate is required for activity, while the distal phenolic function can be methylated without significant effect. Either decreasing the number of iodine atoms on the molecule to one or increasing the number of iodine atoms to four results in the loss of an order of magnitude in potency. These compounds are the first nonpeptidic inhibitors disclosed and represent a template from which better inhibitors might be designed.

  3. Structure-guided Discovery of a Novel Non-peptide Inhibitor of Dengue Virus NS2B-NS3 Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linfeng; Basavannacharya, Chandrakala; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Shang, Luqing; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Yin, Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Dengue fever is a fast emerging epidemic-prone viral disease caused by dengue virus serotypes 1-4. NS2B-NS3 protease of dengue virus is a validated target to develop antiviral agents. A major limitation in developing dengue virus protease inhibitors has been the lack of or poor cellular activity. In this work, we extracted and refined a pharmacophore model based on X-ray crystal structure and predicted binding patterns, followed by a three-dimensional flexible database filtration. These output molecules were screened according to a docking-based protocol, leading to the discovery of a compound with novel scaffold and good cell-based bioactivity that has potential to be further optimized. The discovery of this novel scaffold by combination of in silico methods suggests that structure-guided drug discovery can lead to the development of potent dengue virus protease inhibitors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. A Modified P1 Moiety Enhances In Vitro Antiviral Activity against Various Multidrug-Resistant HIV-1 Variants and In Vitro Central Nervous System Penetration Properties of a Novel Nonpeptidic Protease Inhibitor, GRL-10413.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masayuki; Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro Miguel; Zhao, Rui; Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Das, Debananda; Bulut, Haydar; Delino, Nicole S; Sheri, Venkata Reddy; Ghosh, Arun K; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    We report here that GRL-10413, a novel nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) containing a modified P1 moiety and a hydroxyethylamine sulfonamide isostere, is highly active against laboratory HIV-1 strains and primary clinical isolates (50% effective concentration [EC 50 ] of 0.00035 to 0.0018 μM), with minimal cytotoxicity (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC 50 ] = 35.7 μM). GRL-10413 blocked the infectivity and replication of HIV-1 NL4-3 variants selected by use of atazanavir, lopinavir, or amprenavir (APV) at concentrations of up to 5 μM (EC 50 = 0.0021 to 0.0023 μM). GRL-10413 also maintained its strong antiviral activity against multidrug-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants isolated from patients who no longer responded to various antiviral regimens after long-term antiretroviral therapy. The development of resistance against GRL-10413 was significantly delayed compared to that against APV. In addition, GRL-10413 showed favorable central nervous system (CNS) penetration properties as assessed with an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) reconstruction system. Analysis of the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with GRL-10413 demonstrated that the modified P1 moiety of GRL-10413 has a greater hydrophobic surface area and makes greater van der Waals contacts with active site amino acids of protease than in the case of darunavir. Moreover, the chlorine substituent in the P1 moiety interacts with protease in two distinct configurations. The present data demonstrate that GRL-10413 has desirable features for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants, with favorable CNS penetration capability, and that the newly modified P1 moiety may confer desirable features in designing novel anti-HIV-1 PIs. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Investigations into Small Molecule Non-Peptidic Inhibitors of the Botulinum Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapková, Kateřina; Salzameda, Nicholas T.; Janda, Kim D.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), proteins secreted by the bacteria genus Clostridium, represent a group of extremely lethal toxins and a potential bioterrorism threat. As the current therapeutic options are of a predominantly prophylactic nature and cannot be used en masse, new strategies and ultimately potential treatments are desperately needed to combat any widespread release of these neurotoxins. In these regards, our laboratory has been working on developing new alternatives to treat botulinum intoxication through the development of inhibitors of the light chain proteases, the etiological agent which causes BoNT intoxication. Such a strategy has required the construction of two high throughput screens and small molecule non-peptidic libraries; excitingly, inhibitors of the BoNT/A protease have been uncovered and are being optimized via structure activity relationship studies. PMID:19327377

  6. HIV protease inhibitor resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.J.; Fun, Axel; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV protease is pivotal in the viral replication cycle and directs the formation of mature infectious virus particles. The development of highly specific HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), based on thorough understanding of the structure of HIV protease and its substrate, serves as a prime example of

  7. Proteases and protease inhibitors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    The second conference on 'Proteases and protease inhibitors in cancer' was organized by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and Acta Pathologica Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS). To understand the role of proteinases and to develop relevant synthetic inhibitors to

  8. A Modified P1 Moiety Enhances in vitro Antiviral Activity against Various Multi-Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Variants and in vitro CNS Penetration Properties of a Novel Nonpeptidic Protease Inhibitor, GRL-10413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Masayuki; Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro Miguel; Zhao, Rui; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Das, Debananda; Bulut, Haydar; Delino, Nicole S.; Sheri, Venkata Reddy; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki (Kumamoto); (NIH); (Purdue)

    2016-09-12

    We here report that GRL-10413, a novel non-peptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) containing a modified P1 moiety and a sulfonamide isostere, is highly active against laboratory HIV-1 strains and primary clinical isolates (EC50: 0.00035 - 0.0018 μM) with minimal cytotoxicity (CC50: 35.7 μM). GRL-10413 blocked the infectivity and replication of HIV-1NL4-3variants selected by up to 5 μM concentrations of atazanavir, lopinavir, or amprenavir (EC50: 0.0021 - 0.0023 μM). GRL-10413 also maintained its strong antiviral activity against multi-drug-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants isolated from patients, who no longer responded to various antiviral regimens after long-term antiretroviral therapy. The development of resistance against GRL-10413 was significantly delayed compared to that of APV. In addition, GRL-10413 showed a favorable central nervous system (CNS) penetration property as assessed with anin vitroblood brain barrier (BBB) reconstruction system. Analysis of the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with GRL-10413 demonstrated that the modified P1 moiety of GRL-10413 has a greater hydrophobic surface area and makes greater van der Waals contacts with active-site amino acids of protease than in the case of darunavir. Moreover, the chlorine substituent in the P1 moiety interacts with protease in two distinct configurations. The present data demonstrate that GRL-10413 has desirable features for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multi-drug-resistant HIV-1 variants with favorable CNS-penetration capability and that the newly modified P1-moiety may confer desirable features in designing novel anti-HIV-1 PIs.

  9. Contemporary protease inhibitors and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the evidence linking use of HIV protease inhibitors with excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV+ populations. RECENT FINDINGS: For the two contemporary most frequently used protease inhibitors, darunavir and atazanavir [both pharmacologically boosted...

  10. Structure-based optimization of non-peptidic Cathepsin D inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grädler, Ulrich; Czodrowski, Paul; Tsaklakidis, Christos; Klein, Markus; Werkmann, Daniela; Lindemann, Sven; Maskos, Klaus; Leuthner, Birgitta

    2014-09-01

    We discovered a novel series of non-peptidic acylguanidine inhibitors of Cathepsin D as target for osteoarthritis. The initial HTS-hits were optimized by structure-based design using CatD X-ray structures resulting in single digit nanomolar potency in the biochemical CatD assay. However, the most potent analogues showed only micromolar activities in an ex vivo glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release assay in bovine cartilage together with low cellular permeability and suboptimal microsomal stability. This new scaffold can serve as a starting point for further optimization towards in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  12. Structure-based drug design: the discovery of novel nonpeptide orally active inhibitors of human renin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahuel, J; Rasetti, V; Maibaum, J; Rüeger, H; Göschke, R; Cohen, N C; Stutz, S; Cumin, F; Fuhrer, W; Wood, J M; Grütter, M G

    2000-07-01

    The aspartic proteinase renin plays an important physiological role in the regulation of blood pressure. It catalyses the first step in the conversion of angiotensinogen to the hormone angiotensin II. In the past, potent peptide inhibitors of renin have been developed, but none of these compounds has made it to the end of clinical trials. Our primary aim was to develop novel nonpeptide inhibitors. Based on the available structural information concerning renin-substrate interactions, we synthesized inhibitors in which the peptide portion was replaced by lipophilic moieties that interact with the large hydrophobic S1/S3-binding pocket in renin. Crystal structure analysis of renin-inhibitor complexes combined with computational methods were employed in the medicinal-chemistry optimisation process. Structure analysis revealed that the newly designed inhibitors bind as predicted to the S1/S3 pocket. In addition, however, these compounds interact with a hitherto unrecognised large, distinct, sub-pocket of the enzyme that extends from the S3-binding site towards the hydrophobic core of the enzyme. Binding to this S3(sp) sub-pocket was essential for high binding affinity. This unprecedented binding mode guided the drug-design process in which the mostly hydrophobic interactions within subsite S3(sp) were optimised. Our design approach led to compounds with high in vitro affinity and specificity for renin, favourable bioavailability and excellent oral efficacy in lowering blood pressure in primates. These renin inhibitors are therefore potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Co-evolution of insect proteases and plant protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Maarten A; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-08-01

    Plants are at the basis of the food chain, but there is no such thing as a "free lunch" for herbivores. To promote reproductive success, plants evolved multi-layered defensive tactics to avoid or discourage herbivory. To the detriment of plants, herbivores, in turn, evolved intricate strategies to find, eat, and successfully digest essential plant parts to raise their own offspring. In this battle the digestive tract is the arena determining final victory or defeat as measured by growth or starvation of the herbivore. Earlier, specific molecular opponents were identified as proteases and inhibitors: digestive proteases of herbivores evolved structural motifs to occlude plant protease inhibitors, or alternatively, the insects evolved proteases capable of specifically degrading the host plant inhibitors. In response plant inhibitors evolved hyper-variable and novel protein folds to remain active against potential herbivores. At the level of protease regulation in herbivorous insects, it was shown that inhibition-insensitive digestive proteases are up-regulated when sensitive proteases are inhibited. The way this regulation operates in mammals is known as negative feedback by gut-luminal factors, so-called 'monitor peptides' that are sensitive to the concentration of active enzymes. We propose that regulation of gut enzymes by endogenous luminal factors has been an open invitation to plants to "hijack" this regulation by evolving receptor antagonists, although yet these plant factors have not been identified. In future research the question of the co-evolution of insect proteases and plant inhibitors should, therefore, be better approached from a systems level keeping in mind that evolution is fundamentally opportunistic and that the plant's fitness is primarily improved by lowering the availability of essential amino acids to an herbivore by any available mechanism.

  14. Natural inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdolen, U.; Krol, J.; Sato, S.; Schmitt, M.; Magdolen, V.; Krueger, A.; Mueller, M.M.; Sperl, S.

    2002-01-01

    The turnover and remodelling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of many normal biological processes including development, morphogenesis, and wound healing. ECM turnover also occurs in severe pathological situations like artherosclerosis, fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. The major proteases involved in this turnover are serine proteases (especially the urokinase-type plasminogen activator/plasmin system), matrix metalloproteases (a family of about 20 zinc-dependent endopeptidases including collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, and membrane-type metalloproteases), and cysteine proteases. In vivo, the activity of these proteases is tightly regulated in the extracellular space by zymogen activation and/or controlled inhibition. In the present review, we give an overview on the structure and biochemical properties of important tumor-associated protease inhibitors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, -2, -3, and -4), and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C. Interestingly, some of these inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases display multiple functions which rather promote than inhibit tumor progression, when the presence of inhibitors in the tumor tissue is not balanced. (author)

  15. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, L.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 3 (2009), s. 1209-1239 ISSN 1999-4915 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX00320901 Program:IA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV protease * protease inhibitor * HAART Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  16. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... of novel peptide-based protease inhibitors, efforts were made towards improved methods for peptide synthesis. The coupling of Fmoc-amino acids onto N-methylated peptidyl resins was investigated. These couplings can be low yielding and the effect of the use of microwave heating combined with the coupling...

  17. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  18. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... specific inhibitor of uPA. With the aim of creating better inhibitors based on the upain-2 scaffold, the following three strategies were explored: First, it was attempted to predefine the structure of upain-2 in solution by incorporating turn-inducing sequences and peptidomimetics. Additionally...... bond across the ring. The second bridge was made by a disulfide bridge, amide bond formation or via ring-closing metathesis. A, with upain-2 equipotent, bicyclic inhibitor was obtained and its binding to uPA was studied by ITC, NMR and X-ray. The knowledge of how selective inhibitors bind uPA has been...

  19. Protease inhibitor mediated resistance to insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the defensive molecules that plants produce in order to defend themselves against herbivores. A major aim of this thesis is to develop novel insect resistance traits usingheterologous, non-plant PIs. Prerequisite for the success of the

  20. Protease inhibitor (Pi) locus, fertility and twinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; Frants, R.R.; Bank, R.A.; Martin, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    In a sample of 160 Dutch twin pairs and their parents, we found that mothers of dizygotic twins had frequencies of the S and Z alleles at the protease inhibitor (Pi) locus that were 3 times higher than a control sample. Mothers of identical twins also had a higher frequency of S than controls. The S

  1. Effect of protease inhibitors on exflagellation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Ingrid; Bosse, Rebecca; Schirmeister, Tanja; Pradel, Gabriele

    2008-04-01

    Enzymes involved in sexual differentiation and fertilization of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represent potential targets for transmission blocking strategies. Parasite proteases are putatively involved in several steps during fertilization, but the types of proteases, their targets and modes of action remain hitherto unknown. We investigated the involvement of proteases in gametogenesis via exflagellation and immunofluorescence assays, using a variety of commercially available as well as newly designed protease inhibitors. The assays revealed a blockade of microgamete formation by the cysteine/serine protease inhibitors TLCK and TPCK. The serine protease inhibitor PMSF, the falcipain-targeting inhibitor RV112D, and the aspartic protease inhibitor EPNP also significantly decreased formation of microgametes. The metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline, on the other hand, inhibited exflagellation by interfering with microgamete motility. Furthermore, EPNP reduced the activation of male and female gametocytes. Our data point to a major involvement of serine proteases and a non-thermolysin-like zinc metalloprotease in microgametocyte exflagellation.

  2. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic applications of snake venom protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-06-01

    Protease inhibitors are important constituents of snake venom and play important roles in the pathophysiology of snakebite. Recently, research on snake venom protease inhibitors has provided valuable information to decipher the molecular details of various biological processes and offer insight for the development of some therapeutically important molecules from snake venom. The process of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, in addition to affecting platelet function, are well known as the major targets of several snake venom protease inhibitors. This review summarizes the structure-functional aspects of snake venom protease inhibitors that have been described to date. Because diverse biological functions have been demonstrated by protease inhibitors, a comparative overview of their pharmacological and pathophysiological properties is also highlighted. In addition, since most snake venom protease inhibitors are non-toxic on their own, this review evaluates the different roles of individual protease inhibitors that could lead to the identification of drug candidates and diagnostic molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selection of Protease Inhibitors to Prevent or Attenuate Inflammatory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    temperature. elevated body temperature, pH, oxygen tension): * number of chemical factors (fatty acids. lactid acid, pepsin, lysozyme, antimicrobial ...inhibit toxic serine proteases produced by the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. The known spectrum of protease inhibitors from invertebrates includes also

  4. A Multifunctional Protease Inhibitor To Regulate Endolysosomal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin–pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses. PMID:21910425

  5. Lopinavir-Ritonavir: a new protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, E M; Graham, K K

    2001-11-01

    Lopinavir is a new protease inhibitor that is structurally related to ritonavir. It recently was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a coformulation with ritonavir under the brand name Kaletra. Ritonavir substantially increases lopinavir drug exposure by inhibiting cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4. Based on limited data, lopinavir-ritonavir demonstrates safety and efficacy in both antiretroviral-naive and protease inhibitor-experienced patients. It has the ability to durably suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA for up to 2 years in antiretroviral-naïve patients. Compared with nelfinavir, it had superior virologic control at 48 weeks in antiretroviral-naïve patients. Its side effects include diarrhea, abnormal stools, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and asthenia. A number of patients experienced grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities in liver function tests, cholesterol, and triglycerides while receiving this drug combination. The exact resistance patterns of lopinavir-ritonavir are unknown, but the Department of Health and Human Services strongly recommends it for the initial treatment of HIV-infected adults and adolescents.

  6. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Hoffmann, Marcin [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Grotthuss, Marcin von [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Knizewski, Lukasz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Rychewski, Leszek [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Eitner, Krystian [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Ginalski, Krzysztof [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation.

  7. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors.

  8. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  9. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme-inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases.

  10. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  11. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh-Stenta X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoying Koh-Stenta,1 Joma Joy,1 Si Fang Wang,1 Perlyn Zekui Kwek,1 John Liang Kuan Wee,1 Kah Fei Wan,2 Shovanlal Gayen,1 Angela Shuyi Chen,1 CongBao Kang,1 May Ann Lee,1 Anders Poulsen,1 Subhash G Vasudevan,3 Jeffrey Hill,1 Kassoum Nacro11Experimental Therapeutics Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR, Singapore; 2Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, Singapore; 3Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SingaporeAbstract: Dengue virus (DENV protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described.Keywords: flavivirus protease, small molecule optimization, covalent inhibitor, active site binding, pyrazole ester derivatives

  12. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries......, have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...

  13. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (serpins are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  14. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Fei, Rui; Xue, Baigong; Yu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zuoming; Zhong, Sheng; Gao, Yuanqi; Zhou, Xiaoli

    2017-01-07

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum , was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI) of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  15. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan Budatha

    Full Text Available Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/- develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/- mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa. V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/- mice. PRSS3 was (a localized in epithelial secretions, (b detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/- and wild type mice, and (c cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/- epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice.

  16. Boosted protease inhibitors and the electrocardiographic measures of QT and PR durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Elsayed Z; Lundgren, Jens D; Roediger, Mollie P

    2011-01-01

    There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown.......There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown....

  17. Determining and overcoming resistance to HIV protease inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prejdová, Jana; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2004), s. 137-152 ISSN 1568-0053 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. Design of HIV protease inhibitors based on inorganic polyhedral metallacarboranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Pavlína; Pokorná, Jana; Brynda, Jiří; Kožíšek, Milan; Cígler, Petr; Lepšík, Martin; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Řezáč, Jan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Sieglová, Irena; Plešek, Jaromír; Šícha, Václav; Grüner, Bohumír; Oberwinkler, H.; Sedláček, Juraj; Kräusslich, H. G.; Hobza, Pavel; Král, V.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 22 (2009), s. 7132-7141 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00320901; GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk LC523 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 37693 - HIV PI RESISTANCE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors * aspartic proteases * viral resistance * cobalt bis(dicarbollide) * crystal structure Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.802, year: 2009

  19. The effect of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Saleem, Sahreena; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of Acanthamoeba infections remains problematic, suggesting that new targets and/or chemotherapeutic agents are needed. Bioassay-guided screening of drugs that are clinically-approved for non-communicable diseases against opportunistic eukaryotic pathogens is a viable strategy. With known targets and mode of action, such drugs can advance to clinical trials at a faster pace. Recently Bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor) has been approved by FDA in the treatment of multiple myeloma. As proteasomal pathways are well known regulators of a variety of eukaryotic cellular functions, the overall aim of the present study was to study the effects of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype, in vitro. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of proteasome had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Proteasome inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), but not viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, proteasome inhibitors affected encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form, as well as excystation, as determined by cyst transformation into the trophozoite form. The ability of proteasome inhibitor to block Acanthamoeba differentiation is significant, as it presents a major challenge in the successful treatment of Acanthamoeba infection. As these drugs are used clinically against non-communicable diseases, the findings reported here have the potential to be tested in a clinical setting against amoebic infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rhomboid protease inhibitors: Emerging tools and future therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stříšovský, Kvido

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 60, Dec (2016), s. 52-62 ISSN 1084-9521 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 304154 - Rhomboid substrates Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : rhomboid protease * inhibitor * disease * mechanism * substrate specificity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.614, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1084952116302592

  1. Protease-Mediated Maturation of HIV: Inhibitors of Protease and the Maturation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Adamson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease-mediated maturation of HIV-1 virus particles is essential for virus infectivity. Maturation occurs concomitant with immature virus particle release and is mediated by the viral protease (PR, which sequentially cleaves the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into mature protein domains. Maturation triggers a second assembly event that generates a condensed conical capsid core. The capsid core organizes the viral RNA genome and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication in the next round of infection. The fundamental role of proteolytic maturation in the generation of mature infectious particles has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Development of small molecules that target the PR active site has been highly successful and nine protease inhibitors (PIs have been approved for clinical use. This paper provides an overview of their development and clinical use together with a discussion of problems associated with drug resistance. The second-half of the paper discusses a novel class of antiretroviral drug termed maturation inhibitors, which target cleavage sites in Gag not PR itself. The paper focuses on bevirimat (BVM the first-in-class maturation inhibitor: its mechanism of action and the implications of naturally occurring polymorphisms that confer reduced susceptibility to BVM in phase II clinical trials.

  2. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ferguson, A.G.; Decker, R.S.; Lesch, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  3. Discovery of novel phosphonate derivatives as hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, X Christopher; Pyun, Hyung-Jung; Chaudhary, Kleem; Wang, Jianying; Doerffler, Edward; Fleury, Melissa; McMurtrie, Darren; Chen, Xiaowu; Delaney, William E; Kim, Choung U

    2009-07-01

    A novel class of phosphonate derivatives was designed to mimic the interaction of product-like carboxylate based inhibitors of HCV NS3 protease. A phosphonic acid (compound 2) was demonstrated to be a potent HCV NS3 protease inhibitor, and a potential candidate for treating HCV infection. The syntheses and preliminary biological evaluation of this phosphonate class of inhibitor are described.

  4. Construction of dengue virus protease expression plasmid and in vitro protease assay for screening antiviral inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huiguo; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne human pathogens of global significance causing ~390 million cases annually worldwide. The virus infections cause in general a self-limiting disease, known as dengue fever, but occasionally also more severe forms, especially during secondary infections, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome causing ~25,000 deaths annually. The DENV genome contains a single-strand positive sense RNA, approximately 11 kb in length. The 5'-end has a type I cap structure. The 3'-end has no poly(A) tail. The viral RNA has a single long open reading frame that is translated by the host translational machinery to yield a polyprotein precursor. Processing of the polyprotein precursor occurs co-translationally by cellular proteases and posttranslationally by the viral serine protease in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to yield three structural proteins (capsid (C), precursor membrane (prM), and envelope (E) and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5). The active viral protease consists of both NS2B, an integral membrane protein in the ER, and the N-terminal part of NS3 (180 amino acid residues) that contains the trypsin-like serine protease domain having a catalytic triad of H51, D75, and S135. The C-terminal part of NS3, ~170-618 amino acid residues, encodes an NTPase/RNA helicase and 5'-RNA triphosphatase activities; the latter enzyme is required for the first step in 5'-capping. The cleavage sites of the polyprotein by the viral protease consist of two basic amino acid residues such as KR, RR, or QR, followed by short chain amino acid residues, G, S, or T. Since the cleavage of the polyprotein by the viral protease is absolutely required for assembly of the viral replicase, blockage of NS2B/NS3pro activity provides an effective means for designing dengue virus (DENV) small-molecule therapeutics. Here we describe the screening of small-molecule inhibitors against DENV2 protease.

  5. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  6. Characterization of a novel aspartyl protease inhibitor from Haemonchus contortus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Baojie; Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Gao, Wenxiang; Zhang, Zhenchao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Xu, Lixin; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui; Yan, Ruofeng

    2017-01-01

    Background Aspartyl protease inhibitor (API) was thought to protect intestinal parasitic nematodes from their hostile proteolytic environment. Studies on Ostertagia ostertagi, Ascaris suum and Brugia malayi indicated that aspins might play roles in nematode infection. In a recent study, proteins differentially expressed between free-living third-stage larvae (L3) and activated L3 (xL3) of Haemonchus contortus were identified by 2D-DIGE. API was found downregulated in xL3 when compared with L3...

  7. Mutant HIV-1 protease complexed with tetrapeptide inhibitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Petroková, Hana; Buchtelová, E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 101, - (2002), s. 659-663 ISSN 0587-4246. [Symposium on Synchrotron Crystallography. Krynica, 31.08.2001-04.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA ČR GV203/98/K023; GA ČR GA203/00/D117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV-1 protease * ethylenamine inhibitor * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.345, year: 2002

  8. Antiretroviral activity of protease inhibitors against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianet Monzote

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has caused a marked reduction in the occurrence and severity of parasitic infections, including the toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. These changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity. This study was developed to examine the activity of six antiretroviral protease inhibitors (API on Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. The six API showed anti-Toxoplasma activity, with IC50 value between 1.4 and 6.6 µg/mL. Further studies at the molecular level should be performed to clarify if the use of API could be beneficial or not for AIDS patients with TE.

  9. Zebra chip disease decreases tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) protein content by attenuating protease inhibitor levels and increasing protease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2015-11-01

    Zebra chip disease of potato decreases protease inhibitor levels resulting in enhanced serine-type protease activity, decreased protein content and altered protein profiles of fully mature tubers. Zebra-chip (ZC), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), is a relatively new disease of potato that negatively affects growth, yield, propagation potential, and fresh and process qualities of tubers. Diseased plants produce tubers with characteristic brown discoloration of vascular tissue accompanied by elevated levels of free amino acids and reducing sugars. Here we demonstrate that ZC disease induces selective protein catabolism in tubers through modulating protease inhibitor levels. Soluble protein content of tubers from CLso-infected plants was 33% lower than from non-infected plants and electrophoretic analyses revealed substantial reductions in major tuber proteins. Patatin (~40 kDa) and ser-, asp- (22 kDa) and cys-type (85 kDa) protease inhibitors were either absent or greatly reduced in ZC-afflicted tubers. In contrast to healthy (non-infected) tubers, the proteolytic activity in CLso infected tubers was high and the ability of extracts from infected tubers to inhibit trypsin (ser-type) and papain (cys-type) proteases greatly attenuated. Moreover, extracts from CLso-infected tubers rapidly catabolized proteins purified from healthy tubers (40 kDa patatin, 22 kDa protease inhibitors, 85 kDa potato multicystatin) when subjected to proteolysis individually. In contrast, crude extracts from non-infected tubers effectively inhibited the proteolytic activity from ZC-afflicted tubers. These results suggest that the altered protein profile of ZC afflicted tubers is largely due to loss of ser- and cys-type protease inhibitors. Further analysis revealed a novel PMSF-sensitive (ser) protease (ca. 80-120 kDa) in CLso infected tubers. PMSF abolished the proteolytic activities responsible for degrading patatin, the 22 kDa protease inhibitor(s) and potato

  10. Tailored Ahp-cyclodepsipeptides as Potent Non-covalent Serine Protease Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köcher, Steffen; Rey, Juliana; Bongard, Jens; Tiaden, André N; Meltzer, Michael; Richards, Peter J; Ehrmann, Michael; Kaiser, Markus

    2017-07-10

    The S1 serine protease family is one of the largest and most biologically important protease families. Despite their biomedical significance, generic approaches to generate potent, class-specific, bioactive non-covalent inhibitors for these enzymes are still limited. In this work, we demonstrate that Ahp-cyclodepsipeptides represent a suitable scaffold for generating target-tailored inhibitors of serine proteases. For efficient synthetic access, we developed a practical mixed solid- and solution-phase synthesis that we validated through performing the first chemical synthesis of the two natural products Tasipeptin A and B. The suitability of the Ahp-cyclodepsipeptide scaffold for tailored inhibitor synthesis is showcased by the generation of the most potent human HTRA protease inhibitors to date. We anticipate that our approach may also be applied to other serine proteases, thus opening new avenues for a systematic discovery of serine protease inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Protease activity in the larval stage of the parasitoid wasp, Eulophus pennicornis (Nees) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae); effects of protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, R E; Ford, L; Mosson, H J; Fitches, E; Gatehouse, J A; Gatehouse, A M

    1999-08-01

    Hymenopteran, parasitoid wasps have good potential for use in integrated pest management (IPM); for example, the gregarious ectoparasitoid, Eulophus pennicornis, has been suggested as a biological control agent for larvae of the tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea L.). However, the processes by which such parasitic larvae are able to utilize the nutritional resource provided by the host have been little studied. Protease activity was present in E. pennicornis larvae, and characterization of the enzymes responsible for proteolysis was performed using a range of synthetic substrates and specific inhibitors. Serine protease enzymes was both trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities were present. A range of plant-derived serine protease inhibitors was tested for activity against these enzymes. Certain inhibitors, notably soybean Kunitz inhibitor (SKTI), inhibited enzyme activity by > 80% at < 10(-5) M. When SKTI was fed to L. oleracea larvae in an artificial diet, the inhibitor was subsequently detected within the larval haemolymph, showing that protease inhibitors in the host diet can be delivered to a parasitoid via the host haemolymph. If transgenic plants expressing foreign protease inhibitors for protection against insect pests are to form a component of IPM systems, possible adverse effects, whether direct or indirect, of transgene expression on parasitoids like E. pennicornis should be considered.

  12. A Kunitz-type cysteine protease inhibitor from cauliflower and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halls, C.E.; Rogers, S. W.; Ouffattole, M.

    2006-01-01

    A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor co-purified from cauliflower florets with a granulin domain cysteine protease that cleaved barley proaleurain to yield a molecular form the same size as that for mature aleurain. The purified cauliflower protease required treatment with SDS detergent to become...

  13. Schistosome serine protease inhibitors: parasite defense or homeostasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landys A. Lopez Quezada

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Serpins are a structurally conserved family of macromolecular inhibitors found in numerous biological systems. The completion and annotation of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum has enabled the identification by phylogenetic analysis of two major serpin clades. S. mansoni shows a greater multiplicity of serpin genes, perhaps reflecting adaptation to infection of a human host. Putative targets of schistosome serpins can be predicted from the sequence of the reactive center loop (RCL. Schistosome serpins may play important roles in both post-translational regulation of schistosome-derived proteases, as well as parasite defense mechanisms against the action of host proteases.Serpinas são uma família de inibidores macromoleculares estruturalmente conservados encontrados em inúmeros sistemas biológicos. O término e a anotação dos genomas de Schistosoma mansoni e de Schistosoma japonicum permitiram a identificação por análise filogenética de dois principais clados de serpinas. S. mansoni mostra uma multiplicidade maior de genes de serpinas, talvez refletindo uma adaptação à infecção de um hospedeiro humano. Alvos putativos das serpinas de esquistossomos podem ser preditos a partir da sequência do "loop" do centro reativo. Serpinas de esquistossomos podem ter importantes papeis tanto na regulação pós-traducional de proteases derivadas do esquistossoma, quanto nos mecanismos de defesa contra a ação de proteases do hospedeiro.

  14. Protease inhibitors from processed legumes effectively inhibit superoxide generation in response to TPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavelow, J; Gidlund, M; Troll, W

    1982-01-01

    Crude extracts containing protease inhibitors from edible legumes (canned chick-peas, canned kidney beans and bean curd) were capable of blocking the superoxide response to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes produced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Protease inhibitors purified from crude extracts more effectively blocked the superoxide response produced by TPA. Bowman-Birk soybean inhibitor was more effective in blocking this effect of the tumor promoter than Kunitz soybean inhibitor. The significance of protease inhibitors in edible legumes and the possible role of free oxygen radicals in tumor promotion are discussed.

  15. Synthesis and extended activity of triazole-containing macrocyclic protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehere, A.D.; Pietsch, M.; Gütschow, M.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide-derived protease inhibitors are an important class of compounds with the potential to treat a wide range of diseases. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a series of triazole- containing macrocyclic protease inhibitors pre-organized into a b-strand conformation and an evaluation...

  16. The protease inhibitor HAI-2, but not HAI-1, regulates matriptase activation and shedding through prostasin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Stine; Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Schafer, Jeffrey Martin

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine proteases, matriptase and prostasin, and the membrane-anchored serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 and HAI-2, are critical effectors of epithelial development and postnatal epithelial homeostasis. Matriptase and prostasin f...

  17. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bungard, Christopher J.; Williams, Peter D.; Ballard, Jeanine E.; Bennett, David J.; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S.; Chang, Ronald K.; Dubost, David C.; Fay, John F.; Diamond, Tracy L.; Greshock, Thomas J.; Hao, Li; Holloway, M. Katharine; Felock, Peter J.; Gesell, Jennifer J.; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J.; McKay, Daniel J.; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M.; Nantermet, Philippe G.; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I.; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M.; Vacca, Joseph P.; Crane, Sheldon N.; McCauley, John A. (Merck); (Albany MR)

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  18. Identification of Cysteine Proteases and Screening of Cysteine Protease Inhibitors in Biological Samples by a Two-Dimensional Gel System of Zymography and Reverse Zymography

    OpenAIRE

    Saitoh, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Eishiro; Hayakawa, Yoshimi; Hoshino, Takashi; Sato, Ritsuko; Isemura, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Sadami; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the fi rst-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic...

  19. HIV-protease inhibitors for the treatment of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Fagone, Paolo; McCubrey, James

    2017-01-01

    The possible use of HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) as new therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer primarily originated from their success in treating HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). While these findings were initially attributed to immune reconstitution and better control of oncogenic...... and nitric oxide (NO) derivatives of HIV-PIs. In this article, we discuss the current preclinical and clinical evidences for the potential use of HIV-PIs, and of novel derivatives, such as saquinavir-NO in the treatment of cancer....... viral infections, the number of reports on solid tumors, KS, lymphoma, fibrosarcoma, multiple myeloma and prostate cancer suggest other mechanisms for the anti-neoplastic activity of PIs. However, a major drawback for the possible adoption of HIV-PIs in the therapy of cancer relies on their relatively...

  20. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro

  1. Genome-wide identification and structure-function studies of proteases and protease inhibitors in Cicer arietinum (chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Suresh, C G

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are a family of enzymes present in almost all living organisms. In plants they are involved in many biological processes requiring stress response in situations such as water deficiency, pathogen attack, maintaining protein content of the cell, programmed cell death, senescence, reproduction and many more. Similarly, protease inhibitors (PIs) are involved in various important functions like suppression of invasion by pathogenic nematodes, inhibition of spores-germination and mycelium growth of Alternaria alternata and response to wounding and fungal attack. As much as we know, no genome-wide study of proteases together with proteinaceous PIs is reported in any of the sequenced genomes till now. Phylogenetic studies and domain analysis of proteases were carried out to understand the molecular evolution as well as gene and protein features. Structural analysis was carried out to explore the binding mode and affinity of PIs for cognate proteases and prolyl oligopeptidase protease with inhibitor ligand. In the study reported here, a significant number of proteases and PIs were identified in chickpea genome. The gene expression profiles of proteases and PIs in five different plant tissues revealed a differential expression pattern in more than one plant tissue. Molecular dynamics studies revealed the formation of stable complex owing to increased number of protein-ligand and inter and intramolecular protein-protein hydrogen bonds. The genome-wide identification, characterization, evolutionary understanding, gene expression, and structural analysis of proteases and PIs provide a framework for future analysis when defining their roles in stress response and developing a more stress tolerant variety of chickpea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of wide-spectrum inhibitors targeting coronavirus main proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Yang

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The genus Coronavirus contains about 25 species of coronaviruses (CoVs, which are important pathogens causing highly prevalent diseases and often severe or fatal in humans and animals. No licensed specific drugs are available to prevent their infection. Different host receptors for cellular entry, poorly conserved structural proteins (antigens, and the high mutation and recombination rates of CoVs pose a significant problem in the development of wide-spectrum anti-CoV drugs and vaccines. CoV main proteases (M(pros, which are key enzymes in viral gene expression and replication, were revealed to share a highly conservative substrate-recognition pocket by comparison of four crystal structures and a homology model representing all three genetic clusters of the genus Coronavirus. This conclusion was further supported by enzyme activity assays. Mechanism-based irreversible inhibitors were designed, based on this conserved structural region, and a uniform inhibition mechanism was elucidated from the structures of Mpro-inhibitor complexes from severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV and porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus. A structure-assisted optimization program has yielded compounds with fast in vitro inactivation of multiple CoV M(pros, potent antiviral activity, and extremely low cellular toxicity in cell-based assays. Further modification could rapidly lead to the discovery of a single agent with clinical potential against existing and possible future emerging CoV-related diseases.

  3. SjAPI, the First Functionally Characterized Ascaris-Type Protease Inhibitor from Animal Venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-01-01

    Background Serine protease inhibitors act as modulators of serine proteases, playing important roles in protecting animal toxin peptides from degradation. However, all known serine protease inhibitors discovered thus far from animal venom belong to the Kunitz-type subfamily, and whether there are other novel types of protease inhibitors in animal venom remains unclear. Principal Findings Here, by screening scorpion venom gland cDNA libraries, we identified the first Ascaris-type animal toxin family, which contains four members: Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (SjAPI), Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor 2 (SjAPI-2), Chaerilus tricostatus Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (CtAPI), and Buthus martensii Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (BmAPI). The detailed characterization of Ascaris-type peptide SjAPI from the venom gland of scorpion Scorpiops jendeki was carried out. The mature peptide of SjAPI contains 64 residues and possesses a classical Ascaris-type cysteine framework reticulated by five disulfide bridges, different from all known protease inhibitors from venomous animals. Enzyme and inhibitor reaction kinetics experiments showed that recombinant SjAPI was a dual function peptide with α-chymotrypsin- and elastase-inhibiting properties. Recombinant SjAPI inhibited α-chymotrypsin with a Ki of 97.1 nM and elastase with a Ki of 3.7 μM, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses and chimera experiments indicated that SjAPI contained the unique short side chain functional residues “AAV” and might be a useful template to produce new serine protease inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, SjAPI is the first functionally characterized animal toxin peptide with an Ascaris-type fold. The structural and functional diversity of animal toxins with protease-inhibiting properties suggested that bioactive peptides from animal venom glands might be a new source of protease inhibitors, which will accelerate the development of

  4. SjAPI, the first functionally characterized Ascaris-type protease inhibitor from animal venoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serine protease inhibitors act as modulators of serine proteases, playing important roles in protecting animal toxin peptides from degradation. However, all known serine protease inhibitors discovered thus far from animal venom belong to the Kunitz-type subfamily, and whether there are other novel types of protease inhibitors in animal venom remains unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, by screening scorpion venom gland cDNA libraries, we identified the first Ascaris-type animal toxin family, which contains four members: Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (SjAPI, Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor 2 (SjAPI-2, Chaerilus tricostatus Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (CtAPI, and Buthus martensii Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (BmAPI. The detailed characterization of Ascaris-type peptide SjAPI from the venom gland of scorpion Scorpiops jendeki was carried out. The mature peptide of SjAPI contains 64 residues and possesses a classical Ascaris-type cysteine framework reticulated by five disulfide bridges, different from all known protease inhibitors from venomous animals. Enzyme and inhibitor reaction kinetics experiments showed that recombinant SjAPI was a dual function peptide with α-chymotrypsin- and elastase-inhibiting properties. Recombinant SjAPI inhibited α-chymotrypsin with a Ki of 97.1 nM and elastase with a Ki of 3.7 μM, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses and chimera experiments indicated that SjAPI contained the unique short side chain functional residues "AAV" and might be a useful template to produce new serine protease inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, SjAPI is the first functionally characterized animal toxin peptide with an Ascaris-type fold. The structural and functional diversity of animal toxins with protease-inhibiting properties suggested that bioactive peptides from animal venom glands might be a new source of protease inhibitors, which will accelerate the

  5. A modular system to evaluate the efficacy of protease inhibitors against HIV-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahdi

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease is a homodimeric aspartyl protease that is crucial for the viral life-cycle, cleaving proviral polyproteins, hence creating mature protein components that are required for the formation of an infectious virus. With diagnostic measures and clinically used protease inhibitors focusing on HIV-1, due to its higher virulence and prevalence, studies of the efficacy of those inhibitors on HIV-2 protease remain widely lacking. Utilizing a wild-type HIV-2 vector backbone and cloning techniques we have developed a cassette system where the efficacy of clinically used protease inhibitors can be studied for various serotypes of HIV-2 protease both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. In our experiments, optimization of the expression protocol led to a relatively stable enzyme, for cell culture assays, the efficiency of transfection and transduction capability of the modified vector was tested and was not found to differ from that of the wild-type, moreover, a 2nd generation protease inhibitor was used to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The combination of assays performed with our cassette system is expected to provide an accurate measure of the efficacy of currently used; as well as experimental protease inhibitors on HIV-2.

  6. A modular system to evaluate the efficacy of protease inhibitors against HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Matúz, Krisztina; Tóth, Ferenc; Tőzsér, József

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease is a homodimeric aspartyl protease that is crucial for the viral life-cycle, cleaving proviral polyproteins, hence creating mature protein components that are required for the formation of an infectious virus. With diagnostic measures and clinically used protease inhibitors focusing on HIV-1, due to its higher virulence and prevalence, studies of the efficacy of those inhibitors on HIV-2 protease remain widely lacking. Utilizing a wild-type HIV-2 vector backbone and cloning techniques we have developed a cassette system where the efficacy of clinically used protease inhibitors can be studied for various serotypes of HIV-2 protease both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. In our experiments, optimization of the expression protocol led to a relatively stable enzyme, for cell culture assays, the efficiency of transfection and transduction capability of the modified vector was tested and was not found to differ from that of the wild-type, moreover, a 2nd generation protease inhibitor was used to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The combination of assays performed with our cassette system is expected to provide an accurate measure of the efficacy of currently used; as well as experimental protease inhibitors on HIV-2.

  7. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Butterworth

    Full Text Available The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  8. Reverse zymography alone does not confirm presence of a protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sangita; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-03-01

    Reverse zymography is applied for identification and semi-quantification of protease inhibitors that are of protein in nature. However, a protein that shows band in reverse zymography against a protease used for digestion of the gel need not be an inhibitor; it might be resistant to degradation by the protease. We demonstrate that in reverse zymography, avidin, streptavidin and the leaf extract of Catharanthus roseus behave like inhibitors of proteases like papain, ficin, bromelain extracts from pineapple leaf, stem and fruit and trypsin. Still, they do not act as inhibitors of those proteases when enzyme assays were done in solution. In reverse zymography, the extract of pineapple crown leaf shows two major inhibitor bands against its own proteases. Identification of these proteins from sequences derived from MALDI TOF MS analysis indicated that they are fruit and stem bromelains. Avidin, streptavidin and bromelains are 'kinetically stable proteins' that are usually resistant to proteolysis. Thus, it is recommended that identification of an inhibitor of a protease by reverse zymography should be supported by independent assay methods for confirmation.

  9. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...... endogenous α-amylase 2 and subtilisin (ASI) on chromosome 2, two chymotrypsin/subtilisin inhibitors (CI-1 and CI-2) on chromosome 5 (long arm) and the major trypsin inhibitor (TI-1) on chromosome 3....

  10. A novel substrate-based HIV-1 protease inhibitor drug resistance mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nijhuis, M.; Maarseveen van, N. M.; Lastere, S.; Schipper, P.; Coakley, E.; Glass, B.; Rovenská, Miroslava; Jong de, D.; Chappey, C.; Goedegebuure, I. W.; Heilek-Snyder, G.; Dulude, D.; Cammack, N.; Brakier-Gingras, L.; Konvalinka, Jan; Parkin, N.; Kräusslich, H. G.; Brun-Vezinet, F.; Boucher, Ch. A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2007), s. 152-163 ISSN 1549-1277 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV-1 protease * drug resistance * protease inhibitor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 12.601, year: 2007

  11. Serine protease inhibitors to treat inflammation: a patent review (2011-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soualmia, Feryel; El Amri, Chahrazade

    2018-02-01

    Inflammation is a physiological part of the complex biological response of tissues to counteract various harmful signals. This process involves diverse actors such as immune cells, blood vessels, and nerves as sources of mediators for inflammation control. Among them serine proteases are key elements in both physiological and pathological inflammation. Areas covered: Serine protease inhibitors to treat inflammatory diseases are being actively investigated by various industrial and academic institutions. The present review covers patent literature on serine protease inhibitors for the therapy of inflammatory diseases patented between 2011 and 2016. Expert opinion: Serine proteases regulating inflammation are versatile enzymes, usually involved in proinflammatory cytokine production and activation of immune cells. Their dysregulation during inflammation can have devastating consequences, promoting various diseases including skin and lung inflammation, neuroinflammation, and inflammatory arthritis. Several serine proteases were selected for their contribution to inflammatory diseases and significant efforts that are spread to develop inhibitors. Strategies developed for inhibitor identification consist on either peptide-based inhibitor derived from endogenous protein inhibitors or small-organic molecules. It is also worth noting that among the recent patents on serine protease inhibitors related to inflammation a significant number are related to retinal vascular dysfunction and skin diseases.

  12. Solid-state characterization of the HIV protease inhibitor

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y A

    2002-01-01

    The LB71350, (3S, 4R)-Epoxy-(5S)-[[N-(1-methylethoxy) carbonyl]-3-(methylsulfonyl)-L-valinyl]amin= o]-N-[2-methyl-(1R)-[(phenyl)carbonyl]propyl-6-phenylhexanamide, is a novel HIV protease inhibitor. Its equilibrium solubility at room temperature was less than 40 mu g/mL. It was speculated that the low aqueous solubility might be due to the high crystalline lattice energy resulting from intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The present study was carried out to learn the solid-state characteristics of LB71350 using analytical methods such as NMR, FT-IR and XRD. sup 1 sup 3 C Solid-state NMR, solution NMR, and FT-IR spectra of the various solid forms of LB71350 were used to identify the conformation and structure of the solid forms. The chemical shifts of sup 1 sup 3 C solid-state NMR spectra suggest that the crystalline form might have 3 intermolecular hydrogen bondings between monomers.

  13. Preformulation studies of a novel HIV protease inhibitor, AG1343.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longer, M; Shetty, B; Zamansky, I; Tyle, P

    1995-09-01

    AG1343 is a novel human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor designed using protein structure-based techniques and intended for chronic oral administration in the treatment of AIDS-related conditions. The compound is the mesylate salt of a basic amine with a molecular weight of 663.90, pKa of 6.0, and partition coefficient (log P) of 4.1. Examination of the physicochemical properties of a bench-scale lot of the bulk drug was undertaken in order to establish a preformulation database and to begin development of an oral formulation suitable for phase I clinical trials. A stability-indicating gradient HPLC method was developed, and initial stability studies indicated that the compound is relatively stable under accelerated conditions. Water solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate studies, however, revealed the potential for dissolution rate-limited absorption. Alternative salts were prepared and evaluated for water solubility relative to the mesylate. A pH-solubility profile for AG1343 was generated and its solubility in various pharmaceutical solvents was determined. Formulation into several prototypical oral dosage forms for in-vitro evaluation in animal models prior to phase I clinical trials resulted in a several-fold difference in bioavailability between these formulations.

  14. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  15. Interspecific differences between D. pulex and D. magna in tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J Kuster

    Full Text Available It is known that cyanobacteria negatively affect herbivores due to their production of toxins such as protease inhibitors. In the present study we investigated potential interspecific differences between two major herbivores, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex, in terms of their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. Seven clones each of D. magna and of D. pulex were isolated from different habitats in Europe and North America. To test for interspecific differences in the daphnids' tolerance to cyanobacteria, their somatic and population growth rates were determined for each D. magna and D. pulex clone after exposure to varying concentrations of two Microcystis aeruginosa strains. The M. aeruginosa strains NIVA and PCC(- contained either chymotrypsin or trypsin inhibitors, but no microcystins. Mean somatic and population growth rates on a diet with 20% NIVA were significantly more reduced in D. pulex than in D. magna. On a diet with 10% PCC(-, the population growth of D. pulex was significantly more reduced than that of D. magna. This indicates that D. magna is more tolerant to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors than D. pulex. The reduction of growth rates was possibly caused by an interference of cyanobacterial inhibitors with proteases in the gut of Daphnia, as many other conceivable factors, which might have been able to explain the reduced growth, could be excluded as causal factors. Protease assays revealed that the sensitivities of chymotrypsins and trypsins to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors did not differ between D. magna and D. pulex. However, D. magna exhibited a 2.3-fold higher specific chymotrypsin activity than D. pulex, which explains the observed higher tolerance to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors of D. magna. The present study suggests that D. magna may control the development of cyanobacterial blooms more efficiently than D. pulex due to differences in their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease

  16. Modulating effects of the protease inhibitor Antipain on x-ray induced transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.; Miller, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Protease inhibitors have been shown to inhibit the expression of mutations in bacteria and to inhibit the tumor-promoting effect of phorbol esters in mice. We have investigated the effect of the protease inhibitor Antipain on cell transformation by x-irradiation in two in vitro systems; namely short-term cultures of freshly explanted hamster embryo cells and in the 10T1/2 cell line derived and cloned from C3H mouse embryo

  17. Some Investigations on Protease Enzyme Production Kinetics Using Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 and Effects of Inhibitors on Protease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghobadi Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to great commercial application of protease, it is necessary to study kinetic characterization of this enzyme in order to improve design of enzymatic reactors. In this study, mathematical modeling of protease enzyme production kinetics which is derived from Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 was studied (at 37°C, pH 10 after 73 h in stationary phase, and 150 rpm. The aim of the present paper was to determine the best kinetic model and kinetic parameters for production of protease and calculating Ki (inhibition constant of different inhibitors to find the most effective one. The kinetic parameters Km (Michaelis-Menten constant and Vm (maximum rate were calculated 0.626 mM and 0.0523 mM/min. According to the experimental results, using DFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate and PMSF (phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride as inhibitors almost 50% of the enzyme activity could be inhibited when their concentrations were 0.525 and 0.541 mM, respectively. Ki for DFP and PMSF were 0.46 and 0.56 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the Lineweaver-Burk model was the best fitting model for protease production kinetics DFP was more effective than PMSF and both of them should be covered in the group of noncompetitive inhibitors.

  18. Protease inhibitor (PI) mediated defense in leaves and flowers of pigeonpea (protease inhibitor mediated defense in pigeonpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padul, Manohar V; Tak, Rajesh D; Kachole, Manvendra S

    2012-03-01

    More than 200 insect pests are found growing on pigeonpea. Insects lay eggs, attack and feed on leaves, flowers and developing pods. Plants have developed elaborate defenses against these insect pests. The present work evaluates protease inhibitor (PI) based defense of pigeonpea in leaves and flowers. PIs in the extracts of these tender tissues were detected by using gel X-ray film contact print method. Up to three PIs (PI-3, PI-4 and PI-5) were detected in these tissues as against nine (PI-1-PI-9) in mature seeds. PI-3 is the major component of these tissues. Mechanical wounding, insect chewing, fungal pathogenesis and application of salicylic acid induced PIs in pigeonpea in these tissues. Induction was found to be local as well as systemic but local response was stronger than systemic response. During both local and systemic induction, PI-3 appeared first. In spite of the presence and induction of PIs in these tender tissues and seeds farmers continue to suffer yield loses. This is due to the weak expression of PIs. However the ability of the plant to respond to external stimuli by producing defense proteins does not seem to be compromised. This study therefore indicates that PIs are components of both constitutive and inducible defense and provide a ground for designing stronger inducible defense (PIs or other insect toxin based) in pigeonpea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardio-metabolic effectsof HIV protease inhibitors (lopinavir/ritonavir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M S E Reyskens

    Full Text Available Although antiretroviral treatment decreases HIV-AIDS morbidity/mortality, long-term side effects may include the onset of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART-induced cardio-metabolic effects are poorly understood. In light of this, we hypothesized that HIV protease inhibitor (PI treatment (Lopinavir/Ritonavir elevates myocardial oxidative stress and concomitantly inhibits the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS, thereby attenuating cardiac function. Lopinavir/Ritonavir was dissolved in 1% ethanol (vehicle and injected into mini-osmotic pumps that were surgically implanted into Wistar rats for 8 weeks vs. vehicle and sham controls. We subsequently evaluated metabolic parameters, gene/protein markers and heart function (ex vivo Langendorff perfusions. PI-treated rats exhibited increased serum LDL-cholesterol, higher tissue triglycerides (heart, liver, but no evidence of insulin resistance. In parallel, there was upregulation of hepatic gene expression, i.e. acetyl-CoA carboxylase b and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA-reductase, key regulators of fatty acid oxidation and cholesterol synthesis, respectively. PI-treated hearts displayed impaired cardiac contractile function together with attenuated UPS activity. However, there was no significant remodeling of hearts exposed to PIs, i.e. lack of ultrastructural changes, fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophic response, and oxidative stress. Western blot analysis of PI-treated hearts revealed that perturbed calcium handling may contribute to the PI-mediated contractile dysfunction. Here chronic PI administration led to elevated myocardial calcineurin, nuclear factor of activated T-cells 3 (NFAT3, connexin 43, and phosphorylated phospholamban, together with decreased calmodulin expression levels. This study demonstrates that early changes triggered by PI treatment include increased serum LDL

  20. Identification of cysteine proteases and screening of cysteine protease inhibitors in biological samples by a two-dimensional gel system of zymography and reverse zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Eishiro; Hayakawa, Yoshimi; Hoshino, Takashi; Sato, Ritsuko; Isemura, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Sadami; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2007-11-18

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the first-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic acid (TCA) fixation. Protease activity in the 2D-gel was visualized as transparent spots where gelatin substrate was digested after commassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Some of the transparent spots from the skin mucus extract of rainbow trout were determined to be a cysteine protease through use of E-64 or CA-074. In the reverse zymography technique, the gel was incubated with papain solution at 37 degrees C for 18 h. Cysteine protease inhibitors from broad bean seeds were detected as clear blue spots after CBB staining. The amino (N-) terminal sequences of four papain inhibitor spots thus detected were demonstrated to be identical to that of favin beta chain, a broad bean lectin. Taken together, our system can be considered to be an efficient technique for discovering and characterizing new proteases and protease inhibitors in biological samples. This is the first report describing a 2D-gel system of zymography and reverse zymography.

  1. Identification and characterization of digestive serine proteases from inhibitor-resistant Helicoverpa zea larval midgut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volpicella, M.; Cordewener, J.H.G.; Jongsma, M.A.; Gallerani, R.; Ceci, L.R.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Protease inhibitors mediate a natural form of plant defence against insects, by interfering with the digestive system of the insect. In this paper, affinity chromatography was used to isolate trypsins and chymotrypsins from Helicoverpa zea larvae, which had been raised on inhibitor-containing diet.

  2. Variability and resistance mutations in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease in patients not treated with protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bonome Zeminian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of treatment of chronic hepatitis C is to achieve a sustained virological response, which is defined as exhibiting undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA levels in serum following therapy for at least six months. However, the current treatment is only effective in 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1, the most prevalent genotype in Brazil. Inhibitors of the serine protease non-structural protein 3 (NS3 have therefore been developed to improve the responses of HCV-infected patients. However, the emergence of drug-resistant variants has been the major obstacle to therapeutic success. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms in the NS3 genomic region of HCV from 37 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 had not been treated with protease inhibitors. Plasma viral RNA was used to amplify and sequence the HCV NS3 gene. The results indicate that the catalytic triad is conserved. A large number of substitutions were observed in codons 153, 40 and 91; the resistant variants T54A, T54S, V55A, R155K and A156T were also detected. This study shows that resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms are present in the NS3 region of HCV in patients who have not been treated with protease inhibitors, data that are important in determining the efficiency of this new class of drugs in Brazil.

  3. Structures of HIV Protease Guide Inhibitor Design to Overcome Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W. (GSU)

    2008-06-03

    The HIV/AIDS infection continues to be a major epidemic worldwide despite the initial promise of antiviral drugs. Current therapy includes a combination of drugs that inhibit two of the virally-encoded enzymes, the reverse transcriptase and the protease. The first generation of HIV protease inhibitors that have been in clinical use for treatment of AIDS since 1995 was developed with the aid of structural analysis of protease-inhibitor complexes. These drugs were successful in improving the life span of HIV-infected people. Subsequently, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has necessitated the design of new inhibitors that target mutant proteases. This second generation of antiviral protease inhibitors has been developed with the aid of data from medicinal chemistry, kinetics, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Traditional computational methods such as molecular mechanics and dynamics can be supplemented with intelligent data mining approaches. One approach, based on similarities to the protease interactions with substrates, is to incorporate additional interactions with main chain atoms that cannot easily be eliminated by mutations. Our structural and inhibition data for darunavir have helped to understand its antiviral activity and effectiveness on drug resistant HIV and demonstrate the success of this approach.

  4. Degradation of immunoglobulins, protease inhibitors, and interleukin-1 by a secretory proteinase of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Jong-Hwa; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a secretory proteinase from the pathogenic amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii on host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins such as immunoglobulins, interleukin-1, and protease inhibitors was investigated. The enzyme was found to degrade secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), IgG, and IgM. It also degraded interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-1β. Its activity was not inhibited by endogenous protease inhibitors, such as α2-macroglobulin, α1-trypsin inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin. Furthermore, the enzyme rapidly degraded those endogenous protease inhibitors as well. The degradation of host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins by the Acanthamoeba proteinase suggested that the enzyme might be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:12073735

  5. Protection of Meconium-Induced Lung Epithelial Injury by Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, C; Gopallawa, I; Ivanov, V; Gewolb, IH; Uhal, BD

    2017-01-01

    Earlier work form this laboratory showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to meconium caused significant cell detachment and that meconium-induced detachment of cells was prevented by a protease inhibitor cocktail. Therefore, it was hypothesized that protease inhibitors might protect AEC monolayers against meconium-induced collapse of epithelial barrier function both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate this theory in vitro, albumin flux was measured across cultured, confluent monolayers of human type II derived cell line A549 on microporous filter inserts. Human meconium was collected from seven healthy full-term neonates and the samples were pooled and diluted prior to analysis. Exposure of AECs to 5% human meconium increased albumin flux across the cultured AEC monolayers, but the increase was significantly blocked by protease inhibitors (Pmeconium increased the passage of Evans Blue Dye (EBD) from the vascular compartment into the alveolar spaces, measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid after intravenous injection of EBD. Moreover, intratrachial coinstillation of protease inhibitors prevented the meconium-induced increase in EBD passage into BAL fluid (Pmeconium-induced injury, and suggest the future possibility of using protease inhibitors in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome. PMID:29218325

  6. Crystal structure of a novel cysteinless plant Kunitz-type protease inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Daiane; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Verissimo, Paula; Yoo Im, Sonia; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela

    2007-01-01

    Bauhinia bauhinioides Cruzipain Inhibitor (BbCI) is a cysteine protease inhibitor highly homologous to plant Kunitz-type inhibitors. However, in contrast to classical Kunitz family inhibitors it lacks cysteine residues and therefore disulfide bridges. BbCI is also distinct in the ability to inactivate enzymes belonging to two different classes, cysteine and serine proteases. Besides inhibiting the cysteine protease cruzipain, BbCI also inhibits cathepsin L and the serine proteases HNE (human neutrophil elastase) and PPE (porcine pancreatic elastase). Monoclinic crystals of the recombinant inhibitor that diffract to 1.7 A resolution were obtained using hanging drop method by vapor diffusion at 18 o C. The refined structure shows the conservative β-trefoil fold features of the Kunitz inhibitors. In BbCI, one of the two characteristic S-S bonds is replaced by the water-mediated interaction between Tyr125 and Gly132. In this work we explore the structural differences between Kunitz-type inhibitors and analyze the essential interactions that maintain the protein structural stability preserving its biological function

  7. Dengue Virus NS2B/NS3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting the Prime Side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ali, Akbar; Rusere, Linah; Soumana, Djade I; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2017-05-15

    The mosquito-transmitted dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Maturation of DENV particles requires proper cleavage of the viral polyprotein, including processing of 8 of the 13 substrate cleavage sites by dengue virus NS2B/NS3 protease. With no available direct-acting antiviral targeting DENV, NS2/NS3 protease is a promising target for inhibitor design. Current design efforts focus on the nonprime side of the DENV protease active site, resulting in highly hydrophilic and nonspecific scaffolds. However, the prime side also significantly modulates DENV protease binding affinity, as revealed by engineering the binding loop of aprotinin, a small protein with high affinity for DENV protease. In this study, we designed a series of cyclic peptides interacting with both sides of the active site as inhibitors of dengue virus protease. The design was based on two aprotinin loops and aimed to leverage both key specific interactions of substrate sequences and the entropic advantage driving aprotinin's high affinity. By optimizing the cyclization linker, length, and amino acid sequence, the tightest cyclic peptide achieved a K i value of 2.9 μM against DENV3 wild-type (WT) protease. These inhibitors provide proof of concept that both sides of DENV protease active site can be exploited to potentially achieve specificity and lower hydrophilicity in the design of inhibitors targeting DENV. IMPORTANCE Viruses of the flaviviral family, including DENV and Zika virus transmitted by Aedes aegypti , continue to be a threat to global health by causing major outbreaks in tropical and subtropical regions, with no available direct-acting antivirals for treatment. A better understanding of the molecular requirements for the design of potent and specific inhibitors against flaviviral proteins will contribute to the development of targeted therapies for infections by these viruses. The cyclic peptides reported here as DENV protease inhibitors

  8. Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Resistant to the Protease Inhibitor Darunavir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grantz Šašková, Klára; Kožíšek, Milan; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Yashina, T.; Kagan, R. M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 17 (2009), s. 8810-8818 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 37693 - HIV PI RESISTANCE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV -1 protease * darunavir * X-ray structural analysis * protease inhibitor * mutations Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.150, year: 2009

  9. Protease inhibitor from insect silk - activities of derivatives expressed in vitro and in transgenic potato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Navrátil, Oldřich; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Horáčková, V.; Svobodová, Z.; Vinokurov, Konstantin; Sehnal, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 171, č. 1 (2013), s. 209-224 ISSN 0273-2289 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI91A229 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : genetically modified organism * silk protease inhibitor * protease Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs12010-013-0325-9.pdf

  10. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. van Maarseveen (Noortje); D. Andersson (Dan); M. Lepšík (Martin); A. Fun (Axel); P.J. Schipper (Pauline); D. de Jong (Dorien); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); M. Nijhuis (Monique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mutations in the substrate of HIV-1 protease, especially changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site, can directly contribute to protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and also compensate for defects in viral replicative capacity (RC) due to a drug resistant protease. These NC/p1 changes

  11. Chemistry and biology of natural product derived protease inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Stolze, Sara Christina

    2012-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Dissertation sollten Naturstoffe und davon abgeleitete Derivate synthetisiert und im Hinblick auf ihre biologische Aktivität als Protease-Inhibitoren untersucht werden. Für die Naturstoffklasse der 3-Amino-6-Hydroxy-2-piperidon(Ahp)-Cyclodepsipeptide, die als nicht-kovalente Serin-Protease-Inhibitoren bekannt sind, konnte eine Festphasensynthese basierend auf einem allgemeinen Ahp-Vorläufermolekül entwickelt werden. Für den Ahp-Vorläufer wurde eine Lösungssynthese entwicke...

  12. Recovery of serine protease inhibitor from fish roes by polyethylene glycol precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The fractionation of serine protease inhibitor (SPI from fish roe extracts was carried out using polyethylene glycol-4000 (PEG4000 precipitation. The protease inhibitory activity of extracts and PEG fractions from Alaska pollock (AP, bastard halibut (BH, skipjack tuna (ST, and yellowfin tuna (YT roes were determined against target proteases. All of the roe extracts showed inhibitory activity toward bromelain (BR, chymotrypsin (CH, trypsin (TR, papain-EDTA (PED, and alcalase (AL as target proteases. PEG fractions, which have positive inhibitory activity and high recovery (%, were the PEG1 fraction (0–5 %, w/v against cysteine proteases (BR and PA and the PEG4 fraction (20–40 %, w/v against serine proteases (CH and TR. The strongest specific inhibitory activity toward CH and TR of PEG4 fractions was AP (9278 and 1170 U/mg followed by ST (6687 and 2064 U/mg, YT (3951 and 1536 U/mg, and BH (538 and 98 U/mg. The inhibitory activity of serine protease in extracts and PEG fractions from fish roe was stronger than that of cysteine protease toward common casein substrate. Therefore, SPI is mainly distributed in fish roe and PEG fractionation effectively isolated the SPI from fish roes.

  13. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Geremia, Silvano

    2016-10-31

    Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  14. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasade M. Olajuyigbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  15. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than

  16. Mutational patterns in the frameshift-regulating site of HIV-1 selected by protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Elena; Brakier-Gingras, Léa; Schülter, Eugen; Pfister, Herbert; Kaiser, Rolf; Verheyen, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Sustained suppression of viral replication in HIV-1 infected patients is especially hampered by the emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance. The mechanisms of drug resistance mainly involve mutations directly altering the interaction of viral enzymes and inhibitors. However, protease inhibitors do not only select for mutations in the protease but also for mutations in the precursor Gag and Pol proteins. In this study, we analysed the frameshift-regulating site of HIV-1 subtype B isolates, which also encodes for Gag and Pol proteins, classified as either treatment-naïve (TN) or protease inhibitor resistant (PI-R). HIV-1 Gag cleavage site mutations (G435E, K436N, I437V, L449F/V) especially correlated with protease inhibitor resistance mutations, but also Pol cleavage site mutations (D05G, D05S) could be assigned to specific protease resistance profiles. Additionally, two Gag non-cleavage site mutations (S440F, H441P) were observed more often in HIV-1 isolates carrying protease resistance mutations. However, in dual luciferase assays, the frameshift efficiencies of specific clones did not reveal any effect from these mutations. Nevertheless, two patterns of mutations modestly increased the frameshift rates in vitro, but were not specifically accumulating in PI-resistant HIV-1 isolates. In summary, HIV-1 Gag cleavage site mutations were dominantly selected in PI-resistant HIV-1 isolates but also Pol cleavage site mutations influenced resistance profiles in the protease. Additionally, Gag non-cleavage site mutations accumulated in PI-resistant HIV-1 isolates, but were not related to an increased frameshift efficiency.

  17. Bone mineral density changes in protease inhibitor-sparing vs. nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy: data from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Obel, N; Nielsen, H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).......The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)....

  18. A novel protease inhibitor in Bombyx mori is involved in defense against Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youshan; Zhao, Ping; Liu, Shiping; Dong, Zhaoming; Chen, Jianping; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi, such as Beauveria bassiana, penetrate the insect cuticle using a plethora of hydrolytic enzymes including cuticle-degrading proteases and chitinases, which are important virulence factors. The insect integument and hemolymph contains a relatively high concentration of protease inhibitors, which are closely involved with defense against pathogenic microorganisms. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying resistance against entomopathogenic fungi and to identify a new molecular target for improving fungal resistance in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we cloned and expressed a novel silkworm TIL-type protease inhibitor BmSPI38, which was very stable over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. An activity assay suggested that BmSPI38 potently inactivated the insecticidal cuticle-degrading enzyme (CDEP-1) produced by B. bassiana and subtilisin A produced by Bacillus licheniformis. The melanization of silkworm induced by CDEP-1 protease could also be blocked by BmSPI38. These results provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms whereby insect protease inhibitors provide resistance against entomopathogenic fungi, suggesting the possibility of using fungal biopesticides in sericulture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Companion Protease Inhibitors for the In Situ Protection of Recombinant Proteins in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Stéphanie; Jutras, Philippe V; Khalf, Moustafa; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    We previously described a procedure for the use of plant protease inhibitors as "companion" accessory proteins to prevent unwanted proteolysis of clinically useful recombinant proteins in leaf crude protein extracts (Benchabane et al. Methods Mol Biol 483:265-273, 2009). Here we describe the use of these inhibitors for the protection of recombinant proteins in planta, before their extraction from leaf tissues. A procedure is first described involving inhibitors co-expressed along-and co-migrating-with the protein of interest in host plant cells. An alternative, single transgene scheme is then described involving translational fusions of the recombinant protein and companion inhibitor. These approaches may allow for a significant improvement of protein steady-state levels in leaves, comparable to yield improvements observed with protease-deficient strains of less complex protein expression hosts such as E. coli or yeasts.

  20. Potent and Selective Peptidyl Boronic Acid Inhibitors of the Serine Protease Prostate-Specific Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Singh, Pratap; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer cells produce high (microgram to milligram/milliliter) levels of the serine protease Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA). PSA is enzymatically active in the extracellular fluid surrounding prostate cancers but is found at 1,000- to 10,000-fold lower concentrations in the circulation, where it is inactivated due to binding to abundant serum protease inhibitors. The exclusive presence of high levels of active PSA within prostate cancer sites makes PSA an attractive candidate for targeted imaging and therapeutics. A synthetic approach based on a peptide substrate identified first peptide aldehyde and then boronic acid inhibitors of PSA. The best of these had the sequence Cbz-Ser-Ser-Lys-Leu-(boro)Leu, with a Ki for PSA of 65 nM. The inhibitor had a 60-fold higher Ki for chymotrypsin. A validated model of PSA’s catalytic site confirmed the critical interactions between the inhibitor and residues within the PSA enzyme. PMID:18635003

  1. Structures of a bi-functional Kunitz-type STI family inhibitor of serine and aspartic proteases: Could the aspartic protease inhibition have evolved from a canonical serine protease-binding loop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Yasel; Valiente, Pedro A; Pons, Tirso; Berry, Colin; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Bi-functional inhibitors from the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family are glycosylated proteins able to inhibit serine and aspartic proteases. Here we report six crystal structures of the wild-type and a non-glycosylated mutant of the bifunctional inhibitor E3Ad obtained at different pH values and space groups. The crystal structures show that E3Ad adopts the typical β-trefoil fold of the STI family exhibiting some conformational changes due to pH variations and crystal packing. Despite the high sequence identity with a recently reported potato cathepsin D inhibitor (PDI), three-dimensional structures obtained in this work show a significant conformational change in the protease-binding loop proposed for aspartic protease inhibition. The E3Ad binding loop for serine protease inhibition is also proposed, based on structural similarity with a novel non-canonical conformation described for the double-headed inhibitor API-A from the Kunitz-type STI family. In addition, structural and sequence analyses suggest that bifunctional inhibitors of serine and aspartic proteases from the Kunitz-type STI family are more similar to double-headed inhibitor API-A than other inhibitors with a canonical protease-binding loop. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Evaluation of HIV protease inhibitor use and the risk of sudden death or nonhemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, S W; Kamara, D A; Reiss, P

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have arisen about possible effects of protease inhibitors (PIs) on cardiac conductivity. We found no significant association between current or recent PI exposure and sudden death or nonhemorrhagic stroke (adjusted rate ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, .95-1.57), whereas cumulative ...

  3. A modular and generalizable route to potent, selective and pharmacologically compliant inhibitors of rhomboid proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, Anežka; Stanchev, Stancho; Vinothkumar, K.; Mikles, David C.; Pachl, Petr; Švehlová, Kateřina; Nguyen, M.; Verhelst, S.; Johnson, D.; Bachovchin, D.; Majer, Pavel; Stříšovský, Kvido

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 335 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : rhomboid proteases * inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. A novel non-canonical binding mode for serine proteases on plant Kunitz inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srp, Jaroslav; Pachl, Petr; Mishra, Manasi; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 299 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Kunitz inhibitors * serine proteases Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  5. Dyslipidemia in an Asian population after treatment for two years with protease inhibitor-containing regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerr, Stephen J.; Duncombe, Chris; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Boyd, Mark; Sopa, Bunruan; Medtech, B.; Chuenyam, Theshinee; Cooper, David A.; Lange, Joep M. A.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2007-01-01

    There are limited data about dyslipidemia in Asian patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy. To assess the relative association of different protease-inhibitor-containing regimens with the degree of dyslipidemia, fasting lipid levels were compared during 110 weeks in 250

  6. Entomotoxic and nematotoxic lectins and protease inhibitors from fungal fruiting bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabotič, Jerica; Ohm, Robin A; Künzler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Fruiting bodies or sporocarps of dikaryotic (ascomycetous and basidiomycetous) fungi, commonly referred to as mushrooms, are often rich in entomotoxic and nematotoxic proteins that include lectins and protease inhibitors. These protein toxins are thought to act as effectors of an innate defense

  7. Biopotency of serine protease inhibitors from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds on digestive proteases and the development of Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-latif, Ashraf Oukasha

    2015-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) have been described in many plant species and are universal throughout the plant kingdom, where trypsin inhibitors is the most common type. In the present study, trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity was detected in the seed flour extracts of 13 selected cultivars/accessions of cowpea. Two cowpea cultivars, Cream7 and Buff, were found to have higher trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory potential compared to other tested cultivars for which they have been selected for further purification studies using ammonium sulfate fractionation and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column. Cream7-purified proteins showed two bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) corresponding to molecular mass of 17.10 and 14.90 kDa, while the purified protein from Buff cultivar showed a single band corresponding mass of 16.50 kDa. The purified inhibitors were stable at temperature below 60°C and were active at wide range of pH from 2 to 12. The kinetic analysis revealed noncompetitive type of inhibition for both inhibitors against both enzymes. The inhibitor constant (Ki ) values suggested high affinity between inhibitors and enzymes. Purified inhibitors were found to have deep and negative effects on the mean larval weight, larval mortality, pupation, and mean pupal weight of Spodoptera littoralis, where Buff PI was more effective than Cream7 PI. It may be concluded that cowpea PI gene(s) could be potential insect control protein for future studies in developing insect-resistant transgenic plants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Processing of pro-CGRP in a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line transfected with protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Teit Eliot; Schifter, S; Vogel, Charlotte Katrine

    1991-01-01

    A rat medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line, CA77, was used to study the effect of a series of biosynthesized protease inhibitors on the proteolytic cleavage of the endogenously synthesized pro-CGRP. This cell line efficiently converted the pro-CGRP to mature CGRP as assessed by chromatography...... of cell extracts followed by radioimmunoassay for CGRP. CA77 cells were transfected with expression vectors encoding protease inhibitors: the Arg-serpins, alpha 1-antitrypsin Pittsburgh (358 Met----Arg) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, the Kazal type serine protease inhibitor, pancreatic secretory...... trypsin inhibitor, and the general thiol protease inhibitor, cystatin C. Only the chromatography of cell extracts from CA77 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding cystatin C showed an apparent higher content of unprocessed pro-CGRP as compared to non-transfected cells. No effect on pro-CGRP processing...

  9. Cloning and Characterization of Two Potent Kunitz Type Protease Inhibitors from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L; Fischer, Katja; Zhang, Wenbao; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus is responsible for cystic echinococcosis (CE), a cosmopolitan disease which imposes a significant burden on the health and economy of affected communities. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby E. granulosus is able to survive in the hostile mammalian host environment, avoiding attack by host enzymes and evading immune responses, but protease inhibitors released by the parasite are likely implicated. We identified two nucleotide sequences corresponding to secreted single domain Kunitz type protease inhibitors (EgKIs) in the E. granulosus genome, and their cDNAs were cloned, bacterially expressed and purified. EgKI-1 is highly expressed in the oncosphere (egg) stage and is a potent chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase inhibitor that binds calcium and reduced neutrophil infiltration in a local inflammation model. EgKI-2 is highly expressed in adult worms and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin. As powerful inhibitors of mammalian intestinal proteases, the EgKIs may play a pivotal protective role in preventing proteolytic enzyme attack thereby ensuring survival of E. granulosus within its mammalian hosts. EgKI-1 may also be involved in the oncosphere in host immune evasion by inhibiting neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G once this stage is exposed to the mammalian blood system. In light of their key roles in protecting E. granulosus from host enzymatic attack, the EgKI proteins represent potential intervention targets to control CE. This is important as new public health measures against CE are required, given the inefficiencies of available drugs and the current difficulties in its treatment and control. In addition, being a small sized highly potent serine protease inhibitor, and an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, EgKI-1 may have clinical potential as a novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of Two Potent Kunitz Type Protease Inhibitors from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwanthi L Ranasinghe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus is responsible for cystic echinococcosis (CE, a cosmopolitan disease which imposes a significant burden on the health and economy of affected communities. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby E. granulosus is able to survive in the hostile mammalian host environment, avoiding attack by host enzymes and evading immune responses, but protease inhibitors released by the parasite are likely implicated. We identified two nucleotide sequences corresponding to secreted single domain Kunitz type protease inhibitors (EgKIs in the E. granulosus genome, and their cDNAs were cloned, bacterially expressed and purified. EgKI-1 is highly expressed in the oncosphere (egg stage and is a potent chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase inhibitor that binds calcium and reduced neutrophil infiltration in a local inflammation model. EgKI-2 is highly expressed in adult worms and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin. As powerful inhibitors of mammalian intestinal proteases, the EgKIs may play a pivotal protective role in preventing proteolytic enzyme attack thereby ensuring survival of E. granulosus within its mammalian hosts. EgKI-1 may also be involved in the oncosphere in host immune evasion by inhibiting neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G once this stage is exposed to the mammalian blood system. In light of their key roles in protecting E. granulosus from host enzymatic attack, the EgKI proteins represent potential intervention targets to control CE. This is important as new public health measures against CE are required, given the inefficiencies of available drugs and the current difficulties in its treatment and control. In addition, being a small sized highly potent serine protease inhibitor, and an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, EgKI-1 may have clinical potential as a novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic.

  11. Kinetic intermediates en route to the final serpin-protease complex: studies of complexes of α1-protease inhibitor with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Ashoka A; Swanson, Richard; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2013-11-01

    Serpin protein protease inhibitors inactivate their target proteases through a unique mechanism in which a major serpin conformational change, resulting in a 70-Å translocation of the protease from its initial reactive center loop docking site to the opposite pole of the serpin, kinetically traps the acyl-intermediate complex. Although the initial Michaelis and final trapped acyl-intermediate complexes have been well characterized structurally, the intermediate stages involved in this remarkable transformation are not well understood. To better characterize such intermediate steps, we undertook rapid kinetic studies of the FRET and fluorescence perturbation changes of site-specific fluorophore-labeled derivatives of the serpin, α1-protease inhibitor (α1PI), which report the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in transforming the Michaelis complex to the trapped acyl-intermediate complex in reactions with trypsin. Two kinetically resolvable conformational changes were observed in the reactions, ascribable to (i) serpin reactive center loop insertion into sheet A with full protease translocation but incomplete protease distortion followed by, (ii) full conformational distortion and movement of the protease and coupled serpin conformational changes involving the F helix-sheet A interface. Kinetic studies of calcium effects on the labeled α1PI-trypsin reactions demonstrated both inactive and low activity states of the distorted protease in the final complex that were distinct from the intermediate distorted state. These studies provide new insights into the nature of the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in trapping the acyl-intermediate complex in serpin-protease reactions and support a previously proposed role for helix F in the trapping mechanism.

  12. Assessment and partial purification of serine protease inhibitors from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus annulatuslarvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Nabian

    Full Text Available Ticks are rich sources of serine protease inhibitors, particularly those that prevent blood clotting and inflammatory responses during blood feeding. The tick Rhipicephalus (Boophlus annulatusis an important ectoparasite of cattle. The aims of this study were to characterize and purify the serine protease inhibitors present in R. (B. annulatus larval extract. The inhibitors were characterized by means of one and two-dimensional reverse zymography, and purified using affinity chromatography on a trypsin-Sepharose column. The analysis on one and two-dimensional reverse zymography of the larval extract showed trypsin inhibitory activity at between 13 and 40 kDa. Through non-reducing SDS-PAGE and reverse zymography for proteins purified by trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography, some protein bands with molecular weights between 13 and 34 kDa were detected. Western blotting showed that five protein bands at 48, 70, 110, 130 and 250 kDa reacted positively with immune serum, whereas there was no positive reaction in the range of 13-40 kDa. Serine protease inhibitors from R. (B. annulatus have anti-trypsin activity similar to inhibitors belonging to several other hard tick species, thus suggesting that these proteins may be useful as targets in anti-tick vaccines.

  13. Surimi of king weakfish (Macrodon ancylodon wastes: texture gel evaluation with protease inhibitors and transglutaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Rafael Kuhn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The protease inhibitors (bovine serum albumin -BSA - and egg white and transglutaminase inhibitor (NH4Cl, was added to the surimi obtained by King weakfish (Macrodon ancylodon wastes to evaluate your effect on the gel texture. Results indicated that the treatment with pre-heating (60°C, 30min + 90°C, 15min favored the elasticity of the gel (ashi, demonstrating low proteolysis and characterizing the suwari phenomenon (high gel strength. Protease inhibitors increased gel strength significantly (POs inibidores de protease (soro albumina bovina - BSA e clara de ovo e o inibidor de transglutaminase (NH4Cl, foram adicionados ao surimi elaborado com resíduos do processamento de filetagem da pescada-foguete (Macrodon ancylodon para avaliar seus efeitos sobre a textura do gel. Os resultados de coesividade indicaram que o tratamento com pré-aquecimento (60°C, 30 min + 90°C, 15 min favoreceu a elasticidade do gel, demonstrando pouca atividade proteolítica e caracterizando o 'suwari'. A utilização dos inibidores de protease aumentou significativamente (P<0.05 a força de compressão, com o inibidor BSA superior à clara de ovo. Nos géis de surimi de resíduos da pescada-foguete não foi caracterizada ação da enzima transglutaminase.

  14. Boosting protease inhibitors with low-dose ritonavir - unravelling the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of HAART is to suppress HIV replication maximally, and thereby restore immunological function, reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality, and improve quality of life.1 HIV-infected persons who qualify for treatment can be treated with a HAART regimen consisting of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors ...

  15. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Clemente

    Full Text Available Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for

  16. Structural basis for the immunomodulatory function of cysteine protease inhibitor from human roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Guoqiang; Dong, Jianmei; Li, Zhaotao; Liu, Sanling; Liu, Yunfeng; Sun, Mingze; Liu, Guiyun; Su, Zhong; Liu, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppression associated with infections of nematode parasites has been documented. Cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) released by the nematode parasites is identified as one of the major modulators of host immune response. In this report, we demonstrated that the recombinant CPI protein of Ascaris lumbricoides (Al-CPI) strongly inhibited the activities of cathepsin L, C, S, and showed weaker effect to cathepsin B. Crystal structure of Al-CPI was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Two segments of Al-CPI, loop 1 and loop 2, were proposed as the key structure motifs responsible for Al-CPI binding with proteases and its inhibitory activity. Mutations at loop 1 and loop 2 abrogated the protease inhibition activity to various extents. These results provide the molecular insight into the interaction between the nematode parasite and its host and will facilitate the development of anthelmintic agents or design of anti-autoimmune disease drugs.

  17. Functional characterization of a SUMO deconjugating protease of Plasmodium falciparum using newly identified small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Elizabeth L; Albrow, Victoria E; Leader, Brittany A; Békés, Miklós; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Fonović, Urša Pečar; Shen, Aimee; Drag, Marcin; Xiao, Junpeng; Deu, Edgar; Campbell, Amy J; Powers, James C; Salvesen, Guy S; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-06-24

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is implicated in the regulation of numerous biological processes including transcription, protein localization, and cell cycle control. Protein modification by SUMO is found in Plasmodium falciparum; however, its role in the regulation of the parasite life cycle is poorly understood. Here we describe functional studies of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) of P. falciparum, PfSENP1 (PFL1635w). Expression of the catalytic domain of PfSENP1 and biochemical profiling using a positional scanning substrate library demonstrated that this protease has unique cleavage sequence preference relative to the human SENPs. In addition, we describe a class of small molecule inhibitors of this protease. The most potent lead compound inhibited both recombinant PfSENP1 activity and P. falciparum replication in infected human blood. These studies provide valuable new tools for the study of SUMOylation in P. falciparum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A noncovalent class of papain-like protease/deubiquitinase inhibitors blocks SARS virus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratia, Kiira; Pegan, Scott; Takayama, Jun; Sleeman, Katrina; Coughlin, Melissa; Baliji, Surendranath; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fu, Wentao; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Johnson, Michael E.; Baker, Susan C.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Loyola); (Purdue); (UIC)

    2008-10-27

    We report the discovery and optimization of a potent inhibitor against the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). This unique protease is not only responsible for processing the viral polyprotein into its functional units but is also capable of cleaving ubiquitin and ISG15 conjugates and plays a significant role in helping SARS-CoV evade the human immune system. We screened a structurally diverse library of 50,080 compounds for inhibitors of PLpro and discovered a noncovalent lead inhibitor with an IC{sub 50} value of 20 {mu}M, which was improved to 600 nM via synthetic optimization. The resulting compound, GRL0617, inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication in Vero E6 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 15 {mu}M and had no associated cytotoxicity. The X-ray structure of PLpro in complex with GRL0617 indicates that the compound has a unique mode of inhibition whereby it binds within the S4-S3 subsites of the enzyme and induces a loop closure that shuts down catalysis at the active site. These findings provide proof-of-principle that PLpro is a viable target for development of antivirals directed against SARS-CoV, and that potent noncovalent cysteine protease inhibitors can be developed with specificity directed toward pathogenic deubiquitinating enzymes without inhibiting host DUBs.

  19. Effectiveness of Ritonavir-Boosted Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy in Clinical Practice Even with Previous Virological Failures to Protease Inhibitor-Based Regimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F López-Cortés

    Full Text Available Significant controversy still exists about ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy (mtPI/rtv as a simplification strategy that is used up to now to treat patients that have not experienced previous virological failure (VF while on protease inhibitor (PI -based regimens. We have evaluated the effectiveness of two mtPI/rtv regimens in an actual clinical practice setting, including patients that had experienced previous VF with PI-based regimens.This retrospective study analyzed 1060 HIV-infected patients with undetectable viremia that were switched to lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy. In cases in which the patient had previously experienced VF while on a PI-based regimen, the lack of major HIV protease resistance mutations to lopinavir or darunavir, respectively, was mandatory. The primary endpoint of this study was the percentage of participants with virological suppression after 96 weeks according to intention-to-treat analysis (non-complete/missing = failure.A total of 1060 patients were analyzed, including 205 with previous VF while on PI-based regimens, 90 of whom were on complex therapies due to extensive resistance. The rates of treatment effectiveness (intention-to-treat analysis and virological efficacy (on-treatment analysis at week 96 were 79.3% (CI95, 76.8-81.8 and 91.5% (CI95, 89.6-93.4, respectively. No relationships were found between VF and earlier VF while on PI-based regimens, the presence of major or minor protease resistance mutations, the previous time on viral suppression, CD4+ T-cell nadir, and HCV-coinfection. Genotypic resistance tests were available in 49 out of the 74 patients with VFs and only four patients presented new major protease resistance mutations.Switching to mtPI/rtv achieves sustained virological control in most patients, even in those with previous VF on PI-based regimens as long as no major resistance mutations are present for the administered drug.

  20. A new scaffold for inhibition of cysteine proteases: Structural and functional characterization of Kunitz inhibitors from potato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mishra, Manasi; Brynda, Jiří; Mareš, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, Suppl 1 (2015), s. 13 ISSN 0961-8368. [Annual Symposium of the Protein Society /29./. 22.07.2015-25.07.2015, Barcelona] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cysteine proteases * protease inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Structure-Aided Design of Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease Based on a Benzodiazepine Scaffold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schimer, Jiří; Cígler, Petr; Veselý, J.; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kožíšek, Milan; Císařová, I.; Oberwinkler, H.; Kraeusslich, H. G.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 22 (2012), s. 10130-10135 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR GAP207/11/1798 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitor * rational drug design * 1,4-benzodiazepines Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.614, year: 2012

  2. Analysis of interactions in complexes of HIV-1 protease and its peptidomimetic inhibitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Petroková, Hana; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Buchtelová, Eva; Dušková, Jarmila

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 59 ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of the Czech and Slovak Structural Biologists /2./. 13.03.2003-15.03.2003, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA AV ČR KJB4050312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV protease * peptidomimetic inhibitors * ligand binding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. A novel substrate-based HIV-1 protease inhibitor drug resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Nijhuis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV protease inhibitor (PI therapy results in the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants harbouring one or two substitutions in the viral protease. To combat PI resistance development, two approaches have been developed. The first is to increase the level of PI in the plasma of the patient, and the second is to develop novel PI with high potency against the known PI-resistant HIV protease variants. Both approaches share the requirement for a considerable increase in the number of protease mutations to lead to clinical resistance, thereby increasing the genetic barrier. We investigated whether HIV could yet again find a way to become less susceptible to these novel inhibitors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have performed in vitro selection experiments using a novel PI with an increased genetic barrier (RO033-4649 and demonstrated selection of three viruses 4- to 8-fold resistant to all PI compared to wild type. These PI-resistant viruses did not have a single substitution in the viral protease. Full genomic sequencing revealed the presence of NC/p1 cleavage site substitutions in the viral Gag polyprotein (K436E and/or I437T/V in all three resistant viruses. These changes, when introduced in a reference strain, conferred PI resistance. The mechanism leading to PI resistance is enhancement of the processing efficiency of the altered substrate by wild-type protease. Analysis of genotypic and phenotypic resistance profiles of 28,000 clinical isolates demonstrated the presence of these NC/p1 cleavage site mutations in some clinical samples (codon 431 substitutions in 13%, codon 436 substitutions in 8%, and codon 437 substitutions in 10%. Moreover, these cleavage site substitutions were highly significantly associated with reduced susceptibility to PI in clinical isolates lacking primary protease mutations. Furthermore, we used data from a clinical trial (NARVAL, ANRS 088 to demonstrate that these NC/p1 cleavage site changes are

  4. Anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial activities of a serine protease inhibitor from honeybee (Apis cerana) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia, Jingming; Jin, Byung Rae

    2017-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents, including low-molecular-weight protease inhibitors. While the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 containing a trypsin inhibitor-like cysteine-rich domain was identified from honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom, no anti-fibrinolytic or anti-microbial roles for this inhibitor have been elucidated. In this study, we identified an Asiatic honeybee (A. cerana) venom serine protease inhibitor (AcVSPI) that was shown to act as a microbial serine protease inhibitor and plasmin inhibitor. AcVSPI was found to consist of a trypsin inhibitor-like domain that displays ten cysteine residues. Interestingly, the AcVSPI peptide sequence exhibited high similarity to the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, which suggests that AcVSPI is an allergen Api m 6-like peptide. Recombinant AcVSPI was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, and it demonstrated inhibitory activity against trypsin, but not chymotrypsin. Additionally, AcVSPI has inhibitory effects against plasmin and microbial serine proteases; however, it does not have any detectable inhibitory effects on thrombin or elastase. Consistent with these inhibitory effects, AcVSPI inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products. AcVSPI also bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi as well as gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. These findings demonstrate the anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial roles of AcVSPI as a serine protease inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  6. Design of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating isophthalamide-derived P2-P3 ligands: Synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray structural studies of inhibitor-HIV-1 protease complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Brindisi, Margherita; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Takayama, Jun; Ella-Menye, Jean-Rene; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    Based upon molecular insights from the X-ray structures of inhibitor-bound HIV-1 protease complexes, we have designed a series of isophthalamide-derived inhibitors incorporating substituted pyrrolidines, piperidines and thiazolidines as P2-P3 ligands for specific interactions in the S2-S3 extended site. Compound 4b has shown an enzyme Ki of 0.025 nM and antiviral IC50 of 69 nM. An X-ray crystal structure of inhibitor 4b-HIV-1 protease complex was determined at 1.33 Å resolution. We have also determined X-ray structure of 3b-bound HIV-1 protease at 1.27 Å resolution. These structures revealed important molecular insight into the inhibitor–HIV-1 protease interactions in the active site.

  7. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationships of potent noncovalent and nonpeptidic cruzain inhibitors as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rafaela S; Dessoy, Marco A; Pauli, Ivani; Souza, Mariana L; Krogh, Renata; Sales, Ana I L; Oliva, Glaucius; Dias, Luiz C; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2014-03-27

    The development of cruzain inhibitors has been driven by the urgent need to develop novel and more effective drugs for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Herein, we report the lead optimization of a class of noncovalent cruzain inhibitors, starting from an inhibitor previously cocrystallized with the enzyme (K(i) = 0.8 μM). With the goal of achieving a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships, we have synthesized and evaluated a series of over 40 analogues, leading to the development of a very promising competitive inhibitor (8r, IC50 = 200 nM, K(i) = 82 nM). Investigation of the in vitro trypanocidal activity and preliminary cytotoxicity revealed the potential of the most potent cruzain inhibitors in guiding further medicinal chemistry efforts to develop drug candidates for Chagas' disease.

  8. Kininogens: More than cysteine protease inhibitors and kinin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmanach, Gilles; Naudin, Clément; Lecaille, Fabien; Fritz, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Two kininogens are found in mammalian sera: HK (high molecular weight kininogen) and LK (low molecular weight kininogen) with the exception of the rat which encompasses a third kininogen, T-Kininogen (TK). Kininogens are multifunctional glycosylated molecules related to cystatins (clan IH, family I25). They harbor three cystatin domains but only two of them are tight-binding inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins. HK and LK, but not TK, are precursors of potent peptide hormones, the kinins, which are released proteolytically by tissue and plasma kallikreins. Besides these classical features novel functions of kininogens have been recently discovered; they are described in the second part of this review. HKa, which corresponds to the kinin-free two-chain HK and its isolated domain D5 (kininostatin), possesses angiostatic and pro-apoptotic properties, inhibits the proliferation of endothelial cells and participates in the regulation of angiogenesis. Moreover, some HK-derived peptides display potent and broad-spectrum microbicidal properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and thus may offer a promising alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy. Of seminal interest, a kininogen-derived peptide inhibits activation of the contact phase system of coagulation and protects mice with invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection from pulmonary lesions. On the other hand, TK is a biomarker of aging at the end of lifespan of elderly rats. However, although TK has been initially identified as an acute phase reactant, and earlier known as alpha-l-acute phase globulin, the increase of TK in liver and plasma is not known to relate to any inflammatory event during the senescence process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of inhibitors of the transmembrane protease FlaK of Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburger, Ina; Schaub, Yvonne; Roeser, Dirk; Hardes, Kornelia; Maeder, Patrick; Klee, Nina; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Imhof, Diana; Diederich, Wibke E; Than, Manuel E

    2016-08-01

    GxGD-type intramembrane cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs) form a family of proteolytic enzymes that feature an aspartate-based catalytic mechanism. Yet, they structurally and functionally largely differ from the classical pepsin-like aspartic proteases. Among them are the archaeal enzyme FlaK, processing its substrate FlaB2 during the formation of flagella and γ-secretase, which is centrally involved in the etiology of the neurodegenerative Alzheimer's disease. We developed an optimized activity assay for FlaK and based on screening of a small in-house library and chemical synthesis, we identified compound 9 as the first inhibitor of this enzyme. Our results show that this intramembrane protease differs from classical pepsin-like aspartic proteases and give insights into the substrate recognition of this enzyme. By providing the needed tools to further study the enzymatic cycle of FlaK, our results also enable further studies towards a functional understanding of other GxGD-type I-CLiPs. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Differential efficacy of protease inhibitors against HCV genotypes 2a, 3a, 5a, and 6a NS3/4A protease recombinant viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Jensen, Tanja B

    2011-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype influences efficacy of interferon (IFN)-based therapy. HCV protease inhibitors are being licensed for treatment of genotype 1 infection. Because there are limited or no data on efficacy against HCV genotypes 2-7, we aimed at developing recombinant infectious c...

  11. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H.; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J.; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A.; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-01-01

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30–40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors. PMID:27226628

  12. Interaction of protein C inhibitor with the type II transmembrane serine protease enteropeptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Prohaska

    Full Text Available The serine protease inhibitor protein C inhibitor (PCI is expressed in many human tissues and exhibits broad protease reactivity. PCI binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids, which modulate its inhibitory activity. Enteropeptidase (EP is a type II transmembrane serine protease mainly found on the brush border membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum, where it activates trypsinogen to initiate the digestion of food proteins. Some active EP is also present in duodenal fluid and has been made responsible for causing pancreatitis in case of duodeno-pancreatic reflux. Together with its substrate trypsinogen, EP is furthermore present in the epidermis and in some cancer cells. In this report, we show that PCI inhibited EP with an apparent 2nd order rate constant of 4.48 × 10(4 M(-1 s(-1. Low molecular weight (LMWH and unfractionated heparin (UFH slightly reduced the inhibitory effect of PCI. The SI (stoichiometry of inhibition value for the inhibition of EP by PCI was 10.8 in the absence and 17.9 in the presence of UFH (10 U/ml. By inhibiting trypsin, chymotrypsin, and additionally EP, PCI might play a role in the protection of the pancreas from autodigestion. Furthermore the interaction of PCI with EP may influence the regulation of epithelial differentiation.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor from leaves of Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheesh, L Shilpa; Murugan, K

    2011-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor isolated from Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt. has been reported. A 14.3 kDa protease inhibitor (PI) was isolated and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation (20-85% saturation), sephadex G-75, DEAE sepharose column and trypsin-sepharose affinity chromatography from the leaves of C. grandis. The purity was checked by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. PI exhibited marked growth inhibitory effects on colon cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PI was thermostable and showed antimicrobial activity without hemolytic activity. PI strongly inhibited pathogenic microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Eschershia coli, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, Mucor indicus, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus flavus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Examination by bright field microscopy showed inhibition of mycelial growth and sporulation. Morphologically, PI treated fungus showed a significant shrinkage of hyphal tips. Reduced PI completely lost its activity indicating that disulfide bridge is essential for its protease inhibitory and antifungal activity. Results reported in this study suggested that PI may be an excellent candidate for development of novel oral or other anti-infective agents.

  14. Identification of cysteine protease inhibitors as new drug leads against Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyserman, Ingrid; Mondal, Deboprosad; Sarabia, Francisco; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R; Debnath, Anjan

    2018-03-15

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rapidly fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. PAM occurs principally in healthy children of less than 13 years old with a history of recent exposure to warm fresh water. While as yet not a reportable disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documents a total of 143 cases in the United States. Only four patients have survived. Infection results from water containing N. fowleri entering the nose, followed by migration of the amebae to the brain. Within the brain, N. fowleri infection results in extensive necrosis, leading to death in 3-7 days. Mortality among patients with PAM is greater than 95%. The drugs of choice in treating PAM are the antifungal amphotericin B, and the antileishmanial, miltefosine. However neither drug is FDA-approved for this indication and the use of amphotericin B is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, very few patients treated with amphotericin B have survived PAM. Therefore, development of new, safe and effective drugs is a critical unmet need to avert future deaths of children. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of PAM are poorly understood but it is known that cysteine proteases of N. fowleri play a role in the progression of PAM. We therefore assessed the in vitro activity of the synthetic vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor, K11777, and 33 analogs with valine, phenylalanine or pyridylalanine at P2 position, against cysteine protease activity in the lysate of N. fowleri. Inhibitors with phenylalanine or pyridylalanine at P2 position were particularly effective in inhibiting the cysteine protease activity of N. fowleri cell lysate with IC 50 ranging between 3 nM and 6.6 μM. Three of the 34 inhibitors also showed inhibitory activity against N. fowleri in a cell viability assay and were 1.6- to 2.5-fold more potent than the standard of care drug miltefosine. Our study provides the first evidence

  15. Effect of protease inhibitors on thermal gelation of squid (Illex argentinus. mantle paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elida Paredi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the thermal gelation of squid mantle paste and the effect of protease inhibitors on them were investigated. Pastes in the absence and presence the protease inhibitors, ethylendiaminetetracetic acid (EDTA and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF, were formulated. Pastes were made by the respective one or two step thermal treatments: direct heating at 85°C for 20 min and preincubation at 27 or 40 °C for 3 or 2 hours, followed by heating at 85 °C for 20 min. The gel strength, water holding capacity (WHC and whiteness of gelled pastes were analyzed. The tricloroacetic acid (TCA soluble peptides in homogenate of the muscle were determined. Gel strength decreased when heating was made in two steps. EDTA and PMSF were effective in avoiding that decrease when pre-incubation was made at 40 °C. Maximum gel strength was observed for the gels in presence of EDTA, giving values of 255 and 219 g x cm for the samples made by direct heating and pre-incubated at 40 °C  respectively. TCA soluble peptides increased between 20 and 60 °C, with maximum values reached at 30 and 60 °C. No significant differences (p>0.05 were observed in gel whiteness, neither with the thermal treatment nor with the inhibitors. The WHC was higher (p<0.05 in the gelated paste formulated with EDTA. These results show a good gelation capacity of I argentinus pastes and improvements with protease inhibitors

  16. Phylogenetic distribution of protease inhibitors of the Kazal-family within the Arthropoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoef, Vincent; Breugelmans, Bert; Spit, Jornt; Simonet, Gert; Zels, Sven; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-03-01

    In mammalian pancreatic cells, the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) belonging to the Kazal-family prevents the premature activation of digestive enzymes and thus plays an important role in a protective mechanism against tissue destruction by autophagy. Although a similar protective mechanism exists in Arthropoda, the distribution of these inhibitors in this phylum remains obscure. A comprehensive in silico search of nucleotide databases, revealed the presence of members of the Kazal-family in the four major subphyla of the Arthropoda. Especially in the Hexapoda and the Crustacea these inhibitors are widespread, while in the Chelicerata and Myriapoda only a few Kazal-like protease inhibitors were found. A sequence alignment of inhibitors retrieved in the digestive system of insects revealed a conservation of the PSTI characteristics and strong resemblance to vertebrate PSTI. A phylogenetic analysis of these inhibitors showed that they generally cluster according to their order. The results of this data mining study provide new evidence for the existence of an ancient protective mechanism in metazoan digestive systems. Kazal-like inhibitors, which play an important protective role in the pancreas of vertebrates, also seem to be present in Arthropoda. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of HIV-1 from patients with virological failure to a boosted protease inhibitor regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemark, Marie Rathcke; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) regimens with unboosted protease inhibitors (PIs) has resulted in a high level of virological failure primarily due to the development of resistant virus. Current boosted PI regimens combine successfully low-dose ritonavir (r) with a second...... PI. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of patients, in a population based setting, who develop virological failure on a PI/r regimen. Through The Danish HIV Cohort Study 1,007 patients who received PI/r based treatment between 1995 and 2008 were identified. Twenty-three (2.......3%) experienced virological failure, of whom 19 (83%) started PI/r treatment before 2001. Patients from Copenhagen (n=19) were selected to study the development of protease (PR) and gag cleavage site (CS) mutations during PI/r treatment and PI plasma levels at the time of virological failure. Three patients (16...

  18. Role of hydroxyl group and R/S configuration of isostere in binding properties of HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petroková, Hana; Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Vondráčková-Buchtelová, Eva; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Fábry, Milan; Sedláček, Juraj; Hašek, Jindřich

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 271, č. 22 (2004), s. 4451-4461 ISSN 0014-2956 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312 Keywords : ethyleneamine inhibitor * HIV -1 protease * peptidomimetic inhibitor Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.260, year: 2004

  19. Bone mineral density changes in protease inhibitor-sparing vs. nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy: data from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ab; Obel, N; Nielsen, H

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods Sixty-three HAART...

  20. The battle in the apoplast: further insights into the roles of proteases and their inhibitors in plant–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Mehrabi, Rahim; Collemare, Jérôme; Mesarich, Carl H.; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Upon host penetration, fungal pathogens secrete a plethora of effectors to promote disease, including proteases that degrade plant antimicrobial proteins, and protease inhibitors (PIs) that inhibit plant proteases with antimicrobial activity. Conversely, plants secrete proteases and PIs to protect themselves against pathogens or to mediate recognition of pathogen proteases and PIs, which leads to induction of defense responses. Many examples of proteases and PIs mediating effector-triggered immunity in host plants have been reported in the literature, but little is known about their role in compromising basal defense responses induced by microbe-associated molecular patterns. Recently, several reports appeared in literature on secreted fungal proteases that modify or degrade pathogenesis-related proteins, including plant chitinases or PIs that compromise their activities. This prompted us to review the recent advances on proteases and PIs involved in fungal virulence and plant defense. Proteases and PIs from plants and their fungal pathogens play an important role in the arms race between plants and pathogens, which has resulted in co-evolutionary diversification and adaptation shaping pathogen lifestyles. PMID:26284100

  1. Rapid emergence of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance is expected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Current therapy, consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), leads to sustained viral elimination in only about 45% of patients treated. Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection. However, some patients experience viral breakthrough during dosing, with drug resistant variants being 5%-20% of the virus population as early as day 2 after treatment initiation. Why viral variants appear such a short time after the start of dosing is unclear, especially since this has not been seen with monotherapy for either human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus. Here, using a viral dynamic model, we explain why such rapid emergence of drug resistant variants is expected when potent HCV protease inhibitors are used as monotherapy. Surprisingly, our model also shows that such rapid emergence need not be the case with some potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Examining the case of telaprevir therapy in detail, we show the model fits observed dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant variants during treatment, and supports combination therapy of direct antiviral drugs with PEG-IFN and/or RBV for hepatitis C.

  2. Potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus protease structurally related to L-694,746.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, P; Perlini, P; Abu Sheikha, G; Cappellacci, L; Grifantini, M; Loi, A G; De Montis, A; Pani, A; Marongiu, M E; La Colla, P

    1998-07-01

    A series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors, which are analogues of N-[2(R)-hydroxy-1(S)- indanyl]-5(S)-[(tert-butyloxycarbonyl)amino]-4(S)-hydroxy-6-phenyl-2-(R) - [[4-(carboxymethoxy)phenyl]methyl]hexanamide (L-694,746), a metabolite of the anti-HIV agent L-689,502, were synthesized. In these compounds, the acetic group linked to the para position of the P1' phenyl in the reference inhibitor was replaced either by the bioisosteric phosphonomethoxy group and its diisopropyl/dibenzyl derivatives, or the 1H-tetrazol-5-yl-methoxy group and its 1-benzyl derivative. In enzyme assays, phosphonomethoxy and tetrazolmethoxy analogues proved to be potent inhibitors of the HIV-1 protease, with IC50 values as low as 0.04 nM. When tested for anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-based assays, most of the new derivatives proved active, with benzyl derivatives being more active than their highly polar, unsubstituted counterparts. The dibenzylphosphonomethoxy analogue was the most active compound, with an EC50 value of 10 nM and a selectivity index of 20,000. When compounds were examined for their capability to reduce p24 levels in both acutely and chronically infected MT-4 and H9/IIIB cells, all of them were found to be active at concentrations close to those capable of preventing HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect.

  3. Characterization of the Mamestra configurata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larval midgut protease complement and adaptation to feeding on artificial diet, Brassica species, and protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Martin A; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Baldwin, Douglas; Noakes, Amy; Toprak, Umut

    2010-10-01

    The midgut protease profiles from 5th instar Mamestra configurata larvae fed various diets (standard artificial diet, low protein diet, low protein diet with soybean trypsin inhibitor [SBTI], or Brassica napus) were characterized by one-dimensional enzymography in gelatin gels. The gut protease profile of larvae fed B. napus possessed protease activities of molecular masses of approximately 33 and 55 kDa, which were not present in the guts of larvae fed artificial diet. Similarly, larvae fed artificial diet had protease activities of molecular masses of approximately 21, 30, and 100 kDa that were absent in larvae fed B. napus. Protease profiles changed within 12 to 24 h after switching larvae from artificial diet to plant diet and vice versa. The gut protease profiles from larvae fed various other brassicaceous species and lines having different secondary metabolite profiles did not differ despite significant differences in larval growth rates on the different host plants. Genes encoding putative digestive proteolytic enzymes, including four carboxypeptidases, five aminopeptidases, and 48 serine proteases, were identified in cDNA libraries from 4th instar M. configurata midgut tissue. Many of the protease-encoding genes were expressed at similar levels on all diets; however, three chymoptrypsin-like genes (McSP23, McSP27, and McSP37) were expressed at much higher levels on standard artificial diet and diet containing SBTI as was the trypsin-like gene McSP34. The expression of the trypsin-like gene McSP50 was highest on B. napus. The adaptation of M. configurata digestive biochemistry to different diets is discussed in the context of the flexibility of polyphagous insects to changing diet sources.

  4. Journey of cystatins from being mere thiol protease inhibitors to at heart of many pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Anas; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-09-01

    Cystatins are thiol proteinase inhibitors (TPI), present ubiquitously in animals, plants and micro-organisms. These are not merely inhibitors rather they are at heart of many pathological conditions ranging from diabetes to renal failure. These are essential for maintenance of protein balance of the cell; once this balance gets disturbed, it may lead to cell death. Thus, cystatins cannot be merely regarded as TPI's as these have been found to play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases. Many studies have reported the variation in cystatin level in incidences of different types of cancer; highlighting an important role played by these inhibitors in cancer development and progression. Cystatin C is increasingly replacing creatinine as a biomarker of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) thereby highlighting the importance of this important inhibitor. Some recent studies have also reported the interaction pattern of various anti-cancer drugs with cystatins in a bid to find how these drugs affect this important inhibitors and whether these drugs have any side effect on cystatins. Thus, in this growing disease era it can be said that cystatins are no more just inhibitors blocking the activity of thiol proteases rather they play a pivotal role in variety of pathological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The putative serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 from Apis mellifera venom: recombinant and structural evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Y; McIntyre, M; Ginglinger, H; Ollert, M; Cifuentes, L; Blank, S; Spillner, E

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated reactions to honeybee venom can cause severe anaphylaxis, sometimes with fatal consequences. Detailed knowledge of the allergic potential of all venom components is necessary to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of allergy and to gain a better understanding of the allergological mechanisms of insect venoms. Our objective was to undertake an immunochemical and structural evaluation of the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, a component of honeybee venom. We recombinantly produced Api m 6 as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli and in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.We also assessed specific IgE reactivity of venom-sensitized patients with 2 prokaryotically produced Api m 6 variants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, we built a structural model ofApi m 6 and compared it with other protease inhibitor structures to gain insights into the function of Api m 6. In a population of 31 honeybee venom-allergic patients, 26% showed specific IgE reactivity with prokaryotically produced Api m 6, showing it to be a minor but relevant allergen. Molecular modeling of Api m 6 revealed a typical fold of canonical protease inhibitors, supporting the putative function of this venom allergen. Although Api m 6 has a highly variant surface charge, its epitope distribution appears to be similar to that of related proteins. Api m 6 is a honeybee venom component with IgE-sensitizing potential in a fraction of venom-allergic patients. Recombinant Api m 6 can help elucidate individual component-resolved reactivity profiles and increase our understanding of immune responses to low-molecular-weight allergens

  6. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-11-01

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. General and Modular Strategy for Designing Potent, Selective, and Pharmacologically Compliant Inhibitors of Rhomboid Proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, Anežka; Stanchev, Stancho; Vinothkumar, K. R.; Mikles, David C.; Pachl, Petr; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Švehlová, Kateřina; Nguyen, M. T. N.; Verhelst, S. H. L.; Johnson, D. C.; Bachovchin, D. A.; Lepšík, Martin; Majer, Pavel; Stříšovský, Kvido

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 12 (2017), s. 1523-1536 ISSN 2451-9448 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 304154 - Rhomboid substrates Grant - others:EMBO(DE) 2329 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alpha-ketoamide inhibitors * activity-based probes * intramembrane protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2451945617303513?via%3Dihub

  8. Effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy after protease inhibitor failure: an analytic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losina, Elena; Islam, Runa; Pollock, Alison C; Sax, Paul E; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2004-06-01

    To examine effectiveness of subsequent antiretroviral therapy (ART), studies published during the period of 1 January 1997 through 31 May 2003 involving patients who had failed a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen and were switched to another regimen were reviewed. Twelve studies describing 1197 patients were analyzed. A total of 38% of patients had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA levels of ART regimens in patients who failed a PI-containing regimen provided virologic suppression only in a few patients. The best response was seen in NNRTI-naive patients receiving NNRTI- and boosted PI-containing regimens. New approaches are needed to achieve better suppression in pretreated HIV-infected patients.

  9. Effect of nutrient limitation of cyanobacteria on protease inhibitor production and fitness of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Sadler, Thomas; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Herbivore-plant interactions have been well studied in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as they are crucial for the trophic transfer of energy and matter. In nutrient-rich freshwater ecosystems, the interaction between primary producers and herbivores is to a large extent represented by Daphnia and cyanobacteria. The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and ponds has, at least partly, been attributed to cyanotoxins, which negatively affect the major grazer of planktonic cyanobacteria, i.e. Daphnia. Among these cyanotoxins are the widespread protease inhibitors. These inhibitors have been shown (both in vitro and in situ) to inhibit the most important group of digestive proteases in the gut of Daphnia, i.e. trypsins and chymotrypsins, and to reduce Daphnia growth. In this study we grew cultures of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain BM25 on nutrient-replete, N-depleted or P-depleted medium. We identified three different micropeptins to be the cause for the inhibitory activity of BM25 against chymotrypsins. The micropeptin content depended on nutrient availability: whereas N limitation led to a lower concentration of micropeptins per biomass, P limitation resulted in a higher production of these chymotrypsin inhibitors. The altered micropeptin content of BM25 was accompanied by changed effects on the fitness of Daphnia magna: a higher content of micropeptins led to lower IC50 values for D. magna gut proteases and vice versa. Following expectations, the lower micropeptin content in the N-depleted BM25 caused higher somatic growth of D. magna. Therefore, protease inhibitors can be regarded as a nutrient-dependent defence against grazers. Interestingly, although the P limitation of the cyanobacterium led to a higher micropeptin content, high growth of D. magna was observed when they were fed with P-depleted BM25. This might be due to reduced digestibility of P-depleted cells with putatively thick mucilaginous sheaths. These findings indicate that

  10. A distinct binding model of a hydroxyethylamine isostere inhibitor of HIV-1 protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Hašek, Jindřich; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Hradilek, Martin; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Sedláček, Juraj; Fábry, Milan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2001), s. 472-476 ISSN 0907-4449 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA ČR GA203/97/P031; GA ČR GV203/98/K023; GA AV ČR KSK2050602 Grant - others:GA TU(XC) 30497487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV-1 protease * inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2001

  11. Equine protease inhibitor system as a marker for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinocur Myriam E.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The protease inhibitor system (PI was investigated to ascertain if it can be used as a marker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in thoroughbred horses. Serum samples were taken from healthy thoroughbreds (n = 13 and those diagnosed as having COPD (n = 24 or inflammatory airway disease (IAD, n = 38 as well as from 3,600 undiagnosed thoroughbred horses. PI allelic and genotypic frequencies were estimated using protein electrophoresis on starch and polyacrylamide gels. The four groups of horses showed high genotypic similarity and none of the observed alleles or genotypes of the equine PI system were found to be associated with COPD.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 to 6 Protease Inhibitor Escape Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serre, Stéphanie B N; Jensen, Sanne B; Ghanem, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs) are important components of novel HCV therapy regimens. Studies of PI resistance initially focused on genotype 1. Therefore, knowledge on determinants of PI resistance for the highly prevalent genotypes 2-6 remains limited. Using Huh7.5 cell...... selected under telaprevir/boceprevir conferred less resistance to certain newer PIs. In a single-cycle production assay, across genotypes, PI treatment primarily decreased viral replication, which was rescued by PI resistance substitutions. Identified substitutions resulted in differential effects on viral...... cycle, which is of interest for clinical and virological HCV research....

  13. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R., E-mail: grw7@cornell.edu

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  14. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza

  15. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor: increasing affinity by increasing peptide flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyu Zhao

    Full Text Available Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC, of the serine protease murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA. We used X-ray crystal structure analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, liquid state NMR, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and isothermal titration calorimetry and wild type and engineered variants of murine and human uPA. We demonstrate that Arg6 inserts into the S1 specificity pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending on changes in both P1 - S1 and exosite interactions. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that exosite interactions, while still supporting high affinity binding, differed substantially between different uPA variants. Surprisingly, high affinity binding was facilitated by Ala-substitution of Asp9 of the peptide, in spite of a less favorable binding entropy and loss of a polar interaction. We conclude that increased flexibility of the peptide allows more favorable exosite interactions, which, in combination with the use of novel Arg analogues as P1 residues, can be used to manipulate the affinity and specificity of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden.

  16. Sulfur mustard-stimulated proteases and their inhibitors in a cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes model: A potential approach for anti-vesicant drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiannu Jin

    Full Text Available Protease stimulation in cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK due to sulfur mustard (SM exposure is well documented. However, the specific protease(s stimulated by SM and the protease substrates remain to be determined. In this study, we observed that SM stimulates several proteases and the epidermal-dermal attachment protein laminin-5 is one of the substrates. We propose that following SM exposure of the skin, laminin-5 degradation causes the detachment of the epidermis from the dermis and, therefore, vesication. We utilized gelatin zymography, Western blotting, immuno-fluorescence staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analyses to study the SM-stimulated proteases and laminin-5 degradation in NHEK. Two major protease bands (64 kDa and 72 kDa were observed by zymography in SM-exposed cells. Addition of serine protease inhibitor (aprotinin, 100 μM, or the metalloprotease inhibitor (amastatin, 100 μM to NHEK cultures prior to SM exposure decreased the SM-stimulated protease bands seen by zymography. These inhibitors completely or partially prevented SM-induced laminin-5 γ2 degradation as seen by Western blotting as well as immuno-fluorescence staining. Our results from Western blotting and RT-PCR studies also indicated that the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MT-MM-1 may be involved in SM-induced skin blistering.To summarize, our results in the NHEK model indicate the following: (a SM stimulates multiple proteases including serine protease(s, and metalloproteases; (b SM decreases the level of laminin-5 γ2, which is prevented by either a serine protease inhibitor or a metalloprotease inhibitor and (c MT-MMP-1 maybe one of the proteases that is involved in skin blistering due to SM exposure. Keywords: Sulfur mustard, Serine protease, Metalloprotease, Protease inhibiter, Zymography, Laminin-5 γ2

  17. Structural and functional characterization of cleavage and inactivation of human serine protease inhibitors by the bacterial SPATE protease EspPα from enterohemorrhagic E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Weiss

    Full Text Available EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI, α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition.

  18. The growth hormone dependent serine protease inhibitor, Spi 2.1 inhibits the des (1-3) insulin-like growth factor-I generating protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maake, C; Yamamoto, H; Murphy, L J

    1997-12-01

    The conversion of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) to the biologically more active des (1-3) IGF-I variant is catalyzed by a ubiquitous protease. This proteolytic activity is inhibited by human alpha1-antitrypsin and soy-bean trypsin inhibitor and is up-regulated in serum and tissue extracts of hypophysectomized rats. These observations lead us to investigate whether the growth hormone regulated, serine protease inhibitor, Spi 2.1 was able to inhibit the des (1-3) IGF-I generating protease. Dihydrofolate reductase deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO(dhfr-ve)) cells were transfected with a rat Spi 2.1 expression vector containing the dhfr and neomycin resistance gene. Stable transfectants were selected using G418 and amplified using methotrexate. Conditioned medium from Spi 2.1 transfected CHO cells potently inhibited proteolytic activity directed against a synthetic hexa-peptide with a sequence identical to the N-terminal of IGF-I. In contrast conditioned medium from wild-type CHO cells had little effect. Based upon these observations we suggest that our previous finding of enhanced des (1-3) IGF-I generating protease activity in growth hormone deficient rats may be, at least partly explained by reduced levels of Spi 2.1. Furthermore, we propose that the regulation of the generation of des (1-3) IGF-I may be an additional potential site of growth hormone regulation of IGF-I action.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protease from Southampton norovirus complexed with a Michael acceptor inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussey, R. J.; Coates, L.; Gill, R. S.; Wright, J. N.; Sarwar, M.; Coker, S.; Erskine, P. T.; Cooper, J. B.; Wood, S.; Clarke, I. N.; Lambden, P. R.; Broadbridge, R.; Shoolingin-Jordan, P. M.

    2010-01-01

    The crystallization of the recombinant protease from Southampton norovirus is described. Whilst the native crystals were found to diffract only to medium resolution (2.9 Å), cocrystals with a designed covalently bound inhibitor diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. Noroviruses are the predominant cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional parts. Here, the crystallization of the recombinant protease from the Southampton norovirus is described. Whilst the native crystals were found to diffract only to medium resolution (2.9 Å), cocrystals of an inhibitor complex diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. The polypeptide inhibitor (Ac-EFQLQ-propenyl ethyl ester) possesses an amino-acid sequence designed to match the substrate specificity of the enzyme, but was synthesized with a reactive Michael acceptor group at the C-terminal end

  20. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N. [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, Rafael M. [Biology of Host Parasite Interactions Unit, Institute Pasteur, 75015 Paris (France); Braz, Gloria R.C. [Department of Biochemistry, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tanaka, Aparecida S., E-mail: Tanaka.bioq@epm.br [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  1. Transcriptional regulation in cowpea bruchid guts during adaptation to a plant defence protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, J; Salzman, R A; Ahn, J-E; Koiwa, H; Zhu-Salzman, K

    2004-06-01

    Cowpea bruchid, when fed on a diet containing the soybean cysteine protease inhibitor soyacystatin N (scN), activates an array of counter-defence genes to adapt to the negative effects of the inhibitor and regain its normal rate of feeding and development. A collection of 1920 cDNAs was obtained by differential subtraction with cDNAs prepared from guts of the 4th instar larvae of scN-adapted (reared on scN-containing diet) and scN-unadapted (reared on regular scN-free diet) cowpea bruchids. Subsequent expression profiling using DNA microarray and Northern blot analyses identified ninety-four transcript species from this collection that are responsive to dietary scN. scN-adapted insects induced genes encoding protein and carbohydrate digestive enzymes, probably to help meet their carbon and nitrogen requirements. Up-regulation of antimicrobial and detoxification protein genes may represent a generalized defence response. Genes down-regulated by scN reflected physiological adjustments of the cowpea bruchids to scN challenge. A large portion of the responsive genes, presumably involved in carrying out the counter-defence response, were of unknown function. The full-length cDNA of an scN-inducible cathepsin B-like cysteine protease was obtained. Its transcriptional response to scN during larval development contrasts with the pattern of the cathepsin L family, the major digestive enzymes. These results suggest cathepsin B-like cysteine proteases may play a crucial role in cowpea bruchid adaptation to dietary scN.

  2. Human Kunitz-type protease inhibitor engineered for enhanced matrix retention extends longevity of fibrin biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquez, Priscilla S; Lorentz, Kristen M; Larsson, Hans M; Frey, Peter; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2017-08-01

    Aprotinin is a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor used in the clinic as an anti-fibrinolytic agent in fibrin-based tissue sealants. However, upon re-exposure, some patients suffer from hypersensitivity immune reactions likely related to the bovine origin of aprotinin. Here, we aimed to develop a human-derived substitute to aprotinin. Based on sequence homology analyses, we identified the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) domain of human amyloid-β A4 precursor protein as being a potential candidate. While KPI has a lower intrinsic anti-fibrinolytic activity than aprotinin, we reasoned that its efficacy is additionally limited by its fast release from fibrin material, just as aprotinin's is. Thus, we engineered KPI variants for controlled retention in fibrin biomaterials, using either covalent binding through incorporation of a substrate for the coagulation transglutaminase Factor XIIIa or through engineering of extracellular matrix protein super-affinity domains for sequestration into fibrin. We showed that both engineered KPI variants significantly slowed plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis in vitro, outperforming aprotinin. In vivo, our best engineered KPI variant (incorporating the transglutaminase substrate) extended fibrin matrix longevity by 50%, at a dose at which aprotinin did not show efficacy, thus qualifying it as a competitive substitute of aprotinin in fibrin sealants. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo expression of proteases and protease inhibitor, a serpin, by periodontal pathogens at teeth and implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Martin; Mizgalska, Danuta; Sculean, Anton; Potempa, Jan; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Eick, Sigrun

    2018-03-02

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia secrete proteases, gingipains and KLIKK-proteases. In addition, T. forsythia produces a serpin (miropin) with broad inhibitory spectrum. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the level of expression of miropin and individual proteases in vivo in periodontal and peri-implant health and disease conditions. Biofilm and gingival/peri-implant crevicular fluid (GCF or PISF respectively) samples from healthy tooth and implant sites (n=10), gingivitis and mucositis sites (n=12), and periodontitis and peri-implantitis sites (n=10). Concentration of interleukins (IL)-8, IL-1β and IL-10 in GCF was determined by ELISA. Loads of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia and the presence of proteases and miropin genes were assessed in biofilm by qPCR, while genes expression was estimated by qRT-PCR. Presence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, as well as the level of IL-8 and IL-1β, were associated with disease severity in the periodontal and peri-implant tissues. In biofilm samples harboring T. forsythia genes encoding proteases were found to be present at 72.4% for karilysin and 100% for other KLIKK-proteases genes and miropin. At the same time, detectable mRNA expression of individual genes was in the range from 20.7% to 58.6% samples (for forsylisin and miropsin-1, respectively). In comparison to the T. forsythia proteases, miropin and the gingipains were highly expressed. The level of expression of gingipains was associated with those of miropin and certain T. forsythia proteases around teeth but not implants. Cumulatively, KLIKK-proteases and especially miropin might play a role in pathogenesis of both periodontal and peri-implant diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Replication Upregulates Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal, Resulting in Cellular Resistance to Serine Protease-Dependent Apoptosis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lamontagne, Jason; Pinkerton, Mark; Block, Timothy M.; Lu, Xuanyong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively) are different and distinct viruses, but there are striking similarities in their disease potential. Infection by either virus can cause chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and ultimately, liver cancer, despite the fact that no pathogenetic mechanisms are known which are shared by the two viruses. Our recent studies have suggested that replication of either of these viruses upregulates a cellular protein called serine protease inhibitor Kaz...

  5. Functional analysis of a missense mutation in the serine protease inhibitor SPINT2 associated with congenital sodium diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Faller

    Full Text Available Membrane-bound serine proteases play important roles in different biological processes. Their regulation by endogenous inhibitors is poorly understood. A Y163C mutation in the SPINT2 gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor Hepatocyte Growth Factor Inhibitor HAI-2 is associated with a congenital sodium diarrhea. The functional consequences of this mutation on HAI-2 activity and its physiological targets are unknown. We established a cellular assay in Xenopus laevis oocytes to study functional interactions between HAI-2 and candidate membrane-bound serine proteases expressed in the gastro-intestinal tract. We found that the wild-type form of HAI-2 is a potent inhibitor of nine gastro-intestinal serine proteases. The Y163C mutation in the second Kunitz domain of HAI-2 resulted in a complete loss of inhibitory activity on two intestinal proteases, prostasin and tmprss13. The effect of the mutation of the homologous Y68C in the first Kunitz domain of HAI-2 is consistent with a differential contribution of the two Kunitz domains of HAI-2 in the inhibition of serine proteases. By contrast to the Tyr to Cys, the Tyr to Ser substitution did not change the inhibitory potency of HAI-2, indicating that the thiol-group of the cysteine rather than the Tyr deletion is responsible for the HAI-2 loss of function. Our functional assay allowed us to identify membrane-bound serine proteases as cellular target for inhibition by HAI-2 wild type and mutants, and to better define the role of the Tyr in the second Kunitz domain in the inhibitory activity of HAI-2.

  6. HIV-protease inhibitors for the treatment of cancer: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors while developing more potent NO-hybridized derivatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Fagone, Paolo; McCubrey, James; Bendtzen, Klaus; Mijatovic, Sanja; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2017-04-15

    The possible use of HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) as new therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer primarily originated from their success in treating HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). While these findings were initially attributed to immune reconstitution and better control of oncogenic viral infections, the number of reports on solid tumors, KS, lymphoma, fibrosarcoma, multiple myeloma and prostate cancer suggest other mechanisms for the anti-neoplastic activity of PIs. However, a major drawback for the possible adoption of HIV-PIs in the therapy of cancer relies on their relatively weak anticancer potency and important side effects. This has propelled several groups to generate derivatives of HIV-PIs for anticancer use, through modifications such as attachment of different moieties, ligands and transporters, including saquinavir-loaded folic acid conjugated nanoparticles and nitric oxide (NO) derivatives of HIV-PIs. In this article, we discuss the current preclinical and clinical evidences for the potential use of HIV-PIs, and of novel derivatives, such as saquinavir-NO in the treatment of cancer. © 2016 UICC.

  7. STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF STRONG INHIBITION AND ROLE OF SCAFFOLD FOR SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhimli Dasgupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Canonical serine protease inhibitors inhibit their cognate enzymes by binding tightly at the enzyme active site in a substrate-like manner, being cleaved extremely slowly compared to a true substrate. They interact with cognate enzymes through P3-P2 region of the inhibitory loop while the scaffold hardly makes any contact. Neighbouring scaffolding residues like arginine or asparagine shape-up the inhibitory loop and religate the cleaved scissile bond. The specificity of the inhibitor can be altered by mutating the hyper solvent accessible P1 residue without changing loop-scaffold interactions. To understand the loop-scaffold compatibility, we prepared three chimeric proteins ECIL-WCIS , ETIL-WCIS , and STIL-WCIS , where the inhibitory loops of ECI, ETI, and STI were placed on the scaffold of their homologue WCI. Results showed that although ECIL-WCIS and STIL-WCIS behave like inhibitors, ETIL-WCIS behaves like a substrate. Crystal structure of ETIL-WCIS and its comparison with ETI indicated that three novel scaffolding residues Trp88, Arg74, and Tyr113 in ETI act as barrier to confine the inhibitory loop to canonical conformation. Absence of this barrier in the scaffold of WCI makes the inhibitory loop flexible in ETIL-WCIS leading to a loss of canonical conformation, explaining its substrate-like behaviour. Furthermore, complex structures of the inhibitors with their cognate enzymes indicate that rigidification of the inhibitory loop at the enzyme active site is necessary for efficient inhibition.

  8. Cloning, characterization, expression analysis and inhibition studies of a novel gene encoding Bowman-Birk type protease inhibitor from rice bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the first study describing the isolation, cloning and characterization of a full length gene encoding Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (RbTI) from rice bean (Vigna umbellata). A full-length protease inhibitor gene with complete open reading frame of 327bp encoding 109 amino acids w...

  9. Flavonoids as noncompetitive inhibitors of Dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease: inhibition kinetics and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Lorena Ramos Freitas; Wu, Hongmei; Nebo, Liliane; Fernandes, João Batista; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes; Kiefer, Werner; Kanitz, Manuel; Bodem, Jochen; Diederich, Wibke E; Schirmeister, Tanja; Vieira, Paulo Cezar

    2015-02-01

    NS2B-NS3 is a serine protease of the Dengue virus considered a key target in the search for new antiviral drugs. In this study flavonoids were found to be inhibitors of NS2B-NS3 proteases of the Dengue virus serotypes 2 and 3 with IC50 values ranging from 15 to 44 μM. Agathisflavone (1) and myricetin (4) turned out to be noncompetitive inhibitors of dengue virus serotype 2 NS2B-NS3 protease with Ki values of 11 and 4.7 μM, respectively. Docking studies propose a binding mode of the flavonoids in a specific allosteric binding site of the enzyme. Analysis of biomolecular interactions of quercetin (5) with NT647-NHS-labeled Dengue virus serotype 3 NS2B-NS3 protease by microscale thermophoresis experiments, yielded a dissociation constant KD of 20 μM. Our results help to understand the mechanism of inhibition of the Dengue virus serine protease by flavonoids, which is essential for the development of improved inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sulfur mustard-stimulated proteases and their inhibitors in a cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes model: A potential approach for anti-vesicant drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiannu; Ray, Radharaman; Ray, Prabhati

    2016-01-01

    Protease stimulation in cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) due to sulfur mustard (SM) exposure is well documented. However, the specific protease(s) stimulated by SM and the protease substrates remain to be determined. In this study, we observed that SM stimulates several proteases and the epidermal-dermal attachment protein laminin-5 is one of the substrates. We propose that following SM exposure of the skin, laminin-5 degradation causes the detachment of the epidermis from the dermis and, therefore, vesication. We utilized gelatin zymography, Western blotting, immuno-fluorescence staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses to study the SM-stimulated proteases and laminin-5 degradation in NHEK. Two major protease bands (64 kDa and 72 kDa) were observed by zymography in SM-exposed cells. Addition of serine protease inhibitor (aprotinin, 100 μM), or the metalloprotease inhibitor (amastatin, 100 μM) to NHEK cultures prior to SM exposure decreased the SM-stimulated protease bands seen by zymography. These inhibitors completely or partially prevented SM-induced laminin-5 γ2 degradation as seen by Western blotting as well as immuno-fluorescence staining. Our results from Western blotting and RT-PCR studies also indicated that the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MT-MM-1) may be involved in SM-induced skin blistering. To summarize, our results in the NHEK model indicate the following: (a) SM stimulates multiple proteases including serine protease(s), and metalloproteases; (b) SM decreases the level of laminin-5 γ2, which is prevented by either a serine protease inhibitor or a metalloprotease inhibitor and (c) MT-MMP-1 maybe one of the proteases that is involved in skin blistering due to SM exposure.

  11. Impact of Stereochemistry on Ligand Binding: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Epoxide-Based HIV Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabio; Berti, Federico; Campaner, Pietro; Fanfoni, Lidia; Demitri, Nicola; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; De March, Matteo; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-09-11

    A new pseudopeptide epoxide inhibitor, designed for irreversible binding to HIV protease (HIV-PR), has been synthesized and characterized in solution and in the solid state. However, the crystal structure of the complex obtained by inhibitor-enzyme cocrystallization revealed that a minor isomer, with inverted configuration of the epoxide carbons, has been selected by HIV-PR during crystallization. The structural characterization of the well-ordered pseudopeptide, inserted in the catalytic channel with its epoxide group intact, provides deeper insights into inhibitor binding and HIV-PR stereoselectivity, which aids development of future epoxide-based HIV inhibitors.

  12. Structural Characterization and Determinants of Specificity of Single- Chain Antibody Inhibitors of Membrane-Type Serine Protease 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    protease involved in male chromatin remodeling blocks the development of sea urchin embryos at the initial cell cycle. J. Cell Biochem. 98, 335–342. 18...Macrophage Morphology Changes and Inhibition of Nitric Oxide Production by Macrophages. The cleavage of MSP-1 by MT-SP1 was then tested in primary cells in...inhibitor (Fig. 3) were studied. The morphology change in response to MSP-1 was independent of HAI-1 or anti-MT-SP1 antibody presence. Both inhibitors

  13. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hévila Oliveira Salles

    Full Text Available Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (0.05, Bonferroni test. Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties.

  14. Newly generated cells are increased in hippocampus of adult mice lacking a serine protease inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticker Melanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone occurs throughout the life of mammals and newly generated neurons can integrate functionally into established neuronal circuits. Neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus are modulated by changes in the environment (enrichment, exercise, hippocampal-dependent tasks, NMDA receptor (NMDAR activity, sonic hedgehog (SHH and/or other factors. Results previously, we showed that Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1, a potent serine protease inhibitor, regulates the NMDAR availability and activity as well as SHH signaling. Compared with wild-type (WT, we detected a significant increase in BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of mice lacking PN-1 (PN-1 -/- both in controls and after running exercise. Patched homologue 1 (Ptc1 and Gli1 mRNA levels were higher and Gli3 down-regulated in mutant mice under standard conditions and to a lesser extent after running exercise. However, the number of surviving BrdU-positive cells did not differ between WT and PN-1 -/- animals. NMDAR availability was altered in the hippocampus of mutant animals after exercise. Conclusion All together our results indicate that PN-1 controls progenitors proliferation through an effect on the SHH pathway and suggest an influence of the serpin on the survival of newly generated neurons through modulation of NMDAR availability.

  15. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Hévila Oliveira; Braga, Ana Carolina Linhares; Nascimento, Maria Thayana dos Santos Canuto do; Sousa, Ana Márjory Paiva; Lima, Adriano Rodrigues; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Cavalcante, Antônio Cézar Rocha; Egito, Antonio Silvio do; Andrade, Lúcia Betânia da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (Libidibia ferrea, Moringa oleifera and Ricinus communis (P0.05, Bonferroni test). Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties.

  16. Multi-step inhibition explains HIV-1 protease inhibitor pharmacodynamics and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, S. Alireza; Laird, Gregory M.; Durand, Christine M.; Laskey, Sarah; Shan, Liang; Bailey, Justin R.; Chioma, Stanley; Moore, Richard D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the most effective antiretroviral drugs. They are characterized by highly cooperative dose-response curves that are not explained by current pharmacodynamic theory. An unresolved problem affecting the clinical use of PIs is that patients who fail PI-containing regimens often have virus that lacks protease mutations, in apparent violation of fundamental evolutionary theory. Here, we show that these unresolved issues can be explained through analysis of the effects of PIs on distinct steps in the viral life cycle. We found that PIs do not affect virion release from infected cells but block entry, reverse transcription, and post–reverse transcription steps. The overall dose-response curves could be reconstructed by combining the curves for each step using the Bliss independence principle, showing that independent inhibition of multiple distinct steps in the life cycle generates the highly cooperative dose-response curves that make these drugs uniquely effective. Approximately half of the inhibitory potential of PIs is manifest at the entry step, likely reflecting interactions between the uncleaved Gag and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Sequence changes in the CT alone, which are ignored in current clinical tests for PI resistance, conferred PI resistance, providing an explanation for PI failure without resistance. PMID:23979165

  17. Effects of the aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis seeds on the growth and development of Hypothenemus hampei: an inhibitor showing high homology with storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Diana; Patiño, Luisa; Quintero, Mónica; Cortes, José; Bastos, Sara

    2014-02-01

    The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei is a pest that causes great economic damage to coffee grains worldwide. Because the proteins consumed are digested by aspartic proteases in the insect's midgut, the inhibition of these proteases by transferring a gene encoding an aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis Benth. to coffee plants could provide a promising strategy to control this pest. Five aspartic protease inhibitors from L. bogotensis (LbAPI) were accordingly purified and characterized. The gene encoding the L. bogotensis aspartic protease inhibitor (LbAPI), with the highest inhibitory activity against H. hampei, was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified recombinant protein (rLbAPI), with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, was subsequently assessed for its ability to inhibit the aspartic protease activity present in the H. hampei midgut in vitro, as well as its effects on the growth and development of H. hampei in vivo. The in vitro experiments showed that rLbAPI was highly effective against aspartic proteases from H. hampei guts, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.9 μg. The in vivo experiments showed that the concentration of rLbAPI (w/w) in the artificial diet necessary to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of the larvae was 0.91%. The amino acid sequence of LbAPI had high homology (52-80%) to the seed storage proteins, vicilin and β-conglutin, suggesting that this protein was generated by evolutionary events from a β-conglutin precursor. Based on these results, LbAPI may have a dual function as storage protein, and as defense protein against H. hampei. These results provide a promising alternative to obtain a coffee plant resistant to H. hampei. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Algorithm to design inhibitors using stereochemically mixed l,d polypeptides: Validation against HIV protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pooja; Durani, Susheel

    2015-11-01

    Polypeptides have potential to be designed as drugs or inhibitors against the desired targets. In polypeptides, every chiral α-amino acid has enantiomeric structural possibility to become l or d amino acids and can be used as design monomer. Among the various possibilities, use of stereochemistry as a design tool has potential to determine both functional specificity and metabolic stability of the designed polypeptides. The polypeptides with mixed l,d amino acids are a class of peptidomimitics, an attractive drug like molecules and also less susceptible to proteolytic activities. Therefore in this study, a three step algorithm is proposed to design the polypeptides against desired drug targets. For this, all possible configurational isomers of mixed l,d polyleucine (Ac-Leu8-NHMe) structure were randomly modeled with simulated annealing molecular dynamics and the resultant library of discrete folds were scored against HIV protease as a model target. The best scored folds of mixed l,d structures were inverse optimized for sequences in situ and the resultant sequences as inhibitors were validated for conformational integrity using molecular dynamics. This study presents and validates an algorithm to design polypeptides of mixed l,d structures as drugs/inhibitors by inverse fitting them as molecular ligands against desired target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of Broad-Spectrum Halomethyl Ketone Inhibitors Against Coronavirus Main Protease 3CL(pro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha,U.; Barilla, J.; Gabelli, S.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2008-01-01

    Coronaviruses comprise a large group of RNA viruses with diverse host specificity. The emergence of highly pathogenic strains like the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and the discovery of two new coronaviruses, NL-63 and HKU1, corroborates the high rate of mutation and recombination that have enabled them to cross species barriers and infect novel hosts. For that reason, the development of broad-spectrum antivirals that are effective against several members of this family is highly desirable. This goal can be accomplished by designing inhibitors against a target, such as the main protease 3CLpro (Mpro), which is highly conserved among all coronaviruses. Here 3CLpro derived from the SARS-CoV was used as the primary target to identify a new class of inhibitors containing a halomethyl ketone warhead. The compounds are highly potent against SARS 3CLpro with Ki's as low as 300 nm. The crystal structure of the complex of one of the compounds with 3CLpro indicates that this inhibitor forms a thioether linkage between the halomethyl carbon of the warhead and the catalytic Cys 145. Furthermore, Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) studies of these compounds have led to the identification of a pharmacophore that accurately defines the essential molecular features required for the high affinity.

  20. Optimal therapies of a virus replication model with pharmacological delays based on reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Yongzhen; Li, Changguo; Liang, Xiyin

    2017-01-01

    A short delay in the pharmacological effect on account of the time required for drug absorption, distribution, and penetration into target cells after application of any anti-viral drug, is defined by the pharmacological delay (Herz et al 1996 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 93 7247–51). In this paper, a virus replication model with Beddington–DeAngelis incidence rate and the pharmacological and intracellular delays is presented to describe the treatment to cure the virus infection. The optimal controls represent the efficiency of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors in suppressing viral production and prohibiting new infections. Due to the fact that both the control and state variables contain delays, we derive a necessary conditions for our optimal problem. Based on these results, numerical simulations are implemented not only to show the optimal therapeutic schedules for different infection and release rates, but also to compare the effective of three treatment programs. Furthermore, comparison of therapeutic effects under different maximum tolerable dosages is shown. Our research indicates that (1) the proper and specific treatment program should be determined according to the infection rates of different virus particles; (2) the optimal combined drug treatment is the most efficient; (3) the appropriate proportion of medicament must be formulated during the therapy due to the non-monotonic relationship between maximum tolerable dosages and therapeutic effects; (4) the therapeutic effect is advantageous when the pharmacological delay is considered. (paper)

  1. Optimal therapies of a virus replication model with pharmacological delays based on reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yongzhen; Li, Changguo; Liang, Xiyin

    2017-11-01

    A short delay in the pharmacological effect on account of the time required for drug absorption, distribution, and penetration into target cells after application of any anti-viral drug, is defined by the pharmacological delay (Herz et al 1996 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 93 7247-51). In this paper, a virus replication model with Beddington-DeAngelis incidence rate and the pharmacological and intracellular delays is presented to describe the treatment to cure the virus infection. The optimal controls represent the efficiency of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors in suppressing viral production and prohibiting new infections. Due to the fact that both the control and state variables contain delays, we derive a necessary conditions for our optimal problem. Based on these results, numerical simulations are implemented not only to show the optimal therapeutic schedules for different infection and release rates, but also to compare the effective of three treatment programs. Furthermore, comparison of therapeutic effects under different maximum tolerable dosages is shown. Our research indicates that (1) the proper and specific treatment program should be determined according to the infection rates of different virus particles; (2) the optimal combined drug treatment is the most efficient; (3) the appropriate proportion of medicament must be formulated during the therapy due to the non-monotonic relationship between maximum tolerable dosages and therapeutic effects; (4) the therapeutic effect is advantageous when the pharmacological delay is considered.

  2. Reversal of atherogenic lipoprotein profile in HIV-1 infected patients with lipodystrophy after replacing protease inhibitors by nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negredo, Eugenia; Ribalta, Josep; Paredes, Roger; Ferré, Raimón; Sirera, Guillem; Ruiz, Lidia; Salazar, Juliana; Reiss, Peter; Masana, Lluís; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2002-01-01

    Background: The widespread use of protease inhibitors (PI) has been associated with abnormalities in the lipid profile of HIV-1-infected patients. Treatment simplification approaches in which PI are replaced by nevirapine (NVP) have been shown to improve PI-related toxicity. Objective: To assess the

  3. The ability of four genotypic interpretation systems to predict virological response to ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Zoe V; Geretti, Anna Maria; Kjaer, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    : Limited information exists on the prognostic value of genotypic interpretation systems (GISs) for ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/rs). We compared PI/r resistance levels ascribed by four GIS and examined their abilities to predict HIV-RNA reductions after starting a PI/r-based regimen...

  4. Combination of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV-1-infected patients: a review of pharmacokinetics and clinical experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heeswijk, R. P.; Veldkamp, A.; Mulder, J. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Lange, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the combination of at least three different antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, has greatly improved the prognosis for HIV-1-infected patients. The efficacy of a combination of a protease inhibitor (PI) plus two nucleoside

  5. High Risk of Infection During Triple Therapy with First-Generation Protease Inhibitors: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berden, F.A.C.; Zwietering, I.M.J.M van; Maan, R.; Knegt, R.J. de; Kievit, W.; Drenth, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Peginterferon (PegIFN) remains the backbone of therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in economically constrained regions. However, PegIFN may cause neutropenia and addition of a protease inhibitor can increase the likelihood of neutropenia. The aims of this study were to assess

  6. Unusual binding mode of an HIV-1 protease inhibitor explains its potency against multi-grug-resistant virus strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Jan; Mesters, J. R.; Lepšík, Martin; Prejdová, Jana; Švec, Martin; Šponarová, Jana; Mlčochová, Petra; Skalická, Kristina; Stříšovský, Kvido; Kondrová, Taťána; Souček, Milan; Machala, L.; Staňková, M.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Klimkait, T.; Kraeusslich, H. G.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 324, - (2002), s. 739-754 ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0828; GA MŠk LN00A032; GA MZd NI6339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.359, year: 2002

  7. A rare phenomenon of atypical lipodystrophy in a patient on HAART in the absence of a protease inhibitor regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mitha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipodystrophy is a complication of patients on antiretroviral (ARV medication; however, it is commonest in patients on long-term treatment and those on protease inhibitor (PI regimens.1,2 We present a rare case of atypical lipodystrophy, presenting as multiple subcutaneous lipomas, in a patient who had been on a non-PI ART regimen for 6 weeks.

  8. A Phenylnorstatine Inhibitor Binding to HIV-1 Protease: Geometry, Protonation, and Subsite-Pocket Interactions Analyzed at Atomic Resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Fábry, Milan; Hořejší, Magdalena; Štouračová, Renata; Sedláček, Juraj; Souček, Milan; Hradilek, Martin; Lepšík, Martin; Konvalinka, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 8 (2004), s. 2030-2036 ISSN 0022-2623 Grant - others:V.program EU(XE) QLRI-2000-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : inhibitor * HIV protease * atomic resolution Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.076, year: 2004

  9. Protease Inhibitors in Tick Saliva: The Role of Serpins and Cystatins in Tick-host-Pathogen Interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chmelař, J.; Kotál, Jan; Langhansová, Helena; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAY 29 (2017), č. článku 276. ISSN 2235-2988 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-host interaction * immunomodulation * protease inhibitors * serpins * cystatins Subject RIV: EC - Immunology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  10. The Serine Protease Inhibitor Neuroserpin Is Required for Normal Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Learning and Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Rebecca; Vierk, Ricardo; Zhou, Lepu; Gries, Frederice; Kraus, Vanessa; Mienert, Julia; Romswinkel, Eva; Morellini, Fabio; Ferrer, Isidre; Nicolini, Chiara; Fahnestock, Margaret; Rune, Gabriele; Glatzel, Markus; Galliciotti, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor neuroserpin regulates the activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in the nervous system. Neuroserpin expression is particularly prominent at late stages of neuronal development in most regions of the central nervous system (CNS), whereas it is restricted to regions related to learning and memory in the…

  11. Allium sativum Protease Inhibitor: A Novel Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor from Garlic Is a New Comrade of the Serpin Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooba Naz Shamsi

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to purify and characterize the Protease inhibitor (PI from a plant Allium sativum (garlic with strong medicinal properties and to explore its phytodrug potentials.Allium sativum Protease Inhibitor (ASPI was purified using ammonium sulphate fractionation and Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography on anion exchanger Hi-Trap DEAE column. The purified protein was analyzed for its purity and molecular weight by SDS PAGE. The confirmation of presence of trypsin inhibiting PI was performed by MALDI TOF-TOF and analyzed by MASCOT database. The ASPI was further investigated for its kinetic properties and stability under extreme conditions of pH, temperature and chemical denaturants. Secondary structure was determined by Circular Dichorism (CD spectroscopy.ASPI of ~15 kDa inhibited trypsin and matched "truncated kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor (Glycine max" in MASCOT database. The purified ASPI showed 30376.1371 U/mg specific activity with a fold purity of 159.92 and yield ~93%. ASPI was quite stable in the range of pH 2-12 showing a decline in the activity around pH 4-5 suggesting that the pI value of the protein as ASPI aggregates in this range. ASPI showed stability to a broad range of temperature (10-80°C but declined beyond 80°C. Further, detergents, oxidizing agents and reducing agents demonstrated change in ASPI activity under varying concentrations. The kinetic analysis revealed sigmoidal relationship of velocity with substrate concentration with Vmax 240.8 (μM/min and Km value of 0.12 μM. ASPI showed uncompetitive inhibition with a Ki of 0.08±0.01 nM. The Far UV CD depicted 2.0% α -helices and 51% β -sheets at native pH.To conclude, purified ~15 kDa ASPI exhibited fair stability in wide range of pH and temperature Overall, there was an increase in purification fold with remarkable yield. Chemical modification studies suggested the presence of lysine and tryptophan residues as lead amino acids present in the reactive sites

  12. Allium sativum Protease Inhibitor: A Novel Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor from Garlic Is a New Comrade of the Serpin Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Tooba Naz; Parveen, Romana; Amir, Mohd; Baig, Mohd Affan; Qureshi, M Irfan; Ali, Sher; Fatima, Sadaf

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to purify and characterize the Protease inhibitor (PI) from a plant Allium sativum (garlic) with strong medicinal properties and to explore its phytodrug potentials. Allium sativum Protease Inhibitor (ASPI) was purified using ammonium sulphate fractionation and Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography on anion exchanger Hi-Trap DEAE column. The purified protein was analyzed for its purity and molecular weight by SDS PAGE. The confirmation of presence of trypsin inhibiting PI was performed by MALDI TOF-TOF and analyzed by MASCOT database. The ASPI was further investigated for its kinetic properties and stability under extreme conditions of pH, temperature and chemical denaturants. Secondary structure was determined by Circular Dichorism (CD) spectroscopy. ASPI of ~15 kDa inhibited trypsin and matched "truncated kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor (Glycine max)" in MASCOT database. The purified ASPI showed 30376.1371 U/mg specific activity with a fold purity of 159.92 and yield ~93%. ASPI was quite stable in the range of pH 2-12 showing a decline in the activity around pH 4-5 suggesting that the pI value of the protein as ASPI aggregates in this range. ASPI showed stability to a broad range of temperature (10-80°C) but declined beyond 80°C. Further, detergents, oxidizing agents and reducing agents demonstrated change in ASPI activity under varying concentrations. The kinetic analysis revealed sigmoidal relationship of velocity with substrate concentration with Vmax 240.8 (μM/min) and Km value of 0.12 μM. ASPI showed uncompetitive inhibition with a Ki of 0.08±0.01 nM). The Far UV CD depicted 2.0% α -helices and 51% β -sheets at native pH. To conclude, purified ~15 kDa ASPI exhibited fair stability in wide range of pH and temperature Overall, there was an increase in purification fold with remarkable yield. Chemical modification studies suggested the presence of lysine and tryptophan residues as lead amino acids present in the reactive sites. Therefore, ASPI

  13. 6-Thioguanine is a noncompetitive and slow binding inhibitor of human deubiquitinating protease USP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shang-Ju; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Tang, Hui-Chi; Sun, Chiao-Yin; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2018-02-15

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) belongs to the family of deubiquitinases that can rescue protein targets from proteasomal degradation by reversing their ubiquitination. In various cancers, including prostate cancer and ovarian carcinoma, upregulation of USP2 leads to an increase in the levels of deubiquitinated substrates such as fatty acid synthase, MDM2, cyclin D1 and Aurora-A. USP2 thus plays a critical role in tumor cells' survival and therefore represents a therapeutic target. Here a leukemia drug, 6-thioguanine, was found to be a potent inhibitor of USP2. Enzyme-kinetic and X-ray crystallographic data suggest that 6-thioguanine displays a noncompetitive and slow-binding inhibitory mechanism against USP2. Our study provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of 6-thioguanine for USP2-upregulated cancers.

  14. Serum cysteine proteases and their inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis: relation to disease activity and radiographic progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Iben; Kos, Janko; Krašovec, Marta

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the serum levels of cysteine proteases cathepsins B and H and their inhibitors stefin A, stefin B, and cystatin C, as well as traditional inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to correlate these markers with scores...... of disease activity and radiographic progression. Seventy-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis were included from two previously described cohorts of patients with chronic polyarthritis. At inclusion, disease activity was assessed by a 28-joint count, patient global assessment, and serum C-reactive protein...... associated with disease activity, presence or progression of erosive disease. Number of swollen joints correlated with serum levels of stefin A and B and correlated negatively with cystatin C serum levels. Erosive disease was associated with high serum levels of C-reactive protein and stefin A and low serum...

  15. Identification of lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor 2 in human skin as a kallikrein-related peptidase 5-specific protease inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Meyer-Hoffert

    Full Text Available Kallikreins-related peptidases (KLKs are serine proteases and have been implicated in the desquamation process of the skin. Their activity is tightly controlled by epidermal protease inhibitors like the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI. Defects of the LEKTI-encoding gene serine protease inhibitor Kazal type (Spink5 lead to the absence of LEKTI and result in the genodermatose Netherton syndrome, which mimics the common skin disease atopic dermatitis. Since many KLKs are expressed in human skin with KLK5 being considered as one of the most important KLKs in skin desquamation, we proposed that more inhibitors are present in human skin. Herein, we purified from human stratum corneum by HPLC techniques a new KLK5-inhibiting peptide encoded by a member of the Spink family, designated as Spink9 located on chromosome 5p33.1. This peptide is highly homologous to LEKTI and was termed LEKTI-2. Recombinant LEKTI-2 inhibited KLK5 but not KLK7, 14 or other serine proteases tested including trypsin, plasmin and thrombin. Spink9 mRNA expression was detected in human skin samples and in cultured keratinocytes. LEKTI-2 immune-expression was focally localized at the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum at palmar and plantar sites in close localization to KLK5. At sites of plantar hyperkeratosis, LEKTI-2 expression was increased. We suggest that LEKTI-2 contributes to the regulation of the desquamation process in human skin by specifically inhibiting KLK5.

  16. Structural characterization and expression analysis of a novel cysteine protease inhibitor from Haliotis discus hannai Ino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianfeng; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-02-01

    The sequence of the cysteine protease inhibitor gene of Haliotis discus hannai (designated HdCpi) was determined using the RACE method. The full-length HdCpi cDNA is 1049 bp long, and contains an open reading frame of 813 bp, encoding a 271-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 29.83 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.57. The deduced amino acid sequence of HdCpi contains two cystatin-like domains, and each has the structural features of the cystatin family, including three evolutionarily conserved motifs known to interact with the active sites of cysteine peptidases: the Gly residue at the N-terminus (Gly(65) and Gly(160)), the Gln-X-Val-X-Gly motif (Q(106)IVSG(110) and Q(202)VVAG(206)), and the less conserved motif at the C-terminus (S(136)W(137) and A(254)W(255)). Many putative transcription-factor-binding sites involved in the immune system and cancer occur in the promoter region of HdCpi. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR detected HdCpi expression in all the tissues examined and in the gills of abalone challenged with the bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. HdCpi transcripts were expressed in the mantle, gill, digestive tract, hemocytes, and muscle, and increased HdCpi expression was observed after bacterial stimulation. These results suggest that HdCpi is a biologically active protease inhibitor that is likely to be involved in the antibacterial response of the abalone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of protease inhibitors (indinavir and ritonavir on the pharmacokinetics of gliclazide in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Mastan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kilari Eswar Kumar1, Shaik Mastan2,31Pharmacology Division, University College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India; 2Research and Development Cell, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India; 3Cytel Statistical Software and Services Pvt Ltd, Pune, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of protease inhibitors (indinavir and ritonavir on the pharmacokinetics of gliclazide in rabbits and to evaluate the mechanism of interaction of the combination. Studies in rabbits were conducted with oral doses of gliclazide, selected protease inhibitor, and their combination with a 1-week washout period between each treatment (single dose followed by multiple dose treatment. Blood samples were collected at regular time intervals by marginal ear vein puncture and serum gliclazide levels were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed by noncompartmental analysis using WinNonlin Software. In combination, ritonavir significantly increased serum gliclazide levels and altered the pharmacokinetic parameters of gliclazide in rabbits while indinavir had no significant effect. The percentage increase of serum gliclazide level was 22.34% and 27.78% following single-dose and multiple-dose treatment of ritonavir, respectively. The interaction of ritonavir with gliclazide is pharmacokinetic at a metabolic level (by CYP3A4 inhibition in normal rabbits, while the interaction of indinavir with gliclazide is pharmacodynamic, which needs dose adjustment, and care should be taken when these combinations are prescribed for their clinical benefit in diabetic patients.Keywords: gliclazide, indinavir, ritonavir, diabetes, HIV infection, pharmacokinetics

  18. Intracellular serine protease inhibitor SERPINB4 inhibits granzyme M-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter J A de Koning

    Full Text Available Granzyme-mediated cell death is the major pathway for cytotoxic lymphocytes to kill virus-infected and tumor cells. In humans, five different granzymes (i.e. GrA, GrB, GrH, GrK, and GrM are known that all induce cell death. Expression of intracellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins is one of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing. Intracellular expression of SERPINB9 by tumor cells renders them resistant to GrB-induced apoptosis. In contrast to GrB, however, no physiological intracellular inhibitors are known for the other four human granzymes. In the present study, we show that SERPINB4 formed a typical serpin-protease SDS-stable complex with both recombinant and native human GrM. Mutation of the P2-P1-P1' triplet in the SERPINB4 reactive center loop completely abolished complex formation with GrM and N-terminal sequencing revealed that GrM cleaves SERPINB4 after P1-Leu. SERPINB4 inhibited GrM activity with a stoichiometry of inhibition of 1.6 and an apparent second order rate constant of 1.3×10(4 M(-1 s(-1. SERPINB4 abolished cleavage of the macromolecular GrM substrates α-tubulin and nucleophosmin. Overexpression of SERPINB4 in tumor cells inhibited recombinant GrM-induced as well as NK cell-mediated cell death and this inhibition depended on the reactive center loop of the serpin. As SERPINB4 is highly expressed by squamous cell carcinomas, our results may represent a novel mechanism by which these tumor cells evade cytotoxic lymphocyte-induced GrM-mediated cell death.

  19. Protease purification and characterization of a serine protease inhibitor from Egyptian varieties of soybean seeds and its efficacy against Spodoptera littoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-latif Ashraf Oukasha Abd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine inhibitors have been described in many plant species and are universal throughout the plant kingdom. Trypsin inhibitors are the most common type. In the present study, trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity was detected in the seed flour extracts of four Egyptian varieties of soybean (Glycine max. The soybean variety, Giza 22, was found to have higher trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory potential compared to other tested soybean varieties. For this reason, Giza 22 was selected for further purification studies which used ammonium sulphate fractionation and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column. Soybean purified proteins showed a single band on SDS-PAGE corresponding to a molecular mass of 17.9 kDa. The purified inhibitor was stable at temperatures below 60°C and was active at a wide range of pH, from 2 to 12 pH. The kinetic analysis revealed a non-competitive type of inhibition against trypsin and chymotrypsin enzymes. The inhibitor constant (Ki values suggested that the inhibitor has higher affinity toward a trypsin enzyme than to a chymotrypsin enzyme. Purified inhibitor was found to have deep and negative effects on the mean larval weight, larval mortality, pupation, and mean pupal weight of Spodoptera littoralis. It may be concluded, that soybean protease inhibitor gene(s could be potential targets for those future studies which are concerned with developing insect resistant transgenic plants

  20. Serine protease inhibitor attenuates ovalbumin induced inflammation in mouse model of allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Saw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serine proteases promote inflammation and tissue remodeling by activating proteinase-activated receptors, urokinase, metalloproteinases and angiotensin. In the present study, 4-(2-Aminoethyl benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF a serine protease inhibitor was evaluated for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment in mouse model of airway allergy. METHODS: BALB/c mice were sensitized by i.p route and challenged with ovalbumin. They were treated i.n. with 2, 10 and 50 µg of AEBSF, one hour before or after challenge and euthanized to collect BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, blood and lungs. Proteolytic activity, total cell/eosinophil/neutrophil count eosinophil peroxidase activity (EPO, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, cysteinyl leukotrienes and 8-isoprostane were determined in BALF and immunoglobulins were measured in serum. H&E and PAS stained lung sections were examined for cellular infiltration and airway inflammation. RESULTS: Mice exposed to ovalbumin and treated with PBS showed increased cellular infiltration in lungs and higher serum IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a levels as compared to sham mice. Treatment with AEBSF reduced total cells/eosinophil/neutrophil infiltration. Both prophylactic and therapeutic AEBSF treatment of 10 or 50 µg reduced serum IgE and IgG1 significantly (p<0.05 than control. AEBSF treatment reduced the proteolytic activity in BALF. IL-4 IL-5 and IL-13 levels decreased significantly (p<0.05 after AEBSF treatment while IL-10 levels increased significantly (p<0.05 in BALF. Airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia reduced as demonstrated by lung histopathology, EPO activity and cysteinyl leukotrienes in BALF after treatment. AEBSF treatment also suppressed oxidative stress in terms of 8-isoprostane in BALF. Among the treatment doses, 10 or 50 µg of AEBSF were most effective in reducing the inflammatory parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with serine protease inhibitor attenuates the airway

  1. Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Tom J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are the primary vectors of human malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Many host genes have been shown to affect Plasmodium development in the mosquito, and so are expected to engage in an evolutionary arms race with the pathogen. However, there is little conclusive evidence that any of these mosquito genes evolve rapidly, or show other signatures of adaptive evolution. Methods Three serine protease inhibitors have previously been identified as candidate immune system genes mediating mosquito-Plasmodium interaction, and serine protease inhibitors have been identified as hot-spots of adaptive evolution in other taxa. Population-genetic tests for selection, including a recent multi-gene extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, were applied to 16 serine protease inhibitors and 16 other genes sampled from the An. gambiae species complex in both East and West Africa. Results Serine protease inhibitors were found to show a marginally significant trend towards higher levels of amino acid diversity than other genes, and display extensive genetic structuring associated with the 2La chromosomal inversion. However, although serpins are candidate targets for strong parasite-mediated selection, no evidence was found for rapid adaptive evolution in these genes. Conclusion It is well known that phylogenetic and population history in the An. gambiae complex can present special problems for the application of standard population-genetic tests for selection, and this may explain the failure of this study to detect selection acting on serine protease inhibitors. The pitfalls of uncritically applying these tests in this species complex are highlighted, and the future prospects for detecting selection acting on the An. gambiae genome are discussed.

  2. Plant-derived protease inhibitors LC-pi (Lavatera cashmeriana) inhibit human lung cancer cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakashanda, Syed; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Majeed, Rabiya; Andrabi, Syed Mubashir; Hamid, Abid; Sharma, P R; Amin, Shajrul

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to check the anticancer activity of purified protease inhibitors of Lavatera cashmeriana viz LC-pi I, II, III, and IV (Lavatera cashmeriana protease inhibitors) on A549 (lung) cell. It was found that LC-pi I and II significantly inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells with IC₅₀ value of 54 μg/ml and 38 μg/ml, respectively, whereas inhibition by LC-pi III and IV was negligible. LC-pi I and II were further found to inhibit formation of colonies in a dose-dependent manner. Also, both inhibitors were found to induce apoptosis causing chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation, without loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cell cycle revealed a significant increase of subG₀/G₁ phase cells that are apoptotic cells. We also demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in migration of A549 cells on cell migration assay by both inhibitors. Taken together, we demonstrate that LC-pi I and II inhibited proliferation through arresting cells before apoptosis, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell migration in human lung cancer cells, but the study warrants further investigation. Our results support the notion that plant protease inhibitors may have the potential to advance as chemopreventive agents.

  3. Genetically pyramiding protease-inhibitor genes for dual broad-spectrum resistance against insect and phytopathogens in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Rajendran; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2010-01-01

    Protease inhibitors provide a promising means of engineering plant resistance against attack by insects and pathogens. Sporamin (trypsin inhibitor) from sweet potato and CeCPI (phytocystatin) from taro were stacked in a binary vector, using pMSPOA (a modified sporamin promoter) to drive both genes. Transgenic tobacco lines of T0 and T1 generation with varied inhibitory activity against trypsin and papain showed resistance to both insects and phytopathogens. Larvae of Helicoverpa armigera that ingested tobacco leaves either died or showed delayed growth and development relative to control larvae. Transgenic tobacco-overexpressing the stacked genes also exhibited strong resistance against bacterial soft rot disease caused by Erwinia carotovora and damping-off disease caused by Pythium aphanidermatum. Thus, stacking protease-inhibitor genes, driven by the wound and pathogen responsive pMSPOA promoter, is an effective strategy for engineering crops to resistance against insects and phytopathogens.

  4. Identification of novel small molecule inhibitors against NS2B/NS3 serine protease from Zika virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Ren, Jinhong; Nocadello, Salvatore; Rice, Amy J.; Ojeda, Isabel; Light, Samuel; Minasov, George; Vargas, Jason; Nagarathnam, Dhanapalan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC); (NWU); (Novalex); (DNSK)

    2016-12-26

    Zika flavivirus infection during pregnancy appears to produce higher risk of microcephaly, and also causes multiple neurological problems such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. The Zika virus is now widespread in Central and South America, and is anticipated to become an increasing risk in the southern United States. With continuing global travel and the spread of the mosquito vector, the exposure is expected to accelerate, but there are no currently approved treatments against the Zika virus. The Zika NS2B/NS3 protease is an attractive drug target due to its essential role in viral replication. Our studies have identified several compounds with inhibitory activity (IC50) and binding affinity (KD) of ~5–10 μM against the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease from testing 71 HCV NS3/NS4A inhibitors that were initially discovered by high-throughput screening of 40,967 compounds. Competition surface plasmon resonance studies and mechanism of inhibition analyses by enzyme kinetics subsequently determined the best compound to be a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.5 μM. We also determined the X-ray structure of the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease in a “pre-open conformation”, a conformation never observed before for any flavivirus proteases. This provides the foundation for new structure-based inhibitor design.

  5. Structure-based drug design of novel peptidomimetic cellulose derivatives as HCV-NS3 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Noha A; Elshemey, Wael M

    2017-10-15

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) represents a global health threat not only due to the large number of reported worldwide HCV infections, but also due to the absence of a reliable vaccine for its prevention. HCV NS3 protease is one of the most important targets for drug design aiming at the deactivation of HCV. In the present work, molecular docking simulations are carried out for suggested novel NS3 protease inhibitors applied to the Egyptian genotype 4. These inhibitors are modifications of dimer cellulose by adding a hexa-peptide to the cellulose at one of the positions 2, 3, 6, 2', 3' or 6'. Results show that the inhibitor compound with the hexa-peptide at position 6 shows significantly higher simulation docking score with HCV NS3 protease active site. This is supported by low total energy value of docking system, formation of two H-bonds with HCV NS3 protease active site residues, high binding affinity and increased stability in the interaction system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of Plakortide E from the Caribbean Sponge Plakortis halichondroides as a Trypanocidal Protease Inhibitor using Bioactivity-Guided Fractionation

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    Swarna Oli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report new protease inhibitory activity of plakortide E towards cathepsins and cathepsin-like parasitic proteases. We further report on its anti-parasitic activity against Trypanosoma brucei with an IC50 value of 5 μM and without cytotoxic effects against J774.1 macrophages at 100 μM concentration. Plakortide E was isolated from the sponge Plakortis halichondroides using enzyme assay-guided fractionation and identified by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, enzyme kinetic studies confirmed plakortide E as a non-competitive, slowly-binding, reversible inhibitor of rhodesain.

  7. Monitoring processed, mature Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 particles immediately following treatment with a protease inhibitor-containing treatment regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuritzkes Daniel R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protease inhibitors (PIs block HIV-1 maturation into an infectious virus particle by inhibiting the protease processing of gag and gag-pol precursor proteins. We have used a simple anti-HIV-1 p24 Western blot to monitor the processing of p55gag precursor into the mature p24 capsid immediately following the first dosage of a PI-containing treatment regimen. Evidence of PI activity was observed in plasma virus as early as 72 hours post treatment-initiation and was predictive of plasma viral RNA decrease at 4 weeks.

  8. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  9. Limited HIV-1 Reactivation in Resting CD4+T cells from Aviremic Patients under Protease Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Bouchat, Sophie; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Kabeya, Kabamba; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-12-06

    A latent viral reservoir that resides in resting CD4 + T cells represents a major barrier for eradication of HIV infection. We test here the impact of HIV protease inhibitor (PI) based combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) over nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART on HIV-1 reactivation and integration in resting CD4 + T cells. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection treated with conventional cART with an undetectable viremia. We performed a seven-year study of 47 patients with chronic HIV-infection treated with cART regimens and with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for at least 1 year. Of these 47 patients treated with cART, 24 were treated with a PI-based regimen and 23 with a NNRTI-based regimen as their most recent treatment for more than one year. We evaluated the HIV-1 reservoir using reactivation assay and integrated HIV-1 DNA, respectively, in resting CD4 + T cells. Resting CD4 + T cells isolated from PI-treated patients compared to NNRTI-treated patients showed a limited HIV-1 reactivation upon T-cell stimulation (p = 0·024) and a lower level of HIV-1 integration (p = 0·024). Our study indicates that PI-based cART could be more efficient than NNRTI-based cART for limiting HIV-1 reactivation in aviremic chronically infected patients.

  10. Structure-based design of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors with modified P1-biphenyl ligands: synthesis, biological evaluation, and enzyme-inhibitor X-ray structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arun K; Yu, Xufen; Osswald, Heather L; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-07-09

    We report the design, synthesis, X-ray structural studies, and biological evaluation of a novel series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. We designed a variety of functionalized biphenyl derivatives to make enhanced van der Waals interactions in the S1 subsite of HIV-1 protease. These biphenyl derivatives were conveniently synthesized using a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction as the key step. We examined the potential of these functionalized biphenyl-derived P1 ligands in combination with 3-(S)-tetrahydrofuranyl urethane and bis-tetrahydrofuranyl urethane as the P2 ligands. Inhibitor 21e, with a 2-methoxy-1,1'-biphenyl derivative as P1 ligand and bis-THF as the P2 ligand, displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. This inhibitor also exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray crystal structure of related Boc-derivative 17a-bound HIV-1 protease provided important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions of the biphenyl core in the S1 subsite of HIV-1 protease.

  11. Crystal structure of the cysteine protease inhibitor 2 from Entamoeba histolytica: Functional convergence of a common protein fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casados-Vázquez, Luz E.; Lara-González, Samuel; Brieb, Luis G. (LNGB-Mexico)

    2012-04-18

    Cysteine proteases (CP) are key pathogenesis and virulence determinants of protozoan parasites. Entamoeba histolytica contains at least 50 cysteine proteases; however, only three (EhCP1, EhCP2 and EhCP5) are responsible for approximately 90% of the cysteine protease activity in this parasite. CPs are expressed as inactive zymogens. Because the processed proteases are potentially cytotoxic, protozoan parasites have developed mechanisms to regulate their activity. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases (ICP) of the chagasin-like inhibitor family (MEROPS family I42) were recently identified in bacteria and protozoan parasites. E. histolytica contains two ICP-encoding genes of the chagasin-like inhibitor family. EhICP1 localizes to the cytosol, whereas EhICP2 is targeted to phagosomes. Herein, we report two crystal structures of EhICP2. The overall structure of EhICP2 consists of eight {beta}-strands and closely resembles the immunoglobulin fold. A comparison between the two crystal forms of EhICP2 indicates that the conserved BC, DE and FG loops form a flexible wedge that may block the active site of CPs. The positively charged surface of the wedge-forming loops in EhICP2 contrasts with the neutral surface of the wedge-forming loops in chagasin. We postulate that the flexibility and positive charge observed in the DE and FG loops of EhICP2 may be important to facilitate the initial binding of this inhibitor to the battery of CPs present in E. histolytica.

  12. The crystal structure of protease Sapp1p from Candida parapsilosis in complex with the HIV protease inhibitor ritonavir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pachl, Petr; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2012), s. 160-165 ISSN 1475-6366 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA ČR GA310/09/1945; GA ČR GA203/09/0820 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : secreted aspartic protease * virulence factor * X-ray structure * candidiasis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.495, year: 2012

  13. GS-8374, a Prototype Phosphonate-Containing Inhibitor of HIV-1 Protease, Effectively Inhibits Protease Mutants with Amino Acid Insertions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grantz Šašková, Klára; Kožíšek, Milan; Stray, K.; Jong de, D.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Maarseveen van, N. M.; Nijhuis, M.; Cihlář, T.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 6 (2014), s. 3586-3590 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/1798 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : virus type-1 protease * antiviral activity * drug resistance Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.439, year: 2014

  14. Structure-based design, synthesis, X-ray studies, and biological evaluation of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing isophthalamide-derived P2-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arun K; Takayama, Jun; Kassekert, Luke A; Ella-Menye, Jean-Rene; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors bearing isophthalamide derivatives as the P2-P3 ligands. We have investigated a range of acyclic and heterocyclic amides as the extended P2-P3 ligands. These inhibitors displayed good to excellent HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity. Also, a number of inhibitors showed very good antiviral activity in MT cells. Compound 5n has shown an enzyme Ki of 0.17 nM and antiviral IC50 of 14 nM. An X-ray crystal structure of inhibitor 5o-bound to HIV-1 protease was determined at 1.11Å resolution. This structure revealed important molecular insight into the inhibitor-HIV-1 protease interactions in the active site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Reynolds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics.

  16. Diastereoselective synthesis and molecular docking studies of novel fused tetrahydropyridine derivatives as new inhibitors of HIV protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali A.; Taheri, Salman; Amouzegar, Ali; Ahdenov, Reza; Halvagar, Mohammad Reza; Sadr, Ahmad Shahir

    2017-07-01

    An efficient one-pot, catalyst-free, and four-components procedure for the synthesis of novel 10b-hydroxy-4-nitro-5-phenyl-2,3,5,5a-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[1,2-a]indeno[2,1-e]pyridin-6(10bH)-one derivatives from corresponding diamine, nitro ketene dithioacetal, aldehydes and 1,3-indandione in ethanol has been achieved upon a Knoevenagel condensation-Michael addition-tautomerism-cyclisation sequence. All the newly synthesized compounds were screened for molecular docking studies. Molecular docking studies were carried out using the crystal structure of HIV protease enzyme. Some of the compounds obtain minimum binding energy and good affinity toward the active pocket of HIV protease enzyme in compare with Saquinavir as a standard HIV protease inhibitor.

  17. In vivo and in vitro inhibition of Spodoptera littoralis gut-serine protease by protease inhibitors isolated from maize and sorghum seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-latif, Ashraf Oukasha Abd

    2014-11-01

    Seeds of cereals (Gramineae) are a rich source of serine proteinase inhibitors of most of the several inhibitor families. In the present study, trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activities was detected in the seed flour extracts of three varieties of maize (Zea maize) and six varieties of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). The maize variety, Hi Teck 2031 and the sorghum variety, Giza 10 were found to have higher trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory potentials compared to other tested varieties for which they have been selected for further purification studies using ammonium sulfate fractionation and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column. Maize and sorghum purified proteins showed a single band on SDS-PAGE corresponding to molecular mass of 20.0 and 15.2 kDa for maize and sorghum PIs respectively. The purified inhibitors were stable at temperature below 60 °C and were active at wide range of pH from 2 to 12 pH. The kinetic analysis revealed non-competitive type of inhibition for both inhibitors against both enzymes. The inhibitor constant (Ki) values suggested high affinity between inhibitors and enzymes. Purified inhibitors were found to have deep and negative effects on the mean larval weight, larval mortality, pupation and mean pupal weight of S.littoralis where maize PI was more effective than sorghum PI. It may be concluded that maize and sorghum protease inhibitor gene(s) could be potential targets for future studies in developing insect resistant transgenic plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory.

  19. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Ane H.; Mingossi, Fabiana B.; Dias, Renata O.; Franco, Flávia P.; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O.; Moura, Daniel S.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane’s (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  20. Classification of HIV protease inhibitors on the basis of their antiviral potency using radial basis function neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, S. J.; Jurs, P. C.

    2003-02-01

    HIV protease inhibitors are being used as frontline therapy in the treatment of HIV patients. Multi-drug-resistant HIV mutant strains are emerging with the initial aggressive multi-drug treatment of HIV patients. This necessitates continued search for novel inhibitors of viral replication. These protease inhibitors may further be useful as pharmacological agents for inhibition of other viral replication. Classification models of HIV Protease inhibitors are developed using a data set of 123 compounds containing several heterocycles. Their inhibitory concentrations expressed as log (IC50) ranged from -1.52 to 2.12 log units. The dataset was divided into active and inactive classes on the basis of their antiviral potency. Initially a two-class problem (active, inactive) is explored using k-nearest neighbor approach. In order to introduce non-linearity in the classifier different approaches were investigated. This led to the goal of a fast, simple, minimum user input, radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) classifier development. Then the same two-class problem was resolved using the (RBFNN) classifier. A genetic algorithm with RBFNN fitness evaluator was used to search for the optimum descriptor subsets. The application of majority rules was also tested for the RBFNN classification. The best six descriptor model found by the new cost function showed predictive ability in the high 80% range for an external prediction set.

  1. [Adherence to antiretroviral treatments with a protease inhibitor in HIV-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon-Céron, D; Deleuze, J; Coste, J; Guerin, C; Ginsburg, C; Blanche, P; Finkielsztejn, L; Pecqueux, L; Chaput, S; Gorin, I; Sicard, D

    2000-06-01

    Long-term therapeutic success of powerful antiretroviral treatments dependent on patient adherence. This study was conducted to assess the difficulties HIV-infected patients with advanced-stage disease encounter in adhering to antiretroviral treatments with a protease inhibitor. A prospective self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted at our outpatient clinic for 2 months. CD4 counts and HIV viral loads were also determined. Seventy-one percent of the study population which included 262 responded to the questionnaire. The survey was made a median 215 days after initiating the antiprotease treatment with indinavir (71% of the cases), ritonavir (13%), saquinavir (6%), or a combination of protease inhibitors (10%). At onset of antiprotease treatment, mean CD4 count was 171+/-150/mm(3) and mean HIV viral load was 75,000 copies/ml. The treatment was considered to be difficult to take by 43% of the patients; 66% stated they had forgotten to take their drugs at least once a month. It was most difficult to take the drugs prescribed for the afternoon. Shifts of 1 hour were observed in 58% of patients. Non-adherence was frequent (1 failure to take drugs per week), observed in 13% of patients. Most often, the patients stated they had forgotten to take their drugs because of occupational or relational difficulties (52%). Non-adherence increased with duration of treatment. The drug most often associated with non-adherence was indinavir (73%). Age and sex did not influence adherence. Mean RNA HIV serum level was lower than at onset of the antiprotease treatment in the most non-adherent patients. At the time of the questionnaire, there was no difference in serum RNA HIV level or in the percentage of patients with an undetectable level between non-adherent and adherent patients. This survey confirmed difficulties in adherence are frequent and worsen with time. No relationship was found between non-adherence and reduction in viral load, suggesting that a short-term effect

  2. The role of protease inhibitors on the remineralization of demineralized dentin using the PILP method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nurrohman

    Full Text Available Mineralized and sound dentin matrices contain inactive preforms of proteolytic enzymes that may be activated during the demineralization cycle. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that protease inhibitors (PI preserve demineralized collagen fibrils and other constituents of the dentin matrix and thereby affect the potential for remineralization. Artificial carious lesions with lesion depths of 140 μm were created with acetate buffer (pH = 5.0, 66 hours, and remineralized using a polymer-induced-liquid-precursor (PILP process (pH = 7.4, 14 days containing poly(aspartic acid (pAsp as the process-directing agent. De- and remineralizing procedures were performed in the presence or absence of PI. Ultrastructure and mechanical recovery of demineralized dentin following PILP remineralization were examined and measured in water with atomic force microscopy (AFM and nanoindentation. Nanomechanical properties of hydrated artificial lesions had a low elastic modulus (ER <0.4 GPa extending about 100 μm into the lesion, followed by a sloped region of about 140 μm depth where values reached those of normal dentin (18.0-20.0 GPa. Mapping of mineral content by both micro-FTIR and micro x-ray computed tomography correlated well with modulus profiles obtained by nanoindentation. Tissue demineralized in the presence of PI exhibited higher elastic moduli (average 2.8 GPa across the lesion and comprised a narrow zone in the outer lesion with strongly increased modulus (up to 8 GPa; p < 0.05, which might be related to the preservation of non-collagenous proteins that appear to induce calcium phosphate mineral formation even under demineralizing physical-chemical conditions. However, mechanical aspects of remineralization through the elastic modulus change, and the micromorphological aspects with SEM and TEM observation were almost identical with PILP treatments being conducted in the presence or absence of PI. Thus, the application of the protease inhibitors

  3. The role of protease inhibitors on the remineralization of demineralized dentin using the PILP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurrohman, Hamid; Carneiro, Karina M M; Hellgeth, John; Saeki, Kuniko; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W; Habelitz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Mineralized and sound dentin matrices contain inactive preforms of proteolytic enzymes that may be activated during the demineralization cycle. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that protease inhibitors (PI) preserve demineralized collagen fibrils and other constituents of the dentin matrix and thereby affect the potential for remineralization. Artificial carious lesions with lesion depths of 140 μm were created with acetate buffer (pH = 5.0, 66 hours), and remineralized using a polymer-induced-liquid-precursor (PILP) process (pH = 7.4, 14 days) containing poly(aspartic acid) (pAsp) as the process-directing agent. De- and remineralizing procedures were performed in the presence or absence of PI. Ultrastructure and mechanical recovery of demineralized dentin following PILP remineralization were examined and measured in water with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation. Nanomechanical properties of hydrated artificial lesions had a low elastic modulus (ER <0.4 GPa) extending about 100 μm into the lesion, followed by a sloped region of about 140 μm depth where values reached those of normal dentin (18.0-20.0 GPa). Mapping of mineral content by both micro-FTIR and micro x-ray computed tomography correlated well with modulus profiles obtained by nanoindentation. Tissue demineralized in the presence of PI exhibited higher elastic moduli (average 2.8 GPa) across the lesion and comprised a narrow zone in the outer lesion with strongly increased modulus (up to 8 GPa; p < 0.05), which might be related to the preservation of non-collagenous proteins that appear to induce calcium phosphate mineral formation even under demineralizing physical-chemical conditions. However, mechanical aspects of remineralization through the elastic modulus change, and the micromorphological aspects with SEM and TEM observation were almost identical with PILP treatments being conducted in the presence or absence of PI. Thus, the application of the protease inhibitors (PI

  4. Tri-domain Bifunctional Inhibitor of Metallocarboxypeptidases A and Serine Proteases Isolated from Marine Annelid Sabellastarte magnifica*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-del-Rivero, Maday; Trejo, Sebastian A.; Reytor, Mey L.; Rodriguez-de-la-Vega, Monica; Delfin, Julieta; Diaz, Joaquin; González-González, Yamile; Canals, Francesc; Chavez, Maria Angeles; Aviles, Francesc X.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a novel bifunctional metallocarboxypeptidase and serine protease inhibitor (SmCI) isolated from the tentacle crown of the annelid Sabellastarte magnifica. SmCI is a 165-residue glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 19.69 kDa (mass spectrometry) and 18 cysteine residues forming nine disulfide bonds. Its cDNA was cloned and sequenced by RT-PCR and nested PCR using degenerated oligonucleotides. Employing this information along with data derived from automatic Edman degradation of peptide fragments, the SmCI sequence was fully characterized, indicating the presence of three bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor/Kunitz domains and its high homology with other Kunitz serine protease inhibitors. Enzyme kinetics and structural analyses revealed SmCI to be an inhibitor of human and bovine pancreatic metallocarboxypeptidases of the A-type (but not B-type), with nanomolar Ki values. SmCI is also capable of inhibiting bovine pancreatic trypsin, chymotrypsin, and porcine pancreatic elastase in varying measures. When the inhibitor and its nonglycosylated form (SmCI N23A mutant) were overproduced recombinantly in a Pichia pastoris system, they displayed the dual inhibitory properties of the natural form. Similarly, two bi-domain forms of the inhibitor (recombinant rSmCI D1-D2 and rSmCI D2-D3) as well as its C-terminal domain (rSmCI-D3) were also overproduced. Of these fragments, only the rSmCI D1-D2 bi-domain retained inhibition of metallocarboxypeptidase A but only partially, indicating that the whole tri-domain structure is required for such capability in full. SmCI is the first proteinaceous inhibitor of metallocarboxypeptidases able to act as well on another mechanistic class of proteases (serine-type) and is the first of this kind identified in nature. PMID:22411994

  5. Serine protease inhibitor Serp-1 strongly impairs atherosclerotic lesion formation and induces a stable plaque phenotype in ApoE-/-mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Ilze; von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Donners, Marjo M. P. C.; Lucas, Alexandra; Fekkes, Madelon L.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Kuiper, Johan; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2003-01-01

    The myxoma virus protein Serp-1 is a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily. Serp-1 potently inhibits human serum proteases including plasmin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Serp-1 also displays a high antiinflammatory activity,

  6. Inhibitors of proprotein convertases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Ajoy

    2005-11-01

    The discovery of mammalian subtilases, proprotein convertases (PCs) or subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (SPCs), in 1990 was a result of sustained efforts in searching for enzyme/s responsible for maturation of inactive protein precursors. Since then, seven PCs have so far been discovered that cleave at the carboxy-terminal of a basic amino acid characterized by the consensus sequence Arg/Lys/His-X-X/Lys/Arg-Arg downward arrow, where X denotes any amino acid other than Cys. Two additional PC subtypes--called subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1) or site 1 protease (S1P) and neural apoptosis regulated convertase 1 (NARC-1), also known as PCSK9--that cleave at the carboxy terminus of nonbasic amino acids were discovered later. Numerous studies revealed various important functional roles of PCs in health and diseases such as tumorigenesis, diabetes, viral infections, bacterial pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenarative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Owing to these findings, PCs became a promising frontier for treatment of diverse pathologies. Thus modulation of PC activity with designed inhibitors is an attractive proposition not only for intervention of diseases, but also for biochemical characterization of these enzymes. Various physiological and bioengineered proteins as well as small molecules such as peptide, peptidomimetic, and nonpeptide compounds as inhibitors of PCs have been described in the literature. Among the strategies used for design of PC inhibitors, the most successful is the one based on bioengineered serpin proteins, of which the best example is alpha1-PDX, the double mutant variant of alpha1-antitrypsin (from A(355)IPM(358) to R(355)IPR(358)). Others include small peptide inhibitors with C-terminal carboxyl function modified with a potent neucleophile or those containing pseudo or isosteric peptide bond at the scissile site of a suitable peptide substrate. Among nonpeptide PC inhibitors, the number is very limited. So far, these include

  7. Discovery and Biological Evaluation of Potent and Selective N-Methylene Saccharin-Derived Inhibitors for Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goel, P.; Jumpertz, T.; Mikles, David C.; Tichá, Anežka; Nguyen, M. T. N.; Verhelst, S.; Hubálek, Martin; Johnson, D. C.; Bachovchin, D. A.; Ogorek, I.; Pietrzik, C. U.; Stříšovský, Kvido; Schmidt, B.; Weggen, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 51 (2017), s. 6713-6725 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 304154 - Rhomboid substrates Grant - others:EMBO(DE) 2329 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : intramembrane protease * rhomboid * inhibitor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2016

  8. Effect of a protease inhibitor on the stability of catalase in liver and blood from acatalasemic and normal mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Ogata, Masana

    1991-01-01

    Effects of Gabexate mesilate (GM) (([ethyl-4-(6-guanidino hexanoyloxy) benzoate] methane sulfonate)), a protease inhibitor, on the activities of catalase in liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice were examined. Preincubation without GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min lowered the catalase activities of liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice, to 24%, 40% and 10% of the initial levels, respectively. But, preincubation with GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min de...

  9. Tubers from potato lines expressing a tomato Kunitz protease inhibitor are substantially equivalent to parental and transgenic controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalf, Moustafa; Goulet, Charles; Vorster, Juan; Brunelle, France; Anguenot, Raphaël; Fliss, Ismaïl; Michaud, Dominique

    2010-02-01

    Recombinant protease inhibitors represent useful tools for the development of insect-resistant transgenic crops, but questions have been raised in recent years about the impact of these proteins on endogenous proteases and chemical composition of derived food products. In this study, we performed a detailed compositional analysis of tubers from potato lines expressing the broad-spectrum inhibitor of Ser and Asp proteases, tomato cathepsin D inhibitor (SlCDI), to detect possible unintended effects on tuber composition. A compositional analysis of key nutrients and toxic chemicals was carried out with tubers of SlCDI-expressing and control (comparator) lines, followed by a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) proteomic profiling of total and allergenic proteins to detect eventual effects at the proteome level. No significant differences were observed among control and SlCDI-expressing lines for most chemicals assayed, in line with the very low abundance of SlCDI in tubers. Likewise, proteins detected after 2-DE showed no quantitative variation among the lines, except for a few proteins in some control and test lines, independent of slcdi transgene expression. Components of the patatin storage protein complex and Kunitz protease inhibitors immunodetected after 2-DE showed unaltered deposition patterns in SlCDI-expressing lines, clearly suggesting a null impact of slcdi on the intrinsic allergenic potential of potato tubers. These data suggest, overall, a null impact of slcdi expression on tuber composition and substantial equivalence between comparator and SlCDI-expressing tubers despite reported effects on leaf protein catabolism. They also illustrate the usefulness of proteomics as a tool to assess the authenticity of foods derived from novel-generation transgenic plants.

  10. Enzymatic and structural analysis of the I47A mutation contributing to the reduced susceptibility to HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grantz Šašková, Klára; Kožíšek, Milan; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Václavíková, Jana; Kagan, R. M.; Machala, L.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 9 (2008), s. 1555-1564 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA MZd NR8571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors * antiviral resistance development * X-ray structure * molecular recognition * enzyme kinetics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.115, year: 2008

  11. Prophenoloxidase system, lysozyme and protease inhibitor distribution in the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pabic, Charles; Safi, Georges; Serpentini, Antoine; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Robin, Jean-Paul; Koueta, Noussithé

    2014-01-01

    The immune system of cephalopods remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the specific activity of immune enzymes in epithelial barriers, circulatory and digestive systems of the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. Three enzyme groups with putative functions in immunity were investigated: phenoloxidases (POs), lysozymes and protease inhibitors (PIs). Consistent with a role in immunity, highest PO activities were found in the integument as well as the respiratory and circulatory organs under zymogenic (proPO) and active form. Surprisingly, high PO activities were also found in the digestive gland and its appendages. Similarly, high lysozyme activities were detected in the integument and circulatory organs, but also in the posterior salivary glands, highlighting the implication of this antibacterial enzyme group in most tissues exposed to the environment but also within the circulatory system. Albeit highest in digestive organs, the ubiquitous detection of PI activity in assayed compartments suggests immune function(s) in a wide range of tissues. Our study reports proPO/PO, lysozyme and PI distributions in S. officinalis body compartments for the first time, and thus provides the fundamental basis for a better understanding of the humoral immune system in cephalopods as well as invertebrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid and sharp decline in HCV upon monotherapy with NS3 protease inhibitor, ACH-1625.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Atul; Zhang, Bao; Olek, Elizabeth; Robison, Heather; Robarge, Lisa; Deshpande, Milind

    2012-01-01

    ACH-1625 is a linear peptidomimetic inhibitor that non-covalently binds to HCV NS3 protease with high potency and specificity. Short-term monotherapy of HCV genotype-1 infection with ACH-1625 was found to be safe and resulted in ≥3.3 log(10) IU/ml mean viral load reduction. These viral load decay data were analysed to compare HCV dynamics with prior reports and estimate the antiviral efficiency of ACH-1625. Drug efficiency was estimated by analysing the viral decay following initiation of up to 5 days of monotherapy with ACH-1625 in 36 chronically infected HCV genotype-1 patients. During this monotherapy study, ACH-1625 was administered either twice-a-day for 4.5 days or once daily for 5 days at 5 different dose levels in 36 patients. A sharp viral decay during the first 48 h following the initiation of ACH-1625 treatment afforded high drug efficiency estimates (≥0.9934). In addition, an increase in the estimated drug efficiency was observed with increasing ACH-1625 dose. The observed anti-HCV response was fairly uniform in this proof-of-concept study across the population of 36 patients. Estimates of the treatment-independent viral kinetics parameters were consistent with prior reports and the estimated drug efficiency of ACH-1625 monotherapy was very high (≥0.9934) in fasted and fed states.

  13. Interactions Between Buprenorphine and the Protease Inhibitors Darunavir-Ritonavir and Fosamprenavir-Ritonavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Petrie M.; Moody, David E.; Morse, Gene D.; Ma, Qing; Prathikanti, Sudha; Pade, Patricia A.; Alvanzo, Anika A. H.; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

    2012-01-01

    Background. This study examined drug interactions between buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist used for opioid dependence treatment and pain management, and the protease inhibitors (PIs) darunavir-ritonavir and fosamprenavir-ritonavir. Methods. The pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine and its metabolites and symptoms of opioid withdrawal or excess were compared in opioid-dependent, buprenorphine-naloxone–maintained, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative volunteers (11 for darunavir-ritonavir and 10 for fosamprenavir-ritonavir) before and after 15 days of PI administration. PI pharmacokinetics and adverse effects were compared between the buprenorphine-maintained participants and an equal number of sex-, age-, race-, and weight-matched, healthy, non–opioid-dependent volunteers who received darunavir-ritonavir or fosamprenavir-ritonavir but not buprenorphine. Results. There were no significant changes in buprenorphine or PI plasma levels and no significant changes in medication adverse effects or opioid withdrawal. Increased concentrations of the inactive metabolite buprenorphine-3-glucuronide suggested that darunavir-ritonavir and fosamprenavir-ritonavir induced glucuronidation of buprenorphine. Conclusions. Dose adjustments are not likely to be necessary when buprenorphine and darunavir-ritonavir or fosamprenavir-ritonavir are coadministered for the treatment of opioid dependence and HIV disease. PMID:22100576

  14. Naringin prevents HIV-1 protease inhibitors-induced metabolic complications in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanelisiwe Nzuza

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and overt diabetes are known metabolic complications associated with chronic use of HIV-Protease Inhibitors. Naringin is a grapefruit-derived flavonoid with anti-diabetic, anti-dyslipidemia, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities.The study investigated the protective effects of naringin on glucose intolerance and impaired insulin secretion and signaling in vivo.Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n = 6 and were daily orally treated with distilled water {3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW}, atazanavir (133 mg/kg BW, saquinavir (333 mg/kg BW with or without naringin (50 mg/kg BW, respectively for 56 days. Body weights and water consumption were recorded daily. Glucose tolerance tests were carried out on day 55 of the treatment and thereafter, the rats were sacrificed by halothane overdose.Atazanavir (ATV- or saquinavir (SQV-treated rats exhibited significant weight loss, polydipsia, elevated Fasting blood glucose (FBG, reduced Fasting Plasma Insulin (FPI and expression of phosphorylated, Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 (IRS-1 and Akt proteins, hepatic and pancreatic glucokinase levels, and also increasing pancreatic caspase-3 and -9 as well as UCP2 protein expressions compared to controls, respectively. These effects were completely reversed by naringin treatment.Naringin prevents PI-induced glucose intolerance and impairment of insulin signaling and as nutritional supplement it could therefore alleviate metabolic complications associated with antiretroviral therapy.

  15. Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) promotes the proteolysis and inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanse, Sandip M.; Declerck, Paul J.; Ruf, Wolfram; Broze, George; Etscheid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) activates FVII as well as pro-urokinase and inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB, thus regulating haemostasis- and remodeling-associated processes in the vasculature. A genetic variant of FSAP (Marburg I polymorphism) results in low enzymatic activity and is associated with an enhanced risk for carotid stenosis and stroke. We postulate that there are additional substrates for FSAP that will help to explain its role in vascular biology and have searched for such a substrate. Results and Methods Using screening procedures to determine the influence of FSAP on various haemostasis-related processes on endothelial cells we discovered that FSAP inhibited tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a major anti-coagulant secreted by these cells. Proteolytic degradation of TFPI by FSAP could also be demonstrated by Western blotting and the exact cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequencing. The Marburg I variant of FSAP had a diminished ability to inhibit TFPI. A monoclonal antibody to FSAP, that specifically inhibited FSAP binding to TFPI, reversed the inhibitory effect of FSAP on TFPI. Conclusions The identification of TFPI as a sensitive substrate for FSAP increases our understanding of its role in regulating haemostasis and proliferative remodeling events in the vasculature. PMID:22116096

  16. Design and synthesis of potent C(2)-symmetric diol-based HIV-1 protease inhibitors: effects of fluoro substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyring, D; Lindberg, J; Rosenquist A; Zuccarello, G; Kvarnström, I; Zhang, H; Vrang, L; Unge, T; Classon, B; Hallberg, A; Samuelsson, B

    2001-09-13

    Implementation of derivatized carbohydrates as C(2)-symmetric HIV-1 protease inhibitors has previously been reported. With the objective of improving the anti-HIV activity of such compounds, we synthesized a series of fluoro substituted P1/P1' analogues. These compounds were evaluated for antiviral activity toward both wild type and mutant virus. The potency of the analogues in blocking HIV-1 protease was moderate, with K(i) values ranging from 1 to 7 nM. Nonetheless, compared to the parent nonfluorous inhibitors, a majority of the compounds exhibited improved antiviral activity, for example the 3-fluorobenzyl derivative 9b, which had a K(i) value of 7.13 nM and displayed one of the most powerful antiviral activities in the cellular assay of the series. Our results strongly suggest that fluoro substitution can substantially improve antiviral activity. The X-ray crystal structures of two of the fluoro substituted inhibitors (9a and 9f) cocrystallized with HIV-1 protease are discussed.

  17. Evaluating the role of a trypsin inhibitor from soap nut (Sapindus trifoliatus L. Var. Emarginatus) seeds against larval gut proteases, its purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandreddi, V D Sirisha; Kappala, Vijaya Rachel; Zaveri, Kunal; Patnala, Kiranmayi

    2015-10-22

    The defensive capacities of plant protease Inhibitors (PI) rely on inhibition of proteases in insect guts or those secreted by microorganisms; and also prevent uncontrolled proteolysis and offer protection against proteolytic enzymes of pathogens. An array of chromatographic techniques were employed for purification, homogeneity was assessed by electrophoresis. Specificity, Ki value, nature of inhibition, complex formation was carried out by standard protocols. Action of SNTI on insect gut proteases was computationally evaluated by modeling the proteins by threading and docking studies by piper using Schrodinger tools. We have isolated and purified Soap Nut Trypsin Inhibitor (SNTI) by acetone fractionation, ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange and gel permeation chromatography. The purified inhibitor was homogeneous by both gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). SNTI exhibited a molecular weight of 29 kDa on SDS-PAGE, gel filtration and was negative to Periodic Acid Schiff's stain. SNTI inhibited trypsin and pronase of serine class. SNTI demonstrated non-competitive inhibition with a Ki value of 0.75 ± 0.05×10-10 M. The monoheaded inhibitor formed a stable complex in 1:1 molar ratio. Action of SNTI was computationally evaluated on larval gut proteases from Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda. SNTI and larval gut proteases were modeled and docked using Schrodinger software. Docking studies revealed strong hydrogen bond interactions between Lys10 and Pro71, Lys299 and Met80 and Van Der Waals interactions between Leu11 and Cys76amino acid residues of SNTI and protease from H. Armigera. Strong hydrogen bonds were observed between SNTI and protease of S. frugiperda at positions Thr79 and Arg80, Asp90 and Gly73, Asp2 and Gly160 respectively. We conclude that SNTI potentially inhibits larval gut proteases of insects and the kinetics exhibited by the protease inhibitor further substantiates its efficacy against serine

  18. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of α-keto amides as enterovirus 71 3C protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Debin; Ma, Yuying; Zhang, Rui; Nie, Quandeng; Cui, Zhengjie; Wang, Yaxin; Shang, Luqing; Yin, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    α-Keto amide derivatives as enterovirus 71 (EV71) 3C protease (3C(pro)) inhibitors have been synthesized and assayed for their biochemical and antiviral activities. structure-activity relationship (SAR) study indicated that small moieties were primarily tolerated at P1' and the introduction of para-fluoro benzyl at P2 notably improved the potency of inhibitor. Inhibitors 8v, 8w and 8x exhibited satisfactory activity (IC50=1.32±0.26μM, 1.88±0.35μM and 1.52±0.31μM, respectively) and favorable CC50 values (CC50>100μM). α-Keto amide may represent a good choice as a warhead for EV71 3C(pro) inhibitor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design, synthesis and evaluation of unique 2,4,5-triaryl imidazole derivatives as novel potent aspartic protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Sajid; Akhtar, Salman; Siddiqui, S A; Siddiqui, M S; Srinivasan, K V; Arif, J M

    2012-05-01

    The 2,4,5-triaryl imidazole derivatives (API) were designed, screened and characterized kinetically & thermodynamically against Pepsin and their activity was also tested on the in silico platform. The docking studies of API with Pepsin show that these are novel and unique inhibitors of Aspartic protease. Drug like properties of these compounds were validated in silico based on Lipinski's rule of Five by calculating ClogP, LogS, H-bond acceptors, H-Bond donors, rotational bonds, PSA, PB and BBB values. The Et/Ki and Et/Km values of API show that they follow the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The binding of inhibitors with proteases was explained by using Van't Hoff plot and thermodynamic parameters viz. free energy (ΔG), Entropy (ΔS) and Enthalpy (ΔH). The Van't Hoff analysis showed that the value of Ki decreases with increase in temperature and the binding of the inhibitor are entropically driven. API act as new potent aspartic protease inhibitors with Ki, for Pepsin, ranges from 3.7 µM to 16.7 µM. Strong hydrophobic groups at C-4 & C-5 position in API favor binding of inhibitors with Pepsin. Experiments also showed that among C-2 aryl substituted imidazole, a 4-substitution on aryl ring is preferred and less polar substituent makes the molecule more active whereas polar substituents at 2-position on C-2 aryl ring makes the molecule less active. The docking studies of API with Pepsin further intensify and validate our results.

  20. Structure of the Enterovirus 71 3C Protease in Complex with NK-1.8k and Indications for the Development of Antienterovirus Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxin; Cao, Lin; Zhai, Yangyang; Yin, Zheng; Sun, Yuna; Shang, Luqing

    2017-07-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), caused by enterovirus, is a threat to public health worldwide. To date, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has been one of the major causative agents of HFMD in the Pacific-Asia region, and outbreaks with EV71 cause millions of infections. However, no drug is currently available for clinical therapeutics. In our previous works, we developed a set of protease inhibitors (PIs) targeting the EV71 3C protease (3C pro ). Among these are NK-1.8k and NK-1.9k, which have various active groups and high potencies and selectivities. In the study described here, we determined the structures of the PI NK-1.8k in complex with wild-type (WT) and drug-resistant EV71 3C pro Comparison of these structures with the structure of unliganded EV71 3C pro and its complex with AG7088 indicated that the mutation of N69 to a serine residue destabilized the S2 pocket. Thus, the mutation influenced the cleavage activity of EV71 3C pro and the inhibitory activity of NK-1.8k in an in vitro protease assay and highlighted that site 69 is an additional key site for PI design. More information for the optimization of the P1' to P4 groups of PIs was also obtained from these structures. Together with the results of our previous works, these in-depth results elucidate the inhibitory mechanism of PIs and shed light to develop PIs for the clinical treatment of infections caused by EV71 and other enteroviruses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Gold compounds as cysteine protease inhibitors: perspectives for pharmaceutical application as antiparasitic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Lara; Messori, Luigi; Micale, Nicola; Schirmeister, Tanja; Maes, Louis; Fregona, Dolores; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Gabbiani, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    Gold compounds form a new class of promising metal-based drugs with a number of potential therapeutic applications, particularly in the fields of anticancer and antimicrobial treatments. Previous research revealed that a group of structurally diverse gold compounds cause conspicuous inhibition of the protease activities of the human proteasome. Given the pharmacological importance of protease inhibition, the present study further explored whether these gold compounds might inhibit a few other proteases that are accepted druggable targets for disease treatment. In particular, four distinct cysteine proteases were considered here: cathepsin B and L that play a primary role in tumor-cell invasion and metastasis; rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and CPB2.8ΔCTE, a Leishmania mexicana mature cysteine protease. Based on the encouraging results obtained for some of the tested gold compounds on the two parasitic cysteine proteases, especially against CPB2.8ΔCTE, with IC 50s in the micromolar range, we next evaluated whether those gold compounds might contrast effectively the growth of the respective protozoa and indeed important antiprotozoal properties were disclosed; on the other hand a certain lack of selectivity was highlighted. Also, no direct or clear correlation could be established between the in vitro antiprotozoal properties and the level of protease inhibition. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to possible pharmaceutical applications.

  2. Virological and immunological outcomes at 3 years after starting antiretroviral therapy with regimens containing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or both in INITIO: open-label randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeni, P; Cooper, DA; Aboulker, J-P

    2006-01-01

    antiretroviral therapy with two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (didanosine+stavudine) plus either a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz, EFV) or a protease inhibitor (nelfinavir, NFV), or both (EFV/NFV), in patients with HIV-1 infection who had not previously received...

  3. Mutations in SERPINB7, Encoding a Member of the Serine Protease Inhibitor Superfamily, Cause Nagashima-type Palmoplantar Keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Akiharu; Shiohama, Aiko; Sasaki, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Atsugi, Toru; Sato, Showbu; Shimizu, Atsushi; Mikami, Shuji; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Masaki; Maeda, Tatsuo; Ito, Taisuke; Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Heike, Toshio; Okuyama, Torayuki; Kosaki, Rika; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kudoh, Jun; Hata, Kenichiro; Umezawa, Akihiro; Tokura, Yoshiki; Ishiko, Akira; Niizeki, Hironori; Kabashima, Kenji; Mitsuhashi, Yoshihiko; Amagai, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    “Nagashima-type” palmoplantar keratosis (NPPK) is an autosomal recessive nonsyndromic diffuse palmoplantar keratosis characterized by well-demarcated diffuse hyperkeratosis with redness, expanding on to the dorsal surfaces of the palms and feet and the Achilles tendon area. Hyperkeratosis in NPPK is mild and nonprogressive, differentiating NPPK clinically from Mal de Meleda. We performed whole-exome and/or Sanger sequencing analyses of 13 unrelated NPPK individuals and identified biallelic putative loss-of-function mutations in SERPINB7, which encodes a cytoplasmic member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily. We identified a major causative mutation of c.796C>T (p.Arg266∗) as a founder mutation in Japanese and Chinese populations. SERPINB7 was specifically present in the cytoplasm of the stratum granulosum and the stratum corneum (SC) of the epidermis. All of the identified mutants are predicted to cause premature termination upstream of the reactive site, which inhibits the proteases, suggesting a complete loss of the protease inhibitory activity of SERPINB7 in NPPK skin. On exposure of NPPK lesional skin to water, we observed a whitish spongy change in the SC, suggesting enhanced water permeation into the SC due to overactivation of proteases and a resultant loss of integrity of the SC structure. These findings provide an important framework for developing pathogenesis-based therapies for NPPK. PMID:24207119

  4. Characterisation of adult green lacewing (Chrysoperla carnea) digestive physiology: impact of a cysteine protease inhibitor and a synthetic pyrethroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Evan A; Ferry, Natalie; Jouanin, Lise; Romeis, Jörg; Gatehouse, Angharad M R

    2010-03-01

    In spite of concern regarding potential non-target effects of GM crops, few studies have compared GM pest control with conventional methods. The impacts of cypermethrin and oilseed rape expressing oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1) were compared in this study on the predator Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens). Adults fed purified rOC-1 showed a subtle shift in digestive protease profile, with an increasing reliance on serine proteases (chymotrypsin), increase in aspartic proteases and a slight reduction in elastase activity. Although there were no effects on mortality, onset of oviposition was delayed; however, once egg production commenced, egg laying and hatching success rates were comparable with those of controls. Oryzacystatin-1 expressed in pollen showed no detrimental effects. Cypermethrin had no effect on mortality owing to high levels of non-specific esterase activity resulting in partial breakdown of the insecticide. In spite of this, there was a significant delay in onset of oviposition and a significant reduction in egg production and viability. This study demonstrates the potential for pest management to impact on predators, but importantly it highlights the ability of the predator to detoxify/respond to treatments with different modes of action. In this case, exposure to an insecticide carried a greater fitness cost than exposure to a protease inhibitor expressed in transgenic crops.

  5. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Jon [University of Southampton, England; Coates, Leighton [ORNL; Hussey, Robert [University of Southampton, England

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  6. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M Rossouw

    Full Text Available Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors.Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis.The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3] with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease, severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4], high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47 and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66% at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05; longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005; unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001; tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048 and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038. On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033.Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent protease inhibitor dosing strategy

  7. 2D-QSAR study of fullerene nanostructure derivatives as potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Jafari Mousavi, Somaye; Hamidi, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2017-09-01

    The protease of human immunodeficiency virus1 (HIV-PR) is an essential enzyme for antiviral treatments. Carbon nanostructures of fullerene derivatives, have nanoscale dimension with a diameter comparable to the diameter of the active site of HIV-PR which would in turn inhibit HIV. In this research, two dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (2D-QSAR) of fullerene derivatives against HIV-PR activity were employed as a powerful tool for elucidation the relationships between structure and experimental observations. QSAR study of 49 fullerene derivatives was performed by employing stepwise-MLR, GAPLS-MLR, and PCA-MLR models for variable (descriptor) selection and model construction. QSAR models were obtained with higher ability to predict the activity of the fullerene derivatives against HIV-PR by a correlation coefficient (R2training) of 0.942, 0.89, and 0.87 as well as R2test values of 0.791, 0.67and 0.674 for stepwise-MLR, GAPLS-MLR, and PCA -MLR models, respectively. Leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (R2CV) and Y-randomization methods confirmed the models robustness. The descriptors indicated that the HIV-PR inhibition depends on the van der Waals volumes, polarizability, bond order between two atoms and electronegativities of fullerenes derivatives. 2D-QSAR simulation without needing receptor's active site geometry, resulted in useful descriptors mainly denoting ;C60 backbone-functional groups; and ;C60 functional groups; properties. Both properties in fullerene refer to the ligand fitness and improvement van der Waals interactions with HIV-PR active site. Therefore, the QSAR models can be used in the search for novel HIV-PR inhibitors based on fullerene derivatives.

  8. Characterization of the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor interactive-sites of protein Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Shabir H; Lu, Qiuya; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Yang, Likui; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2014-09-01

    Protein Z (PZ) has been reported to promote the inactivation of factor Xa (FXa) by PZ-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) by about three orders of magnitude. Previously, we prepared a chimeric PZ in which its C-terminal pseudo-catalytic domain was grafted on FX light-chain (Gla and EGF-like domains) (PZ/FX-LC). Characterization of PZ/FX-LC revealed that the ZPI interactive-site is primarily located within PZ pseudo-catalytic domain. Nevertheless, the cofactor function and apparent Kd of PZ/FX-LC for interaction with ZPI remained impaired ~6-7-fold, suggesting that PZ contains a ZPI interactive-site outside pseudo-catalytic domain. X-ray structural data indicates that Tyr-240 of ZPI interacts with EGF2-domain of PZ. Structural data further suggests that 3 other ZPI surface loops make salt-bridge interactions with PZ pseudo-catalytic domain. To identify ZPI interactive-sites on PZ, we grafted the N-terminal EGF2 subdomain of PZ onto PZ/FX-LC chimera (PZ-EGF2/FX-LC) and also generated two compensatory charge reversal mutants of PZ pseudo-catalytic domain (Glu-244 and Arg-212) and ZPI surface loops (Lys-239 and Asp-293). PZ chimeras were expressed in mammalian cells and ZPI derivatives were expressed in Escherichia coli. The PZ EGF2 subdomain fusion restored the defective cofactor function of PZ/FX-LC. The activities of PZ and ZPI mutants were all impaired if assayed individually, but partially restored if the compensatory charge reversal mutants were used in the assay. PZ EGF2 subdomain constitutes an interactive-site for ZPI. Data with compensatory charge reversal mutants validates structural data that the identified residues are part of interactive-sites. Insight is provided into mechanisms through which specificity of ZPI-PZ-FXa complex formation is determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of Boosted Protease Inhibitors Reduces Kaposi Sarcoma Incidence Among Male Veterans With HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowski, Marc A.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Richardson, Peter R.; Suteria, Insia; Chiao, Elizabeth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) incidence has decreased since combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, effects of cART type and duration on KS remain difficult to interpret secondary to KS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Methods. We performed a retrospective study of Veterans Affairs Human Immunodeficiency Virus Clinical Case Registry data from 1985 to 2010. We analyzed the relationship between cART regimens and KS using multivariable Poisson regression, stratified or adjusted for timing around cART initiation. KS was identified by ≥1 inpatient or ≥2 outpatient International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes (176.0–9). Percent of cART on specific regimen and total duration on specific regimen were examined. Results. There were 341 KS cases among 25 529 HIV-infected male veterans (incidence rate = 2.02/1000 person-years). Stratified by years after starting cART, every additional 10% time on boosted protease inhibitors (BPIs) was associated with reduced KS incidence in the third year of cART (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], .69–.90). Months on BPIs was associated with lower KS incidence (P = .02). KS incidence was lower at 12–23 (IRR = 0.47; 95% CI, .23–.95) and ≥36 (IRR = 0.14; 95% CI, .02–1.00) months on BPIs compared with <6 months. Longer duration on other regimens was not associated with decreased KS incidence. Conclusions. Lower KS incidence was observed with longer BPI use, after accounting for potential IRIS and other factors. Future research should evaluate newer cART regimens and long-term benefits of PI-based cART on KS in other cohorts and prospective studies. PMID:25586682

  10. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eMatsunaga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-Free Drug Susceptibility Assay (CFDSA, for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR. The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs. CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of various protease inhibitors (PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1.

  11. Effects of a marine serine protease inhibitor on viability and morphology of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Nogueira, Natália Pereira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Paes, Marcia Cristina; da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that serine peptidase activities of Trypanosoma cruzi play crucial roles in parasite dissemination and host cell invasion and therefore their inhibition could affect the progress of Chagas disease. The present study investigates the interference of the Stichodactyla helianthus Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (ShPI-I), a 55-amino acid peptide, in T. cruzi serine peptidase activities, parasite viability, and parasite morphology. The effect of this peptide was also studied in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and it was proved to be a powerful inhibitor of serine proteases activities and the parasite viability. The ultrastructural alterations caused by ShPI-I included vesiculation of the flagellar pocket membrane and the appearance of a cytoplasmic vesicle that resembles an autophagic vacuole. ShPI-I, which showed itself to be an important T. cruzi serine peptidase inhibitor, reduced the parasite viability, in a dose and time dependent manner. The maximum effect of peptide on T. cruzi viability was observed when ShPI-I at 1×10(-5)M was incubated for 24 and 48h which killed completely both metacyclic trypomastigote and epimastigote forms. At 1×10(-6)M ShPI-I, in the same periods of time, reduced parasite viability about 91-95% respectively. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated the formation of concentric membranar structures especially in the cytosol, involving organelles and small vesicles. Profiles of endoplasmic reticulum were also detected, surrounding cytosolic vesicles that resembled autophagic vacuoles. These results suggest that serine peptidases are important in T. cruzi physiology since the inhibition of their activity killed parasites in vitro as well as inducing important morphological alterations. Protease inhibitors thus appear to have a potential role as anti-trypanosomatidal agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Herbivore damage-induced production and specific anti-digestive function of serine and cysteine protease inhibitors in tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima L. (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Robert F; Halitschke, Rayko; Kessler, André

    2013-05-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the most well-studied and widely distributed resistance traits that plants use against their herbivore attackers. There are different types of plant PIs which putatively function against the different types of proteases expressed in insect guts. Serine protease inhibitors (SPIs) and cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs) are hypothesized to differentially function against the predominant gut proteases in lepidopteran and coleopteran herbivores, respectively. Here, we test the hypothesis that tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima, can specifically respond to damage by different herbivores and differentially induce SPIs and CPIs in response to damage by lepidopteran and coleopteran herbivores. Moreover, we ask if the concerted induction of different types of PIs accounts for variation in induced resistance to herbivory. We altered and optimized a rapid and effective existing methodology to quantitatively analyze both SPI and CPI activity simultaneously from a single tissue sample and to use the same plant extracts directly for characterization of inhibitory effects on insect gut protease activity. We found that both SPIs and CPIs are induced in S. altissima in response to damage, regardless of the damaging herbivore species. However, only SPIs were effective against Spodoptera exigua gut proteases. Our data suggest that plant PI responses are not necessarily specific to the identity of the attacking organism but that different components of generally induced defense traits can specifically affect different herbivore species. While providing an efficient and broadly applicable methodology to analyze multiple PIs extracted from the same tissue, this study furthers our understanding of specificity in induced plant resistance.

  13. Discovering key residues of dengue virus NS2b-NS3-protease: New binding sites for antiviral inhibitors design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Pesantes, D; Robayo, L E; Méndez, P E; Mollocana, D; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Torres, F J; Méndez, M A

    2017-10-28

    The NS2B-NS3 protease is essential for the Dengue Virus (DENV) replication process. This complex constitutes a target for efficient antiviral discovery because a drug could inhibit the viral polyprotein processing. Furthermore, since the protease is highly conserved between the four Dengue virus serotypes, it is probable that a drug would be equally effective against all of them. In this article, a strategy is reported that allowed us to identify influential residues on the function of the Dengue NS2b-NS3 Protease. Moreover, this is a strategy that could be applied to virtually any protein for the search of alternative influential residues, and for non-competitive inhibitor development. First, we incorporated several features derived from computational alanine scanning mutagenesis, sequence, structure conservation, and other structure-based characteristics. Second, these features were used as variables to obtain a multilayer perceptron model to identify defined groups (clusters) of key residues as possible candidate pockets for binding sites of new leads on the DENV protease. The identified residues included: i) amino acids close to the beta sheet-loop-beta sheet known to be important in its closed conformation for NS2b ii) residues close to the active site, iii) several residues evenly spread on the NS2b-NS3 contact surface, and iv) some inner residues most likely related to the overall stability of the protease. In addition, we found concordance on our list of residues with previously identified amino acids part of a highly conserved peptide studied for vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bowman-Birk Protease Inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata Seeds Enhances the Action of Bradykinin-Related Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice da Cunha M. Álvares

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydrolysis of bradykinin (Bk by different classes of proteases in plasma and tissues leads to a decrease in its half-life. Here, Bk actions on smooth muscle and in vivo cardiovascular assays in association with a protease inhibitor, Black eyed-pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI and also under the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin were evaluated. Two synthetic Bk-related peptides, Bk1 and Bk2, were used to investigate the importance of additional C-terminal amino acid residues on serine protease activity. BTCI forms complexes with Bk and analogues at pH 5.0, 7.4 and 9.0, presenting binding constants ranging from 103 to 104 M−1. Formation of BTCI-Bk complexes is probably driven by hydrophobic forces, coupled with slight conformational changes in BTCI. In vitro assays using guinea pig (Cavia porcellus ileum showed that Bk retains the ability to induce smooth muscle contraction in the presence of BTCI. Moreover, no alteration in the inhibitory activity of BTCI in complex with Bk and analogous was observed. When the BTCI and BTCI-Bk complexes were tested in vivo, a decrease of vascular resistance and consequent hypotension and potentiating renal and aortic vasodilatation induced by Bk and Bk2 infusions was observed. These results indicate that BTCI-Bk complexes may be a reliable strategy to act as a carrier and protective approach for Bk-related peptides against plasma serine proteases cleavage, leading to an increase in their half-life. These findings also indicate that BTCI could remain stable in some tissues to inhibit chymotrypsin or trypsin-like enzymes that cleave and inactivate bradykinin in situ.

  15. Hydroxyethylamine isostere of an HIV-1 protease inhibitor prefers its amine to the hydroxy group in binding to catalytic aspartates. A synchrotron study of HIV-1 protease in complex with a peptidomimetic inhibitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Hašek, Jindřich; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Hradilek, Martin; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Sedláček, Juraj; Fábry, Milan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 7 (2002), s. 1432-1438 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA ČR GA203/97/P031; GA ČR GV203/98/K023; GA ČR GA203/00/D117; GA ČR GA204/00/P091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV-1 protease * hydroxyethylamine-containing inhibitor * aspartate Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.566, year: 2002

  16. Increase in the plasma levels of protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor in normal pregnancies but not in non-pregnant patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souri, Masayoshi; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Saito, Shigeru; Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Ichinose, Akitada

    2012-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ)-dependent p-otease inhibitor (ZPI) is a serine protease inhibitor which efficiently inactivates activated factor X, when ZPI is complexed with PZ in plasma. Reduced plasma levels of ZPI and PZ have been reported in association with thrombosis. It has also been reported that PZ

  17. The Effect of the Protease Inhibitors Ritonavir on the Rate of Metabolism of Midazolam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    the HIV protease enzyme that processes the viral proteins essential for the completion of the viral life cycle , thus decreasing the production of more...of long protein chains of the virus so that they can be packaged to complete the viral life cycle . The HIV protease enzyme cuts the long chain into...enzyme (Vmax) and rate constants (Km). In order to avoid the difficulty plotting curvilinear data of enzyme catalyzed reactions, the biochemists

  18. The effect of protease inhibitors on the induction of osteoarthritis-related biomarkers in bovine full-depth cartilage explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Jiang, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    was detected in either extracts or supernatants; ii) Active ADAMTS-4 was primarily responsible for E373-374A bond cleavage in aggrecan in this setting; and iii) The compensatory mechanism could be triggered following the blockage of the enzyme caused by inhibitors. Conclusions ADAMTS-4 appeared to be the major...... protease for the generation of 374ARGS aggrecan fragment in the TNF-α/OSM stimulated bovine cartilage explants. This study addresses the need to determine the roles of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in human articular degradation in OA and hence identify the attractive target for slowing down human cartilage...

  19. Effects of 17β-estradiol on radiation transformation in vitro; inhibition of effects by protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, A.R.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of 17β-estradiol, given either alone or with X-radiation, on the induction of malignant transformation were investigated in vitro. Treatment with 10 -6 M 17β-estradiol for 6 weeks, or 10 -5 M 17β-estradiol for only 5 days, induced malignant transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells. Estradiol also acted as a cocarcinogen for X-ray induced transformation; the results indicated an additive effect when the cells were exposed to both agents together. The protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin suppressed estradiol induced transformation as well as the additive effect observed for estradiol-radiation transformation. (author)

  20. Structural and energy comparison of ethylenamine inhibitor binding to the wild type and mutant HIV-1 proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Petroková, Hana; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Buchtelová, Eva; Dušková, Jarmila

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 63-64 [Meeting of the Czech and Slovak Structural Biologists /2./. 13.03.2003-15.03.2003, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA ČR GA204/00/P091; GA ČR GA203/00/D117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV protease * ethylenamine inhibitor * conformational analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. An ethylenamine inhibitor binds tightly to both wild type and mutant HIV-1 proteases. Structure and energy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Petroková, Hana; Buchtelová, Eva; Dušková, Jarmila; Souček, Milan; Majer, Pavel; Kondrová, Taťána; Konvalinka, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 9 (2003), s. 1636-1644 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA AV ČR KJB4050312; GA ČR GV203/98/K023; GA ČR GA204/00/P091; GA ČR GA203/00/D117; GA MZd NI6339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913; CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : mutant HIV-1 protease * ethylenamine inhibitor * structure Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.820, year: 2003

  2. Kunitzins: Prototypes of a new class of protease inhibitor from the skin secretions of European and Asian frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaole; Wang, He; Shen, Yue; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2016-08-19

    Amphibian skin secretions contain biologically-active compounds, such as anti-microbial peptides and trypsin inhibitors, which are used by biomedical researchers as a source of potential novel drug leads or pharmacological agents. Here, we report the application of a recently developed technique within our laboratory to "shotgun" clone the cDNAs encoding two novel but structurally-related peptides from the lyophilised skin secretions of one species of European frog, Rana esculenta and one species of Chinese frog, Odorrana schmackeri. Bioanalysis of the peptides established the structure of a 17-mer with an N-terminal Ala (A) residue and a C-terminal Cys (C) residue with a single disulphide bridge between Cys 12 and 17, which is a canonical Kunitz-type protease inhibitor motif (-CKAAFC-). Due to the presence of this structural attribute, these peptides were named kunitzin-RE (AAKIILNPKFRCKAAFC) and kunitzin-OS (AVNIPFKVHLRCKAAFC). Synthetic replicates of these two novel peptides were found to display a potent inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli but were ineffective at inhibiting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans at concentrations up to 160 μM, and both showed little haemolytic activity at concentrations up to 120 μM. Subsequently, kunitzin-RE and kunitzin-OS were found to be a potent inhibitor of trypsin with a Ki of 5.56 μM and 7.56 μM that represent prototypes of a novel class of highly-attenuated amphibian skin protease inhibitor. Substitution of Lys-13, the predicted residue occupying the P1 position within the inhibitory loop, with Phe (F) resulted in decrease in trypsin inhibitor effectiveness and antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli, but exhibits a potential inhibition activity against chymotrypsin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protease Inhibitors and Renal Function in Patients with HIV Infection: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis, Corinne Isnard; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-01-08

    Despite antiretroviral (ARV) therapy reducing renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus overall, there is concern that certain ARVs, particularly tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) with or without a boosted protease inhibitor (PI), may reduce renal function over time. It is not known whether effects seen with PI-based regimens are independent, result from interactions with TDF coadministration, or are artefactual owing to inhibition of renal tubular creatinine transport by ritonavir or cobicistat pharmacoenhancement. The aim of this review was to conduct a systematic review of studies, weighted toward high-quality evidence, examining changes in renal function over time with PI-based regimens. PubMed, Embase, and Medline databases and conference abstracts were searched using pre-defined terms for English language articles, published up to and including August 12, 2013, describing changes in renal function over time with PI-based regimens. All available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected; however, to reduce bias, only observational studies recruiting from more than one center and analyzing data from more than 1,000 patients were included. Evidence was qualitatively evaluated according to levels established by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM). A total of 2,322 articles were retrieved by the initial search. Of these, 37 were selected for full review, comprising 24 RCTs (OCEBM Level 1 evidence: 4 reports of fully double-blinded or blinded with respect to the PI component). The remaining 20 RCTs and 13 observational studies qualified as OCEBM Level 2 evidence. Level 1 evidence showed initial but non-progressive increases in serum creatinine and corresponding decreases in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), suggesting an effect on renal tubular transport of creatinine. Level 2 evidence suggested that atazanavir and lopinavir especially in combination with TDF were associated with non-progressive reductions in eGFR over

  4. The HIV protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of refractory pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier-Stephenson V

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa Meier-Stephenson,1,2 Justin Riemer,1,2 Aru Narendran1–3 1Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 2Department of Pediatrics, Alberta Children’s Hospital, 3Pediatric Oncology Experimental Therapeutics Investigators Consortium (POETIC Laboratory, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: Refractory pediatric leukemia remains one of the leading causes of death in children. Intensification of current chemotherapy regimens to improve the outcome in these children is often limited by the effects of drug resistance and cumulative toxicity. Hence, the search for newer agents and novel therapeutic approaches are urgently needed to formulate the next-generation early-phase clinical trials for these patients.Materials and methods: A comprehensive library of antimicrobials, including eight HIV protease inhibitors (nelfinavir [NFV], saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, atazanavir, lopinavir, and darunavir, was tested against a panel of pediatric leukemia cells by in vitro growth inhibition studies. Detailed target modulation studies were carried out by Western blot analyses. In addition, drug synergy experiments with conventional and novel antitumor agents were completed to identify effective treatment regimens for future clinical trials.Results: Several of the HIV protease inhibitors showed cytotoxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations (half-maximal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 1–24 µM. In particular, NFV was found to exhibit the most potent antileukemic properties across all cell lines tested. Mechanistic studies show that NFV leads to the induction of autophagy and apoptosis possibly through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, interference with cell signaling pathways, including Akt and mTOR, was also noted. Finally, drug combination studies have identified agents with potential for synergy with NFV in its antileukemic activity. These include JQ1 (BET inhibitor

  5. Developmental regulation of synthesis and dimerization of the amyloidogenic protease inhibitor cystatin C in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuekang; Lindemann, Petra; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Villadangos, Jose A

    2014-04-04

    The cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C is thought to be secreted by most cells and eliminated in the kidneys, so its concentration in plasma is diagnostic of kidney function. Low extracellular cystatin C is linked to pathologic protease activity in cancer, arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism, and emphysema. Cystatin C forms non-inhibitory dimers and aggregates by a mechanism known as domain swapping, a property that reportedly protects against Alzheimer disease but can also cause amyloid angiopathy. Despite these clinical associations, little is known about the regulation of cystatin C production, dimerization, and secretion. We show that hematopoietic cells are major contributors to extracellular cystatin C levels in healthy mice. Among these cells, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) are the predominant producers of cystatin C. Both cell types synthesize monomeric and dimeric cystatin C in vivo, but only secrete monomer. Dimerization occurs co-translationally in the endoplasmic reticulum and is regulated by the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from mitochondria. Drugs or stimuli that reduce the intracellular concentration of ROS inhibit cystatin C dimerization. The extracellular concentration of inhibitory cystatin C is thus partly dependent on the abundance of macrophages and DC, and the ROS levels. These results have implications for the diagnostic use of serum cystatin C as a marker of kidney function during inflammatory processes that induce changes in DC or macrophage abundance. They also suggest an important role for macrophages, DC, and ROS in diseases associated with the protease inhibitory activity or amyloidogenic properties of cystatin C.

  6. Developmental Regulation of Synthesis and Dimerization of the Amyloidogenic Protease Inhibitor Cystatin C in the Hematopoietic System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuekang; Lindemann, Petra; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    The cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C is thought to be secreted by most cells and eliminated in the kidneys, so its concentration in plasma is diagnostic of kidney function. Low extracellular cystatin C is linked to pathologic protease activity in cancer, arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism, and emphysema. Cystatin C forms non-inhibitory dimers and aggregates by a mechanism known as domain swapping, a property that reportedly protects against Alzheimer disease but can also cause amyloid angiopathy. Despite these clinical associations, little is known about the regulation of cystatin C production, dimerization, and secretion. We show that hematopoietic cells are major contributors to extracellular cystatin C levels in healthy mice. Among these cells, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) are the predominant producers of cystatin C. Both cell types synthesize monomeric and dimeric cystatin C in vivo, but only secrete monomer. Dimerization occurs co-translationally in the endoplasmic reticulum and is regulated by the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from mitochondria. Drugs or stimuli that reduce the intracellular concentration of ROS inhibit cystatin C dimerization. The extracellular concentration of inhibitory cystatin C is thus partly dependent on the abundance of macrophages and DC, and the ROS levels. These results have implications for the diagnostic use of serum cystatin C as a marker of kidney function during inflammatory processes that induce changes in DC or macrophage abundance. They also suggest an important role for macrophages, DC, and ROS in diseases associated with the protease inhibitory activity or amyloidogenic properties of cystatin C. PMID:24570004

  7. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Dam; Romina Quercia; Bärbel Glass; Diane Descamps; Odile Launay; Xavier Duval; Hans-Georg Kräusslich; Allan J Hance; François Clavel

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to protease inhibitors (PI) results from mutations in the viral protease (PR) that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC). Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying dif...

  8. Gag drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 subtype C patients, failing a protease inhibitor inclusive treatment regimen, with detectable lopinavir levels

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Pillay, Sameshnee; Singh, Urisha; Singh, Avashna; Gordon, Michelle; Ndungu, Thumbi

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and their use in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has led to the effective control of HIV replication in infected patients. However the emergence of resistant HIV-1 strains still remains a problem. Literature has shown that mutations may accumulate in the protease (PR) and gag regions of HIV-1 patients who fail therapy with protease inhibitor (PI) drugs (1, 2). Gag mutations have also been found to play an important role in the evolutio...

  9. Ninety-nine is not enough: molecular characterization of inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease mutants with insertions in the flap region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Milan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Maarseveen van, N. M.; De Jongh, D.; Boucher, Ch. A. B.; Kagan, R. M.; Nijhuis, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 12 (2008), s. 5869-5878 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA MZd NR8571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors * aspartic proteases * viral resistance * insertions Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.308, year: 2008

  10. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  11. Assessment of FIV-C infection of cats as a function of treatment with the protease inhibitor, TL-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Rozières Sohela

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protease inhibitor, TL-3, demonstrated broad efficacy in vitro against FIV, HIV and SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus, and exhibited very strong protective effects on early neurologic alterations in the CNS of FIV-PPR infected cats. In this study, we analyzed TL-3 efficacy using a highly pathogenic FIV-C isolate, which causes a severe acute phase immunodeficiency syndrome, with high early mortality rates. Results Twenty cats were infected with uncloned FIV-C and half were treated with TL-3 while the other half were left untreated. Two uninfected cats were used as controls. The general health and the immunological and virological status of the animals was monitored for eight weeks following infection. All infected animals became viremic independent of TL-3 treatment and seven of 20 FIV-C infected animals developed severe immunodepletive disease in conjunction with significantly (p ≤ 0.05 higher viral RNA loads as compared to asymptomatic animals. A marked and progressive increase in CD8+ T lymphocytes in animals surviving acute phase infection was noted, which was not evident in symptomatic animals (p ≤ 0.05. Average viral loads were lower in TL-3 treated animals and of the 6 animals requiring euthanasia, four were from the untreated cohort. At eight weeks post infection, half of the TL-3 treated animals and only one of six untreated animals had viral loads below detection limits. Analysis of protease genes in TL-3 treated animals with higher than average viral loads revealed sequence variations relative to wild type protease. In particular, one mutant, D105G, imparted 5-fold resistance against TL-3 relative to wild type protease. Conclusions The findings indicate that the protease inhibitor, TL-3, when administered orally as a monotherapy, did not prevent viremia in cats infected with high dose FIV-C. However, the modest lowering of viral loads with TL-3 treatment, the greater survival rate in symptomatic animals of

  12. Comparison of single and boosted protease inhibitor versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing cART regimens in antiretroviral-naïve patients starting cART after January 1, 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Horban, A; Clumeck, N

    2006-01-01

    increase) response in antiretroviral-naïve patients starting either a single protease inhibitor (PI; n = 183), a ritonavir-boosted PI regimen (n = 197), or a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART regimen (n = 447) after January 1, 2000, and the odds of lack of virologic...

  13. A treatment with a protease inhibitor recombinant from the cattle tick (Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus ameliorates emphysema in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana D Lourenço

    Full Text Available AIMS: To determine whether a serine protease inhibitor treatment can prevent or minimize emphysema in mice. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were subjected to porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE nasal instillation to induce emphysema and were treated with a serine protease inhibitor (rBmTI-A before (Protocol 1 and after (Protocol 2 emphysema development. In both protocols, we evaluated lung function to evaluate the airway resistance (Raw, tissue damping (Gtis and tissue elastance (Htis. The inflammatory profile was analyzed in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF and through the use of morphometry; we measured the mean linear intercept (Lm (to verify alveolar enlargement, the volume proportion of collagen and elastic fibers, and the numbers of macrophages and metalloprotease 12 (MMP-12 positive cells in the parenchyma. We showed that at both time points, even after the emphysema was established, the rBmTI-A treatment was sufficient to reverse the loss of elastic recoil measured by Htis, the alveolar enlargement and the increase in the total number of cells in the BALF, with a primary decrease in the number of macrophages. Although, the treatment did not control the increase in macrophages in the lung parenchyma, it was sufficient to decrease the number of positive cells for MMP-12 and reduce the volume of collagen fibers, which was increased in PPE groups. These findings attest to the importance of MMP-12 in PPE-induced emphysema and suggest that this metalloprotease could be an effective therapeutic target.

  14. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J. (Abbott)

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  15. Hyperlipidemia related to the use of HIV-protease inhibitors: natural history and results of treatment with fenofibrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Caramelli

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia has been frequently recorded as a side effect of treating HIV patients with protease inhibitors (PI. This study was initiated to analyze the modifications on blood lipids in HIV-patients receiving PI and the safety and efficacy of the treatment with fenofibrate. Total (TC and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and CD4+ T-cell counts were measured in 30 HAART-naive patients (Group I before and after PI introduction. In a second phase of the study, the effects of fenofibrate on lipids, CPK, CD4+, and viral load were determined in 13 patients (Group II with elevated TC or TG. In Group I, 60% of the patients showed TC or TG elevations. Average increments of 31% and 146% in TC and TG respectively (p<0.0006 and p<0.0001 were observed. In Group II, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decrements of 6.6% (TC and 45.7% (TG (p=0.07 and 0.0002 and no modifications on CPK, CD4+, and viral load. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia is common during the treatment of HIV with protease inhibitors, and fenofibrate appears to be an effective and safe choice for its treatment.

  16. Discovery of novel potent and selective dipeptide hepatitis C virus NS3/4A serine protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboisson, Pierre; Lin, Tse-I; Kock, Herman de; Vendeville, Sandrine; Vreken, Wim Van de; McGowan, David; Tahri, Abdellah; Hu, Lili; Lenz, Oliver; Delouvroy, Frederic; Surleraux, Dominique; Wigerinck, Piet; Nilsson, Magnus; Rosenquist, Sa; Samuelsson, Bertil; Simmen, Kenneth

    2008-09-15

    Starting from the previously reported HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor BILN 2061, we have used a fast-follower approach to identify a novel series of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors in which (i) the P3 amino moiety and its capping group have been truncated, (ii) a sulfonamide is introduced in the P1 cyclopropyl amino acid, (iii) the position 8 of the quinoline is substituted with a methyl or halo group, and (iv) the ring size of the macrocycle has been reduced to 14 atoms. SAR analysis performed with a limited set of compounds led to the identification of N-{17-[8-chloro-2-(4-isopropylthiazol-2-yl)-7-methoxyquinolin-4-yloxy]-2,14-dioxo-3,15-diazatricyclo [13.3.0.0 [Bartenschlager, R.; Lohmann, V. J. Gen. Virol. 2000, 81, 1631; Vincent Soriano, Antonio Madejon, Eugenia Vispo, Pablo Labarga, Javier Garcia-Samaniego, Luz Martin-Carbonero, Julie Sheldon, Marcelle Bottecchia, Paula Tuma, Pablo Barreiro Expert Opin. Emerg. Drugs, 2008, 13, 1-19

  17. Hyperlipidemia related to the use of HIV-protease inhibitors: natural history and results of treatment with fenofibrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caramelli Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia has been frequently recorded as a side effect of treating HIV patients with protease inhibitors (PI. This study was initiated to analyze the modifications on blood lipids in HIV-patients receiving PI and the safety and efficacy of the treatment with fenofibrate. Total (TC and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and CD4+ T-cell counts were measured in 30 HAART-naive patients (Group I before and after PI introduction. In a second phase of the study, the effects of fenofibrate on lipids, CPK, CD4+, and viral load were determined in 13 patients (Group II with elevated TC or TG. In Group I, 60% of the patients showed TC or TG elevations. Average increments of 31% and 146% in TC and TG respectively (p<0.0006 and p<0.0001 were observed. In Group II, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decrements of 6.6% (TC and 45.7% (TG (p=0.07 and 0.0002 and no modifications on CPK, CD4+, and viral load. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia is common during the treatment of HIV with protease inhibitors, and fenofibrate appears to be an effective and safe choice for its treatment.

  18. Screening and Characterization of Protease Inhibitors from Marine Bacteria Associated with Sponge Jaspis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIS TRI WAHYUDI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three isolates among 138 sponge-associated bacteria were isolated from Waigeo Island, Raja Ampat West Papua Province, Indonesia, have been shown protease inhibitory activity against subtilisin (serine protease, thermolysin (metalloprotease, and crude extract from pathogenic bacteria (Eschericia coli enteropathogenic/EPEC K.1.1, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Those three isolates were designated as sponge associated bacteria SAB S-12, SAB S-21, and SAB S-17. A simple casein and Sea Water Complete (SWC double layer agar method was used to screen the bacteria against pathogenic bacteria producing protease, i.e. EPEC K.1.1, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Among them, SAB S-12 isolate showed no inhibitory zone indicated. The isolate had the highest inhibitory activity against subtilisin and crude extract enzyme of pathogenic bacteria, the inhibitory activity was 91.6 and 98.9%, respectively. In addition, the SAB S-21 isolate had the highest inhibitory activity against thermolysin, it was 70.4%. The optimum pH and temperature for protease inhibition of the three isolates was at pH 7.0-8.0 and 40-50 °C respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, the closest related with SAB S-12, SAB-17, and SAB-21 isolates was Providencia sp. (92% identity, Paracoccus sp. (86% identity, and Bacillus sp. (100% identity, respectively.

  19. Screening and Characterization of Protease Inhibitors from Marine Bacteria Associated with Sponge Jaspis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIS TRI WAHYUDI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three isolates among 138 sponge-associated bacteria were isolated from Waigeo Island, Raja Ampat West Papua Province, Indonesia, have been shown protease inhibitory activity against subtilisin (serine protease, thermolysin (metalloprotease, and crude extract from pathogenic bacteria (Eschericia coli enteropathogenic/EPEC K.1.1, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Those three isolates were designated as sponge associated bacteria SAB S-12, SAB S-21, and SAB S-17. A simple casein and Sea Water Complete (SWC double layer agar method was used to screen the bacteria against pathogenic bacteria producing protease, i.e. EPEC K.1.1, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Among them, SAB S-12 isolate showed no inhibitory zone indicated. The isolate had the highest inhibitory activity against subtilisin and crude extract enzyme of pathogenic bacteria, the inhibitory activity was 91.6 and 98.9%, respectively. In addition, the SAB S-21 isolate had the highest inhibitory activity against thermolysin, it was 70.4%. The optimum pH and temperature for protease inhibition of the three isolates was at pH 7.0-8.0 and 40-50 oC respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, the closest related with SAB S-12, SAB-17, and SAB-21 isolates was Providencia sp. (92% identity, Paracoccus sp. (86% identity, and Bacillus sp. (% identity, respectively.

  20. 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies on HIV protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jianbo; Wu, Yingji; Bai, Min; Zhan, Pei

    2017-02-01

    In order to well understand the chemical-biological interactions governing their activities toward HIV protease activity, QSAR models of 34 cyclic-urea derivatives with inhibitory HIV were developed. The quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was built by using comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) technique. And the best CoMSIA model has rcv2, rncv2 values of 0.586 and 0.931 for cross-validated and non-cross-validated. The predictive ability of CoMSIA model was further validated by a test set of 7 compounds, giving rpred2 value of 0.973. Docking studies were used to find the actual conformations of chemicals in active site of HIV protease, as well as the binding mode pattern to the binding site in protease enzyme. The information provided by 3D-QSAR model and molecular docking may lead to a better understanding of the structural requirements of 34 cyclic-urea derivatives and help to design potential anti-HIV protease molecules.

  1. An unusual helix-turn-helix protease inhibitory motif in a novel trypsin inhibitor from seeds of Veronica (Veronica hederifolia L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Rebecca; Konarev, Alexander V; Forsyth, Jane; Lovegrove, Alison; Marsh, Justin; Joseph-Horne, Timothy; Shewry, Peter; Brady, R Leo

    2007-09-21

    The storage tissues of many plants contain protease inhibitors that are believed to play an important role in defending the plant from invasion by pests and pathogens. These proteinaceous inhibitor molecules belong to a number of structurally distinct families. We describe here the isolation, purification, initial inhibitory properties, and three-dimensional structure of a novel trypsin inhibitor from seeds of Veronica hederifolia (VhTI). The VhTI peptide inhibits trypsin with a submicromolar apparent K(i) and is expected to be specific for trypsin-like serine proteases. VhTI differs dramatically in structure from all previously described families of trypsin inhibitors, consisting of a helix-turn-helix motif, with the two alpha helices tightly associated by two disulfide bonds. Unusually, the crystallized complex is in the form of a stabilized acyl-enzyme intermediate with the scissile bond of the VhTI inhibitor cleaved and the resulting N-terminal portion of the inhibitor remaining attached to the trypsin catalytic serine 195 by an ester bond. A synthetic, truncated version of the VhTI peptide has also been produced and co-crystallized with trypsin but, surprisingly, is seen to be uncleaved and consequently forms a noncovalent complex with trypsin. The VhTI peptide shows that effective enzyme inhibitors can be constructed from simple helical motifs and provides a new scaffold on which to base the design of novel serine protease inhibitors.

  2. Crystallisation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protease from Southampton norovirus complexed with a Michael-acceptor inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, Leighton [ORNL; Cooper, Jon [University of Southampton, England; Hussey, Robert [University of Southampton, England

    2008-01-01

    Noroviruses are the predominant cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional parts. Here, the crystallization of the recombinant protease from the Southampton norovirus is described. While the native crystals were found to diffract only to medium resolution (2.9 {angstrom}), cocrystals of an inhibitor complex diffracted X-rays to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The polypeptide inhibitor (Ac-EFQLQ-propenyl ethyl ester) possesses an amino-acid sequence designed to match the substrate specificity of the enzyme, but was synthesized with a reactive Michael acceptor group at the C-terminal end.

  3. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; Rao, Shwetha D; Bontell, Irene; Verheyen, Jens; Rao, Vasudev R; Gore, Sagar C; Soni, Neelesh; Shet, Anita; Schülter, Eugen; Ekstrand, Maria L; Wondwossen, Amogne; Kaiser, Rolf; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Prasad, Vinayaka R; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2014-09-24

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region, which appeared in protease inhibitor failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (odds ratio=17.1, P < 0.001) but was naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian HIV-1C sequences. The insertion is predicted to restore ALIX-mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of the insertion needs to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions wherein the use of protease inhibitor drugs are being scaled up.

  4. A small molecule inhibitor of dengue virus type 2 protease inhibits the replication of all four dengue virus serotypes in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Rajendra; Beesetti, Hemalatha; Tyagi, Poornima; Khanna, Ira; Jain, Swatantra K; Jeankumar, Variam U; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2015-02-08

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant of arboviral diseases in the 21st century. It is endemic to >100 tropical and sub-tropical countries around the world placing an estimated 3.6 billion people at risk. It is caused by four genetically similar but antigenically distinct, serotypes of dengue viruses. There is neither a vaccine to prevent nor a drug to treat dengue infections, at the present time. The major objective of this work was to explore the possibility of identifying a small molecule inhibitor of the dengue virus protease and assessing its ability to suppress viral replication in cultured cells. We cloned, expressed and purified recombinant dengue virus type 2 protease. Using an optimized and validated fluorogenic peptide substrate cleavage assay to monitor the activity of this cloned dengue protease we randomly screened ~1000 small molecules from an 'in-house' library to identify potential dengue protease inhibitors. A benzimidazole derivative, named MB21, was found to be the most potent in inhibiting the cloned protease (IC₅₀ = 5.95 μM). In silico docking analysis indicated that MB21 binds to the protease in the vicinity of the active site. Analysis of kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction suggested that MB21 presumably functions as a mixed type inhibitor. Significantly, this molecule identified as an inhibitor of dengue type 2 protease was also effective in inhibiting each one of the four serotypes of dengue viruses in infected cells in culture, based on analysis of viral antigen synthesis and infectious virus production. Interestingly, MB21 did not manifest any discernible cytotoxicity. This work strengthens the notion that a single drug molecule can be effective against all four dengue virus serotypes. The molecule MB21 could be a potential candidate for 'hit-to-lead' optimization, and may pave the way towards developing a pan-dengue virus antiviral drug.

  5. Crystal structure of an FIV/HIV chimeric protease complexed with the broad-based inhibitor, TL-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder John H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have obtained the 1.7 Å crystal structure of FIV protease (PR in which 12 critical residues around the active site have been substituted with the structurally equivalent residues of HIV PR (12X FIV PR. The chimeric PR was crystallized in complex with the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, which inhibits wild type FIV and HIV PRs, as well as 12X FIV PR and several drug-resistant HIV mutants 1234. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that TL-3 inhibits these PRs in the order HIV PR > 12X FIV PR > FIV PR, with Ki values of 1.5 nM, 10 nM, and 41 nM, respectively 234. Comparison of the crystal structures of the TL-3 complexes of 12X FIV and wild-typeFIV PR revealed theformation of additinal van der Waals interactions between the enzyme inhibitor in the mutant PR. The 12X FIV PR retained the hydrogen bonding interactions between residues in the flap regions and active site involving the enzyme and the TL-3 inhibitor in comparison to both FIV PR and HIV PR. However, the flap regions of the 12X FIV PR more closely resemble those of HIV PR, having gained several stabilizing intra-flap interactions not present in wild type FIV PR. These findings offer a structural explanation for the observed inhibitor/substrate binding properties of the chimeric PR.

  6. Molecular cloning, over expression, and activity studies of a peptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor: designed synthetic gene to functional recombinant peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Umasankar, Perunthottathu K; Patole, Milind S; Rao, Mala

    2010-01-01

    The aspartic protease inhibitor (ATBI) purified from a Bacillus sp. is a potent inhibitor of several proteases including recombinant HIV-1 protease, pepsin, and fungal aspartic protease. In this study, we report the cloning, and over expression of a synthetic gene coding for ATBI in Escherichia coli and establish a purification protocol. The ATBI molecule consists of eleven amino acids and is peptidic in nature. We used the peptide sequence data of ATBI to synthesize complementary oligonucleotides, which were annealed and subsequently cloned in-frame with the gene for glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The expression of the resulting fusion protein was induced in E. coli BL21-A1 cells using arabinose. The recombinant peptide was purified using a reduced glutathione column, and cleaved with Factor Xa to remove the GST tag. The resultant product was further purified to homogeneity using RP-HPLC. Mass spectroscopy analysis revealed that the purified peptide had a molecular weight of 1186Da which matches the theoretical molecular weight of the amino acids present in the synthetic gene. The recombinant peptide was found to be active in vitro against HIV-1 protease, pepsin, and fungal aspartic protease. The protocol described in this study may be used to clone pharmaceutically important peptide molecules.

  7. Selection of drug-resistant feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) encoding FIV/HIV chimeric protease in the presence of HIV-specific protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chuan; Happer, Meaghan; Elder, John H

    2013-08-01

    An infectious chimeric feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)/HIV strain carrying six HIV-like protease (PR) mutations (I37V/N55M/V59I/I98S/Q99V/P100N) was subjected to selection in culture against the PR inhibitor lopinavir (LPV), darunavir (DRV), or TL-3. LPV selection resulted in the sequential emergence of V99A (strain S-1X), I59V (strain S-2X), and I108V (strain S-3X) mutations, followed by V37I (strain S-4X). Mutant PRs were analyzed in vitro, and an isogenic virus producing each mutant PR was analyzed in culture for LPV sensitivity, yielding results consistent with the original selection. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for S-1X, S-2X, S-3X, and S-4X were 95, 643, 627, and 1,543 nM, respectively. The primary resistance mutations, V99(82)A, I59(50)V, and V37(32)I, are consistent with the resistance pattern developed by HIV-1 under similar selection conditions. While resistance to LPV emerged readily, similar PR mutations causing resistance to either DRV or TL-3 failed to emerge after passage for more than a year. However, a G37D mutation in the nucleocapsid (NC) was observed in both selections and an isogenic G37D mutant replicated in the presence of 100 nM DRV or TL-3, whereas parental chimeric FIV could not. An additional mutation, L92V, near the PR active site in the folded structure recently emerged during TL-3 selection. The L92V mutant PR exhibited an IC50 of 50 nM, compared to 35 nM for 6s-98S PR, and processed the NC-p2 junction more efficiently, consistent with increased viral fitness. These findings emphasize the role of mutations outside the active site of PR in increasing viral resistance to active-site inhibitors and suggest additional targets for inhibitor development.

  8. HIV-1 protease mutations and inhibitor modifications. Results from a series of X-ray structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Hašek, Jindřich

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 142 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312; GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA MŠk 1K05008 Keywords : HIV-1 protease * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  9. Nanosecond molecular dynamics of HIV protease - inhibitor complexes: insights into the differential binding potency of diasteroisomeres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lepšík, Martin; Kříž, Z.; Havlas, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 57 ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of the Czech and Slovak Structural Biologists /2./. 13.03.2002-15.03.2002, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032; GA ČR GA203/00/0828 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. Application of MM-PBSA functionality in amber to the binding of inhibitors to HIV protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lepšík, Martin; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2002), s. 43-44 ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of the Czech and Slovak Structural Biologists /2./. 13.03.2003-15.03.2003, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032; GA ČR GA203/00/0828 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Brominated polyacetylenic acids from the marine sponge Xestospongia muta: inhibitors of HIV protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, A D; Kokke, W C; Cochran, S; Francis, T A; Tomszek, T; Westley, J W

    1992-09-01

    The EtOAc extract of the sponge Xestospongia muta collected in Colombus Island, Bahamas, yielded eleven straight-chain unsaturated, polyacetylenic, brominated acids, seven of which were identified on the basis of spectral data, including the unknown acids 2-7. These acetylenic acids are the first known examples that have been shown to inhibit HIV protease, a critical enzyme in the replication of human immunodeficiency virus.

  12. Low body weight and type of protease inhibitor predict discontinuation and treatment-limiting adverse drug reactions among HIV-infected patients starting a protease inhibitor regimen: consistent results from a randomized trial and an observational cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Gerstoft, J; Pedersen, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess predictors for discontinuation and treatment-limiting adverse drug reactions (TLADR) among patients starting their first protease inhibitor (PI). METHODS: Data on patients starting a PI regimen (indinavir, ritonavir, ritonavir/saquinavir and saquinavir hard gel...... therapy within less than 2 years. In both populations TLADR were the most common reason for discontinuation. The incidence of TLADR in RAS was: 8.5 (indinavir), 66.0 (ritonavir), 15.6 (saquinavir hard gel) per 100 person-years of follow-up (P ... was associated with a three- to sixfold higher risk of TLADR relative to other PI regimens. Very similar results were documented in RAS [RH for body weight was 1.18 (1.07-1.29)]. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of the patients stopped treatment with the initial PI, most commonly as a result of adverse drug reactions...

  13. Low body weight and type of protease inhibitor predict discontinuation and treatment-limiting adverse drug reactions among HIV-infected patients starting a protease inhibitor regimen: consistent results from a randomized trial and an observational cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Gerstoft, J; Pedersen, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess predictors for discontinuation and treatment-limiting adverse drug reactions (TLADR) among patients starting their first protease inhibitor (PI). METHODS: Data on patients starting a PI regimen (indinavir, ritonavir, ritonavir/saquinavir and saquinavir hard gel...... was associated with a three- to sixfold higher risk of TLADR relative to other PI regimens. Very similar results were documented in RAS [RH for body weight was 1.18 (1.07-1.29)]. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of the patients stopped treatment with the initial PI, most commonly as a result of adverse drug reactions......) in a randomized trial (RAS, n = 318) and an observational cohort (OBC, n = 505) were used to document reasons for discontinuation and TLADR. Risk factors for discontinuation of the initial PI/developing TLADR were assessed in Cox models. RESULTS: A total of 43 (RAS) and 48% (OBC) discontinued the initial PI...

  14. Portulaca oleracea L. as a Prospective Candidate Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Sobia; Hussain, Ishtiaq; Tariq, Muhammad Ilyas; Ijaz, Bushra; Iqbal, Shahid; Qamar-ul-Zaman; Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide health problem affecting about 300 million individuals. HCV causes chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death. Many side effects are associated with the current treatment options. Natural products that can be used as anti-HCV drugs are thus of considerable potential significance. NS3 serine protease (NS3-SP) is a target for the screening of antiviral activity against HCV. The present work explores plants with anti-HCV potential, isolating possible lead compounds. Ten plants, used for medicinal purposes against different infections in rural areas of Pakistan, were collected. The cellular toxicity effects of methanolic extracts of the plants on the viability of Huh-7 cells were studied through the Trypan blue dye exclusion method. Following this, the anti-HCV potential of phytoextracts was assessed by infecting liver cells with HCV-3a-infected serum inoculum. Only the methanolic extract of Portulaca oleracea L. (PO) exhibited more than 70% inhibition. Four fractions were obtained through bioassay-guided extraction of PO. Subsequent inhibition of all organic extract fractions against NS3 serine protease was checked to track the specific target in the virus. The results showed that the PO methanolic crude and ethyl acetate extract specifically abridged the HCV NS3 protease expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Hence, PO extract and its constituents either alone or with interferon could offer a future option to treat chronic HCV.

  15. Design, synthesis, X-ray studies, and biological evaluation of novel macrocyclic HIV-1 protease inhibitors involving the P1'-P2' ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Sean Fyvie, W.; Brindisi, Margherita; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2017-11-01

    Design, synthesis, and evaluation of a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing diverse flexible macrocyclic P1'-P2' tethers are reported. Inhibitor 5a with a pyrrolidinone-derived macrocycle exhibited favorable enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity (Ki = 13.2 nM, IC50 = 22 nM). Further incorporation of heteroatoms in the macrocyclic skeleton provided macrocyclic inhibitors 5m and 5o. These compounds showed excellent HIV-1 protease inhibitory (Ki = 62 pM and 14 pM, respectively) and antiviral activity (IC50 = 5.3 nM and 2.0 nM, respectively). Inhibitor 5o also remained highly potent against a DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant.

  16. Lunasin and Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor concentrations of protein extracts from enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite Nobrega de Moura, Juliana Maria; Hernandez-Ledesma, Blanca; de Almeida, Neiva Maria; Hsieh, Chia-Chien; de Lumen, Ben O; Johnson, Lawrence A

    2011-07-13

    Lunasin and Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (BBI) are two soybean peptides to which health-promoting properties have been attributed. Concentrations of these peptides were determined in skim fractions produced by enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction processing (EAEP) of extruded full-fat soybean flakes (an alternative to extracting oil from soybeans with hexane) and compared with similar extracts from hexane-defatted soybean meal. Oil and protein were extracted by using countercurrent two-stage EAEP of soybeans at 1:6 solids-to-liquid ratio, 50 °C, pH 9.0, and 120 rpm for 1 h. Protein-rich skim fractions were produced from extruded full-fat soybean flakes using different enzyme strategies in EAEP: 0.5% protease (wt/g extruded flakes) used in both extraction stages; 0.5% protease used only in the second extraction stage; no enzyme used in either extraction stage. Countercurrent two-stage protein extraction of air-desolventized, hexane-defatted soybean flakes was used as a control. Protein extraction yields increased from 66% to 89-96% when using countercurrent two-stage EAEP with extruded full-fat flakes compared to 85% when using countercurrent two-stage protein extraction of air-desolventized, hexane-defatted soybean flakes. Extruding full-fat soybean flakes reduced BBI activity. Enzymatic hydrolysis reduced BBI contents of EAEP skims. Lunasin, however, was more resistant to both enzymatic hydrolysis and heat denaturation. Although using enzymes in both EAEP extraction stages yielded the highest protein and oil extractions, reducing enzyme use to only the second stage preserved much of the BBI and Lunasin.

  17. The Escherichia coli replication inhibitor CspD is subject to growth-regulated degradation by the Lon protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langklotz, Sina; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-06-01

    Post-translational proteolysis-dependent regulation of critical cellular processes is a common feature in bacteria. The Escherichia coli Lon protease is involved in the control of the SOS response, acid tolerance and nutritional deprivation. Moreover, Lon plays a role in the regulation of toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems and thereby is linked to persister cell induction. Persister cells represent a small subpopulation that has reversibly switched to a dormant and non-dividing state without genomic alterations. Formation of persister cells permits viability upon nutritional depletion and severe environmental stresses. CspD is a replication inhibitor, which is induced in stationary phase or upon carbon starvation and increases the production of persister cells. It has remained unknown how CspD activity is counteracted when growth is resumed. Here we report that CspD is subject to proteolysis by the Lon protease both in vivo and in vitro. Turnover of CspD by Lon is strictly adjusted to the growth rate and growth phase of E. coli, reflecting the necessity to control CspD levels according to the physiological conditions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Uchida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs, which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P. Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent.

  19. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P) Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Leo; Urata, Shuzo; Ulanday, Gianne Eduard L; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-02-10

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs), which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P). Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent.

  20. The Levels of the Lectin Pathway Serine Protease MASP-1 and Its Complex Formation with C1 Inhibitor Are Linked to the Severity of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Cecilie Bo; Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is known to form complexes with the lectin complement pathway serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2. Deficiency of C1-INH is associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal inherited disease characterized by swelling attacks caused by elevated levels of bradykinin. MASP...

  1. The effect of storage of whole potatoes of three cultivars on the patatin and protease inhibitor content; a study using capillary electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pots, A.M.; Gruppen, H.; Diepenbeek, R. van; Lee, J.J. van der; Boekel, M.A.J.S. van; Wijngaards, G.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    1999-01-01

    The content and biological activity of patatin and the protease inhibitors of molecular size 20-22 kDa present in whole potato tubers were investigated as a function of storage time. The amount of buffer-extractable protein decreased gradually during storage of whole potatoes of the cultivars Bintje

  2. Ultra-fast analysis of plasma and intracellular levels of HIV protease inhibitors in children: A clinical application of MALDI mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); M.L. Reedijk (Mariska); P.C. Burgers (Peter); L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); I.E. van der Ende (Ineke); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D.M. Burger (David); T.M. Luider (Theo); R.A. Gruters (Rob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHIV protease inhibitors must penetrate into cells to exert their action. Differences in the intracellular pharmacokinetics of these drugs may explain why some patients fail on therapy or suffer from drug toxicity. Yet, there is no information available on the intracellular levels of HIV

  3. Validation of Simultaneous Quantitative Method of HIV Protease Inhibitors Atazanavir, Darunavir and Ritonavir in Human Plasma by UPLC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulsidas Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. HIV protease inhibitors are used in the treatment of patients suffering from AIDS and they act at the final stage of viral replication by interfering with the HIV protease enzyme. The paper describes a selective, sensitive, and robust method for simultaneous determination of three protease inhibitors atazanavir, darunavir and ritonavir in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Materials and Methods. The sample pretreatment consisted of solid phase extraction of analytes and their deuterated analogs as internal standards from 50 μL human plasma. Chromatographic separation of analytes was performed on Waters Acquity UPLC C18 (50 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm column under gradient conditions using 10 mM ammonium formate, pH 4.0, and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. Results. The method was established over a concentration range of 5.0–6000 ng/mL for atazanavir, 5.0–5000 ng/mL for darunavir and 1.0–500 ng/mL for ritonavir. Accuracy, precision, matrix effect, recovery, and stability of the analytes were evaluated as per US FDA guidelines. Conclusions. The efficiency of sample preparation, short analysis time, and high selectivity permit simultaneous estimation of these inhibitors. The validated method can be useful in determining plasma concentration of these protease inhibitors for therapeutic drug monitoring and in high throughput clinical studies.

  4. Long-term analysis of resistance development in HIV-1 positive patients treated with protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors: Correlation of the genotype and disease progression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prejdová, Jana; Weber, Jan; Machala, L.; Reiniš, Milan; Linka, M.; Brůčková, M.; Vandasová, M.; Staňková, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2005), 29-36 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NI6339 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV * protease inhibitors * resistance development Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.696, year: 2005

  5. Immunological changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during HIV-specific protease inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Katzenstein, T; Aladdin, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of effective anti-retroviral treatment on immune function, evaluated by a broad array of immunological tests. We followed 12 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for 6 months after initiation of combination anti-retroviral treatment...... including a protease inhibitor. Unstimulated and pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-, interleukin (IL)-2- and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte proliferative responses increased during follow-up reaching average levels from 1.3-fold (PHA) to 3.7-fold (PWM) above baseline values. The total CD4+ lymphocyte...... count increased mainly due to increases in numbers of CD4+ CD28+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ cells, whereas increases in numbers of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells contributed little to the increase in CD4+ cell count. The total cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) killing of autologous B cells infected with HIV-encoding recombinant...

  6. The value of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans in monitoring HIV patients on protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roff, G.; McCarthy, M.; Moore, C.; Mallal, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: With the introduction of HIV protease inhibitors into clinical practice in late 1996, the management and outcome of patients with HIV infection have been greatly improved. However, subsequent findings have found that these drugs produce some complicating peripheral lipodystrohpy, hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. As part of a protocol to monitor these side effects, whole-body DEXA scans are performed to demonstrate and quantify fat mass in various areas of the body. Follow-up scans are then performed every 4-5 months. How beneficial are these scans to the management of the patients or are they lost among the myriad of other procedures? DEXA scans are very helpful to the doctors for monitoring fat mass. Management of the patient is influenced by the results, as this is a more sensitive means of assessing fat mass than other clinical methods

  7. Immunological changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during HIV-specific protease inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Katzenstein, T; Aladdin, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of effective anti-retroviral treatment on immune function, evaluated by a broad array of immunological tests. We followed 12 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for 6 months after initiation of combination anti-retroviral treatment...... count increased mainly due to increases in numbers of CD4+ CD28+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ cells, whereas increases in numbers of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells contributed little to the increase in CD4+ cell count. The total cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) killing of autologous B cells infected with HIV-encoding recombinant...... Vaccinia virus was increased after 3-6 months, whereas the specific HIV-directed CTL activity and the concentration and lytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells were unchanged during follow-up. These results demonstrate that the initiation of a treatment including an HIV protease inhibitor is followed...

  8. Immunological changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during HIV-specific protease inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Katzenstein, T; Aladdin, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of effective anti-retroviral treatment on immune function, evaluated by a broad array of immunological tests. We followed 12 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for 6 months after initiation of combination anti-retroviral treatment...... Vaccinia virus was increased after 3-6 months, whereas the specific HIV-directed CTL activity and the concentration and lytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells were unchanged during follow-up. These results demonstrate that the initiation of a treatment including an HIV protease inhibitor is followed...... count increased mainly due to increases in numbers of CD4+ CD28+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ cells, whereas increases in numbers of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells contributed little to the increase in CD4+ cell count. The total cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) killing of autologous B cells infected with HIV-encoding recombinant...

  9. Effects of 17 beta-estradiol on radiation transformation in vitro; inhibition of effects by protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, A.R.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of 17 beta-estradiol, given both alone and with X-irradiation, on the induction of malignant transformation in vitro. Treatment with 10(-6)M 17 beta-estradiol for 6 weeks, or 10(-5)M 17 beta-estradiol for only 5 days, induced malignant transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells. Estradiol also acted as a cocarcinogen for X-ray induced transformation; the results indicate an additive effect when the cells were exposed to both agents together. The protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin suppressed estradiol induced transformation as well as the additive effect observed for estradiol-radiation transformation

  10. Effects of 17 beta-estradiol on radiation transformation in vitro; inhibition of effects by protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, A.R.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of 17 beta-estradiol, given both alone and with X-irradiation, on the induction of malignant transformation in vitro. Treatment with 10(-6)M 17 beta-estradiol for 6 weeks, or 10(-5)M 17 beta-estradiol for only 5 days, induced malignant transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells. Estradiol also acted as a cocarcinogen for X-ray induced transformation; the results indicate an additive effect when the cells were exposed to both agents together. The protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin suppressed estradiol induced transformation as well as the additive effect observed for estradiol-radiation transformation.

  11. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silveira Carlos H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR. We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI, ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine residues (with some exceptions. Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the

  12. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cristina; Togawa, Roberto C; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Mancini, Adauto L; Minardi, Raquel C de Melo; da Silveira, Carlos H; Jardine, José G; Santoro, Marcelo M; Neshich, Goran

    2010-10-20

    Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes. The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the "miscellaneous-virus" subfamily

  13. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the

  14. Variability in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor concentrations among HIV-infected adults in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltó, José; Blanco, Asunción; Miranda, Cristina; Miranda, José; Puig, Jordi; Valle, Marta; DelaVarga, Meritxell; Fumaz, Carmina R; Barbanoj, Manuel José; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2006-01-01

    What is already known about this subject The concentration of protease and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibtors in plasma has been related to both efficacy and toxicity. Most antiretroviral concentration data come from selected populations of patients undergoing therapeutic drug monitoring programmes, which may overestimate interindividual variability. What this study adds Our study has demonstrated the large interindividual variability in antiretroviral drug concentrations in an unselected population of patients during routine clinical practice. These results may provide interesting information to clinicians for the management of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients. Aims The objective of this study was to assess interindividual variability in trough concentrations of plasma of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) among HIV-infected adults in a routine outpatient setting. Methods One hundred and seventeen patients who attended our clinic for routine blood tests, and who were receiving antiretroviral therapy which included NNRTI or PI were studied. Patients were not informed that drug concentrations were going to be measured until blood sampling. The times of the last antiretroviral dose and of blood sampling were recorded. Drug concentrations were considered optimal if they were above the proposed minimum effective value. In addition, efavirenz, nevirapine and atazanavir concentrations were considered potentially toxic if they were >4.0 mg l−1, >6.0 mg l−1 and >0.85 mg l−1, respectively. Results Overall, interindividual variability of NNRTI and PI concentrations in plasma was approximately 50%, and only 68.4% of the patients had drug concentrations within the proposed therapeutic range. Poor adherence explained only 35% of subtherapeutic drug concentrations. Conclusion Interindividual variability in trough concentrations of NNRTI and PI among HIV-infected adults is large in routine clinical

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Spaller, Mark R.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC 50 : 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the 15 N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC 50 : 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 15 N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV

  16. Tryptogalinin is a tick Kunitz serine protease inhibitor with a unique intrinsic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Valdés

    Full Text Available A salivary proteome-transcriptome project on the hard tick Ixodes scapularis revealed that Kunitz peptides are the most abundant salivary proteins. Ticks use Kunitz peptides (among other salivary proteins to combat host defense mechanisms and to obtain a blood meal. Most of these Kunitz peptides, however, remain functionally uncharacterized, thus limiting our knowledge about their biochemical interactions.We discovered an unusual cysteine motif in a Kunitz peptide. This peptide inhibits several serine proteases with high affinity and was named tryptogalinin due to its high affinity for β-tryptase. Compared with other functionally described peptides from the Acari subclass, we showed that tryptogalinin is phylogenetically related to a Kunitz peptide from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, also reported to have a high affinity for β-tryptase. Using homology-based modeling (and other protein prediction programs we were able to model and explain the multifaceted function of tryptogalinin. The N-terminus of the modeled tryptogalinin is detached from the rest of the peptide and exhibits intrinsic disorder allowing an increased flexibility for its high affinity with its inhibiting partners (i.e., serine proteases.By incorporating experimental and computational methods our data not only describes the function of a Kunitz peptide from Ixodes scapularis, but also allows us to hypothesize about the molecular basis of this function at the atomic level.

  17. Virtual screening for HIV protease inhibitors: a comparison of AutoDock 4 and Vina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The AutoDock family of software has been widely used in protein-ligand docking research. This study compares AutoDock 4 and AutoDock Vina in the context of virtual screening by using these programs to select compounds active against HIV protease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both programs were used to rank the members of two chemical libraries, each containing experimentally verified binders to HIV protease. In the case of the NCI Diversity Set II, both AutoDock 4 and Vina were able to select active compounds significantly better than random (AUC = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively; p<0.001. The binding energy predictions were highly correlated in this case, with r = 0.63 and iota = 0.82. For a set of larger, more flexible compounds from the Directory of Universal Decoys, the binding energy predictions were not correlated, and only Vina was able to rank compounds significantly better than random. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In ranking smaller molecules with few rotatable bonds, AutoDock 4 and Vina were equally capable, though both exhibited a size-related bias in scoring. However, as Vina executes more quickly and is able to more accurately rank larger molecules, researchers should look to it first when undertaking a virtual screen.

  18. Genetic determinants in HIV-1 Gag and Env V3 are related to viral response to combination antiretroviral therapy with a protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sarah K; Perez, Elena E; Rose, Stephanie L; Coman, Roxana M; Lowe, Amanda C; Hou, Wei; Ma, Changxing; Lawrence, Robert M; Dunn, Ben M; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2009-08-24

    To identify novel viral determinants in HIV-1 protease, Gag, and envelope V3 that relate to outcomes to initial protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. A longitudinal cohort study of protease inhibitor-naive, HIV-infected individuals was designed to identify genetic variables in viral Gag and envelope sequences associated with response to antiretroviral therapy. Genetic and statistical models, including amino acid profiles, phylogenetic analyses, receiver operating characteristic analyses, and covariation analyses, were used to evaluate viral sequences and clinical variables from individuals who developed immune reconstitution with or without suppression of viral replication. Pretherapy chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4-using V3 regions had significant associations with viral failure (P = 0.04). Amino acid residues in protease covaried with Gag residues, particularly in p7(NC), independent of cleavage sites. Pretherapy V3 charge combined with p6(Pol) and p2/p7(NC) cleavage site genotypes produced the best three-variable model to predict viral suppression in 88% of individuals. Combinations of baseline CD4 cell percentage with genetic determinants in Gag-protease predicted viral fitness in 100% of individuals who failed to suppress viral replication. Baseline genetic determinants in Gag p6(Pol) and p2/p7(NC), as well as envelope, provide novel combinations of biomarkers for predicting emergence of viral resistance to initial therapy regimens.

  19. Constitutive over-expression of rice chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene OCPI2 results in enhanced growth, salinity and osmotic stress tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Lalit Dev; Mittal, Dheeraj; Chandra Mishra, Ratnesh; Grover, Anil

    2015-07-01

    Protease inhibitors are involved primarily in defense against pathogens. In recent years, these proteins have also been widely implicated in response of plants to diverse abiotic stresses. Rice chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene OCPI2 is highly induced under salt and osmotic stresses. The construct containing the complete coding sequence of OCPI2 cloned downstream to CaMV35S promoter was transformed in Arabidopsis and single copy, homozygous transgenic lines were produced. The transgenic plants exhibited significantly enhanced tolerance to NaCl, PEG and mannitol stress as compared to wild type plants. Importantly, the vegetative and reproductive growth of transgenic plants under unstressed, control conditions was also enhanced: transgenic plants were more vigorous than wild type, resulting into higher yield in terms of silique number. The RWC values and membrane stability index of transgenic in comparison to wild type plants was higher. Higher proline content was observed in the AtOCPI2 lines, which was associated with higher transcript expression of pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase and lowered levels of proline dehydrogenase genes. The chymotrypsin protease activities were lower in the transgenic as against wild type plants, under both unstressed, control as well as stressed conditions. It thus appears that rice chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene OCPI2 is a useful candidate gene for genetic improvement of plants against salt and osmotic stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a protease inhibitor from the latex of Carica papaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarkan, Mohamed [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Faculty of Medicine, Protein Chemistry Unit, Campus Erasme (CP 609), 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Garcia-Pino, Abel [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, Vlaams Interuniversitair Instituut voor Biotechnologie and Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussel (Belgium); Dibiani, Rachid [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Faculty of Medicine, Protein Chemistry Unit, Campus Erasme (CP 609), 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy, E-mail: reloris@vub.ac.be [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, Vlaams Interuniversitair Instituut voor Biotechnologie and Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussel (Belgium); Baeyens-Volant, Danielle [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Faculty of Medicine, Protein Chemistry Unit, Campus Erasme (CP 609), 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The Kunitz-type trypsin/chymotrypsin inhibitor isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two different crystal forms are observed, diffracting to 2.6 and 1.7 Å. A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor purified from the latex of green papaya (Carica papaya) fruits was crystallized in the presence and absence of divalent metal ions. Crystal form I, which is devoid of divalent cations, diffracts to a resolution of 2.6 Å and belongs to space group P3{sub 1} or P3{sub 2}. This crystal form is a merohedral twin with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 74.70, c = 78.97 Å. Crystal form II, which was grown in the presence of Co{sup 2+}, diffracts to a resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.26, b = 81.99, c = 140.89 Å.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a protease inhibitor from the latex of Carica papaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Dibiani, Rachid; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    The Kunitz-type trypsin/chymotrypsin inhibitor isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two different crystal forms are observed, diffracting to 2.6 and 1.7 Å. A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor purified from the latex of green papaya (Carica papaya) fruits was crystallized in the presence and absence of divalent metal ions. Crystal form I, which is devoid of divalent cations, diffracts to a resolution of 2.6 Å and belongs to space group P3 1 or P3 2 . This crystal form is a merohedral twin with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 74.70, c = 78.97 Å. Crystal form II, which was grown in the presence of Co 2+ , diffracts to a resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 44.26, b = 81.99, c = 140.89 Å

  2. Variability in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors concentrations among HIV-infected adults in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltó, José; Blanco, Asunción; Miranda, Cristina; Miranda, José; Puig, Jordi; Valle, Marta; DelaVarga, Meritxell; Fumaz, Carmina R; Barbanoj, Manuel José; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2007-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to assess interindividual variability in plasma trough concentrations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) among HIV-infected adults in an outpatient routine clinical practice setting. Methods The study included 117 patients who attended our clinic for routine outpatient blood tests and who were receiving antiretroviral therapy which included NNRTI or PI. Patients were not informed that drug concentrations were going to be assessed until blood sampling. The time of the last antiretroviral treatment intake and blood sampling were recorded. Drug concentrations were considered optimal if they were above the proposed minimum effective concentration. In addition, efavirenz, nevirapine and atazanavir concentrations were considered potentially toxic if they were higher than 4.0 mg l−1, 6.0 mg l−1, and 0.85 mg l−1, respectively. Results Overall, interindividual variability in NNRTI and PI plasma concentrations was approximately 50%, and only 68.4% of the patients had drug concentrations within the proposed therapeutic range. Inappropriate adherence only explained 35% of subtherapeutic drug concentrations. Conclusion Interindividual variability in trough concentrations of NNRTI and PI among HIV-infected adults is large in routine clinical practice, with drug concentrations being outside the therapeutic window in a significant proportion of patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring may be useful to guide antiretroviral therapy in clinical practice. PMID:17223856

  3. Changes in lipids over twelve months after initiating protease inhibitor therapy among persons treated for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease inhibitors are known to alter the lipid profiles in subjects treated for HIV/AIDS. However, the magnitude of this effect on plasma lipoproteins and lipids has not been adequately quantified. Objective To estimate the changes in plasma lipoproteins and triglycerides occurring within 12 months of initiating PI-based antiretroviral therapy among HIV/AIDS afflicted subjects. Methods We included all antiretroviral naïve HIV-infected persons treated at St-Paul's Hospital, British Columbia, Canada, who initiated therapy with protease inhibitor antiretroviral (ARV drugs between August 1996 and January 2002 and who had at least one plasma lipid measurement. Longitudinal associations between medication use and plasma lipids were estimated using mixed effects models that accounted for repeated measures on the same subjects and were adjusted for age, sex, time dependent CD4+ T-cell count, and time dependent cumulative use of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and adherence. The cumulative number of prescriptions filled for PIs was considered time dependent. We estimated the changes in the 12 months following any initiation of a PI based regimen. Results A total of 679 eligible subjects were dispensed nucleoside analogues and PI at the initiation of therapy. Over a median 47 months of follow-up (interquartile range (IQR: 29–62, subjects had a median of 3 (IQR: 1–6 blood lipid measurements. Twelve months after treatment initiation of PI use, there was an estimated 20% (95% confidence interval: 17% – 24% increase in total cholesterol and 22% (12% – 33% increase in triglycerides. Conclusions Twelve months after treatment initiation with PIs, statistically significant increases in total cholesterol and triglycerides levels were observed in HIV-infected patients under conditions of standard treatment. Our results contribute to the growing body of evidence implicating PIs in the development of blood lipid

  4. Functional characterization of a serine protease inhibitor modulated in the infection of the Aedes aegypti with dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Tatiane Sanches; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Boris Luis; Torquato, Ricardo José Soares; Lemos, Francisco Jose Alves; Costa-da-Silva, André L; Capurro Guimarães, Margareth de Lara; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae

    2018-01-01

    During feeding with blood meal, female Aedes aegypti can transmit infectious agents, such as dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika viruses. Dengue virus causes human mortality in tropical regions of the world, and there is no specific treatment or vaccine with maximum efficiency being used for these infections. In the vector-virus interaction, the production of several molecules is modulated by both mosquitoes and invading agents. However, little information is available about these molecules in the Ae. aegypti mosquito during dengue infection. Inhibitors of the pacifastin family have been described to participate in the immune response of insects and Pac2 is the only gene of this family present in Ae. aegypti being then chosen for investigation. Pac2 was expressed in E. coli, purified and analyzed by mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE. The Pac2 transcript was detected by qPCR, and its protein levels were assessed by Western blotting. The inhibitory activity of Pac2 was measured using its K i , IC 50 and zymography. Mosquito infections with DENV were introduced with the Brazilian ACS-46 DENV-2 strain propagated in C6/36 cells. In the present work, we showed that it is possibly involved in the interaction of the mosquitoes with the dengue virus. The Pac2 transcript was detected in larvae and in both the salivary gland and midgut of Ae. aegypti females, while the native protein was identified in females 3 h post-blood meal. Pac2 is a strong inhibitor of trypsin-like and thrombin-like proteases, which are present in 4th instar larvae midgut and females 24 h after blood meal. During DENV infection, up regulation of Pac2 expression occurs in the salivary gland and midgut. Pac2 is the first Pacifastin inhibitor member described in mosquitoes. Our results suggest that Pac2 acts on mosquito serine proteases, mainly the trypsin-like type, and is under transcriptional control by virus infection signals to allow its survival in the vector or by the mosquito as a defense

  5. Long-lasting protection of activity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (PIs by boosted PI containing regimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra U Scherrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of mutations after long-lasting exposure to a failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is problematic and severely reduces the options for further successful treatments. METHODS: We studied patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study who failed cART with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and either a ritonavir-boosted PI (PI/r or a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI. The loss of genotypic activity 6 months after virological failure was analyzed with Stanford algorithm. Risk factors associated with early emergence of drug resistance mutations (6 months after failure: 8.8% vs. 38.2% (p = 0.009, 7.1% vs. 46.9% (p6 months after failure compared to 41.2%, 49.0% and 63.0% of those who have lost NNRTI activity (all p<0.001. The risk to accumulate an early NRTI mutation was strongly associated with NNRTI-containing cART (adjusted odds ratio: 13.3 (95% CI: 4.1-42.8, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The loss of activity of PIs and NRTIs was low among patients treated with PI/r, even after long-lasting exposure to a failing cART. Thus, more options remain for second-line therapy. This finding is potentially of high relevance, in particular for settings with poor or lacking virological monitoring.

  6. A Pharmacological Inhibitor of the Protease Taspase1 Effectively Inhibits Breast and Brain Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Y.; Lee, Yishan; Van Tine, Brian A.; Searleman, Adam C.; Westergard, Todd D.; Liu, Han; Tu, Ho-Chou; Takeda, Shugaku; Dong, Yiyu; Piwnica-Worms, David R.; Oh, Kyoung J.; Korsmeyer, Stanley J.; Hermone, Ann; Gussio, Richard; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Hsieh, James J.-D.

    2011-01-01

    The threonine endopeptidase Taspase1 has a critical role in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this study, we developed and evaluated small molecule inhibitors of Taspase1 as a new candidate class of therapeutic modalities. Genetic deletion of Taspase1 in the mouse produced no overt deficiencies, suggesting the possibility of a wide therapeutic index for use of Taspase1 inhibitors in cancers. We defined the peptidyl motifs recognized by Taspase1 and conducted a cell-based dual-fluorescent proteolytic screen of the NCI diversity library to identify Taspase1 inhibitors (TASPINs). Based on secondary and tertiary screens the 4-[(4-arsonophenyl)methyl]phenyl]arsonic acid NSC48300 was determined to be the most specific active compound. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated a crucial role for the arsenic acid moiety in mediating Taspase1 inhibition. Additional FRET-based kinetic analysis characterized NSC48300 as a reversible, non-competitive inhibitor of Taspase1 (KI = 4.22 μM). In the MMTV-neu mouse model of breast cancer and the U251 xenograft model of brain cancer NSC48300 produced effective tumor growth inhibition. Our results offer an initial preclinical proof of concept to develop TASPINs for cancer therapy. PMID:22166309

  7. A pharmacologic inhibitor of the protease Taspase1 effectively inhibits breast and brain tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Y; Lee, Yishan; Van Tine, Brian A; Searleman, Adam C; Westergard, Todd D; Liu, Han; Tu, Ho-Chou; Takeda, Shugaku; Dong, Yiyu; Piwnica-Worms, David R; Oh, Kyoung J; Korsmeyer, Stanley J; Hermone, Ann; Gussio, Richard; Shoemaker, Robert H; Cheng, Emily H-Y; Hsieh, James J-D

    2012-02-01

    The threonine endopeptidase Taspase1 has a critical role in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this study, we developed and evaluated small molecule inhibitors of Taspase1 as a new candidate class of therapeutic modalities. Genetic deletion of Taspase1 in the mouse produced no overt deficiencies, suggesting the possibility of a wide therapeutic index for use of Taspase1 inhibitors in cancers. We defined the peptidyl motifs recognized by Taspase1 and conducted a cell-based dual-fluorescent proteolytic screen of the National Cancer Institute diversity library to identify Taspase1 inhibitors (TASPIN). On the basis of secondary and tertiary screens the 4-[(4-arsonophenyl)methyl]phenyl] arsonic acid NSC48300 was determined to be the most specific active compound. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated a crucial role for the arsenic acid moiety in mediating Taspase1 inhibition. Additional fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based kinetic analysis characterized NSC48300 as a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of Taspase1 (K(i) = 4.22 μmol/L). In the MMTV-neu mouse model of breast cancer and the U251 xenograft model of brain cancer, NSC48300 produced effective tumor growth inhibition. Our results offer an initial preclinical proof-of-concept to develop TASPINs for cancer therapy. ©2011 AACR.

  8. LPS counter regulates RNA expression of extracellular proteases and their inhibitors in murine macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Rønø, Birgitte; Lund, Leif R

    2012-01-01

    in extracellular matrix metabolism in the mouse derived-macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 following stimulation with LPS. Our results revealed that LPS induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinases while at the same time decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. The opposite scenario...

  9. Serine Protease Inhibitors in Ticks: An Overview of Their Role in Tick Biology and Tick-Borne Pathogen Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien A. Blisnick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New tick and tick-borne pathogen control approaches that are both environmentally sustainable and which provide broad protection are urgently needed. Their development, however, will rely on a greater understanding of tick biology, tick-pathogen, and tick-host interactions. The recent advances in new generation technologies to study genomes, transcriptomes, and proteomes has resulted in a plethora of tick biomacromolecular studies. Among these, many enzyme inhibitors have been described, notably serine protease inhibitors (SPIs, whose importance in various tick biological processes is only just beginning to be fully appreciated. Among the multiple active substances secreted during tick feeding, SPIs have been shown to be directly involved in regulation of inflammation, blood clotting, wound healing, vasoconstriction and the modulation of host defense mechanisms. In light of these activities, several SPIs were examined and were experimentally confirmed to facilitate tick pathogen transmission. In addition, to prevent coagulation of the ingested blood meal within the tick alimentary canal, SPIs are also involved in blood digestion and nutrient extraction from the meal. The presence of SPIs in tick hemocytes and their involvement in tick innate immune defenses have also been demonstrated, as well as their implication in hemolymph coagulation and egg development. Considering the involvement of SPIs in multiple crucial aspects of tick-host-pathogen interactions, as well as in various aspects of the tick parasitic lifestyle, these molecules represent highly suitable and attractive targets for the development of effective tick control strategies. Here we review the current knowledge regarding this class of inhibitors in tick biology and tick-borne pathogen transmission, and their potential as targets for future tick control trials.

  10. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maarseveen Noortje M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the substrate of HIV-1 protease, especially changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site, can directly contribute to protease inhibitor (PI resistance and also compensate for defects in viral replicative capacity (RC due to a drug resistant protease. These NC/p1 changes are known to enhance processing of the Gag protein. To investigate the capacity of HIV-1 to modulate Gag cleavage and its consequences for PI resistance and RC, we performed a detailed enzymatic and virological analysis using a set of PI resistant NC/p1 variants (HXB2431V, HXB2436E+437T, HXB2437T and HXB2437V. Results Here, we demonstrate that single NC/p1 mutants, which displayed only a slight increase in PI resistance did not show an obvious change in RC. In contrast, the double NC/p1 mutant, which displayed a clear increase in processing efficiency and PI resistance, demonstrated a clear reduction in RC. Cleavage analysis showed that a tridecameric NC/p1 peptide representing the double NC/p1 mutant was cleaved in two specific ways instead of one. The observed decrease in RC for the double NC/p1 mutant (HXB2436E+437T could (partially be restored by either reversion of the 436E change or by acquisition of additional changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site at codon 435 or 438 as was revealed during in vitro evolution experiments. These changes not only restored RC but also reduced PI resistance levels. Furthermore these changes normalized Gag processing efficiency and obstructed the novel secondary cleavage site observed for the double NC/p1 mutant. Conclusions The results of this study clearly demonstrate that HIV-1 can modulate Gag processing and thereby PI resistance. Distinct increases in Gag cleavage and PI resistance result in a reduced RC that can only be restored by amino acid changes in NC/p1 which reduce Gag processing to an optimal rate.

  11. QSAR studies of the bioactivity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitors by multiple linear regression (MLR) and support vector machine (SVM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zijian; Wang, Maolin; Yan, Aixia

    2017-07-01

    In this study, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using various descriptor sets and training/test set selection methods were explored to predict the bioactivity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitors by using a multiple linear regression (MLR) and a support vector machine (SVM) method. 512 HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors and their IC 50 values which were determined by the same FRET assay were collected from the reported literature to build a dataset. All the inhibitors were represented with selected nine global and 12 2D property-weighted autocorrelation descriptors calculated from the program CORINA Symphony. The dataset was divided into a training set and a test set by a random and a Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) method. The correlation coefficients (r 2 ) of training sets and test sets were 0.75 and 0.72 for the best MLR model, 0.87 and 0.85 for the best SVM model, respectively. In addition, a series of sub-dataset models were also developed. The performances of all the best sub-dataset models were better than those of the whole dataset models. We believe that the combination of the best sub- and whole dataset SVM models can be used as reliable lead designing tools for new NS3/4A protease inhibitors scaffolds in a drug discovery pipeline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The spectrum of low molecular weight alpha-amylase/protease inhibitor genes expressed in the US bread wheat cultivar Butte 86

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vensel William H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat grains accumulate a variety of low molecular weight proteins that are inhibitors of alpha-amylases and proteases and play an important protective role in the grain. These proteins have more balanced amino acid compositions than the major wheat gluten proteins and contribute important reserves for both seedling growth and human nutrition. The alpha-amylase/protease inhibitors also are of interest because they cause IgE-mediated occupational and food allergies and thereby impact human health. Results The complement of genes encoding alpha-amylase/protease inhibitors expressed in the US bread wheat Butte 86 was characterized by analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Coding sequences for 19 distinct proteins were identified. These included two monomeric (WMAI, four dimeric (WDAI, and six tetrameric (WTAI inhibitors of exogenous alpha-amylases, two inhibitors of endogenous alpha-amylases (WASI, four putative trypsin inhibitors (CMx and WTI, and one putative chymotrypsin inhibitor (WCI. A number of the encoded proteins were identical or very similar to proteins in the NCBI database. Sequences not reported previously included variants of WTAI-CM3, three CMx inhibitors and WTI. Within the WDAI group, two different genes encoded the same mature protein. Based on numbers of ESTs, transcripts for WTAI-CM3 Bu-1, WMAI Bu-1 and WTAI-CM16 Bu-1 were most abundant in Butte 86 developing grain. Coding sequences for 16 of the inhibitors were unequivocally associated with specific proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS in a previous proteomic analysis of milled white flour from Butte 86. Proteins corresponding to WDAI Bu-1/Bu-2, WMAI Bu-1 and the WTAI subunits CM2 Bu-1, CM3 Bu-1 and CM16 Bu-1 were accumulated to the highest levels in flour. Conclusions Information on the spectrum of alpha-amylase/protease inhibitor genes and proteins expressed in a single wheat cultivar is central to understanding the importance of

  13. Cyclotheonellazoles A-C, Potent Protease Inhibitors from the Marine Sponge Theonella aff. swinhoei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Michal; Aknin, Maurice; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne; De Voogd, Nicole; Ledoux, Alisson; Frederich, Michel; Kashman, Yoel; Carmeli, Shmuel

    2017-04-28

    The extract of a sample of the sponge Theonella aff. swinhoei collected in Madagascar exhibited promising in vitro antiplasmodial activity. The antiplasmodial activity was ascribed in part to the known metabolite swinholide A. Further investigation of the extract afforded three unusual cyclic peptides, cyclotheonellazoles A-C (1-3), which contain six nonproteinogenic amino acids out of the eight acid units that compose these natural products. Among these acids the most novel were 4-propenoyl-2-tyrosylthiazole and 3-amino-4-methyl-2-oxohexanoic acid. The structure of the compounds was elucidated by interpretation of the 1D and 2D NMR data, HRESIMS, and advanced Merfay's techniques. The new compounds were found to be nanomolar inhibitors of chymotrypsin and sub-nanomolar inhibitors of elastase, but did not present antiplasmodial activity.

  14. Design, Synthesis, and Bioevaluation of Viral 3C and 3C-Like Protease Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Allan M.; Kim, Yunjeong; Weerasekara, Sahani; Moroze, Meghan; Alliston, Kevin R.; Uy, Roxanne Adeline Z.; Groutas, William C.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H.

    2013-01-01

    A class of tripeptidyl transition state inhibitors containing a P1 glutamine surrogate, a P2 leucine, and a P3 arylalanines, was found to potently inhibit Norwalk virus replication in enzyme and cell based assays. An array of warheads, including aldehyde, α-ketoamide, bisulfite adduct, and α-hydroxyphosphonate transition state mimic, was also investigated. Tripeptidyls 2 and 6 possess antiviral activities against noroviruses, human rhinovirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, an...

  15. Acute toxicity of second generation HIV protease-inhibitors in combination with radiotherapy: a retrospective case series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, Alfred P; Zeng, Jing; Tran, Phuoc T; Lim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    There is little data on the safety of combining radiation therapy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors to treat cancers in HIV-positive patients. We describe acute toxicities observed in a series of HIV-positive patients receiving modern radiation treatments, and compare patients receiving HIV protease inhibitors (PI) with patients not receiving HIV PIs. By reviewing the clinical records beginning January 1, 2009 from the radiation oncology department, we identified 29 HIV-positive patients who received radiation therapy to 34 body sites. Baseline information, treatment regimen, and toxicities were documented by review of medical records: patient age, histology and source of the primary tumor, HIV medication regimen, pre-radiation CD4 count, systemic chemotherapy, radiation therapy dose and fractionation, irradiated body region, toxicities, and duration of follow-up. Patients were grouped according to whether they received concurrent HIV PIs and compared using Pearson's chi-square test. At baseline, the patients in the two groups were similar with the exception of HIV medication regimens, CD4 count and presence of AIDS-defining malignancy. Patients taking concurrent PIs were more likely to be taking other HIV medications (p = 0.001) and have CD4 count >500 (p = 0.006). Patients taking PIs were borderline less likely to have an AIDS-defining malignancy (p = 0.06). After radiation treatment, 100 acute toxicities were observed and were equally common in both groups (64 [median 3 per patient, IQR 1-7] with PIs; 36 [median 3 per patient, IQR 2-3] without PIs). The observed toxicities were also equally severe in the two groups (Grades I, II, III respectively: 30, 30, 4 with PIs; 23, 13, 0 without PIs: p = 0.38). There were two cases that were stopped early, one in each group; these were not attributable to toxicity. In this study of recent radiotherapy in HIV-positive patients taking second generation PIs, no difference in toxicities was

  16. Acute toxicity of second generation HIV protease-inhibitors in combination with radiotherapy: a retrospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Phuoc T

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little data on the safety of combining radiation therapy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease inhibitors to treat cancers in HIV-positive patients. We describe acute toxicities observed in a series of HIV-positive patients receiving modern radiation treatments, and compare patients receiving HIV protease inhibitors (PI with patients not receiving HIV PIs. Methods By reviewing the clinical records beginning January 1, 2009 from the radiation oncology department, we identified 29 HIV-positive patients who received radiation therapy to 34 body sites. Baseline information, treatment regimen, and toxicities were documented by review of medical records: patient age, histology and source of the primary tumor, HIV medication regimen, pre-radiation CD4 count, systemic chemotherapy, radiation therapy dose and fractionation, irradiated body region, toxicities, and duration of follow-up. Patients were grouped according to whether they received concurrent HIV PIs and compared using Pearson's chi-square test. Results At baseline, the patients in the two groups were similar with the exception of HIV medication regimens, CD4 count and presence of AIDS-defining malignancy. Patients taking concurrent PIs were more likely to be taking other HIV medications (p = 0.001 and have CD4 count >500 (p = 0.006. Patients taking PIs were borderline less likely to have an AIDS-defining malignancy (p = 0.06. After radiation treatment, 100 acute toxicities were observed and were equally common in both groups (64 [median 3 per patient, IQR 1-7] with PIs; 36 [median 3 per patient, IQR 2-3] without PIs. The observed toxicities were also equally severe in the two groups (Grades I, II, III respectively: 30, 30, 4 with PIs; 23, 13, 0 without PIs: p = 0.38. There were two cases that were stopped early, one in each group; these were not attributable to toxicity. Conclusions In this study of recent radiotherapy in HIV-positive patients taking

  17. The potential of P1 site alterations in peptidomimetic protease inhibitors as suggested by virtual screening and explored by the use of C-C-coupling reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weik, Steffen; Luksch, Torsten; Evers, Andreas; Böttcher, Jark; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Hasilik, Andrej; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Klebe, Gerhard; Rademann, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    A synthetic concept is presented that allows the construction of peptide isostere libraries through polymer-supported C-acylation reactions. A phosphorane linker reagent is used as a carbanion equivalent; by employing MSNT as a coupling reagent, the C-acylation can be conducted without racemization. Diastereoselective reduction was effected with L-selectride. The reagent linker allows the preparation of a norstatine library with full variation of the isosteric positions including the P1 side chain that addresses the protease S1 pocket. Therefore, the concept was employed to investigate the P1 site specificity of peptide isostere inhibitors systematically. The S1 pocket of several aspartic proteases including plasmepsin II and cathepsin D was modeled and docked with approximately 500 amino acid side chains. Inspired by this virtual screen, a P1 site mutation library was designed, synthesized, and screened against three aspartic proteases (plasmepsin II, HIV protease, and cathepsin D). The potency of norstatine inhibitors was found to depend strongly on the P1 substituent. Large, hydrophobic residues such as biphenyl, 4-bromophenyl, and 4-nitrophenyl enhanced the inhibitory activity (IC50) by up to 70-fold against plasmepsin II. In addition, P1 variation introduced significant selectivity, as up to 9-fold greater activity was found against plasmepsin II relative to human cathepsin D. The active P1 site residues did not fit into the crystal structure; however, molecular dynamics simulation suggested a possible alternative binding mode.

  18. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor.

  19. Spink13, an Epididymis-specific Gene of the Kazal-type Serine Protease Inhibitor (SPINK) Family, Is Essential for the Acrosomal Integrity and Male Fertility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Yu, Heguo; Ni, Zimei; Hu, Shuanggang; Ma, Wubin; Chu, Chen; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Yonglian

    2013-01-01

    Sperm maturation involves numerous surface modifications by a variety of secreted proteins from epididymal epithelia. The sperm surface architecture depends on correct localization of its components and highlights the importance of the sequence of the proteolytic processing of the sperm surface in the epididymal duct. The presence of several protease inhibitors from different families is consistent with the hypothesis that correctly timed epididymal protein processing is essential for proper sperm maturation. Here we show that the rat (Rattus norvegicus) epididymis-specific gene Spink13, an androgen-responsive serine protease inhibitor, could bind to the sperm acrosome region. Furthermore, knockdown of Spink13 in vivo dramatically enhanced the acrosomal exocytosis during the process of capacitation and thus led to a significant reduction in male fertility, indicating that Spink13 was essential for sperm maturation. We conclude that blockade of SPINK13 may provide a new putative target for post-testicular male contraceptives. PMID:23430248

  20. Triggering HIV polyprotein processing by light using rapid photodegradation of a tight-binding protease inhibitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schimer, Jiří; Pávová, Marcela; Anders, M.; Pachl, Petr; Šácha, Pavel; Cígler, Petr; Weber, Jan; Majer, Pavel; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kräusslich, H. G.; Müller, B.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, Mar (2015), 6461/1-6461/8 ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LO1302 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV maturation * HIV PR photodegradable inhibitor * HIV PR caging Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 11.329, year: 2015 http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150309/ncomms7461/pdf/ncomms7461.pdf

  1. Design, synthesis, and bioevaluation of viral 3C and 3C-like protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Allan M; Kim, Yunjeong; Weerasekara, Sahani; Moroze, Meghan; Alliston, Kevin R; Uy, Roxanne Adeline Z; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H

    2013-12-01

    A class of tripeptidyl transition state inhibitors containing a P1 glutamine surrogate, a P2 leucine, and a P3 arylalanines, was found to potently inhibit Norwalk virus replication in enzyme and cell based assays. An array of warheads, including aldehyde, α-ketoamide, bisulfite adduct, and α-hydroxyphosphonate transition state mimic, was also investigated. Tripeptidyls 2 and 6 possess antiviral activities against noroviruses, human rhinovirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and coronavirus 229E, suggesting a broad range of antiviral activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure-based specificity mapping of secreted aspartic proteases of Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis using peptidomimetic inhibitors and homology modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, F.; Pavlíčková, Libuše; Majer, P.; Hradilek, Martin; Dolejší, Elena; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 387, č. 9 (2006), s. 1247-1254 ISSN 1431-6730 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/04/0432; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida albicans * Candida parapsilosis * Candida inhibitors * secreted aspartic protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.752, year: 2006

  3. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-03-01

    Molecular interaction of darunavir (DRV), a HIV protease inhibitor with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) was studied in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic approaches hand in hand with viscosity measurements and molecular docking technique. The UV absorption and fluorescence results together revealed the formation of a DRV-ct-DNA complex having binding affinities of the order of 103 M- 1, which was more in keeping with the groove binding. The results that DRV bound to ct-DNA via groove binding mode was further evidenced by KI quenching studies, viscosity measurements, competitive binding investigations with EB and Rhodamine B and CD spectral analysis. The effect of ionic strength indicated the negligible involvement of electrostatic interaction between DRV and ct-DNA. The thermodynamic parameters regarding the binding interaction of DRV with ct-DNA in terms of enthalpy change (ΔH0) and entropy change (ΔS0) were - 63.19 kJ mol- 1 and - 141.92 J mol- 1 K- 1, indicating that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a predominant role in the binding process. Furthermore, molecular simulation studies suggested that DRV molecule was prone to bind in the A-T rich region of the minor groove of DNA.

  4. The effect of protease inhibitors on the cervical mucus of HIV-positive women taking norethindrone contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrio, Jessica; Stek, Alice; Vora, Hita; Sanchez-Keeland, Lorraine; Zannat, Ferdous; Natavio, Melissa

    2015-04-01

    To compare cervical mucus score (CMS) with and without protease inhibitors (PI) before and after taking norethindrone (NET). This two-arm, researcher blinded, non-randomised, prospective study was conducted to evaluate cervical mucus quality in HIV-positive women taking progestin only pills. The study group was taking a PI, and compared to women taking ARV regimens that have demonstrated no significant interaction with NET in prior pharmacokinetic trials with combined oral contraceptives. The women had a cervical mucus score prior to NET administration. Mucus Scoring was repeated after 21 days of steady state exposure to oral NET 0.35 milligrams. Cervical mucus quality was quantified according to the World Health Organisation criteria, which include: volume, consistency, cellularity, spinnbarkeit, and ferning. Sixteen women took PI and 17 were controls. Baseline CMS were similar (p ≥ 0.1). After 21 days CMS were similar among the two groups (p = 1). HIV-positive women taking PI demonstrated thickened cervical mucus with oral norethindrone 0.35 mg and are similar to HIV-positive women taking no PI therapy. This may suggest no difference in contraceptive efficacy of progestin only pills in HIV-positive women taking PI.

  5. An assay to monitor HIV-1 protease activity for the identification of novel inhibitors in T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J Hilton

    Full Text Available The emergence of resistant HIV strains, together with the severe side-effects of existing drugs and lack of development of effective anti-HIV vaccines highlight the need for novel antivirals, as well as innovative methods to facilitate their discovery. Here, we have developed an assay in T-cells to monitor the proteolytic activity of the HIV-1 protease (PR. The assay is based on the inducible expression of HIV-1 PR fused within the Gal4 DNA-binding and transactivation domains. The fusion protein binds to the Gal4 responsive element and activates the downstream reporter, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene only in the presence of an effective PR Inhibitor (PI. Thus, in this assay, eGFP acts as a biosensor of PR activity, making it ideal for flow cytometry based screening. Furthermore, the assay was developed using retroviral technology in T-cells, thus providing an ideal environment for the screening of potential novel PIs in a cell-type that represents the natural milieu of HIV infection. Clones with the highest sensitivity, and robust, reliable and reproducible reporter activity, were selected. The assay is easily adaptable to other PR variants, a multiplex platform, as well as to high-throughput plate reader based assays and will greatly facilitate the search for novel peptide and chemical compound based PIs in T-cells.

  6. Expression of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor detected by immunohistochemistry correlating with prognosis and metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guiying; Yang, Jingyan; Zhao, Yulei; Wang, Zhijing; Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Liang; Shi, Dongliang

    2014-12-02

    The potential of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) as a biomarker for colorectal cancer was studied. A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical trial was conducted in 2013 and 2014 to confirm whether the expression of SLPI correlates with prognosis and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect SLPI expression in colorectal cancer. The expression of SLPI was scored by two pathologists independently. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using a Χ2 test to investigate the influence of SLPI on the pathologic characteristics of colorectal cancer. Compared with normal tissue, SLPI was overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissue. Overexpression of SLPI correlated with different grades (moderate or good differentiation: 2.7% low expression versus 97.3% high expression, low differentiation: 41.7% low expression versus 58.3% high expression), TNM stage (I or II: 4.2% low expression versus 95.8% high expression; III or IV: 19.7% low expression versus 80.3% high expression), lymphatic metastasis (18.6% low expression versus 81.4% high expression) and distal metastasis (86.5% low expression versus 13.5% high expression), but not with patient age or sex (P=0.613, P=0.871). Upregulated SLPI correlates with aggressive pathologic characteristics of colorectal cancer; SLPI could be used as an indicator of progression and metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer.

  7. Production of High Amounts of Hepatotoxin Nodularin and New Protease Inhibitors Pseudospumigins by the Brazilian Benthic Nostoc sp. CENA543

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    Jouni Jokela

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nostoc is a cyanobacterial genus, common in soils and a prolific producer of natural products. This research project aimed to explore and characterize Brazilian cyanobacteria for new bioactive compounds. Here we report the production of hepatotoxins and new protease inhibitors from benthic Nostoc sp. CENA543 isolated from a small, shallow, saline-alkaline lake in the Nhecolândia, Pantanal wetland area in Brazil. Nostoc sp. CENA543 produces exceptionally high amounts of nodularin-R. This is the first free-living Nostoc that produces nodularin at comparable levels as the toxic, bloom-forming, Nodularia spumigena. We also characterized pseudospumigins A–F, which are a novel family of linear tetrapeptides. Pseudospumigins are structurally related to linear tetrapeptide spumigins and aeruginosins both present in N. spumigena but differ in respect to their diagnostic amino acid, which is Ile/Leu/Val in pseudospumigins, Pro/mPro in spumigins, and Choi in aeruginosins. The pseudospumigin gene cluster is more similar to the spumigin biosynthetic gene cluster than the aeruginosin gene cluster. Pseudospumigin A inhibited trypsin (IC50 4.5 μM after 1 h in a similar manner as spumigin E from N. spumigena but was almost two orders of magnitude less potent. This study identifies another location and environment where the hepatotoxic nodularin has the potential to cause the death of eukaryotic organisms.

  8. Investigation of a Potential Scintigraphic Tracer for Imaging Apoptosis: Radioiodinated Annexin V-Kunitz Protease Inhibitor Fusion Protein

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    Mei-Hsiu Liao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled annexin V (ANV has been widely used for imaging cell apoptosis. Recently, a novel ANV-Kunitz-type protease inhibitor fusion protein, ANV-6L15, was found to be a promising probe for improved apoptosis detection based on its higher affinity to phosphatidylserine (PS compared to native ANV. The present paper investigates the feasibility of apoptosis detection using radioiodinated ANV-6L15. Native ANV and ANV-6L15 were labeled with iodine-123 and iodine-125 using Iodogen method. The binding between the radioiodinated proteins and erythrocyte ghosts or chemical-induced apoptotic cells was examined. ANV-6L15 can be radioiodinated with high yield (40%−60% and excellent radiochemical purity (>95%. 123I-ANV-6L15 exhibited a higher binding ratio to erythrocyte ghosts and apoptotic cells compared to 123I-ANV. The biodistribution of 123I-ANV-6L15 in mice was also characterized. 123I-ANV-6L15 was rapidly cleared from the blood. High uptake in the liver and the kidneys may limit the evaluation of apoptosis in abdominal regions. Our data suggest that radiolabled ANV-6L15 may be a better scintigraphic tracer than native ANV for apoptosis detection.

  9. Resveratrol Co-Treatment Attenuates the Effects of HIV Protease Inhibitors on Rat Body Weight and Enhances Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Symington

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS emerged as a global health pandemic, with sub-Saharan Africa the hardest hit. While the successful roll-out of antiretroviral (ARV therapy provided significant relief to HIV-positive individuals, such treatment can also elicit damaging side-effects. Here especially HIV protease inhibitors (PIs are implicated in the onset of cardio-metabolic complications such as type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. As there is a paucity of data regarding suitable co-treatments within this context, this preclinical study investigated whether resveratrol (RSV, aspirin (ASP or vitamin C (VitC co-treatment is able to blunt side-effects in a rat model of chronic PI exposure (Lopinavir/Ritonavir treatment for 4 months. Body weights and weight gain, blood metabolite levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, echocardiography and cardiac mitochondrial respiration were assessed in PI-treated rats ± various co-treatments. Our data reveal that PI treatment significantly lowered body weight and cardiac respiratory function while no significant changes were found for heart function and blood metabolite levels. Moreover, all co-treatments ameliorated the PI-induced decrease in body weight after 4 months of PI treatment, while RSV co-treatment enhanced cardiac mitochondrial respiratory capacity in PI-treated rats. This pilot study therefore provides novel hypotheses regarding RSV co-treatment that should be further assessed in greater detail.

  10. Thiol protease-specific inhibitor E-64 arrests human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells at mitotic metaphase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji-Kasai, Y.; Senshu, M.; Iwashita, S.; Imahori, K.

    1988-01-01

    E-64-d /ethyl (2S, 3S)-3-[(S)-3-methyl-1-(3-methylbutylcarbamoyl)butylcarbamoyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate/, a membrane-permeant derivative of the thiol protease-specific inhibitor E-64, was found to arrest human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells at mitotic metaphase. This effect was dose-dependent with a threshold of 20μg/ml in chemically defined culture medium. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that the relative proportion of the G 2 /M population increased 2.5-fold after treatment of the cells with E-64 (100 μg/ml) for 5 hr. In addition, time-lapse video analysis showed that E-64-treated cells remained at metaphase for an extended period after rounding-up, whereas untreated cells were able to complete mitosis within 42.0 +/- 5.7 min. Some treated cells were able to complete mitosis, while others did not do so within limits of the authors observation. An approach to the molecular basis of this phenomenon, they have shown that several cellular proteins can be labeled by incubation of cells with radioactive E-64-d

  11. Transcriptional Analysis of The Adaptive Digestive System of The Migratory Locust in Response to Plant Defensive Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spit, Jornt; Holtof, Michiel; Badisco, Liesbet; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vogel, Elise; Knapen, Dries; vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    Herbivorous insects evolved adaptive mechanisms to compensate for the presence of plant defensive protease inhibitors (PI) in their food. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of these compensatory responses remain largely elusive. In the current study, we investigated the initiation of this adaptive response in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, via microarray analysis of gut tissues. Four hours after dietary uptake of PIs, 114 and 150 transcripts were respectively found up- or downregulated. The results suggest a quick trade-off between compensating for potential loss of digestive activity on the one hand, and stress tolerance, defense, and structural integrity of the gut on the other hand. We additionally addressed the role of a group of related upregulated hexamerin-like proteins in the PI-induced response. Simultaneous knockdown of corresponding transcripts by means of RNA interference resulted in a reduced capacity of the locust nymphs to cope with the effects of PI. Moreover, since insect hexamerins have been shown to bind Juvenile Hormone (JH), we also investigated the effect of JH on the proteolytic digestion in L. migratoria. Our results indicate that JH has a stimulatory effect on the expression of three homologous chymotrypsin genes, while knocking down the JH receptor (methoprene tolerant) led to opposite effects.

  12. Different impact of anti-retroviral regimen containing protease inhibitors on development of HIV-related Kaposi sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleo, Maria Aurora; Di Martino, Filomena; Del Giudice, Annalisa; Gargiulo, Miriam; Parrella, Giovanni; Rosario, Pietro; Sangiovanni, Vincenzo; Viglietti, Rosaria; Esposito, Vincenzo; Chirianni, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an AIDS-related malignancy, has dramatically decreased in the Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART) era. However, KS remains the second most frequent tumor in HIV-infected patients worldwide and has become the most common cancer in the sub-Saharan Africa. Experimental studies have demonstrated a direct anti-neoplastic effect of HAART, and overall of protease inhibitors (PIs), on KS. We describe five cases of KS in HIV-infected patients on HAART regimen, containing PIs as atazanavir/r (ATV/r), darunavir/r (DRV/r), lopinavir/r (LPV/r) and fosamprenavir (fAMP/r). Clinical and experimental observations support the hypothesis that PIs may play an important role in prevention and treatment of KS. In our study, the treatment with PIs of recent generation was not protective against the development of KS. Therefore, it could be necessary to re-evaluate the therapeutic effects of PIs and their role in the development and treatment of KS in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Liver Fibrosis in HCV Monoinfected and HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients: Dysregulation of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs and Their Tissue Inhibitors TIMPs and Effect of HCV Protease Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Latronico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs may contribute to liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C (HCV infection. We measured the circulating levels of different MMPs and TIMPs in HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients and evaluated the potential for anti-HCV therapy to modulate MMP and TIMP levels in HCV subjects. We analyzed 83 plasma samples from 16 HCV monoinfected patients undergoing dual or triple anti-HCV therapy, 15 HIV/HCV coinfected patients with undetectable HIV load, and 10 healthy donors (HD. Levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were measured by a SearchLight Multiplex Immunoassay Kit. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were the highest expressed MMPs among all the analyzed samples and their levels significantly increased in HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected subjects compared to HD. TIMP-1 levels were significantly higher in HCV and HIV/HCV subjects compared to HD and were correlated with liver stiffness. These findings raise the possibility of using circulating TIMP-1 as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in HCV infection. A longitudinal study demonstrated that MMP-9 levels significantly decreased (40% reduction from baseline in patients receiving dual as well as triple direct-acting antivirals (DAA anti-HCV therapy, which had no effect on MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2. As the dysregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 may reflect inflammatory processes in the liver, the decrease of MMP-9 following HCV protease inhibitor treatment suggests a positive effect on the reduction of liver inflammation.

  14. The Protease Inhibitor CI2c Gene Induced by Bird Cherry-Oat Aphid in Barley Inhibits Green Peach Aphid Fecundity in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losvik, Aleksandra; Beste, Lisa; Mehrabi, Sara; Jonsson, Lisbeth

    2017-06-20

    Aphids are phloem feeders that cause large damage globally as pest insects. They induce a variety of responses in the host plant, but not much is known about which responses are promoting or inhibiting aphid performance. Here, we investigated whether one of the responses induced in barley by the cereal aphid, bird cherry-oat aphid ( Rhopalosiphum padi L.) affects aphid performance in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. A barley cDNA encoding the protease inhibitor CI2c was expressed in A. thaliana and aphid performance was studied using the generalist green peach aphid ( Myzus persicae Sulzer). There were no consistent effects on aphid settling or preference or on parameters of life span and long-term fecundity. However, short-term tests with apterous adult aphids showed lower fecundity on three of the transgenic lines, as compared to on control plants. This effect was transient, observed on days 5 to 7, but not later. The results suggest that the protease inhibitor is taken up from the tissue during probing and weakly inhibits fecundity by an unknown mechanism. The study shows that a protease inhibitor induced in barley by an essentially monocot specialist aphid can inhibit a generalist aphid in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  15. Serine protease inhibitor A3K suppressed the formation of ocular surface squamous metaplasia in a mouse model of experimental dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhirong; Zhou, Yueping; Wang, Yuqian; Zhou, Tong; Li, Jie; Luo, Pingping; He, Hui; Wu, Huping; Liu, Zuguo

    2014-08-07

    To investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of serine protease inhibitor A3K (SERPINA3K) on the formation of ocular surface squamous metaplasia in a mouse dry eye model induced by topical benzalkonium chloride (BAC). The eye drops containing SERPINA3K were topically administered during the induction of BAC-induced dry eye. The clinical indications of dry eye were evaluated on day (D)16, including tear break-up time (BUT), tear volume, corneal fluorescein staining, and inflammatory index. Global specimens were collected on D16 and the following examinations were performed: histologic investigation, immunostaining of cytokeratin 10 (K10), p63 and Ki67 in the cornea, and Western blot analysis of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Serine protease inhibitor A3K suppressed the formation of BAC-induced dry eye, presenting with longer BUTs, lower corneal fluorescein staining scores, and inflammatory index, while no significant changes in tear volume. It also reduced the severity of abnormal differentiation and proliferation on ocular surface with lower expressions of K10, p63, and Ki67, and retained the number of goblet cells in the conjunctival fornix. Serine protease inhibitor A3K significantly decreased the levels of TNF-α in the cornea. Topical application of SERPINA3K ameliorated the severity of ocular surface squamous metaplasia and suppressed the formation of BAC-induced dry eye. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  16. The Protease Inhibitor CI2c Gene Induced by Bird Cherry-Oat Aphid in Barley Inhibits Green Peach Aphid Fecundity in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Losvik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are phloem feeders that cause large damage globally as pest insects. They induce a variety of responses in the host plant, but not much is known about which responses are promoting or inhibiting aphid performance. Here, we investigated whether one of the responses induced in barley by the cereal aphid, bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L. affects aphid performance in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. A barley cDNA encoding the protease inhibitor CI2c was expressed in A. thaliana and aphid performance was studied using the generalist green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer. There were no consistent effects on aphid settling or preference or on parameters of life span and long-term fecundity. However, short-term tests with apterous adult aphids showed lower fecundity on three of the transgenic lines, as compared to on control plants. This effect was transient, observed on days 5 to 7, but not later. The results suggest that the protease inhibitor is taken up from the tissue during probing and weakly inhibits fecundity by an unknown mechanism. The study shows that a protease inhibitor induced in barley by an essentially monocot specialist aphid can inhibit a generalist aphid in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  17. Selection of replicon variants resistant to ACH-806, a novel hepatitis C virus inhibitor with no cross-resistance to NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wengang; Zhao, Yongsen; Fabrycki, Joanne; Hou, Xiaohong; Nie, Xingtie; Sanchez, Amy; Phadke, Avinash; Deshpande, Milind; Agarwal, Atul; Huang, Mingjun

    2008-06-01

    We have discovered a novel class of compounds active against hepatitis C virus (HCV), using a surrogate cellular system, HCV replicon cells. The leading compound in the series, ACH-806 (GS-9132), is a potent and specific inhibitor of HCV. The selection of resistance replicon variants against ACH-806 was performed to map the mutations conferring resistance to ACH-806 and to determine cross-resistance profiles with other classes of HCV inhibitors. Several clones emerged after the addition of ACH-806 to HCV replicon cells at frequencies and durations similar to that observed with NS3 protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Phenotypic analyses of these clones revealed that they are resistant to ACH-806 but remain sensitive to other classes of HCV inhibitors. Moreover, no significant change in the susceptibility to ACH-806 was found when the replicon cellular clones resistant to NS3 protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors were examined. Sequencing of the entire coding region of ACH-806-resistant replicon variants yielded several consensus mutations. Reverse genetics identified two single mutations in NS3, a cysteine-to-serine mutation at amino acid 16 and an alanine-to-valine mutation at amino acid 39, that are responsible for the resistance of the replicon variants to ACH-806. Both mutations are located at the N terminus of NS3 where extensive interactions with the central hydrophobic region of NS4A exist. These data provide evidence that ACH-806 inhibits HCV replication by a novel mechanism.

  18. Development of elvitegravir resistance and linkage of integrase inhibitor mutations with protease and reverse transcriptase resistance mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Winters

    Full Text Available Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG and raltegravir (RAL can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point. Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48 typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs.

  19. Synthesis, 2D-NMR and molecular modelling studies of pentacycloundecane lactam-peptides and peptoids as potential HIV-1 wild type C-SA protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makatini, Maya M; Petzold, Katja; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Arvidsson, Per I; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Govender, Patrick; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Sayed, Yasien; JerônimoLameira; Maguire, Glenn E M; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2013-02-01

    In this study, eight non-natural peptides and peptoids incorporating the pentacycloundecane (PCU) lactam were designed and synthesized as potential inhibitors of the wild type C-SA HIV-protease. Five of these inhibitors gave IC(50) values ranging from 0.5 up to 0.75 µM against the resistance-prone wild type C-South African HIV-protease. NMR EASY-ROESY studies enabled us to describe the secondary structure of three of these compounds in solution. The 3D structures of the selected cage peptides were also modelled in solution using QM/MM/MD simulations. Satisfactory agreement between the NMR observations and the low energy calculated structures exists. Only one of these inhibitors (11 peptoid), which showed the best IC(50)(0.5 µM), exhibited a definable 3-D structure in solution. Autodock4 and AutodockVina were used to model the potential interaction between these inhibitors and the HIV-PR. It appears that the docking results are too crude to be correlated with the relative narrow range of experimental IC(50) values (0.5-10 µM). The PCU-peptides and peptoides were several orders less toxic (145 μM for 11 and 102 μM for 11 peptoid) to human MT-4 cells than lopinavir (0.025 μM). This is the first example of a polycyclic cage framework to be employed as an HIV-PR transition state analogue inhibitor and can potentially be utilized for other diseases related proteases. [Figure: see text].

  20. Deficiency in Serine Protease Inhibitor Neuroserpin Exacerbates Ischemic Brain Injury by Increased Postischemic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludewig, Peter; Bernreuther, Christian; Krasemann, Susanne; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Gerloff, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Magnus, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The only approved pharmacological treatment for ischemic stroke is intravenous administration of plasminogen activator (tPA) to re-canalize the occluded cerebral vessel. Not only reperfusion but also tPA itself can induce an inflammatory response. Microglia are the innate immune cells of the central nervous system and the first immune cells to become activated in stroke. Neuroserpin, an endogenous inhibitor of tPA, is up-regulated following cerebral ischemia. To examine neuroserpin-dependent mechanisms of neuroprotection in stroke, we studied neuroserpin deficient (Ns−/−) mice in an animal model of temporal focal ischemic stroke. Infarct size and neurological outcome were worse in neuroserpin deficient mice even though the fibrinolytic activity in the ischemic brain was increased. The increased infarct size was paralleled by a selective increase in proinflammatory microglia activation in Ns−/− mice. Our results show excessive microglial activation in Ns−/− mice mediated by an increased activity of tPA. This activation results in a worse outcome further underscoring the potential detrimental proinflammatory effects of tPA. PMID:23658802

  1. Boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy versus boosted protease inhibitor plus lamivudine dual therapy as second-line maintenance treatment for HIV-1-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa (ANRS12 286/MOBIDIP): a multicentre, randomised, parallel, open-label, superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaffi, Laura; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Sawadogo, Adrien Bruno; Ndour, Cheik Tidiane; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Mbouyap, Pretty Rosereine; Ayangma, Liliane; Zoungrana, Jacques; Gueye, Ndeye Fatou Ngom; Diallo, Mohamadou; Izard, Suzanne; Bado, Guillaume; Kane, Coumba Toure; Aghokeng, Avelin Fobang; Peeters, Martine; Girard, Pierre Marie; Le Moing, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Despite satisfactory efficacy of WHO-recommended second-line antiretroviral treatment for patients with HIV in low-income countries, the need for simplified, low-cost, and less-toxic maintenance strategies remains high. We compared boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy with dual therapy with boosted protease inhibitor plus lamivudine in patients on second-line antiretrovial therapy (ART). We did a multicentre, randomised, parallel, open-label, superiority, trial in the HIV services of five hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa (Yaoundé, Cameroon; Dakar, Senegal; and Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso). We recruited patients from the long-term, post-trial cohort of the ANRS 12169/2LADY study that compared the efficacy of three second-line combinations based on boosted protease inhibitors. Participants for our study were HIV-1 infected with multiple mutations including M184V, at first-line failure, aged 18 years and older, on boosted protease inhibitor plus two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) for at least 48 weeks with at least 48 weeks follow-up in the 2LADY trial, with two viral load measurements of less than 200 copies per mL in the previous 6 months, CD4 counts of more than 100 cells per μL, adherence of at least 90%, and no change to ART in the past 3 months. We randomly assigned participants (1:1) to receive either monotherapy with their boosted protease inhibitor (once-daily darunavir 800 mg [two 400 mg tablets] boosted with ritonavir 100 mg [one tablet] or coformulation of lopinavir 200 mg with ritonavir 50 mg [two tablets taken twice per day]) or to boosted protease inhibitor plus once-daily lamivudine 300 mg (one 300 mg tablet or two 150 mg tablets). Computer-generated randomisation was stratified by study site and viral load at screening (treatment allocation was not masked from clinicians or patients]. Patients had follow-up visits at weeks 4 and 12, and every 3 months until 96 weeks; if viral load exceeded 500 copies per mL at any visit, NRTI

  2. Toward the discovery of inhibitors of babesipain-1, a Babesia bigemina cysteine protease: in vitro evaluation, homology modeling and molecular docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Bianca; Antunes, Sandra; Gonçalves, Lídia M.; Domingos, Ana; Gomes, José R. B.; Gomes, Paula; Teixeira, Cátia

    2013-09-01

    Babesia bigemina is a protozoan parasite that causes babesiosis, a disease with a world-wide distribution in mammals, principally affecting cattle and man. The unveiling of the genome of B. bigemina is a project in active progress that has already revealed a number of new targets with potential interest for the design of anti-babesiosis drugs. In this context, babesipain-1 has been identified as a proteolytically active enzyme whose three-dimensional structure has not been resolved yet, but which is known to be inhibited by cysteine proteases inhibitors such as E64, ALLN, leupeptin, and vinyl sulfones. In this work, we introduce (1) a homology model of babesipain-1; (2) a comparison between babesipain-1 and falcipain-2, a cysteine protease of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum; (3) in vitro data for babesipain-1 inhibition by HEDICINs and HECINs, previously reported as modest inhibitors of falcipain-2; and (4) the docked binding conformations of HEDICINs and HECINs in the model of babesipain-1. HEDICINs presented similar preferred binding conformations for both babesipain-1 and falcipain-2. However, in vitro bioassay shows that HEDICINs and HECINs are better inhibitors of babesipain-1 than of falcipain-2, which could be explained by observed differences between the active pockets of these proteins in silico. Results presented herein provide a valuable contribution to future computer-aided molecular design of new babesipain-1 inhibitors.

  3. Remission from Kaposi's sarcoma on HAART is associated with suppression of HIV replication and is independent of protease inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, V; Caumes, E; Gambotti, L; Ittah, H; Morini, J-P; Deleuze, J; Gorin, I; Katlama, C; Bricaire, F; Dupin, N

    2006-04-10

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces the incidence and improves the prognosis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). This study was designed to identify factors associated with KS clinical responses in HIV-infected patients during HAART. We reviewed the files of 138 HIV-1-infected patients with KS. Epidemiologic and HIV-related clinical and biological parameters were recorded at KS diagnosis (baseline) and every 6 months thereafter. In a subset of 73 antiretroviral-naive patients, we compared the clinical outcome of KS according to the use or nonuse of protease inhibitors (PI). After 6 months of follow-up, KS remission was more frequent in patients who were naive of HAART and who were at ACTG stage S0 at baseline (P = 0.03 and 0.02). Undetectable HIV viral load was strongly associated with KS remission (Ptime points), while CD4 cell count was not. Among the 73 antiretroviral-naive patients at baseline, and who were studied for 24 months, KS outcome did not differ between patients who were prescribed PI-containing and PI-sparing regimens. Intercurrent multicentric Castleman's disease was associated with poor outcome after 60 months of follow-up (P< or = 0.0001). Fourteen deaths occurred after a median follow-up of 37.5 months, eight of which were KS related. Suppression of HIV replication appears to be crucial to control KS. Non-PI-based regimens were equivalent to PI-based regimens as regards the clinical and virological outcome of antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected patients with KS.

  4. Effect of protease inhibitors on steady-state pharmacokinetics of oral norethindrone contraception in HIV-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrio, Jessica; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Neely, Michael; Cherala, Ganesh; Kovacs, Andrea; Mishell, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic interactions exist between combined oral contraceptives and protease inhibitors (PI). However, such information is lacking for progestin-only oral contraception. We sought to define the steady-state pharmacokinetic interaction between norethindrone (NET) and PI in HIV-infected women. We conducted an open-label, prospective, nonrandomized trial to characterize the steady-state pharmacokinetics of serum NET in HIV-infected women receiving PI compared with a control group of HIV-infected women receiving other noninteracting drugs. After 21 days of 0.35 mg of NET ingestion once daily, serial serum samples were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours. The area under the curve between 0 and 72 hours after ingestion was calculated by trapezoidal approximation. Thirty-five women were enrolled, 2 withdrew. Sixteen women in the PI group and 17 controls completed the study. NET half-life and maximum concentration were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Minimum concentration of NET was significantly higher in the PI group (P = 0.01). The ratio of the geometric mean NET area under the curve in the PI group compared with controls was 1.5 (90% confidence interval: 1.21 to 1.86). NET serum concentrations were significantly higher in HIV-infected women taking a PI compared with controls (P = 0.004). Coadministration of PI inhibits NET metabolism as shown by higher serum NET area under the curve levels, a surrogate marker for therapeutic contraceptive efficacy. This study supports the increased utilization of progestin-only pills in HIV-infected women receiving certain PI regimens.

  5. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages.Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp.HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  6. Involvement of a Serpin serine protease inhibitor (OoSerpin) from mollusc Octopus ocellatus in antibacterial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiumei; Xu, Jie; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2015-01-01

    Serpin is an important member of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs), which is capable of regulating proteolytic events and involving in a variety of physiological processes. In present study, a Serpin homolog was identified from Octopus ocellatus (designated as OoSerpin). Full-length cDNA of OoSerpin was of 1735 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region of 214 bp, a 3' UTR of 282 bp, and an open reading frame of 1239 bp. The open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 412 amino acids which has a predicted molecular weight of 46.5 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.52. The OoSerpin protein shares 37% sequence identity with other Serpins from Mus musculus (NP_941373) and Ixodes scapularis (XP_002407493). The existence of a conserved SERPIN domain strongly suggested that OoSerpin was a member of the Serpin subfamily. Expression patterns of OoSerpin, both in tissues and towards bacterial stimulation, were then characterized. The mRNA of OoSerpin was constitutively expressed at different levels in all tested tissues of untreated O. ocellatus, including mantle (lowest), muscle, renal sac, gill, hemocyte, gonad, systemic heart, and hepatopancreas (highest). The transcriptional level of OoSerpin was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in O. ocellatus upon bacterial challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, indicating its involvement in the antibacterial immune response. Furthermore, rOoSerpin, the recombinant protein of OoSerpin, exhibited strong abilities to inhibit proteinase activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as the growth of Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that OoSerpin is a potential antibacterial factor involved in the immune response of O. ocellatus against bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protease inhibitor-associated bone mineral density loss is related to hypothyroidism and related bone turnover acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinai, Ei; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Mizushima, Daisuke; Nishijima, Takeshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Genka, Ikumi; Teruya, Katsuji; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-05-01

    Clinical and experiments evidence indicate that protease inhibitors (PI) can cause bone mineral density (BMD) loss. However, the mechanism of such loss remains obscure. This single-center, cross-sectional study included 184 HIV-infected patients treated with PI who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Serum phosphorus, percentage of tubular reabsorption of phosphate (%TRP), thyroid and parathyroid function (iPTH), vitamin D, osteocalcin (OC), urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (u-NTx) were measured. The rate of hypothyroidism in PI-users [32/117 (27%)] was double that in non-PI users [8/67 (12%), p = 0.016] and was significantly associated with PI use in multivariate analysis [odds ratio (OR) 11.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.358-95.17, p = 0.025]. Spine BMD was significantly lower in hypothyroid patients than euthyroid, for both total population (-1.37 vs. -1.00, p = 0.041) and PI users (-1.56 vs. -1.13, p = 0.029). Multivariate regression analysis identified inverse correlation between hypothyroidism and spine BMD [estimate -0.437, 95% CI -0.858 to -0.024, p = 0.042]. OC, DPD and u-NTx were significantly higher in PI users than in non-PI users (p = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively). PI use is associated with hypothyroidism as well as bone turnover acceleration, which worsens PI-associated BMD loss. In PI-treated patients, thyroid function tests are warranted to prevent further progression of PI-associated BMD loss. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Raman chemical mapping reveals site of action of HIV protease inhibitors in HPV16 E6 expressing cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jarvis, Roger M; Allwood, J William; Batman, Gavin; Moore, Rowan E; Marsden-Edwards, Emma; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N; Goodacre, Royston

    2010-12-01

    It has been shown that the HIV protease inhibitors indinavir and lopinavir may have activity against the human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16 inhibiting HPV E6-mediated proteasomal degradation of p53 in cultured cervical carcinoma cells. However, their mode and site of action is unknown. HPV-negative C33A cervical carcinoma cells and the same cells stably transfected with E6 (C33AE6) were exposed to indinavir and lopinavir at concentrations of 1 mM and 30 μM, respectively. The intracellular distribution of metabolites and metabolic changes induced by these treatments were investigated by Raman microspectroscopic imaging combined with the analysis of cell fractionation products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A uniform cellular distribution of proteins was found in drug-treated cells irrespective of cell type. Indinavir was observed to co-localise with nucleic acid in the nucleus, but only in E6 expressing cells. Principal components analysis (PCA) score maps generated on the full Raman hypercube and the corresponding PCA loadings plots revealed that the majority of metabolic variations influenced by the drug exposure within the cells were associated with changes in nucleic acids. Analysis of cell fractionation products by LC-MS confirmed that the level of indinavir in nuclear extracts was approximately eight-fold greater than in the cytoplasm. These data demonstrate that indinavir undergoes enhanced nuclear accumulation in E6-expressing cells, which suggests that this is the most likely site of action for this compound against HPV.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between the hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor, boceprevir, and the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen H; Feng, Hwa-Ping; Shadle, Craig R; O'Reilly, Terry; Wagner, John A; Butterton, Joan R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine drug interactions between boceprevir, a hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and a combined oral contraceptive containing ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norethindrone (NE). A single-center, open-label study was conducted in 20 healthy female volunteers. In three consecutive 28-day treatment periods, subjects received EE/NE (0.035 mg/1 mg; 21 days on, 7 days off). During period 3, subjects also received boceprevir (800 mg three times daily) for 28 days. Coadministration of boceprevir with EE/NE did not affect NE AUC0-24 but slightly reduced NE C max. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs) for NE AUC0-24 and C max with EE/NE alone and EE/NE plus boceprevir were 0.96 (90% confidence interval (CI), 0.87-1.06) and 0.83 (90% CI, 0.76-0.90). Coadministration of boceprevir with EE/NE reduced EE AUC0-24 and C max by 26 and 21%, with GMRs of 0.74 (90% CI, 0.68-0.80) and 0.79 (90% CI, 0.75-0.84). Boceprevir had no effect on mid-cycle luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), or sex hormone-binding globulin levels, and progesterone concentrations remained Adverse events reported in this study were consistent with the well-established safety profile of boceprevir. Serum progesterone, LH, and FSH levels indicate that ovulation was suppressed during coadministration of boceprevir with EE/NE. Coadministration of boceprevir with combined oral contraceptives containing EE and ≥1 mg of NE is therefore unlikely to alter contraceptive effectiveness. The ovulation suppression activity of oral contraceptives containing lower doses of NE, and of other forms of hormonal contraception during coadministration with boceprevir, has not been established.

  10. HIV protease inhibitors disrupt lipid metabolism by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and inhibiting autophagy activity in adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S Zha

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitors (PI are core components of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART, the most effective treatment for HIV infection currently available. However, HIV PIs have now been linked to lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, which are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Our previous studies have shown that HIV PIs activate endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and disrupt lipid metabolism in hepatocytes and macrophages. Yet, little is known on how HIV PIs disrupt lipid metabolism in adipocytes, a major cell type involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.Cultured and primary mouse adipocytes and human adipocytes were used to examine the effect of frequently used HIV PIs in the clinic, lopinavir/ritonavir, on adipocyte differentiation and further identify the underlying molecular mechanism of HIV PI-induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism in adipocytes. The results indicated that lopinavir alone or in combination with ritonavir, significantly activated the ER stress response, inhibited cell differentiation, and induced cell apoptosis in adipocytes. In addition, HIV PI-induced ER stress was closely linked to inhibition of autophagy activity. We also identified through the use of primary adipocytes of CHOP(-/- mice that CHOP, the major transcriptional factor of the ER stress signaling pathway, is involved in lopinavir/ritonavir-induced inhibition of cell differentiation in adipocytes. In addition, lopinavir/ritonavir-induced ER stress appears to be associated with inhibition of autophagy activity in adipocytes.Activation of ER stress and impairment of autophagy activity are involved in HIV PI-induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism in adipocytes. The key components of ER stress and autophagy signaling pathways are potential therapeutic targets for HIV PI-induced metabolic side effects in HIV patients.

  11. Clinical Significance of Two Real-Time PCR Assays for Chronic Hepatitis C Patients Receiving Protease Inhibitor-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takako; Hmwe, Su Su; Shimada, Noritomo; Kato, Keizo; Ide, Tatsuya; Torimura, Takuji; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Tsubota, Akihito; Takaguchi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of two hepatitis C virus (HCV) real-time PCR assays, the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV test (CAP/CTM) and the Abbott RealTime HCV test (ART), for predicting the clinical outcomes of patients infected with HCV who received telaprevir (TVR)-based triple therapy or daclatasvir/asunaprevir (DCV/ASV) dual therapy. The rapid virological response rates in patients receiving TVR-based triple therapy were 92% (23/25) and 40% (10/25) for CAP/CTM and ART, respectively. The false omission rate (FOR) of ART was 93.3% (14/15), indicating that CAP/CTM could accurately predict clinical outcome in the early phase. In an independent examination of 20 patients receiving TVR-based triple therapy who developed viral breakthrough or relapse, the times to HCV disappearance by ART were longer than by CAP/CTM, whereas the times to HCV reappearance were similar. In an independent experiment of WHO standard HCV RNA serially diluted in serum containing TVR, the analytical sensitivities of CAP/CTM and ART were similar. However, cell cultures transfected with HCV and grown in medium containing TVR demonstrated that ART detected HCV RNA for a longer time than CAP/CTM. Similar results were found for 42 patients receiving DCV/ASV dual therapy. The FOR of ART was 73.3% (11/15) at week 8 after initiation of therapy, indicating that ART at week 8 could not accurately predict the clinical outcome. In conclusion, although CAP/CTM and ART detected HCV RNA with comparable analytical sensitivity, CAP/CTM might be preferable for predicting the clinical outcomes of patients receiving protease inhibitor-based therapy.

  12. Murinoglobulin, a novel protease inhibitor from murine plasma. Isolation, characterization, and comparison with murine alpha-macroglobulin and human alpha-2-macroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, A; Sinohara, H

    1985-01-25

    Two glycoproteins having trypsin-protein esterase activity were purified to apparent homogeneity from murine plasma. One was alpha-macroglobulin, a homologue of human alpha-2-macroglobulin, while the other, tentatively named murinoglobulin, did not correspond to any of the known plasma protease inhibitors that have been well characterized in men or other mammals. Murinoglobulin contained about 7.6% carbohydrate and was composed of a single-polypeptide chain of Mr = 180,000 as judged by the equilibrium sedimentation analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. Murinoglobulin did not cross-react immunologically with mouse alpha-macroglobulin nor with human alpha-2-macroglobulin. Protease-inhibiting properties of murinoglobulin were compared with those of mouse alpha-macroglobulin and human alpha-2-macroglobulin. All the three proteins inhibited trypsin, papain, and thermolysin, although they differed considerably in both the degree of inhibition and the binding stoichiometry of protease-inhibitor complexes. The two macroglobulins inhibited pepsin at pH 5.5, whereas murinoglobulin was inactivated at this pH. Murinoglobulin was more sensitive to methylamine than the two macroglobulins. No protein corresponding to murinoglobulin was detected in human plasma.

  13. Evaluating Andrographolide as a Potent Inhibitor of NS3-4A Protease and Its Drug-Resistant Mutants Using In Silico Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Chandramohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current combination therapy of PEG-INF and ribavirin against the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV genotype-1 infections is ineffective in maintaining sustained viral response in 50% of the infection cases. New compounds in the form of protease inhibitors can complement the combination therapy. Asunaprevir is new to the drug regiment as the NS3-4A protease inhibitor, but it is susceptible to two mutations, namely, R155K and D168A in the protein. Thus, in our study, we sought to evaluate Andrographolide, a labdane-diterpenoid from the Andrographis paniculata plant as an effective compound for inhibiting the NS3-4A protease as well as its concomitant drug-resistant mutants by using molecular docking and dynamic simulations. Our study shows that Andrographolide has best docking scores of −15.0862, −15.2322, and −13.9072 compared to those of Asunaprevir −3.7159, −2.6431, and −5.4149 with wild-type R155K and D168A mutants, respectively. Also, as shown in the MD simulations, the compound was good in binding the target proteins and maintains strong bonds causing very less to negligible perturbation in the protein backbone structures. Our results validate the susceptibility of Asunaprevir to protein variants as seen from our docking studies and trajectory period analysis. Therefore, from our study, we hope to add one more option in the drug regiment to tackle drug resistance in HCV infections.

  14. Design, structure-based focusing and in silico screening of combinatorial library of peptidomimetic inhibitors of Dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2010-03-01

    Serine protease activity of the NS3 protein of Dengue virus is an important target of antiviral agents that interfere with the viral polyprotein precursor processing catalyzed by the NS3 protease (NS3pro), which is important for the viral replication and maturation. Recent studies showed that substrate-based peptidomimetics carrying an electrophilic warhead inhibit the NS2B-NS3pro cofactor-protease complex with inhibition constants in the low micromolar concentration range when basic amino acid residues occupy P1 and P2 positions of the inhibitor, and an aldehyde warhead is attached to the P1. We have used computer-assisted combinatorial techniques to design, focus using the NS2B-NS3pro receptor 3D structure, and in silico screen a virtual library of more than 9,200 peptidomimetic analogs targeted around the template inhibitor Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg- H (Bz—benzoyl) that are composed mainly of unusual amino acid residues in all positions P1-P4. The most promising virtual hits were analyzed in terms of computed enzyme-inhibitor interactions and Adsorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion (ADME) related physico-chemical properties. Our study can direct the interest of medicinal chemists working on a next generation of antiviral chemotherapeutics against the Dengue Fever towards the explored subset of the chemical space that is predicted to contain peptide aldehydes with NS3pro inhibition potencies in nanomolar range which display ADME-related properties comparable to the training set inhibitors.

  15. Second-line protease inhibitor-based HAART after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimens in Asian HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Fahey, Paul; Kariminia, Azar; Yusoff, Nik K N; Khanh, Truong H; Sohn, Annette H; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Razali, Kamarul; Kurniati, Nia; Huy, Bui V; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Fong, Siew M; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based HAART after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) treatment. We examined outcomes of this regimen in Asian HIV-infected children. Children from five Asian countries in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database (TApHOD) with ≥ 24 weeks of NNRTI-based HAART followed by ≥ 24 weeks of bPI-based HAART were eligible. Primary outcomes were the proportions with virological suppression (HIV RNA < 400 copies/ml) and immune recovery (CD4+ T-cell percentage [CD4%]≥ 25% if age < 5 years and CD4+ T-cell count ≥ 500 cells/mm3 if age ≥ 5 years) at 48 and 96 weeks. Of 3,422 children, 153 were eligible; 52% were female. At switch, median age was 10 years, 26% were in WHO stage 4. Median weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) was -1.9 (n = 121), CD4% was 12.5% (n = 106), CD4+ T-cell count was 237 cells/mm3 (n = 112), and HIV RNA was 4.6 log10 copies/ml (n = 61). The most common bPI was lopinavir/ritonavir (83%). At 48 weeks, 61% (79/129) had immune recovery, 60% (26/43) had undetectable HIV RNA and 73% (58/79) had fasting triglycerides ≥ 130 mg/dl. By 96 weeks, 70% (57/82) achieved immune recovery, 65% (17/26) had virological suppression, and hypertriglyceridaemia occurred in 66% (33/50). Predictors for virological suppression at week 48 were longer duration of NNRTI-based HAART (P = 0.006), younger age (P = 0.007), higher WAZ (P = 0.020) and HIV RNA at switch < 10,000 copies/ml (P = 0.049). In this regional cohort of Asian children on bPI-based second-line HAART, 60% of children tested had immune recovery by 1 year, and two-thirds had hyperlipidaemia, highlighting difficulties in optimizing second-line HAART with limited drug options.

  16. Comparison of single and boosted protease inhibitor versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing cART regimens in antiretroviral-naïve patients starting cART after January 1, 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Horban, A; Clumeck, N

    2006-01-01

    increase) response in antiretroviral-naïve patients starting either a single protease inhibitor (PI; n = 183), a ritonavir-boosted PI regimen (n = 197), or a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART regimen (n = 447) after January 1, 2000, and the odds of lack of virologic...... or immunologic response at 3 years after starting cART. METHOD: Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression. RESULTS: After adjustment, compared to patients taking an NNRTI-regimen, patients taking a single-PI regimen were significantly less likely to achieve a viral load (VL)

  17. Protease Inhibitor Resistance Is Uncommon in HIV-1 Subtype C Infected Patients on Failing Second-Line Lopinavir/r-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole L. Wallis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited data exist on HIV-1 drug resistance patterns in South Africa following second-line protease-inhibitor containing regimen failure. This study examined drug resistance patterns emerging in 75 HIV-1 infected adults experiencing virologic failure on a second-line regimen containing 2 NRTI and lopinavir/ritonavir. Ninety six percent of patients (n=72 were infected with HIV-1 subtype C, two patients were infected with HIV-1 subtype D and one with HIV-1 subtype A1. Thirty nine percent (n=29 of patients had no resistance mutations in protease or reverse transcriptase suggesting that medication non-adherence was a major factor contributing to failure. Major lopinavir resistance mutations were infrequent (5 of 75; 7%, indicating that drug resistance is not the main barrier to future viral suppression.

  18. Exploiting subsite S1 of trypsin-like serine proteases for selectivity: potent and selective inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackman, R L; Katz, B A; Breitenbucher, J G; Hui, H C; Verner, E; Luong, C; Liu, L; Sprengeler, P A

    2001-11-08

    A nonselective inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, 2-(2-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl)-1H-indole-5-carboxamidine (1) (Verner, E.; Katz, B. A.; Spencer, J.; Allen, D.; Hataye, J.; Hruzewicz, W.; Hui, H. C.; Kolesnikov, A.; Li, Y.; Luong, C.; Martelli, A.; Radika. K.; Rai, R.; She, M.; Shrader, W.; Sprengeler, P. A.; Trapp, S.; Wang, J.; Young, W. B.; Mackman, R. L. J. Med. Chem. 2001, 44, 2753-2771) has been optimized through minor structural changes on the S1 binding group to afford remarkably selective and potent inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). The trypsin-like serine proteases(1) that comprise drug targets can be broadly categorized into two subfamilies, those with Ser190 and those with Ala190. A single-atom modification, for example, replacement of hydrogen for chlorine at the 6-position of the 5-amidinoindole P1 group on 1, generated up to 6700-fold selectivity toward the Ser190 enzymes and against the Ala190 enzymes. The larger chlorine atom displaces a water molecule (H(2)O1(S1)) that binds near residue 190 in all the complexes of 1, and related inhibitors, in uPA, thrombin, and trypsin. The water molecule, H(2)O1(S1), in both the Ser190 or Ala190 enzymes, hydrogen bonds with the amidine N1 nitrogen of the inhibitor. When it is displaced, a reduction in affinity toward the Ala190 enzymes is observed due to the amidine N1 nitrogen of the bound inhibitor being deprived of a key hydrogen-bonding partner. In the Ser190 enzymes the affinity is maintained since the serine hydroxyl oxygen O gamma(Ser190) compensates for the displaced water molecule. High-resolution crystallography provided evidence for the displacement of the water molecule and validated the design rationale. In summation, a novel and powerful method for engineering selectivity toward Ser190 proteases and against Ala190 proteases without substantially increasing molecular weight is described.

  19. The Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Versus Ongoing Triple Therapy (PIVOT) trial: a randomised controlled trial of a protease inhibitor monotherapy strategy for long-term management of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Nicholas I; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Oddershede, Lars; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Walker, Simon; Sculpher, Mark; Dunn, David T

    2016-03-01

    Standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection uses a combination of drugs, until now considered essential to minimise treatment failure and development of drug resistance. Protease inhibitors (PIs) are potent with a high genetic barrier to resistance and have the potential for use as monotherapy after viral load (VL) suppression achieved on combination therapy. However, longer-term resistance and toxicity risks are uncertain. To compare the effectiveness, toxicity profile and cost-effectiveness of PI monotherapy with those of standard-of-care triple therapy in a pragmatic long-term clinical trial. Open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial. Forty-three HIV clinical centres in the UK NHS. HIV-positive adults taking standard combination ART with a suppressed VL for ≥ 6 months. Patients were randomised to maintain ongoing triple therapy (OT) or switch to a strategy of physician-selected ritonavir-boosted PI monotherapy (PI-mono), with prompt return to combination therapy in the event of VL rebound. The primary outcome was reduction of future drug options, defined as new intermediate-/high-level resistance to one or more drugs to which the patient's virus was considered to be sensitive at trial entry (non-inferiority comparison, 10% margin). Secondary outcomes included confirmed virological rebound, serious drug- or disease-related complications, total grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs), neurocognitive function change, cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count change, change in health-related quality of life, cardiovascular risk change, health-care costs and health economic analysis. In total, 587 participants were randomised (77% male, 68% white) to OT (n = 291) or PI-mono (n = 296) and followed for a median of 44 months, of whom 2.7% withdrew/were lost to follow-up. One or more episodes of confirmed VL rebound were observed in eight patients (Kaplan-Meier estimate 3.2%) in the OT group and

  20. Discovery of novel cyclic peptide inhibitors of dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease with antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Youhei; Matsui, Kouhei; Nobori, Haruaki; Maeda, Haruka; Sato, Akihiko; Kurosu, Takeshi; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi; Hattori, Kazunari; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2017-08-01

    NS2B-NS3 protease is an essential enzyme for the replication of dengue virus (DENV), which continues to be a serious threat to worldwide public health. We designed and synthesized a series of cyclic peptides mimicking the substrates of this enzyme, and assayed their activity against the DENV-2 NS2B-NS3 protease. The introduction of aromatic residues at the appropriate positions and conformational restriction generated the most promising cyclic peptide with an IC 50 of 0.95μM against NS2B-NS3 protease. Cyclic peptides with proper positioning of additional arginines and aromatic residues exhibited antiviral activity against DENV. Furthermore, replacing the C-terminal amide bond of the polybasic amino acid sequence with an amino methylene moiety stabilized the cyclic peptides against hydrolysis by NS2B-NS3 protease, while maintaining their enzyme inhibitory activity and antiviral activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluorescently labeled inhibitors detect localized serine protease activities in Drosophila melanogaster pole cells, embryos, and ovarian egg chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus Kragh; Ono, S.; Powers, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    processes that they mediate. Until only recently, the tools to conveniently address the question of where and when serine proteases are active within complex tissues have been lacking. In order to detect spatially restricted serine protease activities in Drosophila embryos and ovaries we introduce...... activity localized to the oocyte-somatic follicle cell interface of the developing egg chamber. Our results suggest that this technique holds promise to identify new spatially restricted activities in adult Drosophila tissues and developing embryos....

  2. Effects of soybean trypsin inhibitor on hypopharyngeal gland protein content, total midgut protease activity and survival of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagili, Ramesh R; Pankiw, Tanya; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2005-09-01

    Insecticidal properties of protease inhibitors have been established in transgenic plants. In the wake of continuous research and rapid development of protease inhibitors it is important to assess possible effects on beneficial insects like the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.). In this study, newly emerged caged bees were fed pollen diets containing three different concentrations (0.1%, 0.5% and 1% w:w) of soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). Hypopharyngeal gland protein content, total midgut proteolytic enzyme activity of these bees, and survival were measured. Bees fed 1% SBTI had significantly reduced hypopharyngeal gland protein content and midgut proteolytic enzyme activity. There were no significant differences between control, 0.1% and 0.5% SBTI treatments. Bees fed a diet containing 1% SBTI had the lowest survival, followed by 0.5% and 0.1%, over a 30-day period. We concluded that nurse bees fed a pollen diet containing at least 1% SBTI would be poor producers of larval food, potentially threatening colony growth and maintenance.

  3. Bowman-Birk and Kunitz protease inhibitors among antinutrients and bioactives modified by germination and hydrolysis in Brazilian soybean cultivar BRS 133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dia, Vermont P; Gomez, Tegan; Vernaza, Gabriela; Berhow, Mark; Chang, Yoon Kil; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2012-08-15

    Soybean contains constituents that have antinutritional and bioactive properties. Enzymatic hydrolysis and germination can enhance the biological activity of these compounds in soybean. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of germination, Alcalase (protease) hydrolysis, and their combination on the concentrations of antinutritional and bioactive compounds in Brazilian soybean cultivar BRS 133. A combination of germination and Alcalase hydrolysis resulted in the degradation of Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI), and lunasin by 96.9, 97.8, and 38.4%. Lectin was not affected by any of the processing treatments when compared to nongerminated and nonhydrolyzed soy protein extract. Total isoflavones (ISF) and total saponins (SAP) increased by 16.2 and 28.7%, respectively, after 18 h of germination, while Alcalase hydrolysis led to the reduction of these compounds. A significant correlation was found between concentrations of BBI and KTI, BBI and lunasin, BBI and ISF, KTI and lunasin, KTI and ISF, KTI and SAP, lunasin and ISF, and ISF and SAP. Germination and Alcalase hydrolysis interacted in reducing BBI, ISF, and SAP. This study presents a process of preparing soy flour ingredients with lower concentrations of antinutritional factors and with biologically active constituents, important for the promotion of health associated with soybean consumption. In conclusion, 18 h of germination and 3 h of Alcalase hydrolysis is recommended for elimination of protease inhibitors, while bioactives are maintained by at least 50% of their original concentrations.

  4. The effect of liposome encapsulation on the pharmacokinetics of recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (rSLPI) therapy after local delivery to a guinea pig asthma model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Aileen

    2011-09-01

    Inhaled recombinant Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (rSLPI) has shown potential for treatment of inflammatory lung conditions. Rapid inactivation of rSLPI by cathepsin L (Cat L) and rapid clearance from the lungs have limited clinical efficacy. Encapsulation of rSLPI within 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-L-Serine]:Cholesterol liposomes (DOPS-rSLPI) protects rSLPI against Cat L inactivation in vitro. We aimed to determine the effect of liposomes on rSLPI pharmacokinetics and activity in vitro and after local delivery to the airways in vivo.

  5. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; RAO, Shwetha D; BONTELL, Irene; VERHEYEN, Jens; RAO, Vasudev R; GORE, Sagar C; SONI, Neelesh; SHET, Anita; SCHÜLTER, Eugen; EKSTRAND, Maria L.; WONDWOSSEN, Amogne; KAISER, Rolf; MADHUSUDHAN, Mallur S.; PRASAD, Vinayaka R; SONNERBORG, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region which is appears in protease inhibitor (PI) failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (Odds Ratio 17.1, p<0.001) but naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian sequences. The insertion will probably restore the ALIX mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of such insertion need to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions were PI-drugs are being scaled up as second line treatment options. PMID:25102091

  6. Noncanonical Wnt signaling promotes osteoclast differentiation and is facilitated by the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Francisco; Oguma, Junya; Brown, Anthony M.C.; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► First demonstration of direct role for noncanonical Wnt in osteoclast differentiation. ► Demonstration of Ryk as a Wnt5a/b receptor in inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. ► Modulation of noncanonical Wnt signaling by a clinically important drug, ritonavir. ► Establishes a mechanism for an important clinical problem: HIV-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Wnt proteins that signal via the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway directly regulate osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, most studies of Wnt-related effects on osteoclasts involve indirect changes. While investigating bone mineral density loss in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its treatment with the protease inhibitor ritonavir (RTV), we observed that RTV decreased nuclear localization of β-catenin, critical to canonical Wnt signaling, in primary human and murine osteoclast precursors. This occurred in parallel with upregulation of Wnt5a and Wnt5b transcripts. These Wnts typically stimulate noncanonical Wnt signaling, and this can antagonize the canonical Wnt pathway in many cell types, dependent upon Wnt receptor usage. We now document RTV-mediated upregulation of Wnt5a/b protein in osteoclast precursors. Recombinant Wnt5b and retrovirus-mediated expression of Wnt5a enhanced osteoclast differentiation from human and murine monocytic precursors, processes facilitated by RTV. In contrast, canonical Wnt signaling mediated by Wnt3a suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Both RTV and Wnt5b inhibited canonical, β-catenin/T cell factor-based Wnt reporter activation in osteoclast precursors. RTV- and Wnt5-induced osteoclast differentiation were dependent upon the receptor-like tyrosine kinase Ryk, suggesting that Ryk may act as a Wnt5a/b receptor in this context. This is the first demonstration of a direct role for Wnt signaling pathways and Ryk in regulation of osteoclast differentiation, and its modulation by a clinically important drug, ritonavir. These studies

  7. Treatment Failure in HIV-Infected Children on Second-line Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaysod, Rapeepan; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Salvadori, Nicolas; Cressey, Tim R; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Techakunakorn, Pornchai; Krikajornkitti, Sawitree; Srirojana, Sakulrat; Laomanit, Laddawan; Chalermpantmetagul, Suwalai; Lallemant, Marc; Le Cœur, Sophie; McIntosh, Kenneth; Traisathit, Patrinee; Jourdain, Gonzague

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children failing second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) have no access to third-line antiretroviral drugs in many resource-limited settings. It is important to identify risk factors for second-line regimen failure. HIV-infected children initiating protease inhibitor (PI)-containing second-line ART within the Program for HIV Prevention and Treatment observational cohort study in Thailand between 2002 and 2010 were included. Treatment failure was defined as confirmed HIV type 1 RNA load >400 copies/mL after at least 6 months on second-line regimen or death. Adherence was assessed by drug plasma levels and patient self-report. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify risk factors for failure. A total of 111 children started a PI-based second-line regimen, including 59 girls (53%). Median first-line ART duration was 1.9 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.4-3.3 years), and median age at second-line initiation was 10.7 years (IQR, 6.3-13.4 years). Fifty-four children (49%) experienced virologic failure, and 2 (2%) died. The risk of treatment failure 24 months after second-line initiation was 41%. In multivariate analyses, failure was independently associated with exposure to first-line ART for >2 years (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.8; P = .03), age >13 years (aHR, 2.9; P < .001), body mass index-for-age z score < -2 standard deviations at second-line initiation (aHR, 2.8; P = .03), and undetectable drug levels within 6 months following second-line initiation (aHR, 4.5; P < .001). Children with longer exposure to first-line ART, entry to adolescence, underweight, and/or undetectable drug levels were at higher risk of failing second-line ART and thus should be closely monitored. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Virtual screening of commercial cyclic peptides as NS2B-NS3 protease inhibitor of dengue virus serotype 2 through molecular docking simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. A. F.; Aini, R. N.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2017-04-01

    A disease caused by dengue virus infection has become one of the major health problems in the world, particularly in Asia, Africa, and South America. This disease has become endemic in more than 100 countries, and approximately 100 million cases occur each year with 2.5 billion people or 40% of the world population at risk of having this virus infection. Therefore, we need an antiviral drug that can inhibit the activity of the enzymes that involved in the virus replication in the body. Lately, the peptide-based drug design has been developed and proved to have interesting pharmacological properties. This study uses commercially cyclic peptides that have already marketed. The purpose of this study is to screen the commercial cyclic peptides that can be used as an inhibitor of the NS2B-NS3 protease of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) through molecular docking simulations. Inhibition of NS3 protease enzyme can lead to enzymatic inhibition activity so the formed polyprotein from the translation of RNA cannot be cut into pieces and remain in the long strand form. Consequently, proteins that are vital for the sustainability of dengue virus replication cannot be formed. This research resulted in [alpha]-ANF (1-28), rat, Brain Natriuretic Peptide, porcine, Atrial Natriuretic Factor (3-28) (human) and Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (126-150) (rat) as the best drug candidate for inhibiting the NS2B-NS3 protease of DENV-2.

  9. Effectiveness of protease inhibitor/nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based second-line antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Alexander J; Saunders, Matthew J; Boyd, Mark A; Bonnett, Laura J; Johnston, Victoria; Wandeler, Gilles; Schoffelen, Annelot F; Ciaffi, Laura; Stafford, Kristen; Collier, Ann C; Paton, Nicholas I; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2017-12-20

    In sub-Saharan Africa, 25.5 million people are living with HIV, representing 70% of the global total. The need for second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is projected to increase in the next decade in keeping with the expansion of treatment provision. Outcome data are required to inform policy. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting the virological outcomes of protease inhibitor (PI)-based second-line ART in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary outcome was virological suppression (HIV-1 RNA sub-Saharan Africa did not achieve virological suppression although among viraemic patients protease resistance was infrequent. There remain significant challenges in implementation of viral load monitoring. Optimising definitions and strategies for management of second-line ART failure is a research priority. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Discovery and Early Clinical Evaluation of BMS-605339, a Potent and Orally Efficacious Tripeptidic Acylsulfonamide NS3 Protease Inhibitor for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scola, Paul M.; Wang, Alan Xiangdong; Good, Andrew C.; Sun, Li-Qiang; Combrink, Keith D.; Campbell, Jeffrey A.; Chen, Jie; Tu, Yong; Sin, Ny; Venables, Brian L.; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Chen, Yan; Cocuzza, Anthony; Bilder, Donna M.; D’Andrea, Stanley; Zheng, Barbara; Hewawasam, Piyasena; Ding, Min; Thuring, Jan; Li, Jianqing; Hernandez, Dennis; Yu, Fei; Falk, Paul; Zhai, Guangzhi; Sheaffer, Amy K.; Chen, Chaoqun; Lee, Min S.; Barry, Diana; Knipe, Jay O.; Li, Wenying; Han, Yong-Hae; Jenkins, Susan; Gesenberg, Christoph; Gao, Qi; Sinz, Michael W.; Santone, Kenneth S.; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Klei, Herbert E.; Colonno, Richard J.; Grasela, Dennis M.; Hughes, Eric; Chien, Caly; Adams, Stephen; Levesque, Paul C.; Li, Danshi; Zhu, Jialong; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; McPhee, Fiona

    2014-03-13

    The discovery of BMS-605339 (35), a tripeptidic inhibitor of the NS3/4A enzyme, is described. This compound incorporates a cyclopropylacylsulfonamide moiety that was designed to improve the potency of carboxylic acid prototypes through the introduction of favorable nonbonding interactions within the S1' site of the protease. The identification of 35 was enabled through the optimization and balance of critical properties including potency and pharmacokinetics (PK). This was achieved through modulation of the P2* subsite of the inhibitor which identified the isoquinoline ring system as a key template for improving PK properties with further optimization achieved through functionalization. A methoxy moiety at the C6 position of this isoquinoline ring system proved to be optimal with respect to potency and PK, thus providing the clinical compound 35 which demonstrated antiviral activity in HCV-infected patients.

  11. Human kallikrein 2 (hK2), but not prostate-specific antigen (PSA), rapidly complexes with protease inhibitor 6 (PI-6) released from prostate carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, M S; Zhu, Z; Marker, K; Liu, R S; Carpenter, P M; Rittenhouse, H; Mikolajczyk, S D

    2001-11-01

    Human kallikrein 2 (hK2) is a secreted, trypsin-like protease that shares 80% amino acid sequence identity with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). hK2 has been shown to be a serum marker for prostate cancer and may also play a role in cancer progression and metastasis. We have previously identified a novel complex between human kallikrein 2 (hK2) and protease inhibitor 6 (PI-6) in prostate cancer tissue. PI-6 is an intracellular serine protease inhibitor with both antitrypsin and antichymotrypsin activity. In the current study we have shown that PI-6 forms a rapid in vitro complex with hK2 but does not complex with PSA. Recombinant mammalian cells expressing both hK2 and PI-6 showed hK2-PI-6 complex in the spent media only after cell death and lysis. Similarly, LNCaP cells expressing endogenous hK2 and PI-6 showed extracellular hK2-PI-6 complex formation concurrently with cell death. Immunostaining of prostate cancer tissues with PI-6 monoclonal antibodies showed a marked preferential staining pattern in cancerous epithelial cells compared with noncancerous tissue. These results indicate that the hK2-PI-6 complex may be a naturally occurring marker of tissue damage and necrosis associated with neoplasia. Both hK2 and PI-6 were shed into the lumen of prostate cancer glands as granular material that appeared to be cellular necrotic debris. The differential staining pattern of PI6 in tissues suggests a complex regulation of PI-6 expression that may play a role in other aspects of neoplastic progression. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Mutations in CSTA, Encoding Cystatin A, Underlie Exfoliative Ichthyosis and Reveal a Role for This Protease Inhibitor in Cell-Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaydon, Diana C.; Nitoiu, Daniela; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Cabral, Rita M.; Bland, Philip; Hausser, Ingrid; van Heel, David A.; Rajpopat, Shefali; Fischer, Judith; Oji, Vinzenz; Zvulunov, Alex; Traupe, Heiko; Hennies, Hans Christian; Kelsell, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis presents shortly after birth as dry, scaly skin over most of the body with coarse peeling of nonerythematous skin on the palms and soles, which is exacerbated by excessive moisture and minor trauma. Using whole-genome homozygosity mapping, candidate-gene analysis and deep sequencing, we have identified loss-of-function mutations in the gene for protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA) as the underlying genetic cause of exfoliative ichthyosis. We found two homozygous mutations, a splice-site and a nonsense mutation, in two consanguineous families of Bedouin and Turkish origin. Electron microscopy of skin biopsies from affected individuals revealed that the level of detachment occurs in the basal and lower suprabasal layers. In addition, in vitro modeling suggests that in the absence of cystatin A protein, there is a cell-cell adhesion defect in human keratinocytes that is particularly prominent when cells are subject to mechanical stress. We show here evidence of a key role for a protease inhibitor in epidermal adhesion within the lower layers of the human epidermis. PMID:21944047

  13. The protease inhibitor alpha-2-macroglobulin-like-1 is the p170 antigen recognized by paraneoplastic pemphigus autoantibodies in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Schepens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP is a devastating autoimmune blistering disease, involving mucocutaneous and internal organs, and associated with underlying neoplasms. PNP is characterized by the production of autoantibodies targeting proteins of the plakin and cadherin families involved in maintenance of cell architecture and tissue cohesion. Nevertheless, the identity of an antigen of Mr 170,000 (p170, thought to be critical in PNP pathogenesis, has remained unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry based approach, we identified p170 as alpha-2-macroglobuline-like-1, a broad range protease inhibitor expressed in stratified epithelia and other tissues damaged in the PNP disease course. We demonstrate that 10 PNP sera recognize alpha-2-macroglobuline-like-1 (A2ML1, while none of the control sera obtained from patients with bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus and normal subjects does. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study unravels a broad range protease inhibitor as a new class of target antigens in a paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome and opens a new challenging investigation avenue for a better understanding of PNP pathogenesis.

  14. Neither the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir-ritonavir nor the antimicrobial trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevent malaria relapse in plasmodium cynomolgi-infected non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlotte V; Dixit, Saurabh; Penzak, Scott R; Sahu, Tejram; Orr-Gonzalez, Sachy; Lambert, Lynn; Zeleski, Katie; Chen, Jingyang; Neal, Jillian; Borkowsky, William; Wu, Yimin; Duffy, Patrick E

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and only one drug is in clinical use that can kill the hypnozoites that cause P. vivax relapses. HIV and P. vivax malaria geographically overlap in many areas of the world, including South America and Asia. Despite the increasing body of knowledge regarding HIV protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) on P. falciparum malaria, there are no data regarding the effects of these treatments on P. vivax's hypnozoite form and clinical relapses of malaria. We have previously shown that the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV-RTV) and the antibiotic trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) inhibit Plasmodium actively dividing liver stages in rodent malarias and in vitro in P. falciparum, but effect against Plasmodium dormant hypnozoite forms remains untested. Separately, although other antifolates have been tested against hypnozoites, the antibiotic trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, commonly used in HIV infection and exposure management, has not been evaluated for hypnozoite-killing activity. Since Plasmodium cynomolgi is an established animal model for the study of liver stages of malaria as a surrogate for P. vivax infection, we investigated the antimalarial activity of these drugs on Plasmodium cynomolgi relapsing malaria in rhesus macaques. Herein, we demonstrate that neither TMP-SMX nor LPV-RTV kills hypnozoite parasite liver stage forms at the doses tested. Because HIV and malaria geographically overlap, and more patients are being managed for HIV infection and exposure, understanding HIV drug impact on malaria infection is important.

  15. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Malm

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP and Factor H (FH. Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  16. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  17. Protease inhibitor associated mutations compromise the efficacy of therapy in human immunodeficiency virus – 1 (HIV-1 infected pediatric patients: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova Anna

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the introduction of combined therapy with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors has resulted in considerable decrease in HIV related mortality; it has also induced the development of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. The few studies on HIV-1 mutagenesis in HIV infected children have not evaluated the impact of HIV-1 mutations on the clinical, virological and immunological presentation of HIV disease that is fundamental to optimizing the treatment regimens for these patients. Results A cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the impact of treatment regimens and resistance mutation patterns on the clinical, virological, and immunological presentation of HIV disease in 41 children (25 male and 16 female at the Robert Wood Johnson Pediatric AIDS Program in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The study participants were symptomatic and had preceding treatment history with combined ARV regimens including protease inhibitors (PIs, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Fifteen (36.6% children were treated with NRTI+NNRTI+ PI, 6 (14.6% with NRTI+NNRTIs, 13 (31.7% with NRTI+PIs, and the remaining 7 (17.1% received NRTIs only. Combined ARV regimens did not significantly influence the incidence of NRTI and NNRTI associated mutations. The duration of ARV therapy and the child's age had no significant impact on the ARV related mutations. The clinico-immunological presentation of the HIV disease was not associated with ARV treatment regimens or number of resistance mutations. However, primary mutations in the protease (PR gene increased the likelihood of plasma viral load (PVL ≥ 10,000 copies/mL irrespective of the child's age, duration of ARV therapy, presence of NRTI and NNRTI mutation. Viremia ≥ 10,000 copies/mL was recorded in almost all the children with primary mutations in the PR region (n = 12/13, 92.3% as compared with only 50.0% (n

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Novel Inhibitors against the NS2B-NS3 Protease of Dengue Fever Virus Type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh Hanh Nguyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of potent therapeutic compounds against dengue virus is urgently needed. The NS2B-NS3 protease (NS2B-NS3pro of dengue fever virus carries out all enzymatic activities needed for polyprotein processing and is considered to be amenable to antiviral inhibition by analogy. Virtual screening of 300,000 compounds using Autodock 3 on the GVSS platform was conducted to identify novel inhibitors against the NS2B-NS3pro. Thirty-six compounds were selected for in vitro assay against NS2B-NS3pro expressed in Pichia pastoris. Seven novel compounds were identified as inhibitors with IC50 values of 3.9 ± 0.6–86.7 ± 3.6 μM. Three strong NS2B-NS3pro inhibitors were further confirmed as competitive inhibitors with Ki values of 4.0 ± 0.4, 4.9 ± 0.3, and 3.4 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between amino acid residues in the NS3pro active site with inhibition compounds were also identified.

  19. Gag drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 subtype C patients, failing a protease inhibitor inclusive treatment regimen, with detectable lopinavir levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Sameshnee Kelly; Singh, Urisha; Singh, Avashna; Gordon, Michelle; Ndungu, Thumbi

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and their use in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has led to the effective control of HIV replication in infected patients. However the emergence of resistant HIV-1 strains still remains a problem. Literature has shown that mutations may accumulate in the protease (PR) and gag regions of HIV-1 patients who fail therapy with protease inhibitor (PI) drugs (1, 2). Gag mutations have also been found to play an important role in the evolution of PI resistance (2). Despite this, the standard genotypic drug-resistance test examines mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) and PR region of HIV-1 and not gag (3). This study investigated the frequency of gag drug resistance mutations in the absence of major PI mutations in HIV-1 subtype C patients, failing a PI inclusive treatment regimen. Sixty-eight samples were retrieved from patients that were classified as second line treatment failures as they had a viral load greater than 1000 copies\\mL, as well as detectable lopinavir (LPV) levels. The gag and protease region of these patients were genotyped. Mutations in the gag and protease region were assessed using the REga Db sequencing tool and the CPR programme on the Stanford University HIV drug resistance database. The mean LPV level of these samples was 11.66 µg/mL. 69.11% (n=46) of the patients have no major PI mutations in protease. The following mutations that are associated with PI exposure were present in the data set: G62R (n=6), H219Q (n=11), S737T (n=8), I389T (n=8) and Q474L (n=7). Predictably, mutations that are associated with PI resistance were found, which are generally located in the p7/p1 and p1/p6 cleavage site. These mutations are K436R (n=4), I437V (n=1), L449P (n=5), R452K (n=4) and P453L\\T (n=9). These results contribute to the knowledge of resistance mutations in gag and their impact on PI resistance.

  20. Protective effects of the antioxidant Ginkgo biloba extract and the protease inhibitor aprotinin against Leiurus quinquestriatus venom-induced tissue damage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Fatani

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and proteases have been implicated in several diseases and extensive evidence indicates that antioxidants and protease inhibitors help prevent organ functional damage. Leiurus quinquestriatus (LQQ scorpion venom causes cellular injuries that may lead to multiple organ failure. Thus, the capability of the antioxidant "natural standardized extract of Gingko biloba leaves (Gin, EGb 761" and the non-selective protease inhibitor, aprotinin, in ameliorating venom-induced biochemical alterations indicative of cellular injury and oxidative stress was studied to determine their effectiveness in protecting rats from venom-evoked cellular damages. Thus, in this study, rats were treated with LQQ venom (0.3mg.kg-1, subcutaneously alone or after Gin (150mg.kg-1, orally, daily for 2 weeks before venom and/or aprotinin (Apr, 46000 KIU.kg-1, intraperitoneally, 30 min before venom. Control groups were injected with saline or treatment modalities. Lungs and hearts were excised after decapitating rats (n=8/group 60 min after venom injection and the following activities were measured: reduced glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA - an index of lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Our findings demonstrate that LQQ venomsignificantly elevated GSH (p<0.05 vs. control, MDA (p<0.05, G6PD (p<0.05, and LDH activities (p<0.001 in hearts of envenomed rats. The venom also elevated MDA (p<0.05 vs. control and reduced GSH and GPx (p<0.05 in the lungs of envenomed rats. In general, pretreatment with EGb761 attenuated LQQ venom-evoked increases in GSH (p<0.05 vs. venom, MDA in rat hearts and lungs (p<0.05 vs. venom, plus LDH in the heart (p<0.01. Aprotinin alone significantly reduced the venom-elicited increase in G6PD and LDH activities and the decrease in GPx levels (p<0.05. In general, these protective effects of EGb761 on GSH, MDA (p<0.01 vs. venom and LDH (p<0.001 in the

  1. Insight to structural subsite recognition in plant thiol protease-inhibitor complexes : Understanding the basis of differential inhibition and the role of water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhayay Bishnu P

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work represents an extensive MD simulation / water-dynamics studies on a series of complexes of inhibitors (leupeptin, E-64, E-64-C, ZPACK and plant cysteine proteases (actinidin, caricain, chymopapain, calotropin DI of papain family to understand the various interactions, water binding mode, factors influencing it and the structural basis of differential inhibition. Results The tertiary structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes were built by visual interactive modeling and energy minimization followed by dynamic simulation of 120 ps in water environment. DASA study with and without the inhibitor revealed the potential subsite residues involved in inhibition. Though the interaction involving main chain atoms are similar, critical inspection of the complexes reveal significant differences in the side chain interactions in S2-P2 and S3-P3 pairs due to sequence differences in the equivalent positions of respective subsites leading to differential inhibition. Conclusion The key finding of the study is a conserved site of a water molecule near oxyanion hole of the enzyme active site, which is found in all the modeled complexes and in most crystal structures of papain family either native or complexed. Conserved water molecules at the ligand binding sites of these homologous proteins suggest the structural importance of the water, which changes the conventional definition of chemical geometry of inhibitor binding domain, its shape and complimentarity. The water mediated recognition of inhibitor to enzyme subsites (Pn...H2O....Sn of leupeptin acetyl oxygen to caricain, chymopapain and calotropinDI is an additional information and offer valuable insight to potent inhibitor design.

  2. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maarseveen van, N. M.; Andersson, Dan; Lepšík, Martin; Fun, A.; Schipper, P. J.; Jong de, D.; Boucher, Ch. A. B.; Nijhuis, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 29 (2012), s. 1-7 ISSN 1742-4690 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 37693 - HIV PI RESISTANCE Grant - others:Dutch AIDS Fund(XE) 2006028; (NWO) VIDI(XE) 91796349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV -1 * protease * Gag * resistance * cleavage Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.657, year: 2012

  3. Structural and energy comparison of ethyleneamine inhibitor binding to the wild type and mutant HIV-1 proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Petroková, Hana; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Buchtelová, Eva; Dušková, Jarmila

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2002), s. 108-109 [Seminar of the Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association /256./. 25.11.2002, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA ČR GA204/00/P091; GA ČR GA203/00/D117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV -1 protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. Secreted proteases from pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monod, Michel; Capoccia, Sabrina; Léchenne, Barbara; Zaugg, Christophe; Holdom, Mary; Jousson, Olivier

    2002-10-01

    Many species of human pathogenic fungi secrete proteases in vitro or during the infection process. Secreted endoproteases belong to the aspartic proteases of the pepsin family, serine proteases of the subtilisin family, and metalloproteases of two different families. To these proteases has to be added the non-pepsin-type aspartic protease from Aspergillus niger and a unique chymotrypsin-like protease from Coccidioides immitis. Pathogenic fungi also secrete aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and dipeptidyl-peptidases. The function of fungal secreted proteases and their importance in infections vary. It is evident that secreted proteases are important for the virulence of dermatophytes since these fungi grow exclusively in the stratum corneum, nails or hair, which constitutes their sole nitrogen and carbon sources. The aspartic proteases secreted by Candida albicans are involved in the adherence process and penetration of tissues, and in interactions with the immune system of the infected host. For Aspergillus fumigatus, the role of proteolytic activity has not yet been proved. Although the secreted proteases have been intensively investigated as potential virulence factors, knowledge on protease substrate specificities is rather poor and few studies have focused on the research of inhibitors. Knowledge of substrate specificities will increase our understanding about the action of each protease secreted by pathogenic fungi and will help to determine their contribution to virulence.

  5. Identification and isoforms specificity of barley (Hordeum vulgare) grain proteinaceous inhibitors of commercial feed protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionisio, Giuseppe; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    fractionated by affinity or ion exchange chromatography. Inhibitory fractions have been identified qualitatively/quantitatively by mass spectrometry. Ten different recombinant isoforms of potato type I chymotrypsin inhibitors (CI-1/2), three different serpins, two monomeric alpha amylase/trypsin inhibitors...

  6. Markedly diminished lipolysis and partial restoration of glucose metabolism, without changes in fat distribution after extended discontinuation of protease inhibitors in severe lipodystrophic human Immunodeficient virus-1-infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Marc; Allick, Gideon; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Romijn, Johannes A.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Lange, Joep M. A.; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; van Kuijk, Cornelis; Endert, Erik; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Reiss, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Treatment for HIV-1 infection is often complicated by a lipodystrophy syndrome associated with insulin resistance and an elevated rate of lipolysis. In eight HIV-1 infected men with lipodystrophy syndrome, we studied the effects of replacement of protease inhibitor ( PI) by abacavir on insulin

  7. Predictive value of pharmacokinetics-adjusted phenotypic susceptibility on response to ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects failing prior PI therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J; Park, Jeong-Gun; Haubrich, Richard; Aweeka, Francesca; Bastow, Barbara; Pakes, Gary E; Yu, Song; Wu, Hulin; Richman, Douglas D

    2009-06-01

    The activities of protease inhibitors in vivo may depend on plasma concentrations and viral susceptibility. This nonrandomized, open-label study evaluated the relationship of the inhibitory quotient (IQ [the ratio of drug exposure to viral phenotypic susceptibility]) to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) change for ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs). Subjects on PI-based regimens replaced their PIs with ritonavir-enhanced indinavir (IDV/r) 800/200 mg, fosamprenavir (FPV/r) 700/100 mg, or lopinavir (LPV/r) 400/200 mg twice daily. Pharmacokinetics were assessed at day 14; follow-up lasted 24 weeks. Associations between IQ and VL changes were examined. Fifty-three subjects enrolled, 12 on IDV/r, 33 on FPV/r, and 8 on LPV/r. Median changes (n-fold) (FC) of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) to the study PI were high. Median 2-week VL changes were -0.7, -0.1, and -1.0 log(10) for IDV/r, FPV/r, and LPV/r. With FPV/r, correlations between the IQ and the 2-week change in VL were significant (Spearman's r range, -0.39 to -0.50; P PI-experienced subjects with highly resistant HIV-1, short-term VL responses to RTV-enhanced FPV/r correlated best with baseline susceptibility. The IQ improved correlation in analyses of all arms where a greater range of virologic responses was observed.

  8. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zindel, Stephan; Kaman, Wendy E; Fröls, Sabrina; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Peters, Anna; Hays, John P; Fuchsbauer, Hans-Lothar

    2013-07-01

    A novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae was completely inhibited by 10 μM SPI. At this concentration of SPI, no cytotoxicity was observed. We conclude that SPI inhibits bacterial virulence factors and has the potential to become a novel therapeutic treatment against a range of unrelated pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Inhibition of dengue virus replication by novel inhibitors of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and protease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Sveva; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Coluccia, Antonio; La Regina, Giuseppe; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Famiglini, Valeria; Masci, Domiziana; Hiscott, John; Lee, Jin-Ching; Silvestri, Romano

    2017-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the leading mosquito-transmitted viral infection in the world. With more than 390 million new infections annually, and up to 1 million clinical cases with severe disease manifestations, there continues to be a need to develop new antiviral agents against dengue infection. In addition, there is no approved anti-DENV agents for treating DENV-infected patients. In the present study, we identified new compounds with anti-DENV replication activity by targeting viral replication enzymes - NS5, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and NS3 protease, using cell-based reporter assay. Subsequently, we performed an enzyme-based assay to clarify the action of these compounds against DENV RdRp or NS3 protease activity. Moreover, these compounds exhibited anti-DENV activity in vivo in the ICR-suckling DENV-infected mouse model. Combination drug treatment exhibited a synergistic inhibition of DENV replication. These results describe novel prototypical small anti-DENV molecules for further development through compound modification and provide potential antivirals for treating DENV infection and DENV-related diseases.

  10. BACE1 (β-Secretase) Inhibitors for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    BACE1 (β-secretase, memapsin 2, Asp2) has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease. BACE1 is an aspartic protease which functions in the first step of the pathway leading to the production and deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Its gene deletion showed only mild phenotypes. BACE1 inhibition has direct implications in the Alzheimer's Disease pathology without largely affecting viability. However, inhibiting BACE1 selectively in vivo has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. Since its identification in 2000, inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. These inhibitors can be largely classified as either peptidomimetic or non-peptidic inhibitors. Progress in these fields resulted in inhibitors that contain many targeted drug-like characteristics. In this review, we describe structure-based design strategies and evolution of a wide range of BACE1 inhibitors including compounds that have been shown to reduce brain Aβ, rescue the cognitive decline in transgenic AD mice and inhibitor drug candidates that are currently in clinical trials. PMID:24691405

  11. Correlation between the predicted and the observed biological activity of the symmetric and nonsymmetric cyclic urea derivatives used as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. A 3D-QSAR-CoMFA method for new antiviral drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Speranta; Svab, I; Bologa, C; Flonta, Maria-Luiza

    2003-01-01

    The predicted inhibition constant (Ki) and the predicted inhibitor concentration (IC90) of the HIV-1 protease (HIV- 1 PR) inhibitors: symmetric and nonsymmetric - benzyl, ketone, oxime, pyrazole, imidazole, and triazole cyclic urea derivatives, were obtained by the 3D-CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) method. The CoMFA statistical parameters: cross-validate correlation coefficient (q2), higher than 0.5, and the fitted correlation coefficient (r2), higher than 0.90 validated the predicted biological activities. The best predictions were found for the trifluoromethyl ketoxime derivative (log 1/Ki predict = 8.42), the m-pyridineCH2 pyrazole derivative (log 1/Ki predict = 9.77) and the 1,2,3 triazole derivative (log 1/Ki predict = 7.03). We attempted to design a new potent HIV-1 protease inhibitor by addition of o-benzyl to the (p-HOPhCH2) pyrazole 12f derivative inhibitor. A favorable steric area surrounded the o-benzyl, suggesting a possible new potent HIV-1 protease inhibitor.

  12. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome with osteoporosis and secondary adrenal failure in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors: six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Katherine; Pett, Sarah; Gowers, Andrew; McMurchie, Marilyn; Cooper, David A

    2005-07-01

    Ritonavir, a protease inhibitor (PI), is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 3A4. This pharmacological effect, even at low doses (Cushing's syndrome when treated with inhaled fluticasone at varying doses for asthma while concurrently treated with low-dose ritonavir-boosted PI antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens for HIV infection. There was evidence of adrenal suppression in all patients on stimulation studies. After the withdrawal of inhaled fluticasone, four patients became symptomatic of hypocortisolism, and three required oral corticosteroid support for several months. Other complications included evidence of osteoporosis (n = 3), crush fractures (n = 1), and exacerbation of preexisting type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 1). In part, the diagnosis of fluticasone-induced Cushing's syndrome was delayed because all patients had preexisting body composition changes of ART-associated lipodystrophy, masking the Cushing's features. Practitioners should be aware of the impact on the adrenal axis of coadministration of PI-based ART regimens with inhaled corticosteroids and the potential for exacerbating or even inducing other metabolic conditions, such as osteoporosis or diabetes.

  13. Concise and stereocontrolled synthesis of pseudo-C2-symmetric diamino alcohols and triamines for use in HIV protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Luca; Bonini, Bianca F; Dessole, Gabriella; Fochi, Mariafrancesca; Comes-Franchini, Mauro; Gavioli, Silvia; Ricci, Alfredo; Varchi, Greta

    2003-02-21

    A new protocol is described for the stereocontrolled synthesis of pseudo-C(2)-symmetric core units of interest as candidates for HIV protease inhibition. Addition of unbranched and branched organolithium reagents to cyanohydrins from l-phenylalaninal and l-isoleucinal, followed by in situ reduction of the intermediate imines and CHT deprotection under MW irradiation, led to 1,3-diamino alcohols 6a and 8a as the major products in satisfactory to good yields. The first preparation of a previously unreported pseudo-C(2)-symmetric triamino derivative was accomplished expeditiously via high-yielding nitro-Mannich addition of the silylnitronate, from 2-phenyl-1-nitroethane, to the PMP imine derived from l-phenylalaninal. Reduction of the nitro group in the moderately unstable nitro diamine adduct, followed by chromatographic separation of the required diastereoisomer and CHT debenzylation under MW irradiation, led to the 2-PMP-protected triamine 19 isolated as a bis(sulfonamide).

  14. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Elisabeth; Quercia, Romina; Glass, Bärbel; Descamps, Diane; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Hance, Allan J; Clavel, François

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to protease inhibitors (PI) results from mutations in the viral protease (PR) that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC). Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6) with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  15. Three novel clade B serine protease inhibitors from disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus: Molecular perspectives and responses to immune challenges and tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Godahewa, G I; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Chul; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2015-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs) control cellular protease activity in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. The immune and inflammatory responses of invertebrate clade B SERPINs have not been widely reported. In the present study, three proteins with high similarity to clade B SERPINs, referred to as AbSERPIN-1, AbSERPIN-2 and AbSERPIN-3, were identified from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus). While AbSERPIN-1 (399 aa) was of a typical size for this protein class, AbSERPIN-2 (506 aa) and AbSERPIN-3 (532 aa) were relatively larger. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the characteristic SERPIN domain in each AbSERPIN. In addition, the N-terminal region of both AbSERPIN-2 and AbSERPIN-3 contained a predicted low complexity region (LCR) and a signal peptide, suggesting that these proteins are secretory proteins and are, thus, novel peptides. Tertiary structural models of the AbSERPINs highlighted their structural and functional conservation. Ubiquitous expression of AbSERPIN transcripts was evaluated by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) analysis in seven tissue types. AbSERPIN-1, AbSERPIN-2, and AbSERPIN-3 transcript levels were highest in mantle, hemocytes, and muscles, respectively. Temporal expression analysis revealed that AbSERPINs were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in hemocytes during the early/middle stages following the injection of a bacterial pathogen (Vibrio parahaemolyticus or Listeria monocytogenes) or an immuno-stimulant (lipopolysaccharide). Moreover, mantle tissue injury led to significant changes in the temporal expression of AbSERPIN mRNA. Specifically, transcription of AbSERPIN-1 and AbSERPIN-3 was considerably up-regulated, while expression of AbSERPIN-2 was suppressed. These results suggest a potential role of AbSERPINs in response to pathogen invasion and tissue injury in disk abalone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors (PI results from mutations in the viral protease (PR that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC. Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6 with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  17. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/536

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Koltai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS, decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes.

  18. Complex Patterns of Protease Inhibitor Resistance among Antiretroviral Treatment-Experienced HIV-2 Patients from Senegal: Implications for Second-Line Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A.; Ba, Selly; Toure, Macoumba; Traore, Fatou; Sall, Fatima; Pan, Charlotte; Blankenship, Lindsey; Montano, Alexandra; Olson, Julia; Dia Badiane, Ndeye Mery; Mullins, James I.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Sow, Papa Salif; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) can effectively suppress HIV-2 plasma load and increase CD4 counts; however, not all PIs are equally active against HIV-2, and few data exist to support second-line therapy decisions. To identify therapeutic options for HIV-2 patients failing ART, we evaluated the frequency of PI resistance-associated amino acid changes in HIV-2 sequences from a cohort of 43 Senegalese individuals receiving unboosted indinavir (n = 18 subjects)-, lopinavir/ritonavir (n = 4)-, or indinavir and then lopinavir/ritonavir (n = 21)-containing ART. Common protease substitutions included V10I, V47A, I54M, V71I, I82F, I84V, L90M, and L99F, and most patients harbored viruses containing multiple changes. Based on genotypic data, we constructed a panel of 15 site-directed mutants of HIV-2ROD9 containing single- or multiple-treatment-associated amino acid changes in the protease-encoding region of pol. We then quantified the susceptibilities of the mutants to the HIV-2 “active” PIs saquinavir, lopinavir, and darunavir using a single-cycle assay. Relative to wild-type HIV-2, the V47A mutant was resistant to lopinavir (6.3-fold increase in the mean 50% effective concentration [EC50]), the I54M variant was resistant to darunavir and lopinavir (6.2- and 2.7-fold increases, respectively), and the L90M mutant was resistant to saquinavir (3.6-fold increase). In addition, the triple mutant that included I54M plus I84V plus L90M was resistant to all three PIs (31-, 10-, and 3.8-fold increases in the mean EC50 for darunavir, saquinavir, and lopinavir, respectively). Taken together, our data demonstrate that PI-treated HIV-2 patients frequently harbor viruses that exhibit complex patterns of PI cross-resistance. These findings suggest that sequential PI-based regimens for HIV-2 treatment may be ineffective. PMID:23571535

  19. In Silico Screening, Alanine Mutation, and DFT Approaches for Identification of NS2B/NS3 Protease Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Balajee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the ligand that binds to a target protein with high affinity is a nontrivial task in computer-assisted approaches. Antiviral drugs have been identified for NS2B/NS3 protease enzyme on the mechanism to cleave the viral protein using the computational tools. The consequence of the molecular docking, free energy calculations, and simulation protocols explores the better ligand. It provides in-depth structural insights with the catalytic triad of His51, Asp75, Ser135, and Gly133. The MD simulation was employed here to predict the stability of the complex. The alanine mutation has been performed and its stability was monitored by using the molecular dynamics simulation. The minimal RMSD value suggests that the derived complexes are close to equilibrium. The DFT outcome reveals that the HOMO-LUMO gap of Ligand19 is 2.86 kcal/mol. Among the considered ligands, Ligand19 shows the lowest gap and it is suggested that the HOMO of Ligand19 may transfer the electrons to the LUMO in the active regions. The calculated binding energy of Ligand19 using the DFT method is in good agreement with the docking studies. The pharmacological activity of ligand was performed and satisfies Lipinski rule of 5. Moreover, the computational results are compared with the available IC50 values of experimental results.

  20. Efficiency of a second-generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor studied by molecular dynamics and absolute binding free energy calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lepšík, Martin; Kříž, Z.; Havlas, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 57, - (2004), s. 279-293 ISSN 0887-3585 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032; GA MŠk LN00A016; GA ČR GA203/00/0828 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV * inhibitor * resistance Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.429, year: 2004

  1. Cystatins - Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    signal peptides) for cellular export following translation. Results indicating existence of systems for significant internalisation of type 2 cystatins from the extracellular to intracellular compartments are reviewed. Data showing that human neuroblastoma cell lines generally secrete high levels...... staining was observed. The simplistic denotation of the type 2 cystatins as extracellular inhibitors is thus challenged, and possible biological functions of the internalised cystatins are discussed. To illustrate the special case of high cellular cystatin content seen in cells of patients with hereditary...

  2. Predictive Value of Pharmacokinetics-Adjusted Phenotypic Susceptibility on Response to Ritonavir-Enhanced Protease Inhibitors (PIs) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects Failing Prior PI Therapy▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J.; Park, Jeong-Gun; Haubrich, Richard; Aweeka, Francesca; Bastow, Barbara; Pakes, Gary E.; Yu, Song; Wu, Hulin; Richman, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    The activities of protease inhibitors in vivo may depend on plasma concentrations and viral susceptibility. This nonrandomized, open-label study evaluated the relationship of the inhibitory quotient (IQ [the ratio of drug exposure to viral phenotypic susceptibility]) to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) change for ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs). Subjects on PI-based regimens replaced their PIs with ritonavir-enhanced indinavir (IDV/r) 800/200 mg, fosamprenavir (FPV/r) 700/100 mg, or lopinavir (LPV/r) 400/200 mg twice daily. Pharmacokinetics were assessed at day 14; follow-up lasted 24 weeks. Associations between IQ and VL changes were examined. Fifty-three subjects enrolled, 12 on IDV/r, 33 on FPV/r, and 8 on LPV/r. Median changes (n-fold) (FC) of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) to the study PI were high. Median 2-week VL changes were −0.7, −0.1, and −1.0 log10 for IDV/r, FPV/r, and LPV/r. With FPV/r, correlations between the IQ and the 2-week change in VL were significant (Spearman's r range, −0.39 to −0.50; P ≤ 0.029). The strongest correlation with response to FPV/r was the IC50 FC (r = 0.57; P = 0.001), which improved when only adherent subjects were included (r = 0.68; P = 0.001). In multivariable analyses of the FPV/r arm that included FC, one measure of the drug concentration, corresponding IQ, baseline VL, and CD4, the FC to FPV was the only significant predictor of VL decline (P < 0.001). In exploratory analyses of all arms, the area under the concentration-time curve IQ was correlated with the week 2 VL change (r = −0.72; P < 0.001). In conclusion, in PI-experienced subjects with highly resistant HIV-1, short-term VL responses to RTV-enhanced FPV/r correlated best with baseline susceptibility. The IQ improved correlation in analyses of all arms where a greater range of virologic responses was observed. PMID:19307363

  3. On the role of the R configuration of the reaction-intermediate isostere in HIV-1 protease-inhibitor binding: X-ray structure at 2.0 angstrom resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Petroková, Hana; Vondráčková, Eva; Hradilek, Martin; Konvalinka, Jan; Souček, Milan; Brynda, Jiří; Fábry, Milan; Sedláček, Juraj; Hašek, Jindřich

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 62, 5-6 (2006), s. 489-497 ISSN 0907-4449 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : human immunodeficiency virus -1 * protease * inhibitor Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2006

  4. Oxylipin mediated stress response of a miraculin-like protease inhibitor in Hexanoic acid primed eggplant plants infested by Colorado potato beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Galiano, M José; Ruiz-Arroyo, Víctor Manuel; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; Rausell, Carolina; Real, M Dolores; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Robles, Inmaculada

    2017-08-01

    Insect-plant interactions are governed by a complex equilibrium between the mechanisms through which plant recognize insect attack and orchestrate downstream signaling events that trigger plant defense responses, and the mechanisms by which insects overcome plant defenses. Due to this tight and dynamic interplay, insight into the nature of the plant defense response can be gained by analyzing changes in the insect herbivores digestive system upon plant feeding. In this work we have identified a Solanum melongena miraculin-like protease inhibitor in the midgut juice of Colorado potato larvae feeding on eggplant plants treated with the natural inducer of plant defenses hexanoic acid. We analyzed the corresponding gene expression by qRT-PCR and our results showed that this eggplant miraculin-like gene enhanced induction contributes to the hexanoic acid priming effect in this Solanaceae species. Moreover, our data evidencing that OPDA might be involved in this gene regulation highlights its potential as biomarker in eggplant plant responses to stress mediated this oxylipin signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches to elucidate the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV), a second-generation HIV protease inhibitor, is widely used across the world as an important component of HIV therapy. The interaction of DRV with bovine serum albumin (BSA), a major carrier protein, has been studied under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular modeling. Fluorescence data revealed that the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by DRV in terms of a static quenching procedure due to the formation of the DRV-BSA complex. The results indicated the presence of single weak affinity binding site ( 103 M- 1, 310 K) on protein. The thermodynamic parameters, namely enthalpy change (ΔH0), entropy change (ΔS0) and Gibbs free energy change (ΔG0) were calculated, which signified that the binding reaction was spontaneous, the main binding forces were hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Importantly, competitive binding experiments with three site probes, phenylbutazone (in sub-domain IIA, site I), ibuprofen (in sub-domain IIIA, site II) and artemether (in the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB, site II'), suggested that DRV was preferentially bound to the hydrophobic cavity in site II' of BSA, and this finding was validated by the docking results. Additionally, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and Resonance Rayleigh Scattering (RRS) spectroscopy gave qualitative information on the conformational changes of BSA upon adding DRV, while quantitative data were obtained with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  6. Regulation of visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor by nutritional status, metformin, gender and pituitary factors in rat white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C R; Caminos, J E; Vázquez, M J; Garcés, M F; Cepeda, L A; Angel, A; González, A C; García-Rendueles, M E; Sangiao-Alvarellos, S; López, M; Bravo, S B; Nogueiras, R; Diéguez, C

    2009-07-15

    Visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor (vaspin) is a recently discovered adipocytokine mainly secreted from visceral adipose tissue, which plays a main role in insulin sensitivity. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of vaspin gene expression in rat white adipose tissue (WAT) in different physiological (nutritional status, pregnancy, age and gender) and pathophysiological (gonadectomy, thyroid status and growth hormone deficiency) settings known to be associated with energy homeostasis and alterations in insulin sensitivity. We have determined vaspin gene expression by real-time PCR. Vaspin was decreased after fasting and its levels were partially recovered after leptin treatment. Chronic treatment with metformin increased vaspin gene expression. Vaspin mRNA expression reached the highest peak at 45 days in both sexes after birth and its expression was higher in females than males, but its levels did not change throughout pregnancy. Finally, decreased levels of growth hormone and thyroid hormones suppressed vaspin expression. These findings suggest that WAT vaspin mRNA expression is regulated by nutritional status, and leptin seems to be the nutrient signal responsible for those changes. Vaspin is influenced by age and gender, and its expression is increased after treatment with insulin sensitizers. Finally, alterations in pituitary functions modify vaspin levels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating vaspin will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Specific Detection of Naturally Occurring Hepatitis C Virus Mutants with Resistance to Telaprevir and Boceprevir (Protease Inhibitors) among Treatment-Naïve Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra Yolanda; Rivera-Osorio, Pilar; Vazquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Ruíz-Pacheco, Juan Alberto; Cazares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The use of telaprevir and boceprevir, both protease inhibitors (PI), as part of the specifically targeted antiviral therapy for hepatitis C (STAT-C) has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR) rates. However, different clinical studies have also identified several mutations associated with viral resistance to both PIs. In the absence of selective pressure, drug-resistant hepatitis C virus (HCV) mutants are generally present at low frequency, making mutation detection challenging. Here, we describe a mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR method for the specific detection of naturally occurring drug-resistant HCV mutants. MAMA PCR successfully identified the corresponding HCV variants, while conventional methods such as direct sequencing, endpoint limiting dilution (EPLD), and bacterial cloning were not sensitive enough to detect circulating drug-resistant mutants in clinical specimens. Ultradeep pyrosequencing was used to confirm the presence of the corresponding HCV mutants. In treatment-naïve patients, the frequency of all resistant variants was below 1%. Deep amplicon sequencing allowed a detailed analysis of the structure of the viral population among these patients, showing that the evolution of the NS3 is limited to a rather small sequence space. Monitoring of HCV drug resistance before and during treatment is likely to provide important information for management of patients undergoing anti-HCV therapy. PMID:22116161

  8. Long-term clinical outcome of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with discordant immunologic and virologic responses to a protease inhibitor-containing regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piketty, C; Weiss, L; Thomas, F; Mohamed, A S; Belec, L; Kazatchkine, M D

    2001-05-01

    Within a prospective cohort of 150 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients who began first-line protease inhibitor therapy in 1996, the outcome of 42 patients with discrepant virologic and immunologic responses to antiretroviral treatment at 12 months was analyzed at 30 months of treatment. The incidence of AIDS-defining events and deaths (14%) in the group of patients with immunologic responses in the absence of a virologic response was higher than that in full-responder patients (2%); yet, the incidence in this group was lower than that in patients with no immunologic response, despite a virologic response (21%), and was lower than that in patients without an immunologic or virologic response (67%; P<.0001, log-rank test). Differences in outcome were significant (relative risk, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-39.3) when factors for progression were compared with those of responder patients. The results support the relevance of the CD4 cell marker over plasma HIV load for predicting clinical outcome in patients who do not achieve full immunologic and virologic responses.

  9. Discovery of unsymmetrical aromatic disulfides as novel inhibitors of SARS-CoV main protease: Chemical synthesis, biological evaluation, molecular docking and 3D-QSAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Bao, Bo-Bo; Song, Guo-Qing; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Xu-Meng; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zefang; Cai, Yan; Li, Shuang; Fu, Sheng; Song, Fu-Hang; Yang, Haitao; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-08

    The worldwide outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003 had caused a high rate of mortality. Main protease (M pro ) of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is an important target to discover pharmaceutical compounds for the therapy of this life-threatening disease. During the course of screening new anti-SARS agents, we have identified that a series of unsymmetrical aromatic disulfides inhibited SARS-CoV M pro significantly for the first time. Herein, 40 novel unsymmetrical aromatic disulfides were synthesized chemically and their biological activities were evaluated in vitro against SARS-CoV M pro . These novel compounds displayed excellent IC 50 data in the range of 0.516-5.954 μM. Preliminary studies indicated that these disulfides are reversible and mpetitive inhibitors. A possible binding mode was generated via molecular docking simulation and a comparative field analysis (CoMFA) model was constructed to understand the structure-activity relationships. The present research therefore has provided some meaningful guidance to design and identify anti-SARS drugs with totally new chemical structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness and safety of first-generation protease inhibitors in real-world patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection in Brazil: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Azevedo Callefi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of first-generation protease inhibitors for the treatment of genotype 1 hepatitis C virus-infected patients at Brazilian reference centers. METHODS: This multicenter cross-sectional study included hepatitis C virus genotype 1 monoinfected patients treated with Peg-interferon, ribavirin, and either boceprevir (n=158 or telaprevir (n=557 between July 2013 and April 2014 at 15 reference centers in Brazil. Demographic, clinical, virological, and adverse events data were collected during treatment and follow-up. RESULTS: Of the 715 patients, 59% had cirrhosis and 67.1% were treatment-experienced. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, the overall sustained viral response was 56.6%, with similar effectiveness in both groups (51.9% for boceprevir and 58% for telaprevir, p=0.190. Serious adverse events occurred in 44.2% of patients, and six deaths (0.8% were recorded. Cirrhotic patients had lower sustained viral response rates than non-cirrhotic patients (46.9% vs. 70.6%, p65 years, diagnosis of cirrhosis, and abnormal hemoglobin levels/platelet counts prior to treatment were associated with serious adverse events. CONCLUSION: Although serious adverse events rates were higher in this infected population, sustained viral response rates were similar to those reported for other patient cohorts.

  11. Prevention of perinatal HIV I transmission by protease inhibitor based triple drug antiretroviral therapy versus nevirapine as single dose at the time of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, Meenakshi; Bajpai, Smrati; Choudhary, Ashwini; Pazare, Amar

    2012-12-01

    In India, parent to child transmission is the most important source of HIV infection in children below fifteen years of age. Transmission of HIV from mother to child can occur even at low or undetectable HIV virus levels. CD4 count or HIV RNA levels should not be the determining factor when deciding whether to use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. Use of single dose nevirapine during labour, in prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT) programme for pregnant females with CD4 count > 250 cells/cumm has less efficacy in reducing perinatal transmission. And there are high chances of development of nevirapine resistance to both mother and baby after single dose nevirapine exposure. Short course Protease inhibitor(PI) based triple drug combination ART from 28 weeks till delivery for perinatal prophylaxis is effective in reducing perinatal HIV transmission. PI's are safe in pregnancy and also have less chances of development of resistance when used for perinatal prophylaxis and stopped post delivery.Hence, it is opined that PI based combination ART should be offered to pregnant females in PPTCT programme, thereby preventing occurrence of paediatric HIV infection in India. This can have significant impact on the society at large.

  12. Selective killing of human immunodeficiency virus infected cells by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-induced activation of HIV protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeulders Liesbeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current antiretroviral therapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 reduces viral load and thereby prevents viral spread, but it cannot eradicate proviral genomes from infected cells. Cells in immunological sanctuaries as well as cells producing low levels of virus apparently contribute to a reservoir that maintains HIV persistence in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thus, accelerated elimination of virus producing cells may represent a complementary strategy to control HIV infection. Here we sought to exploit HIV protease (PR related cytotoxicity in order to develop a strategy for drug induced killing of HIV producing cells. PR processes the viral Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins during virus maturation, but is also implicated in killing of virus producing cells through off-target cleavage of host proteins. It has been observed previously that micromolar concentrations of certain non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs can stimulate intracellular PR activity, presumably by enhancing Gag-Pol dimerization. Results Using a newly developed cell-based assay we compared the degree of PR activation displayed by various NNRTIs. We identified inhibitors showing higher potency with respect to PR activation than previously described for NNRTIs, with the most potent compounds resulting in ~2-fold increase of the Gag processing signal at 250 nM. The degree of enhancement of intracellular Gag processing correlated with the compound's ability to enhance RT dimerization in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Compounds were analyzed for their potential to mediate specific killing of chronically infected MT-4 cells. Levels of cytotoxicity on HIV infected cells determined for the different NNRTIs corresponded to the relative degree of drug induced intracellular PR activation, with CC50 values ranging from ~0.3 μM to above the tested concentration range (10 μM. Specific cytotoxicity was reverted by addition

  13. AVE 0991, a non-peptide Mas-receptor agonist, facilitates penile erection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Gonçalves, Andrey C; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Leite, Romulo; Santos, Robson A S

    2013-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system plays a crucial role in erectile function. It has been shown that elevated levels of angiotensin II contribute to the development of erectile dysfunction both in humans and in aminals. On the contrary, the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) appears to mediate penile erection by activation of the Mas receptor. Recently, we have shown that the erectile function of Mas gene-deleted mice was substantially reduced, which was associated with a marked increase in fibrous tissue in the corpus cavernosum. We have hypothesized that the synthetic non-peptide Mas agonist, AVE 0991, would potentiate penile erectile function. We showed that intracavernosal injection of AVE 0991 potentiated the erectile response of anaesthetized Wistar rats, measured as the ratio between corpus cavernosum pressure and mean arterial pressure, upon electrical stimulation of the major pelvic ganglion. The facilitatory effect of AVE 0991 on erectile function was dose dependent and completely blunted by the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, l-NAME. Importantly, concomitant intracavernosal infusion of the specific Mas receptor blocker, A-779, abolished the effect of AVE 0991. We demonstrated that AVE 0991 potentiates the penile erectile response through Mas in an NO-dependent manner. Importantly, these results suggest that Mas agonists, such as AVE 0991, might have significant therapeutic benefits for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

  14. Recent Development of Non-Peptide GnRH Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ling Tukun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone, also referred to as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with the sequence (pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2 plays an important role in regulating the reproductive system. It stimulates differential release of the gonadotropins FSH and LH from pituitary tissue. To date, treatment of hormone-dependent diseases targeting the GnRH receptor, including peptide GnRH agonist and antagonists are now available on the market. The inherited issues associate with peptide agonists and antagonists have however, led to significant interest in developing orally active, small molecule, non-peptide antagonists. In this review, we will summarize all developed small molecule GnRH antagonists along with the most recent clinical data and therapeutic applications.

  15. Circulating levels of matrix proteases and their inhibitors in pregnant women with and without a history of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumba, Dilly O C; El Gelany, Saad; Elliott, Sarah L; Li, Tin C

    2010-06-16

    We have recently shown that serum relaxin-2 levels are attenuated in women with a history of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). We sought to determine whether a history of RPL is also associated with changes in serum matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMP) -1 and -2. We obtained serum from 20 pregnant women with a history of RPL and 20 age-matched pregnant women with no history of RPL (NRPL) at 6-8, 10-12, 20, and 34 weeks gestation, and from cord blood. We quantified total serum concentrations of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 by ELISA. We determined whether these serum marker levels were associated with a history of RPL and delivery before 37 weeks gestation. There was no difference in the rates of miscarriage, preterm birth or prelabour rupture of fetal membranes between RPL and NRPL. However babies born to RPL were lighter than those born to NRPL. Serum MMP-1, 9, and TIMP-1 did not differ between RPL and NRPL but MMP-3 was higher in RPL vs. NRPL at 6-8 weeks (P history of RPL than either peptide separately - area under the ROC curves for RLX-2 0.79 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.92), TIMP-2 0.83 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.95), and for RLX-2:TIMP-2 ratio 0.92 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.99). Women with a history of RPL demonstrate increased serum TIMP-2 and reduced RLX-2 during a subsequent viable pregnancy. Determination of both markers in early pregnancy enhances the discrimination of women with a history of RPL. These observations suggest roles for these two peptides in early implantation and placental development. Whether these may prove to be reliable early predictive markers for subsequent pregnancy loss in the index pregnancy is unknown and will require further studies.

  16. Effects of urinary protease inhibitor on inflammatory response during on-pump coronary revascularisation. Effect of ulinastatin on inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingyang, J; Jinping, L; Mingzheng, L; Guyan, W; Zhengyi, F

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac surgery in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) provokes a vigorous inflammatory response with substantial clinical implications. Once the inflammatory response is triggered by CPB, leukocytes and platelets are activated by multiple stimuli. The administration of a urinary trypsin inhibitor (ulinastatin) during CPB is hypothesized to reduce cytokine release and platelet activation and to decrease pulmonary injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the influence of high-dose ulinastatin on cytokines and platelet activation and on respiratory function during and after CPB. In this pilot, prospective, randomized and double-blinded study, 30 first-time three-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD) patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) were randomly divided into 2 groups: U group (n=15) received a total dose of 1000000 U ulinastatin and C group (n=15) received placebo. Blood samples were withdrawn from the central vein to measure polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase (PMNE), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), before induction, 30 min following clamping (T2), reperfusion 3 h (T3), reperfusion 6 h (T4) and reperfusion 12 h (T5). Whole blood samples were taken for CD62P immediately before induction (as baseline), at the end of CPB (before protamine administration), 1 h after heparin neutralization by protamine and 24 h after the operation. In addition, alveolo-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO(2)) in pulmonary gas exchange function was calculated by obtaining arterial blood gas samples before and after CPB. There were no differences in preoperative parameters between the groups. After CPB, the levels of PMNE, TNF-alfa, IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups over baseline values (P<0.01). The levels of PMNE, TNF-alfa, IL-6 and IL-8 in U group were significantly lower than those in C group (P<0.05). No significant differences in CD62p expression between the 2 groups

  17. Disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) expresses a novel antistasin-like serine protease inhibitor: Molecular cloning and immune response against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Oh, Chulhong; Lee, Youngdeuk; Ekanayake, Prashani Mudika; Whang, Ilson; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jehee

    2010-04-01

    A novel antistasin-like cDNA homologue named as Ab-Antistasin was isolated from the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus normalized cDNA library. The Ab-Antistasin (1398-bp) consisted of an 1185-bp open reading frame encoding 395 amino acid (aa) residues. The predicted molecular mass and isoelectric point of Ab-Antistasin was 44 kDa and 8.5, respectively, and showed highest identity (23.1%) to Hydra magnipapillata antistasin. The most striking feature of Ab-Antistasin is the 12-fold internal repeats (IR) of an antistasin-like domain. Ten of the 12 IR domains (26-27 aa) are highly conserved, with 6 cysteines and 1 glycine. Ab-Antistasin was comprised of three Bowman-Birk serine protease inhibitor family motifs. The recombinant Ab-Antistasin (rAb-Antistasin) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using a pMAL system. rAb-Antistasin (10 microM) was able to inhibit trypsin activity by 66% in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, it exhibited low prolongation activity for coagulation in an APTT assay (86.0 s compared to control 42.0 s) with human blood. Endogenous Ab-Antistasin mRNA was found to be expressed in digestive tract, hepatopancreas, hemocytes, abductor muscle and mantle, with highest expression levels in digestive tract followed by hepatopancreas and hemocytes. Quantitative real time PCR results revealed that Ab-Antistasin transcription was significantly induced at 3 h post-infection (p.i.) after challenged by a mixture of bacteria (Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Listeria monocytogenes) in the abalone digestive tract; in the hemocytes, induction occurred at 6 and 12 h. The results indicated that Ab-Antistasin could play an important role in the immune responses of mollusks. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI Decreased the Celluler Expression of NF-Kβ and IL-1β on Wound Macrophages of Rattus novergicus Post Tooth Extraction

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    Agustine Hanafi Putri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of tooth extraction or dental surgery was 48.5% of all dental care in Indonesia. Tooth extraction carries potential health risks and side effects such as pain, swelling, trismus and dysfunction of the oral cavity during recovery. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is one of innate immunity proteins that can inhibit the activation of macrophages. We are expecting the provision of SLPI can decrease excessive inflammatory response in healing after tooth extraction. This study was to investigate the administration of SLPI on cellular expression of NF-Kβ and IL-1β on wound macrophages of Rattus novergicus post tooth extraction. The research design is in vivo experimental study. In total, 20 rats were randomly divided into four groups (each group n=5 and underwent tooth extraction on left incisor teeth of mandible. One of the groups did not receive SLPI administration (control group and the socket was stitched after tooth extraction. Meanwhile, the remaining three groups (experimental groups were given SLPI administration after tooth extraction with three different doses (0.1 µM, 0.5 µM and 2.5 µM, respectively. After SLPI administration, the socket of experimental groups was stitched. The effects of SLPI administration were evaluated by counting at the percentage of NF-Kβ translocation and the expression of expression of IL-1 in macrophages cells of the rat socket using immunohistochemistry analysis. The cellular expression of NF-Kβ and IL-1β were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 on groups with SLPI may decrease cellular expression of NF-Kβ and IL-1β on wound macrophages cells of rats post tooth extraction in a dosedependent manner.

  19. Factors associated with clinical, immunological and virological responses in protease-inhibitor-experienced brazilian children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy containing Lopinavir-Ritonavir

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    Daisy Maria Machado

    Full Text Available This study evaluates clinical, virological and immunological responses to antiretroviral (ARV therapy based on Lopinavir/ritonovir (LPV/r in previously protease -inhibitor-experienced children. The study included 29 Brazilian children (median age = 5.91 years who had failed previous ARV therapy and had begun a regimen based on LPV/r. At 12 months follow-up, a good virological response to LPV/r therapy was defined as achieving an undetectable viral load or as a decrease in plasma HIV RNA levels to > 1 log. A good immunological response was defined as an increase in CD4+ cell count from baseline sufficient to attain a better CDC immune stage classification. The number of infectious episodes 12 months before and 12 months after beginning LPV/r was assessed. Sixteen (55.2% and 19 (65.5% of 29 patients exhibited good virological and immunological responses, respectively. Baseline CD4+ values (>500 predicted both virological and immunological responses (p<0.05. Older children were less likely to develop an immunological response (p<0.001 than younger children. Nine children receiving 3 ARV drugs plus LPV/r showed an immunological response (100% compared to 10/20 (50% children receiving 2 drugs plus LPV/r (p=0.01. A lower number (n<5 of infectious episodes was noted after 12 months follow-up in children using the LPV/r regimen (p=0.006. There was a positive correlation between children whose baseline CD4+ values were greater than 500 cells/mm³ and virological responses. Although virological responses to therapy were seen in about half the children (55.2%, the use of HAART containing LPV/r provided clinical and immmunological benefits.

  20. Predictors of early treatment discontinuation and severe anemia in a Brazilian cohort of hepatitis C patients treated with first-generation protease inhibitors

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    N. Miotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for adverse events (AE-related treatment discontinuation and severe anemia among patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infection, treated with first-generation protease inhibitor (PI-based therapy. We included all patients who initiated treatment with PI-based therapy at a Brazilian university hospital between November 2013 and December 2014. We prospectively collected data from medical records using standardized questionnaires and used Epi Info 6.0 for analysis. Severe anemia was defined as hemoglobin ≤8.5 mg/dL. We included 203 patients: 132 treated with telaprevir (TVR and 71 treated with boceprevir (BOC. AE-related treatment discontinuation rate was 19.2% and anemia was the main reason (38.5%. Risk factors for treatment discontinuation were higher comorbidity index (OR=1.85, CI=1.05-3.25 for BOC, and higher bilirubin count (OR=1.02, CI=1.01-1.04 and lower BMI (OR=0.98, CI=0.96-0.99 for TVR. Severe anemia occurred in 35 (17.2% patients. Risk factors for this outcome were lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; OR=0.95, CI=0.91-0.98 for patients treated with TVR, and higher comorbidity index (OR=2.21, CI=1.04-4.67 and ribavirin dosage (OR=0.84, CI=0.72-0.99 for those treated with BOC. Fifty-five (57.3% patients treated with TVR and 15 (27.3% patients treated with BOC achieved sustained virological response (SVR. Among patients who received TVR and interrupted treatment due to AE (n=19, only 26.3% (n=5 achieved SVR (P=0.003. Higher number of comorbidities, lower eGFR and advanced liver disease are associated with severe anemia and early treatment cessation, which may compromise SVR achievement.

  1. Virologic failure of protease inhibitor-based second-line antiretroviral therapy without resistance in a large HIV treatment program in South Africa.

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    Julie H Levison

    Full Text Available We investigated the prevalence of wild-type virus (no major drug resistance and drug resistance mutations at second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART failure in a large HIV treatment program in South Africa.HIV-infected patients ≥ 15 years of age who had failed protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line ART (2 consecutive HIV RNA tests >1000 copies/ml on lopinavir/ritonavir, didanosine, and zidovudine were identified retrospectively. Patients with virologic failure were continued on second-line ART. Genotypic testing for drug resistance was performed on frozen plasma samples obtained closest to and after the date of laboratory confirmed second-line ART failure. Of 322 HIV-infected patients on second-line ART, 43 were adults with confirmed virologic failure, and 33 had available plasma for viral sequencing. HIV-1 RNA subtype C predominated (n = 32, 97%. Mean duration on ART (SD prior to initiation of second-line ART was 23 (17 months, and time from second-line ART initiation to failure was 10 (9 months. Plasma samples were obtained 7(9 months from confirmed failure. At second-line failure, 22 patients (67% had wild-type virus. There was no major resistance to PIs found. Eleven of 33 patients had a second plasma sample taken 8 (5.5 months after the first. Median HIV-1 RNA and the genotypic resistance profile were unchanged.Most patients who failed second-line ART had wild-type virus. We did not observe evolution of resistance despite continuation of PI-based ART after failure. Interventions that successfully improve adherence could allow patients to continue to benefit from second-line ART therapy even after initial failure.

  2. Cystatins--Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte K; Wassélius, Johan; Ekström, Ulf; Abrahamson, Magnus

    2010-11-01

    Cystatins are present in mammals, birds, fish, insects, plants, fungi and protozoa and constitute a large protein family, with most members sharing a cysteine protease inhibitory function. In humans 12 functional cystatins exist, forming three groups based on molecular organisation and distribution in the organism. The type 1 cystatins (A and B) are known as intracellular, type 2 cystatins (C, D, E/M, F, G, S, SN and SA) extracellular and type 3 cystatins (L- and H-kininogen) intravascular proteins. The present paper is focused on the human cystatins and especially those of type 2, which are directed (with signal peptides) for cellular export following translation. Results indicating existence of systems for significant internalisation of type 2 cystatins from the extracellular to intracellular compartments are reviewed. Data showing that human neuroblastoma cell lines generally secrete high levels, but also contain high amounts of cystatin C are presented. Culturing of these cells in medium containing cystatin C at concentrations found in body fluids resulted in increased intracellular cystatin C, as a result of an uptake process. At immunofluorescence cytochemistry a pronounced vesicular cystatin C staining was observed. The simplistic denotation of the type 2 cystatins as extracellular inhibitors is thus challenged, and possible biological functions of the internalised cystatins are discussed. To illustrate the special case of high cellular cystatin content seen in cells of patients with hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy, expression vectors for wild-type and L68Q mutated cystatin C were used to transfect SK-N-BE(2) cells. Clones overexpressing the two variants showed increased secreted levels of cystatin C. Within the cells the L68Q variant appeared to mainly localise to the endoplasmic reticulum rather than to acidic vesicular organelles, indicating limitations in the transport out from the cell rather than increased uptake as explanation for the

  3. Pepper pathogenesis-related protein 4c is a plasma membrane-localized cysteine protease inhibitor that is required for plant cell death and defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) type III effector AvrBsT triggers programmed cell death (PCD) and activates the hypersensitive response (HR) in plants. Here, we isolated and identified the plasma membrane localized pathogenesis-related (PR) protein 4c gene (CaPR4c) from pepper (Capsicum annuum) leaves undergoing AvrBsT-triggered HR cell death. CaPR4c encodes a protein with a signal peptide and a Barwin domain. Recombinant CaPR4c protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited cysteine protease-inhibitor activity and ribonuclease (RNase) activity. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that CaPR4c localized to the plasma membrane in plant cells. CaPR4c expression was rapidly and specifically induced by avirulent Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient expression of CaPR4c caused HR cell death in pepper leaves, which was accompanied by enhanced accumulation of H2 O2 and significant induction of some defense-response genes. Deletion of the signal peptide from CaPR4c abolished the induction of HR cell death, indicating a requirement for plasma membrane localization of CaPR4c for HR cell death. CaPR4c silencing in pepper disrupted both basal and AvrBsT-triggered resistance responses, and enabled Xcv proliferation in infected leaves. H2 O2 accumulation, cell-death induction, and defense-response gene expression were distinctly reduced in CaPR4c-silenced pepper. CaPR4c overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred greater resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. These results collectively suggest that CaPR4c plays an important role in plant cell death and defense signaling. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Role of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Testing in the Era of Direct Acting Antiviral Therapies: What We Can Learn from the Protease Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh Thuy Nguyen

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antiviral (DAA therapies have revolutionised the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV. The financial cost of DAAs however is significant, and first generation protease inhibitors (PIs also require frequent monitoring of viral RNA levels to guide treatment. In this context, we examined the relevance of HCV antigen testing to evaluate the potential role in monitoring virological response to HCV antiviral treatment with the PI-based triple therapies, telaprevir (TVR and boceprevir (BOC. Chronic HCV-infected individuals (n = 152 enrolled in the Irish Hepatitis C Outcomes Research Network (ICORN study were prospectively analysed for baseline markers and the early viral kinetics associated with SVR. The sustained virological response (SVR rates in the cohort receiving TVR and BOC were 87.3% and 73.8%, respectively. Baseline factors associated with successful outcome in TVR therapy were age (P = 0.0098, IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0330 and viral load (P = 0.0456. RNA level at week 4 (P = 0.0068 and viral antigen negativity at week 2 (P = 0.0359 were predictive of SVR for TVR-based therapy. In BOC therapy, prior interferon treatment (P = 0.0209 and IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0410 were baseline predictors of SVR. Evidence of viraemia based either on viral RNA or antigen at week 4 predicted SVR in these patients. Our data showed that rapid decline of HCV antigen to negative level at week 2 in TVR treatment and <0.96 log fmol/l in BOC treatment after commencement of PI triple therapy were associated with SVR. HCV antigen measurement should be considered as a potential alternative for monitoring treatment response during DAA-based regimens.

  5. Ulinastatin, a protease inhibitor, may inhibit allogeneic blood transfusion-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines and systemic inflammatory response syndrome and improve postoperative recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Haihua; Liu, Kuanzhi; He, Qiulan; Zhong, Fei; Yang, Lu; Li, Qiaobo; Liu, Weifeng; Ye, Fang; Huang, Wenqi

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ulinastatin, a protease inhibitor, and blood transfusion on perioperative surgical complications, changes of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, and levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in patients undergoing liver resection. Materials and methods Patients aged 18–65 years were enrolled and divided into four groups (12 patients in each group): a control group, a group given ulinastatin (UTI group), a group given blood transfusion (BT group), and a group given both blood transfusion and ulinastatin (BT+UTI group). Patients were randomised to receive ulinastatin or not, whereas blood transfusion was administered based on a transfusion trigger. Ulinastatin was given at a dose of 100,000 units/10 kg, infused 15 min before allogeneic blood transfusion or after completion of the liver resection. The patients were followed up for 3 days to record surgical complications, SIRS scores and levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Results Forty-four patients were included in the data analysis. The SIRS rate (SIRS scores ≥2) was significantly higher in the BT groups than in the control group at 6 hours and on day 3 after surgery and was significantly lower in the BT+UTI group than in the BT group on day 3 after surgery. Allogeneic blood transfusion significantly increased and ulinastatin significantly decreased postoperative levels of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. The length of stay in hospital was significantly longer in the BT groups than in the control group but was not significantly different between the BT+UTI and BT groups. Conclusion A single dose of ulinastatin before allogeneic blood transfusion may lower the rate of postoperative SIRS and levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α associated with allogeneic blood transfusion and improve patients’ postoperative recovery. PMID:23736923

  6. Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Icon View public health webinars on blood disorders Inhibitors Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... because treatment of bleeds becomes less effective. About Inhibitors People with hemophilia, and many with VWD type ...

  7. The prevalence of the pre-existing hepatitis C viral variants and the evolution of drug resistance in patients treated with the NS3-4a serine protease inhibitor telaprevir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Some patients experience viral breakthrough, which has been shown to be associated with emergence of telaprevir-resistant HCV variants during treatment. The exact mechanisms underlying the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants during dosing are not fully understood. In this paper, we develop a two-strain model to study the pre-treatment prevalence of the mutant virus and derive an analytical solution of the mutant frequency after administration of the protease inhibitor. Our analysis suggests that the rapid increase of the mutant frequency during therapy is not due to mutant growth but rather due to the rapid and profound loss of wild-type virus, which uncovers the pre-existing mutant variants. We examine the effects of backward mutation and hepatocyte proliferation on the pre-existence of the mutant virus and the competition between wild-type and drug resistant virus during therapy. We then extend the simple model to a general model with multiple viral strains. Mutations during therapy do not play a significant role in the dynamics of various viral strains, although they are capable of generating low levels of HCV variants that would otherwise be completely suppressed because of fitness disadvantages. Hepatocyte proliferation may not affect the pretreatment frequency of mutant variants, but is able to influence the quasispecies dynamics during therapy. It is the relative fitness of each mutant strain compared with wild-type that determines which strain(s) will dominate the virus population. The study provides a theoretical framework for exploring the prevalence of pre-existing mutant variants and the evolution of drug resistance during treatment with other protease inhibitors or HCV polymerase inhibitors.

  8. Positive Virological Outcomes of HIV-Infected Patients on Protease Inhibitor-Based Second-Line Regimen in Cambodia: The ANRS 12276 2PICAM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Ségéral

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAssessment of virological outcomes among HIV-infected patients receiving protease (PR inhibitor-based second-line regimen are uncommon in Cambodia. The objective of this study is to assess the virological effectiveness of this regimen as well as impact of adherence boosting for patients experiencing virological failure.MethodsThe 2PICAM study (Clinicaltrial: NCT01801618 is a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults on PR inhibitor-based second-line regimen since at least 6 months, conducted in 13 representative sites, comprising more than 90% of the target population. Adults with HIV RNA above 250 copies/mL (threshold of the assay at inclusion received boosted adherence counseling during 3 months followed by HIV RNA control. For confirmed virological failure, genotype resistance test was performed and expert committee used results for therapeutic decision.ResultsAmong the 1,317 adults enrolled, the median duration of second-line regimen was 5 years. At inclusion, 1,182 (89.7% patients achieved virological success (<250 copies/mL and 135 (10.3% experienced a virological failure (>250 copies/mL. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with virological success were: CD4 cell count between 201 and 350/mm3 (OR: 4.66, 95% CI: 2.57–8.47, p < 0.0001 and >350/mm3 (OR: 6.67, 95% CI: 4.02–11.06, p < 0.0001, duration of PI-based regimen >2 years (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.03–2.62, p = 0.037, ATV-containing regimen (0R: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.04–2.63, p = 0.034 and high level of adherence (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.07–5.41, p = 0.033. After adherence counseling, 63 (46.7% patients were rescued while 72 (53.3% were not. For the 54 patients with genotype resistance tests available, high or intermediate levels of resistance to lopinavir, atazanavir, and darunavir were reported for 13 (24%, 12 (22.2%, and 2 (3.7% patients, respectively. Change to an alternative PR inhibitor-based regimen was recommended for 17

  9. Earthworm Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Pan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The alimentary tract of earthworm secretes a group of proteases with a relative wide substrate specificity. In 1983, six isozymes were isolated from earthworm with fibrinolytic activities and called fibriniolytic enzymes. So far, more isozymes have been found from different earthworm species such as Lumbricus rubellus and Eisenia fetida. For convenience, the proteases are named on the basis of the earthworm species and the protein function, for instance, Eisenia fetida protease (EfP. The proteases have the abilities not only to hydrolyze fibrin and other protein, but also activate proenzymes such as plasminogen and prothrombin. In the light of recent studies, eight of the EfPs contain oligosaccharides chains which are thought to support the enzyme structure. Interestingly, EfP-II has a broader substrate specificity presenting alkaline trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities, but EfP-III-1 has a stricter specificity. The protein crystal structures show the characteristics in their specificities. Earthworm proteases have been applied in several areas such as clinical treatment of clotting diseases, anti-tumor study, environmental protection and nutritional production. The current clinical utilizations and some potential new applications of the earthworm protease will be discussed in this paper.

  10. Earthworm Protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, R.; Zhang, Z.; He, R.

    2010-01-01

    The alimentary tract of earthworm secretes a group of proteases with a relative wide substrate specificity. In 1983, six isozymes were isolated from earthworm with fibrinolytic activities and called fibrinolytic enzymes. So far, more isozymes have been found from different earthworm species such as Lumbricus rubellus and Eisenia fetida. For convenience, the proteases are named on the basis of the earthworm species and the protein function, for instance, Eisenia fetida protease (EfP). The proteases have the abilities not only to hydrolyze fibrin and other protein, but also activate pro enzymes such as plasminogen and prothrombin. In the light of recent studies, eight of the EfPs contain oligosaccharides chains which are thought to support the enzyme structure. Interestingly, EfP-II has a broader substrate specificity presenting alkaline trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities, but EfP-III-1 has a stricter specificity. The protein crystal structures show the characteristics in their specificities. Earthworm proteases have been applied in several areas such as clinical treatment of clotting diseases, anti-tumor study, environmental protection and nutritional production. The current clinical utilizations and some potential new applications of the earthworm protease will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Evaluation of a D-amino-acid-containing fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide library for profiling prokaryotic proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Voskamp-Visser, I.; de Jongh, D.M.C.; Endtz, H.P.; van Belkum, A.; Hays, J.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial proteases play an important role in a broad spectrum of processes, including colonization, proliferation, and virulence. In this respect, bacterial proteases are potential biomarkers for bacterial diagnosis and targets for novel therapeutic protease inhibitors. To investigate these

  12. Efeito do inibidor de protease Kunitz sobre níveis de lipoxigenases em sementes de soja Effect of protease inhibitor on the levels of lipoxygenase in soybean seeds

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    Josie Gomes de Almeida Barros

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available As lipoxigenases (LOX são responsáveis pelo "beany flavor", sabor característico da soja [Glycine max. (L. Merrill], que é o maior obstáculo ao consumo da soja nos países ocidentais. O inibidor de tripsina Kunitz (KTI é responsável por 80% da inibição da atividade tríptica, além de provocar hiperplasia pancreática em animais monogástricos. Essas duas características são muito importantes em programas de melhoramento que visam à melhoria da qualidade da soja. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho verificar o efeito do inibidor de protease (KTI, sobre níveis de LOX em sementes de soja, nos seguintes genótipos: KTI+/LOX+, KTI+/LOX-, KTI-/LOX+ e KTI-/LOX-. As LOXs foram identificadas por teste colorimétrico, atividade enzimática e eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida. O teor de proteína foi quantificado pelo método do ácido bicinconínico para determinação da atividade específica de LOX. Observou-se que, para o genótipo KTI+/LOX+, a atividade específica de LOX 1 foi alta, variando de 177,92 a 206,94 UA/mg de proteína e para LOX 3 variou de 17,90 a 19,85 UA/mg de proteína; para KTI+/LOX- e KTI-/LOX- não foi detectada atividade de LOX e que para o genótipo KTI-/LOX+ a atividade específica para LOX 1 variou de 117,24 a 124,64 UA/mg de proteína, e de 17,35 a 20,29 UA/mg de proteína para LOX 3. Houve uma redução de 40% na atividade específica de LOX1 e de 1% para LOX 3, no genótipo KTI-/LOX+, quando comparados ao KTI+/LOX+. Esses resultados comprovam uma associação negativa entre o inibidor de tripsina Kunitz e a atividade de lipoxigenases.Lipoxygenases (LOX are responsible for the beany flavor, which is the most important obstacle for the consumption of soybean [Glycine max. (L. Merrill] products in Western countries. The Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI is responsible for 80% of the inhibition of tryptic activity in soybean seeds, and besides it can cause pancreatic hyperplasia in monogastric animals. These two traits are

  13. Durability of Efavirenz Compared With Boosted Protease Inhibitor-Based Regimens in Antiretroviral-Naïve Patients in the Caribbean and Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro-Vega, Yanink; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda E; Shepherd, Bryan E; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Pape, Jean W; Padgett, Denis; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; McGowan, Catherine C; Sierra-Madero, Juan G

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Efavirenz (EFV) and boosted protease inhibitors (bPIs) are still the preferred options for firstline antiretroviral regimens (firstline ART) in Latin America and have comparable short-term efficacy. We assessed the long-term durability and outcomes of patients receiving EFV or bPIs as firstline ART in the Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet). Methods We included ART-naïve, HIV-positive adults on EFV or bPIs as firstline ART in CCASAnet between 2000 and 2016. We investigated the time from starting until ending firstline ART according to changes of third component for any reason, including toxicity and treatment failure, death, and/or loss to follow-up. Use of a third-line regimen was a secondary outcome. Kaplan-Meier estimators of composite end points were generated. Crude cumulative incidence of events and adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were estimated accounting for competing risk events. Results We included 14 519 patients: 12 898 (89%) started EFV and 1621 (11%) bPIs. The adjusted median years on firstline ART were 4.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4–4.7) on EFV and 3.8 (95% CI, 3.8–4.0) on bPI (P < .001). Cumulative incidence of firstline ART ending at 10 years of follow-up was 32% (95% CI, 31–33) on EFV and 44% (95% CI, 39–48) on bPI (aHR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78–0.97). The cumulative incidence rates of third-line initiation in the bPI-based group were 6% (95% CI, 2.4–9.6) and 2% (95% CI, 1.4–2.2) among the EFV-based group (P < .01). Conclusions Durability of firstline ART was longer with EFV than with bPIs. EFV-based regimens may continue to be the preferred firstline regimen for our region in the near future due to their high efficacy, relatively low toxicity (especially at lower doses), existence of generic formulations, and affordability for national programs. PMID:29527539

  14. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina

    2014-08-01

    High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362), which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their mechanism of action and

  15. Sensitive Deep-Sequencing-Based HIV-1 Genotyping Assay To Simultaneously Determine Susceptibility to Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, Integrase, and Maturation Inhibitors, as Well as HIV-1 Coreceptor Tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Richard M.; Meyer, Ashley M.; Winner, Dane; Archer, John; Feyertag, Felix; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel; Robertson, David L.; Schmotzer, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    With 29 individual antiretroviral drugs available from six classes that are approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, a combination of different phenotypic and genotypic tests is currently needed to monitor HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we developed a novel HIV-1 genotypic assay based on deep sequencing (DeepGen HIV) to simultaneously assess HIV-1 susceptibilities to all drugs targeting the three viral enzymes and to predict HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Patient-derived gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/IN- and env-C2V3 PCR products were sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Reads spanning the 3′ end of the Gag, protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase (IN), and V3 regions were extracted, truncated, translated, and assembled for genotype and HIV-1 coreceptor tropism determination. DeepGen HIV consistently detected both minority drug-resistant viruses and non-R5 HIV-1 variants from clinical specimens with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml and from B and non-B subtypes. Additional mutations associated with resistance to PR, RT, and IN inhibitors, previously undetected by standard (Sanger) population sequencing, were reliably identified at frequencies as low as 1%. DeepGen HIV results correlated with phenotypic (original Trofile, 92%; enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay [ESTA], 80%; TROCAI, 81%; and VeriTrop, 80%) and genotypic (population sequencing/Geno2Pheno with a 10% false-positive rate [FPR], 84%) HIV-1 tropism test results. DeepGen HIV (83%) and Trofile (85%) showed similar concordances with the clinical response following an 8-day course of maraviroc monotherapy (MCT). In summary, this novel all-inclusive HIV-1 genotypic and coreceptor tropism assay, based on deep sequencing of the PR, RT, IN, and V3 regions, permits simultaneous multiplex detection of low-level drug-resistant and/or non-R5 viruses in up to 96 clinical samples. This comprehensive test, the first of its class, will be instrumental in the development of new

  16. Potent Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease: Design and Synthesis of Macrocyclic Substrate-Based [beta]-Strand Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudreau, Nathalie; Brochu, Christian; Cameron, Dale R.; Duceppe, Jean-Simon; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Ferland, Jean-Marie; Grand-Maître, Chantal; Poirier, Martin; Simoneau, Bruno; Tsantrizos, Youla S. (Boehringer)

    2008-06-30

    The virally encoded NS3 protease is essential to the life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen causing chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The design and synthesis of 15-membered ring {beta}-strand mimics which are capable of inhibiting the interactions between the HCV NS3 protease enzyme and its polyprotein substrate will be described. The binding interactions between a macrocyclic ligand and the enzyme were explored by NMR and molecular dynamics, and a model of the ligand/enzyme complex was developed.

  17. Expression in Escherichia coli of cysteine protease inhibitors from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata): The crystal structure of a single-domain cystatin gives insights on its thermal and pH stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro Júnior, José Edvar; Valadares, Napoleão Fonseca; Pereira, Humberto D'Muniz; Dyszy, Fábio Henrique; da Costa Filho, Antônio José; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; da Silveira Carvalho, Cristina Paiva; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa

    2017-09-01

    Two cysteine proteinase inhibitors from cowpea, VuCys1 and VuCys2, were produced in E. coli ArcticExpress (DE3). The recombinant products strongly inhibited papain and chymopapain as well as the midgut proteases from Callosobruchus maculatus larvae, a bruchid that uses cysteine proteases as major digestive enzymes. Heat treatment at 100°C for up to 60min or incubation at various pH values caused little reduction in the papain inhibitory activity of both inhibitors. Moreover, minor conformational variations, as probed by circular dichroism spectroscopy, were observed after VuCys1 and VuCys2 were subjected to these treatments. The crystal structure of VuCys1 was determined at a resolution of 1.95Å, revealing a domain-swapped dimer in the asymmetric unit. However, the two lobes of the domain-swapped dimer are positioned closer to each other in VuCys1 in comparison to other similar cystatin structures. Moreover, some polar residues from opposite lobes recruit water molecules, forming a hydrogen bond network that mediates contacts between the lobes, thus generating an extended open interface. Due to the closer distance between the lobes, a small hydrophobic core is also formed, further stabilizing the folded domain-swapped dimer. These structural features might account for the extraordinary thermal and pH stability of VuCys1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Profiling acylated homoserine lactones in Yersinia ruckeri and influence of exogenous acyl homoserine lactones and known quorum-sensing inhibitors on protease production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2007-01-01

    produced. 3-oxo-C8-HSL was detected in organs from fish infected with Y. ruckeri. Protease production was significantly lower at temperatures above 23 degrees C than below although growth was faster at the higher temperatures. Neither addition of sterile filtered high-density Y. ruckeri culture supernatant...

  19. Role of Proteases in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is generally associated with progressive destruction of airways and lung parenchyma. Various factors play an important role in the development and progression of COPD, like imbalance of proteases, environmental and genetic factors and oxidative stress. This review is specifically focused on the role of proteases and their imbalance in COPD. There are three classes (serine, mettalo, and cysteine of proteases involved in COPD. In serine proteases, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 are involved in destruction of alveolar tissue. Matrix-mettaloproteinase-9, 12, 13, plays an influential role in severity of COPD. Among cysteine proteases, caspase-3, caspases-8 and caspase-9 play an important role in controlling apoptosis. These proteases activities can be regulated by inhibitors like α-1-antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, and leukocyte protease inhibitor. Studies suggest that neutrophil elastase may be a therapeutic target for COPD, and specific inhibitor against this enzyme has potential role to control the disease. Current study suggests that Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV is a potential marker for COPD. Since the expression of proteases and its inhibitors play an important role in COPD pathogenesis, therefore, it is worth investigating the role of proteases and their regulation. Understanding the biochemical basis of COPD pathogenesis using advanced tools in protease biochemistry and aiming toward translational research from bench-to-bedside will have great impact to deal with this health problem.

  20. Ontogeny, immunocytochemical localization, and biochemical properties of the pregnancy-associated uterine elastase/cathepsin-G protease inhibitor, antileukoproteinase (ALP): monospecific antibodies to a synthetic peptide recognize native ALP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmen, R C; Michel, F J; Fliss, A E; Smith, L C; Fliss, M F

    1992-04-01

    Expression of the mRNA encoding the elastase/cathepsin-G protease inhibitor, antileukoproteinase (ALP), is highest in pig uterus during mid- and late pregnancy, suggesting a stage of pregnancy-dependent role for ALP in feto-maternal interactions. To elucidate a function for ALP in these events, immunogenic probes were developed to localize sites of ALP expression in the environment of the developing fetus. Monospecific antibodies raised against a 16-mer synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 21-36 (ALP 16P) of the deduced amino acid sequence of pig uterine ALP were generated by active immunization of sheep. ALP 16P conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin elicited high titer antibodies that were specific to ALP. The antipeptide antibodies were used to characterize pig uterine ALP from allantoic fluids. Uterine ALP has an approximate mol wt of 14,000 and a pI of 8.2 and exhibits elastase inhibitor activity. Amino-terminal amino acid sequencing of uterine ALP indicated the sequence AENALKGGACPPRKIVQC, which has 44% identity with the corresponding region in human bronchial ALP. RIA for ALP, developed using ALP 16P as standard and iodinated tracer, demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive ALP in early, mid-, and late pregnant endometrium and myometrium, placenta, allantoic fluids, fetal cord blood, and fetal liver. ALP was undetectable in the maternal circulation. The ALP levels in endometrium, allantoic fluids, and fetal cord blood changed with the stage of pregnancy; however, ALP content in placenta, myometrium, and fetal liver, although different among tissues, remained invariant during gestation. By immunocytochemical analyses, ALP was localized in the glandular epithelium of the uterus, in placenta, and in fetal liver, consistent with the presence of immunoreactive ALP as measured by RIA. The localization of uterine ALP in placenta and its corresponding transport to fetal circulation provide strong evidence to support a physiological function for the

  1. Teaching Foundational Topics and Scientific Skills in Biochemistry within the Conceptual Framework of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a…

  2. Secreted aspartic proteases of .I.Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis./I. and .I.Candida lusitaniae./I.. Inhibition with peptidomimetic inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pichová, Iva; Pavlíčková, Libuše; Dostál, Jiří; Dolejší, Elena; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Weber, Jan; Ruml, T.; Souček, Milan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 268, č. 9 (2001), s. 2669-2677 ISSN 0014-2956 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/98/1612; GA ČR GA303/98/P252; GA ČR GA303/01/0831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : secreted aspartic protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.849, year: 2001

  3. HIV-1 protease mutations and inhibitor modifications monitored on a series of complexes. Structural basis for the effect of the A71V mutation on the active site

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Hradilek, Martin; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Hašek, Jindřich

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 19 (2006), s. 5777-5784 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312; GA MŠk 1K05008; GA AV ČR IAA4050811 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV -1 protease * protein crystallography * drug design Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.115, year: 2006

  4. Tissue dissociation enzyme neutral protease assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breite, A G; Dwulet, F E; McCarthy, R C

    2010-01-01

    Neutral proteases, essential components of purified tissue dissociation enzymes required for successful human islet isolation, show variable activities and effects of substrate on their activities. Initially we used a spectrophotometric endpoint assay with azocasein substrate to measure neutral protease activity. After critical review of the results, we observed these data to be inconsistent and not correlating expected differences in specific activities between thermolysin and Bacillus polymyxa proteases. This observation led to the development of a fluorescent microplate assay using fluorescein isothyocyanate-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) as the substrate. This simpler, more flexible method offered a homogeneous, kinetic enzyme assay allowing determination of steady state reaction rates of sample replicates at various dilutions. The assay had a linear range of 4- to 8-fold and interassay coefficients of variation for B polymyxa protease and thermolysin of inhibitors, as illustrated by addition of sulfhydryl protease inhibitors, which, consistent with earlier reports, strongly indicated that the main contaminant in purified collagenase preparations was clostripain. Determination of the specific activities for several purified neutral proteases showed that the B polymyxa and Clostridium histolyticum proteases had approximately 40% and 15% specific activities, respectively, of those obtained with purified thermolysin, indicating the different characteristics of neutral protease enzymes for cell isolation procedures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of action of nonpeptide hormones on resveratrol-induced antiproliferation of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Cheng, Guei-Yun; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Chin, Yu-Tang; Shih, Ya-Jung; Nana, André Wendindondé; Lin, Shin-Ying; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Chiang, I-Jen; Wang, Kuan

    2017-09-01

    Nonpeptide hormones, such as thyroid hormone, dihydrotestosterone, and estrogen, have been shown to stimulate cancer proliferation via different mechanisms. Aside from their cytosolic or membrane-bound receptors, there are receptors on integrin α v β 3 for nonpeptide hormones. Interaction between hormones and integrin α v β 3 can induce signal transduction and eventually stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Resveratrol induces inducible COX-2-dependent antiproliferation via integrin α v β 3 . Resveratrol and hormone-induced signals are both transduced by activated extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2); however, hormones promote cell proliferation, while resveratrol induces antiproliferation in cancer cells. Hormones inhibit resveratrol-stimulated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15, resveratrol-induced nuclear COX-2 accumulation, and formation of p53-COX-2 nuclear complexes. Subsequently, hormones impair resveratrol-induced COX-2-/p53-dependent gene expression. The inhibitory effects of hormones on resveratrol action can be blocked by different antagonists of specific nonpeptide hormone receptors but not integrin α v β 3 blockers. Results suggest that nonpeptide hormones inhibit resveratrol-induced antiproliferation in cancer cells downstream of the interaction between ligand and receptor and ERK1/2 activation to interfere with nuclear COX-2 accumulation. Thus, the surface receptor sites for resveratrol and nonpeptide hormones are distinct and can induce discrete ERK1/2-dependent downstream antiproliferation biological activities. It also indicates the complex pathways by which antiproliferation is induced by resveratrol in various physiological hormonal environments. . © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Discovery of Peptidomimetic Antibody-Drug Conjugate Linkers with Enhanced Protease Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, BinQing; Gunzner-Toste, Janet; Yao, Hui; Wang, Tao; Wang, Jing; Xu, Zijin; Chen, Jinhua; Wai, John; Nonomiya, Jim; Tsai, Siao Ping; Chuh, Josefa; Kozak, Katherine R; Liu, Yichin; Yu, Shang-Fan; Lau, Jeff; Li, Guangmin; Phillips, Gail D; Leipold, Doug; Kamath, Amrita; Su, Dian; Xu, Keyang; Eigenbrot, Charles; Steinbacher, Stefan; Ohri, Rachana; Raab, Helga; Staben, Leanna R; Zhao, Guiling; Flygare, John A; Pillow, Thomas H; Verma, Vishal; Masterson, Luke A; Howard, Philip W; Safina, Brian

    2018-02-08

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have become an important therapeutic modality for oncology, with three approved by the FDA and over 60 others in clinical trials. Despite the progress, improvements in ADC therapeutic index are desired. Peptide-based ADC linkers that are cleaved by lysosomal proteases have shown sufficient stability in serum and effective payload-release in targeted cells. If the linker can be preferentially hydrolyzed by tumor-specific proteases, safety margin may improve. However, the use of peptide-based linkers limits our ability to modulate protease specificity. Here we report the structure-guided discovery of novel, nonpeptidic ADC linkers. We show that a cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxamide-containing linker is hydrolyzed predominantly by cathepsin B while the valine-citrulline dipeptide linker is not. ADCs bearing the nonpeptidic linker are as efficacious and stable in vivo as those with the dipeptide linker. Our results strongly support the application of the peptidomimetic linker and present new opportunities for improving the selectivity of ADCs.

  7. Sustained Virologic Response at 24 Weeks after the End of Treatment Is a Better Predictor for Treatment Outcome in Real-World HCV-Infected Patients Treated by HCV NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors with Peginterferon plus Ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Tawada, Akinobu; Arai, Makoto; Mikami, Shigeru; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV with or without peginterferon plus ribavirin result in higher eradication rates of HCV and shorter treatment duration. We examined which is better for predicting persistent virologic response, the assessment of serum HCV RNA at 12 or 24 weeks after the end of treatment for predicting sustained virologic response (SVR12 or SVR24, respectively) in patients treated by HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors with peginterferon plus ribavirin. In all, 149 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1b treated by peginterferon plus ribavirin with telaprevir or simeprevir were retrospectively analyzed: 59 and 90 patients were treated with telaprevir- and simeprevir-including regimens, respectively. HCV RNA was measured by TaqMan HCV Test, version 2.0, real-time PCR assay. SVR12 or SVR24, respectively, was defined as HCV RNA negativity at 12 or 24 weeks after ending treatment. Total SVR rates were 78.0% and 66.7% in the telaprevir and simeprevir groups, respectively. In the telaprevir group, all 46 patients with SVR12 finally achieved SVR24. In the simeprevir group, 60 (93.8%) of the total 64 patients with SVR12 achieved SVR24, with the other 4 patients all being previous-treatment relapsers. SVR12 was suitable for predicting persistent virologic response in almost all cases. In simeprevir-including regimens, SVR12 could not always predict persistent virologic response. Clinicians should use SVR24 for predicting treatment outcome in the use of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors with peginterferon plus ribavirin for any group of real-world patients chronically infected with HCV.

  8. GRL-09510, a Unique P2-Crown-Tetrahydrofuranylurethane -Containing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, Maintains Its Favorable Antiviral Activity against Highly-Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Variants in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Masayuki; Miguel Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Delino, Nicole S.; Nakata, Hirotomo; Venkateswara Rao, Kalapala; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2017-09-25

    We report that GRL-09510, a novel HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) containing a newly-generated P2-crown-tetrahydrofuranylurethane (Crwn-THF), a P2'-methoxybenzene, and a sulfonamide isostere, is highly active against laboratory and primary clinical HIV-1 isolates (EC50: 0.0014–0.0028 μM) with minimal cytotoxicity (CC50: 39.0 μM). Similarly, GRL-09510 efficiently blocked the replication of HIV-1NL4-3 variants, which were capable of propagating at high-concentrations of atazanavir, lopinavir, and amprenavir (APV). GRL-09510 was also potent against multi-drug-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants and HIV-2ROD. Under the selection condition, where HIV-1NL4-3 rapidly acquired significant resistance to APV, an integrase inhibitor raltegravir, and a GRL-09510 congener (GRL-09610), no variants highly resistant against GRL-09510 emerged over long-term in vitro passage of the virus. Crystallographic analysis demonstrated that the Crwn-THF moiety of GRL-09510 forms strong hydrogen-bond-interactions with HIV-1 protease (PR) active-site amino acids and is bulkier with a larger contact surface, making greater van der Waals contacts with PR than the bis-THF moiety of darunavir. The present data demonstrate that GRL-09510 has favorable features for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multi-drug-resistant HIV-1 variants, that the newly generated P2-Crwn-THF moiety confers highly desirable anti-HIV-1 potency. The use of the novel Crwn-THF moiety sheds lights in the design of novel PIs.

  9. Substitutions at NS3 Residue 155, 156, or 168 of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes 2 to 6 Induce Complex Patterns of Protease Inhibitor Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne B.; Serre, Stephanie B. N.; Humes, Daryl G.

    2015-01-01

    but were not characterized systematically. To elucidate the impact of key PI resistance substitutions on genotypes 2-6, we engineered the substitutions R155A/E/G/H/K/Q/T, A156G/S/T/V, D/Q168A/E/G/H/N/V into HCV recombinants expressing genotype 2-6 proteases. We evaluated viral fitness and sensitivity...... resistant. For the remaining PIs, most genotype 2-, 4-, 5-, and 6-, but not genotype 3-variants, showed varying resistance levels. Overall, grazoprevir (MK-5172) had the highest efficacy against original viruses and variants.This is the first comprehensive study revealing the impact of described key PI...

  10. Molecular interaction of a potent nonpeptide agonist with the chemokine receptor CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Nygaard, Rie; Thiele, Stefanie

    2007-01-01

    Most nonpeptide antagonists for CC-chemokine receptors share a common pharmacophore with a centrally located, positively charged amine that interacts with the highly conserved glutamic acid (Glu) located in position 6 of transmembrane helix VII (VII:06). We present a novel CCR8 nonpeptide agonist......, 8-[3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl]-1-phenethyl-1,3,8-triaza-spiro[4.5]decan-4-one (LMD-009), that also contains a centrally located, positively charged amine. LMD-009 selectively stimulated CCR8 among the 20 identified human chemokine receptors. It mediated chemotaxis, inositol phosphate accumulation......-binding pockets of CCR8 uncovered that the binding of LMD-009 and of four analogs [2-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-4-yl)benzoic acid (LMD-584), N-ethyl-2-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (LMD-902), N-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)-2-phenyl-4-(pyrrolidin-1yl)butanamide (LMD-268...

  11. In Vitro Mode of Action and Anti-thrombotic Activity of Boophilin, a Multifunctional Kunitz Protease Inhibitor from the Midgut of a Tick Vector of Babesiosis, Rhipicephalus microplus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Assumpção, T.C.; Ma, D.; Mizurini, D.M.; Kini, D.M.; Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Monteiro, R.Q.; Francischetti, I.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2016), č. článku e0004298. ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : thrombin inhibitor * salivary gland * anticolagulant protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.834, year: 2016

  12. Emerging principles in protease-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drag, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S

    2010-09-01

    Proteases have an important role in many signalling pathways, and represent potential drug targets for diseases ranging from cardiovascular disorders to cancer, as well as for combating many parasites and viruses. Although inhibitors of well-established protease targets such as angiotensin-converting enzyme and HIV protease have shown substantial therapeutic success, developing drugs for new protease targets has proved challenging in recent years. This in part could be due to issues such as the difficulty of achieving selectivity when targeting protease active sites. This Perspective discusses the general principles in protease-based drug discovery, highlighting the lessons learned and the emerging strategies, such as targeting allosteric sites, which could help harness the therapeutic potential of new protease targets.

  13. The effect of chemical anti-inhibitors on fibrinolytic enzymes and inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Jespersen, J; Kluft, C

    1997-01-01

    Fibrinolytic enzyme inhibitors hamper the determination of the specific fibrinolytic serine protease activity. Reportedly, chemical anti-inhibitors eliminate the influence of fibrinolytic inhibitors, but it remains unclear to what extent they change the specific activity of fibrinolytic serine...

  14. Marketed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, antihypertensives, and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors: as-yet-unused weapons of the oncologists’ arsenal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papanagnou P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Panagiota Papanagnou,1 Panagiotis Baltopoulos,2 Maria Tsironi1 1Department of Nursing, Faculty of Human Movement and Quality of Life Sciences, University of Peloponnese, Sparta, 2Department of Sports Medicine and Biology of Physical Activity, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Experimental data indicate that several pharmacological agents that have long been used for the management of various diseases unrelated to cancer exhibit profound in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. This is of major clinical importance, since it would possibly aid in reassessing the therapeutic use of currently used agents for which clinicians already have experience. Further, this would obviate the time-consuming process required for the development and the approval of novel antineoplastic drugs. Herein, both pre-clinical and clinical data concerning the antineoplastic function of distinct commercially available pharmacological agents that are not currently used in the field of oncology, ie, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihypertensive agents, and anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents inhibiting viral protease, are reviewed. The aim is to provide integrated information regarding not only the molecular basis of the antitumor function of these agents but also the applicability of the reevaluation of their therapeutic range in the clinical setting. Keywords: repositioning, tumorigenesis, pleiotropy, exploitation

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus Papain-Like Novel Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Protein-Ligand X-ray Structure and Biological Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Takayama, Jun; Rao, Kalapala Venkateswar; Ratia, Kiira; Chaudhuri, Rima; Mulhearn, Debbie C.; Lee, Hyun; Nichols, Daniel B.; Baliji, Surendranath; Baker, Susan C.; Johnson, Michael E.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Purdue); (UC); (UIC)

    2012-02-21

    The design, synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of a series of new generation SARS-CoV PLpro inhibitors are described. A new lead compound 3 (6577871) was identified via high-throughput screening of a diverse chemical library. Subsequently, we carried out lead optimization and structure-activity studies to provide a series of improved inhibitors that show potent PLpro inhibition and antiviral activity against SARS-CoV infected Vero E6 cells. Interestingly, the (S)-Me inhibitor 15h (enzyme IC{sub 50} = 0.56 {mu}M; antiviral EC{sub 50} = 9.1 {mu}M) and the corresponding (R)-Me 15g (IC{sub 50} = 0.32 {mu}M; antiviral EC{sub 50} = 9.1 {mu}M) are the most potent compounds in this series, with nearly equivalent enzymatic inhibition and antiviral activity. A protein-ligand X-ray structure of 15g-bound SARS-CoV PLpro and a corresponding model of 15h docked to PLpro provide intriguing molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  16. Purification of an Intracellular Fibrinolytic Protease from Ganoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Method: The intracellular fibrinolytic protease produced by Ganoderma lucidum VK12 was isolated from the mycelia grown in MCDBF broth ... The inhibitory effect of different metal ions and commercial protease inhibitors on enzyme activity was studied. ... sodium hydroxide and 2.9 %w/v sodium carbonate in glass-distilled ...

  17. Identification of Chalcones as Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L Inhibitors Using a Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Ferraro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased reports of human infections have led fasciolosis, a widespread disease of cattle and sheep caused by the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, to be considered an emerging zoonotic disease. Chemotherapy is the main control measure available, and triclabendazole is the preferred drug since is effective against both juvenile and mature parasites. However, resistance to triclabendazole has been reported in several countries urging the search of new chemical entities and target molecules to control fluke infections.We searched a library of forty flavonoid derivatives for inhibitors of key stage specific Fasciola hepatica cysteine proteases (FhCL3 and FhCL1. Chalcones substituted with phenyl and naphtyl groups emerged as good cathepsin L inhibitors, interacting more frequently with two putative binding sites within the active site cleft of the enzymes. One of the compounds, C34, tightly bounds to juvenile specific FhCL3 with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. We demonstrated that C34 is a slow-reversible inhibitor that interacts with the Cys-His catalytic dyad and key S2 and S3 pocket residues, determinants of the substrate specificity of this family of cysteine proteases. Interestingly, C34 induces a reduction in NEJ ability to migrate through the gut wall and a loss of motility phenotype that leads to NEJ death within a week in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic to bovine cells.Up to date there are no reports of in vitro screening for non-peptidic inhibitors of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins, while in general these are considered as the best strategy for in vivo inhibition. We have identified chalcones as novel inhibitors of the two main Cathepsins secreted by juvenile and adult liver flukes. Interestingly, one compound (C34 is highly active towards the juvenile enzyme reducing larval ability to penetrate the gut wall and decreasing NEJ´s viability in vitro. These findings open new avenues for the development of novel agents to control

  18. Identification of Chalcones as Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L Inhibitors Using a Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Florencia; Merlino, Alicia; Dell Oca, Nicolás; Gil, Jorge; Tort, José F; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo; Cabrera, Mauricio; Corvo, Ileana

    2016-07-01

    Increased reports of human infections have led fasciolosis, a widespread disease of cattle and sheep caused by the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, to be considered an emerging zoonotic disease. Chemotherapy is the main control measure available, and triclabendazole is the preferred drug since is effective against both juvenile and mature parasites. However, resistance to triclabendazole has been reported in several countries urging the search of new chemical entities and target molecules to control fluke infections. We searched a library of forty flavonoid derivatives for inhibitors of key stage specific Fasciola hepatica cysteine proteases (FhCL3 and FhCL1). Chalcones substituted with phenyl and naphtyl groups emerged as good cathepsin L inhibitors, interacting more frequently with two putative binding sites within the active site cleft of the enzymes. One of the compounds, C34, tightly bounds to juvenile specific FhCL3 with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. We demonstrated that C34 is a slow-reversible inhibitor that interacts with the Cys-His catalytic dyad and key S2 and S3 pocket residues, determinants of the substrate specificity of this family of cysteine proteases. Interestingly, C34 induces a reduction in NEJ ability to migrate through the gut wall and a loss of motility phenotype that leads to NEJ death within a week in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic to bovine cells. Up to date there are no reports of in vitro screening for non-peptidic inhibitors of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins, while in general these are considered as the best strategy for in vivo inhibition. We have identified chalcones as novel inhibitors of the two main Cathepsins secreted by juvenile and adult liver flukes. Interestingly, one compound (C34) is highly active towards the juvenile enzyme reducing larval ability to penetrate the gut wall and decreasing NEJ´s viability in vitro. These findings open new avenues for the development of novel agents to control fluke infection and

  19. Effects of Smoking on Pegylated Interferon alpha 2a and First Generation Protease Inhibitor-based Antiviral Therapy in Naïve Patients Infected with Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Tim; Hueppe, Dietrich; Mauss, Stefan; Buggisch, Peter; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Grimm, Daniel; Galle, Peter R; Alshuth, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Smoking has multiple effects on factors influencing hepatitis C and antiviral therapy, including lipid metabolism, fibrosis, platelet count and adherence aspects. The aim of this analysis was to determine the impact of smoking on hepatitis C virus antiviral therapy. Data of two cohorts of an observational multicenter study including therapy-naïve patients infected with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) treated with dual antiviral therapy (n=7,796) with pegylated interferon alpha 2a in combination with ribavirin, or triple antiviral therapy (n=1,122) containing telaprevir or boceprevir, were analysed. In the univariate matched pair analysis of dual antiviral therapy patients (n=584), smoking was significantly associated with lower sustained viral response rates (p=0.026, OR 0.69 CI: 0.50 - 0.96). The effect of smoking on sustained viral response remained significant (p=0.028, OR 0.67 CI: 0.47 - 0.96) in the multivariate analysis when adjusting for all other baseline parameters with a significant association in the univariate analysis, i.e. diabetes, fibrosis, body mass index, transaminases and baseline viral load. Under protease inhibitors the influence of smoking on virological response did not arise. Smoking has a negative impact on antiviral therapy in naïve patients infected with HCV genotype 1 independently of age, gender, history of drug use or alcoholic liver disease. The effects of smoking might be overcome by the new antiviral agents.

  20. Impact of HCV kinetics on treatment outcome differs by the type of real-time HCV assay in NS3/4A protease inhibitor-based triple therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Furusyo, Norihiro; Murata, Masayuki; Hayashi, Takeo; Shimizu, Motohiro; Mukae, Haru; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Hotta, Taeko; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Hayashi, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Repeated measurement of the HCV RNA level is essential for properly monitoring treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of two HCV real-time assays in the evaluation of the impact of hepatitis C virus (HCV) kinetics on the outcome of triple therapy with NS3/4A protease inhibitors (PIs), telaprevir or simeprevir. This study consisted of 171 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1. All 3266 serum samples taken during and post treatment were tested with both the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HCV Test v2.0 and the Abbott RealTime (ART) HCV Test. Of the 2597 samples undetectable (lower limit of detection [HCV RNA by the CAP/CTM assay from the on and post treatment, 400 (15.4%) (369 detectable/less than the lower limitation of quantification [HCV RNA HCV RNA being once HCV RNA (detectable/HCV RNA after 12 weeks (without PI-treatment period). The superior ability to detect low-level HCV RNA by ART could be useful for predicting SVR by difficult-to-treat patients in the early period and relapse in the late period. Copyright © 20