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Sample records for nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency

  1. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes Shares Features of Both Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Lentiviral Infections.

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    Edward J D Greenwood

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The virus-host relationship in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infected chimpanzees is thought to be different from that found in other SIV infected African primates. However, studies of captive SIVcpz infected chimpanzees are limited. Previously, the natural SIVcpz infection of one chimpanzee, and the experimental infection of six chimpanzees was reported, with limited follow-up. Here, we present a long-term study of these seven animals, with a retrospective re-examination of the early stages of infection. The only clinical signs consistent with AIDS or AIDS associated disease was thrombocytopenia in two cases, associated with the development of anti-platelet antibodies. However, compared to uninfected and HIV-1 infected animals, SIVcpz infected animals had significantly lower levels of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cells. Despite this, levels of T-cell activation in chronic infection were not significantly elevated. In addition, while plasma levels of β2 microglobulin, neopterin and soluble TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (sTRAIL were elevated in acute infection, these markers returned to near-normal levels in chronic infection, reminiscent of immune activation patterns in 'natural host' species. Furthermore, plasma soluble CD14 was not elevated in chronic infection. However, examination of the secondary lymphoid environment revealed persistent changes to the lymphoid structure, including follicular hyperplasia in SIVcpz infected animals. In addition, both SIV and HIV-1 infected chimpanzees showed increased levels of deposition of collagen and increased levels of Mx1 expression in the T-cell zones of the lymph node. The outcome of SIVcpz infection of captive chimpanzees therefore shares features of both non-pathogenic and pathogenic lentivirus infections.

  2. Divergent CD4+ T memory stem cell dynamics in pathogenic and nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

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    Cartwright, Emily K; McGary, Colleen S; Cervasi, Barbara; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Elliott, Sarah T C; Collman, Ronald G; Bosinger, Steven E; Paiardini, Mirko; Vanderford, Thomas H; Chahroudi, Ann; Silvestri, Guido

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies have identified a subset of memory T cells with stem cell-like properties (T(SCM)) that include increased longevity and proliferative potential. In this study, we examined the dynamics of CD4(+) T(SCM) during pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RM) and nonpathogenic SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SM). Whereas SIV-infected RM show selective numeric preservation of CD4(+) T(SCM), SIV infection induced a complex perturbation of these cells defined by depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM), increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and high levels of direct virus infection. The increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation in SIV-infected RM correlated inversely with the levels of central memory CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, nonpathogenic SIV infection of SM evidenced preservation of both CD4(+) T(SCM) and CD4(+) central memory T cells, with normal levels of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and lack of selective depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM). Importantly, SIV DNA was below the detectable limit in CD4(+) T(SCM) from 8 of 10 SIV-infected SM. We propose that increased proliferation and infection of CD4(+) T(SCM) may contribute to the pathogenesis of SIV infection in RM.

  3. Enteric Ganglionitis in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight in...

  4. Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with expansion of the enteric virome.

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    Handley, Scott A; Thackray, Larissa B; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel; Miller, Andrew D; Droit, Lindsay; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Stanley, Kelly; Kramer, Joshua; Macri, Sheila C; Permar, Sallie R; Schmitz, Joern E; Mansfield, Keith; Brenchley, Jason M; Veazey, Ronald S; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2012-10-12

    Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with enteropathy, which likely contributes to AIDS progression. To identify candidate etiologies for AIDS enteropathy, we used next-generation sequencing to define the enteric virome during SIV infection in nonhuman primates. Pathogenic, but not nonpathogenic, SIV infection was associated with significant expansion of the enteric virome. We identified at least 32 previously undescribed enteric viruses during pathogenic SIV infection and confirmed their presence by using viral culture and PCR testing. We detected unsuspected mucosal adenovirus infection associated with enteritis as well as parvovirus viremia in animals with advanced AIDS, indicating the pathogenic potential of SIV-associated expansion of the enteric virome. No association between pathogenic SIV infection and the family-level taxonomy of enteric bacteria was detected. Thus, enteric viral infections may contribute to AIDS enteropathy and disease progression. These findings underline the importance of metagenomic analysis of the virome for understanding AIDS pathogenesis.

  5. Inner architecture of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

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    Fukui, T; Imura, S; Goto, T; Nakai, M

    1993-07-01

    The cores of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) were observed by negative staining after isolation of the core with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde. Four kinds of cores were found: asymmetric and symmetric sectoral shapes, a bar shape, and a triangular shape. These results were confirmed by the examination of ultrathin sections of whole virions. In some virions, the connection between the core and the envelope was observed after freeze fracturing. Its structure was considered to be characteristic of an intermediate stage of viral maturation. The HIV-1 core was reacted with anti-HIV-1 p24 mouse monoclonal antibody.

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for the simian immunodeficiency virus.

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    Letvin, N L; Schmitz, J E; Jordan, H L; Seth, A; Hirsch, V M; Reimann, K A; Kuroda, M J

    1999-08-01

    A non-human primate model for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkey, was used to explore the role of the AIDS virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in disease pathogenesis. This CTL response was measured using the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/peptide tetramer technology. Large numbers of tetramer-binding CD8+ T lymphocytes were demonstrable not only in the peripheral blood, but in lymph nodes and even in semen of chronically SIV-infected monkeys. The central role of these effector T lymphocytes in containing SIV spread during primary infection was demonstrated by showing that early SIV clearance during primary infection correlated with the emergence of the tetramer binding CD8+ T lymphocytes and that in vivo depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes eliminated the ability of the infected monkeys to contain SIV replication. These observations suggest that an effective AIDS vaccine should elicit a potent virus-specific CTL response. In fact, a live, recombinant SIV vaccine constructed using the attenuated pox virus vector modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) elicited a high-frequency CTL response, comparable in magnitude to that elicited by SIV infection itself. This suggests that vaccine modalities such as MVA may prove useful in creating an effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. These studies also indicate the power of both the SIV/macaque model and MHC class I/peptide tetramers for assessing AIDS vaccine strategies.

  7. BST-2 mediated restriction of simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

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    Ruiz, Autumn; Lau, David; Mitchell, Richard S; Hill, M Sarah; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guatelli, John C; Stephens, Edward B

    2010-10-25

    Pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) contain HIV-1 Vpu and SIV Nef, both shown to counteract BST-2 (HM1.24; CD317; tetherin) inhibition of virus release in a species-specific manner. We show that human and pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) restrict SHIV. We found that sequential "humanization" of the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) protein resulted in a fluctuation in sensitivity to HIV-1 Vpu. Our results also show that the length of the TMD in human and ptBST-2 proteins is important for BST-2 restriction and susceptibility to Vpu. Taken together, our results emphasize the importance of tertiary structure in BST-2 antagonism and suggests that the HIV-1 Vpu transmembrane domain may have additional functions in vivo unrelated to BST-2 antagonism.

  8. Enteric Ganglionitis in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus▿

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    Orandle, Marlene S.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight into potential pathogenic mechanisms of GI disease. Ganglia from duodenum, ileum, and colon were examined in healthy and acutely infected macaques by using a combination of routine histology, double-label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Evaluation of tissues from infected macaques showed progressive infiltration of myenteric ganglia by CD3+ T cells and IBA1+ macrophages beginning as early as 8 days postinfection. Quantitative image analysis revealed that the severity of myenteric ganglionitis increased with time after SIV infection and, in general, was more severe in ganglia from the small intestine than in ganglia from the colon. Despite an abundance of inflammatory cells in myenteric ganglia during acute infection, the ENS was not a target for virus infection. This study provides evidence that the ENS may be playing a role in the pathogenesis of GI disease and enteropathy in HIV-infected people. PMID:17392357

  9. Lentivirus vectors using human and simian immunodeficiency virus elements.

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    White, S M; Renda, M; Nam, N Y; Klimatcheva, E; Zhu, Y; Fisk, J; Halterman, M; Rimel, B J; Federoff, H; Pandya, S; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1999-04-01

    Lentivirus vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) constitute a recent development in the field of gene therapy. A key property of HIV-1-derived vectors is their ability to infect nondividing cells. Although high-titer HIV-1-derived vectors have been produced, concerns regarding safety still exist. Safety concerns arise mainly from the possibility of recombination between transfer and packaging vectors, which may give rise to replication-competent viruses with pathogenic potential. We describe a novel lentivirus vector which is based on HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and which we refer to as HIV/SIVpack/G. In this system, an HIV-1-derived genome is encapsidated by SIVmac core particles. These core particles are pseudotyped with VSV glycoprotein G. Because the nucleotide homology between HIV-1 and SIVmac is low, the likelihood of recombination between vector elements should be reduced. In addition, the packaging construct (SIVpack) for this lentivirus system was derived from SIVmac1A11, a nonvirulent SIV strain. Thus, the potential for pathogenicity with this vector system is minimal. The transduction ability of HIV/SIVpack/G was demonstrated with immortalized human lymphocytes, human primary macrophages, human bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells, and primary mouse neurons. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first demonstration that the HIV-1-derived genome can be packaged by an SIVmac capsid. We demonstrate that the lentivirus vector described here recapitulates the biological properties of HIV-1-derived vectors, although with increased potential for safety in humans.

  10. Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Moeller, Andrew H; Peeters, Martine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Esteban, Amadine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2015-02-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we examine the effects of SIVgor, a close relative of SIVcpz of chimpanzees and HIV-1 of humans, on the gut bacterial communities residing within wild gorillas, revealing that gorilla gut microbiomes are exceptionally robust to SIV infection. In contrast to the microbiomes of HIV-1-infected humans and SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees, SIVgor-infected gorilla microbiomes exhibit neither rises in the frequencies of opportunistic pathogens nor elevated rates of microbial turnover within individual hosts. Regardless of SIV infection status, gorilla microbiomes assort into enterotypes, one of which is compositionally analogous to those identified in humans and chimpanzees. The other gorilla enterotype appears specialized for a leaf-based diet and is enriched in environmentally derived bacterial genera. We hypothesize that the acquisition of this gorilla-specific enterotype was enabled by lowered immune system control over the composition of the microbiome. Our results indicate differences between the pathology of SIVgor and SIVcpz/HIV-1 infections, demonstrating the utility of investigating host microbial ecology as a means for studying disease in wild primates of high conservation priority.

  11. Mapping the small RNA content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV.

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    Markus Brameier

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that regulatory small non-coding RNAs are not only components of eukaryotic cells and vesicles, but also reside within a number of different viruses including retroviral particles. Using ultra-deep sequencing we have comprehensively analyzed the content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV, which were compared to mock-control preparations. Our analysis revealed that more than 428,000 sequence reads matched the SIV mac239 genome sequence. Among these we could identify 12 virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs that were highly abundant. Beside known retrovirus-enriched small RNAs, like 7SL-RNA, tRNA(Lys3 and tRNA(Lys isoacceptors, we also identified defined fragments derived from small ILF3/NF90-associated RNA snaR-A14, that were enriched more than 50 fold in SIV. We also found evidence that small nucleolar RNAs U2 and U12 were underrepresented in the SIV preparation, indicating that the relative number or the content of co-isolated exosomes was changed upon infection. Our comprehensive atlas of SIV-incorporated small RNAs provides a refined picture of the composition of retrovirions, which gives novel insights into viral packaging.

  12. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

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    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  13. Impact of simian immunodeficiency virus infection on chimpanzee population dynamics.

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    Rebecca S Rudicell

    Full Text Available Like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz can cause CD4+ T cell loss and premature death. Here, we used molecular surveillance tools and mathematical modeling to estimate the impact of SIVcpz infection on chimpanzee population dynamics. Habituated (Mitumba and Kasekela and non-habituated (Kalande chimpanzees were studied in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Ape population sizes were determined from demographic records (Mitumba and Kasekela or individual sightings and genotyping (Kalande, while SIVcpz prevalence rates were monitored using non-invasive methods. Between 2002-2009, the Mitumba and Kasekela communities experienced mean annual growth rates of 1.9% and 2.4%, respectively, while Kalande chimpanzees suffered a significant decline, with a mean growth rate of -6.5% to -7.4%, depending on population estimates. A rapid decline in Kalande was first noted in the 1990s and originally attributed to poaching and reduced food sources. However, between 2002-2009, we found a mean SIVcpz prevalence in Kalande of 46.1%, which was almost four times higher than the prevalence in Mitumba (12.7% and Kasekela (12.1%. To explore whether SIVcpz contributed to the Kalande decline, we used empirically determined SIVcpz transmission probabilities as well as chimpanzee mortality, mating and migration data to model the effect of viral pathogenicity on chimpanzee population growth. Deterministic calculations indicated that a prevalence of greater than 3.4% would result in negative growth and eventual population extinction, even using conservative mortality estimates. However, stochastic models revealed that in representative populations, SIVcpz, and not its host species, frequently went extinct. High SIVcpz transmission probability and excess mortality reduced population persistence, while intercommunity migration often rescued infected communities, even when immigrating females had a chance of being SIVcpz

  14. Proliferating Cellular Nuclear Antigen Expression as a Marker of Perivascular Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Brain perivascular macrophages are a major target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques and HIV infection in humans. Perivascular macrophages are distinct from parenchymal microglia in their location, morphology, expression of myeloid markers, and turnover in the CNS. In contrast to parenchymal microglia, perivascular macrophages are continuously repopulated by blood monocytes, which undergo maturation to macrophages on entering the central nervous system (CNS). ...

  15. Understanding the Process of Envelope Glycoprotein Incorporation into Virions in Simian and Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

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    José L. Affranchino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lentiviral envelope glycoproteins (Env mediate virus entry by interacting with specific receptors present at the cell surface, thereby determining viral tropism and pathogenesis. Therefore, Env incorporation into the virions formed by assembly of the viral Gag polyprotein at the plasma membrane of the infected cells is a key step in the replication cycle of lentiviruses. Besides being useful models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections in humans and valuable tools for developing AIDS therapies and vaccines, simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively are relevant animal retroviruses; the study of which provides important information on how lentiviral replication strategies have evolved. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the incorporation of the SIV and FIV Env glycoproteins into viral particles.

  16. Chemical inactivation of recombinant vaccinia viruses and the effects on antigenicity and immunogenicity of recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.J. Hulskotte (Ellen); M.E.M. Dings (Marlinda); S.G. Norley (Stephen); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe efficiency of paraformaldehyde (PFA) and binary ethylenimine (BEI) in inactivating recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV), present in baby hamster kidney cells expressing simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins (SIV-Env), was measured in a series of inactivation studies. Both

  17. Isolation of a simian immunodeficiency virus from a malbrouck (Chlorocebus cynosuros).

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    Carr, Michael; Kawaguchi, Akira; Sasaki, Michihito; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Ito, Kimihito; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Zhao, Guoyan; Wang, David; Orba, Yasuko; Ishii, Akihiro; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the diversity of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) among nonhuman primates (NHPs) in Zambia, next-generation sequencing was performed to determine the complete genome sequence of a novel SIV recovered by co-culturing African green monkey (AGM) peripheral blood lymphocytes with human CD4(+) T-cell lines. We report the first described SIV (SIVagmMAL-ZMB) from a malbrouck (Chlorocebus cynosuros). SIVagmMAL-ZMB was detected by real-time PCR analysis of splenic RNA in 3.2% (3/94) of AGMs and was undetectable in baboons (0/105). SIVagmMAL-ZMB possessed <80% nucleotide sequence identity to known SIV isolates and was located basally to vervet monkey SIV strains in all phylogenies.

  18. Variation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase within the simian immunodeficiency virus genome of RT-SHIV.

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    Debra A Wadford

    Full Text Available RT-SHIV is a chimera of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV containing the reverse transcriptase (RT-encoding region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 within the backbone of SIVmac239. It has been used in a non-human primate model for studies of non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTI and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. We and others have identified several mutations that arise in the "foreign" HIV-1 RT of RT-SHIV during in vivo replication. In this study we catalogued amino acid substitutions in the HIV-1 RT and in regions of the SIV backbone with which RT interacts that emerged 30 weeks post-infection from seven RT-SHIV-infected rhesus macaques. The virus set points varied from relatively high virus load, moderate virus load, to undetectable virus load. The G196R substitution in RT was detected from 6 of 7 animals at week 4 post-infection and remained in virus from 4 of 6 animals at week 30. Virus from four high virus load animals showed several common mutations within RT, including L74V or V75L, G196R, L214F, and K275R. The foreign RT from high virus load isolates exhibited as much variation as that of the highly variable envelope surface glycoprotein, and 10-fold higher than that of the native RT of SIVmac239. Isolates from moderate virus load animals showed much less variation in the foreign RT than the high virus load isolates. No variation was found in SIVmac239 genes known to interact with RT. Our results demonstrate substantial adaptation of the foreign HIV-1 RT in RT-SHIV-infected macaques, which most likely reflects selective pressure upon the foreign RT to attain optimal activity within the context of the chimeric RT-SHIV and the rhesus macaque host.

  19. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Course Is Predicted by the Extent of Virus Replication during Primary Infection

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    Staprans, Silvija I.; Dailey, Peter J.; Rosenthal, Ann; Horton, Chris; Grant, Robert M.; Lerche, Nicholas; Feinberg, Mark B.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between early viral infection events and immunodeficiency virus disease progression, quantitative-competitive and branched-DNA methods of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA quantitation were cross-validated and used to measure viremia following infection of rhesus macaques with the pathogenic SIVmac251 virus isolate. Excellent correlation between the methods suggests that both accurately approximate SIV copy number. Plasma viremia was evident 4 days postinfection, and rapid viral expansion led to peak viremia levels of 107 to 109 SIV RNA copies/ml by days 8 to 17. Limited resolution of primary viremia was accompanied by relatively short, though variable, times to the development of AIDS (81 to 630 days). The persistent high-level viremia observed following intravenous inoculation of SIVmac251 explains the aggressive disease course in this model. Survival analyses demonstrated that the disease course is established 8 to 17 days postinfection, when peak viremia is observed. The most significant predictor of disease progression was the extent of viral decline following peak viremia; larger decrements in viremia were associated with both lower steady-state viremia (P = 0.0005) and a reduced hazard of AIDS (P = 0.004). The data also unexpectedly suggested that following SIVmac251 infection, animals with the highest peak viremia were better able to control virus replication rather than more rapidly developing disease. Analysis of early viral replication dynamics should help define host responses that protect from disease progression and should provide quantitative measures to assess the extent to which protective responses may be induced by prophylactic vaccination. PMID:10233944

  20. Quantification of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus by SYBR Green RT-PCR Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LU; Li QIN; Guang-jie LIU; Si-ting ZHAO; Xiao-ping CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Plasma viral RNA load is widely accepted as the most relevant parameter to assess the status and progression of Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections. To accurately measure RNA levels of the virus, a one-step fluorescent quantitative assay was established based on the SYBR green Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The lower detection limit of the assay was 10 copies per reaction for the virus. This method was successfully applied to quantify SIVmac251 and SIVmac239 viruses produced in CEM×174 cells. Additionally, the performance of the SYBR green RT-PCR was assessed in a SIVmac251 infected rhesus macaque. The result demonstrated that the method could detect as little as 215 copies per milliliter of plasma and the dynamic pattern of viral load was highly consistent with previous results. With regard to convenience, sensitivity and accuracy our assay represents a realistic alternative to both branched-chain DNA (b-DNA) assays or real-time PCR assays based on TaqMan probes.

  1. Morphological changes of an inflammatory myopathy in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

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    Dalakas, M C; Gravell, M; London, W T; Cunningham, G; Sever, J L

    1987-09-01

    Eleven of 25 rhesus monkeys which died of simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) caused by infection with a type D retrovirus related to Mason-Pfizer monkey virus showed evidence of muscle weakness and atrophy and had elevated levels of muscle enzymes. Biopsies of affected muscle studied with enzyme histochemistry showed the characteristic features of polymyositis. Inflammatory cells consisting of lymphocytes, macrophages, and large vacuolated bizarre-shaped cells of undetermined type were surrounding or invading muscle fibers and were present in the perivascular spaces and endomysia septa. Within the perivascular infiltrates, lymphocytes were abundant but very few macrophages were present. Other myopathic features including profound proliferation of fibrous tissue, necrosis, and phagocytosis of muscle fibers were noted to a variable degree. The retrovirus was isolated from affected muscles. The clinical and historical features of polymyositis in rhesus monkeys with SAIDS are very similar to those of human polymyositis. The polymyositis in SAIDS induced by a type D retrovirus related to Mason-Pfizer monkey virus is an excellent primate model to study the mechanism and morphological changes of viral-induced muscle damage.

  2. Complex determinants of macrophage tropism in env of simian immunodeficiency virus.

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    Mori, K; Ringler, D J; Kodama, T; Desrosiers, R C

    1992-04-01

    Macrophage-tropic virus variants evolved during the course of infection of individual rhesus monkeys with cloned, non-macrophagetropic simian immunodeficiency virus. Specific changes in the envelope gene (env) were found to be primarily responsible for the dramatic increase in the ability of the virus to replicate in macrophages. Cloned viruses differing at nine amino acid positions in env exhibited a more than 100-fold difference in replicative capacity for primary cultures of rhesus monkey alveolar macrophages. At least five of the nine amino acid changes contributed to macrophage tropism. These determinants were distributed across the full length of env, including both the gp120 and gp41 products of the env gene. Furthermore, the emergence of macrophagetropic variants in vivo was associated with specific pathologic manifestations in which the macrophage is the major infected cell type. Thus, major determinants of macrophage tropism reside in env, they can be complex in nature, and the presence of macrophage-tropic virus variants in vivo can influence the disease course and disease manifestations.

  3. Vif Proteins from Diverse Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Lineages Have Distinct Binding Sites in A3C.

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    Zhang, Zeli; Gu, Qinyong; Jaguva Vasudevan, Ananda Ayyappan; Jeyaraj, Manimehalai; Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zielonka, Jörg; Perković, Mario; Heckel, Jens-Ove; Cichutek, Klaus; Häussinger, Dieter; Smits, Sander H J; Münk, Carsten

    2016-11-15

    Lentiviruses have evolved the Vif protein to counteract APOBEC3 (A3) restriction factors by targeting them for proteasomal degradation. Previous studies have identified important residues in the interface of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif and human APOBEC3C (hA3C) or human APOBEC3F (hA3F). However, the interaction between primate A3C proteins and HIV-1 Vif or natural HIV-1 Vif variants is still poorly understood. Here, we report that HIV-1 Vif is inactive against A3Cs of rhesus macaques (rhA3C), sooty mangabey monkeys (smmA3C), and African green monkeys (agmA3C), while HIV-2, African green monkey simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVagm), and SIVmac Vif proteins efficiently mediate the depletion of all tested A3Cs. We identified that residues N/H130 and Q133 in rhA3C and smmA3C are determinants for this HIV-1 Vif-triggered counteraction. We also found that the HIV-1 Vif interaction sites in helix 4 of hA3C and hA3F differ. Vif alleles from diverse HIV-1 subtypes were tested for degradation activities related to hA3C. The subtype F-1 Vif was identified to be inactive for degradation of hA3C and hA3F. The residues that determined F-1 Vif inactivity in the degradation of A3C/A3F were located in the C-terminal region (K167 and D182). Structural analysis of F-1 Vif revealed that impairing the internal salt bridge of E171-K167 restored reduction capacities to A3C/A3F. Furthermore, we found that D101 could also form an internal interaction with K167. Replacing D101 with glycine and R167 with lysine in NL4-3 Vif impaired its counteractivity to A3F and A3C. This finding indicates that internal interactions outside the A3 binding region in HIV-1 Vif influence the capacity to induce degradation of A3C/A3F.

  4. Proliferating Cellular Nuclear Antigen Expression as a Marker of Perivascular Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

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    Williams, Kenneth; Schwartz, Annette; Corey, Sarah; Orandle, Marlene; Kennedy, William; Thompson, Brendon; Alvarez, Xavier; Brown, Charlie; Gartner, Suzanne; Lackner, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Brain perivascular macrophages are a major target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques and HIV infection in humans. Perivascular macrophages are distinct from parenchymal microglia in their location, morphology, expression of myeloid markers, and turnover in the CNS. In contrast to parenchymal microglia, perivascular macrophages are continuously repopulated by blood monocytes, which undergo maturation to macrophages on entering the central nervous system (CNS). We studied differences in monocyte/macrophages in vivo that might account for preferential infection of perivascular macrophages by SIV. In situ hybridization for SIV and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry demonstrated that SIV-infected and PCNA-positive cells were predominantly found in perivascular cuffs of viremic animals and in histopathological lesions that characterize SIV encephalitis (SIVE) in animals with AIDS. Multilabel techniques including double-label immunohistochemistry and combined in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed numerous infected perivascular macrophages that were PCNA-positive. Outside the CNS, SIV-infected, PCNA-expressing macrophage subpopulations were found in the small intestine and lung of animals with AIDS. While PCNA is used as a marker of cell proliferation it is also strongly expressed in non-dividing cells undergoing DNA synthesis and repair. Therefore, more specific markers for cell proliferation including Ki-67, topoisomerase IIα, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation were used which indicated that PCNA-positive cells within SIVE lesions were not proliferating. These observations are consistent with perivascular macrophages as terminally differentiated, non-dividing cells and underscores biological differences that could potentially define mechanisms of preferential, productive infection of perivascular macrophages in the rhesus macaque model of neuroAIDS. These studies

  5. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  6. Early myeloid dendritic cell dysregulation is predictive of disease progression in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Viskam Wijewardana

    Full Text Available Myeloid dendritic cells (mDC are lost from blood in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection but the mechanism for this loss and its relationship to disease progression are not known. We studied the mDC response in blood and lymph nodes of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques with different disease outcomes. Early changes in blood mDC number were inversely correlated with virus load and reflective of eventual disease outcome, as animals with stable infection that remained disease-free for more than one year had average increases in blood mDC of 200% over preinfection levels at virus set-point, whereas animals that progressed rapidly to AIDS had significant loss of mDC at this time. Short term antiretroviral therapy (ART transiently reversed mDC loss in progressor animals, whereas discontinuation of ART resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in mDC over preinfection levels only in stable animals, approaching 10-fold in some cases. Progressive SIV infection was associated with increased CCR7 expression on blood mDC and an 8-fold increase in expression of CCL19 mRNA in lymph nodes, consistent with increased mDC recruitment. Paradoxically, lymph node mDC did not accumulate in progressive infection but rather died from caspase-8-dependent apoptosis that was reduced by ART, indicating that increased recruitment is offset by increased death. Lymph node mDC from both stable and progressor animals remained responsive to exogenous stimulation with a TLR7/8 agonist. These data suggest that mDC are mobilized in SIV infection but that an increase in the CCR7-CCL19 chemokine axis associated with high virus burden in progressive infection promotes exodus of activated mDC from blood into lymph nodes where they die from apoptosis. We suggest that inflamed lymph nodes serve as a sink for mDC through recruitment, activation and death that contributes to AIDS pathogenesis.

  7. Optimization of the doxycycline-dependent simian immunodeficiency virus through in vitro evolution

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    Piatak Mike

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination of macaques with live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV provides significant protection against the wild-type virus. The use of a live attenuated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV as AIDS vaccine in humans is however considered unsafe because of the risk that the attenuated virus may accumulate genetic changes during persistence and evolve to a pathogenic variant. We earlier presented a conditionally live HIV-1 variant that replicates exclusively in the presence of doxycycline (dox. Replication of this vaccine strain can be limited to the time that is needed to provide full protection through transient dox administration. Since the effectiveness and safety of such a conditionally live virus vaccine should be tested in macaques, we constructed a similar dox-dependent SIV variant. The Tat-TAR transcription control mechanism in this virus was inactivated through mutation and functionally replaced by the dox-inducible Tet-On regulatory system. This SIV-rtTA variant replicated in a dox-dependent manner in T cell lines, but not as efficiently as the parental SIVmac239 strain. Since macaque studies will likely require an efficiently replicating variant, we set out to optimize SIV-rtTA through in vitro viral evolution. Results Upon long-term culturing of SIV-rtTA, additional nucleotide substitutions were observed in TAR that affect the structure of this RNA element but that do not restore Tat binding. We demonstrate that the bulge and loop mutations that we had introduced in the TAR element of SIV-rtTA to inactivate the Tat-TAR mechanism, shifted the equilibrium between two alternative conformations of TAR. The additional TAR mutations observed in the evolved variants partially or completely restored this equilibrium, which suggests that the balance between the two TAR conformations is important for efficient viral replication. Moreover, SIV-rtTA acquired mutations in the U3 promoter region. We demonstrate

  8. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides.

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    Jamie L Schafer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I ligands on target cells. We previously reported that the binding of a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A1*002, to the inhibitory receptor Mamu-KIR3DL05 is stabilized by certain simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV peptides, but not by others. Here we investigated the functional implications of these interactions by testing SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 for the ability to modulate Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cell responses. Twenty-eight of 75 SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 suppressed the cytolytic activity of primary Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells, including three immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitopes previously shown to stabilize Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. Substitutions at C-terminal positions changed inhibitory peptides into disinhibitory peptides, and vice versa, without altering binding to Mamu-A1*002. The functional effects of these peptide variants on NK cell responses also corresponded to their effects on Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. In assays with mixtures of inhibitory and disinhibitory peptides, low concentrations of inhibitory peptides dominated to suppress NK cell responses. Consistent with the inhibition of Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells by viral epitopes presented by Mamu-A1*002, SIV replication was significantly higher in Mamu-A1*002+ CD4+ lymphocytes co-cultured with Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells than with Mamu-KIR3DL05- NK cells. These results demonstrate that viral peptides can differentially affect NK cell responses by modulating MHC class I interactions with inhibitory KIRs, and provide a mechanism by which immunodeficiency viruses may evade NK cell responses.

  9. Macaques with Rapid Disease Progression and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis Have a Unique Cytokine Profile in Peripheral Lymphoid Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The influence of host cytokine response on viral load, disease progression, and neurologic lesions was investigated in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaque model of AIDS. Cytokine gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and viral loads were evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR in lymph nodes of 5 control animals and 28 animals infected with SIVmac251 at the terminal st...

  10. Enhanced Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines in the Central Nervous System Is Associated with Neuroinvasion by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and the Development of Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-associated encephalitis. To examine this in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaque model of neuroAIDS, inflammatory cytokine gene expression was evaluated in the brains of macaques infected with pathogenic SIVmac251 by reverse transcriptase PCR. Interleukin-1 beta was readily detected in the brains of all animals evaluated, regardless of infection status o...

  11. Divergent Kinetics of Proliferating T Cell Subsets in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infection: SIV Eliminates the “First Responder” CD4+ T Cells in Primary Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Although increased lymphocyte turnover in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection has been reported in blood, there is little information on cell turnover in tissues, particularly in primary SIV infection. Here we examined the levels of proliferating T cell subsets in mucosal and peripheral lymphoid tissues of adult macaques throughout SIV infection. To specifically label cells in S-phase division, all animals were inoculated with bromodeoxyuridi...

  12. Brain Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected, Antiretroviral-Suppressed Macaques: a Functional Latent Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Claudia R; Abreu, Celina M; Queen, Suzanne E; Li, Ming; Price, Sarah; Shirk, Erin N; Engle, Elizabeth L; Forsyth, Ellen; Bullock, Brandon T; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Haase, Ashley T; Zink, M Christine; Mankowski, Joseph L; Clements, Janice E; Gama, Lucio

    2017-08-15

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cure requires an understanding of the cellular and anatomical sites harboring virus that contribute to viral rebound upon treatment interruption. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are reported in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Biomarkers for macrophage activation and neuronal damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-infected individuals demonstrate continued effects of HIV in brain and suggest that the central nervous system (CNS) may serve as a viral reservoir. Using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model for HIV encephalitis and AIDS, we evaluated whether infected cells persist in brain despite ART. Eight SIV-infected pig-tailed macaques were virally suppressed with ART, and plasma and CSF viremia levels were analyzed longitudinally. To assess whether virus persisted in brain macrophages (BrMΦ) in these macaques, we used a macrophage quantitative viral outgrowth assay (MΦ-QVOA), PCR, and in situ hybridization (ISH) to measure the frequency of infected cells and the levels of viral RNA and DNA in brain. Viral RNA in brain tissue of suppressed macaques was undetectable, although viral DNA was detected in all animals. The MΦ-QVOA demonstrated that the majority of suppressed animals contained latently infected BrMΦ. We also showed that virus produced in the MΦ-QVOAs was replication competent, suggesting that latently infected BrMΦ are capable of reestablishing productive infection upon treatment interruption. This report provides the first confirmation of the presence of replication-competent SIV in BrMΦ of ART-suppressed macaques and suggests that the highly debated issue of viral latency in macrophages, at least in brain, has been addressed in SIV-infected macaques treated with ART.IMPORTANCE Resting CD4(+) T cells are currently the only cells that fit the definition of a latent reservoir. However, recent evidence suggests that HIV

  13. Derivation and Characterization of a CD4-Independent, Non-CD4-Tropic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, Adrienne E.; Haggarty, Beth; Jordan, Andrea P. O.; Romano, Josephine; Leslie, George J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Marx, Preston A.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Robinson, James E.; Betts, Michael R.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4 tropism is conserved among all primate lentiviruses and likely contributes to viral pathogenesis by targeting cells that are critical for adaptive antiviral immune responses. Although CD4-independent variants of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been described that can utilize the coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4 in the absence of CD4, these viruses typically retain their CD4 binding sites and still can interact with CD4. We describe the derivation of a novel CD4-independent variant of pathogenic SIVmac239, termed iMac239, that was used to derive an infectious R5-tropic SIV lacking a CD4 binding site. Of the seven mutations that differentiate iMac239 from wild-type SIVmac239, a single change (D178G) in the V1/V2 region was sufficient to confer CD4 independence in cell-cell fusion assays, although other mutations were required for replication competence. Like other CD4-independent viruses, iMac239 was highly neutralization sensitive, although mutations were identified that could confer CD4-independent infection without increasing its neutralization sensitivity. Strikingly, iMac239 retained the ability to replicate in cell lines and primary cells even when its CD4 binding site had been ablated by deletion of a highly conserved aspartic acid at position 385, which, for HIV-1, plays a critical role in CD4 binding. iMac239, with and without the D385 deletion, exhibited an expanded host range in primary rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells that included CCR5+ CD8+ T cells. As the first non-CD4-tropic SIV, iMac239-ΔD385 will afford the opportunity to directly assess the in vivo role of CD4 targeting on pathogenesis and host immune responses. IMPORTANCE CD4 tropism is an invariant feature of primate lentiviruses and likely plays a key role in pathogenesis by focusing viral infection onto cells that mediate adaptive immune responses and in protecting virions attached to cells from neutralizing antibodies. Although CD4

  14. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Cote d'Ivoire.

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    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs. While simian foamy virus (SFV and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d'Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%, two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d'Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%, 8/858 (0.93%, and 18/858 (2.1% were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1 or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7. We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d'Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  15. Identification of an Enterocytozoon bieneusi-like microsporidian parasite in simian-immunodeficiency-virus-inoculated macaques with hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, K G; Carville, A; Shvetz, D; MacKey, J; Tzipori, S; Lackner, A A

    1997-04-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a common opportunistic pathogen of human patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) causing significant morbidity and mortality. In a retrospective analysis utilizing conventional histochemical techniques, in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and ultrastructural examination, we identified 18 simian-immunodeficiency-virus-infected macaques (16 Macaca mulatta, 1 M. nemestrina, and 1 M. cyclopis) with Enterocytozoon infection of the hepatobiliary system and small intestine. The organisms were readily identified in the bile ducts and gall bladder by special stains and by in situ hybridization using a probe directed against the small subunit ribosomal RNA of human origin E. bieneusi. Infection of the biliary system was associated with a nonsuppurative and proliferative cholecystitis and choledochitis. Hepatic involvement was characterized by bridging portal fibrosis and nodular hepatocellular regeneration accompanied by marked bile ductular and septal duct hyperplasia. Ultrastructurally, all developmental stages of the organism were found in direct contact with the host cell cytoplasm; spores and sporoblasts contained a double layer of polar tubes. Sequencing of a 607-bp segment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA revealed 97 and 100% identity to two clones of small subunit ribosomal RNA derived from E. bieneusi of human origin. Extensive morphological and genetic similarities between the simian and human enterocytozoons suggest that experimentally infected macaques may serve as a useful model of microsporidial infection in AIDS.

  16. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors.

  17. Pathogenic infection of Macaca nemestrina with a CCR5-tropic subtype-C simian-human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ruijiang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina have been used in AIDS research for years, less is known about the early immunopathogenic events in this species, as compared to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Similarly, the events in early infection are well-characterized for simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV, but less so for chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV, although the latter have been widely used in HIV vaccine studies. Here, we report the consequences of intrarectal infection with a CCR5-tropic clade C SHIV-1157ipd3N4 in pig-tailed macaques. Results Plasma and cell-associated virus was detectable in peripheral blood and intestinal tissues of all four pig-tailed macaques following intrarectal inoculation with SHIV-1157ipd3N4. We also observed a rapid and irreversible loss of CD4+ T cells at multiple mucosal sites, resulting in a marked decrease of CD4:CD8 T cell ratios 0.5–4 weeks after inoculation. This depletion targeted subsets of CD4+ T cells expressing the CCR5 coreceptor and having a CD28-CD95+ effector memory phenotype, consistent with the R5-tropism of SHIV-1157ipd3N4. All three animals that were studied beyond the acute phase seroconverted as early as week 4, with two developing cross-clade neutralizing antibody responses by week 24. These two animals also demonstrated persistent plasma viremia for >48 weeks. One of these animals developed AIDS, as shown by peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell depletion starting at 20 weeks post inoculation. Conclusion These findings indicate that SHIV-1157ipd3N4-induced pathogenesis in pig-tailed macaques followed a similar course as SIV-infected rhesus macaques. Thus, R5 SHIV-C-infection of pig-tailed macaques could provide a useful and relevant model for AIDS vaccine and pathogenesis research.

  18. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally.

  19. Promoter-targeted siRNAs induce gene silencing of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Heidi G W; Suzuki, Kazuo; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2008-03-01

    RNA interference is a conserved process by which sequence-specific double-stranded RNA is converted into small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) that can induce gene silencing via two pathways: post-transcriptional gene silencing and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). We previously reported TGS of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) could be induced by siRNAs targeting regions within its 5'-long-terminal repeat (5'LTR) promoter region. Here we show that promoter-targeted siRNAs can also induce silencing of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication by similar mechanisms. Suppression of productive infection was achieved in two different cell lines: a CD4, CCR5, CXCR4 expressing HeLa cell line (MAGIC-5) and in a human lymphoid cell line (CEMx174). HpaII digestion demonstrated induction of methylation at a CpG site within the SIV promoter region following siRNA-induced suppression. Both 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC) and trichostatin A (TSA), inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylation, respectively, partially reversed the silencing effect. Furthermore, using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays we found enrichment in the region of the LTR of heterochromatin markers dimethylated histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27) in the siRNA silenced cultures. Together, these results strongly suggest certain siRNAs targeting the promoter region of SIV can effect viral silencing through the induction of epigenetic changes.

  20. Chronic Binge Alcohol Administration Dysregulates Hippocampal Genes Involved in Immunity and Neurogenesis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUD exacerbate neurocognitive dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV+ patients. We have shown that chronic binge alcohol (CBA administration (13–14 g EtOH/kg/wk prior to and during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in rhesus macaques unmasks learning deficits in operant learning and memory tasks. The underlying mechanisms of neurocognitive alterations due to alcohol and SIV are not known. This exploratory study examined the CBA-induced differential expression of hippocampal genes in SIV-infected (CBA/SIV+; n = 2 macaques in contrast to those of sucrose administered, SIV-infected (SUC/SIV+; n = 2 macaques. Transcriptomes of hippocampal samples dissected from brains obtained at necropsy (16 months post-SIV inoculation were analyzed to determine differentially expressed genes. MetaCore from Thomson Reuters revealed enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, immune responses, and neurodevelopment. Functional relevance of these alterations was examined in vitro by exposing murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs to ethanol (EtOH and HIV trans-activator of transcription (Tat protein. EtOH impaired NPC differentiation as indicated by decreased βIII tubulin expression. These findings suggest a role for neuroinflammation and neurogenesis in CBA/SIV neuropathogenesis and warrant further investigation of their potential contribution to CBA-mediated neurobehavioral deficits.

  1. Lineage-Specific Differences between the gp120 Inner Domain Layer 3 of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and That of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shilei; Medjahed, Halima; Prévost, Jérémie; Coutu, Mathieu; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-11-15

    Binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein to CD4 triggers conformational changes in gp120 that promote its interaction with one of the chemokine receptors, usually CCR5, ultimately leading to gp41-mediated virus-cell membrane fusion and entry. We previously described that topological layers (layer 1, layer 2, and layer 3) in the gp120 inner domain contribute to gp120-trimer association in the unliganded state but also help secure CD4 binding. Relative to layer 1 of HIV-1 gp120, the SIVmac239 gp120 layer 1 plays a more prominent role in maintaining gp120-trimer association but is minimally involved in promoting CD4 binding, which could be explained by the existence of a well-conserved tryptophan at position 375 (Trp 375) in HIV-2/SIVsmm. In this study, we investigated the role of SIV layer 3 in viral entry, cell-to-cell fusion, and CD4 binding. We observed that a network of interactions involving some residues of the β8-α5 region in SIVmac239 layer 3 may contribute to CD4 binding by helping shape the nearby Phe 43 cavity, which directly contacts CD4. In summary, our results suggest that layer 3 in SIV has a greater impact on CD4 binding than in HIV-1. This work defines lineage-specific differences in layer 3 from HIV-1 and that from SIV.

  2. Personality and serotonin transporter genotype interact with social context to affect immunity and viral set-point in simian immunodeficiency virus disease

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, stress has been a suspected contributor to the wide variation seen in disease progression, and some evidence supports this idea. Not all individuals respond to a stressor in the same way, however, and little is known about the biological mechanisms by which variations in individuals’ responses to their environment affect disease-relevant immunologic processes. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus/rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we explored how persona...

  3. A vaccine against CCR5 protects a subset of macaques upon intravaginal challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac251.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompay, Koen K A; Hunter, Zoe; Jayashankar, Kartika; Peabody, Julianne; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia C; Keele, Brandon F; Jensen, Kara; Abel, Kristina; Chackerian, Bryce

    2014-02-01

    As an alternative to targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we have developed vaccines targeting CCR5, a self-protein critically involved in HIV replication and pathogenesis. By displaying peptides derived from CCR5 at high density on the surface of virus-like particles, we can efficiently induce high-titer IgG antibodies against this self-molecule. Here, we investigated whether prophylactic immunization of rhesus macaques with a particle-based vaccine targeting two regions of macaque CCR5 could prevent or suppress vaginal infection with highly virulent SIVmac251. Twelve macaques were vaccinated with a bacteriophage Qß-based vaccine targeting macaque CCR5 (Qß.CCR5). Six control animals were immunized with the Qß platform alone. All animals immunized with Qß.CCR5 developed high-titer anti-CCR5 antibody responses. Macaques were vaginally challenged with a high dose of SIVmac251. The mean peak viral RNA levels in the vaccinated groups were 30-fold lower than in the control group (10(6.8) versus 10(8.3) copies/ml plasma). Three of the 12 vaccinated macaques dramatically suppressed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication: peak viral loads were low (10(3) to 10(4) RNA copies/ml), and SIV RNA became undetectable from 6 weeks onward. No viral RNA or DNA could be detected in colon and lymph node biopsy specimens collected 13 months after challenge. In vivo depletion of CD8(+) cells failed to induce a viral rebound. However, once anti-CCR5 antibody responses had waned, the 3 animals became infected after intravaginal and/or intravenous rechallenge. In conclusion, vaccination against CCR5 was associated with dramatic suppression of virus replication in a subset (25%) of macaques. These data support further research of vaccination against CCR5 to combat HIV infection.

  4. Lineage-specific differences between human and simian immunodeficiency virus regulation of gp120 trimer association and CD4 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, Andrés; Pacheco, Beatriz; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pancera, Marie; Herschhorn, Alon; Wang, Liping; Zeng, Xing; Desormeaux, Anik; Kwong, Peter D; Sodroski, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Metastable conformations of the gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) must be maintained in the unliganded state of the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Binding of gp120 to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers the transition to an open conformation of the trimer, promoting interaction with the CCR5 chemokine receptor and ultimately leading to gp41-mediated virus-cell membrane fusion and entry. Topological layers in the gp120 inner domain contribute to gp120-trimer association in the unliganded state and to CD4 binding. Here we describe similarities and differences between HIV-1 and SIVmac gp120. In both viruses, the gp120 N/C termini and the inner domain β-sandwich and layer 2 support the noncovalent association of gp120 with the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Layer 1 of the SIVmac gp120 inner domain contributes more to trimer association than the corresponding region of HIV-1 gp120. On the other hand, layer 1 plays an important role in stabilizing the CD4-bound conformation of HIV-1 but not SIVmac gp120 and thus contributes to HIV-1 binding to CD4. In SIVmac, CD4 binding is instead enhanced by tryptophan 375, which fills the Phe 43 cavity of gp120. Activation of SIVmac by soluble CD4 is dependent on tryptophan 375 and on layer 1 residues that determine a tight association of gp120 with the trimer. Distinct biological requirements for CD4 usage have resulted in lineage-specific differences in the HIV-1 and SIV gp120 structures that modulate trimer association and CD4 binding.

  5. Protection of Macaques against pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6PD by passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascola, J R; Lewis, M G; Stiegler, G; Harris, D; VanCott, T C; Hayes, D; Louder, M K; Brown, C R; Sapan, C V; Frankel, S S; Lu, Y; Robb, M L; Katinger, H; Birx, D L

    1999-05-01

    The role of antibody in protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been difficult to study in animal models because most primary HIV-1 strains do not infect nonhuman primates. Using a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) based on the envelope of a primary isolate (HIV-89.6), we performed passive-transfer experiments in rhesus macaques to study the role of anti-envelope antibodies in protection. Based on prior in vitro data showing neutralization synergy by antibody combinations, we evaluated HIV immune globulin (HIVIG), and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 given alone, compared with the double combination 2F5/2G12 and the triple combination HIVIG/2F5/2G12. Antibodies were administered 24 h prior to intravenous challenge with the pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD. Six control monkeys displayed high plasma viremia, rapid CD4(+)-cell decline, and clinical AIDS within 14 weeks. Of six animals given HIVIG/2F5/2G12, three were completely protected; the remaining three animals became SHIV infected but displayed reduced plasma viremia and near normal CD4(+)-cell counts. One of three monkeys given 2F5/2G12 exhibited only transient evidence of infection; the other two had marked reductions in viral load. All monkeys that received HIVIG, 2F5, or 2G12 alone became infected and developed high-level plasma viremia. However, compared to controls, monkeys that received HIVIG or MAb 2G12 displayed a less profound drop in CD4(+) T cells and a more benign clinical course. These data indicate a general correlation between in vitro neutralization and protection and suggest that a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibody should have a protective effect against HIV-1 infection or disease.

  6. Loss of effector and anti-inflammatory natural killer T lymphocyte function in pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Namita Rout

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic immune activation is a key determinant of AIDS progression in HIV-infected humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected macaques but is singularly absent in SIV-infected natural hosts. To investigate whether natural killer T (NKT lymphocytes contribute to the differential modulation of immune activation in AIDS-susceptible and AIDS-resistant hosts, we compared NKT function in macaques and sooty mangabeys in the absence and presence of SIV infection. Cynomolgus macaques had significantly higher frequencies of circulating invariant NKT lymphocytes compared to both rhesus macaques and AIDS-resistant sooty mangabeys. Despite this difference, mangabey NKT lymphocytes were functionally distinct from both macaque species in their ability to secrete significantly more IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17 in response to CD1d/α-galactosylceramide stimulation. While NKT number and function remained intact in SIV-infected mangabeys, there was a profound reduction in NKT activation-induced, but not mitogen-induced, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-10, and TGF-β in SIV-infected macaques. SIV-infected macaques also showed a selective decline in CD4(+ NKT lymphocytes which correlated significantly with an increase in circulating activated memory CD4(+ T lymphocytes. Macaques with lower pre-infection NKT frequencies showed a significantly greater CD4(+ T lymphocyte decline post SIV infection. The disparate effect of SIV infection on NKT function in mangabeys and macaques could be a manifestation of their differential susceptibility to AIDS. Alternately, these data also raise the possibility that loss of anti-inflammatory NKT function promotes chronic immune activation in pathogenic SIV infection, while intact NKT function helps to protect natural hosts from developing immunodeficiency and aberrant immune activation.

  7. Diverse Host Responses and Outcomes following Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239 Infection in Sooty Mangabeys and Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amitinder; Grant, Robert M.; Means, Robert E.; McClure, Harold; Feinberg, Mark; Johnson, R. Paul

    1998-01-01

    Sooty mangabeys naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) do not develop immunodeficiency despite the presence of viral loads of 105 to 107 RNA copies/ml. To investigate the basis of apathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys, three sooty mangabeys and three rhesus macaques were inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 and evaluated longitudinally for 1 year. SIVmac239 infection of sooty mangabeys resulted in 2- to 4-log-lower viral loads than in macaques and did not reproduce the high viral loads observed in natural SIVsmm infection. During acute SIV infection, polyclonal cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity coincident with decline in peak plasma viremia was observed in both macaques and mangabeys; 8 to 20 weeks later, CTL activity declined in the macaques but was sustained and broadly directed in the mangabeys. Neutralizing antibodies to SIVmac239 were detected in the macaques but not the mangabeys. Differences in expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes or in the percentage of naive phenotype T cells expressing CD45RA and CD62L-selection did not correlate with development of AIDS in rhesus macaques. In macaques, the proportion of CD4+ T lymphocytes expressing CD25 declined during SIV infection, while in mangabeys, CD25-expressing CD4+ T lymphocytes increased. Longitudinal evaluation of cytokine secretion by flow cytometric analysis of unstimulated lymphocytes revealed elevation of interleukin-2 and gamma interferon in a macaque and only interleukin-10 in a concurrently infected mangabey during acute SIV infection. Differences in host responses following experimental SIVmac239 infection may be associated with the divergent outcome in sooty mangabeys and rhesus macaques. PMID:9811693

  8. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) type 3, also known as lymphoid tissue inducer cells, plays a major role in both the development and remodeling of organized lymphoid tissues and the maintenance of adaptive immune responses. HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection causes breakdown of intestinal barriers resulting in microbial translocation, leading to systemic immune activation and disease progression. However, the effects of HIV/SIV infection on ILC3 are unknown. Here, we analyzed ILC3 from mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues in chronically SIV-infected macaques and uninfected controls. ILC3 cells were defined and identified in macaque lymphoid tissues as non-T, non-B (lineage-negative), c-Kit(+)IL-7Rα(+) (CD117(+)CD127(+)) cells. These ILC3 cells highly expressed CD90 (∼ 63%) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and produced IL-17 (∼ 63%), IL-22 (∼ 36%), and TNF-α (∼ 72%) but did not coexpress CD4 or NK cell markers. The intestinal ILC3 cell loss correlated with the reduction of total CD4(+) T cells and T helper (Th)17 and Th22 cells in the gut during SIV infection (P lymphoid tissues in SIV-infected macaques, further contributing to the HIV-induced impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue structure and function, especially in mucosal tissues.

  9. Acute toxicity study of a simian immunodeficiency virus-based lentiviral vector for retinal gene transfer in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Miyazaki, Masanori; Kohno, Ri-ichiro; Murakami, Yusuke; Murata, Toshinori; Goto, Yoshinobu; Tabata, Toshiaki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ono, Fumiko; Suzuki, Toshimichi; Ageyama, Naohide; Terao, Keiji; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Sueishi, Katsuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-09-01

    A phase 1 clinical trial evaluating the safety of gene therapy for patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or retinoblastoma has been completed without problems. The efficacy of gene therapy for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) was reported by three groups. Gene therapy may thus hold promise as a therapeutic method for the treatment of intractable ocular diseases. However, it will first be important to precisely evaluate the efficiency and safety of alternative gene transfer vectors in a preclinical study using large animals. In the present study, we evaluated the acute local (ophthalmic) and systemic toxicity of our simian immunodeficiency virus from African green monkeys (SIVagm)-based lentiviral vectors carrying human pigment epithelium-derived factor (SIV-hPEDF) for transferring genes into nonhuman primate retinas. Transient inflammation and elevation of intraocular pressure were observed in some animals, but these effects were not dose dependent. Electroretinograms (ERGs), including multifocal ERGs, revealed no remarkable change in retinal function. Histopathologically, SIV-hPEDF administration resulted in a certain degree of inflammatory reaction and no apparent structural destruction in retinal tissue. Regarding systemic toxicity, none of the animals died, and none showed any serious side effects during the experimental course. No vector leakage was detected in serum or urine samples. We thus propose that SIVagm-mediated stable gene transfer might be useful and safe for ocular gene transfer in a clinical setting.

  10. Macaques with Rapid Disease Progression and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis Have a Unique Cytokine Profile in Peripheral Lymphoid Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandle, Marlene S.; Williams, Kenneth C.; MacLean, Andrew G.; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of host cytokine response on viral load, disease progression, and neurologic lesions was investigated in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaque model of AIDS. Cytokine gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and viral loads were evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR in lymph nodes of 5 control animals and 28 animals infected with SIVmac251 at the terminal stages of AIDS. Infected animals showed higher expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs compared with controls. Levels of all cytokines were comparable between animals with rapid (survival, 200 days) disease progression. However, among rapid progressors, the eight animals with SIV encephalitis had a unique cytokine profile (increased IL-2, IL-6, and IFN-γ) that was associated with higher viral loads. These observations provide evidence that host cytokine responses may influence SIV neuropathogenesis independent of disease progression. PMID:11287599

  11. Transmembrane envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIV-mac exist as homodimers.

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, M A; Laurent, A G; McClure, J; Krust, B; Montagnier, L; Hovanessian, A G

    1990-01-01

    An 80-kilodalton glycoprotein (gp80) was produced in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2)-infected cells along with three envelope glycoproteins that we have recently reported: the extracellular glycoprotein (gp125), the envelope glycoprotein precursor (gp140), and the transient dimeric form of the precursor (gp300). gp125 and gp80 were detectable after the synthesis of gp140 and the formation of gp300. Using a specific monoclonal antibody, we showed here that gp80 is a dimeric form of...

  12. Capsid proteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Pathak, Vinay K; Peng, Weiqun; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-09-01

    We have recently shown that the Gag polyproteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 can coassemble and functionally complement each other. During virion maturation, the Gag polyproteins undergo proteolytic cleavage to release mature proteins including capsid (CA), which refolds and forms the outer shell of a cone-shaped mature core. Less than one-half of the CA proteins present within the HIV-1 virion are required to form the mature core. Therefore, it is unclear whether the mature core in virions containing both HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag consists of CA proteins from a single virus or from both viruses. To determine whether CA proteins from two different viruses can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses, we exploited the specificity of the tripartite motif 5alpha protein from the rhesus monkey (rhTRIM5alpha) for cores containing HIV-1 CA (hCA) but not the simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac) CA protein (sCA). If hCA and sCA cannot coassemble into the same core when equal amounts of sCA and hCA are coexpressed, the infectivities of such virus preparations in cells should be inhibited less than twofold by rhTRIM5alpha. However, if hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same core structure to form a mixed core, rhTRIM5alpha would be able to recognize such cores and significantly restrict virus infectivity. We examined the restriction phenotypes of viruses containing both hCA and sCA. Our results indicate that hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same mature core to produce infectious virus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of functional coassembly of heterologous CA protein into the retroviral core.

  13. A quantitative measurement of antiviral activity of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drugs against simian immunodeficiency virus infection: dose-response curve slope strongly influences class-specific inhibitory potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E; Siliciano, Robert F

    2012-10-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques is so far the best animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) studies, but suppressing viral replication in infected animals remains challenging. Using a novel single-round infectivity assay, we quantitated the antiviral activities of antiretroviral drugs against SIV. Our results emphasize the importance of the dose-response curve slope in determining the inhibitory potential of antiretroviral drugs and provide useful information for regimen selection in treating SIV-infected animals in models of therapy and virus eradication.

  14. Persistent Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Causes Ultimate Depletion of Follicular Th Cells in AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Malam, Naomi; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are critical for the generation of humoral immune responses to pathogenic infections, providing help for B cell development, survival, and affinity maturation of Abs. Although CD4(+) Tfh cells are reported to accumulate in HIV or SIV infection, we found that germinal center Tfh cells, defined in this study as CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH)CD4(+) T cells, did not consistently accumulate in chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques compared with those infected with less pathogenic simian HIV, vaccinated and SIVmac-challenged, or SIVmac-infected Mamu-A*01(+) macaques, all of which are associated with some control of virus replication and slower disease progression. Interestingly, CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH) Tfh cells in lymphoid tissues were eventually depleted in macaques with AIDS compared with the other cohorts. Chronic activation and proliferation of CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH) Tfh were increased, but PD-L2 expression was downregulated on B cells, possibly resulting in germinal center Tfh cell apoptosis. Together, these findings suggest that changes in CXCR5(+)PD-1(HIGH) Tfh cells in lymph nodes correlate with immune control during infection, and their loss or dysregulation contribute to impairment of B cell responses and progression to AIDS.

  15. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Prime and Intramuscular Protein Boost Provides Protection against Intrarectal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge in Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Tian, Baoping; Cleveland, Brad; Guo, Wenjin; Polacino, Patricia; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2015-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition occurs predominantly through mucosal transmission. We hypothesized that greater mucosal immune responses and protective efficacy against mucosal HIV-1 infection may be achieved by prime-boost immunization at mucosal sites. We used a macaque model to determine the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of orally delivered, replication-competent but attenuated recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full-length HIV-1 SF162 envelope (Env) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag-Pol proteins. We examined the dose and route that are suitable for oral immunization with recombinant vaccinia viruses. We showed that sublingual inoculation of two vaccinia virus-naive pigtailed macaques with 5 × 10(8) PFU of recombinant vaccinia viruses was safe. However, sublingual inoculation with a higher dose or tonsillar inoculation resulted in secondary oral lesions, indicating the need to optimize the dose and route for oral immunization with replication-competent vaccinia virus vectors. Oral priming alone elicited antibody responses to vaccinia virus and to the SF162 Env protein. Intramuscular immunization with the SF162 gp120 protein at either 20 or 21 weeks postpriming resulted in a significant boost in antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. Furthermore, we showed that immune responses induced by recombinant vaccinia virus priming and intramuscular protein boosting provided protection against intrarectal challenge with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162-P4.

  16. Distinct Patterns of Tryptophan Maintenance in Tissues during Kynurenine Pathway Activation in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

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    Julia L Drewes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of the kynurenine pathway (KP of tryptophan catabolism has been proposed to contribute to T cell dysfunction during human/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV infection via depletion of local tryptophan levels and production of immunomodulatory KP metabolites. However, while changes in tryptophan and KP metabolites have been observed in plasma, their levels in lymphoid tissues and levels of enzymes downstream of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1 have been relatively unexplored. We used our SIV-infected pigtailed macaque model to analyze longitudinal changes in KP metabolites and enzymes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and NanoString nCounter gene expression analysis, respectively, in spleen and blood compared to changes previously established in brain and CSF. We found that tryptophan levels were remarkably stable in tissue sites despite robust depletion in the circulating plasma and CSF. We also demonstrated that intracellular tryptophan reserves were maintained in cultured cells even in the presence of depleted extracellular tryptophan levels. Kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, quinolinic acid, and the KP enzymes all displayed highly divergent patterns in the sites examined, though IDO1 expression always correlated with local kynurenine/tryptophan ratios. Finally, we demonstrated by FACS that myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and cells of monocytic lineage were the highest producers of IDO1 in chronically infected spleens. Overall our study reveals insights into the tissue-specific regulation of KP enzymes and metabolites and, in particular, highlights the multiple mechanisms by which cells and tissues seek to prevent TRP starvation during inflammation.

  17. Control of simian immunodeficiency virus replication by vaccine-induced Gag- and Vif-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Nami; Takahashi, Naofumi; Seki, Sayuri; Nomura, Takushi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Shu, Tsugumine; Naruse, Taeko K; Kimura, Akinori; Matano, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    For development of an effective T cell-based AIDS vaccine, it is critical to define the antigens that elicit the most potent responses. Recent studies have suggested that Gag-specific and possibly Vif/Nef-specific CD8(+) T cells can be important in control of the AIDS virus. Here, we tested whether induction of these CD8(+) T cells by prophylactic vaccination can result in control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication in Burmese rhesus macaques sharing the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) haplotype 90-010-Ie associated with dominant Nef-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. In the first group vaccinated with Gag-expressing vectors (n = 5 animals), three animals that showed efficient Gag-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in the acute phase postchallenge controlled SIV replication. In the second group vaccinated with Vif- and Nef-expressing vectors (n = 6 animals), three animals that elicited Vif-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in the acute phase showed SIV control, whereas the remaining three with Nef-specific but not Vif-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses failed to control SIV replication. Analysis of 18 animals, consisting of seven unvaccinated noncontrollers and the 11 vaccinees described above, revealed that the sum of Gag- and Vif-specific CD8(+) T-cell frequencies in the acute phase was inversely correlated with plasma viral loads in the chronic phase. Our results suggest that replication of the AIDS virus can be controlled by vaccine-induced subdominant Gag/Vif epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells, providing a rationale for the induction of Gag- and/or Vif-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses by prophylactic AIDS vaccines.

  18. Critical Role for Monocytes/Macrophages in Rapid Progression to AIDS in Pediatric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chie; Merino, Kristen M; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Wang, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Xavier A; Wakao, Hiroshi; Mori, Kazuyasu; Kim, Woong-Ki; Veazey, Ronald S; Didier, Elizabeth S; Kuroda, Marcelo J

    2017-09-01

    Infant humans and rhesus macaques infected with the human or simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV or SIV), respectively, express higher viral loads and progress more rapidly to AIDS than infected adults. Activated memory CD4(+) T cells in intestinal tissues are major primary target cells for SIV/HIV infection, and massive depletion of these cells is considered a major cause of immunodeficiency. Monocytes and macrophages are important cells of innate immunity and also are targets of HIV/SIV infection. We reported previously that a high peripheral blood monocyte turnover rate was predictive for the onset of disease progression to AIDS in SIV-infected adult macaques. The purpose of this study was to determine if earlier or higher infection of monocytes/macrophages contributes to the more rapid progression to AIDS in infants. We observed that uninfected infant rhesus macaques exhibited higher physiologic baseline monocyte turnover than adults. Early after SIV infection, the monocyte turnover further increased, and it remained high during progression to AIDS. A high percentage of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP nick end label (TUNEL)-positive macrophages in the lymph nodes (LNs) and intestine corresponded with an increasing number of macrophages derived from circulating monocytes (bromodeoxyuridine positive [BrdU(+)] CD163(+)), suggesting that the increased blood monocyte turnover was required to rapidly replenish destroyed tissue macrophages. Immunofluorescence analysis further demonstrated that macrophages were a significant portion of the virus-producing cells found in LNs, intestinal tissues, and lungs. The higher baseline monocyte turnover in infant macaques and subsequent macrophage damage by SIV infection may help explain the basis of more rapid disease progression to AIDS in infants.IMPORTANCE HIV infection progresses much more rapidly in pediatric cases than in adults; however, the mechanism for this difference is unclear. Using the rhesus macaque model

  19. Lentiviral Gag assembly analyzed through the functional characterization of chimeric simian immunodeficiency viruses expressing different domains of the feline immunodeficiency virus capsid protein.

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    María J Esteva

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the functional relationship between the capsid (CA domains of the Gag polyproteins of simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively, we constructed chimeric SIVs in which the CA-coding region was partially or totally replaced by the equivalent region of the FIV CA. The phenotypic characterization of the chimeras allowed us to group them into three categories: the chimeric viruses that, while being assembly-competent, exhibit a virion-associated unstable FIV CA; a second group represented only by the chimeric SIV carrying the N-terminal domain (NTD of the FIV CA which proved to be assembly-defective; and a third group constituted by the chimeric viruses that produce virions exhibiting a mature and stable FIV CA protein, and which incorporate the envelope glycoprotein and contain wild-type levels of viral genome RNA and reverse transcriptase. Further analysis of the latter group of chimeric SIVs demonstrated that they are non-infectious due to a post-entry impairment, such as uncoating of the viral core, reverse transcription or nuclear import of the preintegration complex. Furthermore, we show here that the carboxyl-terminus domain (CTD of the FIV CA has an intrinsic ability to dimerize in vitro and form high-molecular-weight oligomers, which, together with our finding that the FIV CA-CTD is sufficient to confer assembly competence to the resulting chimeric SIV Gag polyprotein, provides evidence that the CA-CTD exhibits more functional plasticity than the CA-NTD. Taken together, our results provide relevant information on the biological relationship between the CA proteins of primate and nonprimate lentiviruses.

  20. Pentavalent HIV-1 vaccine protects against simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Todd; Pollara, Justin; Santra, Sampa; Vandergrift, Nathan; Pittala, Srivamshi; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Shen, Xiaoying; Parks, Robert; Goodman, Derrick; Eaton, Amanda; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Saunders, Kevin O.; Weiner, Joshua A.; Scearce, Richard; Sutherland, Laura L.; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Reed, Steven G.; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Theis, James F.; Pinter, Abraham; Montefiori, David C.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Peachman, Kristina K.; Rao, Mangala; Michael, Nelson L.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia; Ferrari, Guido; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2017-01-01

    The RV144 Thai trial HIV-1 vaccine of recombinant poxvirus (ALVAC) and recombinant HIV-1 gp120 subtype B/subtype E (B/E) proteins demonstrated 31% vaccine efficacy. Here we design an ALVAC/Pentavalent B/E/E/E/E vaccine to increase the diversity of gp120 motifs in the immunogen to elicit a broader antibody response and enhance protection. We find that immunization of rhesus macaques with the pentavalent vaccine results in protection of 55% of pentavalent-vaccine-immunized macaques from simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. Systems serology of the antibody responses identifies plasma antibody binding to HIV-infected cells, peak ADCC antibody titres, NK cell-mediated ADCC and antibody-mediated activation of MIP-1β in NK cells as the four immunological parameters that best predict decreased infection risk that are improved by the pentavalent vaccine. Thus inclusion of additional gp120 immunogens to a pox-prime/protein boost regimen can augment antibody responses and enhance protection from a SHIV challenge in rhesus macaques. PMID:28593989

  1. Increased cellular immune responses and CD4+ T-cell proliferation correlate with reduced plasma viral load in SIV challenged recombinant simian varicella virus - simian immunodeficiency virus (rSVV-SIV vaccinated rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahar Bapi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV-research. Our recent study showed that vaccination of rhesus macaques with recombinant simian varicella virus (rSVV vector – simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV envelope and gag genes, induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and also significantly reduced plasma viral loads following intravenous pathogenic challenge with SIVMAC251/CX1. Findings The purpose of this study was to define cellular immunological correlates of protection in rSVV-SIV vaccinated and SIV challenged animals. Immunofluorescent staining and multifunctional assessment of SIV-specific T-cell responses were evaluated in both Experimental and Control vaccinated animal groups. Significant increases in the proliferating CD4+ T-cell population and polyfunctional T-cell responses were observed in all Experimental-vaccinated animals compared with the Control-vaccinated animals. Conclusions Increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation was significantly and inversely correlated with plasma viral load. Increased SIV-specific polyfunctional cytokine responses and increased proliferation of CD4+ T-cell may be crucial to control plasma viral loads in vaccinated and SIVMAC251/CX1 challenged macaques.

  2. Mycobacterium avium complex in macaques with AIDS is associated with a specific strain of simian immunodeficiency virus and prolonged survival after primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, K G; Pauley, D; Young, H L; Lackner, A A

    1995-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques is a frequent opportunistic infection that shares many features with the condition in human AIDS patients. A retrospective analysis of necropsies on 135 macaques with SIV-induced simian AIDS that received neither antiretroviral nor antimicrobial therapy revealed that 17% (23/135) were infected with MAC. MAC developed in 31.3% (21/67) of the animals inoculated with uncloned SIVmac251 versus 1.9% (1/53) and 6.7% (1/15) of the animals inoculated with the molecular clones SIVmac239 and SIVmac239/316EM, respectively (P = .001). This is the first example in which the risk of infection with a specific opportunistic organism was affected by the infecting strain of immunodeficiency virus. In addition, animals with MAC had a longer mean survival after primary infection and lower CD4 cell counts at death than animals that did not develop this opportunistic infection. The SIV-inoculated macaque is a valuable model in which to study the pathogenesis of MAC in the immunocompromised host.

  3. Infection of rhesus macaques with a pool of simian immunodeficiency virus with the envelope genes from acute HIV-1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Kendall C; Tian, Meijuan; Asmal, Mohammed; Ling, Binhua; Nelson, Kenneth; Henry, Kenneth; Gibson, Richard; Li, Yuejin; Han, Weining; Shattock, Robin J; Veazey, Ronald S; Letvin, Norman; Arts, Eric J; Gao, Yong

    2016-11-25

    New simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses with an HIV-1 env (SHIVenv) are critical for studies on HIV pathogenesis, vaccine development, and microbicide testing. Macaques are typically exposed to single CCR5-using SHIVenv which in most instances does not reflect the conditions during acute/early HIV infection (AHI) in humans. Instead of individual and serial testing new SHIV constructs, a pool of SHIVenv_B derived from 16 acute HIV-1 infections were constructed using a novel yeast-based SHIV cloning approach and then used to infect macaques. Even though none of the 16 SHIVenvs contained the recently reported mutations in env genes that could significantly enhance their binding affinity to RhCD4, one SHIVenv (i.e. SHIVenv_B3-PRB926) established infection in macaques exposed to this pool. AHI SHIVenv_B viruses as well as their HIVenv_B counterparts were analyzed for viral protein content, function, and fitness to identify possible difference between SHIVenv_B3-PRB926 and the other 15 SHIVenvs in the pool. All of the constructs produced SHIV or HIV chimeric with wild type levels of capsid (p27 and p24) content, reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and expressed envelope glycoproteins that could bind to cell receptors CD4/CCR5 and mediate virus entry. HIV-1env_B chimeric viruses were propagated in susceptible cell lines but the 16 SHIVenv_B variants showed only limited replication in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 174×CEM.CCR5 cell line. AHI chimeric viruses including HIVenv_B3 showed only minor variations in cell entry efficiency and kinetics as well as replicative fitness in human PBMCs. Reduced number of N-link glycosylation sites and slightly greater CCR5 affinity/avidity was the only distinguishing feature of env_B3 versus other AHI env's in the pool, a feature also observed in the HIV establishing new infections in humans. Despite the inability to propagate in primary cells and cell lines, a pool of 16 SHIVenv viruses could

  4. "Resistance" to PSC-RANTES revisited: two mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 SF162 or simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV SF162-p3 do not confer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedellec, Rebecca; Coetzer, Mia; Lederman, Michael M; Offord, Robin E; Hartley, Oliver; Mosier, Donald E

    2010-06-01

    Resistance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to small-molecule CCR5 inhibitors is well demonstrated, but resistance to macromolecular CCR5 inhibitors (e.g., PSC-RANTES) that act by both CCR5 internalization and receptor blockade had not been reported until recently (3). The report of a single simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162-p3) variant with one V3 and one gp41 sequence change in gp160 that conferred both altered replicative fitness and resistance to PSC-RANTES was therefore surprising. We introduced the same two mutations into both the parental HIV-1(SF162) and the macaque-adapted SHIV(SF162-p3) and found minor differences in entry fitness but no changes in sensitivity to inhibition by either PSC-RANTES or the small-molecule allosteric inhibitor TAK-779. We attribute the earlier finding to confounding fitness effects with inhibitor sensitivity.

  5. Enhanced Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines in the Central Nervous System Is Associated with Neuroinvasion by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and the Development of Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandle, Marlene S.; MacLean, Andrew G.; Sasseville, Vito G.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-associated encephalitis. To examine this in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaque model of neuroAIDS, inflammatory cytokine gene expression was evaluated in the brains of macaques infected with pathogenic SIVmac251 by reverse transcriptase PCR. Interleukin-1 beta was readily detected in the brains of all animals evaluated, regardless of infection status or duration of infection. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) transcripts were undetectable in the brains of uninfected control animals but were upregulated at 7 and 14 days postinoculation. At the terminal stage of infection, TNF-α and IFN-γ transcripts were coexpressed in the brains of four of five animals with SIV encephalitis (SIVE). Within an encephalitic brain, TNF-α and IFN-γ transcripts were detected in six of seven regions with histologic evidence of SIVE, suggesting a direct relationship between neuropathology and altered cytokine gene expression. With combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, TNF-α-expressing cells were frequently identified as CD68-positive macrophages within perivascular lesions. These observations provide evidence that cytokines produced by activated inflammatory macrophages are an important element in the pathogenesis of SIVE. PMID:11992008

  6. Tracking the Emergence of Host-Specific Simian Immunodeficiency Virus env and nef Populations Reveals nef Early Adaptation and Convergent Evolution in Brain of Naturally Progressing Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Nolan, David J; Rife, Brittany D; Fogel, Gary B; McGrath, Michael S; Burdo, Tricia H; Autissier, Patrick; Williams, Kenneth C; Goodenow, Maureen M; Salemi, Marco

    2015-08-01

    While a clear understanding of the events leading to successful establishment of host-specific viral populations and productive infection in the central nervous system (CNS) has not yet been reached, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque provides a powerful model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intrahost evolution and neuropathogenesis. The evolution of the gp120 and nef genes, which encode two key proteins required for the establishment and maintenance of infection, was assessed in macaques that were intravenously inoculated with the same viral swarm and allowed to naturally progress to simian AIDS and potential SIV-associated encephalitis (SIVE). Longitudinal plasma samples and immune markers were monitored until terminal illness. Single-genome sequencing was employed to amplify full-length env through nef transcripts from plasma over time and from brain tissues at necropsy. nef sequences diverged from the founder virus faster than gp120 diverged. Host-specific sequence populations were detected in nef (~92 days) before they were detected in gp120 (~182 days). At necropsy, similar brain nef sequences were found in different macaques, indicating convergent evolution, while gp120 brain sequences remained largely host specific. Molecular clock and selection analyses showed weaker clock-like behavior and stronger selection pressure in nef than in gp120, with the strongest nef selection in the macaque with SIVE. Rapid nef diversification, occurring prior to gp120 diversification, indicates that early adaptation of nef in the new host is essential for successful infection. Moreover, the convergent evolution of nef sequences in the CNS suggests a significant role for nef in establishing neurotropic strains. The SIV-infected rhesus macaque model closely resembles HIV-1 immunopathogenesis, neuropathogenesis, and disease progression in humans. Macaques were intravenously infected with identical viral swarms to investigate

  7. Divergent kinetics of proliferating T cell subsets in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection: SIV eliminates the "first responder" CD4+ T cells in primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2013-06-01

    Although increased lymphocyte turnover in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection has been reported in blood, there is little information on cell turnover in tissues, particularly in primary SIV infection. Here we examined the levels of proliferating T cell subsets in mucosal and peripheral lymphoid tissues of adult macaques throughout SIV infection. To specifically label cells in S-phase division, all animals were inoculated with bromodeoxyuridine 24 h prior to sampling. In healthy macaques, the highest levels of proliferating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were in blood and, to a lesser extent, in spleen. Substantial percentages of proliferating cells were also found in intestinal tissues, including the jejunum, ileum, and colon, but very few proliferating cells were detected in lymph nodes (axillary and mesenteric). Moreover, essentially all proliferating T cells in uninfected animals coexpressed CD95 and many coexpressed CCR5 in the tissues examined. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that proliferating cells were substantial viral target cells for SIV infection and viral replication. After acute SIV infection, percentages of proliferating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher in tissues of chronically infected macaques and macaques with AIDS than in those of the controls. Surprisingly, however, we found that proliferating CD4(+) T cells were selectively decreased in very early infection (8 to 10 days postinoculation [dpi]). In contrast, levels of proliferating CD8(+) T cells rapidly increased after SIV infection, peaked by 13 to 21 dpi, and thereafter remained significantly higher than those in the controls. Taken together, these findings suggest that SIV selectively infects and destroys dividing, nonspecific CD4(+) T cells in acute infection, resulting in homeostatic changes and perhaps continuing loss of replication capacity to respond to nonspecific and, later, SIV-specific antigens.

  8. Adoptive Transfer of Engineered Rhesus Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Reduces the Number of Transmitted/Founder Viruses Established in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Barsov, Eugene V; Jain, Sumiti; Piatak, Michael; Trubey, Charles M; Alvord, W Gregory; Chertova, Elena; Roser, James D; Smedley, Jeremy; Komin, Alexander; Keele, Brandon F; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-11-01

    AIDS virus infections are rarely controlled by cell-mediated immunity, in part due to viral immune evasion and immunodeficiency resulting from CD4(+) T-cell infection. One likely aspect of this failure is that antiviral cellular immune responses are either absent or present at low levels during the initial establishment of infection. To test whether an extensive, timely, and effective response could reduce the establishment of infection from a high-dose inoculum, we adoptively transferred large numbers of T cells that were molecularly engineered with anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (anti-SIV) activity into rhesus macaques 3 days following an intrarectal SIV inoculation. To measure in vivo antiviral activity, we assessed the number of viruses transmitted using SIVmac239X, a molecularly tagged viral stock containing 10 genotypic variants, at a dose calculated to transmit 12 founder viruses. Single-genome sequencing of plasma virus revealed that the two animals receiving T cells expressing SIV-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) had significantly fewer viral genotypes than the two control animals receiving non-SIV-specific T cells (means of 4.0 versus 7.5 transmitted viral genotypes; P = 0.044). Accounting for the likelihood of transmission of multiple viruses of a particular genotype, the calculated means of the total number of founder viruses transmitted were 4.5 and 14.5 in the experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.021). Thus, a large antiviral T-cell response timed with virus exposure can limit viral transmission. The presence of strong, preexisting T-cell responses, including those induced by vaccines, might help prevent the establishment of infection at the lower-exposure doses in humans that typically transmit only a single virus.

  9. Nonprogressing HIV-infected children share fundamental immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Adland, Emily; Karimanzira, Owen

    2016-01-01

    nonprogressors. These children therefore express two cardinal immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys-low immune activation despite high viremia and low CCR5 expression on long-lived central memory CD4 T cells-suggesting closer similarities with nonpathogenetic mechanisms evolved......Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors...... preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-Age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26...

  10. A Vaccine against CCR5 Protects a Subset of Macaques upon Intravaginal Challenge with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we have developed vaccines targeting CCR5, a self-protein critically involved in HIV replication and pathogenesis. By displaying peptides derived from CCR5 at high density on the surface of virus-like particles, we can efficiently induce high-titer IgG antibodies against this self-molecule. Here, we investigated whether prophylactic immunization of rhesus macaques with a particle-based vaccine targeting two regions of macaque ...

  11. Some human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu proteins are able to antagonize macaque BST-2 in vitro and in vivo: Vpu-negative simian-human immunodeficiency viruses are attenuated in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Masashi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Martin, Malcolm A; Strebel, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpu enhances the release of viral particles from infected cells by targeting BST-2/tetherin, a cellular protein inhibiting virus release. The widely used HIV-1(NL4-3) Vpu functionally inactivates human BST-2 but not murine or monkey BST-2, leading to the notion that Vpu antagonism is species specific. Here we investigated the properties of the CXCR4-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus DH12 (SHIV(DH12)) and the CCR5-tropic SHIV(AD8), each of which carries vpu genes derived from different primary HIV-1 isolates. We found that virion release from infected rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells was enhanced to various degrees by the Vpu present in both SHIVs. Transfer of the SHIV(DH12) Vpu transmembrane domain to the HIV-1(NL4-3) Vpu conferred antagonizing activity against macaque BST-2. Inactivation of the SHIV(DH12) and SHIV(AD8) vpu genes impaired virus replication in 6 of 8 inoculated rhesus macaques, resulting in lower plasma viral RNA loads, slower losses of CD4(+) T cells, and delayed disease progression. The expanded host range of the SHIV(DH12) Vpu was not due to adaptation during passage in macaques but was an intrinsic property of the parental HIV-1(DH12) Vpu protein. These results demonstrate that the species-specific inhibition of BST-2 by HIV-1(NL4-3) Vpu is not characteristic of all HIV-1 Vpu proteins; some HIV-1 isolates encode a Vpu with a broader host range.

  12. Anti-V3 humanized antibody KD-247 effectively suppresses ex vivo generation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and affords sterile protection of monkeys against a heterologous simian/human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Toshio; Ami, Yasushi; Nakasone, Tadashi; Takizawa, Mari; Someya, Kenji; Kaizu, Masahiko; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Yoshino, Naoto; Matsushita, Shuzo; Higuchi, Hirofumi; Matsui, Hajime; Shinohara, Katsuaki; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2006-06-01

    In an accompanying report (Y. Eda, M. Takizawa, T. Murakami, H. Maeda, K. Kimachi, H. Yonemura, S. Koyanagi, K. Shiosaki, H. Higuchi, K. Makizumi, T. Nakashima, K. Osatomi, S. Tokiyoshi, S. Matsushita, N. Yamamoto, and M. Honda, J. Virol. 80:5552-5562, 2006), we discuss our production of a high-affinity humanized monoclonal antibody, KD-247, by sequential immunization with V3 peptides derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade B primary isolates. Epitope mapping revealed that KD-247 recognized the Pro-Gly-Arg V3 tip sequence conserved in HIV-1 clade B isolates. In this study, we further demonstrate that in vitro, KD-247 efficiently neutralizes CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 clade B and clade B' with matching neutralization sequence motifs but does not neutralize sequence-mismatched clade B and clade E isolates. Monkeys were provided sterile protection against heterologous simian/human immunodeficiency virus challenge by the passive transfer of a single high dose (45 mg per kg of body weight) of KD-247 and afforded partial protection by lower antibody doses (30 and 15 mg per kg). Protective neutralization endpoint titers in plasma at the time of virus challenge were 1:160 in animals passively transferred with a high dose of the antibody. The antiviral efficacy of the antibody was further confirmed by its suppression of the ex vivo generation of primary HIV-1 quasispecies in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from HIV-infected individuals. Therefore, KD-247 promises to be a valuable tool not only as a passive immunization antibody for the prevention of HIV infection but also as an immunotherapy for the suppression of HIV in phenotype-matched HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Variability of Bio-Clinical Parameters in Chinese-Origin Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus: A Nonhuman Primate AIDS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Wu, Xiaoxiang; Lu, Yaozheng; Han, Daishu; Guo, Weizhong; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Lu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Although Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques (Ch RhMs) infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been used for many years to evaluate the efficacy of AIDS vaccines and therapeutics, the bio-clinical variability of such a nonhuman primate AIDS model was so far not established. Methodology/Principal Findings By randomizing 150 (78 male and 72 female) Ch RhMs with diverse MHC class I alleles into 3 groups (50 animals per group) challenged with intrarectal (ir) SIVmac239, intravenous (iv) SIVmac239, or iv SIVmac251, we evaluated variability in bio-clinical endpoints for 118 weeks. All SIV-challenged Ch RhMs became seropositive for SIV during 1–2 weeks. Plasma viral load (VL) peaked at weeks 1–2 and then declined to set-point levels as from week 5. The set-point VL was 30 fold higher in SIVmac239 (ir or iv)-infected than in SIVmac251 (iv)-infected animals. This difference in plasma VL increased overtime (>100 fold as from week 68). The rates of progression to AIDS or death were more rapid in SIVmac239 (ir or iv)-infected than in SIVmac251 (iv)-infected animals. No significant difference in bio-clinical endpoints was observed in animals challenged with ir or iv SIVmac239. The variability (standard deviation) in peak/set-point VL was nearly one-half lower in animals infected with SIVmac239 (ir or iv) than in those infected with SIVmac251 (iv), allowing that the same treatment-related difference can be detected with one-half fewer animals using SIVmac239 than using SIVmac251. Conclusion/Significance These results provide solid estimates of variability in bio-clinical endpoints needed when designing studies using the Ch RhM SIV model and contribute to the improving quality and standardization of preclinical studies. PMID:21850259

  14. Immunogenicity of a vaccine regimen composed of simian immunodeficiency virus DNA, rMVA, and viral particles administered to female rhesus macaques via four different mucosal routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Mariana; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Cobo-Molinos, Antonio; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Wilson, Robert L; Montefiori, David C; Carville, Angela; Aldovini, Anna

    2013-04-01

    A comparative evaluation of the immunity stimulated with a vaccine regimen that includes simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and IL-15 DNAs, recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA), and inactivated SIVmac239 particles administered into the oral and nasal cavities, small intestine, and vagina was carried out in female rhesus macaques to determine the best route to induce diverse anti-SIV immunity that may be critical to protection from SIV infection and disease. All four immunizations generated mucosal SIV-specific IgA. Oral immunization was as effective as vaginal immunization in inducing SIV-specific IgA in vaginal secretions and generated greater IgA responses in rectal secretions and saliva samples compared to the other immunization routes. All four immunizations stimulated systemic T-cell responses against Gag and Env, albeit to a different extent, with oral immunization providing greater magnitude and nasal immunization providing wider functional heterogeneity. SIV-specific T cells producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) dominated these responses. Limited levels of SIV-specific IgG antibodies were detected in plasma samples, and no SIV-specific IgG antibodies were detected in secretions. Vaccination also induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses in the rectal and vaginal mucosa with greater functional heterogeneity than in blood samples. Rectal T-cell responses were significantly greater in the orally vaccinated animals than in the other animals. The most balanced, diverse, and higher-magnitude vaginal T-cell responses were observed after intestinal vaccination. Significantly higher CD8(+) granzyme B-positive T-cell responses were observed systemically after intestinal vaccination and in rectal cells after oral immunization. The majority of SIV-specific T cells that produced granzyme B did not produce cytokines. Of the immunization routes tested, oral vaccination provided the most diverse and significant response to the vaccine.

  15. Enhanced antibody responses elicited by a CpG adjuvant do not improve the protective effect of an aldrithiol-2-inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus therapeutic AIDS vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichuan; Blozis, Shelley A; Lederman, Michael; Krieg, Arthur; Landay, Alan; Miller, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    The potential benefit of using unmethylated CpG oligoribodeoxynucleotides (ODN) as an adjuvant in a therapeutic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine consisting of AT2-inactivated SIVmac239 was evaluated in SIV-infected rhesus macaques receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesized that using CpG ODN as an adjuvant in therapeutic vaccination would enhance SIV-specific immune responses and suppress SIV replication after ART was stopped. To test our hypothesis, we immunized chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques receiving ART with one of the following therapeutic vaccines: (i) AT2-inactivated SIVmac239, (ii) CpG10103 plus AT2-inactivated SIVmac239, (iii) CpG10103, and (iv) saline. While immunization with CpG plus AT2-SIVmac239 significantly increased SIV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers, the mean plasma viral RNA (vRNA) level in these animals after ART did not differ from those of saline-treated animals. The AT2-inactivated SIVmac239-immunized animal group had a significantly higher mean SIV-specific gamma interferon T-cell response after three immunizations and lower plasma vRNA levels for 6 weeks after ART was withdrawn compared to the saline-treated animal group. Compared to the saline control group, the animal group treated with CpG alone had a significantly higher mean SIV-specific lymphocyte proliferation index and a higher rate of plasma vRNA rebound after ART. These results demonstrate that while the use of CpG as an adjuvant enhances SIV-specific antibody responses, this does not improve the control of SIV replication after ART is stopped. The lack of benefit may be related to the high levels of SIV-specific lymphocyte proliferation in the CpG adjuvant group.

  16. Evaluation of the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of whole inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccines with conformationally and functionally intact envelope glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifson, Jeffrey D; Rossio, Jeffrey L; Piatak, Michael; Bess, Julian; Chertova, Elena; Schneider, Douglas K; Coalter, Vicky J; Poore, Barbara; Kiser, Rebecca F; Imming, Robert J; Scarzello, Anthony J; Henderson, Louis E; Alvord, W Gregory; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Benveniste, Raoul E; Arthur, Larry O

    2004-07-01

    A novel, general approach to chemical inactivation of retroviruses was used to produce inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles with functional envelope glycoproteins. Inactivated virions of three different virus isolates (SIVmne E11S, SIVmac239, and SIVmac239 g4,5), prepared by treatment with 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (aldrithol-2, AT-2), were not detectably infectious, in vitro or in vivo. Immunization of pigtailed macaques with inactivated SIVmne E11S particles, without adjuvant, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Four of six animals immunized with the inactivated particles did not show measurable SIV RNA in plasma (virus (SIVmne E11S), compared to peak values of > or =10(6) copy Eq/ml in challenged SIV-naive control animals (p = 0.0001). Despite the absence of measurable viral RNA in plasma in these animals, culturable virus and viral DNA were initially detectable in blood and lymph node specimens; in contrast to control animals, SIV DNA could no longer be detected in PBMC by 10 weeks postchallenge in five of six SIV-immunized animals (p = 0.0001). However, vaccines did not resist a sequential rechallenge with the heterologous pathogenic virus SIVsm E660. AT-2-inactivated virus with functional envelope glycoproteins is a novel class of vaccine immunogen and was noninfectious, under conditions of rigorous in vivo challenge, and induced both binding and neutralizing antibody responses, along with cellular immune responses. Results suggest that immunization facilitated effective containment of pathogenic homologous challenge virus. With further optimization, AT-2-inactivated viral particles may be a useful class of immunogen in the development of a vaccine to prevent AIDS.

  17. Frequent substitution polymorphisms in African green monkey CCR5 cluster at critical sites for infections by simian immunodeficiency virus SIVagm, implying ancient virus-host coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhmann, S E; Madani, N; Diop, O M; Platt, E J; Morvan, J; Müller-Trutwin, M C; Barré-Sinoussi, F; Kabat, D

    2001-09-01

    In contrast to humans, several primate species are believed to have harbored simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) since ancient times. In particular, the geographically dispersed species of African green monkeys (AGMs) are all infected with highly diversified SIVagm viruses at high prevalences (greater than 50% of sexually mature individuals) without evident diseases, implying that the progenitor monkeys were infected prior to their dispersal. If this is correct, AGMs would be expected to have accumulated frequent resistance-conferring polymorphisms in host genes that are important for SIV replication. Accordingly, we analyzed the coding sequences of the CCR5 coreceptors from 26 AGMs (52 alleles) in distinct populations of the four species. These samples contained 29 nonsynonymous coding changes and only 15 synonymous nucleotide substitutions, implying intense functional selection. Moreover, 24 of the resulting amino acid substitutions were tightly clustered in the CCR5 amino terminus (D13N in the vervets and Y14N in the tantalus species) or in the first extracellular loop (Q93R and Q93K in all species). The Y14N substitution was extremely frequent in the 12 wild-born African tantalus, with 7 monkeys being homozygous for this substitution and 4 being heterozygous. Although two of these heterozygotes and the only wild-type homozygote were naturally infected with SIVagm, none of the Y14N homozygotes were naturally infected. A focal infectivity assay for SIVagm indicated that all five tested SIVagms efficiently use CCR5 as a coreceptor and that they also use CXCR6 (STRL33/Bonzo) and GPR15 (BOB) with lower efficiencies but not CXCR4. Interestingly, the D13N, Y14N, Q93R, and Q93K substitutions in AGM CCR5 all strongly inhibited infections by the SIVagm isolates in vitro. The Y14N substitution eliminates a tyrosine sulfation site that is important for infections and results in partial N-linked glycosylation (i.e., 60% efficiency) at this position. Nevertheless, the CCR

  18. Lack of Interleukin-10-Mediated Anti-Inflammatory Signals and Upregulated Interferon Gamma Production Are Linked to Increased Intestinal Epithelial Cell Apoptosis in Pathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Diganta; Kenway-Lynch, Carys S.; Lala, Wendy; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Das, Arpita

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an immunomodulatory cytokine that is important for maintenance of epithelial cell (EC) survival and anti-inflammatory responses (AIR). The majority of HIV infections occur through the mucosal route despite mucosal epithelium acting as a barrier to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Therefore, understanding the role of IL-10 in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis during HIV infection is of interest for better characterization of the pathogenesis of HIV-mediated enteropathy. We demonstrated here changes in mucosal IL-10 signaling during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques. Disruption of the epithelial barrier was manifested by EC apoptosis and loss of the tight-junction protein ZO-1. Multiple cell types, including a limited number of ECs, produced IL-10. SIV infection resulted in increased levels of IL-10; however, this was associated with increased production of mucosal gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), suggesting that IL-10 was not able to regulate AIR. This observation was supported by the downregulation of STAT3, which is necessary to inhibit production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and the upregulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3, which are important regulatory molecules in the IL-10-mediated AIR. We also observed internalization of the IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) in mucosal lymphocytes, which could limit cellular availability of IL-10 for signaling and contribute to the loss of a functional AIR. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that internalization of IL-10R with the resultant impact on IL-10 signaling and dysregulation of the IL-10-mediated AIR might play a crucial role in EC damage and subsequent SIV/HIV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Interleukin-10 (IL-10), an important immunomodulatory cytokine plays a key role to control inflammatory function and homeostasis of the gastrointestinal mucosal immune system. Despite recent advancements in the study of IL-10 and its role in HIV

  19. Frequent Simian Foamy Virus Infection in Persons Occupationally Exposed to Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    SWITZER, WILLIAM M.; Bhullar, Vinod; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Cong, Mian-er; Parekh, Bharat; Lerche, Nicholas W; Yee, JoAnn L.; Ely, John J.; Boneva, Roumiana; Chapman, Louisa E.; Folks, Thomas M.; Heneine, Walid

    2004-01-01

    The recognition that AIDS originated as a zoonosis heightens public health concerns associated with human infection by simian retroviruses endemic in nonhuman primates (NHPs). These retroviruses include simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV), simian type D retrovirus (SRV), and simian foamy virus (SFV). Although occasional infection with SIV, SRV, or SFV in persons occupationally exposed to NHPs has been reported, the characteristics and significance of t...

  20. Simian crease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... negative meaning (the word "simian" refers to a monkey or ape). The crease is usually just referred ... Single palmar crease; Transverse palmar crease; Palmar crease Images Single palmar crease References Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. ...

  1. Variability of bio-clinical parameters in Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: a nonhuman primate AIDS model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques (Ch RhMs infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV have been used for many years to evaluate the efficacy of AIDS vaccines and therapeutics, the bio-clinical variability of such a nonhuman primate AIDS model was so far not established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By randomizing 150 (78 male and 72 female Ch RhMs with diverse MHC class I alleles into 3 groups (50 animals per group challenged with intrarectal (i.r. SIVmac239, intravenous (i.v. SIVmac239, or i.v. SIVmac251, we evaluated variability in bio-clinical endpoints for 118 weeks. All SIV-challenged Ch RhMs became seropositive for SIV during 1-2 weeks. Plasma viral load (VL peaked at weeks 1-2 and then declined to set-point levels as from week 5. The set-point VL was 30 fold higher in SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v.-infected than in SIVmac251 (i.v.-infected animals. This difference in plasma VL increased overtime (>100 fold as from week 68. The rates of progression to AIDS or death were more rapid in SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v.-infected than in SIVmac251 (i.v.-infected animals. No significant difference in bio-clinical endpoints was observed in animals challenged with i.r. or i.v. SIVmac239. The variability (standard deviation in peak/set-point VL was nearly one-half lower in animals infected with SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v. than in those infected with SIVmac251 (i.v., allowing that the same treatment-related difference can be detected with one-half fewer animals using SIVmac239 than using SIVmac251. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide solid estimates of variability in bio-clinical endpoints needed when designing studies using the Ch RhM SIV model and contribute to the improving quality and standardization of preclinical studies.

  2. Construction and characterization of a new simian/human immunodeficiency viruses clone carrying an env gene derived from a CRF07_BC strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue; YANG Gui-bo; CHEN Qi-min; LIU Qiang; MENG Zhe-feng; GENG Yun-qi; QIAO Wen-tao; SHAO Yi-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background The CRF07_BC recombinant strain has been one of the most predominantly circulated HIV-1 strains in China, it is therefore necessary and urgent to develop a relevant animal model to evaluate candidate vaccines targeting HIV-1 CRF07_BC. A highly replication-competent simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) construct containing the Chinese CRF07_BC HIV-1 env gene with the ability to infect Chinese rhesus monkeys would serve as an important tool in the development of HIV vaccines. The aim of this study was to examine whether SHIV XJDC6431 with the env fragment from a Chinese HIV-1 isolate virus could infect the human and monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), establish infection in Chinese rhesus macaque.Methods A SHIV strain was constructed by replacing the rev/env genes of SHIV KB9 with the corresponding fragment derived from the HIV-1 CRF07_BC strain. The infectious activity of the SHIV clones was determined in vitro in PBMCs from both non-human primate animals and humans. Finally, one Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) was infected with one SHIV via intravenous infusion.Results One SHIV clone designated as SHIV XJDC6431, was generated that could infect macaque and human PBMC. The virus produced from this clone also efficiently infected the CCR5-expressing GHOST cell lines, indicating that it uses CCR5 as its coreceptor. Finally, the virus was intravenously inoculated into one Chinese rhesus macaque. Eventually, the animal became infected as shown by the occurrence of viremia within 3 of infection. The viral load reached 10~5 copies of viral RNA per ml of plasma during the acute phase of infection and lasted for 10 weeks post infection. Conclusions We conclude that SHIV XJDC6431 is an R5-tropic chimeric virus, which can establish infection not only in vitro but also in vivo in the Chinese rhesus macaque. Although the animal inoculated with SHIV XJDC6431 became infected without developing a pathologic phenotype, the virus efficiently

  3. Antibody-mediated protection against mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge of macaques immunized with alphavirus replicon particles and boosted with trimeric envelope glycoprotein in MF59 adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Sun, Yide; Kan, Elaine; Legg, Harold; Lian, Ying; Bost, Kristen; Zhou, Fengmin; Goodsell, Amanda; Zur Megede, Jan; Polo, John; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Otten, Gillis R; Miller, Christopher J; Vajdy, Michael; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2010-06-01

    We have previously shown that rhesus macaques were partially protected against high-dose intravenous challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162P4) following sequential immunization with alphavirus replicon particles (VRP) of a chimeric recombinant VEE/SIN alphavirus (derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEE] and the Sindbis virus [SIN]) encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1(SF162) gp140DeltaV2 envelope (Env) and trimeric Env protein in MF59 adjuvant (R. Xu, I. K. Srivastava, C. E. Greer, I. Zarkikh, Z. Kraft, L. Kuller, J. M. Polo, S. W. Barnett, and L. Stamatatos, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 22:1022-1030, 2006). The protection did not require T-cell immune responses directed toward simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag. We extend those findings here to demonstrate antibody-mediated protection against mucosal challenge in macaques using prime-boost regimens incorporating both intramuscular and mucosal routes of delivery. The macaques in the vaccination groups were primed with VRP and then boosted with Env protein in MF59 adjuvant, or they were given VRP intramuscular immunizations alone and then challenged with SHIV(SF162P4) (intrarectal challenge). The results demonstrated that these vaccines were able to effectively protect the macaques to different degrees against subsequent mucosal SHIV challenge, but most noteworthy, all macaques that received the intramuscular VRP prime plus Env protein boost were completely protected. A statistically significant association was observed between the titer of virus neutralizing and binding antibodies as well as the avidity of anti-Env antibodies measured prechallenge and protection from infection. These results highlight the merit of the alphavirus replicon vector prime plus Env protein boost vaccine approach for the induction of protective antibody responses and are of particular relevance to advancing our understanding of the potential correlates of immune protection against

  4. Full-Length Genome Analyses of Two New Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV Strains from Mustached Monkeys (C. Cephus in Gabon Illustrate a Complex Evolutionary History among the SIVmus/mon/gsn Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Liégeois

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans.

  5. Full-length genome analyses of two new simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains from mustached monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon illustrate a complex evolutionary history among the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Ondo, Bertrand Mve; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-07-22

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans.

  6. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Targeting of CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T Cells in Secondary Lymphoid Organs Is Associated with Robust CXCL10 Expression in Monocyte/Macrophage Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Masayuki; Sato, Hirotaka; Okamura, Tomotaka; Uda, Akihiko; Takeda, Satoshi; Ahmed, Nursarat; Shichino, Shigeyuki; Shiino, Teiichiro; Saito, Yohei; Watanabe, Satoru; Sugimoto, Chie; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Ato, Manabu; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Izumo, Shuji; Matsushima, Kouji; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Ansari, Aftab A; Villinger, Francois; Mori, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Glycosylation of Env defines pathogenic properties of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We previously demonstrated that pathogenic SIVmac239 and a live-attenuated, quintuple deglycosylated Env mutant (Δ5G) virus target CD4(+) T cells residing in different tissues during acute infection. SIVmac239 and Δ5G preferentially infected distinct CD4(+) T cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) and within the lamina propria of the small intestine, respectively (C. Sugimoto et al., J Virol 86:9323-9336, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00948-12). Here, we studied the host responses relevant to SIV targeting of CXCR3(+) CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells in SLOs. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that Th1-polarized inflammatory responses, defined by expression of CXCR3 chemokines, were distinctly induced in the SIVmac239-infected animals. Consistent with robust expression of CXCL10, CXCR3(+) T cells were depleted from blood in the SIVmac239-infected animals. We also discovered that elevation of CXCL10 expression in blood and SLOs was secondary to the induction of CD14(+) CD16(+) monocytes and MAC387(+) macrophages, respectively. Since the significantly higher levels of SIV infection in SLOs occurred with a massive accumulation of infiltrated MAC387(+) macrophages, T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and residential macrophages near high endothelial venules, the results highlight critical roles of innate/inflammatory responses in SIVmac239 infection. Restricted infection in SLOs by Δ5G also suggests that glycosylation of Env modulates innate/inflammatory responses elicited by cells of monocyte/macrophage/DC lineages.IMPORTANCE We previously demonstrated that a pathogenic SIVmac239 virus and a live-attenuated, deglycosylated mutant Δ5G virus infected distinct CD4(+) T cell subsets in SLOs and the small intestine, respectively (C. Sugimoto et al., J Virol 86:9323-9336, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00948-12). Accordingly, infections with SIVmac239, but not with Δ5G

  7. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1.

  8. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Their Mapping by Monomeric gp120 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Humans and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3N-Infected Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Manxue; Lu, Hong; Markowitz, Martin; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding of the similarities and differences between neutralizing antibodies elicited by simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus macaques and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans, we examined the plasma of 13 viremic macaques infected with SHIVSF162P3N and 85 HIV-1-infected humans with known times of infection. We identified 5 macaques (38%) from 1 to 2 years postinfection (p.i.) with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against tier 2 HIV-1. In comparison, only 2 out of 42 (5%) human plasma samples collected in a similar time frame of 1 to 3 years p.i. exhibited comparable neutralizing breadths and potencies, with the number increasing to 7 out of 21 (30%) after 3 years p.i. Plasma mapping with monomeric gp120 identified only 2 out of 9 humans and 2 out of 4 macaques that contained gp120-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating distinct specificities in these plasma samples, with most of them recognizing the envelope trimer (including gp41) rather than the gp120 monomer. Indeed, a total of 20 gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) isolated from a human subject (AD358) and a Chinese rhesus macaque (GB40) displayed no or limited neutralizing activity against tier 2 strains. These isolated MAbs, mapped to the CD4-binding site, the V3 loop, the inner domain, and the C5 region of gp120, revealed genetic similarity between the human and macaque immunoglobulin genes used to encode some V3-directed MAbs. These results also support the use of envelope trimer probes for efficient isolation of HIV-1 bnAbs. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 vaccine research can benefit from understanding the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) in rhesus macaques, commonly used to assess vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. Here, we examined 85 HIV-1-infected humans and 13 SHIVSF162P3N-infected macaques for bnAbs and found that, similar to HIV-1-infected humans, bnAbs in SHIV-infected macaques are also rare

  9. Simian-Human immunodeficiency viruses expressing chimeric subtype B/C Vpu proteins demonstrate the importance of the amino terminal and transmembrane domains in the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Autumn; Schmitt, Kimberly; Culley, Nathan; Stephens, Edward B

    2013-01-20

    Previously, we reported that simian-human immunodeficiency viruses expressing either the lab adapted subtype B (SHIV(KU-1bMC33)) or subtype C (SHIV(SCVpu)) Vpu proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) had different rates of CD4(+) T cell loss following inoculation into macaques. In this study, we have generated SHIVs that express either the subtype B or subtype C N-terminal (NTD) and transmembrane (TMD) domains and the opposing cytoplasmic domain (SHIV(VpuBC), SHIV(VpuCB)). In culture systems, SHIV(VpuBC) replicated faster than SHIV(VpuCB) while both proteins exhibited similar ability to down-modulate CD4 surface expression. Following inoculation into macaques, SHIV(VpuBC) resulted in rapid CD4(+) T cell loss similar to the parental SHIV(KU-1bMC33), while the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in those inoculated with SHIV(VpuCB) was intermediate of SHIV(SCVpu) and SHIV(KU-1bMC33). These results emphasize the importance of the Vpu NTD/TMD region in the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in the pathogenic X4 SHIV/macaque model.

  10. Response of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251 to raltegravir: a basis for a new treatment for simian AIDS and an animal model for studying lentiviral persistence during antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenhouse Jack

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we successfully created a new approach to ART in SIVmac251 infected nonhuman primates. This drug regimen is entirely based on drugs affecting the pre-integration stages of replication and consists of only two nucleotidic/nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (Nt/NRTIs and raltegravir, a promising new drug belonging to the integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI class. Results In acutely infected human lymphoid CD4+ T-cell lines MT-4 and CEMx174, SIVmac251 replication was efficiently inhibited by raltegravir, which showed an EC90 in the low nanomolar range. This result was confirmed in primary macaque PBMCs and enriched CD4+ T cell fractions. In vivo monotherapy with raltegravir for only ten days resulted in reproducible decreases in viral load in two different groups of animals. When emtricitabine (FTC and tenofovir (PMPA were added to treatment, undetectable viral load was reached in two weeks, and a parallel increase in CD4 counts was observed. In contrast, the levels of proviral DNA did not change significantly during the treatment period, thus showing persistence of this lentiviral reservoir during therapy. Conclusions In line with the high conservation of the three main amino acids Y143, Q148 and N155 (responsible for raltegravir binding and molecular docking simulations showing similar binding modes of raltegravir at the SIVmac251 and HIV-1 IN active sites, raltegravir is capable of inhibiting SIVmac251 replication both in tissue culture and in vivo. This finding may help to develop effective ART regimens for the simian AIDS model entirely based on drugs adopted for treatment in humans. This ART-treated AIDS nonhuman primate model could be employed to find possible strategies for virus eradication from the body.

  11. Nonprogressing HIV-infected children share fundamental immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Adland, Emily; Karimanzira, Owen; Crowther, Carol; Pace, Matthew; Csala, Anna; Leitman, Ellen; Moonsamy, Angeline; McGregor, Callum; Hurst, Jacob; Groll, Andreas; Mori, Masahiko; Sinmyee, Smruti; Thobakgale, Christina; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Prendergast, Andrew J; Kloverpris, Henrik; Roider, Julia; Leslie, Alasdair; Shingadia, Delane; Brits, Thea; Daniels, Samantha; Frater, John; Willberg, Christian B; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Jooste, Pieter; Moore, Penny L; Morris, Lynn; Goulder, Philip

    2016-09-28

    Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26,000 copies/ml). Potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in most of the subjects and strong virus-specific T cell activity were present but did not drive pediatric nonprogression. However, reduced CCR5 expression and low HIV infection in long-lived central memory CD4 T cells were observed in pediatric nonprogressors. These children therefore express two cardinal immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys-low immune activation despite high viremia and low CCR5 expression on long-lived central memory CD4 T cells-suggesting closer similarities with nonpathogenetic mechanisms evolved over thousands of years in natural SIV hosts than those operating in HIV-infected adults.

  12. Generation of lineage-related, mucosally transmissible subtype C R5 simian-human immunodeficiency viruses capable of AIDS development, induction of neurological disease, and coreceptor switching in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuze; Mumbauer, Alexandra; Gettie, Agegnehu; Seaman, Michael S; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Westmoreland, Susan; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2013-06-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmissions are initiated with CCR5 (R5)-using viruses across mucosal surfaces, with the majority in regions where HIV type 1 (HIV-1) clade C predominates. Mucosally transmissible, highly replication competent, pathogenic R5 simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) encoding biologically relevant clade C envelopes are therefore needed as challenge viruses in vaccine efficacy studies with nonhuman primates. Here we describe the generation of three lineage-related subtype C SHIVs through four successive rapid transfers in rhesus macaques of SHIVC109F.PB4, a molecular clone expressing the soluble-CD4 (sCD4)-sensitive CCR5-tropic clade C envelope of a recently infected subject in Zambia. The viruses differed in their monkey passage histories and neutralization sensitivities but remained R5 tropic. SHIVC109P3 and SHIVC109P3N were recovered from a passage-3 rapid-progressor animal during chronic infection (24 weeks postinfection [wpi]) and at end-stage disease (34 wpi), respectively, and are classified as tier 1B strains, whereas SHIVC109P4 was recovered from a passage-4 normal-progressor macaque at 22 wpi and is a tier 2 virus, more difficult to neutralize. All three viruses were transmitted efficiently via intrarectal inoculation, reaching peak viral loads of 10(7) to 10(9) RNA copies/ml plasma and establishing viremia at various set points. Notably, one of seven (GC98) and two of six (CL31, FI08) SHIVC109P3- and SHIVC109P3N-infected macaques, respectively, progressed to AIDS, with neuropathologies observed in GC98 and FI08, as well as coreceptor switching in the latter. These findings support the use of these new SHIVC109F.PB4-derived viruses to study the immunopathology of HIV-1 clade C infection and to evaluate envelope-based AIDS vaccines in nonhuman primates.

  13. Significant Depletion of CD4+ T Cells Occurs in the Oral Mucosa during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with the Infected CD4+ T Cell Reservoir Continuing to Persist in the Oral Mucosa during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffy George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV infections are characterized by manifestation of numerous opportunistic infections and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. The loss of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in maintaining mucosal immunity likely contributes to this process. Here we show that CD4+ T cells constitute a minor population of T cells in the oral mucosa and display a predominantly central memory phenotype mirroring other mucosal sites such as the rectal mucosa. Chronic SIV infection was associated with a near total depletion of CD4+ T cells in the oral mucosa that appear to repopulate during antiretroviral therapy (ART. Repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored a large fraction of Th17 cells suggesting that ART potentially reconstitutes oral mucosal immunity. However, a minor fraction of repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored SIV DNA suggesting that the viral reservoir continues to persist in the oral mucosa during ART. Therapeutic approaches aimed at obtaining sustainable CD4+ T cell repopulation in combination with strategies that can eradicate the latent viral reservoir in the oral mucosa are essential for better oral health and long-term outcome in HIV infected patients.

  14. Analysis of the N-terminal positively charged residues of the simian immunodeficiency virus Vif reveals a critical amino acid required for the antagonism of rhesus APOBEC3D, G, and H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kimberly; Katuwal, Miki; Wang, Yaqiong; Li, Cicy; Stephens, Edward B

    2014-01-20

    Previous studies have shown that apolipoprotein B mRNA editing, enzyme catalytic, polypeptide G (APOBEC3G; hA3G) and F (APOBEC3F; hA3F) proteins interact with a nonlinear binding site located at the N-terminal region of the HIV-1 Vif protein. We have analyzed the role of 12 positively charged amino acids of the N-terminal region of the SIV Vif. Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) were constructed that expressed each of these amino acid substitutions. These viruses were examined for replication in the presence of rhesus macaque APOBEC3 proteins (rhA3A-rhA3H), incorporation of the different A3 proteins into virions, and replication in rhesus macaque PBMC. Similar to other studies, we found that K27 was essential for rhA3G activity and rhA3F but was not important for restriction of SHIVΔvif by rhA3A, rhA3D or rhA3H. Our results identified the arginine at position 14 of the SIV Vif as a critical residue for virus restriction by rhA3D, rhA3G and rhA3H.

  15. Convergence and divergence in the evolution of the APOBEC3G-Vif interaction reveal ancient origins of simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Alex A; Emerman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Naturally circulating lentiviruses are abundant in African primate species today, yet their origins and history of transmitting between hosts remain obscure. As a means to better understand the age of primate lentiviruses, we analyzed primate genomes for signatures of lentivirus-driven evolution. Specifically, we studied the adaptive evolution of host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G) in Old World Monkey (OWM) species. We find recurrent mutation of A3G in multiple primate lineages at sites that determine susceptibility to antagonism by the lentiviral accessory protein Vif. Using a broad panel of SIV Vif isolates, we demonstrate that natural variation in OWM A3G confers resistance to Vif-mediated degradation, suggesting that adaptive variants of the host factor were selected upon exposure to pathogenic lentiviruses at least 5-6 million years ago (MYA). Furthermore, in members of the divergent Colobinae subfamily of OWM, a multi-residue insertion event in A3G that arose at least 12 MYA blocks the activity of Vif, suggesting an even more ancient origin of SIV. Moreover, analysis of the lentiviruses associated with Colobinae monkeys reveal that the interface of the A3G-Vif interaction has shifted and given rise to a second genetic conflict. Our analysis of virus-driven evolution describes an ancient yet ongoing genetic conflict between simian primates and lentiviruses on a million-year time scale.

  16. Modification of a loop sequence between α-helices 6 and 7 of virus capsid (CA protein in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 derivative that has simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239 vif and CA α-helices 4 and 5 loop improves replication in cynomolgus monkey cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adachi Akio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 productively infects only humans and chimpanzees but not cynomolgus or rhesus monkeys while simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from macaque (SIVmac readily establishes infection in those monkeys. Several HIV-1 and SIVmac chimeric viruses have been constructed in order to develop an animal model for HIV-1 infection. Construction of an HIV-1 derivative which contains sequences of a SIVmac239 loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5 of capsid protein (CA and the entire SIVmac239 vif gene was previously reported. Although this chimeric virus could grow in cynomolgus monkey cells, it did so much more slowly than did SIVmac. It was also reported that intrinsic TRIM5α restricts the post-entry step of HIV-1 replication in rhesus and cynomolgus monkey cells, and we previously demonstrated that a single amino acid in a loop between α-helices 6 and 7 (L6/7 of HIV type 2 (HIV-2 CA determines the susceptibility of HIV-2 to cynomolgus monkey TRIM5α. Results In the study presented here, we replaced L6/7 of HIV-1 CA in addition to L4/5 and vif with the corresponding segments of SIVmac. The resultant HIV-1 derivatives showed enhanced replication capability in established T cell lines as well as in CD8+ cell-depleted primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cynomolgus monkey. Compared with the wild type HIV-1 particles, the viral particles produced from a chimeric HIV-1 genome with those two SIVmac loops were less able to saturate the intrinsic restriction in rhesus monkey cells. Conclusion We have succeeded in making the replication of simian-tropic HIV-1 in cynomolgus monkey cells more efficient by introducing into HIV-1 the L6/7 CA loop from SIVmac. It would be of interest to determine whether HIV-1 derivatives with SIVmac CA L4/5 and L6/7 can establish infection of cynomolgus monkeys in vivo.

  17. human immunodeficiency virus and the nervous system: an update ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    recognition in. 1981. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrolentivirus causing ... syndrome (AIDS) and eventual death. The origin of HIV in humans lies in its evolution from the simian ... brain barrier (BBB) or the blood CSF.

  18. Therapeutic dendritic-cell vaccine for simian AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu,W; Wu,XX; Lu,YZ; Guo,WZ; Andrieu,JM

    2005-01-01

    An effective immune response against human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is critical in achieving control of viral replication. Here, we show in SIV-infected rhesus monkeys that an effective and durable SIV-specific cellular and humoral immunity is elicited by a vaccination with chemically inactivated SIV-pulsed dendritic cells. After three immunizations made at two-week intervals, the animals exhibited a 50-fold decrease of SIV DNA and a 1,000-fold decrease of SIV RNA in peripheral blood. Such reduced viral load levels were maintained over the remaining 34 weeks of the study. Molecular and cellular analyses of axillary and inguinal node lymphocytes of vaccinated monkeys revealed a correlation between decreased SIV DNA and RNA levels and increased SIV-specific T-cell responses. Neutralizing antibody responses were augmented and remained elevated. Inactivated whole virus-pulsed dendritic cell vaccines are promising means to control diseases caused by immunodeficiency viruses.

  19. Preliminary Study on the Pathogenesis and Treatment in Simian AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    AIDSis a severe immunodeficiency and autoimmunity disease caused by HIVin human beings.It ruins some areaintheworld.About200macaques were usedtoinvestigatethe pathogenesis of simian AIDS(SAIDS)by means of pathological andim-munological processes.There are some data of SAIDS pathogenesis as bellows:1.Primary SIVinfection in monkeys.When SIVentered into CD4+Tlymphocytes,it replicated and delivered intobloodto be high viremia.Some SIV-CD4+Tlymphocyte went tothe lymphoidtissue.The level of SIVantibody ele-vated...

  20. Safety and tolerability of conserved region vaccines vectored by plasmid DNA, simian adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus ankara administered to human immunodeficiency virus type 1-uninfected adults in a randomized, single-blind phase I trial.

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    Emma-Jo Hayton

    Full Text Available TRIAL DESIGN: HIV-1 vaccine development has advanced slowly due to viral antigenic diversity, poor immunogenicity and recently, safety concerns associated with human adenovirus serotype-5 vectors. To tackle HIV-1 variation, we designed a unique T-cell immunogen HIVconsv from functionally conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which were presented to the immune system using a heterologous prime-boost combination of plasmid DNA, a non-replicating simian (chimpanzee adenovirus ChAdV-63 and a non-replicating poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara. A block-randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled phase I trial HIV-CORE 002 administered for the first time candidate HIV-1- vaccines or placebo to 32 healthy HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, UK and elicited high frequencies of HIV-1-specific T cells capable of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in vitro. Here, detail safety and tolerability of these vaccines are reported. METHODS: Local and systemic reactogenicity data were collected using structured interviews and study-specific diary cards. Data on all other adverse events were collected using open questions. Serum neutralizing antibody titres to ChAdV-63 were determined before and after vaccination. RESULTS: Two volunteers withdrew for vaccine-unrelated reasons. No vaccine-related serious adverse events or reactions occurred during 190 person-months of follow-up. Local and systemic events after vaccination occurred in 27/32 individuals and most were mild (severity grade 1 and predominantly transient (<48 hours. Myalgia and flu-like symptoms were more strongly associated with MVA than ChAdV63 or DNA vectors and more common in vaccine recipients than in placebo. There were no intercurrent HIV-1 infections during follow-up. 2/24 volunteers had low ChAdV-63-neutralizing titres at baseline and 7 increased their titres to over 200 with a median (range of 633 (231-1533 post-vaccination, which is of no safety concern. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate

  1. Isolation and characterization of a new simian rotavirus, YK-1

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    Shin Gary

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To effectively analyze the requirements for protection to rotavirus infection, a reliable animal model that reasonably mimics infection and disease in humans is needed. A requirement for an effective animal model is the availability of appropriate rotavirus stocks for challenge. Results A new simian rotavirus, designated YK-1, was isolated from a 2-year-old immunodeficient pigtailed macaque with chronic diarrhea. YK-1 was distinguishable by electropherotype from the other simian rotavirus strains, SA11 and RRV. One variant of YK-1, clone 311, which was isolated after adaptation and plaque purification in cell cultures, displayed an unusual RNA electropherotype with an abnormally migrating gene 11 segment. Sequence analysis demonstrated a genetic rearrangement that involved a partial duplication of the gene 11 ORF encoding NSP5. YK-1 was identified as a Group A rotavirus belonging to subgroup 1. To further characterize the YK-1 strain, the genes encoding VP4, VP7, and NSP4 were sequenced. Analysis of VP4 and VP7 gene fragments suggests that this strain is a G3P3 rotavirus and is closely related to the simian rotavirus strain RRV. Serotype analysis also identified YK-1 as a G3 rotavirus. The NSP4 genotype of YK-1 is C, the same genotype as RRV. Conclusion This newly isolated rotavirus, YK-1, is being used to establish a nonhuman primate model for studying the infectivity, immunity, and pathogenesis of rotavirus and for evaluating candidate rotavirus vaccines.

  2. Frequent simian foamy virus infection in persons occupationally exposed to nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, William M; Bhullar, Vinod; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Cong, Mian-Er; Parekh, Bharat; Lerche, Nicholas W; Yee, JoAnn L; Ely, John J; Boneva, Roumiana; Chapman, Louisa E; Folks, Thomas M; Heneine, Walid

    2004-03-01

    The recognition that AIDS originated as a zoonosis heightens public health concerns associated with human infection by simian retroviruses endemic in nonhuman primates (NHPs). These retroviruses include simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV), simian type D retrovirus (SRV), and simian foamy virus (SFV). Although occasional infection with SIV, SRV, or SFV in persons occupationally exposed to NHPs has been reported, the characteristics and significance of these zoonotic infections are not fully defined. Surveillance for simian retroviruses at three research centers and two zoos identified no SIV, SRV, or STLV infection in 187 participants. However, 10 of 187 persons (5.3%) tested positive for SFV antibodies by Western blot (WB) analysis. Eight of the 10 were males, and 3 of the 10 worked at zoos. SFV integrase gene (int) and gag sequences were PCR amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes available from 9 of the 10 persons. Phylogenetic analysis showed SFV infection originating from chimpanzees (n = 8) and baboons (n = 1). SFV seropositivity for periods of 8 to 26 years (median, 22 years) was documented for six workers for whom archived serum samples were available, demonstrating long-standing SFV infection. All 10 persons reported general good health, and secondary transmission of SFV was not observed in three wives available for WB and PCR testing. Additional phylogenetic analysis of int and gag sequences provided the first direct evidence identifying the source chimpanzees of the SFV infection in two workers. This study documents more frequent infection with SFV than with other simian retroviruses in persons working with NHPs and provides important information on the natural history and species origin of these infections. Our data highlight the importance of studies to better define the public health implications of zoonotic SFV infections.

  3. Field efficacy of nonpathogenic Streptomyces species against potato common scab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of potato fields suppressive to common scab (CS) and of association of non-pathogenic streptomycetes with CS resistance suggest that non-pathogenic strains have potential to control or modulate CS disease. Biocontrol potential of non-pathogenic Streptomyces was examined in field experiments ...

  4. Comparative Phylogenomics of Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Species

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    Emily Whiston

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ascomycete Onygenales order embraces a diverse group of mammalian pathogens, including the yeast-forming dimorphic fungal pathogens Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides spp. and Blastomyces dermatitidis, the dermatophytes Microsporum spp. and Trichopyton spp., the spherule-forming dimorphic fungal pathogens in the genus Coccidioides, and many nonpathogens. Although genomes for all of the aforementioned pathogenic species are available, only one nonpathogen had been sequenced. Here, we enhance comparative phylogenomics in Onygenales by adding genomes for Amauroascus mutatus, Amauroascus niger, Byssoonygena ceratinophila, and Chrysosporium queenslandicum—four nonpathogenic Onygenales species, all of which are more closely related to Coccidioides spp. than any other known Onygenales species. Phylogenomic detection of gene family expansion and contraction can provide clues to fungal function but is sensitive to taxon sampling. By adding additional nonpathogens, we show that LysM domain-containing proteins, previously thought to be expanding in some Onygenales, are contracting in the Coccidioides-Uncinocarpus clade, as are the self-nonself recognition Het loci. The denser genome sampling presented here highlights nearly 800 genes unique to Coccidiodes, which have significantly fewer known protein domains and show increased expression in the endosporulating spherule, the parasitic phase unique to Coccidioides spp. These genomes provide insight to gene family expansion/contraction and patterns of individual gene gain/loss in this diverse order—both major drivers of evolutionary change. Our results suggest that gene family expansion/contraction can lead to adaptive radiations that create taxonomic orders, while individual gene gain/loss likely plays a more significant role in branch-specific phenotypic changes that lead to adaptation for species or genera.

  5. Full genome sequence analysis of a novel adenovirus of rhesus macaque origin indicates a new simian adenovirus type and species

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    Daniel Malouli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple novel simian adenoviruses have been isolated over the past years and their potential to cross the species barrier and infect the human population is an ever present threat. Here we describe the isolation and full genome sequencing of a novel simian adenovirus (SAdV isolated from the urine of two independent, never co-housed, late stage simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The viral genome sequences revealed a novel type with a unique genome length, GC content, E3 region and DNA polymerase amino acid sequence that is sufficiently distinct from all currently known human- or simian adenovirus species to warrant classifying these isolates as a novel species of simian adenovirus. This new species, termed Simian mastadenovirus D (SAdV-D, displays the standard genome organization for the genus Mastadenovirus containing only one copy of the fiber gene which sets it apart from the old world monkey adenovirus species HAdV-G, SAdV-B and SAdV-C.

  6. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  7. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines

  8. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines enc

  9. SIVsm Quasispecies Adaptation to a New Simian Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential for infectious agents harbored by other species to become emerging human pathogens, little is known about why some agents establish successful cross-species transmission, while others do not. The simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs, certain variants of which gave rise to the human HIV-1 and HIV-2 epidemics, have demonstrated tremendous success in infecting new host species, both simian and human. SIVsm from sooty mangabeys appears to have infected humans on several occasions, and was readily transmitted to nonnatural Asian macaque species, providing animal models of AIDS. Here we describe the first in-depth analysis of the tremendous SIVsm quasispecies sequence variation harbored by individual sooty mangabeys, and how this diverse quasispecies adapts to two different host species-new nonnatural rhesus macaque hosts and natural sooty mangabey hosts. Viral adaptation to rhesus macaques was associated with the immediate amplification of a phylogenetically related subset of envelope (env variants. These variants contained a shorter variable region 1 loop and lacked two specific glycosylation sites, which may be selected for during acute infection. In contrast, transfer of SIVsm to its natural host did not subject the quasispecies to any significant selective pressures or bottleneck. After 100 d postinfection, variants more closely representative of the source inoculum reemerged in the macaques. This study describes an approach for elucidating how pathogens adapt to new host species, and highlights the particular importance of SIVsm env diversity in enabling cross-species transmission. The replicative advantage of a subset of SIVsm variants in macaques may be related to features of target cells or receptors that are specific to the new host environment, and may involve CD4-independent engagement of a viral coreceptor conserved among primates.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 long terminal repeat: analysis of regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, S. K.; Gallo, R C

    1988-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and a related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) contain cis-acting positive regulatory elements upstream and the major transactivator gene (tat) response element and a possible negative regulatory element downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The tat response element of HIV-2 and of SIVmac was more complex than that of HIV-1. Two structurally similar subelements within the HIV-2 tat response ...

  11. HIV-2 and its role in conglutinated approach towards Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Diwan, Batul; Saxena, Rupali; Tiwari, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is one of the most critically acclaimed endemic diseases, caused by two lentiviruses HIV-1 and 2. HIV-2 displays intimate serological and antigenic resemblance to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) along with less pathogenicity, lower infectivity and appreciable cross reactivity with HIV-1 antigens. The present era is confronted with the challenge to fabricate a vaccine effective against all clades of both the species of HIV. But vaccine development ...

  12. Immunodeficiency disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as corticosteroids). Immunosuppression is also a common side effect of chemotherapy given to treat cancer. Acquired immunodeficiency may be a complication of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and malnutrition (especially if the person does not eat enough ...

  13. Primary immunodeficiency

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    McCusker Christine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID refers to a heterogeneous group of over 130 disorders that result from defects in immune system development and/or function. PIDs are broadly classified as disorders of adaptive immunity (i.e., T-cell, B-cell or combined immunodeficiencies or of innate immunity (e.g., phagocyte and complement disorders. Although the clinical manifestations of PIDs are highly variable, most disorders involve at least an increased susceptibility to infection. Early diagnosis and treatment are imperative for preventing significant disease-associated morbidity and, therefore, consultation with a clinical immunologist is essential. PIDs should be suspected in patients with: recurrent sinus or ear infections or pneumonias within a 1 year period; failure to thrive; poor response to prolonged use of antibiotics; persistent thrush or skin abscesses; or a family history of PID. Patients with multiple autoimmune diseases should also be evaluated. Diagnostic testing often involves lymphocyte proliferation assays, flow cytometry, measurement of serum immunoglobulin (Ig levels, assessment of serum specific antibody titers in response to vaccine antigens, neutrophil function assays, stimulation assays for cytokine responses, and complement studies. The treatment of PIDs is complex and generally requires both supportive and definitive strategies. Ig replacement therapy is the mainstay of therapy for B-cell disorders, and is also an important supportive treatment for many patients with combined immunodeficiency disorders. The heterogeneous group of disorders involving the T-cell arm of the adaptive system, such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID, require immune reconstitution as soon as possible. The treatment of innate immunodeficiency disorders varies depending on the type of defect, but may involve antifungal and antibiotic prophylaxis, cytokine replacement, vaccinations and bone marrow transplantation. This article

  14. Molecular and physiological differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naveed A; Jarroll, Edward L; Paget, Timothy A

    2002-09-01

    In this study, 14 isolates of Acanthamoeba from both clinical and environmental sources belonging to seven different species were assayed for tolerance of high osmotic pressure, temperature tolerance, extracellular proteases, and cytopathic effects (CPE) on immortalized rabbit corneal epithelial cells. On the basis of the results, amoeba isolates were divided into pathogenic and nonpathogenic groups. Ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on these isolates. Phylogenetic relationships revealed that all the pathogenic strains tested clustered together as one group, while nonpathogenic strains clustered into other groups. Sequence comparisons with previously published sequences determined that among the six new pathogenic isolates used in this study, five belong to T4 genotype and one to T11. This is the first report of a T11 genotype being found in Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  15. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessain, Antoine; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Turpin, Jocelyn; Mahieux, Renaud

    2013-01-05

    Non-human primates are considered to be likely sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by some retroviruses, as the simian immunodeficiency viruses and the simian T lymphotropic viruses, which have the ability to cross-species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread. This leads to a pandemic situation for HIV-1 or an endemic one for HTLV-1. Here, we present the available data on the discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology of the recently discovered HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 deltaretroviruses, as well as the simian foamy retroviruses present in different human populations at risk, especially in central African hunters. We discuss also the natural history in humans of these retroviruses of zoonotic origin (magnitude and geographical distribution, possible inter-human transmission). In Central Africa, the increase of the bushmeat trade during the last decades has opened new possibilities for retroviral emergence in humans, especially in immuno-compromised persons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Divergent Simian Arteriviruses Cause Simian Hemorrhagic Fever of Differing Severities in Macaques

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    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF is a highly lethal disease in captive macaques. Three distinct arteriviruses are known etiological agents of past SHF epizootics, but only one, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV, has been isolated in cell culture. The natural reservoir(s of the three viruses have yet to be identified, but African nonhuman primates are suspected. Eleven additional divergent simian arteriviruses have been detected recently in diverse and apparently healthy African cercopithecid monkeys. Here, we report the successful isolation in MARC-145 cell culture of one of these viruses, Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1, from serum of a naturally infected red colobus (Procolobus [Piliocolobus] rufomitratus tephrosceles sampled in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Intramuscular (i.m. injection of KRCV-1 into four cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis resulted in a self-limiting nonlethal disease characterized by depressive behavioral changes, disturbance in coagulation parameters, and liver enzyme elevations. In contrast, i.m. injection of SHFV resulted in typical lethal SHF characterized by mild fever, lethargy, lymphoid depletion, lymphoid and hepatocellular necrosis, low platelet counts, increased liver enzyme concentrations, coagulation abnormalities, and increasing viral loads. As hypothesized based on the genetic and presumed antigenic distance between KRCV-1 and SHFV, all four macaques that had survived KRCV-1 injection died of SHF after subsequent SHFV injection, indicating a lack of protective heterotypic immunity. Our data indicate that SHF is a disease of macaques that in all likelihood can be caused by a number of distinct simian arteriviruses, although with different severity depending on the specific arterivirus involved. Consequently, we recommend that current screening procedures for SHFV in primate-holding facilities be modified to detect all known simian arteriviruses.

  17. Earliest known simian primate found in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinot, M; Mahboubi, M

    1992-05-28

    The record of early fossil Simiiformes (Anthropoidea) from the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula has increased dramatically in recent years. We report here the discovery of a new, diminutive and much older (Early or Middle Eocene) simian from an Algerian locality, Glib Zegdou. This species is smaller than any other living or fossil African simiiform. Derived similarities shared with Aegyptopithecus suggest that the new genus is more closely related to propliopithecines than to oligopithecines, implying that these two subfamilies differentiated during the Early Eocene. The new discovery confirms predictions about the great antiquity of Simiiformes and emphasizes a long and endemic African history for higher primates.

  18. Debilitating clinical disease in a wild-born captive western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) co-infected with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Nicholas; Niphuis, Henk; Verschoor, Ernst; Breuer, Judith; Quinlivan, Mark; Wawrzynczyk, Teresa; Stidworthy, Mark

    2010-12-01

    A wild-born, 34-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was transferred between zoologic collections in the United Kingdom. Adjustment to its new environment was difficult and a series of health problems ensued. Progressive severe illness of multiple etiologies, and a failure to respond to multiple therapies, led to its euthanasia 5 mo later. Disease processes included severe thoracic and axillary cutaneous ulceration of T2-3 dermatome distribution, gastroenteritis, ulcerative stomatitis, emaciation, hind limb weakness or paresis, and decubitus ulcers of the ankles and elbows. Ante- and postmortem infectious disease screening revealed that this animal was not infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, simian varicella virus (SVV), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), or hepatitis B virus; but was infected with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV). It is hypothesized that recrudescence of VZV and other disease processes described were associated with chronic STLV infection and the end of a characteristically long incubation period.

  19. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is ... and acquired agammaglobulinemia. Why Is the Study of Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) a Priority for NIAID? CVID ...

  20. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed.

  1. Nonpathogenic Entamoeba dispar quickly outgrows pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica in mixed xenic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysova, I; Tumova, P; Tolarova, V; Nohynkova, E

    2009-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar are two microscopically indistinguishable amoebae living in the human colon. The former is a pathogen, whereas the latter is a nonpathogenic commensal. Using a model system of in vitro cocultures and PCR detection of the Entamoeba species, we found that the nonpathogenic species can rapidly outgrow the pathogen in xenic cultures.

  2. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) SCID is a group of rare disorders ... life-saving treatments. Why Is the Study of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) a Priority for NIAID? SCID is a ...

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vif Protein Is an Integral Component of an mRNP Complex of Viral RNA and Could Be Involved in the Viral RNA Folding and Packaging Process

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dornadula, Geethanjali; Sun, Yong

    2000-01-01

    Virion infectivity factor (Vif) is a protein encoded by human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and -2) and simian immunodeficiency virus, plus other lentiviruses, and is essential for viral replication either in vivo or in culture for nonpermissive cells such as peripheral blood lymphoid cells, macrophages, and H9 T cells. Defects in the vif gene affect virion morphology and reverse transcription but not the expression of viral components. It has been shown that Vif colocalizes wit...

  4. Cryptic Polyketide Synthase Genes in Non-Pathogenic Clostridium SPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Swantje; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Modular type I polyketide synthases (PKS) produce a vast array of bacterial metabolites with highly diverse biological functions. Notably, all known polyketides were isolated from aerobic bacteria, and yet no example has been reported for strict anaerobes. In this study we explored the diversity and distribution of PKS genes in the genus Clostridium. In addition to comparative genomic analyses combined with predictions of modular type I polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters in sequenced genomes of Clostridium spp., a representative selection of other species inhabiting a variety of ecological niches was investigated by PCR screening for PKS genes. Our data reveal that all studied pathogenic Clostridium spp. are devoid of putative PKS genes. In stark contrast, cryptic PKS genes are widespread in genomes of non-pathogenic Clostridium species. According to phylogenetic analyses, the Clostridium PKS genes have unusual and diverse origins. However, reverse transcription quantitative PCR demonstrates that these genes are silent under standard cultivation conditions, explaining why the related metabolites have been overlooked until now. This study presents clostridia as a putative source for novel bioactive polyketides. PMID:22235310

  5. Spatial analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cougars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David C; Waller, Lance A; Biek, Roman

    2010-07-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations.

  6. Molecular ecology and natural history of simian foamy virus infection in wild-living chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying microbial pathogens with zoonotic potential in wild-living primates can be important to human health, as evidenced by human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2 and Ebola virus. Simian foamy viruses (SFVs are ancient retroviruses that infect Old and New World monkeys and apes. Although not known to cause disease, these viruses are of public health interest because they have the potential to infect humans and thus provide a more general indication of zoonotic exposure risks. Surprisingly, no information exists concerning the prevalence, geographic distribution, and genetic diversity of SFVs in wild-living monkeys and apes. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of SFVcpz infection in free-ranging chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes using newly developed, fecal-based assays. Chimpanzee fecal samples (n = 724 were collected at 25 field sites throughout equatorial Africa and tested for SFVcpz-specific antibodies (n = 706 or viral nucleic acids (n = 392. SFVcpz infection was documented at all field sites, with prevalence rates ranging from 44% to 100%. In two habituated communities, adult chimpanzees had significantly higher SFVcpz infection rates than infants and juveniles, indicating predominantly horizontal rather than vertical transmission routes. Some chimpanzees were co-infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz; however, there was no evidence that SFVcpz and SIVcpz were epidemiologically linked. SFVcpz nucleic acids were recovered from 177 fecal samples, all of which contained SFVcpz RNA and not DNA. Phylogenetic analysis of partial gag (616 bp, pol-RT (717 bp, and pol-IN (425 bp sequences identified a diverse group of viruses, which could be subdivided into four distinct SFVcpz lineages according to their chimpanzee subspecies of origin. Within these lineages, there was evidence of frequent superinfection and viral recombination. One chimpanzee was infected by a foamy virus from a Cercopithecus monkey

  7. Reinforcing effects of non-pathogenic bacteria and predation risk: from physiology to life history

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2014-01-01

    The important ecological role of predation risk in shaping populations, communities and ecosystems is becoming increasingly clear. In this context, synergistic effects between predation risk and other natural stressors on prey organisms are gaining attention. Although non-pathogenic bacteria can be widespread in aquatic ecosystems their role in mediating effects of predation risk has been ignored. We here address the hypothesis that non-pathogenic bacteria may reinforce the negative effects o...

  8. Adaptation of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses for resistance to tetherin/BST-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Moreno, Ruth; Evans, David T

    2012-06-01

    Tetherin (BST-2 or CD317) is an interferon-inducible cellular factor that prevents the detachment of enveloped viruses from infected cells. The primate lentiviruses have evolved different countermeasures to tetherin. The majority of SIVs use Nef to antagonize the tetherin proteins of their nonhuman primate hosts. However, due to the absence of sequences in human tetherin required for antagonism by Nef, HIV-1 Vpu and HIV-2 Env evolved to serve this function in humans. We recently identified compensatory changes in the Env cytoplasmic domain of a pathogenic nef-deleted SIV that confers resistance to rhesus macaque tetherin. These observations highlight the extraordinary plasticity of the primate lentiviruses in adapting to the tetherin proteins of their respective hosts, and reveal a prominent role for tetherin in shaping the evolution of the primate lentiviruses.

  9. Effect of combination antiretroviral therapy on Chinese rhesus macaques of simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Binhua; Rogers, Linda; Johnson, Ann-Marie; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey; Veazey, Ronald S

    2013-11-01

    Definitive treatment of HIV infection remains a critical but elusive goal, with persistence of residual virus even in the face of prolonged administration of suppressive combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) providing a source for recrudescent infection if treatment is stopped. Characterization of the residual virus and devising strategies to target it for eradication are key goals in HIV treatment research. Indian rhesus macaques (In-RM) infected with SIVmac have been widely used in such research. However, it has proven challenging to achieve and sustain clinically relevant levels of suppression (suppression by cART is related to pretreatment levels of viral replication, and levels of replication of SIVmac239/251 are lower in Chinese rhesus macaques (Ch-RM) than in In-RM, we evaluated cART administration to SIVmac-infected Ch-RM as a potential model for studies of residual virus and eradication strategies. Four SIVmac239-infected Ch-RM received cART including reverse transcriptase inhibitors PMPA/FTC and integrase inhibitor L-870812 daily for 8 weeks. Plasma viral loads were promptly reduced to CCR5(+)CD4(+) mucosal memory T cells increased significantly; restoration of these cells was associated with reductions in immune activation. In conclusion, cART effectively suppressed viral replication to infected Ch-RM, reducing immune activation and restoring mucosal immune cell populations. SIVmac239-infected Ch-RM may be a useful model for studying responses to cART and persistent tissue reservoirs and evaluating candidate eradication strategies to cure HIV infection.

  10. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Jamie L; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Wiertz, EJ; Wilson, Nancy A; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously reporte

  11. High Rate of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infections in Wild Chimpanzees in Northeastern Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Vanina; Locatelli, Sabrina; Boucher, Floriane; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Butel, Christelle; Esteban, Amandine; Okouga, Alain-Prince; Ndoungouet, Alphonse; Motsch, Peggy; Le Flohic, Guillaume; Ngari, Paul; Prugnolle, Franck; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rouet, François; Liégeois, Florian

    2015-09-15

    The emergence of HIV-1 groups M, N, O, and P is the result of four independent cross-species transmissions between chimpanzees (cpz) and gorillas (gor) from central/south Cameroon and humans respectively. Although the first two SIVcpz were identified in wild-born captive chimpanzees in Gabon in 1989, no study has been conducted so far in wild chimpanzees in Gabon. To document the SIVcpz infection rate, genetic diversity, and routes of virus transmission, we analyzed 1458 faecal samples collected in 16 different locations across the country, and we conducted follow-up missions in two of them. We found 380 SIV antibody positive samples in 6 different locations in the north and northeast. We determined the number of individuals collected by microsatellite analysis and obtained an adjusted SIV prevalence of 39.45%. We performed parental analysis to investigate viral spread between and within communities and found that SIVs were epidemiologically linked and were transmitted by both horizontal and vertical routes. We amplified pol and gp41 fragments and obtained 57 new SIVcpzPtt strains from three sites. All strains, but one, clustered together within a specific phylogeographic clade. Given that these SIV positive samples have been collected nearby villages and that humans continue to encroach in ape's territories, the emergence of a new HIV in this area needs to be considered.

  12. High Rate of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV Infections in Wild Chimpanzees in Northeastern Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Boué

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of HIV-1 groups M, N, O, and P is the result of four independent cross-species transmissions between chimpanzees (cpz and gorillas (gor from central/south Cameroon and humans respectively. Although the first two SIVcpz were identified in wild-born captive chimpanzees in Gabon in 1989, no study has been conducted so far in wild chimpanzees in Gabon. To document the SIVcpz infection rate, genetic diversity, and routes of virus transmission, we analyzed 1458 faecal samples collected in 16 different locations across the country, and we conducted follow-up missions in two of them. We found 380 SIV antibody positive samples in 6 different locations in the north and northeast. We determined the number of individuals collected by microsatellite analysis and obtained an adjusted SIV prevalence of 39.45%. We performed parental analysis to investigate viral spread between and within communities and found that SIVs were epidemiologically linked and were transmitted by both horizontal and vertical routes. We amplified pol and gp41 fragments and obtained 57 new SIVcpzPtt strains from three sites. All strains, but one, clustered together within a specific phylogeographic clade. Given that these SIV positive samples have been collected nearby villages and that humans continue to encroach in ape’s territories, the emergence of a new HIV in this area needs to be considered.

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease.

  14. Damaged intestinal epithelial integrity linked to microbial translocation in pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Estes

    Full Text Available The chronic phase of HIV infection is marked by pathological activation of the immune system, the extent of which better predicts disease progression than either plasma viral load or CD4(+ T cell count. Recently, translocation of microbial products from the gastrointestinal tract has been proposed as an underlying cause of this immune activation, based on indirect evidence including the detection of microbial products and specific immune responses in the plasma of chronically HIV-infected humans or SIV-infected Asian macaques. We analyzed tissues from SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RMs to provide direct in situ evidence for translocation of microbial constituents from the lumen of the intestine into the lamina propria and to draining and peripheral lymph nodes and liver, accompanied by local immune responses in affected tissues. In chronically SIV-infected RMs this translocation is associated with breakdown of the integrity of the epithelial barrier of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and apparent inability of lamina propria macrophages to effectively phagocytose translocated microbial constituents. By contrast, in the chronic phase of SIV infection in sooty mangabeys, we found no evidence of epithelial barrier breakdown, no increased microbial translocation and no pathological immune activation. Because immune activation is characteristic of the chronic phase of progressive HIV/SIV infections, these findings suggest that increased microbial translocation from the GI tract, in excess of capacity to clear the translocated microbial constituents, helps drive pathological immune activation. Novel therapeutic approaches to inhibit microbial translocation and/or attenuate chronic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals may complement treatments aimed at direct suppression of viral replication.

  15. Damaged Intestinal Epithelial Integrity Linked to Microbial Translocation in Pathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob D. Estes; Harris, Levelle D.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Brian Tabb; Stefania Pittaluga; Mirko Paiardini; G Robin Barclay; Jeremy Smedley; Rhonda Pung; Oliveira, Kenneth M.; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Guido Silvestri; Douek, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher J.; Ashley T Haase

    2010-01-01

    The chronic phase of HIV infection is marked by pathological activation of the immune system, the extent of which better predicts disease progression than either plasma viral load or CD4(+) T cell count. Recently, translocation of microbial products from the gastrointestinal tract has been proposed as an underlying cause of this immune activation, based on indirect evidence including the detection of microbial products and specific immune responses in the plasma of chronically HIV-infected hu...

  16. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoul Nada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi, and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun to 35% (ileum at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum or IgM (duodenum plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and vaccines as well. Understanding the mechanisms that impair IgA production during acute HIV/SIV infection is crucial to improve virus-specific response in mucosa and control microbial translocation.

  17. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  18. Cell killing by Simian virus 40: protective effect of chloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Einck, K H

    1978-12-01

    Treatment of CV-1 cells with chloroquine before infection by simian virus 40 resulted in the accumulation of fewer nonviable, trypan blue-stainable cells at 72 h. The drug did not affect the fraction of infected T-antigen-producing cells or the viral yields. It did diminish the apparent redistribution of lysosomal N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase from a particulate to a soluble cell fraction, and it caused an increase in the size and number of lysosomes.

  19. Comparative genome analysis of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Clavibacter strains reveals adaptations to their lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Załuga, Joanna; Stragier, Pieter; Baeyen, Steve; Haegeman, Annelies; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; De Vos, Paul

    2014-05-22

    The genus Clavibacter harbors economically important plant pathogens infecting agricultural crops such as potato and tomato. Although the vast majority of Clavibacter strains are pathogenic, there is an increasing number of non-pathogenic isolates reported. Non-pathogenic Clavibacter strains isolated from tomato seeds are particularly problematic because they affect the current detection and identification tests for Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), which is regulated with a zero tolerance in tomato seed. Their misidentification as pathogenic Cmm hampers a clear judgment on the seed quality and health. To get more insight in the genetic features linked to the lifestyle of these bacteria, a whole-genome sequence of the tomato seed-borne non-pathogenic Clavibacter LMG 26808 was determined. To gain a better understanding of the molecular determinants of pathogenicity, the genome sequence of LMG 26808 was compared with that of the pathogenic Cmm strain (NCPPB 382). The comparative analysis revealed that LMG 26808 does not contain plasmids pCM1 and pCM2 and also lacks the majority of important virulence factors described so far for pathogenic Cmm. This explains its apparent non-pathogenic nature in tomato plants. Moreover, the genome analysis of LMG 26808 detected sequences from a plasmid originating from a member of Enterobacteriaceae/Klebsiella relative. Genes received that way and coding for antibiotic resistance may provide a competitive advantage for survival of LMG 26808 in its ecological niche. Genetically, LMG 26808 was the most similar to the pathogenic Cmm NCPPB 382 but contained more mobile genetic elements. The genome of this non-pathogenic Clavibacter strain contained also a high number of transporters and regulatory genes. The genome sequence of the non-pathogenic Clavibacter strain LMG 26808 and the comparative analyses with other pathogenic Clavibacter strains provided a better understanding of the genetic bases of virulence and

  20. Differentiation between a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris using PCR-RFLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Jørgensen, Thomas Rohde; Buchmann, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form.......A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form....

  1. Immunomodulation and immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Aiden P

    2004-04-01

    This article briefly reviews the concepts of immunodeficiency and immunomodulation as they relate to selected skin diseases in the dog and cat. Immunodeficiency states are uncommon and may be associated with a subnormal or down-regulated immune system, including humoral deficiencies, such as IgA, and abnormal lymphocyte or neutrophil function. Establishing a causal relationship between a skin disease and presumed immunodeficient state has been difficult due to the rarity of such conditions, and the limited nature of the techniques used to characterise the immune system response. Severe combined immunodeficiency in dogs is a well characterised primary immunodeficiency state involving lymphocytes; retrovirus infection in cats may lead to an acquired immunodeficient state with some association with certain dermatological conditions although it remains unclear that infection is causally linked with disease. Immunomodulation usually implies stimulating the immune system along a beneficial pathway. Such a therapeutic approach may involve a wide variety of agents, for example intravenous immunoglobulin. There are few randomised controlled trials with veterinary patients that unequivocally demonstrate beneficial responses to immunomodulatory agents. Interferons are cytokines of major interest in human and veterinary medicine for their antiviral, anti-tumour and immunomodulatory effects. The advent of veterinary-licensed products containing recombinant interferon may enable demonstration of the efficacy of interferons for conditions such as canine papillomatosis and feline eosinophilic granuloma complex. Canine pyoderma has been treated with a number of presumed immunomodulatory agents with limited success. With more detailed knowledge of the pathogenesis of pyoderma it may be possible to develop efficacious immunomodulators.

  2. Conversion of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum magna to a nonpathogenic, endophytic mutualist by gene disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, R.S.; Ranson, J.C.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Hygromycin-resistant transformants of the cucurbit pathogen Colletotrichum magna (teleomorph: Glomerella magna) were generated by restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) transformation. A rapid pathogenicity assay involving watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) seedlings was developed and 14,400 REMI transformants were screened and assessed for their ability to cause disease, colonize plant tissues, and confer disease resistance against wild-type C. magna. A total of 176 nonpathogenic REMI mutants capable of colonizing cucurbit plants were isolated and assigned to three groups based on their ability to confer disease resistance: phenotype A, 80 to 100% disease protection; phenotype B, 10 to 65% disease protection; and phenotype C, 0 to 4% disease protection. Molecular and genetic analyses of one REMI mutant (R1) indicated that the nonpathogenic phenotype A resulted from a single-site integration. R1 showed a 1:1 segregation of hygromycin resistance and nonpathogenicity and all hygromycin-resistant progeny were nonpathogenic. The integrated vector and 5.5 kb of flanking fungal genomic DNA were isolated from R1 and designated pGMR1. To verify that pGMR1 contained pathogenicity gene sequences, a wild-type isolate of C. magna was transformed with pGMR1 to induce gene disruptions by homologous integration. Approximately 47% of the pGMR1 transformants expressed phenotype A, indicating homologous integration and gene disruption.

  3. Avian and simian malaria: do they have a cancer connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martin; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    It has been claimed that infectious agents transmitted by mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) may have a greater connection to cancer then hitherto supposed and that the immune system struggles to recognize and fight some of these infectious agents. One of the claims made is that there is a connection between human malaria and brain cancers in the USA. However, the USA declared itself free of human malaria in the last century, yet cancer incidences remain high, suggesting any overall cancer connection is slight. Two fundamental questions arise from the possible mosquito-cancer connection. Firstly, if mosquitoes are able to vector some pathogens and parasites linked with cancer pathogenesis, why has the fact not been discovered decades ago? Secondly, if there is a connection (other than in relation to Burkett's lymphoma), what is its extent? The answers may well lie with the various types of malarias known to exist. The discovery in humans of the simian malaria, caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, suggests that other forms of simian or even avian malaria may be capable of survival in humans, albeit at low levels of parasitemia, and humans may be a dead-end host. Other carcinogenic infectious agents transmitted by mosquitoes may also go undetected because either no one is looking for them, or they are looking in wrong anatomical locations and/or with inadequate tools. Research on false negative test results with respect to many infectious agents is sadly lacking, so its extent is unknown. However, electronic and other media provide numerous instances of patients failing to be diagnosed for both human malaria and Lyme's disease, to take just two examples. This review suggests that to shed light on a potential mosquito-cancer connection, more research is required to establish whether other simian and avian forms of malaria play a part. If so, then they potentially provide unique markers for early cancer detection.

  4. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  5. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States.

  6. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  7. Mobile Manipulation and Mobility as Manipulation: Design and Algorithms of RoboSimian

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    RoboSimian’s body shell removed showing the quick latches and easy access to internal components. 2.4 Hand Design (a) RoboSimian hand with drive gears ...such as the drill. Figure 5: RoboSimian hand with tendon spool exposed and the drive gear system exposed. Similar to its namesakes, RoboSimian uses...feature was left out for the competition hands. The hand has three under-actuated fingers, each with a braided Dyneema R© tendon wrapped around pulleys at

  8. Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Strains of Entamoeba histolytica can be Differentiated by Monoclonal Antibodies to the Galactose-Specific Adherence Lectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    AD- A235 913 DEVELOPMENT Ei ENGINEERING CENTER CRDEC-TR-268 PATHOGENIC AND NONPATHOGENIC STRAINS OF ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA CAN BE DIFFERENTIATED BY...Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Strains of Entamoeba Histolytica can be Differentiated by Monoclonal PR-IFJlX2XXRPEW Antibodies to the Galactose-Specific...galactose lectin produced by Entamoeba histolytica provide the basis for development of a model system for the environmental detection of adherence and

  9. Molecular evidence of simian virus 40 infections in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Arrington, A. S.; Wong, C.; Lednicky, J. A.; Finegold, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have detected simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA in certain human tumors and normal tissues. The significance of human infections by SV40, which was first discovered as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines used between 1955 and 1963, remains unknown. The occurrence of SV40 infections in unselected hospitalized children was evaluated. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analyses were done on archival tissue specimens from patients positive for SV40 neutralizing antibody. SV40 DNA was identified in samples from 4 of 20 children (1 Wilms' tumor, 3 transplanted kidney samples). Sequence variation among SV40 regulatory regions ruled out laboratory contamination of specimens. This study shows the presence of SV40 infections in pediatric patients born after 1982.

  10. [Basics of primary immunodeficiencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martínez, Claudia; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva; Hernández-Martínez, Ana Rosa; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, the etiology are the defects in the development or function of the immune system. The principal PID manifestations are the infections in early age, malignancy and diseases of immune dysregulation as autoimmunity and allergy. PIDs are genetics disorders and most of them are inherited as autosomal recessive, also this group of diseases is more prevalent in males and in childhood. The antibody immunodeficiency is the PID more common in adults. The more frequent disorders are the infections in the respiratory tract, abscesses, candidiasis, diarrhea, BCGosis etc. Initial approach included a complete blood count and quantification of immunoglobulins. The delay in diagnosis could be explained due to a perception that the recurrent infections are normal process or think that they are exclusively of childhood. The early diagnosis of PID by primary care physicians is important to opportune treatment and better prognosis.

  11. Coselection of cadmium and benzalkonium chloride resistance in conjugative transfers from nonpathogenic Listeria spp. to other Listeriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katharios-Lanwermeyer, S; Rakic-Martinez, M; Elhanafi, D; Ratani, S; Tiedje, J M; Kathariou, S

    2012-11-01

    Resistance to the quaternary ammonium disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC) may be an important contributor to the ability of Listeria spp. to persist in the processing plant environment. Although a plasmid-borne disinfectant resistance cassette (bcrABC) has been identified in Listeria monocytogenes, horizontal transfer of these genes has not been characterized. Nonpathogenic Listeria spp. such as L. innocua and L. welshimeri are more common than L. monocytogenes in food processing environments and may contribute to the dissemination of disinfectant resistance genes in listeriae, including L. monocytogenes. In this study, we investigated conjugative transfer of resistance to BC and to cadmium from nonpathogenic Listeria spp. to other nonpathogenic listeriae, as well as to L. monocytogenes. BC-resistant L. welshimeri and L. innocua harboring bcrABC, along with the cadmium resistance determinant cadA2, were able to transfer resistance to other nonpathogenic listeriae as well as to L. monocytogenes of diverse serotypes, including strains from the 2011 cantaloupe outbreak. Transfer among nonpathogenic Listeria spp. was noticeably higher at 25°C than at 37°C, whereas acquisition of resistance by L. monocytogenes was equally efficient at 25 and 37°C. When the nonpathogenic donors were resistant to both BC and cadmium, acquisition of cadmium resistance was an effective surrogate for transfer of resistance to BC, suggesting coselection between these resistance attributes. The results suggest that nonpathogenic Listeria spp. may behave as reservoirs for disinfectant and heavy metal resistance genes for other listeriae, including the pathogenic species L. monocytogenes.

  12. Coselection of Cadmium and Benzalkonium Chloride Resistance in Conjugative Transfers from Nonpathogenic Listeria spp. to Other Listeriae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katharios-Lanwermeyer, S.; Rakic-Martinez, M.; Elhanafi, D.; Ratani, S.; Tiedje, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to the quaternary ammonium disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC) may be an important contributor to the ability of Listeria spp. to persist in the processing plant environment. Although a plasmid-borne disinfectant resistance cassette (bcrABC) has been identified in Listeria monocytogenes, horizontal transfer of these genes has not been characterized. Nonpathogenic Listeria spp. such as L. innocua and L. welshimeri are more common than L. monocytogenes in food processing environments and may contribute to the dissemination of disinfectant resistance genes in listeriae, including L. monocytogenes. In this study, we investigated conjugative transfer of resistance to BC and to cadmium from nonpathogenic Listeria spp. to other nonpathogenic listeriae, as well as to L. monocytogenes. BC-resistant L. welshimeri and L. innocua harboring bcrABC, along with the cadmium resistance determinant cadA2, were able to transfer resistance to other nonpathogenic listeriae as well as to L. monocytogenes of diverse serotypes, including strains from the 2011 cantaloupe outbreak. Transfer among nonpathogenic Listeria spp. was noticeably higher at 25°C than at 37°C, whereas acquisition of resistance by L. monocytogenes was equally efficient at 25 and 37°C. When the nonpathogenic donors were resistant to both BC and cadmium, acquisition of cadmium resistance was an effective surrogate for transfer of resistance to BC, suggesting coselection between these resistance attributes. The results suggest that nonpathogenic Listeria spp. may behave as reservoirs for disinfectant and heavy metal resistance genes for other listeriae, including the pathogenic species L. monocytogenes. PMID:22904051

  13. Discrimination of Pathogenic vs. Nonpathogenic Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Using Proteomics Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    assignments. Validated peptide sequences, differentially present or absent in various strains (STB matrices), were visualized as assignment bitmaps...PERL, MATLAB, and Microsoft Visual Basic. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The current project characterized and identified pathogenic and nonpathogenic...ECa_O157H7EDt9|ECOt.UTie ABC«.51!2| AEt «.MlHEllBA(41_AP5|BAPH_BP|6V»PH_5G|r»O_RBS0|ECEN_AU1054|BaC_rK;|BMAl. SO.O_MOR5ITAN5 ECCl.536|ECOt_536|ECOl._CFT073

  14. The properties of lectins and cells surface biopolymers of non-pathogenic corynebacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sashschuk E. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study lectin properties of non-pathogenic corynebacteria cells and preparations of their surface biopolymers (SBP, extracted by SDS. Methods. SBP were extracted from intact cells by 0.15 M solution of NaCl contains 1 % SDS. Protein content was determined using Lowry method, carbohydrates – with anthrone method. Electrophoresis was performed in SDS-PAGE according to Lemmli. Hemagglutinating activity (HAA was studied using rabbit erythrocytes. The lectin carbohydrate specificity was determined by reaction of inhibition of hemagglutination. Results. Electrophoretic set of SBP preparations contained the proteins and carbohydrates biopolymers with molecular mass of 10.0–120.0 kDa which did not possess HAA. After extraction of SBP the corynebacteria cells remained viable and have HAA higher than intact cells (64–2048 units. The hemagglutinins of the majority of corynebacteria strains after treatment of cells with SDS exhibited the highest affinity to the bovine submandibular gland mucin and N-acetylneuraminic acid. Conclusions. The examined non-pathogenic strains of corynebacteria were found to contain the lectins, associated with internal layers of a cell wall, which showed a predominant specificity to sialic acids.

  15. Phylogeographic Diversity of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Hantaviruses in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miša Korva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Slovenia is a very diverse country from a natural geography point of view, with many different habitats within a relatively small area, in addition to major geological and climatic differences. It is therefore not surprising that several small mammal species have been confirmed to harbour hantaviruses: A. flavicollis (Dobrava virus, A. agrarius (Dobrava virus–Kurkino, M. glareolus (Puumala virus, S. areanus (Seewis virus,M. agrestis, M. arvalis and M. subterraneus (Tula virus. Three of the viruses, namely the Dobrava, Dobrava–Kurkino and Puumala viruses, cause disease in humans, with significant differences in the severity of symptoms. Due to changes in haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome cases (HFRS epidemiology, a detailed study on phylogenetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of pathogenic and non-pathogenic hantaviruses circulating in ecologically diverse endemic regions was performed. The study presents one of the largest collections of hantavirus L, M and S sequences obtained from hosts and patients within a single country. Several genetic lineages were determined for each hantavirus species, with higher diversity among non-pathogenic compared to pathogenic viruses. For pathogenic hantaviruses, a significant geographic clustering of human- and rodent-derived sequences was confirmed. Several geographic and ecological factors were recognized as influencing and limiting the formation of endemic areas.

  16. Molecular Analysis of a Novel Simian Virus 40 (SV40) Type in Rhesus Macaques and Evidence for Double Infections with the Classical SV40 Type▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagrouch, Zahra; Karremans, Kevin; Deuzing, Ilona; van Gessel, Sabine; Niphuis, Henk; Bogers, Willy; Verschoor, Ernst J.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of simian virus 40 (SV40) infections in rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) and in uninfected animals was determined using PCR. Rates varied from 5% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of uninfected monkeys to 19.6% in SHIV-infected macaques. Much higher detection rates, up to 75%, were found in lymph nodes and spleen samples of SHIV-infected animals. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that they form two genetic clusters, one containing the majority of known SV40 strains and the other formed by variants with 7% genetic difference. Based on this difference, we propose two SV40 types: “type 1” or “classical type” for the majority of SV40 strains and “type 2” for the novel SV40 variants. The genome of one variant, SV40-Ri257, was completely sequenced and analyzed. The agnogene of SV40-Ri257 extends into the VP2 open reading frame and encodes a typical agnoprotein fused to a C-terminal hydrophobic region. The transcriptional control region (TCR) of SV40-Ri257 is the least conserved region compared to type 1 viruses. Particularly, the 3′ end of the TCR, containing the early promoter and enhancer region, exhibits considerable variation. Further analysis of SHIV-infected macaques with type-specific PCRs revealed that the TCR of type 1 was completely conserved, whereas this region in type 2 varied considerably within the early enhancer region. We provide evidence here for the existence of a novel SV40 type in rhesus macaques and show that double infections with both types frequently occur. PMID:21307214

  17. Molecular analysis of a novel simian virus 40 (SV40) type in rhesus macaques and evidence for double infections with the classical SV40 type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagrouch, Zahra; Karremans, Kevin; Deuzing, Ilona; van Gessel, Sabine; Niphuis, Henk; Bogers, Willy; Verschoor, Ernst J

    2011-04-01

    The incidence of simian virus 40 (SV40) infections in rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) and in uninfected animals was determined using PCR. Rates varied from 5% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of uninfected monkeys to 19.6% in SHIV-infected macaques. Much higher detection rates, up to 75%, were found in lymph nodes and spleen samples of SHIV-infected animals. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that they form two genetic clusters, one containing the majority of known SV40 strains and the other formed by variants with 7% genetic difference. Based on this difference, we propose two SV40 types: "type 1" or "classical type" for the majority of SV40 strains and "type 2" for the novel SV40 variants. The genome of one variant, SV40-Ri257, was completely sequenced and analyzed. The agnogene of SV40-Ri257 extends into the VP2 open reading frame and encodes a typical agnoprotein fused to a C-terminal hydrophobic region. The transcriptional control region (TCR) of SV40-Ri257 is the least conserved region compared to type 1 viruses. Particularly, the 3' end of the TCR, containing the early promoter and enhancer region, exhibits considerable variation. Further analysis of SHIV-infected macaques with type-specific PCRs revealed that the TCR of type 1 was completely conserved, whereas this region in type 2 varied considerably within the early enhancer region. We provide evidence here for the existence of a novel SV40 type in rhesus macaques and show that double infections with both types frequently occur.

  18. Seroprevalence and genomic divergence of circulating strains of feline immunodeficiency virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Jennifer L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2005-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today.

  19. Relationship of lymphoid lesions to disease course in mucosal feline immunodeficiency virus type C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-09-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection typically has a prolonged and variable disease course in cats, which can limit its usefulness as a model for human immunodeficiency virus infection. A clade C FIV isolate (FIV-C) has been associated with high viral burdens and rapidly progressive disease in cats. FIV-C was transmissible via oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosal exposure, and infection resulted in one of three disease courses: rapid, conventional/slow, or regressive. The severity of the pathologic changes paralleled the disease course. Thymic depletion was an early lesion and was correlated with detection of FIV RNA in thymocytes by in situ hybridization. The major changes in thymic cell populations were depletion of p55+/S100+ dendritic cells, CD3- cells, CD4+/CD8- cells, and CD4+/CD8+ cells and increases in apoptosis, CD45R+ B cells, and lymphoid follicles. In contrast to thymic depletion, peripheral lymphoid tissues often were hyperplastic. Mucosally transmitted FIV-C is thymotropic and induces a spectrum of lymphoid lesions and disease mirroring that seen with the human and simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

  20. DNA characterization of simian Entamoeba histolytica-like strains to differentiate them from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Jun-ichiro; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Kato, Miyoko; Narita, Toyoko; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Koji

    2009-10-01

    Two simian Entamoeba histolytica-like strains, EHMfas1 and P19-061405, have been suggested to represent a new species based on genetic characterization. Sequence analyses of the hexokinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, and phosphoglucomutase genes supported the previous findings of isoenzyme analyses demonstrating a new zymodeme pattern. Phylogenetic studies of 18S rDNA, 5.8S rDNA, the chaperonin 60 gene, and the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase gene showed original clusters of simian E. histolytica-like strains below or near E. histolytica, respectively. Comparative studies of the chitinase and the serine-rich E. histolytica protein genes and locus 1-2 region revealed that most mutated units were shared among the simian E. histolytica-like strains. The similarities of each of the repeating units within the simian E. histolytica-like strains or E. histolytica and the differences of those between the both might be generated by concerted evolution. Our results indicate that EHMfas1 and P19-061405 should be considered to be the same species, despite that they were isolated from different monkey species and different habitats. Simian E. histolytica-like amebas may be endemic to macaque monkeys, as a counterpart to E. histolytica in humans, and should be differentiated from E. histolytica by the revival name Entamoeba nuttalli, as proposed for P19-061405.

  1. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  2. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  3. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Z D; Birch, C; Heath, R; Gust, I

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H2O2 for 1 h each.

  4. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Z.D.; Birch, C.; Heath, R.; Gust, I.

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for 1 h each.

  5. Early pathogenesis of transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Leslie A; Hoover, Edward A

    2002-06-01

    To identify the early target cells and tissues in transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, cats were exposed to a clade C FIV isolate via the oral-nasal or vaginal mucosa and multiple tissues were examined by virus isolation coculture (VI), DNA PCR, catalyzed tyramide signal-amplified in situ hybridization (TSA-ISH), and immunohistochemistry between days 1 and 12 postinoculation (p.i.). FIV RNA was detected in tonsil and oral or vaginal mucosa as early as 1 day p.i. by TSA-ISH and in retropharyngeal, tracheobronchial, or external iliac lymph nodes and sometimes in spleen or blood mononuclear cells by day 2, indicating that regional and distant spread of virus-infected cells occurred rapidly after mucosal exposure. By day 8, viral RNA, DNA, and culturable virus were uniformly detected in regional and distant tissues, connoting systemic infection. TSA-ISH proved more sensitive than DNA PCR in detecting early FIV-infected cells. In mucosal tissues, the earliest demonstrable FIV-bearing cells were either within or subjacent to the mucosal epithelium or were in germinal centers of regional lymph nodes. The FIV(+) cells were of either of two morphological types, large stellate or small round. Those FIV RNA(+) cells which could be colabeled for a phenotype marker, were labeled for either dendritic-cell-associated protein p55 or T-lymphocyte receptor antigen CD3. These studies indicate that FIV crosses mucous membranes within hours after exposure and rapidly traffics via dendritic and T cells to systemic lymphoid tissues, a pathway similar to that thought to occur in the initial phase of infection by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

  6. Space Flight Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has had sufficient concern for the well-being of astronauts traveling in space to create the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), which is investigating several areas of biomedical research including those of immunology. As part of the Immunology, Infection, and Hematology Team, the co-investigators of the Space Flight Immunodeficiency Project began their research projects on April 1, 1998 and are now just into the second year of work. Two areas of research have been targeted: 1) specific immune (especially antibody) responses and 2) non-specific inflammation and adhesion. More precise knowledge of these two areas of research will help elucidate the potential harmful effects of space travel on the immune system, possibly sufficient to create a secondary state of immunodeficiency in astronauts. The results of these experiments are likely to lead to the delineation of functional alterations in antigen presentation, specific immune memory, cytokine regulation of immune responses, cell to cell interactions, and cell to endothelium interactions.

  7. HIV-1 vaccines based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia protected Chinese rhesus macaques from simian HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Yue; Luo, Zhenwu; Yang, Guibo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Maosheng; Dai, Jiejie; Li, Qihan; Qin, Chuan; Shao, Yiming

    2015-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccines constructed from replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia virus (rTV) alone or combined with DNA in protecting Chinese rhesus macaques from homologous Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-CN97001 challenge. The nef, gag, pol, and gp140 genes from strain CRF07_BC HIV-1 CN54 were selected to construct an HIV vaccine using the rTV or rTV/DNA vaccine. After vaccination, the vaccine and control groups were intravenously challenged with SHIV-CN97001 (32 MID50). HIV-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, gp70 V1V2 binding antibodies, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were measured prospectively after vaccination with an ELISA, a virus infectivity assay in TZM-bl cells, and ELISPOT assays, respectively. Viral RNA was quantified after challenge with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and protection efficacy was determined with an analysis of CD8 lymphocyte depletion in vivo. Both rTV and DNA/rTV vaccine groups developed strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 CN54 antigens, including Gag and Env, and also developed significant and persistent anti-Env antibodies and neutralizing antibodies after immunization. Both the rTV and DNA/rTV groups were significantly protected against SHIV-CN97001 or displayed lower viremia than the controls. After CD8 lymphocyte depletion, no viremia was detectable in the vaccinated monkeys, but rebounded rapidly in the control animals. Protection against infection correlated with vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies specific for homologous HIV-1 viruses. An rTV-based HIV-1 vaccine, with or without a DNA primer, provided protection from SHIV challenge in a macaque model. Replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia is a promising vector and should enable advances in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  8. Suppressing active replication of a live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine does not abrogate protection from challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, Benjamin; Fiebig, Uwe; Hohn, Oliver [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Plesker, Roland; Coulibaly, Cheick; Cichutek, Klaus; Mühlebach, Michael D. [Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen (Germany); Bannert, Norbert; Kurth, Reinhard [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Norley, Stephen, E-mail: NorleyS@rki.de [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Although safety concerns preclude the use of live attenuated HIV vaccines in humans, they provide a useful system for identifying the elusive correlates of protective immunity in the SIV/macaque animal model. However, a number of pieces of evidence suggest that protection may result from prior occupancy of susceptible target cells by the vaccine virus rather than the immune response. To address this, we developed a Nef-deletion variant of an RT-SHIV whose active replication could be shut off by treatment with RT-inhibitors. Groups of macaques were inoculated with the ∆Nef-RT-SHIV and immune responses allowed to develop before antiretroviral treatment and subsequent challenge with wild-type SIVmac239. Vaccinated animals either resisted infection fully or significantly controlled the subsequent viremia. However, there was no difference between animals undergoing replication of the vaccine virus and those without. This strongly suggests that competition for available target cells does not play a role in protection. - Highlights: • A Nef-deleted RT-SHIV was used as a live attenuated vaccine in macaques. • Vaccine virus replication was shut down to investigate its role in protection. • Ongoing vaccine virus replication did not appear to be necessary for protection. • An analysis of T- and B-cell responses failed to identify a correlate of protection.

  9. Vaccination with live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus causes dynamic changes in intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsley William

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination with live attenuated SIV can protect against detectable infection with wild-type virus. We have investigated whether target cell depletion contributes to the protection observed. Following vaccination with live attenuated SIV the frequency of intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells, an early target of wild-type SIV infection and destruction, was determined at days 3, 7, 10, 21 and 125 post inoculation. Results In naive controls, modest frequencies of intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells were predominantly found within the LPL TTrM-1 and IEL TTrM-2 subsets. At day 3, LPL and IEL CD4+CCR5+ TEM cells were dramatically increased whilst less differentiated subsets were greatly reduced, consistent with activation-induced maturation. CCR5 expression remained high at day 7, although there was a shift in subset balance from CD4+CCR5+ TEM to less differentiated TTrM-2 cells. This increase in intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells preceded the peak of SIV RNA plasma loads measured at day 10. Greater than 65.9% depletion of intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells followed at day 10, but overall CD4+ T cell homeostasis was maintained by increased CD4+CCR5- T cells. At days 21 and 125, high numbers of intestinal CD4+CCR5- naive TN cells were detected concurrent with greatly increased CD4+CCR5+ LPL TTrM-2 and IEL TEM cells at day 125, yet SIV RNA plasma loads remained low. Conclusions This increase in intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells, following vaccination with live attenuated SIV, does not correlate with target cell depletion as a mechanism of protection. Instead, increased intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells may correlate with or contribute to the protection conferred by vaccination with live attenuated SIV.

  10. Relation between phylogeny of African green monkey CD4 genes and their respective simian immunodeficiency virus genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Diop, Ousmane

    1997-01-01

    An apparent species-specific relatedness of SIVagm suggests a coevolution with their natural hosts. However, the exact species or subspecies classification of African green monkeys, AGM, is uncertain because current classification schemes rely on phenotype markers, while more definitive genetic...... data are lacking. In this study, the CD4 protein involved in tissue type recognition was gentically cloned and sequence from PBMC RNA from all AGM species, including Barbados green monkeys (BGM). Phylogenetic trees were constructed that also included genomic CD4 nucleotide sequences from patas, sooty...... mangabeys, rhesus and pig-tail macaques, chimpanzees, and humans. Chimpanzees and humans consistently clustered together. Monkeys within the Cercopithecus genus formed a separate cluster which included pata monkeys, supporting its grouping as a member of Cercopithecus. Surprisingly, sooty mangabeys were...

  11. Turnover rates of B cells, T cells, and NK cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Mohri, H.; Ho, D.D.; Perelson, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We determined average cellular turnover rates by fitting mathematical models to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine measurements in SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. The daily turnover rates of CD4(+) T cells, CD4(-) T cells, CD20(+) B cells, and CD16(+) NK cells in normal uninfected rhesus macaques

  12. Vif proteins of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses require cellular CBFβ to degrade APOBEC3 restriction factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultquist, Judd F; Binka, Mawuena; LaRue, Rebecca S; Simon, Viviana; Harris, Reuben S

    2012-03-01

    HIV-1 requires the cellular transcription factor CBFβ to stabilize its accessory protein Vif and promote APOBEC3G degradation. Here, we demonstrate that both isoforms of CBFβ allow for increased steady-state levels of Vif, enhanced APOBEC3G degradation, and increased viral infectivity. This conserved functional interaction enhances the steady-state levels of Vif proteins from multiple HIV-1 subtypes and is required for the degradation of all human and rhesus Vif-sensitive APOBEC3 proteins by their respective lentiviral Vif proteins.

  13. Characterization of a new simian immunodeficiency virus strain in a naturally infected Pan troglodytes troglodytes chimpanzee with AIDS related symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghokeng Avelin F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on the evolution of natural SIV infection in chimpanzees (SIVcpz and on the impact of SIV on local ape populations are only available for Eastern African chimpanzee subspecies (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, and no data exist for Central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes, the natural reservoir of the ancestors of HIV-1 in humans. Here, we report a case of naturally-acquired SIVcpz infection in a P.t.troglodytes chimpanzee with clinical and biological data and analysis of viral evolution over the course of infection. Results A male chimpanzee (Cam155, 1.5 years, was seized in southern Cameroon in November 2003 and screened SIV positive during quarantine. Clinical follow-up and biological analyses have been performed for 7 years and showed a significant decline of CD4 counts (1,380 cells/mm3 in 2004 vs 287 in 2009, a severe thrombocytopenia (130,000 cells/mm3 in 2004 vs 5,000 cells/mm3 in 2009, a weight loss of 21.8% from August 2009 to January 2010 (16 to 12.5 kg and frequent periods of infections with diverse pathogens. DNA from PBMC, leftover from clinical follow-up samples collected in 2004 and 2009, was used to amplify overlapping fragments and sequence two full-length SIVcpzPtt-Cam155 genomes. SIVcpzPtt-Cam155 was phylogenetically related to other SIVcpzPtt from Cameroon (SIVcpzPtt-Cam13 and Gabon (SIVcpzPtt-Gab1. Ten molecular clones 5 years apart, spanning the V1V4 gp120 env region (1,100 bp, were obtained. Analyses of the env region showed positive selection (dN-dS >0, intra-host length variation and extensive amino acid diversity between clones, greater in 2009. Over 5 years, N-glycosylation site frequency significantly increased (p Conclusions Here, we describe for the first time the clinical history and viral evolution of a naturally SIV infected P.t.troglodytes chimpanzee. The findings show an increasing viral diversity over time and suggest clinical progression to an AIDS-like disease, showing that SIVcpz can be pathogenic in its host, as previously described in P.t.schweinfurthii. Although studying the impact of SIV infection in wild apes is difficult, efforts should be made to better characterize the pathogenicity of the ancestors of HIV-1 in their natural host and to find out whether SIV infection also plays a role in ape population decline.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  15. Growth regulation of simian and human AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines by TGF-β1 and IL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Laura S

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL is the second most frequent cancer associated with AIDS, and is a frequent cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. Experimental analysis of AIDS-NHL has been facilitated by the availability of an excellent animal model, i.e., simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (SAIDS in the rhesus macaque consequent to infection with simian immunodeficiency virus. A recent study of SAIDS-NHL demonstrated a lymphoma-derived cell line to be sensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of the ubiquitous cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta. The authors concluded that TGF-beta acts as a negative growth regulator of the lymphoma-derived cell line and, potentially, as an inhibitory factor in the regulatory network of AIDS-related lymphomagenesis. The present study was conducted to assess whether other SAIDS-NHL and AIDS-NHL cell lines are similarly sensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of TGF-beta, and to test the hypothesis that interleukin-6 (IL-6 may represent a counteracting positive influence in their growth regulation. Methods Growth stimulation or inhibition in response to cytokine treatment was quantified using trypan blue exclusion or colorimetric MTT assay. Intracellular flow cytometry was used to analyze the activation of signaling pathways and to examine the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins and distinguishing hallmarks of AIDS-NHL subclass. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometric analysis of cell populations with sub-G1 DNA content and by measuring activated caspase-3. Results Results confirmed the sensitivity of LCL8664, an immunoblastic SAIDS-NHL cell line, to TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition, and further demonstrated the partial rescue by simultaneous treatment with IL-6. IL-6 was shown to activate STAT3, even in the presence of TGF-beta1, and thereby to activate proliferative and anti-apoptotic pathways. By comparison, human AIDS-NHL cell lines

  16. Genetic diversity of non-pathogenic Clavibacter strains isolated from tomato seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluga, Joanna; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Stragier, Pieter; Maes, Martine; De Vos, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) is a seed-transmitted, quarantine pathogen which causes bacterial wilt and canker of tomato. Despite efforts to prevent seed contamination, new introductions are regularly detected, associated with new regions of tomato seed production. It seems as if the expanding diversity of Cmm also challenges the limited host range. Clavibacter-like isolates from tomato seed are phenotypically similar to Cmm in the common diagnostic semi-selective media and are identified as Cmm in the customary tests but are not pathogenic to tomato. In our first study four representatives formed a separate cluster in gyrB sequence analysis and in MALDI-TOF MS. Their presence on seed prevents clear judgment on the health status of tomato seeds. As their nature and function are unclear we aimed to investigate and compare them to Cmm. Twenty strains described as Clavibacter-like isolated from tomato seed and not pathogenic to tomato plantlets were selected. Leaf spots, wilting or cankers were not induced after local or systemic inoculation. Tomato stems were not colonized nor was there evidence of survival in tomato stems. Total DNA-DNA hybridization and sequence analysis of gyrB and dnaA proved that they belong to the Cm species but can be unambiguously separated from Cmm. Some of the genes encoding virulence determinants in Cmm strains were also detected in some of the non-pathogenic isolates. Moreover, Cmm strains formed a coherent group, while non-pathogenic Cm strains were heterogenic. The latter was confirmed by BOX-PCR. We speculate that tomato seeds likely represent a larger reservoir of unexplored Clavibacter diversity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyamine Metabolism in Flax in Response to Treatment with Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Fusarium Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioleta eWojtasik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Flax crop yield is limited by various environmental factors, but the largest crop losses worldwide are caused by Fusarium infection. Polyamines are one of the many metabolites possibly involved in the plant response to infection. However, in flax the polyamine composition, genes involved in polyamine synthesis, and their regulation, were previously unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the polyamine synthesis pathway in flax and its involvement in response to pathogen infection. It is well established that polyamines are essential for the growth and development of both plants and fungi, but their role in pathogen infection still remains unknown. In our study we correlated the expression of genes involved in polyamine metabolism with the polyamine levels in plant tissues and compared the results for flax seedlings treated with two pathogenic and one non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium. We observed an increase in the expression of genes participating in polyamine synthesis after fungal infection, and it was reflected in an increase of polyamine content in the plant tissues. The highest level of mRNA was characteristic for ornithine decarboxylase during infection with all tested Fusarium strains and the arginine decarboxylase gene during infection with the pathogenic strain of F. culmorum. The main polyamine identified in the flax was putrescine, and its level changed the most during infection. Moreover, the considerable increase in the cell wall-bound polyamines compared to the levels of free and conjugated polyamines may indicate that their main role during pathogen infection lies in strengthening of the cell wall. In vitro experiments showed that the polyamines inhibit Fusarium growth, which suggests that they play an important role in plant defence mechanisms. Furthermore, changes in metabolism and content of polyamines indicate different defence mechanisms activated in flax in response to infection by pathogenic and non-pathogenic

  18. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  19. Differences among isolates of simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravell, M; London, W T; Leon, M E; Palmer, A E; Hamilton, R S

    1986-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus is a member of the Togaviridae family which currently is unclassified to genus. We have studied the relatedness of four different SHF virus isolates obtained from infected macaque or patas monkeys. Differences were found among isolates in type and severity of disease produced in patas monkeys, cell sensitivity to infection, viral antigens, and levels of specific antibody induced in patas monkeys. Based on these criteria, the four isolates have been grouped in two categories: those producing acute infections in patas monkeys (LVR, P-180) and those producing persistent infections (P-248, P-741). The P-180 isolate induced the most severe disease in experimentally infected patas monkeys, but only occasionally were their infections fatal. Persistently infected patas monkeys were viremic over a period of years, but showed no signs or symptoms of infection. All four isolates were found to be antigenically related by use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); the P-248 isolate showing the weakest antigenic relationship. However, none of the four isolates induced cross-neutralizing antibodies in infected patas monkeys. High titers of specific IgG antibody (up to 31,250 as determined by ELISA) were induced in acutely infected patas monkeys (LVR, P-180), but antibody was barely detectable (less than or equal to 50) in persistently infected patas monkeys (P-248, P-741). LVR lytically infected USU-104 cells, patas monkey peritoneal macrophages (PMAC), and rhesus monkey PMAC. The P-180 isolate lytically infected both patas monkey PMAC and rhesus monkey PMAC, but not USU-104 cells. The isolates producing persistent infections (P-248, P-741) lytically infected only rhesus monkey PMAC. These results show that marked differences exist among isolates of SHF virus from naturally infected animals. These differences should be useful in categorizing new isolates.

  20. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development.

  1. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppenheim Ariella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP. SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C. Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool.

  2. Acylated simian virus 40-specific proteins in the plasma membrane of HeLa cells infected with adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 hybrid virus Ad2+ND2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockmann, U.; Deppert, W.

    1983-04-30

    HeLa cells infected with the adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 (Ad2+SV40) hybrid virus Ad2+ND2 were labeled with either (/sup 35/S)methionine or (/sup 3/H)palmitate and fractionated into cytoplasmic, nuclear, and plasma membrane fractions. Analysis of these fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the SV40-specific proteins in the plasma membrane fraction were specificially acylated.

  3. Comparative Genomics of Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Unveil Molecular and Evolutionary Events Linked to Pathoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesbron, Sophie; Briand, Martial; Essakhi, Salwa; Gironde, Sophie; Boureau, Tristan; Manceau, Charles; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial species Xanthomonas arboricola contains plant pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. It includes the pathogen X. arboricola pv. juglandis, causing the bacterial blight of Juglans regia. The emergence of a new bacterial disease of J. regia in France called vertical oozing canker (VOC) was previously described and the causal agent was identified as a distinct genetic lineage within the pathovar juglandis. Symptoms on walnut leaves and fruits are similar to those of a bacterial blight but VOC includes also cankers on trunk and branches. In this work, we used comparative genomics and physiological tests to detect differences between four X. arboricola strains isolated from walnut tree: strain CFBP 2528 causing walnut blight (WB), strain CFBP 7179 causing VOC and two nonpathogenic strains, CFBP 7634 and CFBP 7651, isolated from healthy walnut buds. Whole genome sequence comparisons revealed that pathogenic strains possess a larger and wider range of mobile genetic elements than nonpathogenic strains. One pathogenic strain, CFBP 7179, possessed a specific integrative and conjugative element (ICE) of 95 kb encoding genes involved in copper resistance, transport and regulation. The type three effector repertoire was larger in pathogenic strains than in nonpathogenic strains. Moreover, CFBP 7634 strain lacked the type three secretion system encoding genes. The flagellar system appeared incomplete and nonfunctional in the pathogenic strain CFBP 2528. Differential sets of chemoreceptor and different repertoires of genes coding adhesins were identified between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. Besides these differences, some strain-specific differences were also observed. Altogether, this study provides valuable insights to highlight the mechanisms involved in ecology, environment perception, plant adhesion and interaction, leading to the emergence of new strains in a dynamic environment.

  4. Comparative genomics of pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains of Xanthomonas arboricola unveil molecular and evolutionary events linked to pathoadaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCesbron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial species Xanthomonas arboricola contains plant pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. It includes the pathogen X. arboricola pv. juglandis, causing the bacterial blight of Juglans regia. The emergence of a new bacterial disease of Juglans regia in France called vertical oozing canker (VOC was previously described and the causal agent was identified as a distinct genetic lineage within the pathovar juglandis. Symptoms on walnut leaves and fruits are similar to those of a bacterial blight but VOC includes also cankers on trunk and branches. In this work, we used comparative genomics and physiological tests to detect differences between four X. arboricola strains isolated from walnut tree: strain CFBP 2528 causing walnut blight, strain CFBP 7179 causing VOC and two nonpathogenic strains, CFBP 7634 and CFBP 7651, isolated from healthy walnut buds. Whole genome sequence comparisons revealed that pathogenic strains possess a larger and wider range of mobile genetic elements than nonpathogenic strains. One pathogenic strain, CFBP 7179, possessed a specific integrative and conjugative element of 95 kb encoding genes involved in copper resistance, transport and regulation. The type three effector repertoire was larger in pathogenic strains than in nonpathogenic strains. Moreover, CFBP 7634 strain lacked the type three secretion system encoding genes. The flagellar system appeared incomplete and nonfunctional in the pathogenic strain CFBP 2528. Differential sets of chemoreceptor and different repertoires of genes coding adhesins were identified between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. Besides these differences, some strain-specific differences were also observed. Altogether, this study provides valuable insights to highlight the mechanisms involved in ecology, environment perception, plant adhesion and interaction, leading to the emergence of new strains in a dynamic environment.

  5. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Simian Foamy Virus Isolate from a Cynomolgus Macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koji; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete proviral genome sequence (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession no. LC094267) of a simian foamy virus, SFVmfa/Cy5061, isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). This proviral genome consists of 12,965 nucleotides and has five open reading frames, gag, pol, env, tas, and bet, as with other foamy viruses. PMID:27908992

  6. Low titer lentiviral transgenesis in rodents with simian immundeficiency virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Balázs; Hoffmann, Orsolya Ivett; Negre, Didier; Kvell, Krisztián; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Hiripi, László

    2013-09-01

    Efficient production of transgenic animals using low-titer lentiviral constructs remains challenging. Here we demonstrate that microinjection of simian immundeficiency virus-derived lentiviral constructs can produce transgenic mice and rats with high efficiency even when using low-titer virus preparations.

  7. Characterization of components released by alkali disruption of simian virus 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Landers, T; Griffith, J

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of simian virus 40 (SV40) particles at pH 9.8 in the presence of 1 mM dithiothreitol for 5 min at 37 degrees C disrupted the virions into a 60S DNA-protein complex and DNA-free 7S protein particles. The DNA-protein complex contained approximately equal amounts of DNA and protein...

  8. Simian varicella virus infection of Chinese rhesus macaques produces ganglionic infection in the absence of rash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner ); R. Mahalingam (Ravi); V. Traina-Dorge (Vicki); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M. Wellish (Mary); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D. Gilden (Don); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractVaricella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis, and may reactivate to cause herpes zoster (shingles). VZV may infect ganglia via retrograde axonal transport from infected skin or through hematogenous spread. Simian varicell

  9. Specific Detection of Two Divergent Simian Arteriviruses Using RNAscope In Situ Hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Qìng Yú

    Full Text Available Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF is an often lethal disease of Asian macaques. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV is one of at least three distinct simian arteriviruses that can cause SHF, but pathogenesis studies using modern methods have been scarce. Even seemingly straightforward studies, such as examining viral tissue and cell tropism in vivo, have been difficult to conduct due to the absence of standardized SHFV-specific reagents. Here we report the establishment of an in situ hybridization assay for the detection of SHFV and distantly related Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1 RNA in cell culture. In addition, we detected SHFV RNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from an infected rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta. The assay is easily performed and can clearly distinguish between SHFV and KRCV-1. Thus, if further developed, this assay may be useful during future studies evaluating the mechanisms by which a simian arterivirus with a restricted cell tropism can cause a lethal nonhuman primate disease similar in clinical presentation to human viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  10. Biochemical analysis of plant protection afforded by a nonpathogenic endophytic mutant of Colletotrichum magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, R.S.; Freeman, S.; Clifton, D.R.; Morrel, J.; Brown, G.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    A nonpathogenic mutant of Colletotrichum magna (path-1) was previously shown to protect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings from anthracnose disease elicited by wild-type C. magna. Disease protection was observed in stems of path-1-colonized cucurbits but not in cotyledons, indicating that path-1 conferred tissue-specific and/or localized protection. Plant biochemical indicators of a localized and systemic (peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, lignin, and salicylic acid) 'plant-defense' response were investigated in anthracnose-resistant and -susceptible cultivars of cucurbit seedlings exposed to four treatments: (1) water (control), (2) path-1 conidia, (3) wild-type conidia, and (4) challenge conditions (inoculation into path-1 conidia for 48 h and then exposure to wild-type conidia). Collectively, these analyses indicated that disease protection in path-1 colonized plants was correlated with the ability of these plants to mount a defense response more rapidly and to equal or greater levels than plants exposed to wild-type C. magna alone. Watermelon plants colonized with path-1 were also protected against disease caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare and Fusarium oxysporum. A model based on the kinetics of plant-defense activation is presented to explain the mechanism of path-1-conferred disease protection.

  11. A biochemical comparison of proteases from pathogenic naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Tsutsumi, Victor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2007-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the etiologic agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Proteases have been suggested to be involved in tissue invasion and destruction during infection. We analyzed and compared the complete protease profiles of total crude extract and conditioned medium of both pathogenic N. fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi trophozoites. Using SDS-PAGE, we found differences in the number and molecular weight of proteolytic bands between the two strains. The proteases showed optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 35 degrees C for both strains. Inhibition assays showed that the main proteolytic activity in both strains is due to cysteine proteases although serine proteases were also detected. Both N. fowleri and N. gruberi have a variety of different protease activities at different pH levels and temperatures. These proteases may allow the amoebae to acquire nutrients from different sources, including those from the host. Although, the role of the amoebic proteases in the pathogenesis of PAM is not clearly defined, it seems that proteases and other molecules of the parasite as well as those from the host, could be participating in the damage to the human central nervous system.

  12. Living biointerfaces based on non-pathogenic bacteria support stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jake J.; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Hassi, Karoliina; Moulisova, Vladimira; Dalby, Matthew J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis, a non-pathogenic bacteria, has been genetically engineered to express the III7–10 fragment of human fibronectin as a membrane protein. The engineered L. lactis is able to develop biofilms on different surfaces (such as glass and synthetic polymers) and serves as a long-term substrate for mammalian cell culture, specifically human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). This system constitutes a living interface between biomaterials and stem cells. The engineered biofilms remain stable and viable for up to 28 days while the expressed fibronectin fragment induces hMSC adhesion. We have optimised conditions to allow long-term mammalian cell culture, and found that the biofilm is functionally equivalent to a fibronectin-coated surface in terms of osteoblastic differentiation using bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) added to the medium. This living bacteria interface holds promise as a dynamic substrate for stem cell differentiation that can be further engineered to express other biochemical cues to control hMSC differentiation.

  13. Biochemical analysis of plant protection afforded by a nonpathogenic endophytic mutant of Colletotrichum magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redman, R.S.; Rodriguez, R.J. (Geological Survey, Seattle, WA (United States) Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Botany); Clifton, D.R.; Morrel, J.; Brown, G. (Geological Survey, Seattle, WA (United States)); Freeman, S. (Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-02-01

    A nonpathogenic mutant of Colletotrichum magna (path-1) was previously shown to protect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings from anthracnose disease elicited by wild-type C. magna. Disease protection was observed in stems of path-1-colonized cucurbits but not in cotyledons, indicating that path-1 conferred tissue-specific and/or localized protection. Plant biochemical indicators of a localized and systemic (peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, lignin, and salicylic acid) plant-defense response were investigated in anthracnose-resistant and-susceptible cultivars of cucurbit seedlings exposed to four treatments: (1) water (control), (2) path-1 conidia, (3) wild-type conidia, and (4) challenge conditions (inoculation into path-1 conidia for 48 h and then exposure to wild-type conidia). Collectively, these analyses indicated that disease protection in path-1-colonized plants was correlated with the ability of these plants to mount a defense response more rapidly and to equal or greater levels than plants exposed to wild-type C. magna alone. Watermelon plants colonized with path-1 were also protected against disease caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare and Fusarium oxysporum. A model based on the kinetics of plant-defense activation is presented to explain the mechanism of path-1-conferred disease protection.

  14. Nonpathogenic strains of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum trigger progressive bean defense responses during appressorium-mediated penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Laugé, Richard; Langin, Thierry

    2005-08-01

    The fungal bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum differentiates appressoria in order to penetrate bean tissues. We showed that appressorium development in C. lindemuthianum can be divided into three stages, and we obtained three nonpathogenic strains, including one strain blocked at each developmental stage. H18 was blocked at the appressorium differentiation stage; i.e., no genuine appressoria were formed. H191 was blocked at the appressorium maturation stage; i.e., appressoria exhibited a pigmentation defect and developed only partial internal turgor pressure. H290 was impaired in appressorium function; i.e., appressoria failed to penetrate into bean tissues. Furthermore, these strains could be further discriminated according to the bean defense responses that they induced. Surprisingly, appressorium maturation, but not appressorium function, was sufficient to induce most plant defense responses tested (superoxide ion production and strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins). However, appressorium function (i.e., entry into the first host cell) was necessary for avirulence-mediated recognition of the fungus.

  15. Risk of immunodeficiency virus infection may increase with vaccine-induced immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbusch, Matthias; Ignatius, Ralf; Temchura, Vladimir; Nabi, Ghulam; Tippler, Bettina; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Salazar, Andres M; Sauermann, Ülrike; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Uberla, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of novel complementary prime-boost immunization regimens in a nonhuman primate model for HIV infection, rhesus monkeys primed by different DNA vaccines were boosted with virus-like particles (VLP) and then challenged by repeated low-dose rectal exposure to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Characteristic of the cellular immune response after the VLP booster immunization were high numbers of SIV-specific, gamma interferon-secreting cells after stimulation with inactivated SIV particles, but not SIV peptides, and the absence of detectable levels of CD8(+) T cell responses. Antibodies specific to SIV Gag and SIV Env could be induced in all animals, but, consistent with a poor neutralizing activity at the time of challenge, vaccinated monkeys were not protected from acquisition of infection and did not control viremia. Surprisingly, vaccinees with high numbers of SIV-specific, gamma interferon-secreting cells were infected fastest during the repeated low-dose exposures and the numbers of these immune cells in vaccinated macaques correlated with susceptibility to infection. Thus, in the absence of protective antibodies or cytotoxic T cell responses, vaccine-induced immune responses may increase the susceptibility to acquisition of immunodeficiency virus infection. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that virus-specific T helper cells mediate this detrimental effect and contribute to the inefficacy of past HIV vaccination attempts (e.g., STEP study).

  16. HIV-2 and its role in conglutinated approach towards Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Batul; Saxena, Rupali; Tiwari, Archana

    2013-12-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is one of the most critically acclaimed endemic diseases, caused by two lentiviruses HIV-1 and 2. HIV-2 displays intimate serological and antigenic resemblance to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) along with less pathogenicity, lower infectivity and appreciable cross reactivity with HIV-1 antigens. The present era is confronted with the challenge to fabricate a vaccine effective against all clades of both the species of HIV. But vaccine development against HIV-1 has proven highly intricate, moreover the laborious and deficient conventional approaches has slackened the pace regarding the development of new vaccines. These concerns may be tackled with the development of HIV-2 vaccine as a natural control of HIV-1 that has been found in ancestors of HIV-2 i.e. African monkeys, mangabeys and macaques. Thereby, suggesting the notion of cross protection among HIV-2 and HIV-1. Assistance of bioinformatics along with vaccinomics strategy can bring about a quantum leap in this direction for surpassing the bottleneck in conventional approaches. These specifics together can add to our conception that HIV-2 vaccine design by in silico strategy will surely be a constructive approach for HIV-1 targeting.

  17. Potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus by MDL 101028, a novel sulphonic acid polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D L; Brennan, T M; Bridges, C G; Mullins, M J; Tyms, A S; Jackson, R; Cardin, A D

    1995-10-01

    MDL 101028, a novel biphenyl disulphonic acid urea co-polymer was designed and synthesised as a heparin mimetic. This low molecular weight polymer showed potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a number of host-cell/virus systems, including primary clinical isolates of the virus cultured in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). When compared with the heterogeneous polysulphated molecules, heparin and dextran sulphate, this chemically defined compound showed equivalent antiviral activity with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the range 0.27-3.0 micrograms/ml in the host-cell/virus systems tested. MDL 101028 also inhibited the replication of HIV type 2 and the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), as well as HIV-1 variants resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Virus growth was blocked when exposure of T-lymphocytes to MDL 101028 was restricted to the virus absorption stage, or even in whole blood conditions. MDL 101028 did not irreversibly inactivate virions, and in contrast to heparin, did not inhibit the attachment of radiolabelled HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells. MDL 101028 blocked HIV-induced cell-to-cell fusion and this activity appears to explain the mechanism of its antiviral action. The antiviral evaluation of discrete oligomer molecules of MDL 101028 showed that a polymer chain length of six repeating units had optimal potency. The lack of anticoagulant properties and significant antiviral activity in whole blood may allow the development of MDL 101028 as a treatment of HIV infections.

  18. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) . ...

  19. Probiotic yeasts: Anti-inflammatory potential of various non-pathogenic strains in experimental colitis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benot; Foligné; Jo■lle; Dewulf; Pascal; Vandekerckove; Georges; Pignède; Bruno; Pot

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the in vitro immunomodulation capacity of various non-pathogenic yeast strains and to investigate the ability of some of these food grade yeasts to prevent experimental colitis in mice.METHODS: In vitro immunomodulation was assessed by measuring cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12p70,IL-10,tumor necrosis factor and interferon γ] released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after 24 h stimulation with 6 live yeast strains (Saccharomyces ssp.) and with bacterial reference strains.A murine ...

  20. Oropharyngeal Colonization With Neisseria lactamica, Other Nonpathogenic Neisseria Species and Moraxella catarrhalis Among Young Healthy Children in Ahvaz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhi, Raheleh; Amin, Mansour; Rostami, Soodabeh; Shoja, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neisseria lactamica as one of the main commensal in oropharynx during the childhood is related to the induction of a natural immunity against meningococcal meningitis. Also Moraxella catarrhalis in oropharynx of children is a predisposing factor for otitis media infection. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the frequency of the N. lactamica, other nonpathogenic Neisseria spp. and M. catarrhalis in the oropharynx of young healthy children in Ahvaz, Iran by the two p...

  1. Characterisation and differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains by their protein and antigen profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walochnik, J; Sommer, K; Obwaller, A; Haller-Schober, E-M; Aspöck, H

    2004-03-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are the causative agents of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Acanthamoebae occur ubiquitously in the environment and are thus a constant cause of antigenic stimulation. In a previous study we have shown that compared to control sera, AK patients exhibit markedly lower immunoreactivities to whole cell antigen of Acanthamoeba spp. As the pathogenicity of acanthamoebae primarily relies on the excretion of proteins, it was the aim of the present study to investigate the immunoreactivity of metabolic antigen from different Acanthamoeba strains of varying pathogenicity. Three Acanthamoeba strains, one highly pathogenic, one non-pathogenic but thermophilic and one non-thermophilic non-pathogenic, were used for antigen extraction. The antigen was harvested before and after contact with human cells and all strains were tested with AK sera and with sera from healthy individuals. It was shown that the somatic protein profiles of the Acanthamoeba strains correlated to the morphological groups, and that within morphological group II-the group associated with AK-the profiles of the metabolic antigens correlated to strain pathogenicity. Moreover, it was shown that the control sera showed markedly higher immunoreactivities than the sera of the AK patients and that this immunoreactivity was generally higher to the non-pathogenic strains than to the pathogenic strain. Altogether our results once again raise the question of whether there is an immunological predisposition in AK. To our knowledge this is the first study on the immunoreactivity of metabolic antigen of acanthamoebae.

  2. Cytokine responses of human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells to the nonpathogenic bacterium Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Rieko; Saegusa, Shizue; Ametani, Akio; Kiuchi, Kan; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2003-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells produce cytokines in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, cellular responses of these cells to nonpathogenic strains, such as Bacillus subtilis, are yet to be determined. In this study, we investigate whether epithelial-like human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells produce cytokines in response to B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The latter strain is utilized for manufacturing the fermented soy food "natto". Live cells of nonpathogenic B. subtilis JCM 1465(T), B. subtilis (natto) and E. coli JCM 1649(T), as well as pathogenic S. enteritidis JCM 1652 and P. aeruginosa JCM 5516 strains, induced secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or IL-8, but not IL-7, IL-15 or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 cell monolayers cultured with E. coli, S. enteritidis or P. aeruginosa decreased more rapidly than that of cells cultured with B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The amounts of cytokine induced by B. subtilis (natto) cells were strain-dependent. Moreover, B. subtilis (natto) cells subjected to hydrochloric acid treatment, but not autoclaving, induced a higher secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 than intact cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including AG126 and genistein, suppressed cytokine secretion. Our results suggest that the nonpathogenic B. subtilis (natto) bacterium induces cytokine responses in intestinal epithelial cells via activation of an intracellular signaling pathway, such as that of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB).

  3. Cancers related to immunodeficiencies : Update and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Tabarsi, Payam; Mansouri, Davod; Khosravi, Adnan; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Aliakbar; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The life span of patients with primary and secondary immunodeficiency is increasing due to recent improvements in therapeutic strategies. While the incidence of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) is 1:10,000 births, that of secondary immunodeficiencies are more common and are associated with posttran

  4. Optimizing production of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in non-pathogenic Leishmania by two genetic constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemayatkar M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA is one of the most important thrombolytic agents used in patients with vascular occlusions such as acute ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. A variety of recombinant protein expression systems have been developed for heterologous gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts. In recent years, Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae, a non-pathogenic trypanosomatid protozoa, has come under consideration because of its safety and immunogenicity as a vaccine vector and special attributes in the expression of complex proteins. This study was done to improve rt-PA expression in this protozoon and create the opportunity for the replacement of rt-PA gene with other genes for the production of other complex proteins."n "n Methods: Two expression cassettes were used for the integration of two copies of t-PA cDNA, one copy in each cassette, into the parasite genome by electroporation. The transformed clones were selected by antibiotic resistancy. The expression of active secreted rt-PA was confirmed by Western blot analysis and Chromolize assay."n "n Results: Appearance of a 64 kD band in nitrocellulose membrane in the Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of full-length rt-PA in the culture media. Chromolize assay showed the expression levels of active recombinant t-PA in single and double transfected L. tarentolae clones- 375 IU/ml and 480 IU/ml of the culture media, respectively."n "n Conclusion: The produced rt-PA in the culture media containing the transfected cells was at least seven times higher than what has been reported in previous studies on L. tarentolae or on some other eukaryotic systems.

  5. Prevalences of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in mollusks from the Spanish Mediterranean Coast

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    Carmen eLopez-Joven

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a well-recognized pathogen of humans. To better understand the ecology of the human-pathogenic variants of this bacterium in the environment, a study on the prevalence in bivalves of pathogenic variants (tlh + and tdh+ and/or trh+ versus a nonpathogenic one (only tlh+ as species marker for V. parahaemolyticus, was performed in two bays in Catalonia, Spain. Environmental factors that might affect dynamics of both variants of V. parahaemolyticus were taken into account. The results showed that the global prevalence of total V. parahaemolyticus found in both bays was 14.2% (207/1459. It was, however, significantly dependent on sampling point, campaign (year and bivalve species. Pathogenic variants of V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+ and/or trh+ were detected in 3.8% of the samples (56/1459, meaning that the proportion of bivalves who contained tlh gene were contaminated by pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains is 27.1% (56/207. Moreover, the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+ was significantly correlated with water salinity, thus the probability of finding pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus decreased 1.45 times with every salinity unit (ppt increased. Additionally, data showed that V. parahaemolyticus could establish close associations with Ruditapes spp. (P-value < 0.001, which could enhance the transmission of illness to human by pathogenic variants, when clams were eaten raw or slightly cooked.This study provides information on the abundance, ecology and characteristics of total and human-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus variants associated with bivalves cultured in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

  6. Prevalences of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in mollusks from the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Joven, Carmen; de Blas, Ignacio; Furones, M Dolores; Roque, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a well-recognized pathogen of humans. To better understand the ecology of the human-pathogenic variants of this bacterium in the environment, a study on the prevalence in bivalves of pathogenic variants (tlh+ and tdh+ and/or trh+) versus a non-pathogenic one (only tlh+ as species marker for V. parahaemolyticus), was performed in two bays in Catalonia, Spain. Environmental factors that might affect dynamics of both variants of V. parahaemolyticus were taken into account. The results showed that the global prevalence of total V. parahaemolyticus found in both bays was 14.2% (207/1459). It was, however, significantly dependent on sampling point, campaign (year) and bivalve species. Pathogenic variants of V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+ and/or trh+) were detected in 3.8% of the samples (56/1459), meaning that the proportion of bivalves who contained tlh gene were contaminated by pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains is 27.1% (56/207). Moreover, the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+) was significantly correlated with water salinity, thus the probability of finding pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus decreased 1.45 times with every salinity unit (ppt) increased. Additionally, data showed that V. parahaemolyticus could establish close associations with Ruditapes spp. (P-value < 0.001), which could enhance the transmission of illness to human by pathogenic variants, when clams were eaten raw or slightly cooked. This study provides information on the abundance, ecology and characteristics of total and human-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus variants associated with bivalves cultured in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

  7. Genetic islands in pome fruit pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia species and related plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo eLlop

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available New pathogenic bacteria species belonging to the genus Erwinia associated with pome fruit trees (Erwinia pyrifoliae, E. piriflorinigrans, E. uzenensis have been increasingly described in the last years, and comparative analyses have found that all these species share several genetic characteristics. Studies at different level (whole genome comparison, virulence genes, plasmid content, etc. show a high intraspecies homogeneity (i.e. among E. amylovora strains and also abundant similarities appear between the different Erwinia species: presence of plasmids of similar size in the pathogenic species; high similarity in several genes associated with exopolysaccharide production and hence, with virulence, as well as in some other genes, in the chromosomes. Many genetic similarities have been observed also among some of the plasmids (and genomes from the pathogenic species and E. tasmaniensis or E. billingiae, two epiphytic species on the same hosts. The amount of genetic material shared in this genus varies from individual genes to clusters, genomic islands and genetic material that even may constitute a whole plasmid. Recent research on evolution of erwinias point out the horizontal transfer acquisition of some genomic islands that were subsequently lost in some species and several pathogenic traits that are still present. How this common material has been obtained and is efficiently maintained in different species belonging to the same genus sharing a common ecological niche provides an idea of the origin and evolution of the pathogenic Erwinia and the interaction with nonpathogenic species present in the same niche, and the role of the genes that are conserved in all of them.

  8. Genetic islands in pome fruit pathogenic and non-pathogenic Erwinia species and related plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    New pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Erwinia associated with pome fruit trees (Erwinia, E. piriflorinigrans, E. uzenensis) have been increasingly described in the last years, and comparative analyses have found that all these species share several genetic characteristics. Studies at different level (whole genome comparison, virulence genes, plasmid content, etc.) show a high intraspecies homogeneity (i.e., among E. amylovora strains) and also abundant similarities appear between the different Erwinia species: presence of plasmids of similar size in the pathogenic species; high similarity in several genes associated with exopolysaccharide production and hence, with virulence, as well as in some other genes, in the chromosomes. Many genetic similarities have been observed also among some of the plasmids (and genomes) from the pathogenic species and E. tasmaniensis or E. billingiae, two epiphytic species on the same hosts. The amount of genetic material shared in this genus varies from individual genes to clusters, genomic islands and genetic material that even may constitute a whole plasmid. Recent research on evolution of erwinias point out the horizontal transfer acquisition of some genomic islands that were subsequently lost in some species and several pathogenic traits that are still present. How this common material has been obtained and is efficiently maintained in different species belonging to the same genus sharing a common ecological niche provides an idea of the origin and evolution of the pathogenic Erwinia and the interaction with non-pathogenic species present in the same niche, and the role of the genes that are conserved in all of them.

  9. Comparative transcriptional analysis of homologous pathogenic and non-pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in infected porcine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio A Vannucci

    Full Text Available Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. This disease affects various animal species, including nonhuman primates, has been endemic in pigs, and is an emerging concern in horses. Non-pathogenic variants obtained through multiple passages in vitro do not induce disease, but bacterial isolates at low passage induce clinical and pathological changes. We hypothesize that genes differentially expressed between pathogenic (passage 10 and non-pathogenic (passage 60 L. intracellularis isolates encode potential bacterial virulence factors. The present study used high-throughput sequencing technology to characterize the transcriptional profiling of a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic homologous L. intracellularis variant during in vitro infection. A total of 401 genes were exclusively expressed by the pathogenic variant. Plasmid-encoded genes and those involved in membrane transporter (e.g. ATP-binding cassette, adaptation and stress response (e.g. transcriptional regulators were the categories mostly responsible for this wider transcriptional landscape. The entire gene repertoire of plasmid A was repressed in the non-pathogenic variant suggesting its relevant role in the virulence phenotype of the pathogenic variant. Of the 319 genes which were commonly expressed in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic variants, no significant difference was observed by comparing their normalized transcription levels (fold change±2; p<0.05. Unexpectedly, these genes demonstrated a positive correlation (r(2 = 0.81; p<0.05, indicating the involvement of gene silencing (switching off mechanisms to attenuate virulence properties of the pathogenic variant during multiple cell passages. Following the validation of these results by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR using ten selected genes, the present study represents the first report characterizing the transcriptional profile of L. intracellularis. The complexity of the virulence

  10. Diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Gennery, A; Cant, A

    2001-01-01

    Early diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is important to enable prompt referral to a supraregional centre for bone marrow transplantation before the occurrence of end organ damage secondary to infective complications. This review outlines clinical, microbiological, and immunopathological clues that aid the diagnosis of SCID and emphasises the multidisciplinary approach needed to diagnose and treat these infants.

  11. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, B; van Wamel, J L

    1996-10-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the autocomplementary loop sequences. This hairpin motif with the palindromic loop sequence is referred to as the dimer initiation site (DIS), and the type of interaction is termed loop-loop kissing. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of the DIS motifs in different human and simian immunodeficiency viruses revealed conservation of the hairpin structure with a 6-mer palindrome in the loop, despite considerable sequence divergence. This finding supports the loop-loop kissing mechanism. To test this possibility, proviral genomes with mutations in the DIS palindrome were constructed. The appearance of infectious virus upon transfection into SupT1 T cells was delayed for the DIS mutants compared with that obtained by transfection of the wild-type provirus (pLAI), confirming that this RNA motif plays an important role in virus replication. Surprisingly, the RNA genome extracted from mutant virions was found to be fully dimeric and to have a normal thermal stability. These results indicate that the DIS motif is not essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA dimerization and suggest that DIS base pairing does not contribute to the stability of the mature RNA dimer. Instead, we measured a reduction in the amount of viral RNA encapsidated in the mutant virions, suggesting a role of the DIS motif in RNA packaging. This result correlates with the idea that the processes of RNA dimerization and packaging are intrinsically linked, and we propose that DIS pairing is a prerequisite for RNA packaging.

  12. Within-Host Evolution of Simian Arteriviruses in Crab-Eating Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncla, Louise H; Weiler, Andrea M; Barry, Gabrielle; Weinfurter, Jason T; Dinis, Jorge M; Charlier, Olivia; Lauck, Michael; Bailey, Adam L; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Nelson, Chase W; Johnson, Joshua C; Caì, Yíngyún; Goldberg, Tony L; O'Connor, David H; Jahrling, Peter B; Kuhn, Jens H; Friedrich, Thomas C

    2017-02-15

    Simian arteriviruses are a diverse clade of viruses infecting captive and wild nonhuman primates. We recently reported that Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1) causes a mild and self-limiting disease in experimentally infected crab-eating macaques, while simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes lethal viral hemorrhagic fever. Here we characterize how these viruses evolved during replication in cell culture and in experimentally infected macaques. During passage in cell culture, 68 substitutions that were localized in open reading frames (ORFs) likely associated with host cell entry and exit became fixed in the KRCV-1 genome. However, we did not detect any strong signatures of selection during replication in macaques. We uncovered patterns of evolution that were distinct from those observed in surveys of wild red colobus monkeys, suggesting that these species may exert different adaptive challenges for KRCV-1. During SHFV infection, we detected signatures of selection on ORF 5a and on a small subset of sites in the genome. Overall, our data suggest that patterns of evolution differ markedly among simian arteriviruses and among host species. Certain RNA viruses can cross species barriers and cause disease in new hosts. Simian arteriviruses are a diverse group of related viruses that infect captive and wild nonhuman primates, with associated disease severity ranging from apparently asymptomatic infections to severe, viral hemorrhagic fevers. We infected nonhuman primate cell cultures and then crab-eating macaques with either simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) or Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1) and assessed within-host viral evolution. We found that KRCV-1 quickly acquired a large number of substitutions in its genome during replication in cell culture but that evolution in macaques was limited. In contrast, we detected selection focused on SHFV ORFs 5a and 5, which encode putative membrane proteins. These patterns suggest that in addition to diverse

  13. A New Zearalenone Biodegradation Strategy Using Non-Pathogenic Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszt, Rókus; Krifaton, Csilla; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Cserháti, Mátyás; Kriszt, Balázs; Kukolya, József; Czéh, Árpád; Fehér-Tóth, Szilvia; Török, Lívia; Szőke, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, Krisztina J.; Barna, Teréz; Ferenczi, Szilamér

    2012-01-01

    Zearalenone (hereafter referred to as ZEA) is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium spp. on cereal grains. ZEA is one of the most hazardous natural endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) which induces hyper estrogenic responses in mammals. This can result in reproductive disorders in farm animals as well as in humans. Consequently, detoxification strategies for contaminated crops are crucial for food safety. In this study we have developed a bacterial based detoxification system using a non-pathogen Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Following 5 days treatment of ZEA with R. pyridinivorans K408 strain HPLC analyses showed an 87.21% ZEA-degradation efficiency of the bacterial enzyme systems. In another approach, the strain biotransformation ability has also been confirmed by a bioluminescent version of the yeast estrogen screening system (BLYES), which detected an 81.75% of biodegradability of ZEA, in a good agreement with the chemical analyses. Furthermore, the capacity of R. pyridinivorans to eliminate the estrogenic effects of ZEA was tested by using an immature uterotrophic assay. Prepubertal female rats were treated with vehicle (olive oil), 17β-estradiol, ZEA (0.1-1-5-10 mg/kg body weight) and LB broth containing 500 mg/l ZEA that has already been incubated with or without Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Uterine weights were measured and the mRNA level changes relating to apelin, aquaporin 5, complement component 2, and calbindin-3 genes were measured by qRT-PCR. These genes represent the major pathways that are affected by estromimetic compounds. Zearalenone feeding significantly increased the uterus weight in a dose dependent manner and at the same time upregulated complement component 2 and calbindin-3 expression as well as decreased apelin and aquaporin 5 mRNA levels comparable to that seen in 17β-estradiol exposed rats. In contrast, LB broth in which ZEA was incubated with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 prior to

  14. [Cancer as secondary immunodeficiency. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Guido-Bayardo, Ricardo Leopoldo; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora Ernestina; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Secondary immunodeficiencys, previously presented in immunocompetent individuals. The lack of primary or secondary response to the presence of a foreign antigen, in the case of infections is a sentinel data in the diagnosis of immunodeficiency (can be primary or secondary), in the case of a self antigen may generate the presence of Cancer. Cancer has shown an increase in the prevalence and incidence globally. Most current medical treatments in cancer are focused primarily on immunomodulatory actions (immunosuppression / immune stimulation or both). Knowledge of key concepts from the perspective of innate and acquired immunity lead to cancer development, engaging immune surveillance and escape mechanisms of this that contribute to better understand the origin, behavior and treatment of neoplasm's. These treatments can cause immunological disorders such as allergy, anaphylaxis, lack of response immunogenicity care fields specialist in allergy and clinical immunology.

  15. Persistence of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in Various Tropical Agricultural Soils of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganandhini, S; Kennedy, Z John; Uyttendaele, M; Balachandar, D

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli (STEC) strains in the agricultural soil creates serious threat to human health through fresh vegetables growing on them. However, the survival of STEC strains in Indian tropical soils is not yet understood thoroughly. Additionally how the survival of STEC strain in soil diverges with non-pathogenic and genetically modified E. coli strains is also not yet assessed. Hence in the present study, the survival pattern of STEC strain (O157-TNAU) was compared with non-pathogenic (MTCC433) and genetically modified (DH5α) strains on different tropical agricultural soils and on a vegetable growing medium, cocopeat under controlled condition. The survival pattern clearly discriminated DH5α from MTCC433 and O157-TNAU, which had shorter life (40 days) than those compared (60 days). Similarly, among the soils assessed, the red laterite and tropical latosol supported longer survival of O157-TNAU and MTCC433 as compared to wetland and black cotton soils. In cocopeat, O157 recorded significantly longer survival than other two strains. The survival data were successfully analyzed using Double-Weibull model and the modeling parameters were correlated with soil physico-chemical and biological properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA of all the three strains revealed that pH, microbial biomass carbon, dehydrogenase activity and available N and P contents of the soil decided the survival of E. coli strains in those soils and cocopeat. The present research work suggests that the survival of O157 differs in tropical Indian soils due to varied physico-chemical and biological properties and the survival is much shorter than those reported in temperate soils. As the survival pattern of non-pathogenic strain, MTCC433 is similar to O157-TNAU in tropical soils, the former can be used as safe model organism for open field studies.

  16. Persistence of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in Various Tropical Agricultural Soils of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naganandhini

    Full Text Available The persistence of Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli (STEC strains in the agricultural soil creates serious threat to human health through fresh vegetables growing on them. However, the survival of STEC strains in Indian tropical soils is not yet understood thoroughly. Additionally how the survival of STEC strain in soil diverges with non-pathogenic and genetically modified E. coli strains is also not yet assessed. Hence in the present study, the survival pattern of STEC strain (O157-TNAU was compared with non-pathogenic (MTCC433 and genetically modified (DH5α strains on different tropical agricultural soils and on a vegetable growing medium, cocopeat under controlled condition. The survival pattern clearly discriminated DH5α from MTCC433 and O157-TNAU, which had shorter life (40 days than those compared (60 days. Similarly, among the soils assessed, the red laterite and tropical latosol supported longer survival of O157-TNAU and MTCC433 as compared to wetland and black cotton soils. In cocopeat, O157 recorded significantly longer survival than other two strains. The survival data were successfully analyzed using Double-Weibull model and the modeling parameters were correlated with soil physico-chemical and biological properties using principal component analysis (PCA. The PCA of all the three strains revealed that pH, microbial biomass carbon, dehydrogenase activity and available N and P contents of the soil decided the survival of E. coli strains in those soils and cocopeat. The present research work suggests that the survival of O157 differs in tropical Indian soils due to varied physico-chemical and biological properties and the survival is much shorter than those reported in temperate soils. As the survival pattern of non-pathogenic strain, MTCC433 is similar to O157-TNAU in tropical soils, the former can be used as safe model organism for open field studies.

  17. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Meyer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We here compared pathogenic (p and non-pathogenic (np isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12 derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12 derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica.

  18. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin; Fehling, Helena; Matthiesen, Jenny; Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-08-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica.

  19. Radiosensitive Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2010-01-01

    Inherited defects in components of the non-homologous end joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens traditionally utilized for conditioning prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known etiologies of radiosensit...

  20. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research: Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting and an opportunity for public comment on...

  1. Transcriptome profiling of soybean (Glycine max) roots challenged with pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Muppirala, Usha K; Severin, Andrew J; Marocco, Adriano; Munkvold, Gary P

    2015-12-21

    Fusarium oxysporum is one of the most common fungal pathogens causing soybean root rot and seedling blight in U.S.A. In a recent study, significant variation in aggressiveness was observed among isolates of F. oxysporum collected from roots in Iowa, ranging from highly pathogenic to weakly or non-pathogenic isolates. We used RNA-seq analysis to investigate the molecular aspects of the interactions of a partially resistant soybean genotype with non-pathogenic/pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum at 72 and 96 h post inoculation (hpi). Markedly different gene expression profiles were observed in response to the two isolates. A peak of highly differentially expressed genes (HDEGs) was triggered at 72 hpi in soybean roots and the number of HDEGs was about eight times higher in response to the pathogenic isolate compared to the non-pathogenic one (1,659 vs. 203 HDEGs, respectively). Furthermore, the magnitude of induction was much greater in response to the pathogenic isolate. This response included a stronger activation of defense-related genes, transcription factors, and genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis, secondary and sugar metabolism. The obtained data provide an important insight into the transcriptional responses of soybean-F. oxysporum interactions and illustrate the more drastic changes in the host transcriptome in response to the pathogenic isolate. These results may be useful in the developing new methods of broadening resistance of soybean to F. oxysporum, including the over-expression of key soybean genes.

  2. Host-species transferrin receptor 1 orthologs are cellular receptors for nonpathogenic new world clade B arenaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Abraham

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a New World (NW clade B arenavirus to enter cells using human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 strictly correlates with its ability to cause hemorrhagic fever. Amapari (AMAV and Tacaribe (TCRV, two nonpathogenic NW clade B arenaviruses that do not use human TfR1, are closely related to the NW arenaviruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers. Here we show that pseudotyped viruses bearing the surface glycoprotein (GP of AMAV or TCRV can infect cells using the TfR1 orthologs of several mammalian species, including those of their respective natural hosts, the small rodent Neacomys spinosus and the fruit bat Artibeus jamaicensis. Mutation of one residue in human TfR1 makes it a functional receptor for TCRV, and mutation of four residues makes it a functional receptor for AMAV. Our data support an in vivo role for TfR1 in the replication of most, if not all, NW clade B arenaviruses, and suggest that with modest changes in their GPs the nonpathogenic arenaviruses could use human TfR1 and emerge as human pathogens.

  3. Effect of input multiplicity on the establishment of simian virus 40 persistent infections in rhesus monkey kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C

    1977-12-01

    Monolayer cultures of LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells become persistently infected with simian virus 40 after infection at input multiplicities of 100, 10, or 1 plaque-forming unit per cell. After 3 weeks, all cells of the cultures infected at a multiplicity of 1 plaque-forming unit per cell produced the simian virus 40 T antigen. In contrast, 8 to 11 weeks elapsed before all the cells in the cultures infected at a multiplicity of 100 plaque-forming units per cell produced T antigen. Defective interfering particles and interferon production were not evident during this time.

  4. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  5. Recombinational joints in a simian virus 40 variant generated in a persistent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Piatak, M

    1982-12-01

    SP1, a viable simian virus 40 (SV40) variant isolated from a persistent infection of rhesus monkey kidney cells, contains sequence rearrangements in the untranslated region of the SV40 genome which are transcribed into late mRNA leader sequences and in the region which encodes the large T antigen. Nucleotide sequences about the recombinational junctions in SP1 were determined. The sequence data show that in most instances there was not extensive homology between recombining sequences. The recombinant sequences are discussed with respect to the mechanisms by which they might have been generated.

  6. Characterization of am404, an amber mutation in the simian virus 40 T antigen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, D R; Collis, P; Muzyczka, N

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the biological activity of an amber mutation, am404, at map position 0.27 in the T antigen gene of simian virus 40. Immunoprecipitation of extracts from am404-infected cells demonstrated the presence of an amber protein fragment (am T antigen) of the expected molecular weight (67,000). Differential immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibody demonstrated that am T antigen was missing the carboxy-terminal antigenic determinants. The amber mutant was shown to be defective for most of the functions associated with wild-type T antigen. The mutant did not replicate autonomously, but this defect could be complemented by a helper virus (D. R. Rawlins and N. Muzyczka, J. Virol. 36:611-616, 1980). The mutant failed to transform nonpermissive rodent cells and did not relieve the host range restriction of adenovirus 2 in monkey cells. However, stimulation of host cell DNA, whose functional region domain has been mapped within that portion of the protein synthesized by the mutant, could be demonstrated in am404-infected cells. A number of unexpected observations were made. First, the am T antigen was produced in unusually large amounts in a simian virus 40-transformed monkey cell line (COS-1), but overproduction was not seen in nontransformed monkey cells regardless of whether or not a helper virus was present. This feature of the mutant was presumably the result of the inability of am T antigen to autoregulate, the level of wild-type T antigen in COS-1 cells, and the unusually short half-life of am T antigen in vivo. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that am T antigen had an intracellular half-life of approximately 10 min. In addition, although the am T antigen retained the major phosphorylation site found in simian virus 40 T antigen, it was not phosphorylated. Thus, phosphorylation of simian virus 40 T antigen is not required for the stimulation of host cell DNA synthesis. Finally, fusion of am404-infected monkey cells with Escherichia coli protoplasts

  7. Relationship between current level of immunodeficiency and non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, Joanne; Kosa, Csaba; Engsig, Frederik;

    2010-01-01

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era, non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies account for more morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients than AIDS-defining malignancies. However, conflicting data have been reported on the re......In the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era, non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies account for more morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients than AIDS-defining malignancies. However, conflicting data have been reported...... on the relationship between immunodeficiency and the development of some non-AIDS-defining malignancies....

  8. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-01-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1–A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1–B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. “Non-pathogenicity” included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while “pathogenicity” comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  9. Infiltration characteristics of water in forest soils in the Simian mountains, Chongqing City, southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Hongjiang ZHANG; Meng LI; Jinhua CHENG; Bo WANG; Weili LU

    2009-01-01

    Spearman rank-correlation analysis and grey relational grade analysis were used to study infiltration characteristics of water in different forest soils in the Simian mountains, Chongqing City. The results indicate that the soil bulk density, contents of coarse sand, and porosity of macropores were significantly correlated with saturated hydraulic conductivity. Porosity of macropores and contents of coarse sand were positively correlated with soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil bulk density negatively. Based on the initial infiltration rate, the stable infiltration rate, time required for infiltration to reach a stable state, and cumulative infiltration, all of which are crucial parameters determining soil infiltration capacity, the results of grey relational grade analysis showed that the grey relational grades of the different forest soils were listed from high to low as broad-leaved forest (0.8031) > Phyllostachys pubescens forest (0.7869) > mixed coniferbroadleaf forest (0.4454)>coniferous forest (0.4039). Broadleaf forest had the best ability to be infiltrated among the four soils studied. The square roots of the coefficients of determination obtained from fitting the Horton infiltration equation, simulated in our study of forest soils, were higher than 0.950. We conclude that soils of broad-leaved forests were the best suited for infiltration processes of forestry in the Simian mountains.

  10. Cell killing by simian virus 40: variation in the pattern of lysosomal enzyme release, cellular enzyme release, and cell death during productive infection of normal and simian virus 40-transformed simian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Ouellette, J

    1976-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) growth on rhesus kidney cells and on the T-22 line of SV40-transformed green monkey kidney (GMK) cells is largely limited by the low plating efficiency of SV40 on these cells. In addition, a fraction of the rhesus kidney and T-22 cells are resistant to infection by SV40. Nevertheless, 72-h viral yields per infected rhesus kidney and T-22 cell are nearly equivalent to that obtained on normal GMK cells and are independent of the multiplicity of infection. Despite the production of high viral yields, infected rhesus kidney and T-22 cells are killed slowly by SV40. Monolayers of these cells are also refractory to plaque formation by SV40. SV40 induces the release of lysosomal N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase into the cytoplasmic fractions of rhesus kidney and T-22 cells to an extent equal to that observed during infection of rapidly killed normal GMK cells. In contrast, damage to the plasma membrane, as indicated by the release of the cellular enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase into the overlay media, occurred to a much greater extent in the normal GMK cells than in the rhesus kidney or T-22 cells. Neither a lysosomal hydrolase mechanism nor viral release appear to be responsible for this phenomenon. The different rates and extents of the SV40 cytocidal process on these cells do not result from the differences in the viral plating efficiency on them. PMID:176470

  11. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  12. Longitudinal Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance in Diarrheagenic and Non-pathogenic Escherichia coli from Young Tanzanian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Jessica C.; Johnson, Lashaunda B.; Levens, Joshua; Mkocha, Harran; Muñoz, Beatriz; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; West, Sheila K.; Coles, Christian L.

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative, enteropathogenic, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli contribute significantly to the burden of diarrheal infections particularly in developing countries. Antibiotic resistance is increasingly common among bacterial pathogens including pathogenic E. coli. We assessed the relationship between pathogenic E. coli carriage and resistance to six antibiotics in E. coli isolated from young children in rural Tanzania. We surveyed temporal stability in antibiotic resistance in 2492 E. coli isolated from fecal samples obtained from young children in rural Tanzania collected over a 6 months period. Approximately half of the 377 children sampled were exposed to an azithromycin mass treatment program for trachoma control and half resided in control villages. Children were sampled at baseline, 1-, 3-, and 6 months following azithromycin treatment. We compared resistance to six antibiotics in pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains at the population level, within fecal specimens, and within individuals over time using chi-square tests, paired odds ratios, and logistic regression, respectively. Resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was highly prevalent (>65%). Resistance to 5 of 6 antibiotics tested and multi-drug resistance occurred more frequently in pathogenic isolates (p ≤ 0.001) within fecal specimens and overall. Azithromycin mass treatment exposure was significantly associated with increased odds of carriage of isolates resistant to erythromycin (OR 3.64, p < 0.001) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (OR 1.60, p < 0.05). Pathogenic isolates were approximately twice as likely to be resistant to erythromycin, ampicillin, or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole compared to non-pathogenic isolates from the same fecal specimen. The potential linkage between resistance and virulence in E. coli suggests hygiene and sanitation interventions aimed at reducing disease burden could play a role in controlling transmission of antibiotic resistance. PMID

  13. Production of anti-fungal volatiles by non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum and its efficacy in suppression of verticillium wilt of cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: The study aimed to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) strain CanR-46, and to determine the anti-fungal spectrum and the control efficacy of the Fo-VOCs. Methods: The Fo-VOCs were identified by GC-MS. The antifungal activity of the...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Dimorphic Fungus Sporothrix pallida, a Nonpathogenic Species Belonging to Sporothrix, a Genus Containing Agents of Human and Feline Sporotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alessandro, Enrico; Giosa, Domenico; Huang, Lilin; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Wenchao; Brankovics, Balazs; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Scordino, Fabio; Lo Passo, Carla; Criseo, Giuseppe; van Diepeningen, Anne D.; Huang, Huaiqiu; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2016-01-01

    Sporothrix pallida is considered to be a mostly avirulent environmental fungus, phylogenetically closely related to the well-known pathogen Sporothrix schenckii. Here, we present the first assembly of its genome, which provides a valuable resource for future comparative genomic studies between nonpathogenic and pathogenic Sporothrix spp. PMID:27034494

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Nonpathogenic, Thermotolerant, and Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bacillus anthracis Strain PFAB2 from Panifala Hot Water Spring in West Bengal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aparna; Halder, Urmi; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Mantri, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of fatal anthrax in both animals and humans. It is prevalently pathogenic. Here, we present a Bacillus anthracis PFAB2 strain from a relatively unexplored Panifala hot water spring in West Bengal, India. It is nonpathogenic, exopolysaccharide producing, and thermotolerant in nature. PMID:28007848

  16. Current Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the original description of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in 1952, the number of independent primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs has expanded to more than 100 entities. By definition, a PID is a genetically determined disorder resulting in enhanced susceptibility to infectious disease. Despite the heritable nature of these diseases, some PIDs are clinically manifested only after prerequisite environmental exposures but they often have associated malignant, allergic, or autoimmune manifestations. PIDs must be distinguished from secondary or acquired immunodeficiencies, which are far more common. In this review, we will place these immunodeficiencies in the context of both clinical and laboratory presentations as well as highlight the known genetic basis.

  17. Strategies for B-cell receptor repertoire analysis in Primary Immunodeficiencies:From severe combined immunodeficiency to common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna eIJspeert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The antigen receptor repertoires of B and T cells form the basis of the adaptive immune response. The repertoires should be sufficiently diverse to recognize all possible pathogens. However, careful selection is needed to prevent responses to self or harmless antigens. Limited antigen receptor repertoire diversity leads to immunodeficiency, whereas unselected or misdirected repertoires can result in autoimmunity. The antigen receptor repertoire harbors information about abnormalities in many immunological disorders. Recent developments in next generation sequencing allow the analysis of the antigen receptor repertoire in much greater detail than ever before. Analyzing the antigen receptor repertoire in patients with mutations in genes responsible for the generation of the antigen receptor repertoire will give new insights into repertoire formation and selection. In this perspective we describe strategies and considerations for analysis of the naive and antigen selected B-cell repertoires in primary immunodeficiency (PID patients with a focus on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID.

  18. Strategies for B-Cell Receptor Repertoire Analysis in Primary Immunodeficiencies: From Severe Combined Immunodeficiency to Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJspeert, Hanna; Wentink, Marjolein; van Zessen, David; Driessen, Gertjan J.; Dalm, Virgil A. S. H.; van Hagen, Martin P.; Pico-Knijnenburg, Ingrid; Simons, Erik J.; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; Stubbs, Andrew P.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    The antigen receptor repertoires of B- and T-cells form the basis of the adaptive immune response. The repertoires should be sufficiently diverse to recognize all possible pathogens. However, careful selection is needed to prevent responses to self or harmless antigens. Limited antigen receptor repertoire diversity leads to immunodeficiency, whereas unselected or misdirected repertoires can result in autoimmunity. The antigen receptor repertoire harbors information about abnormalities in many immunological disorders. Recent developments in next generation sequencing allow the analysis of the antigen receptor repertoire in much greater detail than ever before. Analyzing the antigen receptor repertoire in patients with mutations in genes responsible for the generation of the antigen receptor repertoire will give new insights into repertoire formation and selection. In this perspective, we describe strategies and considerations for analysis of the naive and antigen-selected B-cell repertoires in primary immunodeficiency patients with a focus on severe combined immunodeficiency and common variable immunodeficiency. PMID:25904919

  19. Replication of simian virus 40 in simian virus 40-transformed hamster kidney cells induced by mitomycin C or /sup 60/Co. gamma. irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakusanova, T.; Smales, W.P.; Kaplan, J.C.; Black, P.H.

    1978-07-15

    Several clones of simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster kidney cells, which are heterogeneous for induction of infectious SV40, have been studied. SV40 yields are low after induction with /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation or mitomycin C. In order to clarify the mechanism(s) by which virus is produced in induced cells, we analyzed the replication of viral DNA and production of virion (V) antigen and infectious virus after induction in various clones as well as in lytically infected permissive cells. Cells replicating SV40 DNA or synthesizing V antigen were visualized by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques, respectively. Only some cells in induced cultures were found to produce SV40 and those which did were less efficient than lytically infected monkey cells. Mitomycin C or /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation acted by inducing more cells to replicate virus rather than by increasing the amount of SV40 released from individual cells. A greater proportion of cells could be induced to replicate SV40 DNA than to synthesize V antigen in all induced clones studied. Also, SV40 DNA replication was induced at lower doses of ..gamma.. irradiation than the production of either V antigen or infectious virus suggesting that synthesis of late virus protein is more restricted in induced cells than is replication of SV40 DNA. These findings indicate that one of the effects of induction treatments on SV40-transformed hamster cells is an enhancement of the cells' capacity to support SV40 replication.

  20. Hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and infectious virus in gut-associated lymphoid tissue of mice after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C A; Dolfi, D V; Di Vietro, M L; Heaton, P A; Offit, P A; Clark, H F

    2001-04-01

    Oral inoculation of infants with a vaccine that contains simian-human reassortant rotaviruses has been found to be a rare cause of intussusception. Because intussusception can be associated with enlargement of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, we studied the capacity of simian-human and bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses to cause lymphoid hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Peyer's patches (PP) of adult BALB/c mice. Neither hypertrophy nor hyperplasia was detected in PP after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses. However, infectious virus was detected in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes after oral inoculation with simian, but not bovine, reassortant rotaviruses. Implications of these findings on the pathogenesis of intussusception are discussed.

  1. CERVICAL CANCER AND THE HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as Mexico, Columbia and many developed nations), the reduction in ..... detection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant Thai women: implications ... Moscicki A. Impact of HPV infection in adolescent populations. J Adolesc ...

  2. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital with urethral catheter in situ and having failed medical therapy, he opted ... Keywords: Human immunodeficiency virus infected patients, morbidity, risk of transmission, transurethral .... exposure, and the frequency of at risk exposures.

  3. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  4. FOXN1 deficient nude severe combined immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Rota, Ioanna A.; Dhalla, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Nude severe combined immunodeficiency is a rare inherited disease caused by autosomal recessive loss-of-function mutations in FOXN1. This gene encodes a transcription factor essential for the development of the thymus, the primary lymphoid organ that supports T-cell development and selection. To date nine cases have been reported presenting with the clinical triad of absent thymus resulting in severe T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia universalis and nail dystrophy. Diagnosis relies...

  5. Emergence of simian virus 40 variants during serial passage of plaque isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Tirrell, S M

    1982-01-01

    Three serial passage series of simian virus 40 (SV40) in CV-1 cells were initiated by infection directly from the same wild-type plaque isolate, three series were initiated by infection with another plaque isolate, and two series were initiated with each of two other plaque isolates. Aberrant SV40 genomes were not detected in any of the passage series until after the fifty undiluted passage, and each series generated a different array of variant genomes. The results show that the variants were not present in the original plaque isolates but, instead, were randomly generated during subsequent high-input multiplicity passages. Although many of the aberrant viral genomes in each passage series contained reiterations of the SV40 origin of replication and some also contained host cell sequences, there was no indication that SV40 is predisposed toward generating any particular variant. Images PMID:6283180

  6. Analysis of simian virus 40 DNA with the restriction enzyme of Haemophilus aegyptius, endonuclease Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, E S; Newbold, J E; Pagano, J S

    1973-04-01

    Limited digestion of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA from both small- and large- plaque strains with the restriction endonuclease Z from Haemophilus aegyptius yielded 10 specific fragments. The number of nucleotide pairs for each fragment, determined by co-electrophoresis with phiX174 RF fragments produced by endonuclease Z, ranges from 2,050 to 80. The difference in the pattern between the large- and small-plaque strains is the disappearance of one fragment containing approximately 255 nucleotide pairs and the appearance of a new fragment with 145 nucleotide pairs. This finding can be explained either by deletions or insertions totaling 110 nucleotide pairs. Complementary RNA synthesized in vitro from the adeno-SV40 hybrid virus, strain ND-1, hybridized preferentially to four of the fragments of SV40 DNA.

  7. Non-simian foamy viruses: molecular virology, tropism and prevalence and zoonotic/interspecies transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Timo; Tan, Juan; Materniak, Magdalena

    2013-09-13

    Within the field of retrovirus, our knowledge of foamy viruses (FV) is still limited. Their unique replication strategy and mechanism of viral persistency needs further research to gain understanding of the virus-host interactions, especially in the light of the recent findings suggesting their ancient origin and long co-evolution with their nonhuman hosts. Unquestionably, the most studied member is the primate/prototype foamy virus (PFV) which was originally isolated from a human (designated as human foamy virus, HFV), but later identified as chimpanzee origin; phylogenetic analysis clearly places it among other Old World primates. Additionally, the study of non-simian animal FVs can contribute to a deeper understanding of FV-host interactions and development of other animal models. The review aims at highlighting areas of special interest regarding the structure, biology, virus-host interactions and interspecies transmission potential of primate as well as non-primate foamy viruses for gaining new insights into FV biology.

  8. Emergence of simian virus 40 variants during serial passage of plaque isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Tirrell, S M

    1982-05-01

    Three serial passage series of simian virus 40 (SV40) in CV-1 cells were initiated by infection directly from the same wild-type plaque isolate, three series were initiated by infection with another plaque isolate, and two series were initiated with each of two other plaque isolates. Aberrant SV40 genomes were not detected in any of the passage series until after the fifty undiluted passage, and each series generated a different array of variant genomes. The results show that the variants were not present in the original plaque isolates but, instead, were randomly generated during subsequent high-input multiplicity passages. Although many of the aberrant viral genomes in each passage series contained reiterations of the SV40 origin of replication and some also contained host cell sequences, there was no indication that SV40 is predisposed toward generating any particular variant.

  9. Sequences locating the 5' ends of the major simian virus 40 late mRNA forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, M; Ghosh, P K; Norkin, L C; Weissman, S M

    1983-01-01

    The 5' sequences of late mRNA specified by several constructed or naturally occurring deletion or duplication mutants of simian virus 40 were examined. The mutants included viruses with various small deletions centered about 25 nucleotides upstream from the major transcription initiation site, as well as viruses containing tandem duplications of a sequence of 50 nucleotides or less embedding the major transcription initiation site. The results show that the sequences 25 to 30 nucleotides upstream from the major initiation site in the position of the TATA box of other polymerase II promoters are not essential for the precise localization of the initiation site of late mRNA. Rather, we deduce that the major late mRNA start site is determined primarily by sequences located very close to the initiation site, and that the relative abundance of the 5' ends with this initiation site is modulated by nearby downstream sequences. Modification of six nucleotides adjacent upstream to the initiation site almost completely prevents the utilization of this site. Various deletions and substitutions of sequences 21 nucleotides or more downstream from the major initiation site causes upstream shifts in the localization of the most abundantly utilized 5' ends. The sequences immediately downstream from the major simian virus 40 initiation sites contain inverted symmetries that could give rise to secondary structures in either single-stranded DNA or RNA; the possibility that these inverted symmetries function in transcription initiation at the level of DNA structure rather than in RNA stabilization is discussed. Finally, we present additional evidence that precursor species with certain 5' termini are selectively spliced to form 19S RNA, whereas other 5' termini are preferred for forming the 16S RNA splice. We discuss the possibility that this is a consequence of the influence of leader structure on downstream splicing events. Images PMID:6194314

  10. Cell killing by simian virus 40: impairment of membrane formation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C

    1977-03-01

    Simian virus 40 infection of the CV-1 line of green monkey kidney cells results in the release of mitochondrial malic dehydrogenase as early as 24 h. Released malic dehydrogenase is detected in the cytoplasm prior to its appearance in the overlay medium. Infected cells lose the ability to consume oxygen between 48 and 56 h, and damage to the elctron transport system is indicated. Nevertheless, cellular ATP levels remain high as late as 72 h. Infection leads to a stimulation of membrane phospholipid synthesis, which reaches a peak at about 32 h. This is followed by a severe decline in new membrane synthesis, which correlates in time with the release of cytoplasmic lactic dehydrogenase into the overlay media. Lactic dehydrogenase release precedes the accumulation of trypan blue-stainable cells by about 6 h. Infection had no effect on the turnover of prelabeled membrane phospholipids. An early simian virus 40 mutant, tsA58, and a late mutant, tsB11, are both less effective than wild-type virus at causing reduced levels of phospholipid synthesis, enzyme release, and the accumulation of trypan blue-stainable cells. Another late mutant, tsB8, is similar to wild-type virus in these respects. At 64 h, there is no detectable cell-associated lactic dehydrogenase and nearly all the cells are trypan blue stainable. Nevertheless, at concentrations of deoxyglucose in the medium below the transport Km, deoxyglucose uptake was similar in infected and control cultures. With higher concentrations of deoxyglucose in the medium, uptake by the infected cultures exceeded that by the control cultures.

  11. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  12. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  13. Longitudinal Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance in Diarrheagenic and Non-pathogenic E. coli from Young Tanzanian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Couvillion Seidman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteroaggregative, enteropathogenic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli contribute significantly to the burden of diarrheal infections particularly in developing countries. Antibiotic resistance is increasingly common among bacterial pathogens including pathogenic E. coli. We assessed the relationship between pathogenic E. coli carriage and resistance to 6 antibiotics in E. coli isolated from young children in rural Tanzania. We surveyed temporal stability in antibiotic resistance in 2492 E. coli isolated from fecal samples obtained from young children in rural Tanzania collected over a 6 month period. Enteroaggregative, enteropathogenic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli contribute significantly to the burden of diarrheal infections particularly in developing countries. Antibiotic resistance is increasingly common among bacterial pathogens including pathogenic E. coli. We assessed the relationship between pathogenic E. coli carriage and resistance to 6 antibiotics in E. coli isolated from young children in rural Tanzania. We surveyed temporal stability in antibiotic resistance in 2492 E. coli isolated from fecal samples obtained from young children in rural Tanzania collected over a 6 month period. Approximately half of the 377 children sampled were exposed to an azithromycin mass treatment program for trachoma control and half resided in control villages. Children were sampled at baseline, 1-, 3- and 6 months following azithromycin treatment. We compared resistance to 6 antibiotics in pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains at the population level, within fecal specimens, and within individuals over time using chi-square tests, paired odds ratios, and logistic regression, respectively. Resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was highly prevalent (>65%. Resistance to 5 of 6 antibiotics tested and multi-drug resistance occurred more frequently in pathogenic isolates (p≤0.001 within fecal specimens and overall. Azithromycin mass treatment

  14. Radiosensitive Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Inherited defects in components of the non-homologous end joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens traditionally utilized for conditioning prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known etiologies of radiosensitive SCID include deficiencies of Artemis, DNA Ligase IV, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and Cernunnos-XLF, all of which have been treated with HCT. Because of their sensitivity to certain forms of chemotherapy, the approach to donor selection and type of conditioning regimen utilized for a radiosensitive SCID patient requires careful consideration. Significantly more research needs to be done in order to determine the long-term outcomes of radiosensitive SCID patients following HCT, as well as to discover novel non-toxic approaches to HCT that might benefit those with intrinsic radio- and chemo-sensitivity, as well as potentially all patients undergoing an HCT. PMID:20113890

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; Hickey, Martha; Giles, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    This article aims to review currently available evidence for women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and menopause and to propose clinical management algorithms. Key studies addressing HIV and menopause have been reviewed, specifically age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women, frequency of menopausal symptoms, comorbidities associated with HIV and aging (including cardiovascular disease and bone disease), treatment of menopausal symptoms, and prevention of comorbidities in HIV-infected women. Studies suggest an earlier onset of menopause in HIV-infected women, with increased frequency of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease risk may be increased in this population, with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and chronic inflammation associated with HIV, contributing to increased risk. Chronic inflammation and cART have been independently implicated in bone disease. No published data have assessed the safety and efficacy of hormone therapy in relation to symptoms of menopause, cardiovascular risk, and bone disease among HIV-infected women. Few studies on menopause have been conducted in HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women. Many questions regarding age of menopause onset, frequency of menopausal symptoms and associated complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular disease, and efficacy of treatment among HIV-infected women remain. The incidence and severity of some of these factors may be increased in the setting of HIV and cART.

  16. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal...

  17. Flagellins of Salmonella Typhi and nonpathogenic Escherichia coli are differentially recognized through the NLRC4 pathway in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingyi; Zhang, Ejuan; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Zhong, Maohua; Li, Yaoming; Zhou, Dihan; Chen, Yaoqing; Cao, Yuan; Xiao, Yang; He, Benxia; Yang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Lu, Mengji; Yan, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is recognized by both Toll-like receptor (TLR)5 and NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasome receptors. We hypothesized that the flagellins derived from different bacteria might differentially activate TLR5 and/or NAIP5/NLRC4 signal pathways. To test this, the immune recognition of recombinant flagellins derived from pathogenic Salmonella Typhi (SF) and the nonpathogenic Escherichia coli K12 strain MG1655 (KF) were examined by the activation of TLR5 and NLRC4 pathways in various cell types. While flagellins SF and KF were not distinguishable in activating the TLR5 pathway, KF induced significantly less interleukin-1β production and pyroptotic cell death in peritoneal macrophages than SF, and showed markedly lower efficiency in activating caspase-1 through the NLRC4 pathway than SF. Macrophages may differentially recognize flagellins by intracellular sensors and thereby initiate the immune response to invading pathogenic bacteria. Our findings suggest an active role of flagellin as an important determinant in host differential immune recognition and for the control of bacteria infection.

  18. Cloning of Genomic DNA Flanking Transposon in the Nonpathogenic Mutant of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines M715

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA AKHDIYA RUSMANA

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to clone flanking DNA derived from Tn-5 mutagenesis of wild type strain Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines as first step to clone and to identify the gene involved in pathogenicity mechanism. We have localized the flanking DNA fragment from a nonpathogenic mutant of Xag M715. Southern hybridization analysis using 2.8 kb EcoRI from pYR103 as a probe showed that the fragment is located within 2.0 kb PstI fragment. A 0.7 kb flanking DNA was amplified using inverse PCR technique, and inserted into pGEM-T Easy vector generating a 3.7 kb recombinant plasmid (pAA01. Southern hybridization analysis of the wild type (YR32 with pAA01 as a probe indicated a hybridization signal located at approximately 3.0 kb PstI fragment. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the DNA fragment has a 64% identity to a vir gene of Bacillus anthracis.

  19. The non-pathogenic Henipavirus Cedar paramyxovirus phosphoprotein has a compromised ability to target STAT1 and STAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Kim G; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Netter, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Immune evasion by the lethal henipaviruses, Hendra (HeV) and Nipah virus, is mediated by its interferon (IFN) antagonist P gene products, phosphoprotein (P), and the related V and W proteins, which can target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 proteins to inhibit IFN/STAT signaling. However, it is not clear if the recently identified non-pathogenic Henipavirus, Cedar paramyxovirus (CedPV), is also able to antagonize the STAT proteins. We performed comparative studies between the HeV P gene products (P/V/W) and CedPV-P (CedPV does not encode V or W) and demonstrate that differences exist in their ability to engage the STAT proteins using immunoprecipitation and quantitative confocal microscopic analysis. In contrast to HeV-P gene encoded proteins, the ability of CedPV-P to interact with and relocalize STAT1 or STAT2 is compromised, correlating with a reduced capacity to inhibit the mRNA synthesis of IFN-inducible gene MxA. Furthermore, infection studies with HeV and CedPV demonstrate that HeV is more potent than CedPV in inhibiting the IFN-α-mediated nuclear accumulation of STAT1. These results strongly suggest that the ability of CedPV to counteract the IFN/STAT response is compromised compared to HeV.

  20. Green synthesis of highly stabilized nanocrystalline silver particles by a non-pathogenic and agriculturally important fungus T. asperellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, P; Mukherjee, P K; Kale, S P [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, M; Mandal, B P; Tyagi, A K [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dey, G K [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghatak, J [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)], E-mail: sharadkale@gmail.com

    2008-02-20

    A controlled and up-scalable biosynthetic route to nanocrystalline silver particles with well-defined morphology using cell-free aqueous filtrate of a non-pathogenic and commercially viable biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum is being reported for the first time. A transparent solution of the cell-free filtrate of Trichoderma asperellum containing 1 mM AgNO{sub 3} turns progressively dark brown within 5 d of incubation at 25 deg. C. The kinetics of the reaction was studied using UV-vis spectroscopy. An intense surface plasmon resonance band at {approx}410 nm in the UV-vis spectrum clearly reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles. The size of the silver particles using TEM and XRD studies is found to be in the range 13-18 nm. These nanoparticles are found to be highly stable and even after prolonged storage for over 6 months they do not show significant aggregation. A plausible mechanism behind the formation of silver nanoparticles and their stabilization via capping has been investigated using FTIR and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  1. The genome of Erwinia tasmaniensis strain Et1/99, a non-pathogenic bacterium in the genus Erwinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kube, Michael; Migdoll, Alexander Michael; Müller, Ines; Kuhl, Heiner; Beck, Alfred; Reinhardt, Richard; Geider, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    The complete genome of the bacterium Erwinia tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 consisting of a 3.9 Mb circular chromosome and five plasmids was sequenced. Strain Et1/99 represents an epiphytic plant bacterium related to Erwinia amylovora and E. pyrifoliae, which are responsible for the important plant diseases fire blight and Asian pear shoot blight, respectively. Strain Et1/99 is a non-pathogenic bacterium and is thought to compete with these and other bacteria when occupying the same habitat during initial colonization. Genome analysis revealed tools for colonization, cellular communication and defence modulation, as well as genes coding for the synthesis of levan and a not detected capsular exopolysaccharide. Strain Et1/99 may secrete indole-3-acetic acid to increase availability of nutrients provided on plant surfaces. These nutrients are subsequently accessed and metabolized. Secretion systems include the hypersensitive response type III pathway present in many pathogens. Differences or missing parts within the virulence-related factors distinguish strain Et1/99 from pathogens such as Pectobacterium atrosepticum and the related Erwinia spp. Strain Et1/99 completely lacks the sorbitol operon, which may also affect its inability to invade fire blight host plants. Erwinia amylovora in contrast depends for virulence on utilization of sorbitol, the dominant carbohydrate in rosaceous plants. The presence of other virulence-associated factors in strain Et1/99 indicates the ancestral genomic background of many plant-associated bacteria.

  2. Biological control of crown gall on grapevine and root colonization by nonpathogenic Rhizobium vitis strain ARK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A nonpathogenic strain of Rhizobium vitis ARK-1 was tested as a biological control agent for grapevine crown gall. When grapevine roots were soaked in a cell suspension of strain ARK-1 before planting in the field, the number of plants with tumors was reduced. The results from seven field trials from 2009 to 2012 were combined in a meta-analysis. The integrated relative risk after treatment with ARK-1 was 0.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.29, P0.001), indicating that the disease incidence was significantly reduced by ARK-1. In addition, the results from four field trials from 2007 to 2009 using R. vitis VAR03-1, a previously reported biological control agent for grapevine crown gall, were combined in a meta-analysis. The integrated relative risk after treatment with VAR03-1 was 0.24 (95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.53, P0.001), indicating the superiority of ARK-1 in inhibiting grapevine crown gall over VAR03-1 under field conditions. ARK-1 did not cause necrosis on grapevine shoot explants. ARK-1 established populations on roots of grapevine tree rootstock and persisted inside roots for two years.

  3. Rhamnolipids from non-pathogenic Burkholderia thailandensis E264: Physicochemical characterization, antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy against oral hygiene related pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikh, Mohamed; Funston, Scott; Chebbi, Alif; Ahmed, Syed; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2017-05-25

    Biosurfactants are naturally occurring surface active compounds that have mainly been exploited for environmental applications and consumer products, with their biomedical efficacy an emerging area of research. Rhamnolipids area major group of biosurfactants that have been reported for their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. One of the main limiting factors for scaled up production and downstream applications of rhamnolipids is the fact that they are predominantly produced from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this article, we have reported the production and characterisation of long chain rhamnolipids from non-pathogenic Burkholderia thailandensis E264 (ATCC 700388). We have also investigated the antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of these rhamnolipids against some oral pathogens (Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Neisseria mucosa and Streptococcus sanguinis), important for oral health and hygiene. Treating these bacteria with different concentrations of long chain rhamnolipids resulted in a reduction of 3-4 log of bacterial viability, placing these rhamnolipids close to being classified as biocidal. Investigating long chain rhamnolipid efficacy as antibiofilm agents for prospective oral-related applications revealed good potency against oral-bacteria biofilms in a co-incubation experiments, in a pre-coated surface format, in disrupting immature biofilms and has shown excellent combination effect with Lauryl Sodium Sulphate which resulted in a drastic decrease in its minimal inhibitory concentration against different bacteria. Investigating the rhamnolipid permeabilization effect along with their ability to induce the formation of reactive oxygen species has shed light on the mechanism through which inhibition/killing of bacteria may occur.

  4. Simian virus 40 regulatory region structural diversity and the association of viral archetypal regulatory regions with human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, J A; Butel, J S

    2001-02-01

    The regulatory region (RR) of simian virus 40 (SV40) contains enhancer/promoter elements and an origin of DNA replication. Natural SV40 isolates from simian brain or kidney tissues typically have an archetypal RR arrangement with a single 72-basepair enhancer element. A rare simpler, shorter SV40 RR exists that lacks a duplicated sequence in the G/C-rich region and is termed protoarchetypal. Occasionally, SV40 strain variants arise de novo that have complex RRs, which typically contain sequence reiterations, rearrangements, and/or deletions. These variants replicate faster and to higher titers in tissue culture; we speculate that such faster-growing variants were selected when laboratory strains of SV40 were initially recovered. SV40 strains with archetypal RRs have been found in some human brain tumors. The possible implications of these findings and a brief review of the SV40 RR structure are presented.

  5. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  6. ERdj5 Reductase Cooperates with Protein Disulfide Isomerase To Promote Simian Virus 40 Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Takamasa; Dosey, Annie; Herbstman, Jeffrey F.; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tsai, Billy

    2015-01-01

    The nonenveloped polyomavirus (PyV) simian virus 40 (SV40) traffics from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it penetrates the ER membrane to reach the cytosol before mobilizing into the nucleus to cause infection. Prior to ER membrane penetration, ER lumenal factors impart structural rearrangements to the virus, generating a translocation-competent virion capable of crossing the ER membrane. Here we identify ERdj5 as an ER enzyme that reduces SV40's disulfide bonds, a r...

  7. Attenuation of pathogenic immune responses during infection with human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV by the tetracycline derivative minocycline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L Drewes

    Full Text Available HIV immune pathogenesis is postulated to involve two major mechanisms: 1 chronic innate immune responses that drive T cell activation and apoptosis and 2 induction of immune regulators that suppress T cell function and proliferation. Both arms are elevated chronically in lymphoid tissues of non-natural hosts, which ultimately develop AIDS. However, these mechanisms are not elevated chronically in natural hosts of SIV infection that avert immune pathogenesis despite similarly high viral loads. In this study we investigated whether minocycline could modulate these pathogenic antiviral responses in non-natural hosts of HIV and SIV. We found that minocycline attenuated in vitro induction of type I interferon (IFN and the IFN-stimulated genes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1 and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and PBMCs exposed to aldrithiol-2 inactivated HIV or infectious influenza virus. Activation-induced TRAIL and expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4 in isolated CD4+ T cells were also reduced by minocycline. Translation of these in vitro findings to in vivo effects, however, were mixed as minocycline significantly reduced markers of activation and activation-induced cell death (CD25, Fas, caspase-3 but did not affect expression of IFNβ or the IFN-stimulated genes IDO1, FasL, or Mx in the spleens of chronically SIV-infected pigtailed macaques. TRAIL expression, reflecting the mixed effects of minocycline on activation and type I IFN stimuli, was reduced by half, but this change was not significant. These results show that minocycline administered after infection may protect against aspects of activation-induced cell death during HIV/SIV immune disease, but that in vitro effects of minocycline on type I IFN responses are not recapitulated in a rapid progressor model in vivo.

  8. Transfer of primer binding site-mutated simian immunodeficiency virus vectors by genetically engineered artificial and hybrid tRNA-like primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A C; Grunwald, T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2001-01-01

    could be obtained by cotransfection of a gene for an engineered tRNA(Pro)-tRNA hybrid with a match to PBS-Pro. The importance of tRNA backbone identity was further analyzed by complementing the PBS-X2 vector with a gene for a matching x2 primer with a tRNA backbone, which led to three- to fourfold...

  9. Quantification system for the viral dynamics of a highly pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus based on an in vitro experiment and a mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwami Shingo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing a quantitative understanding of viral kinetics is useful for determining the pathogenesis and transmissibility of the virus, predicting the course of disease, and evaluating the effects of antiviral therapy. The availability of data in clinical, animal, and cell culture studies, however, has been quite limited. Many studies of virus infection kinetics have been based solely on measures of total or infectious virus count. Here, we introduce a new mathematical model which tracks both infectious and total viral load, as well as the fraction of infected and uninfected cells within a cell culture, and apply it to analyze time-course data of an SHIV infection in vitro. Results We infected HSC-F cells with SHIV-KS661 and measured the concentration of Nef-negative (target and Nef-positive (infected HSC-F cells, the total viral load, and the infectious viral load daily for nine days. The experiments were repeated at four different MOIs, and the model was fitted to the full dataset simultaneously. Our analysis allowed us to extract an infected cell half-life of 14.1 h, a half-life of SHIV-KS661 infectiousness of 17.9 h, a virus burst size of 22.1 thousand RNA copies or 0.19 TCID50, and a basic reproductive number of 62.8. Furthermore, we calculated that SHIV-KS661 virus-infected cells produce at least 1 infectious virion for every 350 virions produced. Conclusions Our method, combining in vitro experiments and a mathematical model, provides detailed quantitative insights into the kinetics of the SHIV infection which could be used to significantly improve the understanding of SHIV and HIV-1 pathogenesis. The method could also be applied to other viral infections and used to improve the in vitro determination of the effect and efficacy of antiviral compounds.

  10. Clonal repertoires of virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes are shared in mucosal and systemic compartments during chronic simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Piya; Furr, Kathryn L; Dorosh, Lauren A; Letvin, Norman L

    2010-08-15

    Because it is thought that mucosal tissues play a fundamental role in early HIV/SIV infection, it is crucial to understand the virus-specific responses in mucosal tissues to facilitate devising strategies to prevent and control these infections. We have employed TCR repertoire analyses to define the clonal composition of a dominant SIV epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell population in mucosal and systemic compartments of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys during both acute and chronic infection. We show that the CD8(+) T cell repertoire in mucosal tissues of uninfected rhesus monkeys is oligoclonal, whereas the CD8(+) T cell repertoire in blood is polyclonal. Early postinfection, the SIV-specific CD8(+) T cell clonal repertoire is distinct in mucosal compartments and peripheral blood. However, we observed a narrowing of the virus-specific CD8(+) T cell clonal repertoire in all sampled anatomic compartments as infection progressed from acute to chronic, and there was comparable clonal diversity in all anatomic compartments. We showed during chronic infection that the same clonal populations of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are present in all compartments. These data indicate that the SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in systemic and mucosal sites have a shared clonal origin and are, therefore, capable of both responding to infection in the systemic circulation and trafficking to mucosal tissues.

  11. Structure and immunogenicity of alternative forms of the simian immunodeficiency virus gag protein expressed using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L

    2007-06-05

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-) or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infected primary mouse embryo fibroblasts, mouse L929 cells and primate Vero cells showed comparable expression levels for each protein, as well as extracellular virus-like particles (VRP-Gagmyr+) and distinctive cytoplasmic aggregates (VRP-Gagmyr-) with each cell type. VRP were used to immunize BALB/c mice, and immune responses were compared using an interferon (IFN)-gamma ELISPOT assay and a serum antibody ELISA. Although all three VRP generated similar levels of IFN-gamma-producing cells at 1 week post-boost, at 10 weeks post-boost the MA/CA-VRP-induced response was maintained at a significantly higher level relative to that induced by Gagmyr+-VRP. Antibody responses to MA/CA-VRP and Gagmyr+-VRP were not significantly different.

  12. Structure and Immunogenicity of Alternative Forms of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag Protein Expressed Using Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-), or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infect...

  13. DNA Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimen To Increase Breadth, Magnitude, and Cytotoxicity of the Cellular Immune Responses to Subdominant Gag Epitopes of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xintao; Valentin, Antonio; Dayton, Frances; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Rosati, Margherita; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Gautam, Rajeev; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Martin, Malcolm A; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2016-11-15

    HIV sequence diversity and the propensity of eliciting immunodominant responses targeting variable regions of the HIV proteome are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. An HIV-derived conserved element (CE) p24(gag) plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine is able to redirect immunodominant responses to otherwise subdominant and often more vulnerable viral targets. By homology to the HIV immunogen, seven CE were identified in SIV p27(Gag) Analysis of 31 rhesus macaques vaccinated with full-length SIV gag pDNA showed inefficient induction (58% response rate) of cellular responses targeting these CE. In contrast, all 14 macaques immunized with SIV p27CE pDNA developed robust T cell responses recognizing CE. Vaccination with p27CE pDNA was also critical for the efficient induction and increased the frequency of Ag-specific T cells with cytotoxic potential (granzyme B(+) CD107a(+)) targeting subdominant CE epitopes, compared with the responses elicited by the p57(gag) pDNA vaccine. Following p27CE pDNA priming, two booster regimens, gag pDNA or codelivery of p27CE+gag pDNA, significantly increased the levels of CE-specific T cells. However, the CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination elicited significantly broader CE epitope recognition, and thus, a more profound alteration of the immunodominance hierarchy. Vaccination with HIV molecules showed that CE+gag pDNA booster regimen further expanded the breadth of HIV CE responses. Hence, SIV/HIV vaccine regimens comprising CE pDNA prime and CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination significantly increased cytotoxic T cell responses to subdominant highly conserved Gag epitopes and maximized response breadth. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Kinetics of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Frequency and Function during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, Combination Antiretroviral Therapy, and Treatment Interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dross, Sandra E; Munson, Paul V; Kim, Se Eun; Bratt, Debra L; Tunggal, Hillary C; Gervassi, Ana L; Fuller, Deborah H; Horton, Helen

    2017-01-15

    During chronic lentiviral infection, poor clinical outcomes correlate both with systemic inflammation and poor proliferative ability of HIV-specific T cells; however, the connection between the two is not clear. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which expand during states of elevated circulating inflammatory cytokines, may link the systemic inflammation and poor T cell function characteristic of lentiviral infections. Although MDSC are partially characterized in HIV and SIV infection, questions remain regarding their persistence, activity, and clinical significance. We monitored MDSC frequency and function in SIV-infected rhesus macaques. Low MDSC frequency was observed prior to SIV infection. Post-SIV infection, MDSC were elevated in acute infection and persisted during 7 mo of combination antiretroviral drug therapy (cART). After cART interruption, we observed MDSC expansion of surprising magnitude, the majority being granulocytic MDSC. At all stages of infection, granulocytic MDSC suppressed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation in response to polyclonal or SIV-specific stimulation. In addition, MDSC frequency correlated significantly with circulating inflammatory cytokines. Acute and post-cART levels of viremia were similar, however, the levels of inflammatory cytokines and MDSC were more pronounced post-cART. Expanded MDSC during SIV infection, especially during the post-cART inflammatory cytokine surge, likely limit cellular responses to infection. As many HIV curative strategies require cART interruption to determine efficacy, our work suggests treatment interruption-induced MDSC may especially undermine the effectiveness of such strategies. MDSC depletion may enhance T cell responses to lentiviral infection and the effectiveness of curative approaches. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Modified Primers for the Identification of Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Isolates That Have Biological Control Potential against Fusarium Wilt of Cucumber in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaojen; Lin, Yisheng; Lin, Yinghong; Chung, Wenhsin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), which is not pathogenic to cucumbers, could serve as a biological control agent for managing Fusarium wilt of cucumber caused by Fo f. sp. cucumerinum (Foc) in Taiwan. However, thus far it has not been possible to separate the populations of pathogenic Fo from the nonpathogenic isolates that have biological control potential through their morphological characteristics. Although these two populations can be distinguished from one another using a bioassay, the work is laborious and time-consuming. In this study, a fragment of the intergenic spacer (IGS) region of ribosomal DNA from an Fo biological control agent, Fo366, was PCR-amplified with published general primers, FIGS11/FIGS12 and sequenced. A new primer, NPIGS-R, which was designed based on the IGS sequence, was paired with the FIGS11 primer. These primers were then evaluated for their specificity to amplify DNA from nonpathogenic Fo isolates that have biological control potential. The results showed that the modified primer pair, FIGS11/NPIGS-R, amplified a 500-bp DNA fragment from five of seven nonpathogenic Fo isolates. These five Fo isolates delayed symptom development of cucumber Fusarium wilt in greenhouse bioassay tests. Seventy-seven Fo isolates were obtained from the soil and plant tissues and then subjected to amplification using the modified primer pair; six samples showed positive amplification. These six isolates did not cause symptoms on cucumber seedlings when grown in peat moss infested with the isolates and delayed disease development when the same plants were subsequently inoculated with a virulent isolate of Foc. Therefore, the modified primer pair may prove useful for the identification of Fo isolates that are nonpathogenic to cucumber which can potentially act as biocontrol agents for Fusarium wilt of cucumber. PMID:23762289

  16. Immune Responses in the Central Nervous System Are Anatomically Segregated in a Non-Human Primate Model of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

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    Barbara Tavano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV accesses the central nervous system (CNS early during infection, leading to HIV-associated cognitive impairment and establishment of a viral reservoir. Here, we describe a dichotomy in inflammatory responses in different CNS regions in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected macaques, a model for HIV infection. We found increased expression of inflammatory genes and perivascular leukocyte infiltration in the midbrain of SIV-infected macaques. Conversely, the frontal lobe showed downregulation of inflammatory genes associated with interferon-γ and interleukin-6 pathways, and absence of perivascular cuffing. These immunologic alterations were not accompanied by differences in SIV transcriptional activity within the tissue. Altered expression of genes associated with neurotoxicity was observed in both midbrain and frontal lobe. The segregation of inflammatory responses to specific regions of the CNS may both account for HIV-associated neurological symptoms and constitute a critical hurdle for HIV eradication by shielding the CNS viral reservoir from antiviral immunity.

  17. Screening for severe combined immunodeficiency in neonates

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    Kelly BT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Brian T Kelly,1 Jonathan S Tam,1 James W Verbsky,1,2 John M Routes1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID is a rare disease that severely affects the cellular and humoral immune systems. Patients with SCID present with recurrent or severe infections and often with chronic diarrhea and failure to thrive. The disease is uniformly fatal, making early diagnosis essential. Definitive treatment is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with best outcomes prior to 3.5 months of age. Newborn screening for SCID using the T-cell receptor excision circle assay has revolutionized early identification of infants with SCID or severe T-cell lymphopenia. Keywords: severe combined immunodeficiency, T-cell receptor excision circle, newborn screening, primary immunodeficiency

  18. [Revertant somatic mosaicism in primary immunodeficiency diseases].

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    Wada, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    Revertant somatic mosaicism has been described in an increasing number of genetic disorders including primary immunodeficiency diseases. Both back mutations leading to restoration of wild-type sequences and second-site mutations resulting in compensatory changes have been demonstrated in mosaic individuals. Recent studies identifying revertant somatic mosaicism caused by multiple independent genetic changes further support its frequent occurrence in primary immunodeficiency diseases. Revertant mosaicism acquires a particular clinical relevance because it may lead to selective growth advantage of the corrected cells, resulting in improvement of disease symptoms or atypical clinical presentations. This phenomenon also provides us unique opportunities to evaluate the biological effects of restored gene expression in different cell lineages. Here we review the recent findings of revertant somatic mosaicism in primary immunodeficiency diseases and discuss its clinical implications.

  19. Gene therapy of primary T cell immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2013-08-10

    Gene therapy of severe combined immunodeficiencies has been proven to be effective to provide sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiencies. This has been achieved for 2 forms of SCID, i.e SCID-X1 (γc deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Occurrence of gene toxicity generated by integration of first generation retroviral vectors, as observed in the SCID-X1 trials has led to replace these vectors by self inactivated (SIN) retro(or lenti) viruses that may provide equivalent efficacy with a better safety profile. Results of ongoing clinical studies in SCID as well as in other primary immunodeficiencies, such as the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, will be thus very informative.

  20. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases.

  1. Multispecies reassortant bovine rotavirus strain carries a novel simian G3-like VP7 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Yashpal Singh; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Kuldeep; Saurabh, Sharad; Dhama, Kuldeep; Prasad, Minakshi; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus-A (RVAs), are the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in the young of mammals and birds. RVA strains possessing G6, G8, and G10 genotypes in combination with P[1] or P[11] have been commonly detected in cattle. During a routine surveillance for enteric viruses in a bovine population on North-Western temperate Himalayan region of India, an uncommon bovine RVA strain, designated as RVA/Cow-wt/IND/M1/09/2009 was detected in a diarrhoeic crossbred calf. The examination of nearly complete genome sequence of this RVA strain revealed an unusual G-P combination (G3P[11]) on a typical bovine RVA genotype backbone (I2-R2-C2-M2-A11-N2-T6-E2-H3). The VP7 gene of M1/09 isolate displayed a maximum nucleotide sequence identity of 73.8% with simian strain (RVA/Simian-tc/USA/RRV/1975/G3P[3]). The VP4 and NSP5 genes clustered with an Indian pig strain, RVA/Pig-wt/IND/AM-P66/2012/G10P[11] (99.6%), and a caprine strain, RVA/Goat-tc/BGD/GO34/1999/G6P[1] (98.9%) from Bangladesh, respectively, whilst the, VP6, NSP1, NSP3 and NSP4 genes were identical or nearly identical to Indian bovine strains (RVA/Cow-wt/IND/B-72/2008/G10P[X], RVA/Cow-wt/IND/B85/2010/GXP[X], and RVA/Cow-wt/IND/C91/2011/G6P[X]). The remaining four genes (VP1, VP2, VP3 and NSP2) were more closely related to RVA/Human-wt/ITA/PAI11/1996/G2P[4] (93.5%), RVA/Sheep-wt/CHN/LLR/1985/G10P[15] (88.8%), RVA/Human-tc/SWE/1076/1983/G2P2A[6] (93.2%) and RVA/Human-wt/AUS/CK20003/2000/G2P[4] (91.2%), respectively. Altogether, these findings are suggestive of multiple independent interspecies transmission and reassortment events between co-circulating bovine, porcine, ovine and human rotaviruses. The complete genome sequence information is necessary to establish the evolutionary relationship, interspecies transmission and ecological features of animal RVAs from different geographical regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Macaque homologs of EBV and KSHV show uniquely different associations with simian AIDS-related lymphomas.

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    A Gregory Bruce

    Full Text Available Two gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV (Lymphocryptovirus genus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV (Rhadinovirus genus have been implicated in the etiology of AIDS-associated lymphomas. Homologs of these viruses have been identified in macaques and other non-human primates. In order to assess the association of these viruses with non-human primate disease, archived lymphoma samples were screened for the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV homologs of EBV, and macaque rhadinoviruses belonging to the RV1 lineage of KSHV homologs or the more distant RV2 lineage of Old World primate rhadinoviruses. Viral loads were determined by QPCR and infected cells were identified by immunolabeling for different viral proteins. The lymphomas segregated into three groups. The first group (n = 6 was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of LCV (1-25 genomes/cell and expressed the B-cell antigens CD20 or BLA.36. A strong EBNA-2 signal was detected in the nuclei of the neoplastic cells in one of the LCV-high lymphomas, indicative of a type III latency stage. None of the lymphomas in this group stained for the LCV viral capsid antigen (VCA lytic marker. The second group (n = 5 was associated with D-type simian retrovirus-2 (SRV-2 infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (9-790 genomes/cell and expressed the CD3 T-cell marker. The third group (n = 3 was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (2-260 genomes/cell and was negative for both CD20 and CD3. In both the CD3-positive and CD3/CD20-negative lymphomas, the neoplastic cells stained strongly for markers of RV2 lytic replication. None of the lymphomas had detectable levels of retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV, the macaque RV1 homolog of KSHV. Our data suggest etiological roles for both lymphocryptoviruses and RV2 rhadinoviruses in the development of simian AIDS-associated lymphomas and indicate that

  3. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriaroon, Panida; Ballow, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been standard treatment in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases for the past 3 decades. The goal of therapy is to reduce serious bacterial infections in individuals with antibody function defects. Approximately one-third of patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment experience adverse reactions. Recent advances in manufacturing processes have resulted in products that are safer and better tolerated. Self-infusion by the subcutaneous route has become popular and resulted in better quality of life. This review summarizes the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency diseases including its properties, dosing, adverse effects, and different routes of administration.

  4. Enhanced Protective Efficacy of Nonpathogenic Recombinant Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinases Combined with a Sand Fly Salivary Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Seyed, Negar; Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Meneses, Claudio; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Rafati, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel vaccination approaches are needed to prevent leishmaniasis. Live attenuated vaccines are the gold standard for protection against intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania and there have been new developments in this field. The nonpathogenic to humans lizard protozoan parasite, Leishmania (L) tarentolae, has been used effectively as a vaccine platform against visceral leishmaniasis in experimental animal models. Correspondingly, pre-exposure to sand fly saliva or immunization with a salivary protein has been shown to protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we tested the efficacy of a novel combination of established protective parasite antigens expressed by L. tarentolae together with a sand fly salivary antigen as a vaccine strategy against L. major infection. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of different DNA/Live and Live/Live prime-boost vaccination modalities with live recombinant L. tarentolae stably expressing cysteine proteinases (type I and II, CPA/CPB) and PpSP15, an immunogenic salivary protein from Phlebotomus papatasi, a natural vector of L. major, were tested both in susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice. Both humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed before challenge and at 3 and 10 weeks after Leishmania infection. In both strains of mice, the strongest protective effect was observed when priming with PpSP15 DNA and boosting with PpSP15 DNA and live recombinant L. tarentolae stably expressing cysteine proteinase genes. Conclusion/Significance The present study is the first to use a combination of recombinant L. tarentolae with a sand fly salivary antigen (PpSP15) and represents a novel promising vaccination approach against leishmaniasis. PMID:24675711

  5. Enhanced protective efficacy of nonpathogenic recombinant leishmania tarentolae expressing cysteine proteinases combined with a sand fly salivary antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Zahedifard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Novel vaccination approaches are needed to prevent leishmaniasis. Live attenuated vaccines are the gold standard for protection against intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania and there have been new developments in this field. The nonpathogenic to humans lizard protozoan parasite, Leishmania (L tarentolae, has been used effectively as a vaccine platform against visceral leishmaniasis in experimental animal models. Correspondingly, pre-exposure to sand fly saliva or immunization with a salivary protein has been shown to protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we tested the efficacy of a novel combination of established protective parasite antigens expressed by L. tarentolae together with a sand fly salivary antigen as a vaccine strategy against L. major infection. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of different DNA/Live and Live/Live prime-boost vaccination modalities with live recombinant L. tarentolae stably expressing cysteine proteinases (type I and II, CPA/CPB and PpSP15, an immunogenic salivary protein from Phlebotomus papatasi, a natural vector of L. major, were tested both in susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice. Both humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed before challenge and at 3 and 10 weeks after Leishmania infection. In both strains of mice, the strongest protective effect was observed when priming with PpSP15 DNA and boosting with PpSP15 DNA and live recombinant L. tarentolae stably expressing cysteine proteinase genes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study is the first to use a combination of recombinant L. tarentolae with a sand fly salivary antigen (PpSP15 and represents a novel promising vaccination approach against leishmaniasis.

  6. Morphological and comparative genomic analyses of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium solani isolated from Dalbergia sissoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, M; Zaidi, N W; Haq, Q M R; Singh, Y P; Taj, G; Kar, C S; Singh, U S

    2015-06-01

    Sissoo or shisham (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.) is one of the finest wood of South Asia. Fusarium solani is a causal organism of sissoo wilt, decline, or dieback. It is also a potential causal organism associated with other valuable tree species. Thirty-eight Fusarium isolates including 24 F. solani and 14 Fusarium sp., were obtained in 2005 from different geographical locations in India. All 38 (18 pathogenic and 20 non-pathogenic) isolates were characterized for genomic analysis, growth behaviour, pigmentation and sensitivity to carbendazim. Based on growth pattern, growth rate, pigmentation and sensitivity to carbendazim, all 38 isolates showed a wide range of variability, but no correlation with pathogenicity or geographical distribution. Three techniques were used for comparative genomic analysis: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD); inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR); and simple sequence repeats (SSR). A total of 90 primers targeting different genome regions resulted a total of 1159 loci with an average of 12.88 loci per primer. These primers showed high genomic variability among the isolates. The maximum loci (14.64) per primer were obtained with RAPD. The total variation of the first five principal components for RAPD, ISSR, SSR and combined analysis were estimated as 47.42, 48.21, 46.30 and 46.78 %, respectively. Among the molecular markers, highest Pearson correlation value (r = 0.957) was recorded with combination of RAPD and SSR followed by RAPD and ISSR (r = 0.952), and SSR and ISSR (r = 0.942). The combination of these markers would be similarly effective as single marker system i.e. RAPD, ISSR and SSR. Based on polymorphic information content (PIC = 0.619) and highest coefficient (r = 0.995), RAPD was found to be the most efficient marker system compared to ISSR and SSR. This study will assist in understanding the population biology of wilt causing phytopathogen, F. solani, and in assisting with integrated disease management measures.

  7. Mutation of the Erwinia amylovora argD gene causes arginine auxotrophy, nonpathogenicity in apples, and reduced virulence in pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Peter, Kari A; McNellis, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Fire blight is caused by Erwinia amylovora and is the most destructive bacterial disease of apples and pears worldwide. In this study, we found that E. amylovora argD(1000)::Tn5, an argD Tn5 transposon mutant that has the Tn5 transposon inserted after nucleotide 999 in the argD gene-coding region, was an arginine auxotroph that did not cause fire blight in apple and had reduced virulence in immature pear fruits. The E. amylovora argD gene encodes a predicted N-acetylornithine aminotransferase enzyme, which is involved in the production of the amino acid arginine. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type argD gene complemented both the nonpathogenic and the arginine auxotrophic phenotypes of the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant. However, even when mixed with virulent E. amylovora cells and inoculated onto immature apple fruit, the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant still failed to grow, while the virulent strain grew and caused disease. Furthermore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid was stably maintained in the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant growing in host tissues without any antibiotic selection. Therefore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid could be useful for the expression of genes, markers, and reporters in E. amylovora growing in planta, without concern about losing the plasmid over time. The ArgD protein cannot be considered an E. amylovora virulence factor because the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant was auxotrophic and had a primary metabolism defect. Nevertheless, these results are informative about the parasitic nature of the fire blight disease interaction, since they indicate that E. amylovora cannot obtain sufficient arginine from apple and pear fruit tissues or from apple vegetative tissues, either at the beginning of the infection process or after the infection has progressed to an advanced state.

  8. Distribution and prevalence of the Australian non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus is correlated with rainfall and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, June; Fordham, Damien A; Cooke, Brian D; Cox, Tarnya; Mutze, Greg; Strive, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Australia relies heavily on rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for the biological control of introduced European wild rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus, which are significant economic and environmental pests. An endemic non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus termed RCV-A1 also occurs in wild rabbits in Australian and provides partial protection against lethal RHDV infection, thus interfering with effective rabbit control. Despite its obvious importance for rabbit population management, little is known about the epidemiology of this benign rabbit calicivirus. We determined the continent-wide distribution and prevalence of RCV-A1 by analysing 1,805 serum samples from wild rabbit populations at 78 sites across Australia for the presence of antibodies to RCV-A1 using a serological test that specifically detects RCV-A1 antibodies and does not cross-react with co-occurring RHDV antibodies. We also investigated possible correlation between climate variables and prevalence of RCV-A1 by using generalised linear mixed effect models. Antibodies to RCV-A1 were predominantly detected in rabbit populations in cool, high rainfall areas of the south-east and south-west of the continent. There was strong support for modelling RCV-A1 prevalence as a function of average annual rainfall and minimum temperature. The best ranked model explained 26% of the model structural deviance. According to this model, distribution and prevalence of RCV-A1 is positively correlated with periods of above average rainfall and negatively correlated with periods of drought. Our statistical model of RCV-A1 prevalence will greatly increase our understanding of RCV-A1 epidemiology and its interaction with RHDV in Australia. By defining the environmental conditions associated with the prevalence of RCV-A1, it also contributes towards understanding the distribution of similar viruses in New Zealand and Europe.

  9. Distribution and prevalence of the Australian non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus is correlated with rainfall and temperature.

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    June Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Australia relies heavily on rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV for the biological control of introduced European wild rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus, which are significant economic and environmental pests. An endemic non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus termed RCV-A1 also occurs in wild rabbits in Australian and provides partial protection against lethal RHDV infection, thus interfering with effective rabbit control. Despite its obvious importance for rabbit population management, little is known about the epidemiology of this benign rabbit calicivirus. METHODS: We determined the continent-wide distribution and prevalence of RCV-A1 by analysing 1,805 serum samples from wild rabbit populations at 78 sites across Australia for the presence of antibodies to RCV-A1 using a serological test that specifically detects RCV-A1 antibodies and does not cross-react with co-occurring RHDV antibodies. We also investigated possible correlation between climate variables and prevalence of RCV-A1 by using generalised linear mixed effect models. RESULTS: Antibodies to RCV-A1 were predominantly detected in rabbit populations in cool, high rainfall areas of the south-east and south-west of the continent. There was strong support for modelling RCV-A1 prevalence as a function of average annual rainfall and minimum temperature. The best ranked model explained 26% of the model structural deviance. According to this model, distribution and prevalence of RCV-A1 is positively correlated with periods of above average rainfall and negatively correlated with periods of drought. IMPLICATIONS: Our statistical model of RCV-A1 prevalence will greatly increase our understanding of RCV-A1 epidemiology and its interaction with RHDV in Australia. By defining the environmental conditions associated with the prevalence of RCV-A1, it also contributes towards understanding the distribution of similar viruses in New Zealand and Europe.

  10. PD 404,182 Is a Virocidal Small Molecule That Disrupts Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Ana Maria; Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Bobardt, Michael; Simeon, Rudo; Chang, Jinhong

    2012-01-01

    We describe a virucidal small molecule, PD 404,182, that is effective against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the antiviral effect of PD 404,182 against HCV and HIV in cell culture are 11 and 1 μM, respectively. The antiviral activity of PD 404,182 is due to the physical disruption of virions that is accompanied to various degrees (depending on the virus and exposure temperature/time) by the release of viral nucleic acids into the surrounding medium. PD 404,182 does not directly lyse liposomal membranes even after extended exposure, and it shows no attenuation in antiviral activity when preincubated with liposomes of various lipid compositions, suggesting that the compound inactivates viruses through interaction with a nonlipid structural component of the virus. The virucidal activity of PD 404,182 appears to be virus specific, as little to no viral inactivation was detected with the enveloped Dengue and Sindbis viruses. PD 404,182 effectively inactivates a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 as well as HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and it does not exhibit significant cytotoxicity with multiple human cell lines in vitro (50% cytotoxic concentration, >300 μM). The compound is fully active in cervical fluids, although it exhibits decreased potency in the presence of human serum, retains its full antiviral potency for 8 h when in contact with cells, and is effective against both cell-free and cell-associated HIV. These qualities make PD 404,182 an attractive candidate anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV transmission through sexual intercourse. PMID:22083468

  11. Detection of Abundantly Transcribed Genes and Gene Translocation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Non—Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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    V. Tarantul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several novel, differentially transcribed genes were identified in one centroblastic and one immunoblastic HIV-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BNHL by subtractive cloning. In both lymphomas, we detected an upregulated transcription of several mitochondrial genes. In the centroblastic B-NHL, we found a high level transcription of nuclear genes including the interferon-inducible gene (INF-ind, the immunoglobulin light chain gene (IgL, the set oncogene, and several unknown genes. The data obtained on upregulated expression of the genes in human B-NHL of HIV-infected patients considerably overlap with those obtained earlier for the B-NHL of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. In the centroblastic lymphoma, one transcript revealed a fusion of the 3'-untranslated region of the set gene and the C-terminal region of the IgL gene. This chimeric sequence was confirmed by a site-directed polymerase chain reaction performed with total cDNA and genomic DNA. The expected amplification product was obtained in both cases pointing to a genomic rearrangement. The IgL-set fusion sequence was not found in cDNA preparations and genomic DNA of the immunoblastic HIV-associated B-NHL. Further studies are necessary to determine whether these genes contribute to lymphoma development or can be used as therapeutic targets.

  12. Pneumocystis colonization, airway inflammation, and pulmonary function decline in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Karen A; Morris, Alison; Patil, Sangita; Fernandes, Eustace

    2006-01-01

    As a result of improved diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care for HIV-infected patients, AIDS in developed countries has now become a chronic infection with prolonged survival time, but longterm complications are increasing contributors to morbidity and mortality. HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for the development of pulmonary complications, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the mechanisms associated with this increased susceptibility have not been defined. Infectious agents may contribute to the development of COPD by upregulating inflammatory mediators in the lung that act in concert with cigarette smoke to promote lung pathology. Studies in human subjects and non-human primate models of AIDS suggest that the inflammatory response to asymptomatic carriage or colonization by the opportunistic pathogen, Pneumocystis sp. (Pc), is similar to that of COPD, which is characterized by influx of CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages into the lungs. We have shown a high frequency of Pc colonization among asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects and in non-HIV infected subjects with COPD. To investigate the role of Pc in the progression of obstructive lung disease in HIV infections, we developed a non-human primate model of Pc colonizatoin and infection in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques. These animals develop a prolonged colonization state characterized by a persistent influx of CD8+ T cells and neutrophils, and local increases in IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. SIV-infected Pc-colonized monkeys show progressive decline in pulmonary function compared to SIV-infected monkeys. We hypothesize that in the context of AIDS-immune dysfunction, Pc colonization induces inflammatory responses leading to changes in pulmonary function and architecture similar to that seen in emphysema. Information gained from these studies will lead to the development of interventions to prevent lung injury associated with Pc

  13. Class I major histocompatibility proteins are an essential component of the simian virus 40 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, W C; Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1992-01-01

    The class I molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) present endogenously synthesized antigenic peptide fragments to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We show here that these proteins are an essential component of the cell surface receptor for simian virus 40 (SV40). First, SV40 binding to cells can be blocked by two monoclonal antibodies against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins but not by monoclonal antibodies specific for other cell surface proteins. Second, SV40 does not bind to cells of two different human lymphoblastoid cell lines which do not express surface class I MHC proteins because of genetic defects in the beta 2-microglobulin gene in one line and in the HLA complex in the other. Transfection of these cell lines with cloned genes for beta 2-microglobulin and HLA-B8, respectively, restored expression of their surface class I MHC proteins and resulted in concomitant SV40 binding. Finally, SV40 binds to purified HLA proteins in vitro and selectively binds to class I MHC proteins in a cell surface extract. Images PMID:1312619

  14. Class I major histocompatibility proteins as cell surface receptors for simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1989-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility complex proteins appear to be the major cell surface receptors for simian virus 40 (SV40), as implied by the following observations. Adsorption of SV40 to LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells specifically inhibited binding of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. Conversely, pretreatment of LLC-MK2 cells with anti-HLA MAbs inhibited infection by SV40. The ability of anti-HLA to inhibit infection was greatly reduced when the order of addition of the anti-HLA and the virus was reversed. Infection was also inhibited by preincubating SV40 with purified soluble class I protein. Finally, human lymphoblastoid cells of the Daudi line, which do not express class I major histocompatibility complex proteins, were infected at relatively low levels with SV40 virions. In a control experiment, we found that pretreatment of cells with a MAb specific for the leukocytic-function-associated antigen LFA-3 actually enhanced infection. This finding may also support the premise that class I major histocompatibility complex proteins are receptors for SV40. PMID:2476575

  15. MHC class I molecules are enriched in caveolae but do not enter with simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H A; Chen, Y; Norkin, L C

    1998-06-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binds to MHC class I molecules anywhere on the cell surface and then enters through caveolae. The fate of class I molecules after SV40 binding is not known. Sensitivity of 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules to papain cleavage was used to distinguish internalized class I molecules from class I molecules remaining at the cell surface. Whereas the caveolae-enriched membrane microdomain was found to also be enriched for class I molecules, no internalized papain-resistant 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules could be detected at any time in either control cells or in cells preadsorbed with saturating amounts of SV40. Instead, 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules, as well as preadsorbed 125I-labelled anti-class I antibodies, accumulated in the medium, coincident with the turnover of class I molecules at the cell surface. The class I heavy chains that accumulated in the medium were truncated and their release was specifically prevented by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline. Thus, whereas class I molecules mediate SV40 binding, they do not appear to mediate SV40 entry.

  16. Disassembly of simian virus 40 during passage through the endoplasmic reticulum and in the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Norkin, Leonard C

    2012-02-01

    The nonenveloped polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40) is taken up into cells by a caveola-mediated endocytic process that delivers the virus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Within the ER lumen, the capsid undergoes partial disassembly, which exposes its internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining with antibodies. We demonstrate here that the SV40 genome does not become accessible to detection while the virus is in the ER. Instead, the genome becomes accessible two distinct detection procedures, one using anti-bromodeoxyuridine antibodies and the other using a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-based chemical reaction, only after the emergence of partially disassembled SV40 particles in the cytoplasm. These cytoplasmic particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. Thus, SV40 particles undergo discrete disassembly steps during entry that are separated temporally and topologically. First, a partial disassembly of the particles occurs in the ER, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection.

  17. Simian virus 40 infection via MHC class I molecules and caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C

    1999-04-01

    MHC class I molecules are a necessary component of the cell surface receptor for simian virus 40 (SV40). After binding to class I molecules, SV40 enters cells via a unique endocytic pathway that involves caveolae, rather than clathrin-coated pits. This pathway is dependent on a transmembrane signal that SV40 transmits from the cell surface. Furthermore, it delivers SV40 to the endoplasmic reticulum, rather than to the endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is the usual target for endocytic traffic. The glycosphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane domains that contain caveolae are also enriched for class I molecules, relative to whole plasma membrane. Nevertheless, although class I molecules bind SV40, they do not enter with SV40, nor do they enter spontaneously into uninfected SV40 host cells. Instead, they are shed from the cell surface by the activity of a metalloprotease. These results imply the existence of a putative secondary receptor for SV40 that might mediate SV40 entry. It is not yet clear whether class I molecules are active in transmitting the SV40 signal. Monoclonal antibodies against class I molecules also induce a signal in the SV40 host cells. However, the antibody-induced signal is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), whereas the SV40 signal is independent of MAP kinase.

  18. Simian virus 40 late proteins possess lytic properties that render them capable of permeabilizing cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Robert; Rusan, Nasser M; Wilbuer, Anne-Kathrin; Norkin, Leonard C; Wadsworth, Patricia; Hebert, Daniel N

    2006-07-01

    Many nonenveloped viruses have evolved an infectious cycle that culminates in the lysis or permeabilization of the host to enable viral release. How these viruses initiate the lytic event is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the simian virus 40 progeny accumulated at the nuclear envelope prior to the permeabilization of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes at a time which corresponded with the release of the progeny. The permeabilization of these cellular membranes temporally correlated with late protein expression and was not observed upon the inhibition of their synthesis. To address whether one or more of the late proteins possessed an inherent capacity to induce membrane permeabilization, we examined the permeability of Escherichia coli that separately expressed the late proteins. VP2 and VP3, but not VP1, caused the permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, VP3 expression resulted in bacterial cell lysis. These findings demonstrate that VP3 possesses an inherent lytic property that is independent of eukaryotic signaling or cell death pathways.

  19. Neutralizing and IgG antibodies against simian virus 40 in healthy pregnant women in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40 sequences have been detected in various human specimens and SV40 antibodies have been found in human sera from both healthy individuals and cancer patients. This study analyzed serum samples from healthy pregnant women as well as cord blood samples to determine the prevalence of SV40 antibodies in pregnancy.Serum samples were collected at the time of delivery from two groups of pregnant women as well as cord bloods from one group. The women were born between 1967 and 1993. Samples were assayed by two different serological methods, one group by neutralization of viral infectivity and the other by indirect ELISA employing specific SV40 mimotopes as antigens. Viral DNA assays by real-time polymerase chain reaction were carried out on blood samples.Neutralization and ELISA tests indicated that the pregnant women were SV40 antibody-positive with overall prevalences of 10.6% (13/123 and 12.7% (14/110, respectively. SV40 neutralizing antibodies were detected in a low number of cord blood samples. Antibody titers were generally low. No viral DNA was detected in either maternal or cord bloods.SV40-specific serum antibodies were detected in pregnant women at the time of delivery and in cord bloods. There was no evidence of transplacental transmission of SV40. These data indicate that SV40 is circulating at a low prevalence in the northern Italian population long after the use of contaminated vaccines.

  20. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past.

  1. Viral latency in blood and saliva of simian foamy virus-infected humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Rua

    Full Text Available Simian foamy viruses (SFV are widespread retroviruses among non-human primates (NHP. SFV actively replicate in the oral cavity and can be transmitted to humans through NHP bites, giving rise to a persistent infection. We aimed at studying the natural history of SFV infection in human. We have analyzed viral load and gene expression in 14 hunters from Cameroon previously shown to be infected with a gorilla SFV strain. Viral DNA could be detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR targeting the pol-in region, in most samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (7.1 ± 6.0 SFV DNA copies/105 PBMCs and saliva (2.4 ± 4.3 SFV DNA copies/105 cells derived from the hunters. However, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR revealed the absence of SFV viral gene expression in both PBMCs and saliva, suggesting that SFV was latent in the human samples. Our study demonstrates that a latent infection can occur in humans and persist for years, both in PBMCs and saliva. Such a scenario may contribute to the putative lack of secondary human-to-human transmissions of SFV.

  2. Simian virus 40 inhibits differentiation and maturation of rhesus macaque DC-SIGN+-dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are the initiators and modulators of the immune responses. Some species of pathogenic microorganisms have developed immune evasion strategies by controlling antigen presentation function of DC. Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a DNA tumor virus of rhesus monkey origin. It can induce cell transformation and tumorigenesis in many vertebrate species, but often causes no visible effects and persists as a latent infection in rhesus monkeys under natural conditions. To investigate the interaction between SV40 and rhesus monkey DC, rhesus monkey peripheral blood monocyte-derived DC were induced using recombinant human Interleukin-4 (rhIL-4 and infective SV40, the phenotype and function of DC-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN+ DC were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results showed that SV40 can down-regulate the expression of CD83 and CD86 on DC and impair DC-induced activation of T cell proliferation. These findings suggest that SV40 might also cause immune suppression by influencing differentiation and maturation of DC.

  3. [Macropore characteristics and its relationships with the preferential flow in broadleaved forest soils of Simian Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong-jiang; Cheng, Jin-hua; Wu, Yu-he; Du, Shi-cai; Wang, Ran

    2010-05-01

    Brilliant blue dyeing and water breakthrough curve were applied to study the number and distribution of macropores and their relations to the preferential flow in typical sub-tropic broad-leaved forest soils of Simian Mountains. The radii of the macropores were mainly between 0. 3 and 3.0 mm, with the macroporosities in the range of 6.3% to 10.5%, and the macropores were always distributed in aggregation with increasing soil depth. The number of the macropores in each radius interval of dye-stained areas was tenfold increase than that of blank areas. The number of the macropores with radius larger than 0.3 mm, especially larger than 1.5 mm, was the most important factor affecting the occurrence of preferential flow. Significant correlations were found between the number of macropores and the water steady effluent volume, with the highest correlation coefficients of 0.842 and 0.879 for the radii intervals of 0.7-1.5 mm and 1.5-3.0 mm, respectively. Macro-pore continuity in dye-stained areas was better than that in blank areas, especially in the radius interval of 1.5-3.0 mm, with the biggest difference of 78.31%. In dye-stained areas, the number of macropores decreased gradually with soil depth. The filler-like distribution of macropores formed an effective water pressure gradient, which resulted in the preferential transport of water.

  4. Replication stress and mitotic dysfunction in cells expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Filippakis, Harilaos; Huang, Haomin; Yen, Timothy J; Gjoerup, Ole V

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) binds to the Bub1 kinase, a key regulator of the spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation. Bub1 mutations or altered expression patterns are linked to chromosome missegregation and are considered to be a driving force in some human cancers. Here we report that LT, dependent on Bub1 binding, causes micronuclei, lagging chromatin, and anaphase bridges, which are hallmarks of chromosomal instability (CIN) and Bub1 insufficiency. Using time-lapse microscopy, we demonstrate that LT imposes a Bub1 binding-dependent delay in the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Kinetochore fibers reveal that LT, via Bub1 binding, causes aberrant kinetochore (KT)-microtubule (MT) attachments and a shortened interkinetochore distance, consistent with a lack of tension. Previously, we showed that LT also induces the DNA damage response (DDR) via Bub1 binding. Using inducible LT cell lines, we show that an activated DDR was observed before the appearance of anaphase bridges and micronuclei. Furthermore, LT induction in serum-starved cells demonstrated γ-H2AX accumulation in cells that had not yet entered mitosis. Thus, DDR activation can occur independently of chromosome segregation defects. Replication stress pathways may be responsible, because signatures of replication stress were observed, which were attenuated by exogenous supplementation with nucleosides. Our observations allow us to propose a model that explains and integrates the diverse manifestations of genomic instability induced by LT.

  5. Class I major histocompatibility proteins are an essential component of the simian virus 40 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, W C; Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1992-04-01

    The class I molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) present endogenously synthesized antigenic peptide fragments to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We show here that these proteins are an essential component of the cell surface receptor for simian virus 40 (SV40). First, SV40 binding to cells can be blocked by two monoclonal antibodies against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins but not by monoclonal antibodies specific for other cell surface proteins. Second, SV40 does not bind to cells of two different human lymphoblastoid cell lines which do not express surface class I MHC proteins because of genetic defects in the beta 2-microglobulin gene in one line and in the HLA complex in the other. Transfection of these cell lines with cloned genes for beta 2-microglobulin and HLA-B8, respectively, restored expression of their surface class I MHC proteins and resulted in concomitant SV40 binding. Finally, SV40 binds to purified HLA proteins in vitro and selectively binds to class I MHC proteins in a cell surface extract.

  6. Class I major histocompatibility proteins as cell surface receptors for simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1989-10-01

    Class I major histocompatibility complex proteins appear to be the major cell surface receptors for simian virus 40 (SV40), as implied by the following observations. Adsorption of SV40 to LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells specifically inhibited binding of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. Conversely, pretreatment of LLC-MK2 cells with anti-HLA MAbs inhibited infection by SV40. The ability of anti-HLA to inhibit infection was greatly reduced when the order of addition of the anti-HLA and the virus was reversed. Infection was also inhibited by preincubating SV40 with purified soluble class I protein. Finally, human lymphoblastoid cells of the Daudi line, which do not express class I major histocompatibility complex proteins, were infected at relatively low levels with SV40 virions. In a control experiment, we found that pretreatment of cells with a MAb specific for the leukocytic-function-associated antigen LFA-3 actually enhanced infection. This finding may also support the premise that class I major histocompatibility complex proteins are receptors for SV40.

  7. Discovery and characterization of distinct simian pegiviruses in three wild African Old World monkey species.

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    Samuel D Sibley

    Full Text Available Within the Flaviviridae, the recently designated genus Pegivirus has expanded greatly due to new discoveries in bats, horses, and rodents. Here we report the discovery and characterization of three simian pegiviruses (SPgV that resemble human pegivirus (HPgV and infect red colobus monkeys (Procolobus tephrosceles, red-tailed guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius and an olive baboon (Papio anubis. We have designated these viruses SPgVkrc, SPgVkrtg and SPgVkbab, reflecting their host species' common names, which include reference to their location of origin in Kibale National Park, Uganda. SPgVkrc and SPgVkrtg were detected in 47% (28/60 of red colobus and 42% (5/12 red-tailed guenons, respectively, while SPgVkbab infection was observed in 1 of 23 olive baboons tested. Infections were not associated with any apparent disease, despite the generally high viral loads observed for each variant. These viruses were monophyletic and equally divergent from HPgV and pegiviruses previously identified in chimpanzees (SPgVcpz. Overall, the high degree of conservation of genetic features among the novel SPgVs, HPgV and SPgVcpz suggests conservation of function among these closely related viruses. Our study describes the first primate pegiviruses detected in Old World monkeys, expanding the known genetic diversity and host range of pegiviruses and providing insight into the natural history of this genus.

  8. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... marker and whether correction of anemia itself results in a better prognosis remain to be determined....

  9. Prevalence of primary immunodeficiency in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Kyung Hyo; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Bong Seong; Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Chang Hwi; Kim, Hwang Min; Park, Hee Ju; Pai, Ki Soo; Son, Byong Kwan; Shin, Kyung Sue; Oh, Moo Young; Woo, Young Jong; Yoo, Young; Lee, Kun Soo; Lee, Kyung Yil; Lee, Chong Guk; Lee, Joon Sung; Chung, Eun Hee; Choi, Eun Hwa; Hahn, Youn Soo; Park, Hyun Young; Kim, Joong Gon

    2012-07-01

    This study represents the first epidemiological study based on the national registry of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) in Korea. Patient data were collected from 23 major hospitals. A total of 152 patients with PID (under 19 yr of age), who were observed from 2001 to 2005, have been entered in this registry. The period prevalence of PID in Korea in 2005 is 11.25 per million children. The following frequencies were found: antibody deficiencies, 53.3% (n = 81), phagocytic disorders, 28.9% (n = 44); combined immunodeficiencies, 13.2% (n = 20); and T cell deficiencies, 4.6% (n = 7). Congenital agammaglobulinemia (n = 21) and selective IgA deficiency (n = 21) were the most frequently reported antibody deficiency. Other reported deficiencies were common variable immunodeficiencies (n = 16), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 15), IgG subclass deficiency (n = 4). Phagocytic disorder was mostly chronic granulomatous disease. A small number of patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficiency were also registered. Overall, the most common first manifestation was pneumonia. This study provides data that permit a more accurate estimation PID patients in Korea.

  10. Evaluation of primary immunodeficiency disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reust, Carin E

    2013-06-01

    One in 2,000 children younger than 18 years is thought to have a primary immunodeficiency disease. Antibody, combined B-cell and T-cell, phagocytic, and complement disorders are the most common types. Children with these diseases tend to have bacterial or fungal infections with unusual organisms, or unusually severe and recurrent infections with common organisms. A family history of primary immunodeficiency disease is the strongest predictor of a person having this type of disease. When an immunodeficiency disease is suspected, initial laboratory screening should include a complete blood count with differential and measurement of serum immunoglobulin and complement levels. The presence of lymphocytopenia on complete blood count suggests a T-cell disorder, whereas a finding of neutropenia suggests a phagocytic disorder. Abnormal serum immunoglobulin levels suggest a B-cell disorder. Abnormalities on assay of the classic or alternative complement pathways suggest a complement disorder. If laboratory results are abnormal, or if clinical suspicion continues despite normal laboratory results, children should be referred for further evaluation. Human immunodeficiency virus infection should also be considered, and testing should be performed, if appropriate; this infection often clinically resembles a T-cell disorder.

  11. 110 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) SEROPOSITIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -http://www.ajol.info/journals/ajcem ... A seroprevalence study of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in new patients attending the eye .... previous reports that Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in ..... The increase in the number of patients with mild proteinuria after treatment and its implication require ...... bacteriophage.

  12. Distinct expression profiles of TGF-β1 signaling mediators in pathogenic SIVmac and non-pathogenic SIVagm infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butor Cécile

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The generalized T-cell activation characterizing HIV-1 and SIVmac infections in humans and macaques (MACs is not found in the non-pathogenic SIVagm infection in African green monkeys (AGMs. We have previously shown that TGF-β1, Foxp3 and IL-10 are induced very early after SIVagm infection. In SIVmac-infected MACs, plasma TGF-β1 induction persists during primary infection 1. We raised the hypothesis that MACs are unable to respond to TGF-β1 and thus cannot resorb virus-driven inflammation. We therefore compared the very early expression dynamics of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers as well as of factors involved in the TGF-β1 signaling pathway in SIV-infected AGMs and MACs. Methods Levels of transcripts encoding for pro- and anti-inflammatory markers (tnf-α, ifn-γ, il-10, t-bet, gata-3 as well as for TGF-β1 signaling mediators (smad3, smad4, smad7 were followed by real time PCR in a prospective study enrolling 6 AGMs and 6 MACs. Results During primary SIVmac infection, up-regulations of tnf-α, ifn-γ and t-bet responses (days 1–16 p.i. were stronger whereas il-10 response was delayed (4th week p.i. compared to SIVagm infection. Up-regulation of smad7 (days 3–8 p.i., a cellular mediator inhibiting the TGF-β1 signaling cascade, characterized SIV-infected MACs. In AGMs, we found increases of gata-3 but not t-bet, a longer lasting up-regulation of smad4 (days 1–21 p.i, a mediator enhancing TGF-β1 signaling, and no smad7 up-regulations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the inability to resorb virus-driven inflammation and activation during the pathogenic HIV-1/SIVmac infections is associated with an unresponsiveness to TGF-β1.

  13. Mechanisms of Action and Dose-Response Relationships Governing Biological Control of Fusarium Wilt of Tomato by Nonpathogenic Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, R P; Fravel, D R

    1999-12-01

    ABSTRACT Three isolates of nonpathogenic Fusarium spp. (CS-1, CS-20, and Fo47), previously shown to reduce the incidence of Fusarium wilt diseases of multiple crops, were evaluated to determine their mechanisms of action and antagonist-pathogen inoculum density relationships. Competition for nutrients, as represented by a reduction in pathogen saprophytic growth in the presence of the biocontrol isolates, was observed to be an important mechanism of action for isolate Fo47, but not for isolates CS-1 and CS-20. All three biocontrol isolates demonstrated some degree of induced systemic resistance in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) plants, as determined by split-root tests, but varied in their relative abilities to reduce disease. Isolate CS-20 provided the most effective control (39 to 53% disease reduction), while Fo47 provided the least effective control (23 to 25% reduction) in split-root tests. Dose-response relationships also differed considerably among the three biocon-trol isolates, with CS-20 significantly reducing disease incidence at antagonist doses as low as 100 chlamydospores per g of soil (cgs) and at pathogen densities up to 10(5) cgs. Isolate CS-1 also was generally effective at antagonist densities of 100 to 5,000 cgs, but only when pathogen densities were below 10(4) cgs. Isolate Fo47 was effective only at antagonist densities of 10(4) to 10(5) cgs, regardless of pathogen density. Epidemiological dose-response models (described by linear, negative exponential, hyperbolic saturation [HS], and logistic [LG] functions) fit to the observed data were used to quantify differences among the biocontrol isolates and establish biocontrol characteristics. Each isolate required a different model to best describe its dose-response characteristics, with the HS/HS, LG/HS, and LG/LG models (pathogen/biocontrol components) providing the best fit for isolates CS-1, CS-20, and Fo47, respectively. Model parameters (defining effective

  14. Interactions between rye (Secale cereale) root border cells (RBCs) and pathogenic and nonpathogenic rhizosphere strains of Fusarium culmorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszuk-Sciseł, Jolanta; Kurek, Ewa; Rodzik, Beata; Winiarczyk, Krystyna

    2009-10-01

    Interactions of rye (Secale cereale) root border cells (RBCs), generated during plant growth and surrounding the root cap, with nonpathogenic rhizosphere Fusarium culmorum isolates: DEMFc2 (PGPF) and DEMFc5 (DRMO), and a pathogenic strain DEMFc37 were studied in test tube experiments. The effect of water-suspended RBCs released from the rye root cap on the rate of macroconidia germination and hyphae (mycelial) growth of F. culmorum strains was also examined. It was found that root caps of 3-d-old rye seedlings (with the root length of 20mm) were surrounded with a layer of RBCs generated in a number specific for this plant species of 1980+/-30. Introduction of the macroconidia of the tested F. culmorum strains into the root zone of 3-d-old seedlings resulted, after 3d of incubation, in the formation of mantle-like structures only in the rhizosphere of plants inoculated with the pathogenic DEMFc37 strain. The macroconidia were suspended in (1) water, (2) a water mixture with root caps deprived of RBCs, (3) Martin medium, (4) malt extract broth, and (5) a water mixture with rye RBCs, and their percentage germination was determined during 96-h incubation at 20 degrees C. Germination of the macroconidia of all the tested F. culmorum strains suspended in the rich growth media (Martin and malt extract broth) and in the mixture with RBCs was significantly speeded up. While only an average of 16.6 % of macroconidia suspended in water germinated after 96-h incubation, more than 90 % of those suspended in the growth media or in the mixture with RBCs germinated after 24h of incubation. In all the treatments, the highest rate of macroconidia germination was found in suspensions of the pathogenic strain and the lowest in macroconidial suspensions of the PGPF strain. The stimulatory effect of RBCs was not specific to the pathogenic strain. Nevertheless, microscopic observation revealed that it was only in the suspension containing a mixture of rye RBCs and macroconidia of the

  15. Is Demodex really non-pathogenic? O Demodex é realmente não patogênico?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Patrus PENA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Although usually considered a non-pathogenic parasite in parasitological textbooks, Demodex folliculorum has been implicated as a causative agent for some dermatological conditions, such as rosacea-like eruptions and some types of blepharitis. Several anecdotal reports have demonstrated unequivocal tissue damage directly related to the presence of the parasite. However, this seems to be exceedingly rare, in contrast with the marked prevalence of this infestation. We have had the opportunity to observe one of such cases. A 38-year-old woman presented with rosacea-like papular lesions in her right cheek. Histopathological examination revealed granulomatous dermal inflammation with a well-preserved mite phagocytized by a multinucleated giant cell. This finding may be taken as an evidence for the pathogenicity of the parasite, inasmuch as it does not explain how such a common parasite is able to produce such a rare disease.Embora geralmente considerado um parasita não patogênico nos livros-texto de parasitologia, Demodex folliculorum tem sido implicado como agente causal de algumas condições dermatológicas, como erupções tipo rosácea e alguns tipos de blefarite. Vários relatos isolados têm demonstrado alterações teciduais sem dúvida relacionadas diretamente à presença do parasita. Entretanto, esses achados são extremamente raros, ao contrário da enorme prevalência da infestação. Tivemos a oportunidade de observar um destes casos. Paciente do sexo feminino, com 38 anos, apresentou lesões papulosas rosaceiformes, na região zigomática direita. O exame histopatológico revelou inflamação dérmica granulomatosa, com um ácaro bem preservado, fagocitado por uma célula gigante. Esse achado pode ser considerado como evidência a favor da patogenicidade do parasita, embora não explique como um parasita tão comum pode ser capaz de produzir alteração tão rara.

  16. Close sequence identity between ribosomal DNA episomes of the non-pathogenic Entamoeba dispar and pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaishree Paul; Alok Bhattacharya; Sudha Bhattacharya

    2002-11-01

    Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba histolytica are now recognized as two distinct species – the former being nonpathogenic to humans. We had earlier studied the organization of ribosomal RNA genes in E. histolytica. Here we report the analysis of ribosomal RNA genes in E. dispar. The rRNA genes of E. dispar, like their counterpart in E. histolytica are located on a circular rDNA molecule. From restriction map analysis, the size of E. dispar rDNA circle was estimated to be 24.4 kb. The size was also confirmed by linearizing the circle with BsaHI, and by limited DNAseI digestion. The restriction map of the E. dispar rDNA circle showed close similarity to EhR1, the rDNA circle of E. histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS which has two rDNA units per circle. The various families of short tandem repeats found in the upstream and downstream intergenic spacers (IGS) of EhR1 were also present in E. dispar. Partial sequencing of the cloned fragments of E. dispar rDNA and comparison with EhR1 revealed only 2.6% to 3.8% sequence divergence in the IGS. The region Tr and the adjoining PvuI repeats in the IGS of EhR1, which are missing in those E. histolytica strains that have one rDNA unit per circle, were present in the E. dispar rDNA circle. Such close similarity in the overall organization and sequence of the IGS of rDNAs of two different species is uncommon. In fact the spacer sequences were only slightly more divergent than the 18S rRNA gene sequence which differs by 1.6% in the two species. The most divergent sequence between E. histolytica and E. dispar was the internal transcribed spacer, ITS2. Therefore, it was concluded that probes derived from the ITS1 and ITS2 sequences would be more reliable and reproducible than probes from the IGS regions used earlier for identifying these species.

  17. A model of the effect of temperature on the growth of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from oysters in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, K S; Min, K J; Jung, Y J; Kwon, K Y; Lee, J K; Oh, S W

    2008-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is recognized as the leading cause of human gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of seafood. The objective of this study was to model the growth kinetics of pathogenic and nonpathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in broth and oyster slurry. Primary growth models of V. parahaemolyticus in broth and oyster slurry fit well to a modified Gomperz equation (broth R(2)=0.99; oyster slurry R(2)=0.96). The lag time (LT), specific growth rate (SGR), and maximum population density (MPD) of each primary model were compared. The growth of nonpathogenic V. parahaemolyticus was found to be more rapid than that of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus, regardless of the model medium. In addition, significant (P<0.05) differences in the growth kinetics between pathogenic and nonpathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in broth were observed at 10 degrees C. When compared to growth in broth, the growth of V. parahaemolyticus was delayed in oyster slurry, and growth was not observed at 10 or 15 degrees C. The Davey and square root models were identified as appropriate secondary models for predicting the LT and SGR, respectively. For the broth model, the average B(f) and A(f) values for LT were found to be 0.97 and 1.3, respectively, whereas the average B(f) and A(f) values for SGR were 1.05 and 1.11, respectively. The model generated in this study predicted an LT that was shorter and an SGR that was similar to those that were actually observed, which indicates that these models provide a reliable and safe prediction of V. parahaemolyticus growth.

  18. Simian varicella virus open reading frame 63/70 expression is required for efficient virus replication in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, Elizabeth; Wellish, Mary; Kaufer, Benedict B.; Tischer, B. Karsten; Gray, Wayne; Zhou, Fuchun; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Hanlon, Teri; Golive, Anjani; Hall, Travis; Nair, Sreekala; Owens, Gregory P.; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Gilden, Don

    2011-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) open reading frame (ORF) 63, duplicated in the virus genome as ORF 70, is homologous to varicella zoster virus ORF 63/70. Transfection of bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the wild-type SVV genome and mutants with stop codons in ORF 70, in both ORFs 63 and 70 and the repaired virus DNA sequences into Vero cells produced a cytopathic effect (CPE). The onset of CPE was much slower with the double-mutant transfectants (10 days vs. 3 days) and plaques were smaller. While SVV ORF 63 is not required for replication in culture, its expression leads to robust virus replication. PMID:21479719

  19. Simian varicella virus open reading frame 63/70 expression is required for efficient virus replication in culture

    OpenAIRE

    Brazeau, Elizabeth; Wellish, Mary; Kaufer, Benedict B.; Tischer, B. Karsten; Gray, Wayne; Zhou, Fuchun; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Hanlon, Teri; Golive, Anjani; Hall, Travis; Nair, Sreekala; Owens, Gregory P.; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah

    2011-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) open reading frame (ORF) 63, duplicated in the virus genome as ORF 70, is homologous to varicella zoster virus ORF 63/70. Transfection of bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the wild-type SVV genome and mutants with stop codons in ORF 70, in both ORFs 63 and 70 and the repaired virus DNA sequences into Vero cells produced a cytopathic effect (CPE). The onset of CPE was much slower with the double-mutant transfectants (10 days vs. 3 days) and plaques ...

  20. Extracellular simian virus 40 transmits a signal that promotes virus enclosure within caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Norkin, L C

    1999-01-10

    It was reported earlier that entry of simian virus 40 (SV40) into cells is promoted by a signal transmitted by the virus from the cell surface and that SV40 enters cells through caveolae. It is shown here that bound SV40 begins to partition into a caveolae-enriched Triton X-100-insoluble membrane fraction at 30 min postadsorption. Maximal levels of SV40 were seen in that fraction at 1 h. The sterol-binding agent nystatin, which selectively disrupts the cholesterol-enriched caveolae-containing membrane microdomain, selectively blocked the SV40-induced signal. This implies that the SV40 signal is transmitted from that membrane microdomain. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, which was earlier shown to block the SV40-induced signal and infectious entry, did not block the partitioning of SV40 into the detergent-insoluble membrane fraction. This shows that the signal is not required for the translocation of SV40 to the detergent-insoluble membrane and is consistent with the finding that the signal is likely transmitted from that membrane microdomain. However, electron microscopy of the Triton X-100-insoluble membrane fraction showed that genistein caused SV40 particles to accumulate at the annuli or mouths of the caveolae. In contrast, most SV40 particles were found enclosed within caveolae in parallel samples from untreated control cells. Together, these results imply that SV40 initially binds to flat detergent-soluble membrane. The virus then translocates to a caveolae-containing detergent-insoluble membrane microdomain. From the flat portion of that membrane microdomain the virus induces a signal which promotes its entry into caveolae. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Simian virus 40 may be associated with developing malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    THANH, TRAN DINH; THO, NGUYEN VAN; LAM, NGUYEN SON; DUNG, NGUYEN HUY; TABATA, CHIHARU; NAKANO, YASUTAKA

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is associated with a history of heavy, long-term exposure to asbestos. However, MPM may also be associated with simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus. The association between SV40 and MPM remains unclear. The present study was conducted in order to investigate the proportion of SV40 presence in the histological specimens of Vietnamese patients with MPM. Histological specimens were obtained from 45 patients (19 men and 26 women) with MPM at the Pham Ngoc Thach Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The specimens were processed and examined in order to detect the presence of the SV40 large T antigen (SV40 Tag) expression using immunohistochemistry. Of the 45 patients, 23 (51%) were epithelioid, 7 (16%) were biphasic, 6 (13%) were sarcomatoid, 4 (9%) were desmoplastic, 4 (9%) were well-differentiated papillary and 1 (2%) was the anaplastic subtype. In total, 9/45 patients (20%) demonstrated SV40 Tag expression. The proportion of patients that demonstrated SV40 Tag expression was not significantly different between the epithelioid subtype and the other subtypes (22 vs. 18%; P=1.000) or between the patients with stage IV disease and other stages (20 vs. 20%; P=1.000). The median survival time was not significantly different between the patients with or without SV40 Tag expression (196 vs. 236 days, P=0.8949). In summary, a 5th of the Vietnamese patients with MPM were associated with infection with SV40. SV40 may be a potential cause of MPM in Vietnam and this potential association requires additional studies. PMID:26998120

  2. Frequent and recent human acquisition of simian foamy viruses through apes' bites in central Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Betsem

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human infection by simian foamy viruses (SFV can be acquired by persons occupationally exposed to non-human primates (NHP or in natural settings. This study aimed at getting better knowledge on SFV transmission dynamics, risk factors for such a zoonotic infection and, searching for intra-familial dissemination and the level of peripheral blood (proviral loads in infected individuals. We studied 1,321 people from the general adult population (mean age 49 yrs, 640 women and 681 men and 198 individuals, mostly men, all of whom had encountered a NHP with a resulting bite or scratch. All of these, either Pygmies (436 or Bantus (1085 live in villages in South Cameroon. A specific SFV Western blot was used and two nested PCRs (polymerase, and LTR were done on all the positive/borderline samples by serology. In the general population, 2/1,321 (0.2% persons were found to be infected. In the second group, 37/198 (18.6% persons were SFV positive. They were mostly infected by apes (37/39 FV (mainly gorilla. Infection by monkey FV was less frequent (2/39. The viral origin of the amplified sequences matched with the history reported by the hunters, most of which (83% are aged 20 to 40 years and acquired the infection during the last twenty years. The (proviral load in 33 individuals infected by a gorilla FV was quite low (<1 to 145 copies per 10(5 cells in the peripheral blood leucocytes. Of the 30 wives and 12 children from families of FV infected persons, only one woman was seropositive in WB without subsequent viral DNA amplification. We demonstrate a high level of recent transmission of SFVs to humans in natural settings specifically following severe gorilla bites during hunting activities. The virus was found to persist over several years, with low SFV loads in infected persons. Secondary transmission remains an open question.

  3. Bayesian inference reveals ancient origin of simian foamy virus in orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michael J C; Switzer, William M; Schillaci, Michael A; Klegarth, Amy R; Campbell, Ellsworth; Ragonnet, Manon; Joanisse, Isabelle; Caminiti, Kyna; Lowenberger, Carl A; Galdikas, Birute Mary F; Hollocher, Hope; Sandstrom, Paul A; Brooks, James I

    2017-03-05

    Simian foamy viruses (SFVs) infect most nonhuman primate species and appears to co-evolve with its hosts. This co-evolutionary signal is particularly strong among great apes, including orangutans (genus Pongo). Previous studies have identified three distinct orangutan SFV clades. The first of these three clades is composed of SFV from P. abelii from Sumatra, the second consists of SFV from P. pygmaeus from Borneo, while the third clade is mixed, comprising an SFV strain found in both species of orangutan. The existence of the mixed clade has been attributed to an expansion of P. pygmaeus into Sumatra following the Mount Toba super-volcanic eruption about 73,000years ago. Divergence dating, however, has yet to be performed to establish a temporal association with the Toba eruption. Here, we use a Bayesian framework and a relaxed molecular clock model with fossil calibrations to test the Toba hypothesis and to gain a more complete understanding of the evolutionary history of orangutan SFV. As with previous studies, our results show a similar three-clade orangutan SFV phylogeny, along with strong statistical support for SFV-host co-evolution in orangutans. Using Bayesian inference, we date the origin of orangutan SFV to >4.7 million years ago (mya), while the mixed species clade dates to approximately 1.7mya, >1.6 million years older than the Toba super-eruption. These results, combined with fossil and paleogeographic evidence, suggest that the origin of SFV in Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, including the mixed species clade, likely occurred on the mainland of Indo-China during the Late Pliocene and Calabrian stage of the Pleistocene, respectively.

  4. Organising pneumonia in common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujaoude, Ziad; Arya, Rohan; Rafferty, William; Dammert, Pedro

    2013-06-07

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common of the primary immunodeficiency disorders. Pulmonary manifestations are characterised by recurrent rhinosinusitis, respiratory tract infections and bronchiectasis. Less commonly the lung may be affected by lymphoid disorders and sarcoid-like granulomas. Organising pneumonia (OP) is a rare pulmonary manifestation. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with CVID who presented with fever, dyspnoea and persistent lung infiltrates despite antibiotic therapy. CT of the chest showed bilateral patchy alveolar infiltrates. Pulmonary function tests revealed moderate restriction and reduction in diffusion capacity. Initial bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies did not yield a diagnosis but surgical lung biopsies identified OP. Significant clinical, radiographic and physiological improvement was achieved after institution of corticosteroid therapy.

  5. Dyschromia related to severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Cid, Paola; Noguera-Morel, Lucero; Moreno-Alonso-de-Celada, Ricardo; De-Lucas-Laguna, Raúl; Feito-Rodríguez, Marta; Beato-Merino, Maria José; Casado-Jiménez, Mariano

    2013-12-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency includes a group of diseases characterized by different inherited immunological defects. A 4-month-old girl diagnosed with Omenn syndrome, a subtype of severe combined immunodeficiency presenting with generalized erythroderma, was referred to our hospital for an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Days before transplantation, she developed hyperpigmented macules that increased in number in the following months. As the erythroderma resolved after transplantation, diffuse hypopigmentation was simultaneously noted together with the expansion of hyperpigmented lesions. Cutaneous biopsy samples were taken at different moments, showing features of Omenn syndrome at first, and 2 months later changes consistent with hypopigmentation and repigmentation were observed. Although pigmentary disorders are rarely described in this context, these must be taken into account as a possible alternative diagnosis to graft-versus-host disease and toxicoderma in immunosuppressed patients.

  6. Malignant syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiby Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant syphilis or Lues maligna, commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, has now seen a resurgence with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Immunosuppression and sexual promiscuity set the stage for this deadly association of HIV and Treponema pallidum that can manifest atypically and can prove to cause diagnostic problems. We report one such case in a 30-year-old female who responded favorably to treatment with penicillin.

  7. Screening for severe combined immunodeficiency in neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly BT; Tam JS; Verbsky JW; Routes JM

    2013-01-01

    Brian T Kelly,1 Jonathan S Tam,1 James W Verbsky,1,2 John M Routes1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare disease that severely affects the cellular and humoral immune systems. Patients with SCID present with recurrent or severe infections and often with chronic diarrhea and failure to thrive. The disease is uniformly fatal, making early diag...

  8. Early diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Hague, R A; Rassam, S; Morgan, G; Cant, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Infants with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCIDS) have a greatly improved prognosis if diagnosed and treated before they develop overwhelming infection. Clinical and laboratory data on 45 patients with SCIDS were retrospectively reviewed to assess the value of absolute lymphocyte counts in making an early diagnosis. Ninety infants matched for age, sex, and presenting symptoms were used as controls. Thirteen (29%) infants with SCIDS were diagnosed at birth as previous siblings had...

  9. Prenatal exclusion of severe combined immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Levinsky, R J; Linch, D. C.; Beverly, C L; Rodeck, C.

    1982-01-01

    By analysing leucocyte subpopulations with monoclonal antisera, we have shown that the diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency can be made soon after birth. The technique of staining has been adapted for small blood samples, and normal ranges of leucocyte subpopulations have been established for fetal blood taken from mid-trimester pregnancies. Using this information, we gave prenatal advice to an at risk family and predicted that the pregnancy would be normal; this was confirmed after ...

  10. Immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, and the XCIND syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Richard A; Boder, Elena; Good, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Through the analysis of a rare disorder called ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), many important biological lessons have been gleaned. Today, it is clear that the underlying defect of A-T lies in the nucleus, as an inability to repair or process double strand breaks. More important, by the A-T phenotype now allows us to appreciate a much more general distinction between immunodeficiencies that are radiosensitive and those that are not.

  11. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Teixeira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species. Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs in South America.

  12. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-09

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  13. Co-occurrence of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium decemcellulare and Lasiodiplodia theobromae isolates in cushion galls disease of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Daynet Sosa del

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Flowery cushion gall of cacao is a disease complex with six types. Fusarium decemcellulare have been isolated from both flowery and green point galls and recognized as the etiological agent of the disease. In the present work we: i identified by ITS-rDNA sequencing and/or taxonomy the cultivable fungal species or Operative Taxonomic Units (OTUs associated with the five symptoms of cushion galls in cacao from Venezuela, and ii determined the gall inducing capacity on cacao peeled seeds after 45 days of inoculation with suspensions of mycelia/ spores from distinct isolate types. The whole isolate collection rendered an abundance of 113 isolates with a richness of 39 OTUs (27 and eight identified at the species or genera levels, respectively, and in unidentified fungi. The dominant recovered species (≈36% were F. decemcellulare and Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Some isolates of F. decemcellulare, L. theobromae, F. equiseti, Fusarium spp., F. solani, F. incarnatum, Rhizocthonia solani and Penicillium sp. were pathogenic. Some other isolates of the first six mentioned taxa behave as non-pathogenic. Furthermore, pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates can also co-occur within a single plant and gall type. Moreover, 2-5 species within a single gall symptom in a single tree were identified (not necessarily at the same point in the tree, indicating a broad diversity of co-occurring taxa.

  14. DNA Banking of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Anna Isaian

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders, with different modes of inheritance, consisting of more than 100 different types. We constructed the DNA banking of primary immunodeficiency disorders for the first time in Iran. The DNA of 31 immunodeficient patients and their families (total of 92 samples were collected, as the first step for construction of DNA banking. DNA was isolated from whole blood by salting out method. Among our patients, Common variable immunodeficiency was the most common disorder, followed by X-linked agammaglobulinemia, Ataxia-telangiectasia, Chronic granulomatous disease, Severe combined immunodeficiency, Hyper IgM syndromes, and Leukocyte adhesion defects. DNA banking is a useful method for further detection of mutation in immunodeficient patients and prenatal diagnosis for presence or absence of the disorder in the fetus which can be confirmed by molecular genetics testing.

  15. Bilateral optic neuritis in acute human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M; Toft, P.B.; Bernhard, P;

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report a case of acute viral disease accompanied by bilateral optic neuritis with substantial paraclinical evidence that human immunodeficiency virus was the causative agent. METHODS: Clinical and paraclinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Virus and antibody titers...... as well as reverse lymphocytosis were consistent with acute infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-1. CONCLUSIONS: Human immunodeficiency virus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute optic neuritis...

  16. DNA Banking of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Isaian; Mostafa Moin; Zahra Pourpak; Nima Rezaei; Asghar Aghamohammadi; Masoud Movahedi; Mohammad Gharagozlou; Javad Ghaffari; Fariborz Zieh; Mahboubeh Mansouri; Abolhassan Farhoudi

    2006-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders, with different modes of inheritance, consisting of more than 100 different types. We constructed the DNA banking of primary immunodeficiency disorders for the first time in Iran. The DNA of 31 immunodeficient patients and their families (total of 92 samples) were collected, as the first step for construction of DNA banking. DNA was isolated from whole blood by salting out method. Among our patients, Common vari...

  17. Severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Waqar; Batool, Asma; Ahmed, Tahir Aziz; Bashir, Muhammad Mukarram

    2012-03-01

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency is the term applied to a group of rare genetic disorders characterised by defective or absent T and B cell functions. Patients usually present in first 6 months of life with respiratory/gastrointestinal tract infections and failure to thrive. Among the various types of severe combined immunodeficiency, enzyme deficiencies are relatively less common. We report the case of a 6 years old girl having severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

  18. 78 FR 33848 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... No. FDA-2013-D-0589] Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral Drugs... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...

  19. Chapter 27: Approach to primary immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzaman, Ashraf; Fuleihan, Ramsay L

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID) are inherited defects of the innate or adaptive arms of the immune system that lead to an increase in the incidence, frequency, or severity of infections. There may be defects in the adaptive arm of the immune system that include combined immunodeficiency and antibody deficiency syndromes or by abnormalities in innate immunity such as disorders of phagocytes, the complement pathway, or Toll-Like receptor (TLR) mediated signaling. Recurrent sinopulmonary infections with encapsulated bacteria such as Haemophilus influenza type B or Streptococcus pneumoniae may be characteristic of an IgG antibody deficiency or dysfunction. Frequent viral, fungal, or protozoal infections may suggest T lymphocyte dysfunction. Multiple staphylococcal skin infections and fungal infections may imply neutrophil dysfunction or the hyper-IgE syndrome, and recurrent neisserial infection is a characteristic manifestation of late complement component (C5-9, or the membrane attack complex) defects. Recurrent viral or pyogenic bacterial infections often without the presence of a significant inflammatory response suggest a defect in TLR signaling. Mycobacterial infections are characteristic of defects in interleukin (IL)-12, interferon (IFN) gamma, or their receptors. Screening of newborns for T-cell lymphopenia using a polymerase chain reaction to amplify T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), which are formed when a T cell rearranges the variable region of its receptor, serves as a surrogate for newly synthesized naïve T cells. Because of very low numbers of TRECs, severe combined immunodeficiency, DiGeorge syndrome, and other causes of T-cell lymphopenia have been identified in newborns.

  20. Lipid management in human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Merle

    2015-05-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV.

  1. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  2. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  3. Screening for severe combined immunodeficiency in neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian T; Tam, Jonathan S; Verbsky, James W; Routes, John M

    2013-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare disease that severely affects the cellular and humoral immune systems. Patients with SCID present with recurrent or severe infections and often with chronic diarrhea and failure to thrive. The disease is uniformly fatal, making early diagnosis essential. Definitive treatment is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with best outcomes prior to 3.5 months of age. Newborn screening for SCID using the T-cell receptor excision circle assay has revolutionized early identification of infants with SCID or severe T-cell lymphopenia. PMID:24068875

  4. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Corinne; D'Angelo, Lawrence J

    2010-08-01

    Despite advances in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment and discovery of effective prevention programs, HIV infection in American youth continues to rise, especially in minority youth. The crisis underscores the lack of access to care and wellness of our adolescent and young adult populations. Primary care practitioners who care for young adults will diagnose and/or encounter HIV-infected patients in their practice. Providers need to become familiar with the basics of HIV prevention and treatment, as well as how adolescence presents unique challenges in HIV care.

  6. Novel simian foamy virus infections from multiple monkey species in women from the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Switzer William M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in Central Africa is ongoing and can result in pandemic human infection. While simian foamy virus (SFV infection was reported in primate hunters in Cameroon and Gabon, little is known about the distribution of SFV in Africa and whether human-to-human transmission and disease occur. We screened 3,334 plasmas from persons living in rural villages in central Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC using SFV-specific EIA and Western blot (WB tests. PCR amplification of SFV polymerase sequences from DNA extracted from buffy coats was used to measure proviral loads. Phylogenetic analysis was used to define the NHP species origin of SFV. Participants completed questionnaires to capture NHP exposure information. Results Sixteen (0.5% samples were WB-positive; 12 of 16 were from women (75%, 95% confidence limits 47.6%, 92.7%. Sequence analysis detected SFV in three women originating from Angolan colobus or red-tailed monkeys; both monkeys are hunted frequently in DRC. NHP exposure varied and infected women lived in distant villages suggesting a wide and potentially diverse distribution of SFV infections across DRC. Plasmas from 22 contacts of 8 WB-positive participants were all WB negative suggesting no secondary viral transmission. Proviral loads in the three women ranged from 14 – 1,755 copies/105 cells. Conclusions Our study documents SFV infection in rural DRC for the first time and identifies infections with novel SFV variants from Colobus and red-tailed monkeys. Unlike previous studies, women were not at lower risk for SFV infection in our population, providing opportunities for spread of SFV both horizontally and vertically. However, limited testing of close contacts of WB-positive persons did not identify human-to-human transmission. Combined with the broad behavioral risk and distribution of NHPs across DRC, our results suggest that SFV infection may have a wider geographic

  7. Gene Therapy for RAG-deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Pike (Karin)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractSevere combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare class of primary, inherited, immunodeficiency causing infants to suffer from persistent diarrhea, opportunistic infections and a failure to thrive. RAG proteins play a crucial role in the initiation of V(D)J recombination of immun

  8. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-14

    Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Graft Versus Host Disease; X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; Familial Erythrophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Hyper IgM Syndrome; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome; Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome

  9. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions X-linked SCID X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is an inherited disorder of the immune ...

  10. Gene Therapy for RAG-deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Pike (Karin)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractSevere combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare class of primary, inherited, immunodeficiency causing infants to suffer from persistent diarrhea, opportunistic infections and a failure to thrive. RAG proteins play a crucial role in the initiation of V(D)J recombination of immun

  11. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular secreted proteins expressed by two pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii clinical isolates and a non-pathogenic ATCC strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-Ming; Lin, Wei-Chen; Li, Sung-Chou; Shih, Min-Hsiu; Chan, Wen-Ching; Shin, Jyh-Wei; Huang, Fu-Chin

    2016-07-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a serious ocular disease caused by pathogenic Acanthamoeba gaining entry through wounds in the corneal injury; generally, patients at risk for contracting AK wear contact lenses, usually over a long period of time. Moreover, pathogenic Acanthamoeba causes serious consequences: it makes the cornea turbid and difficult to operate on, including procedures such as enucleation of the eyeball. At present, diagnosis of this disease is not straightforward, and treatment is very demanding. We have established the comparative transcriptome and extracellular secreted proteomic database according to the non-pathogenic strain ATCC 30010 and the pathogenic strains NCKU_B and NCKU_D. We identified 44 secreted proteins successfully, 10 consensus secreted proteins and 34 strain-specific secreted proteins. These proteins may provide targets for therapy and immuno-diagnosis of Acanthamoeba infections. This study shows a suitable approach to identify secreted proteins in Acanthamoeba and provides new perspectives for the study of molecules potentially involved in the AK.

  13. TRIM5 suppresses cross-species transmission of a primate immunodeficiency virus and selects for emergence of resistant variants in the new species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kirmaier

    Full Text Available Simian immunodeficiency viruses of sooty mangabeys (SIVsm are the source of multiple, successful cross-species transmissions, having given rise to HIV-2 in humans, SIVmac in rhesus macaques, and SIVstm in stump-tailed macaques. Cellular assays and phylogenetic comparisons indirectly support a role for TRIM5alpha, the product of the TRIM5 gene, in suppressing interspecies transmission and emergence of retroviruses in nature. Here, we investigate the in vivo role of TRIM5 directly, focusing on transmission of primate immunodeficiency viruses between outbred primate hosts. Specifically, we retrospectively analyzed experimental cross-species transmission of SIVsm in two cohorts of rhesus macaques and found a significant effect of TRIM5 genotype on viral replication levels. The effect was especially pronounced in a cohort of animals infected with SIVsmE543-3, where TRIM5 genotype correlated with approximately 100-fold to 1,000-fold differences in viral replication levels. Surprisingly, transmission occurred even in individuals bearing restrictive TRIM5 genotypes, resulting in attenuation of replication rather than an outright block to infection. In cell-culture assays, the same TRIM5 alleles associated with viral suppression in vivo blocked infectivity of two SIVsm strains, but not the macaque-adapted strain SIVmac239. Adaptations appeared in the viral capsid in animals with restrictive TRIM5 genotypes, and similar adaptations coincide with emergence of SIVmac in captive macaques in the 1970s. Thus, host TRIM5 can suppress viral replication in vivo, exerting selective pressure during the initial stages of cross-species transmission.

  14. Hyperimmune antisera against synthetic peptides representing the glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 can mediate neutralization and antibody-dependent cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björling, E; Broliden, K; Bernardi, D; Utter, G; Thorstensson, R; Chiodi, F; Norrby, E

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-five 13- to 35-amino-acid-long peptides representing regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), strain SBL6669, envelope proteins were evaluated for their immunogenic activity in guinea pigs. The peptides were selected to provide homologous representation of sites in the HIV-1 envelope proteins that were previously documented to have a particular immunogenic importance. A number of the HIV-2 peptides were found to be capable of inducing strain SBL6669 neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) antibodies. Two overlapping peptides covering amino acids 311-337 representing the central and C-terminal part of the variable third (V3) region, terminology according to Modrow et al. [Modrow, S., Hahn, B., Shaw, G. M., Gallo, R. C., Wong-Staal, F. & Wolf, H. (1987) J. Virol. 61, 570-578], showed the most pronounced capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. One of the peptides (amino acids 318-337) also induced antibodies mediating ADCC. Two additional regions in the large glycoprotein, gp125, containing linear sites reacting with neutralizing antibodies were identified (amino acids, 119-137 and 472-509). The transmembrane protein, gp36, of HIV-2 harbored two regions of importance for induction of neutralizing antibodies (amino acids 595-614 and 714-729). ADCC activity was induced by two additional gp125-specific peptides (amino acids 291-311 and 446-461). Thus, except for the single V3-specific site there was no correlation between linear immunogenic sites stimulating neutralizing antibody and ADCC activity. These findings pave the way for development of synthetic vaccines against HIV-2 and possibly also simian immunodeficiency virus infections. The capacity of such a product to induce protective immunity can be evaluated in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:2068087

  15. Cytopathicity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) in Human Lymphoid Tissue Is Coreceptor Dependent and Comparable to That of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Birgit; Penn, Michael L.; Palacios, Emil H.; Grant, Robert M.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Goldsmith, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is markedly less pathogenic than HIV-1 in vivo. Individuals infected with HIV-2 exhibit a remarkably slow rate of disease development, and these clinical properties have been attributed presumptively to an “attenuated” phenotype of HIV-2 itself. Here, we investigated the impact of coreceptor usage on the cytopathicity of HIV-2 and compared its pathogenic potential with that of HIV-1 in a unique human lymphoid histoculture model. We found that HIV-2 strains, as well as closely related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), displayed mildly or highly aggressive cytopathic phenotypes depending on their abilities to use the coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, respectively. A side-by-side comparison of primary X4 HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains revealed similar, high degrees of cytopathicity induced by both HIV types. Furthermore, we found that HIV-2 coreceptor specificity for CCR5 and CXCR4 determined the target cell population for T-cell depletion in lymphoid tissue. Finally, utilization of the alternate coreceptors BOB and Bonzo did not significantly increase the cytopathic properties of HIV-2. These findings demonstrate that coreceptor preference is a key regulator of target cell specificity and the cytopathic potential of HIV-2, with indistinguishable rules compared with HIV-1. Moreover, HIV-2 strains are not characterized by an intrinsically lower cytopathicity than HIV-1 strains. Therefore, direct cytopathic potential per se does not explain the unique behavior of HIV-2 in people, highlighting that other unknown factors need to be elucidated as the basis for their lesser virulence in vivo. PMID:11000231

  16. Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with DOCK8 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Jeremiah C.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Jing, Huie; Favreau, Amanda J.; Matthews, Helen F.; Davis, Joie; Turner, Maria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.; Su, Helen C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections with elevated serum levels of IgE are features of some variants of combined immunodeficiency. The genetic causes of these variants are unknown. METHODS We collected longitudinal clinical data on 11 patients from eight families who had recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections. We performed comparative genomic hybridization arrays and targeted gene sequencing. Variants with predicted loss-of-expression mutations were confirmed by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase –polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunoblotting. We evaluated the number and function of lymphocytes with the use of in vitro assays and flow cytometry. RESULTS Patients had recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonias; recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infections with otitis externa; recurrent, severe herpes simplex virus or herpes zoster infections; extensive and persistent infections with molluscum contagiosum; and human papillomavirus infections. Most patients had severe atopy with anaphylaxis; several had squamous-cell carcinomas, and one had T-cell lymphoma –leukemia. Elevated serum IgE levels, hypereosinophilia, low numbers of T cells and B cells, low serum IgM levels, and variable IgG antibody responses were common. Expansion in vitro of activated CD8 T cells was impaired. Novel homozygous or compound heterozygous deletions and point mutations in the gene encoding the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) led to the absence of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS Autosomal recessive DOCK8 deficiency is associated with a novel variant of combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19776401

  17. Severe combined immunodeficiency--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Emilia; Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; D'Assante, Roberta; Grasso, Fiorentino; Romano, Roberta; Di Lillo, Cristina; Galasso, Giovanni; Pignata, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCIDs) are a group of inherited disorders responsible for severe dysfunctions of the immune system. These diseases are life-threatening when the diagnosis is made too late; they are the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency. SCID patients often die during the first two years of life if appropriate treatments to reconstitute their immune system are not undertaken. Conventionally, SCIDs are classified according either to the main pathway affected by the molecular defect or on the basis of the specific immunologic phenotype that reflects the stage where the blockage occurs during the differentiation process. However, during the last few years many new causative gene alterations have been associated with unusual clinical and immunological phenotypes. Many of these novel forms of SCID also show extra-hematopoietic alterations, leading to complex phenotypes characterized by a functional impairment of several organs, which may lead to a considerable delay in the diagnosis. Here we review the biological and clinical features of SCIDs paying particular attention to the most recently identified forms and to their unusual or extra-immunological clinical features.

  18. Family physician perspectives on primary immunodeficiency diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan eOrange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with a PID. Selective immunoglobulin A (IgA, deficiency (21%, and chronic granulomatous disease (11% were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P<.0001. Use of intravenously administered Ig, and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P<.0001. Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4% vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P<.0001. Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with a PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care.

  19. Pathology of thyroid in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaneshwar Namdeorao Lanjewar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The course of human immunodeficiency virus infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be complicated by a variety of endocrine abnormalities, including abnormalities of thyroid gland. Materials and Methods: This study was designed to understand the spectrum of pathology of thyroid in Indian patients with AIDS. The present study describes the findings of retrospective autopsy findings of 158 patients with AIDS which revealed infectious diseases from a time period before the use of highly active antiretroviral regimen. Results: A wide range of bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were observed. Tuberculosis was recorded in 14 (09% patients, Cryptococcus neoformans in 11 (7% patients and cytomegalovirus in 3 (2% patients. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and lymphocytic thyroiditis were seen in 02 (01% patients each. One patient had dual infection comprising of tuberculosis and cytomegalovirus infection. The other microscopic findings observed were goiter (2 patients, interstitial fibrosis in thyroid (7 patients, and calcification in thyroid (8 patients. Conclusions: Abnormalities of thyroid are uncommon findings in patients with HIV infection however several case reports of thyroid involvement by infectious agents and neoplasm are described in these patients; hence patients with HIV infection should be closely followed up for development of goiter or abnormalities of thyroid functions.

  20. Neonatal Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puck, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Population-based newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and related disorders has been instituted in five states, with several more planning to add this testing to their newborn screening panels. This review summarizes the rationale, development, and implementation of SCID screening programs to date and highlights current and future challenges. Recent findings Early results of T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) testing newborns in pilot states indicate that this addition to the newborn screening panel can be successfully integrated into state public health programs. The TREC test has clinical validity and TRECs, as predicted, are an excellent biomarker of poor T-cell lymphocyte production in the thymus or increased lymphocyte loss resulting in T-cell lymphopenia. A variety of cases with typical SCID genotypes and other conditions have been detected in a timely manner and referred for appropriate early treatment. Summary Early detection of primary immunodeficiency is recognized as important for avoiding infectious complications that compromise outcomes. Routine screening of all newborns with the TREC test, implemented as part of an integrated public health program, can achieve pre-symptomatic diagnosis of SCID and other disorders with T-cell lymphopenia, allowing prompt and effective treatment and leading to a better understanding of the spectrum of these disorders and how to manage them. PMID:22001765

  1. Comparative Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Reveals Insights into the Infection Process of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, a quarantinable pathogen in several areas worldwide, including the European Union. In order to develop efficient control methods for this disease, it is necessary to improve the understanding of the key determinants associated with host restriction, colonization and the development of pathogenesis. After an initial characterization, by multilocus sequence analysis, of 15 strains of X. arboricola isolated from Prunus, one strain did not group into the pathovar pruni or into other pathovars of this species and therefore it was identified and defined as a X. arboricola pv. pruni look-a-like. This non-pathogenic strain and two typical strains of X. arboricola pv. pruni were selected for a whole genome and phenotype comparative analysis in features associated with the pathogenesis process in Xanthomonas. Comparative analysis among these bacterial strains isolated from Prunus spp. and the inclusion of 15 publicly available genome sequences from other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of X. arboricola revealed variations in the phenotype associated with variations in the profiles of TonB-dependent transporters, sensors of the two-component regulatory system, methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins, components of the flagella and the type IV pilus, as well as in the repertoire of cell-wall degrading enzymes and the components of the type III secretion system and related effectors. These variations provide a global overview of those mechanisms that could be associated with the development of bacterial spot disease. Additionally, it pointed out some features that might influence the host specificity and the variable virulence observed in X. arboricola.

  2. Administration of non-pathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens type A to piglets in a herd affected with a high incidence of neonatal diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, C; Kahler, A; Gerlach, G-F; Viehmann, M; von Altrock, A; Hennig-Pauka, I

    2017-04-01

    A bacterial cocktail of living strains of Clostridium perfringens type A (CPA) without β2-toxin gene and non-pathogenic Escherichia coli was administered orally to newborn piglets before first colostrum intake and on 2 consecutive days on a farm with a high incidence of diarrhoea and antibiotic treatment in suckling piglets associated with E. coli and CPA. This clinical field study was driven by the hypothetic principle of competitive exclusion of pathogenic bacteria due to prior colonization of the gut mucosal surface by non-pathogenic strains of the same bacterial species with the aim of preventing disease. Although CPA strains used in this study did not produce toxins in vitro, their lack of pathogenicity cannot be conclusively confirmed. The health status of the herd was impaired by a high incidence of postpartum dysgalactia syndrome in sows (70%) and a high incidence of neonatal diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli and CPA during the study. No obvious adverse effect of the bacterial treatment occurred. On average, more piglets were weaned in litters treated (P=0.009). Visual pathological alterations in the small intestinal wall were more frequent in dead piglets of the control group (P=0.004) and necrotizing enteritis was only found in that group. A higher average daily weight gain of piglets in the control group (P<0.001) may be due to an increased milk uptake due to less competition in the smaller litters. The bacterial cocktail was tested under field conditions for its potential to stabilize gut health status in suckling piglets before disease development due to colibacillosis and clostridial infections; however, the gut flora stabilizing effect of the bacterial cocktail was not clearly discernible in this study. Further basic research is needed to confirm the positive effects of the bacterial treatment used and to identify additional potential bacterial candidates for competitive exclusion.

  3. Expression of the nfa1 gene cloned from pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in nonpathogenic N. gruberi enhances cytotoxicity against CHO target cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seok-Ryoul; Lee, Sang-Chul; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Im, Kyung-Il; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2005-07-01

    The pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri has a 360-bp nfa1 gene that encodes the Nfa1 protein (13.1 kDa), which is located in the pseudopodia of the amoeba, and an anti-Nfa1 antibody reduces N. fowleri-induced mammalian-cell cytotoxicity in vitro. In contrast, an anti-Nfa1 antibody cannot detect Nfa1 protein expression in the nonpathogenic amoeba Naegleria gruberi, which also possesses the nfa1 gene. In the present study, the nfa1 gene cloned from pathogenic N. fowleri was transfected into nonpathogenic N. gruberi to determine whether it was related to pathogenicity. The nfa1 gene was initially inserted into a eukaryotic transfection vector, pEGFP-C2, containing a cytomegalovirus promoter and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, and was designed as pEGFP-C2/nfa1UTR (nfa1UTR contains 5' upstream regions, the nfa1 open reading frame, and 3' downstream regions). After transfection, the green fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of N. gruberi trophozoites. These transfectants were preserved for more than 9 months after selection. The transfected nfa1 gene was observed by PCR using nfa1- and vector-specific primers in the genomic DNA of N. gruberi transfected with the pEGFP-C2/nfa1UTR vector. In addition, the nfa1 and GFP genes were identified by reverse transcription-PCR in transgenic N. gruberi. The Nfa1 protein expressed in transgenic N. gruberi was identified as a 13.1-kDa band by Western blotting using an anti-Nfa1 antibody. Finally, N. gruberi transfected with the pEGFP-C2/nfa1UTR vector was found to have enhanced cytotoxicity against CHO cells compared with naïve N. gruberi.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis and polyphasic characterization of Clavibacter michiganensis strains isolated from tomato seeds reveal that nonpathogenic strains are distinct from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Durand, Karine; Orgeur, Geoffrey; Balidas, Samuel; Fricot, Céline; Bonneau, Sophie; Quillévéré, Anne; Audusseau, Corinne; Olivier, Valérie; Grimault, Valérie; Mathis, René

    2012-12-01

    The genus Clavibacter comprises one species and five subspecies of plant-pathogenic bacteria, four of which are classified as quarantine organisms due to the high economic threat they pose. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is one of the most important pathogens of tomato, but the recommended diagnostic tools are not satisfactory due to false-negative and/or -positive results. To provide a robust analysis of the genetic relatedness among a worldwide collection of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains, relatives (strains from the four other C. michiganensis subspecies), and nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains isolated from tomato, we performed multilocus sequence-based analysis and typing (MLSA and MLST) based on six housekeeping genes (atpD, dnaK, gyrB, ppK, recA, and rpoB). We compared this "framework" with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics such as pathogenicity on tomato, reaction to two antisera by immunofluorescence and to five PCR identification tests, and the presence of four genes encoding the main C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity determinants. We showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is monophyletic and is distinct from its closest taxonomic neighbors. The nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains were identified as C. michiganensis using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These strains, while cross-reacting with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis identification tools, are phylogenetically distinct from the pathogenic strains but belong to the C. michiganensis clade. C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis clonal complexes linked strains from highly diverse geographical origins and also strains isolated over long periods of time in the same location. This illustrates the importance of seed transmission in the worldwide dispersion of this pathogen and its survival and adaptation abilities in a new environment once introduced.

  5. The isolation and identification of Pantoea dispersa strain JFS as a non-pathogenic surrogate for Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 42 in flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudge, James; Dunn, Michael; Pike, Oscar; Robison, Richard; Steele, Frost

    2016-02-16

    Salmonella is a common pathogen which has been the cause of foodborne illness outbreaks implicating a variety of commodities, including low-moisture foods such as flour. Salmonella costs more than any other pathogen in the United States in terms of health care expenses and time of lost work. Heat treatment can be used to reduce Salmonella and other pathogens in flour to safe levels. However, in low-moisture foods, process times must be increased to achieve adequate lethality, possibly resulting in changes in the flour's functionality such as changes in the gluten quality, vitamin content, and the level of starch gelatinization. There is a need to determine the minimal heat treatment required to achieve desired lethality in flour and other low-moisture foods, with the goal of retaining the flour's functionality. Currently there is no published data about a nonpathogenic bacterial surrogate for Salmonella in flour. In this study, a surrogate, which closely matches the thermal death rate of Salmonella in flour, has been isolated. The surrogate was identified following an evaluation of thermal death curves of ten different strains of bacteria isolated from heat-treated flour and two nonpathogenic surrogates used in other commodities. Flour samples were inoculated with Salmonella or one of the twelve bacterial isolates, and then subjected to heat (70, 75, and 80 °C) for 12-60 min. The heat tolerance for each organism was determined by plating out at least four different time points for each temperature and comparing the death curve to those from Salmonella. The death curve from Pantoea dispersa was not statistically different (p<0.05) than the death curve of Salmonella. This strain of P. dispersa (strain JFS) can be used as a conservative, slightly more heat resistant, surrogate for Salmonella. It can be used to verify the combination of heat and time necessary to kill Salmonella in flour using a commercial heat-treatment process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Modification of AxSYM Human Immunodeficiency Virus Assay to Identify Recent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Korean Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jin-Sook; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-01-01

    To estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence using HIV avidity assays in Korea, we established a serological testing method to differentiate recent HIV infections from long-standing ones...

  7. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  8. Truncation of the membrane-spanning domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein defines elements required for fusion, incorporation, and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ling; Shang, Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein from human (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency viruses plays a key role in anchoring the Env complex into the viral membrane but also contributes to its biological function in fusion and virus entry. In HIV type 1 (HIV-1), it has been predicted to span 27 amino acids, from lysine residue 681 to arginine 707, and encompasses an internal arginine at residue 694. By examining a series of C-terminal-truncation mutants of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein that substituted termination codons for amino acids 682 to 708, we show that this entire region is required for efficient viral infection of target cells. Truncation to the arginine at residue 694 resulted in an Env complex that was secreted from the cells. In contrast, a region from residues 681 to 698, which contains highly conserved hydrophobic residues and glycine motifs and extends 4 amino acids beyond 694R, can effectively anchor the protein in the membrane, allow efficient transport to the plasma membrane, and mediate wild-type levels of cell-cell fusion. However, these fusogenic truncated Env mutants are inefficiently incorporated into budding virions. Based on the analysis of these mutants, a "snorkeling" model, in which the flanking charged amino acid residues at 681 and 694 are buried in the lipid while their side chains interact with polar head groups, is proposed for the HIV-1 MSD.

  9. Frequency and clinical manifestations of patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders in Iran: update from the Iranian Primary Immunodeficiency Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Moin, Mostafa; Pourpak, Zahra; Movahedi, Masoud; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Atarod, Lida; Ghazi, Bahram Mirsaeid; Isaeian, Anna; Mahmoudi, Maryam; Abolmaali, Kamran; Mansouri, Davoud; Arshi, Saba; Tarash, Naser Javaher; Sherkat, Roya; Akbari, Hedayat; Amin, Reza; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Kashef, Sara; Farid, Reza; Mohammadzadeh, Iraj; Shabestari, Mehrnaz Sadeghi; Nabavi, Mohammad; Farhoudi, Abolhassan

    2006-11-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) are a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by an increased susceptibility to infections. A total of 930 patients (573 males and 357 females) are registered in Iranian PID Registry (IPIDR) during three decades. Predominantly antibody deficiencies were the most common (38.4%), followed by congenital defects of phagocyte number and/or function (28.3%), other well-defined immunodeficiency syndromes (17.7%), combined T- and B-cell immunodeficiencies (11.0%), complement deficiencies (2.4%), and diseases of immune dysregulation (2.3%). Common variable immunodeficiency was the most frequent disorder (20.8%), followed by chronic granulomatous disease, ataxia-telangiectasia, btk deficiency, selective IgA deficiency, and T-B-severe combined immunodeficiency. The frequency of other PID disorders was less than 50 in number (disorders.

  10. A chromosomal breakage syndrome with profound immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, M E; Spinner, N B; Emanuel, B S; Nowell, P C; Nichols, W W

    1986-05-01

    The chromosomal breakage syndromes--ataxia-telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, and Bloom's syndrome--are associated with growth failure, neurologic abnormalities, immunodeficiency, and an increased incidence of malignancy. The relationship between these features is unknown. We recently evaluated a 21-year-old female with more severe chromosomal breakage, immunodeficiency, and growth failure than in any of the mentioned disorders. As of November 1985, the patient remains clinically free of malignancy. At age 18, the patient's weight was 22.6 kg (50th percentile for seven years), height was 129 cm (50th percentile for eight years), and head circumference was 42 cm (50th percentile for six months). Laboratory studies demonstrated a marked decrease in both B and T cell number and function. The peripheral blood contained 400 to 900 lymphocytes/microL with 32% T11 cells, 17% T4 cells, and 21% T8 cells. The proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen, and concanavalin A were less than 10% of control. There were 1% surface IgM positive cells, and serum IgG was 185 mg/dL, IgM 7 mg/dL, IgA 5 mg/dL. In lymphocyte cultures stimulated with the T cell mitogens PHA, phorbol ester, and interleukin 2, 55% of the banded metaphases demonstrated breaks or rearrangements. The majority of the breaks involved four fragile sites on chromosomes 7 and 14, 7p13, 7q35, 14q11, and 14q32. These are the sites of the genes for the T cell-antigen receptor and the immunoglobulin heavy chain and are sites of gene rearrangement in lymphocyte differentiation. Epstein-Barr virus stimulated B cells and fibroblast cultures also demonstrated a high incidence of breaks, but the sites were less selective. These findings suggest that the sites of chromosomal fragility in the chromosomal breakage syndromes may be informative and that factors other than the severity of the immunodeficiency or the high incidence of chromosomal damage may contribute to the occurrence of malignancy in the

  11. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  12. Mortality in Primary Immunodeficient Patients, Registered in Iranian Primary Immunodeficiency Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Mir Saeid Ghazi

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiencies (PID are a group of disorders, characterized by an unusual susceptibility to infections. Delay in diagnosis results in increased morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the mortality rate of Iranian immunodeficient patients referred to Children Medical Center Hospital affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences over a period of 20 years.In this study, records of 235 (146 males, 89 females patients with immunodeficiency who were diagnosed and followed in our center, during 22 years period (1979-2001 were reviewed. The diagnosis of immunodeficiency was based on the standard criteria. The cause of death was determined by review of death certificates.Antibody deficiency was the most common diagnosis made in our patients. The overall five-year survival rate was 22.7% in our studied patient group; this was greatest in antibody deficiency. During the 22 year period of study, 32 patients died. As some of the patients could not be located, the true mortality rate ranged between 13.6% and 17.5%. The main leading cause of death were lower respiratory tract involvement in 14 cases (44%. The most common pathogenic microorganisms causing fatal infections were psudomonas and staphylococcus in 9 cases (28.1% followed by E. coli in 7 (21.9%, tuberculosis in 13 (40.6% and salmonella in 1 (3.1%.Based on our study, delay in diagnosis in patients with PID results in tissue and organ damage and several complications. Mortality and morbidity are increased in undiagnosed patients.

  13. Cancers related to Immunodeficiencies:Update and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Mortaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The life span of patients with primary and secondary immunodeficiency is increasing due to recent improvements in therapeutic strategies. Whilst, the incidence of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs is 1:10.000 births, that of secondary immunodeficiencies is more common and are associated with post transplantation immune dysfunction or with immunosuppressive medication for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV or with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV infection.After infection, malignancy is the most prevalent cause of death in both children and adults with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs. PIDs more often associated with cancer include common variable immunodeficiency (CVID, Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS, ataxia-telangiectasia (AT and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. This suggests that a protective immune response against both infectious non-self (pathogens and malignant self-challenges (cancer exist. The increased incidence of cancer has been attributed to defective elimination of altered or transformed cells and/or defective immunity towards cancer cells. The concept of abberant immune surveillance occurring in PIDs is supported by evidence in mice and from patients undergoing immunosuppression after transplantation. Here, we discuss the importance of PID defects in the development of malignancies, the current limitations associated with molecular pathogenesis of these diseases and emphasize the need for further knowledge of how specific mutations can modulate the immune system to alter immunosurveillance and thereby play a key role in the etiology of malignancies in PID patients.

  14. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F; Jeggo, Penny A; Martin, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects.

  15. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F.; Jeggo, Penny A.; Martin, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus-negative plasmablastic lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Xudong; Dong, Meng; Li, Ling; Wang, Xinhua; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Xiaorui; Sun, Zhenchang; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Zhaoming; Chang, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Chen, Qingjiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare subtype of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that predominantly manifests in the oral cavity. Patient concerns: Three cases of HIV-negative PBL were reported. Diagnoses: HIV-negative PBL Interventions: The patient had undergone chemotherapy. Outcomes: Clinical outcomes were very poor in Cases 1 and 3; Case 2, whose diagnosis suggested no bone marrow involvement, is still alive. Lessons subsections: These cases served to broaden the reported clinical spectrum of HIV-negative PBL. Clinicians and pathologists need to be familiar with lymphoma in the identified extra-oral PBL variation and there levant differential diagnosis procedures for this particular disease. PMID:28207555

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  18. Inborn errors of metabolism underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh, Nima; Quartier, Pierre; Rostami, Parastoo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-10-01

    A number of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) have been shown to result in predominantly immunologic phenotypes, manifesting in part as inborn errors of immunity. These phenotypes are mostly caused by defects that affect the (i) quality or quantity of essential structural building blocks (e.g., nucleic acids, and amino acids), (ii) cellular energy economy (e.g., glucose metabolism), (iii) post-translational protein modification (e.g., glycosylation) or (iv) mitochondrial function. Presenting as multisystemic defects, they also affect innate or adaptive immunity, or both, and display various types of immune dysregulation. Specific and potentially curative therapies are available for some of these diseases, whereas targeted treatments capable of inducing clinical remission are available for others. We will herein review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) due to underlying metabolic disorders.

  19. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  20. Cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Shuang; YE Jun-jie; ZHAO Jia-liang; LI Tai-sheng; HAN Yang

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most severe intraocular complication that results in total retinal destruction and loss of visual acuity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to investigate the fundus characteristics, systemic manifestations and therapeutic outcomes of CMV retinitis associated with AIDS.Methods It was a retrospective case series. CMV retinitis was present in 39 eyes (25 patients). Best corrected visual acuities, anterior segment, fundus features, fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts of the patients with CMV retinitis associated with AIDS were analyzed. Intravitreal injections of ganciclovir (400 μg) were performed in 4 eyes (2 patients).Results Retinal vasculitis, dense, full-thickness, yellow-white lesions along vascular distribution with irregular granules at the border, and hemorrhage on the retinal surface were present in 28 eyes. The vitreous was clear or mildly opaque.Late stage of the retinopathy was demonstrated in 8 eyes characterized as atrophic retina, sclerotic and attenuated vessels, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, and optic nerve atrophy. Retinal detachment was found in 3 eyes. The average CD4+ T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood of the patients with CMV retinitis was (30.6±25.3) ×106/L (range,(0-85) × 106/L). After intravitreal injections of ganciclovir, visual acuity was improved and fundus lesions regressed.Conclusions CMV retinitis is the most severe and the most common intraocular complication in patients with AIDS. For the patients with yellow-white retinal lesions, hemorrhage and retinal vasculitis without clear cause, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology should be performed. Routine eye examination is also indicated in HIV positive patients.

  1. Prevalence of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in Kerman, Southeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Bazargan Harandi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID are rare and heterogeneous congenital diseases leading to increased unusual susceptibility to developing infections and causingsome malignancies and autoimmune diseases. This study was conducted to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of primary these diseases in patients attending the clinic of immunodeficiency diseases in Kerman.Subjects and Methods: In a case series study from from 2003 to 2014 in our tertiary referral center, 32 patients with primary immunodeficiency disease were included. Data was analyzed by statistical software SPSS-19 . The level of significance was considered P

  2. [Dynamics of nitrogen and sulfur wet deposition in typical forest stand at different spatial levels in Simian Mountain, mid-subtropical region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Ma, Ming; Wang, Ding-yong; Huang, Li-xin

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the dynamics of nitrogen and sulfur wet deposition in subtropical forest ecosystem, one typical forest stand, evergreen broad-leaved forest, at Simian Mountain located in Chongqing was selected in this research. Based on field monitoring, effects of precipitation, throughfall, litterfall, and groundwater runoff of the typical forest stand on the quality of water of Simian Mountain were investigated from September 2012 to August 2013. Results showed that the rainfall of Simian Mountain was apparently acidic, with average pH of 4.89 and maximum pH of 5.14. The soil, canopies and trunks could increase pH of precipitation, with soils having the maximum increment, followed by the forest canopy. Forest canopy had the function of adsorption and purification of NO3-, NO2- and SO4(2-), and the average entrapment rate was 56.68%, 45.84% and 35.51%, respectively. Moreover, the degradation of litter was probably the main reason for the increase of ion concentrations in the surface litter water. Forest soils could absorb and neutralize NO3-, SO2- and NH4+, and release NO2-. The evergreen broad-leaf forest of mid-subtropical region had the function of interception on NO3-, NO2-, NH4+ and SO4(2-), and the total entrapment rate was 92.86%, 57.86%, 87.24% and 87.25%, respectively, and it had a certain buffering function for the acid rain.

  3. Primary immunodeficiency diseases: an update on the classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed eAl-Herz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of primary immunodeficiencies. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up to date catalogue of all known primary immunodeficiencies and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases.

  4. Oligo-DNA custom macroarray for monitoring major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria in the phyllosphere of apple trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hong He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To monitor the richness in microbial inhabitants in the phyllosphere of apple trees cultivated under various cultural and environmental conditions, we developed an oligo-DNA macroarray for major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of apple trees. METHODS AND FINDINGS: First, we isolated culturable fungi and bacteria from apple orchards by an agar-plate culture method, and detected 32 fungal and 34 bacterial species. Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Rhodotorula, Cystofilobasidium, and Epicoccum genera were predominant among the fungi, and Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Pantoea genera were predominant among the bacteria. Based on the data, we selected 29 major non-pathogenic and 12 phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria as the targets of macroarray. Forty-one species-specific 40-base pair long oligo-DNA sequences were selected from the nucleotide sequences of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer region for fungi and 16S rDNA for bacteria. The oligo-DNAs were fixed on nylon membrane and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes prepared for each species. All arrays except those for Alternaria, Bacillus, and their related species, were specifically hybridized. The array was sensitive enough to detect 10(3 CFU for Aureobasidium pullulans and Bacillus cereus. Nucleotide sequencing of 100 each of independent fungal rDNA-ITS and bacterial 16S-rDNA sequences from apple tree was in agreement with the macroarray data obtained using the same sample. Finally, we analyzed the richness in the microbial inhabitants in the samples collected from apple trees in four orchards. Major apple pathogens that cause scab, Alternaria blotch, and Marssonina blotch were detected along with several non-phytopathogenic fungal and bacterial inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: The macroarray technique presented here is a strong tool to monitor the major microbial species and the community structures in

  5. Extranodal marginal zone (MALT) lymphoma in common variable immunodeficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desar, I.M.; Keuter, M.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2006-01-01

    We describe two patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) who developed extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (formerly described as mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma or MALT lymphoma). One patient, with documented pernicious anaemia and chronic atrophic gastritis with metaplasia, d

  6. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  7. Feline immunodeficiency virus: Studies on pathogenesis and vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractFeline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is classified as a member of the genus Lentivirus (subfamily Lentivirinae) of the Retroviridae family on basis of its morphology, biochemical characteristics, genomic organization, Mg'+ dependent reverse transcriptase, and nucleotide sequence homology

  8. Feline immunodeficiency virus: Studies on pathogenesis and vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractFeline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is classified as a member of the genus Lentivirus (subfamily Lentivirinae) of the Retroviridae family on basis of its morphology, biochemical characteristics, genomic organization, Mg'+ dependent reverse transcriptase, and nucleotide sequence homology

  9. Neutrophil microbial killing mechanisms: Lessons learned from primary immunodeficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    Humans and microbes have a balanced and longstanding relationship. Immunosuppresive therapies and primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) may disturb this balance and result in infection. Patients with neutropenia or PIDs with neutrophil functional defects, including Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD), a

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: ... were analyzed using molecular biology techniques that involved RT-PCR, ... There is evidence of genetic diversity of HIV and HCV; virulent hepatitis C virus ...

  11. Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post-exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post-exposure prophylaxis among doctors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. ... of PEP policy in the hospital. The level of knowledge concerning the high-risk fluid and three drugs used in PEP is high.

  12. Disparities in the Magnitude of Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    human immunodeficiency virus-related opportunistic infections between high and ... estimated 35.3 million people living with HIV (PLHIV), and. 2.3 million new HIV ...... us not erronously conclude that OIs have become a thing of the past.

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Özlem; Okan, Mehmet S; Kilic, Sara S

    2012-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency comprises a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies with complex clinical and immunologic phenotypes. Immune dysregulation leads to the generation of multiple autoantibodies against various antigenic targets in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a heterogeneous disorder that indicates an autoimmune response against peripheral nerve myelin. We describe a 7-year-old girl with common variable immunodeficiency who developed chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy. A 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (500 mg/kg/day) improved her neurologic disorder. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy should be added to the broadening spectrum of neurologic complications in common variable immunodeficiency. Early detection and consequent treatment may reverse the neurologic sequelae.

  14. Genetic, Clinical, and Laboratory Markers for DOCK8 Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah C. Davis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome (DIDS is a combined immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent viral infections, severe atopy, and early onset malignancy. Genetic studies revealed large, unique deletions in patients from different families and ethnic backgrounds. Clinical markers of DIDS include atopic dermatitis, allergies, cutaneous viral infections, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and malignancy. Immune assessments showed T cell lymphopenia, hyper-IgE, hypo-IgM, and eosinophilia. The impaired lymphocyte functions in DIDS patients appear central for disease pathogenesis.

  15. Improving Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Related Cancer Outcomes through International Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Nokta

    2011-01-01

    @@ The spectrum of cancers seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected individuals is diverse and complex,and reflects an ever-changing HIV epidemic.In parts of the world where combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is available,HIV-infected patients are living longer and are less likely to die of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)defining malignancies within a year or two of developing AIDS.

  16. Clinical and imaging considerations in primary immunodeficiency disorders: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Eveline Y. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Pediatrics, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ehrlich, Lauren [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Handly, Brian [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Frush, Donald P. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Buckley, Rebecca H. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Primary immunodeficiencies are a group of genetically determined disorders with diverse presentations. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical and brief description of a select number of these diseases and to discuss the important role the radiologist can have in making an early diagnosis and in detecting and following disease complications. The role of diagnostic imaging and informed performance and interpretation are vital in the diagnosis, surveillance and management of all primary immunodeficiency disorders. (orig.)

  17. Late Onset Combined Immunodeficiency Presenting with Recurrent Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Ilias Papakonstantinou; Ioannis G. Baraboutis; Lazaros Karnesis

    2014-01-01

    Late onset combined immunodeficiency (LOCID) is a recently described variant of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), involving adult patients presenting with opportunistic infections and/or low CD4+ lymphocyte counts. A 36-year-old male with unremarkable past medical history presented with fever, respiratory failure, and lymphocytopenia. He was found to have Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP), subsequently complicated by recurrent hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and ...

  18. Omenn’s Syndrome: A rare primary immunodeficiency disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Elnour, Ibtisam B; Ahmed, Shakeel; Halim, Kamal; Nirmala, V

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 17 years different forms of severe combined immunodeficiency have been diagnosed at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat. Omenn’s syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency. We report a 6 weeks old Omani infant who presented with the characteristic clinical and immunological phenotype of Omenn’s syndrome. We take the opportunity to discuss and review the immunological aspect of this rare syndrome.

  19. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency – More Than Just an Immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Victoria Whitmore; Hubert Bobby Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) which results from mutations in the gene encoding adenosine deaminase. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a severe combined immunodeficiency. Therapies are currently available that can that target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidenc...

  20. Clinical Applications of Gene Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have represented a paradigmatic model for successes and pitfalls of hematopoietic stem cells gene therapy. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors (γ-RV) for adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), X-linked SCID (SCID-X1), and Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) showed that gene therapy is a valid therapeutic option in patients lacking an HLA-identical donor. No insertional mutagenesis events have been observed in mor...

  1. State policies and the financing of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, A; Cvitanic, M; Bennett, C; Gorman, M; Serrato, C A

    1989-01-01

    State policies, with respect to the operation of Medicaid programs and the regulation of private health insurance, affect who gets what care, how much is spent, and who ultimately pays. A RAND Corporation study was used to assess States and the District of Columbia in terms of the effects of their Medicaid and health insurance regulations on people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other human immunodeficiency virus-related illnesses. State characteristics are used to explain the individual State policy rankings.

  2. "The spectrum of primary immunodeficiency disorders in Iran "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Aghamohammadi A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown wide geographical and racial variation in the prevalence and patterns of immunodeficiency disorders. To determine the frequency of primary immunodeficiencies (PID in Iran, the Iranian primary Immunodeficiencies Registry (IPIDR was organized in 1999. the diagnosis of immunodeficiency in our patients was based on standard criteria. The patient’s data were extracted, by using a uniform questionnaire from their hospital records. Three hundred and twenty eight patients with PID have been registered in our registry till 2000. Among these patients, the following frequencies were found: predominantly antibody deficiency in 48.48% of patients (n=159, T-cell disorders in 25.91% (n=85, phagocytic disorders in 24.7% (n=81, and complement deficiencies in 0.91% (n=3. Common variable immunodeficiency was the most frequent disorder (n=73, followe by chronic granulomatous disease (n=55, ataxia telangiectasia (n=39, x-linked agammaglobulinemia (n=35, selective IgA deficiency (n=34. This study reveals that antibody deficiencies are the most frequent diagnosed primary immunodeficiency disorder in our patients, which is similar to that observed in other registries. A comparative study shows some differences between our results and other registries

  3. The Tomato Wilt Fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici shares Common Ancestors with Nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolated from Wild Tomatoes in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Keigo; Kashiwa, Takeshi; Kawabe, Masato; Onokubo-Okabe, Akiko; Ishikawa, Nobuko; Pérez, Enrique Rodríguez; Hozumi, Takuo; Caballero, Liliana Aragón; de Baldarrago, Fatima Cáceres; Roco, Mauricio Jiménez; Madadi, Khalid A.; Peever, Tobin L.; Teraoka, Tohru; Kodama, Motoichiro; Arie, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an ascomycetous fungus that is well-known as a soilborne plant pathogen. In addition, a large population of nonpathogenic F. oxysporum (NPF) inhabits various environmental niches, including the phytosphere. To obtain an insight into the origin of plant pathogenic F. oxysporum, we focused on the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and its pathogenic F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL). We collected F. oxysporum from wild and transition Solanum spp. and modern cultivars of tomato in Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Mexico, Afghanistan, Italy, and Japan, evaluated the fungal isolates for pathogenicity, VCG, mating type, and distribution of SIX genes related to the pathogenicity of FOL, and constructed phylogenies based on ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer sequences. All F. oxysporum isolates sampled were genetically more diverse than FOL. They were not pathogenic to the tomato and did not carry SIX genes. Certain NPF isolates including those from wild Solanum spp. in Peru were grouped in FOL clades, whereas most of the NPF isolates were not. Our results suggested that the population of NPF isolates in FOL clades gave rise to FOL by gaining pathogenicity. PMID:24909710

  4. The tomato wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici shares common ancestors with nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolated from wild tomatoes in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Keigo; Kashiwa, Takeshi; Kawabe, Masato; Onokubo-Okabe, Akiko; Ishikawa, Nobuko; Pérez, Enrique Rodríguez; Hozumi, Takuo; Caballero, Liliana Aragón; de Baldarrago, Fatima Cáceres; Roco, Mauricio Jiménez; Madadi, Khalid A; Peever, Tobin L; Teraoka, Tohru; Kodama, Motoichiro; Arie, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an ascomycetous fungus that is well-known as a soilborne plant pathogen. In addition, a large population of nonpathogenic F. oxysporum (NPF) inhabits various environmental niches, including the phytosphere. To obtain an insight into the origin of plant pathogenic F. oxysporum, we focused on the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and its pathogenic F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL). We collected F. oxysporum from wild and transition Solanum spp. and modern cultivars of tomato in Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Mexico, Afghanistan, Italy, and Japan, evaluated the fungal isolates for pathogenicity, VCG, mating type, and distribution of SIX genes related to the pathogenicity of FOL, and constructed phylogenies based on ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer sequences. All F. oxysporum isolates sampled were genetically more diverse than FOL. They were not pathogenic to the tomato and did not carry SIX genes. Certain NPF isolates including those from wild Solanum spp. in Peru were grouped in FOL clades, whereas most of the NPF isolates were not. Our results suggested that the population of NPF isolates in FOL clades gave rise to FOL by gaining pathogenicity.

  5. RNAseq analysis of cassava reveals similar plant responses upon infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Bodnar, Alejandra; Perez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Gomez-Cano, Fabio; Gil, Juliana; Michelmore, Richard; Bernal, Adriana; Szurek, Boris; Lopez, Camilo

    2014-11-01

    An RNAseq-based analysis of the cassava plants inoculated with Xam allowed the identification of transcriptional upregulation of genes involved in jasmonate metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and putative targets for a TALE. Cassava bacterial blight, a disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), is a major limitation to cassava production worldwide and especially in developing countries. The molecular mechanisms underlying cassava susceptibility to Xam are currently unknown. To identify host genes and pathways leading to plant susceptibility, we analyzed the transcriptomic responses occurring in cassava plants challenged with either the non-pathogenic Xam strain ORST4, or strain ORST4(TALE1 Xam ) which is pathogenic due to the major virulence transcription activator like effector TALE1 Xam . Both strains triggered similar responses, i.e., induction of genes related to photosynthesis and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and repression of genes related to jasmonic acid signaling. Finally, to search for TALE1 Xam virulence targets, we scanned the list of cassava genes induced upon inoculation of ORST4(TALE1 Xam ) for candidates harboring a predicted TALE1 Xam effector binding element in their promoter. Among the six genes identified as potential candidate targets of TALE1 Xam a gene coding for a heat shock transcription factor stands out as the best candidate based on their induction in presence of TALE1 Xam and contain a sequence putatively recognized by TALE1 Xam .

  6. Ataxia-telangiectasia: Immunodeficiency and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Nienke J H; Jansen, Anne F M; van Deuren, Marcel; Haraldsson, Asgeir; van Driel, Nieke T M; Etzioni, Amos; van der Flier, Michiel; Haaxma, Charlotte A; Morio, Tomohiro; Rawat, Amit; Schoenaker, Michiel H D; Soresina, Annarosa; Taylor, Alexander M R; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Weemaes, Corry M R; Roeleveld, Nel; Willemsen, Michèl A A P

    2017-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia, telangiectasia, and immunodeficiency. An increased risk of malignancies and respiratory diseases dramatically reduce life expectancy. To better counsel families, develop individual follow-up programs, and select patients for therapeutic trials, more knowledge is needed on factors influencing survival. This retrospective cohort study of 61 AT patients shows that classical AT patients had a shorter survival than variant patients (HR 5.9, 95%CI 2.0-17.7), especially once a malignancy was diagnosed (HR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1-5.5, compared to classical AT patients without malignancy). Patients with the hyper IgM phenotype with hypogammaglobulinemia (AT-HIGM) and patients with an IgG2 deficiency showed decreased survival compared to patients with normal IgG (HR 9.2, 95%CI 3.2-26.5) and patients with normal IgG2 levels (HR 7.8, 95%CI 1.7-36.2), respectively. If high risk treatment trials will become available for AT, those patients with factors indicating the poorest prognosis might be considered for inclusion first. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Arikan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in women of child-bearing age continue to increase both internationally and in Canada. The care of HIV-infected pregnant women is complex, and multiple issues must be addressed, including the current and future health of the woman, minimization of the risk of maternal-infant HIV transmission, and maintenance of the well-being of the fetus and neonate. Vertical transmission of HIV can occur in utero, intrapartum and postpartum, but current evidence suggests that the majority of transmission occurs toward end of term, or during labour and delivery. Several maternal and obstetrical factors influence transmission rates, which can be reduced by optimal medical and obstetrical care. Zidovudine therapy has been demonstrated to reduce maternal-infant transmission significantly, but several issues, including the short and long term safety of antiretrovirals and the optimal use of combination antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, remain to be defined. It is essential that health care workers providing care to these women fully understand the natural history of HIV disease in pregnancy, the factors that affect vertical transmission and the management issues during pregnancy. Close collaboration among a multidisciplinary team of knowledgeable health professionals and, most importantly, the woman herself can improve both maternal and infant outcomes.

  8. Replication of biotinylated human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshan, Michael; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated recently the adaptation of the Escherichia coli biotin ligase BirA - biotin acceptor sequence (BAS) labeling system to produce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viruses with biotinylated integrase (NLXIN(B)) and matrix (NLXMA(B)) proteins (Belshan et al., 2009). This report describes the construction of an HIV permissive cell line stably expressing BirA (SupT1.BirA). Consistent with the results in the previous report, NLXMA(B) replicated similar to wild-type levels and expressed biotinylated Gag and MA proteins in the SupT1.BirA cells, whereas the replication of NLXIN(B) was reduced severely. Three additional HIV type 2 (HIV-2) viruses were constructed with the BAS inserted into the vpx and vpr accessory genes. Two BAS insertions were made into the C-terminal half of the Vpx, including one internal insertion, and one at the N-terminus of Vpr. All three viruses were replication competent in the SupT1.BirA cells and their target proteins biotinylated efficiently and incorporated into virions. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the biotinylation system to label and capture HIV protein complexes in the context of replicating virus.

  9. Reduced intensity transplantation for primary immunodeficiency disorders

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    Paul Veys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies so far indicate that reduced intensity transplantation (RIT may have an important role in treating patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PID. Unlike more standard approaches, such regimens can be used without severe toxicity in patients with severe pulmonary or hepatic disease. RIT also offers the advantage that long-term sequelae such as infertility or growth retardation may be avoided or reduced. RIT appears to be most appropriate for those patients with significant co-morbidities (eg T cell deficiencies and those undergoing unrelated donor haematopoietic cell transplantation. More studies are required using pharmacokinetic monitoring (eg busulphan, treosulfan and alemtuzumab and varying stem cell sources to optimise graft vs marrow reactions and minimise graft vs host disease. In certain PID patients RIT will be the “first step” towards establishing donor cell engraftment; second infusions of donor stem cells, donor lymphocyte infusions, or a second myeloablative HCT, which appears to be well tolerated, may be required in some patients with low level donor chimerism or graft rejection.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus infection, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, H W; Telzak, E E; Sepkowitz, K A; Wormser, G P

    1998-12-01

    The acceptance of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among patients and health care providers has had a dramatic impact on the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of many opportunistic infections associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Previously intractable opportunistic infections and syndromes are now far less common. In addition, effective antibiotic prophylactic therapies have had a profound impact on the risk of patients developing particular infections and on the incidence of these infections overall. Most notable among these are Pneumocystis carinii, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, tuberculosis, and toxoplasmosis. Nevertheless, infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality among patients who are infected with HIV. The role of HAART in many clinical situations is unquestioned. Compelling data from clinical trials support the use of these therapies during pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV. HAART is also recommended for health care workers who have had a "significant" exposure to the blood of an HIV-infected patient. Both of these situations are discussed in detail in this article. In addition, although more controversial, increasing evidence supports the use of HAART during the acute HIV seroconversion syndrome. An "immune reconstitution syndrome" has been newly described for patients in the early phases of treatment with HAART who develop tuberculosis, M avium complex, and cytomegalovirus disease. Accumulating data support the use of hydroxyurea, an agent with a long history in the field of myeloproliferative disorders, for the treatment of HIV. Newer agents, particularly abacavir and adefovir dipivoxil, are available through expanded access protocols, and their roles are being defined and clarified.

  11. Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Etiological and Treatment Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Naguwa, Stanley M.; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2009-01-01

    One of the great advances in clinical medicine was the recognition of the pleomorphism of the immune response and the multiple afferent and efferent limbs of antigen processing and responsiveness. A significant contribution to this understanding was derived from studies of human immunodeficiency states, including both inherited and acquired syndromes. Amongst these syndromes, one of the most common, and least understood, is common variable immune deficiency (CVID). CVID is a syndrome that leads to a reduction in serum immunoglobulins and complications including recurrent infections. Management includes immunoglobulin replacement therapy; however, patients with CVID are at risk for complications of exogenous immunoglobulin administration as well as CVID-associated diseases such as autoimmune processes and malignancies. To assess the current state of knowledge in the field, we performed a literature review of a total of 753 publications covering the period of 1968 until 2008. From this list, 189 publications were selected for discussion. In this review, we demonstrate that while the molecular basis of CVID in many cases remains incompletely understood, significant strides have been made and it is now clear that there is involvement of several pathways of immune activation, with contributions from both T and B cells. Furthermore, despite the current gaps in our knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of the syndrome, there have been dramatic advances in management that have led to improved survival and significantly reduced morbidity in affected patients. PMID:19571563

  12. The surgeon and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jens; Kalangu, Kazadi K N

    2003-08-01

    The moral dilemmas faced by surgeons worldwide who treat patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be viewed against the background of experience in sub-Saharan countries, where the community prevalence is in excess of 25% (90% of hospital inpatients). When seeking consent for an HIV test before surgery, frank communication regarding the surgeons' perspective of risks to themselves and the patient is helpful. When consent for a test must be obtained from a substitute decision-maker, the surgeon should consider if the patient would want the decision-maker to know the result. Understanding the natural history of HIV in the surgical setting can help deal with the uncertainties encountered and should be a research priority for developing countries. International professional organizations are useful platforms for the exchange of ideas when surgeons encounter uncertainty by increasing access to journals and creating opportunities for discussion. Although supervisory bodies in some parts of the world prevent HIV-infected surgeons from putting patients at risk by offering surgery, the withdrawal of their services in developing countries can cause more harm than good. Surgeons in that position may be entitled to offer surgery but only with full disclosure of the risk of HIV infection to the patient. The decision-making process known as "accountability for reasonableness" allows surgeons to determine fairness, legitimacy, and acceptability when making resource allocation decisions involving patients with HIV.

  13. Aging, human immunodeficiency virus, and bone health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C Mansky

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Kim C ManskyDivision of Orthodontics, Department of Developmental and Surgical Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has had a profound impact on improving the long-term prognosis for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. HAART has been available for close to two decades, and now a significant number of patients with access to HAART are over the age of 50 years. Many clinical studies have indicated that HIV infection, as well as components of HAART, can increase the risk in these individuals to a variety of noninfectious complications, including a risk to bone health. There is a significant need for detailed mechanistic analysis of the aging, HIV-infected population regarding the risk of HIV infection and therapy in order to maintain bone health. Insights from basic mechanistic studies will help to shed light on the role of HIV infection and the components of HAART that impact bone health, and will help in identifying preventative countermeasures, particularly for individuals 50 years of age and older.Keywords: osteopenia, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, bisphosphonates, tenofovir, osteoimmunology

  14. Primary Immunodeficiencies with Elevated IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Trine H

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) characterized by elevated Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels have been uncovered and termed as Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES). In addition to the elevated levels of IgE, patients with these PIDs display a spectrum of infections by staphylococci and fungi, and in some cases viruses, particularly affecting skin and lungs. Most of these PIDs also have a non-infectious phenotype, comprising musculoskeletal, vascular, and neurological abnormalities. The genetic basis for the majority of conditions with elevated IgE has now been established and includes mutations in STAT3, DOCK8, TYK2, and most recently PGM3 molecules. However, in some patients with the relevant phenotype, mutations in these molecules are not identified, suggesting additional genetic etiologies of HIES not yet discovered. As the immunological and molecular basis of HIES is being unraveled, important insights are emerging that may have implications for our understanding of basic principles of immunology and protective immunity as well as for the pathogenesis and clinical management of patients with these complex and challenging PIDs. In this review, are presented the current knowledge on the clinical presentation, infectious phenotype, and the genetic and immunological pathogenesis of hyper-IgE syndromes as well as some other PIDs with elevated levels of IgE.

  15. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and its ocular complications

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    Rao Narsing

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus infection is the first major pandemic of the 20th century. At present, almost 10 million people are known to be infected with this virus, and it is estimated that by the year 2000, approximately 40 million people will be infected. Transmission of this deadly infection is predominantly by sexual contact. Individuals infected with this virus pass through several predictable stages with progressive decrease in circulating CD4+ T cells. During the advanced stage, these patients develop various opportunistic infections or malignancies, or both. It is this advanced stage that was first recognized as AIDS, which has a 100% mortality rate. The opportunistic organisms that can involve the eye in patients with AIDS include cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Pneumocystis carinii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida, and others. Intraocular lesions from these agents often represent disseminated infections. Visual morbidity occurs secondary to retinitis due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, or Toxoplasma gondii. Anti-viral agents such as ganciclovir or foscarnet are effective against cytomegalovirus infection. The role of the ophthalmologist in the diagnosis and management of AIDS is becoming increasingly important. Not only does the eye reflect systemic disease, but ocular involvement may often precede systemic manifestations. In the AIDS patient, the ophthalmologist thus has an opportunity to make not only a slight-saving, but also life-saving diagnosis of disseminated opportunistic infections.

  16. Immunodeficiency and laser magnetic therapy in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maati, Moufagued; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Avdoshin, V. P.

    1996-11-01

    The importance of immunodeficiency problem has increased last time not only due to AIDS appearance, but also to a great extent as a result of the development and active practical use of the methods of immunology parameters investigations. Al great pharmaceutical firms are organizing the process of creating the drugs, influencing on the different phases of immunity, but unfortunately, the problem of their adverse effect and connected complications is till today a milestone. A great number of investigations, proving a good effect of laser-magnetic therapy concerning immune system have been done today. There is, in particular, changing of blood counts and immunologic tests after intravenous laser irradiation of blood. Intravenous laser irradiation of blood results in increasing of lymphocytes, T-immuno stimulation, stabilization of t-lymphocyte subpopulation, increasing of t-lymphocyte helper activity and decreasing of suppressor one.Under this laser action number of circulating immune complexes is decreased, and blood serum bactericide activity and lisozyme number are increased.

  17. Goldenhar syndrome: a cause of secondary immunodeficiency?

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    De Golovine Serge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Goldenhar syndrome (GS results from an aberrant development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations, the most common being microtia, hemifacial microsomia, epibulbar dermoids and vertebral malformations. We present two cases of GS and secondary immunodeficiency due to anatomical defects characteristic of this disorder. Case 1 (3-year-old female averaged 6 episodes of sinusitis and otitis media per year. Case 2 (7-year-old female also had recurrent otitis media, an episode of bacterial pneumonia, and 2 episodes of bacterial meningitis. Their immune evaluation included a complete blood count with differential, serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody concentrations, lymphocyte phenotyping, and mitogen and antigen responses, the results of which were all within normal ranges. Both children demonstrated major structural abnormalities of the inner and middle ear structures, retention of fluid in mastoid air cells, and chronic sinusitis by computed tomography. These two cases illustrate how a genetically-associated deviation of the middle ear cleft can cause recurrent infections and chronic inflammation of the middle ear and adjacent sinuses, even meninges, leading to a greatly reduced quality of life for the child and parents.

  18. How I treat severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, H Bobby; Qasim, Waseem; Davies, E Graham; Rao, Kanchan; Amrolia, Persis J; Veys, Paul

    2013-11-28

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) arises from different genetic defects associated with lymphocyte development and function and presents with severe infections. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an extremely effective way of restoring immunity in these individuals. Numerous multicenter studies have identified the factors determining successful outcome, and survival for SCID has shown great improvement. Advances in understanding the genetic basis of disease also mean that we increasingly tailor transplant protocols to the specific SCID form. Wherever possible, we attempt to transplant SCID patients without the use of cytoreductive conditioning, but it is clear that this is only successful for specific SCID forms and, although survival is good, in specific patients there are ongoing humoral defects. We aim to use matched related and unrelated donors (including cord blood) whenever possible and have limited the use of mismatched haploidentical donors. The development of autologous hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy provides another treatment of the X-linked and adenosine deaminase-deficient forms of SCID, and we discuss how we have integrated gene therapy into our treatment strategy. These developments together with the advent of universal newborn screening for SCID should allow for a highly favorable outcome for this otherwise lethal condition.

  19. Pediatric Selective IgM Immunodeficiency

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    Marc F. Goldstein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Limited information exists on features of pediatric Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID. Previously published pediatric cases and 2 new cases are reviewed. Methods. English literature from PubMed and references from relevant articles were reviewed. Previously reported cases and 2 new cases from an allergy/immunology practice were analyzed. Results. Forty-nine reported cases of SIgMID presented with respiratory infections (77.6%, gastrointestinal disease (16.3%, skin disease (12.2%, and meningitis (8.2%. Mean serum IgM level was 16.5±13.8 mg/dL. Two patients were identified with SIgMID among 6300 active pediatric patients (0.03% presenting with asthma, vasomotor rhinitis, and recurrent respiratory infections. In the 51 cases reported, none developed lymphoproliferative disease nor evolved into panhypogammaglobulinemia; four fatalities were reported. Conclusions. The prevalence of SIgMID in our pediatric population was 0.03%. In general, respiratory infections are the common comorbid conditions. Death and autoimmune disease are uncommon complications of pediatric SIgMID.

  20. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, D.; Holt, L.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that non-pathogenic Gram negative bacteria induce RelA phosphorylation, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism...... of immune-epithelial cell cross-talk on Gram-negative enteric bacteria-induced NF-kappaB signalling and pro-inflammatory gene expression in IEC using HT-29/MTX as well as CaCO-2 transwell cultures Interestingly, while differentiated HT-29/MTX cells are unresponsive to non-pathogenic Gram negative bacterial...... in the presence of PBMC. Interestingly, B. vulgatus- and E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharide-induced similar IL-8 mRNA expression in epithelial cells after basolateral stimulation of HT-29/PBMC cocultures. Although luminal enteric bacteria have adjuvant and antigenic properties in chronic intestinal inflammation...

  1. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, D.; Holt, L.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2004-01-01

    of immune-epithelial cell cross-talk on Gram-negative enteric bacteria-induced NF-kappaB signalling and pro-inflammatory gene expression in IEC using HT-29/MTX as well as CaCO-2 transwell cultures Interestingly, while differentiated HT-29/MTX cells are unresponsive to non-pathogenic Gram negative bacterial......-kappaB signalling and IL-8 gene expression in IEC cocultured with immune cells and suggests the presence of mechanisms that assure hyporesponsiveness of the intestinal epithelium to certain commensally enteric bacteria.......We have previously shown that non-pathogenic Gram negative bacteria induce RelA phosphorylation, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism...

  2. Relationship between expression of epidermal growth factor and simian virus 40 T antigen in a line of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, R E; Giammalvo, J T; Norkin, L C

    1995-09-01

    The pattern of expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen gene and resultant dysplasia were re-examined in a line of transgenic mice in which the T antigen gene was under the control of the SV40 early promoter. We found that T antigen expression in the kidney, and resulting dysplastic lesions, occurred exclusively in the distal convoluted tubules and the ascending limbs of Henle. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the kidney of normal mice was similarly immunolocalized. The correlation between high EGF immunoreactivity in normal mouse tissues and T antigen expression in the transgenic counterpart was also seen in the choroid plexus epithelium and in the submandibular glands of male mice. T antigen was not found in the submandibular gland of transgenic females. Similarly, EGF was only rarely detected in the normal female submandibular gland. In contrast to the correlation between T antigen expression in the transgenic mice and EGF expression in the corresponding tissues of the normal mice, within the dysplastic lesions of the transgenic mice EGF expression was severely diminished. Adenocarcinomas of the male submandibular gland from another line of transgenic mice that expresses the Int-1 transgene, showed similarly reduced levels of immunostaining for EGF. Thus, reduced expression of EGF might be a general feature of dysplasia and tumorigenesis in those tissues that normally express EGF.

  3. Comparison of human tenascin expression in normal, simian-virus-40-transformed and tumor-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnemolla, B; Borsi, L; Bannikov, G; Troyanovsky, S; Zardi, L

    1992-04-15

    Tenascin is a polymorphic high-molecular-mass extracellular-matrix glycoprotein composed of six similar subunits. Using two-domain-specific anti-tenascin monoclonal antibodies, we have studied the expression and distribution of tenascin in four cultured normal human fibroblasts, two simian-virus-40-(SV40)-transformed and three tumor-derived (melanoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and fibrosarcoma) cell lines. We found that (a) cultured normal human fibroblasts accumulate considerable amounts of tenascin and retain 60-90% in the extracellular matrix, while they release the remainder into the tissue-culture medium; (b) of the two SV40-transformed counterparts we have tested, the AG-280 cell line accumulates no detectable amounts of tenascin and the WI-38-VA cell line accumulates about 10-times less tenascin than its normal counterpart and releases about 90% of it into the culture medium; (c) some tumor-derived cell lines accumulate considerable amounts of tenascin, but in these cases, more than 90% is released into the culture media; (d) in normal human fibroblasts, two major tenascin isoforms, generated by alternative splicing of the mRNA precursor, are detectable (280 kDa and 190 kDa, respectively) and the lower-molecular-mass tenascin isoform is accumulated preferentially in the extracellular matrix; (e) in SV40-transformed or tumor-derived cell lines, only the higher-molecular-mass isoform is detectable and it is more sialylated than the tenascin produced by the normal human fibroblast cell lines.

  4. Facial paralysis and lymphocytic facial neuritis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) positive for simian retrovirus type D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Anna L; Colby, Lesley A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2011-12-01

    Simian retrovirus type D (SRVD) is a naturally occurring betaretrovirus in nonhuman primates of the genus Macaca. Infection can lead to a variety of clinical, hematologic, and histopathologic abnormalities. We report an unusual clinical presentation of facial paralysis and histologic lymphocytic neuritis in an SRVD type 2 (SRVD2)-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a catheter-associated vena caval thrombus, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and multisystemic lymphoid hyperplasia. At initial presentation, a right atrial mass was detected by echocardiography. The macaque was clinically asymptomatic but had persistent anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinemia, and later neutropenia. It was seropositive for SRV and PCR-positive for SRVD 2. Approximately 1 mo after initial presentation, the macaque developed right facial paralysis and was euthanized. Histologic lesions included lymphoplasmacytic aggregates affecting multiple organs, consistent with SRV-related lymphoid hyperplasia. The right facial nerve showed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. The nerve itself was negative immunohistochemically for SRV antigen, but antigen was present infrequently in pericapillary lymphoid cells within the facial nerve and abundantly within lymphoid aggregates in the adjacent parotid salivary gland, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Known neurotropic viruses could not be identified. Given the widespread inflammation in this macaque, particularly in the area surrounding the facial nerve, lymphocytic neuritis and facial paralysis likely were an indirect effect of SRV infection due to local extension of SRV-related inflammation in the surrounding tissue.

  5. Assignment of simian rotavirus SA11 temperature-sensitive mutant groups B and E to genome segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombold, J.L.; Estes, M.K.; Ramig, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    Recombinant (reassortant) viruses were selected from crosses between temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of simian rotavirus SA11 and wild-type human rotavirus Wa. The double-stranded genome RNAs of the reassortants were examined by electrophoresis in Tris-glycine-buffered polyacrylamide gels and by dot hybridization with a cloned DNA probe for genome segment 2. Analysis of replacements of genome segments in the reassortants allowed construction of a map correlating genome segments providing functions interchangeable between SA11 and Wa. The reassortants revealed a functional correspondence in order of increasing electrophoretic mobility of genome segments. Analysis of the parental origin of genome segments in ts+ SA11/Wa reassortants derived from the crosses SA11 tsB(339) X Wa and SA11 tsE(1400) X Wa revealed that the group B lesion of tsB(339) was located on genome segment 3 and the group E lesion of tsE(1400) was on segment 8.

  6. Immortalization of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with telomerase reverse transcriptase and simian virus 40 large T antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Chang; ZHAO Kui; TONG Guo-xin; ZHU Yong-liang; CHEN Peng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish normally conditionally-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by ectopic expression of the human telomerase catalytic enzyme (hTERT) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 LT) antigen. Methods:Primary HUVECs were transfected with recombinant retrovirus containing hTERT or SV40 LT respectively. Subsequently drug resistant cell clones were screened and expanded for further studies. Endothelial cell biomarkers were confirmed by examination.Results: The morphological phenotype of the transfected cells was similar to the non-transfected cells. Von Willebrand factor,hTERT and SV40 LT could be detected in transfected HUVECs. Moreover, higher telomerase activity in transfected cells was maintained for over 50 population doublings compared with only low level of endogenous telomerase transiently at early population doublings in primary HUVECs. When exposed to TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), the expression of E-selectin in transfected cells was significantly up-regulated, but no alteration of endothelial lipase was found. Conclusion: Ectopic coexpression of hTERT and SV40 LT can effectively immortalize HUVECs without tumorigenicity in vitro. Immortalized HUVECs may be an ideal target of further molecular function studies.

  7. Simian varicella virus infection of rhesus macaques recapitulates essential features of varicella zoster virus infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhem Messaoudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Simian varicella virus (SVV, the etiologic agent of naturally occurring varicella in primates, is genetically and antigenically closely related to human varicella zoster virus (VZV. Early attempts to develop a model of VZV pathogenesis and latency in nonhuman primates (NHP resulted in persistent infection. More recent models successfully produced latency; however, only a minority of monkeys became viremic and seroconverted. Thus, previous NHP models were not ideally suited to analyze the immune response to SVV during acute infection and the transition to latency. Here, we show for the first time that intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV closely mimics naturally occurring varicella (chickenpox in humans. Infected monkeys developed varicella and viremia that resolved 21 days after infection. Months later, viral DNA was detected only in ganglia and not in non-ganglionic tissues. Like VZV latency in human ganglia, transcripts corresponding to SVV ORFs 21, 62, 63 and 66, but not ORF 40, were detected by RT-PCR. In addition, as described for VZV, SVV ORF 63 protein was detected in the cytoplasm of neurons in latently infected monkey ganglia by immunohistochemistry. We also present the first in depth analysis of the immune response to SVV. Infected animals produced a strong humoral and cell-mediated immune response to SVV, as assessed by immunohistology, serology and flow cytometry. Intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV provides a novel model to analyze viral and immunological mechanisms of VZV latency and reactivation.

  8. Effect of mutations in a simian virus 40 PolyA signal enhancer on green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H G; Wang, X F; Jing, X Y; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; Lv, Z J

    2011-08-26

    Our previous studies have shown that tandem Alu repeats inhibit green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression when inserted downstream of the GFP gene in the pEGFP-C1 vector. We found that the 22R sequence (5'-GTGAAAAAAATGCTTTATTTGT-3') from the antisense PolyA (240 bp polyadenylation signal) of simian virus 40, eliminated repression of GFP gene expression when inserted between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats. The 22R sequence contains an imperfect palindrome; based on RNA structure software prediction, it forms an unstable stem-loop structure, including a loop, a first stem, a bulge, and a second stem. Analysis of mutations of the loop length of the 22R sequence showed that the three-nucleotide loop (wild-type, 22R) induced much stronger GFP expression than did other loop lengths. Two mutations, 4TMI (A7→T, A17→T) and 5AMI (A6→T, T18→A), which caused the base type changes in the bulge and in the second stem in the 22R sequence, induced stronger GFP gene expression than 22R itself. Mutation of the bulge base (A17→T), leading to complete complementation of the stem, caused weaker GFP gene expression. Sequences without a palindrome (7pieA, 5'-GTGAAAAAAATG CAAAAAAAGT-3', 7pieT, 5'-GTGTTTTTTTTGCTTTTTTTGT-3') did not activate GFP gene expression. We conclude that an imperfect palindrome affects and can increase GFP gene expression.

  9. High genetic diversity and adaptive potential of two simian hemorrhagic fever viruses in a wild primate population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Bailey

    Full Text Available Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 10(6-10(7 RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF 5 (SHFV-krc2 only and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2. Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses.

  10. AZT resistance of simian foamy virus reverse transcriptase is based on the excision of AZTMP in the presence of ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Maximilian J.; Kretzschmar, Benedikt; Frohn, Anne; Nowrouzi, Ali; Rethwilm, Axel; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2008-01-01

    Azidothymidine (AZT, zidovudine) is one of the few nucleoside inhibitors known to inhibit foamy virus replication. We have shown previously that up to four mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of simian foamy virus from macaque (SFVmac) are necessary to confer high resistance against AZT. To characterize the mechanism of AZT resistance we expressed two recombinant reverse transcriptases of highly AZT-resistant SFVmac in Escherichia coli harboring three (K211I, S345T, E350K) or four mutations (K211I, I224T, S345T, E350K) in the reverse transcriptase gene. Our analyses show that the polymerization activity of these mutants is impaired. In contrast to the AZT-resistant reverse transcriptase of HIV-1, the AZT resistant enzymes of SFVmac reveal differences in their kinetic properties. The SFVmac enzymes exhibit lower specific activities on poly(rA)/oligo(dT) and higher KM-values for polymerization but no change in KD-values for DNA/DNA or RNA/DNA substrates. The AZT resistance of the mutant enzymes is based on the excision of the incorporated inhibitor in the presence of ATP. The additional amino acid change of the quadruple mutant appears to be important for regaining polymerization efficiency. PMID:18096624

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and tropical diseases: a Brazilian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariza G Morgado

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes recent findings on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/Aids, highlighting the role of co-infections with major tropical diseases. Such co-infections have been studied in the Brazilian context since the beginning of the Aids epidemic and are expected to be more frequent and relevant as the Aids epidemic in Brazil proceeds towards smaller municipalities and the countryside, where tropical diseases are endemic. Unlike opportunistic diseases that affect basically the immunocompromised host, most tropical diseases, as well as tuberculosis, are pathogenic on their own, and can affect subjects with mild or no immunossuppression. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapies (HAART, opportunistic diseases seem to be on decrease in Brazil, where such medicines are fully available. Benefiting from HAART in terms of restoration of the immune function, putative milder clinical courses are expected in the future for most co-infections, including tropical diseases. On the other hand, from an ecological perspective, the progressive geographic diffusion of Aids makes tropical diseases and tuberculosis a renewed challenge for Brazilian researchers and practitioners dealing with HIV/Aids in the coming years.

  12. Hyaluronidase facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolles S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Jolles Department of Immunology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Immunoglobulin (Ig-replacement therapy represents the mainstay of treatment for patients with primary antibody deficiency and is administered either intravenously (IVIg or subcutaneously (SCIg. While hyaluronidase has been used in clinical practice for over 50 years, the development of a high-purity recombinant form of this enzyme (recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 has recently enabled the study of repeated and more prolonged use of hyaluronidase in facilitating the delivery of SC medicines. It has been used in a wide range of clinical settings to give antibiotics, local anesthetics, insulin, morphine, fluid replacement, and larger molecules, such as antibodies. Hyaluronidase has been used to help overcome the limitations on the maximum volume that can be delivered into the SC space by enabling dispersion of SCIg and its absorption into lymphatics. The rate of facilitated SCIg (fSCIg infusion is equivalent to that of IVIg, and the volume administered at a single site can be greater than 700 mL, a huge increase over conventional SCIg, at 20–40 mL. The use of fSCIg avoids the higher incidence of systemic side effects of IVIg, and it has higher bioavailability than SCIg. Data on the long-term safety of this approach are currently lacking, as fSCIg has only recently become available. fSCIg may help several areas of patient management in primary antibody deficiency, and the extent to which it may be used in future will depend on long-term safety data and cost–benefit analysis. Keywords: enzyme facilitated IgG infusion, recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20, subcutaneous immunoglobulin, intravenous immunoglobulin, primary immunodeficiency disease

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus in institutionalized elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luiz Gorzoni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: A search in the SciELO and PubMed databases showed few studies on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive individuals in long-term care institutions (LTCIs, thus prompting the present study. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether there were any HIV-positive individuals in LTCIs for the elderly. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in which the Hospital Infection Control Committee (HICC of a 405-bed LTCI was consulted. METHODS: The medical records of 405 individuals interned in the LTCI who had been tested for HIV infection were requested for analysis of the following variables: [1] age and gender; [2] length of stay at LTCI (months; [3] causes and diagnoses on admission to LTCI according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition; [4] date of HIV diagnosis; [5] seropositivity for syphilis and hepatitis B and C viruses; [6] medications used at last prescription in medical file; and [7] mean CD4 lymphocyte count based on: total lymphocyte count/6 and total lymphocyte count x 0.8 x 0.2 or 0.3. RESULTS: Four men were HIV-positive, with mean age 71.2 ± 8.6 years, LTCI stay 74.2 ± 38.1 months and length of HIV diagnosis 24.5 ± 17 months (confirmed by HICC standard screening. Three had stroke sequelae; one, dementia syndrome; two, seropositivity for syphilis; two, hepatitis B and one, hepatitis C. The main drugs used were lamivudine, zidovudine, lopinavir, ritonavir, levothyroxine, omeprazole, ranitidine, lactulose and risperidone. The estimated CD4 count was 341 ± 237/mm3. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-positive individuals are present in LTCIs, diagnosable through serological screening and treatable with antiretroviral drugs.

  14. Medical management of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempen John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS pandemic has pervasive effects on culture, economics, policy, and human development. All organs can be affected by complications of HIV/AIDS, including the eye. When sufficient resources are available and widespread antiretroviral resistance does not exist, the four available classes of antiretroviral agents - nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors - can be combined to provide highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. For many (not all patients, HAART converts an inexorably fatal disease into a chronic disease with a fairly good prognosis. Use of HAART often induces partial immune recovery, which has predominantly beneficial effects on ocular complications of AIDS. However, HAART-induced immune recovery sometimes results in immune recovery inflammatory syndromes, such as immune recovery uveitis. Use of HAART is the single most useful intervention for most patients with ocular complications of AIDS. However, specific ocular therapy is also critical to avoid blindness in the early months before immune recovery can occur, or if HAART is unavailable. Increasing availability of HAART worldwide shows great promise to alleviate one of the world′s greatest plagues. However, predictable secular trends in the AIDS epidemic make it likely that the number of cases of ocular complications of AIDS will increase substantially before they decrease. Ophthalmologists worldwide should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of cytomegalovirus retinitis - the most common ocular complication of AIDS - and should establish partnerships with physicians who are able to provide HAART. Research is needed to determine the optimal approach for managing cytomegalovirus retinitis in resource-constrained settings.

  15. Ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, M; Goto, T

    1996-08-01

    The ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were elucidated by observation with several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryo-microscopy. The virus particle consists of an envelope, a core and matrix. The virus particles were observed extracellularly as having one of three profiles: (1) a centric or an eccentric electron-dense core, (2) rod-shaped electron-dense core, and (3) doughnut-shaped. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high resolution electron cryo-microscopy to be globular, and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Many projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially head parts, were found to vary in each projection. By isolation with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, HIV-1 cores were confirmed to consist of p24 protein by immunogold labeling. When the virus enters the cell, two entry modes were found: membrane fusion and endocytosis. No structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm after viral entry. In HIV-1-infected cells, positive reactions by immuno-labeling suggest that HIV-1 Gag may be produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by cytoskeletons. Then a crescent electron-dense layer was first formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle was released from the cell surface. Several cell clones producing defective particles were isolated from MT-4/HIV-1 cells. Among them, doughnut-shaped or teardrop-shaped particles were seen to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins faced each other against the inner electron dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein.

  16. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04494.001 PMID:25599590

  17. The majority of genes in the pathogenic Neisseria species are present in non-pathogenic Neisseria lactamica, including those designated as 'virulence genes'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders Nigel J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neisseria meningitidis causes the life-threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and meningococcal septicemia. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is closely related to the meningococcus, but is the cause of the very different infection, gonorrhea. A number of genes have been implicated in the virulence of these related yet distinct pathogens, but the genes that define and differentiate the species and their behaviours have not been established. Further, a related species, Neisseria lactamica is not associated with either type of infection in normally healthy people, and lives as a harmless commensal. We have determined which of the genes so far identified in the genome sequences of the pathogens are also present in this non-pathogenic related species. Results Thirteen unrelated strains of N. lactamica were investigated using comparative genome hybridization to the pan-Neisseria microarray-v2, which contains 2845 unique gene probes. The presence of 127 'virulence genes' was specifically addressed; of these 85 are present in N. lactamica. Of the remaining 42 'virulence genes' only 11 are present in all four of the sequenced pathogenic Neisseria. Conclusion Assessment of the complete dataset revealed that the vast majority of genes present in the pathogens are also present in N. lactamica. Of the 1,473 probes to genes shared by all four pathogenic genome sequences, 1,373 hybridize to N. lactamica. These shared genes cannot include genes that are necessary and sufficient for the virulence of the pathogens, since N. lactamica does not share this behaviour. This provides an essential context for the interpretation of gene complement studies of the pathogens.

  18. Stem Cell Transplantation for Treatment of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna M. Müller Wilhelm Friedrich

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Immunodeficiencies constitute a group of highly complex congenital disorders most of which are characterized by a very poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has become an established curative treatment approach in many of these disorders, which may be permanently corrected. In this presentation basic and practical aspects of HSCT are presented, with an emphasis on its application in lymphocyte disorders such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. Optimal results and outcome of HSCT are highly dependant on early and correct diagnosis of these rare disorders, and HSCT should usually be applied early in the course of the disease in order to prevent irreversible complications from infections. Clinical results will be summarized based on recent analysis performed in large patient cohorts, which have shown steady improvements and have led to a marked change in the prognosis of patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

  19. Late Onset Combined Immunodeficiency Presenting with Recurrent Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraboutis, Ioannis G.; Karnesis, Lazaros

    2014-01-01

    Late onset combined immunodeficiency (LOCID) is a recently described variant of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), involving adult patients presenting with opportunistic infections and/or low CD4+ lymphocyte counts. A 36-year-old male with unremarkable past medical history presented with fever, respiratory failure, and lymphocytopenia. He was found to have Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP), subsequently complicated by recurrent hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and immune reconstitution phenomena, attributed to restoration of immunoglobulin levels. Clinicians should be aware of LOCID, which could be confused with HIV infection/AIDS or idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. In the English bibliography there is only one case report, where PJP was the initial presentation of CVID (that case would probably be classified as LOCID). Phenomena of immune reconstitution are described in various settings, including primary immunodeficiency, manifesting as temporary clinical and radiologic deterioration and leading to misperceptions of therapeutic failure and/or presence of alternative/additional diagnoses. PMID:24799913

  20. Immunodeficiency and autoimmune enterocolopathy linked to NFAT5 haploinsufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Brigid S; Widjaja, Christella E; Banno, Asoka; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Stephanie H; Stoven, Samantha; Peterson, Michael R; Jones, Marilyn C; Su, H Irene; Crowe, Sheila E; Bui, Jack D; Ho, Samuel B; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Goel, Ajay; Marietta, Eric V; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Jepsen, Kristen; Aramburu, Jose; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Sandborn, William J; Murray, Joseph A; Harismendy, Olivier; Chang, John T

    2015-03-15

    The link between autoimmune diseases and primary immunodeficiency syndromes has been increasingly appreciated. Immunologic evaluation of a young man with autoimmune enterocolopathy and unexplained infections revealed evidence of immunodeficiency, including IgG subclass deficiency, impaired Ag-induced lymphocyte proliferation, reduced cytokine production by CD8(+) T lymphocytes, and decreased numbers of NK cells. Genetic evaluation identified haploinsufficiency of NFAT5, a transcription factor regulating immune cell function and cellular adaptation to hyperosmotic stress, as a possible cause of this syndrome. Inhibition or deletion of NFAT5 in normal human and murine cells recapitulated several of the immune deficits identified in the patient. These results provide evidence of a primary immunodeficiency disorder associated with organ-specific autoimmunity linked to NFAT5 deficiency.

  1. Late Onset Combined Immunodeficiency Presenting with Recurrent Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Papakonstantinou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset combined immunodeficiency (LOCID is a recently described variant of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID, involving adult patients presenting with opportunistic infections and/or low CD4+ lymphocyte counts. A 36-year-old male with unremarkable past medical history presented with fever, respiratory failure, and lymphocytopenia. He was found to have Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP, subsequently complicated by recurrent hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and immune reconstitution phenomena, attributed to restoration of immunoglobulin levels. Clinicians should be aware of LOCID, which could be confused with HIV infection/AIDS or idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. In the English bibliography there is only one case report, where PJP was the initial presentation of CVID (that case would probably be classified as LOCID. Phenomena of immune reconstitution are described in various settings, including primary immunodeficiency, manifesting as temporary clinical and radiologic deterioration and leading to misperceptions of therapeutic failure and/or presence of alternative/additional diagnoses.

  2. Mycoplasma hominis septic arthritis and common variable immunodeficiency in a postpartum patient:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Randy A. McCool

    2012-01-01

    Postpartum patients with an unrecognized primary immunodeficiency disease, including common variable immunodeficiency, demonstrate increased susceptibility to Mycoplasma hominis infection. Diagnosis, treatment, and clinical course in a postpartum patient presenting with joint pain and episodic fever are presented.

  3. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  4. A viable simian virus 40 variant with a deletion in the overlapping genes for virion proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Piatak, M

    1982-12-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis was used to determine the exact location of a deletion in the late region of the SP2 mutant of simian virus 40 (SV40), a viable small-plaque variant isolated from a persistent infection of rhesus monkey kidney cells. The results indicate that six base pairs are deleted from that part of the SV40 genome in which the coding regions for the three virion proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, overlap. This implies that all three virion proteins are affected by the deletion. This finding is discussed with respect to the viability of SP2.

  5. A novel Bayesian method for detection of APOBEC3-mediated hypermutation and its application to zoonotic transmission of simian foamy viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A Matsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Simian Foamy Virus (SFV can be transmitted from non-human primates (NHP to humans. However, there are no documented cases of human to human transmission, and significant differences exist between infection in NHP and human hosts. The mechanism for these between-host differences is not completely understood. In this paper we develop a new Bayesian approach to the detection of APOBEC3-mediated hypermutation, and use it to compare SFV sequences from human and NHP hosts living in close proximity in Bangladesh. We find that human APOBEC3G can induce genetic changes that may prevent SFV replication in infected humans in vivo.

  6. Retrospective TREC testing of newborns with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and other primary immunodeficiency diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jilkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Manitoba, Canada, the overall incidence of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID is three-fold higher than the national average, with SCID overrepresented in two population groups: Mennonites and First Nations of Northern Cree ancestries. T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC assay is being used increasingly for neonatal screening for SCID in North America. However, the majority of SCID patients in Manitoba are T-cell-positive. Therefore it is likely that the TREC assay will not identify these infants. The goal of this study was to blindly and retrospectively perform TREC analysis in confirmed SCID patients using archived Guthrie cards. Thirteen SCID patients were tested: 5 T-negative SCID (3 with adenosine deaminase deficiency, 1 with CD3δ deficiency, and 1 unclassified and 8 T-positive SCID (5 with zeta chain-associated protein kinase (ZAP70 deficiency and 3 with inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase beta (IKKβ deficiency. As a non-SCID patient group, 5 Primary Immunodeficiency Disease (PID patients were studied: 1 T-negative PID (cartilage-hair hypoplasia and 4 T-positive PID (2 common immune deficiency (CID, 1 Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome, and 1 X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Both patient groups required hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In addition, randomly-selected de-identified controls (n = 982 were tested. Results: all T-negative SCID and PID had zero TRECs. Low-TRECs were identified in 2 ZAP70 siblings, 1 CID patient as well as 5 preterm, 1 twin, and 4 de-identified controls. Conclusions: TREC method will identify T-negative SCID and T-negative PID. To identify other SCID babies, newborn screening in Manitoba must include supplemental targeted screening for ethnic-specific mutations.

  7. Unique pattern of enzootic primate viruses in Gibraltar macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Gregory A; Pizarro, Mark; Shaw, Eric; Cortes, John; Fuentes, Agustin; Barry, Peter; Lerche, Nicholas; Grant, Richard; Cohn, Douglas; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2008-07-01

    Because Gibraltar's macaques (Macaca sylvanus) have frequent contact with humans, we assayed 79 macaques for antibodies to enzootic primate viruses. All macaques were seronegative for herpesvirus B, simian T-cell lymphotropic virus, simian retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and rhesus cytomegalovirus. Seroprevalence of simian foamy virus reached 88% among adult animals.

  8. Identification and characterization of highly divergent simian foamy viruses in a wide range of new world primates from Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia P Muniz

    Full Text Available Foamy viruses naturally infect a wide range of mammals, including Old World (OWP and New World primates (NWP, which are collectively called simian foamy viruses (SFV. While NWP species in Central and South America are highly diverse, only SFV from captive marmoset, spider monkey, and squirrel monkey have been genetically characterized and the molecular epidemiology of SFV infection in NWPs remains unknown. We tested a large collection of genomic DNA (n = 332 comprising 14 genera of NWP species for the presence of SFV polymerase (pol sequences using generic PCR primers. Further molecular characterization of positive samples was carried out by LTR-gag and larger pol sequence analysis. We identified novel SFVs infecting nine NWP genera. Prevalence rates varied between 14-30% in different species for which at least 10 specimens were tested. High SFV genetic diversity among NWP up to 50% in LTR-gag and 40% in pol was revealed by intragenus and intrafamilial comparisons. Two different SFV strains infecting two captive yellow-breasted capuchins did not group in species-specific lineages but rather clustered with SFVs from marmoset and spider monkeys, indicating independent cross-species transmission events. We describe the first SFV epidemiology study of NWP, and the first evidence of SFV infection in wild NWPs. We also document a wide distribution of distinct SFVs in 14 NWP genera, including two novel co-speciating SFVs in capuchins and howler monkeys, suggestive of an ancient evolutionary history in NWPs for at least 28 million years. A high SFV genetic diversity was seen among NWP, yet these viruses seem able to jump between NWP species and even genera. Our results raise concerns for the risk of zoonotic transmission of NWP SFV to humans as these primates are regularly hunted for food or kept as pets in forest regions of South America.

  9. Simian sarcoma virus-encoded gag-related protein: in vitro cleavage by Friend leukemia virus-associated proteolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafenrichter, R; Thiel, H J

    1985-05-01

    The simian sarcoma virus (SSV) encodes a gag-related 65,000-Da protein (SSV p65) which is not processed in SSV nonproducer cells (SSV-NP cells) (H.-J. Thiel, T. J. Matthews, E. M. Broughton, K. J. Weinhold, D. P. Bolognesi, T. Graf, and H. Beug (1981a), Virology 114, 124-131). In order to cleave SSV p65, retroviral particles containing this antigen were incubated with extracts from the heterologous helper virus Friend leukemia virus (FLV). Superinfection of SSV-NP cells by FLV has been previously shown to result in processing of SSV p65 in vivo (H.-J. Thiel, F. Weiland, R. Hafenrichter, T. J. Matthews, and K. J. Weinhold (1982), Virology 123, 229-234). In vitro cleavage was most efficient in the presence of a nonionic detergent (greater than 0.1% Nonidet-P40) and a reducing agent (greater than 5 mM dithiothreitol) at a pH of 7.0. The products, termed SSV p55 (p15, p12, p30), SSV p30, SSV p25 (p15, p12), and SSV p10, were characterized by (1) molecular weight, (2) kinetics experiments, (3) incorporation of different radiolabeled amino acids, and (4) comparison with SSAV structural proteins. Kinetics experiments with two amino acids ([3H]leucine, [35S]cysteine) revealed that initial processing of SSV p65 produced SSV p55 and SSV p10, with subsequent processing of SSV p55 occurring thereafter. In contrast to the Moloney system, the major intermediate p40 (p30, p10) could not be clearly demonstrated. A direct comparison of SSAV p10 and the cleavage product SSV p10 by SDS-PAGE suggests that SSAV pr65gag and SSV p65 differ slightly by molecular weight.

  10. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  11. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... (PHS) Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV... Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus... Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) through Transplantation of Human Tissue and Organs. The 2011......

  12. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and......

  13. Genetics Home Reference: T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alopecia, and nail dystrophy is a type of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which is a group of disorders characterized ... Diseases Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease InfoSearch: T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia and ...

  14. Vaccine-associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis in Immunodeficient Children, Iran, 1995–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Mamishi, Setareh; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Gooya, Mohammad Mehdi; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi, Taha; Yousefi, Maryam; Farrokhi, Kobra; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Nategh, Rakhshandeh

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in immunodeficient infants, we reviewed all documented cases caused by immunodeficiency-associated vaccine-derived polioviruses in Iran from 1995 through 2008. Changing to an inactivated polio vaccine vaccination schedule and introduction of screening of neonates for immunodeficiencies could reduce the risk for VAPP infection. PMID:20587188

  15. Vaccine-associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis in Immunodeficient Children, Iran, 1995–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Mamishi, Setareh; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Gooya, Mohammad Mehdi; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi, Taha; Yousefi, Maryam; Farrokhi, Kobra; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; NATEGH, RAKHSHANDEH; Parvaneh, Nima

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in immunodeficient infants, we reviewed all documented cases caused by immunodeficiency-associated vaccine-derived polioviruses in Iran from 1995 through 2008. Changing to an inactivated polio vaccine vaccination schedule and introduction of screening of neonates for immunodeficiencies could reduce the risk for VAPP infection.

  16. Survival and Persistence of Nonpathogenic Escherichia coli and Attenuated Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Soils Amended with Animal Manure in a Greenhouse Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manan; Millner, Patricia D; Hashem, Fawzy; Camp, Mary; Whyte, Celia; Graham, Lorna; Cotton, Corrie P

    2016-06-01

    Animal manure provides benefits to agriculture but may contain pathogens that contaminate ready-to-eat produce. U.S. Food and Drug Administration standards include 90- or 120-day intervals between application of manure and harvest of crop to minimize risks of pathogen contamination of fresh produce. Data on factors affecting survival of Escherichia coli in soils under greenhouse conditions are needed. Three separate studies were conducted to evaluate survival of nonpathogenic E. coli (gEc) and attenuated E. coli O157:H7 (attO157) inoculated at either low (4 log CFU/ml) or high (6 log CFU/ml) populations over 56 days. Studies involved two pot sizes (small, 398 cm(3); large, 89 liters), three soil types (sandy loam, SL; clay loam, CL; silt loam, SIL), and four amendments (poultry litter, PL; dairy manure liquids, DML; horse manure, HM; unamended). Amendments were applied to the surface of the soil in either small or large containers. Study 1, conducted in regularly irrigated small containers, showed that populations of gEc and attO157 (2.84 to 2.88 log CFU/g) in PL-amended soils were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those in DML-amended (0.29 to 0.32 log CFU/g [dry weight] [gdw]) or unamended (0.25 to 0.28 log CFU/gdw) soils; soil type did not affect E. coli survival. Results from study 2, in large pots with CL and SIL, showed that PL-amended soils supported significantly higher attO157 and gEc populations compared with HM-amended or unamended soils. Study 3 compared results from small and large containers that received high inoculum simultaneously. Overall, in both small and large containers, PLamended soils supported higher gEc and attO157 populations compared with HM-amended and unamended soils. Populations of attO157 were significantly greater in small containers (1.83 log CFU/gdw) than in large containers (0.65 log CFU/gdw) at week 8, perhaps because small containers received more regular irrigation than large pots. Regular irrigation of small pots may have

  17. Characterization of a non-pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus isolated from a migratory duck flying from Siberia in Hokkaido, Japan, in October 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamatsu Masatoshi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs of domestic poultry and wild birds has spread to more than 60 countries in Eurasia and Africa. It is concerned that HPAIVs may be perpetuated in the lakes in Siberia where migratory water birds nest in summer. To monitor whether HPAIVs circulate in migratory water birds, intensive surveillance of avian influenza has been performed in Mongolia and Japan in autumn each year. Until 2008, there had not been any H5N1 viruses isolated from migratory water birds that flew from their nesting lakes in Siberia. In autumn 2009, A/mallard/Hokkaido/24/09 (H5N1 (Mal/Hok/24/09 was isolated from a fecal sample of a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos that flew from Siberia to Hokkaido, Japan. The isolate was assessed for pathogenicity in chickens, domestic ducks, and quails and analyzed antigenically and phylogenetically. Results No clinical signs were observed in chickens inoculated intravenously with Mal/Hok/24/09 (H5N1. There was no viral replication in chickens inoculated intranasally with the isolate. None of the domestic ducks and quails inoculated intranasally with the isolate showed any clinical signs. There were no multiple basic amino acid residues at the cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA of the isolate. Each gene of Mal/Hok/24/09 (H5N1 is phylogenetically closely related to that of influenza viruses isolated from migratory water birds that flew from their nesting lakes in autumn. Additionally, the antigenicity of the HA of the isolate was similar to that of the viruses isolated from migratory water birds in Hokkaido that flew from their northern territory in autumn and different from those of HPAIVs isolated from birds found dead in China, Mongolia, and Japan on the way back to their northern territory in spring. Conclusion Mal/Hok/24/09 (H5N1 is a non-pathogenic avian influenza virus for chickens, domestic ducks, and quails, and is antigenically and genetically

  18. The role of cell wall-based defences in the early restriction of non-pathogenic hrp mutant bacteria in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy; Brown, Ian; Knox, Paul; Mansfield, John

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the cause of the restricted multiplication of hrp mutant bacteria in leaves of Arabidopsis. Our focus was on early interactions leading to differentiation between virulent wild-type and non-pathogenic hrpA mutant strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. An initial drop in recoverable bacteria detected 0-4 h after inoculation with either strain was dependent on a functional FLS2 receptor and H2O2 accumulation in challenged leaves. Wild-type bacteria subsequently multiplied rapidly whereas the hrpA mutant was restricted within 6 h. Despite the early restriction, the hrpA mutant was still viable several days after inoculation. Analysis of intercellular washing fluids (IWFs), showed that high levels of nutrients were readily available to bacteria in the apoplast and that no diffusible inhibitors were produced in response to bacterial challenge. Histochemical and immunocytochemical methods were used to detect changes in polysaccharides (callose, two forms of cellulose, and pectin), arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), H2O2 and peroxidase. Quantitative analysis showed very similar changes in localisation of AGPs, cellulose epitopes and callose 2 and 4 h after inoculation with either strain. However from 6 to 12 h after inoculation papillae expanded only next to the hrp mutant. In contrast to the similar patterns of secretory activity recorded from mesophyll cells, accumulation of H2O2 and peroxidase was significantly greater around the hrpA mutant within the first 4h after inoculation. A striking differential accumulation of H2O2 was also found in chloroplasts in cells next to the mutant. Ascorbate levels were lower in the IWFs recovered from sites inoculated with the hrp mutant than with wild-type bacteria. The critical response, observed at the right time and place to explain the observed differential behaviour of wild-type and hrpA mutant bacteria was the accumulation of H2O2, probably generated through Type III peroxidase activity and in

  19. Validation of Baking To Control Salmonella Serovars in Hamburger Bun Manufacturing, and Evaluation of Enterococcus faecium ATCC 8459 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as Nonpathogenic Surrogate Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channaiah, Lakshmikantha H; Holmgren, Elizabeth S; Michael, Minto; Sevart, Nicholas J; Milke, Donka; Schwan, Carla L; Krug, Matthew; Wilder, Amanda; Phebus, Randall K; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Milliken, George

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to validate a simulated commercial baking process for hamburger buns to destroy Salmonella serovars and to determine the appropriateness of using nonpathogenic surrogates (Enterococcus faecium ATCC 8459 or Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for in-plant process validation studies. Wheat flour was inoculated (∼6 log CFU/g) with three Salmonella serovars (Typhimurium, Newport, or Senftenberg 775W) or with E. faecium. Dough was formed, proofed, and baked to mimic commercial manufacturing conditions. Buns were baked for up to 13 min in a conventional oven (218.3°C), with internal crumb temperature increasing to ∼100°C during the first 8 min of baking and remaining at this temperature until removal from the oven. Salmonella and E. faecium populations were undetectable by enrichment (>6-log CFU/g reductions) after 9.0 and 11.5 min of baking, respectively, and ≥5-log-cycle reductions were achieved by 6.0 and 7.75 min, respectively. D-values of Salmonella (three-serovar cocktail) and E. faecium 8459 in dough were 28.64 and 133.33, 7.61 and 55.67, and 3.14 and 14.72 min at 55, 58, and 61°C, respectively, whereas D-values of S. cerevisiae were 18.73, 5.67, and 1.03 min at 52, 55, and 58°C, respectivly. The z-values of Salmonella, E. faecium, and S. cerevisiae were 6.58, 6.25, and 4.74°C, respectively. A high level of thermal lethality was observed for baking of typical hamburger bun dough, resulting in rapid elimination of high levels of the three-strain Salmonella cocktail; however, the lethality and microbial destruction kinetics should not be extrapolated to other bakery products without further research. E. faecium demonstrated greater thermal resistance compared with Salmonella during bun baking and could serve as a conservative surrogate to validate thermal process lethality in commercial bun baking operations. Low thermal tolerance of S. cerevisiae relative to Salmonella serovars limits its usefulness as a surrogate for process validations.

  20. Myopericarditis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosed by gallium scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cregler, L.L.; Sosa, I.; Ducey, S.; Abbey, L. (Bronx VA Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Myocarditis is among the cardiac complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and, yet, is often not discovered until autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy has been employed in diagnosing this entity, but few data are available about its diagnostic accuracy and value. Here, the authors report two cases of myopericarditis as diagnosed by gallium scan.

  1. Neutralizing antibodies in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Tozzini; D. Matteucci; P. Bandecchi; F. Baldinotti; C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M. Bendinelli

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSera from cats experimentally infected with five isolates of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) from various geographical regions and from FIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-seropositive field cats from four European countries neutralized the Petaluma strain of FIV (FIV-P), originall

  2. BCGitis and BCGosis in children with primary immunodeficiency - imaging characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrot, Shai; Soudack, Michalle [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Barkai, Galia [Sheba Medical Center, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Safra Children' s Hospital, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Ben-Shlush, Aviva [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ramat-Gan (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    When administered to an immune-compromised patient, BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guerin) can cause disseminated and life-threatening infections. To describe the imaging findings in children with primary immunodeficiency and BCG-related infections. We reviewed the imaging findings of children with primary immunodeficiency treated at a children's hospital during 2012-2014 with localized or disseminated BCG infection. Imaging modalities included US, CT and radiography. Nine children with primary immunodeficiency had clinical signs of post-vaccination BCGitis; seven of these children showed disseminated disease and two showed only regional lesions with characteristic ipsilateral lymphadenopathy. Overall, lymphadenopathy was the most prevalent feature (n = 8) and characteristically appeared as a ring-enhancing hypodense (CT) or hypoechoic (US) lesion. Visceral involvement with multiple abscesses appeared in the spleen (n = 2), liver (n = 1) and bones (n = 1). All lesions regressed following appropriate anti-tuberculosis treatment. BCG infection needs to be considered in children with typical findings and with suspected primary immunodeficiency. (orig.)

  3. Successful nonsibling bone marrow transplantation in severe combined immunodeficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsøe, K; Skinhøj, P; Andersen, V

    1978-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was diagnosed in a girl immediately after birth; her older brother had SCID and was successfully reconstituted by bone marrow transplantation from his uncle. She was isolated in a laminar air flow bench and decontaminated. The father differed by one HLA...

  4. Vaccination against feline immunodeficiency virus using fixed infected cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Verschoor, E.J.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Egberink, H.F.; Hesselink, W.; Alphen, W.E. van; Joosten, I.; Boog, C.J.P.; Ronde, A. de

    1995-01-01

    Crandell feline kidney cells and feline thymocytes, either feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infected or uninfected, were fixed with paraformaldehyde and used to vaccinate cats. The cells were mixed with a 30:70 water/mineral oil emulsion containing 250 mu g ml−1 N-acetyl-d-glucosaminyl-beta-(1 4)

  5. Evaluation of subunit vaccines against feline immunodeficiency virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Verschoor, E.J.; Willemse, M.J.; Stam, J.G.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Pouwels, H.; Chalmers, S.K.; Sondermeijer, P.J.; Hesselink, W.; Ronde, A. de

    1996-01-01

    Subunit vaccines prepared against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection were evaluated in two trials. First, cats were immunized with bacterial expression products of an envelope fragment that contained the V3 neutralization domain of the FIV surface protein fused to either galactokinase

  6. Genetics Home Reference: ZAP70-related severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related SCID is one of several forms of severe combined immunodeficiency, a group of disorders with several genetic causes. Children with SCID lack ... Foundation Jeffrey Modell Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders ... ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles ...

  7. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  8. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Presenting with Neonatal Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri; Woolfrey, Ann; Fleming, Mark; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  9. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Alteration in pancreatic islet function in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind the defects in insulin production and secretion associated with antihuman immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapy and the development of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) are discussed in this article. Data suggesting insulin resistance on the beta cell an...

  11. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozkan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases. Early diagnosis, including prenatally, and early transplantation improve HSCT outcomes. Survival rates improve with advances in the methods of preparing hosts and donor cells, and in supportive and conditioning regimes.

  12. The EUROclass trial: Defining subgroups in common variable immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Wehr (Claudia); T. Kivioja (Teemu); C. Schmitt (Christian); B. Ferry (Berne); T. Witte (Torsten); E. Eren (Efrem); M. Vlkova (Marcela); M. Hernandez (Manuel); D. Detkova (Drahomira); P.R. Bos (Philip); G. Poerksen (Gonke); H. von Bernuth (Horst); U. Baumann (Ulrich); S. Goldacker (Sigune); S. Gutenberger (Sylvia); M. Schlesier (Michael); F. Bergeron-Van der Cruyssen (Florence); M. Le Garff (Magali); P. Debré (Patrice); R. Jacobs (Roland); J. Jones (John); E. Bateman (Elizabeth); J. Litzman (Jiri); P.M. van Hagen (Martin); A. Plebani (Alessandro); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); V. Thon (Vojtech); I. Quinti (Isabella); T. Espanol (Teresa); A.D. Webster (David); H. Chapel (Helen); M. Vihinen (Mauno); E. Oksenhendler (Eric); H.H. Peter; K. Warnatz (Klaus)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe heterogeneity of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) calls for a classification addressing pathogenic mechanisms as well as clinical relevance. This European multicenter trial was initiated to develop a consensus of 2 existing classification schemes based on flowcytometric B-cell

  13. Simian foamy virus in non-human primates and cross-species transmission to humans in Gabon: an emerging zoonotic disease in central Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2013-06-19

    It is now known that all human retroviruses have a non-human primate counterpart. It has been reported that the presence of these retroviruses in humans is the result of interspecies transmission. Several authors have described the passage of a simian retrovirus, simian foamy virus (SFV), from primates to humans. To better understand this retroviral "zoonosis" in natural settings, we evaluated the presence of SFV in both captive and wild non-human primates and in humans at high risk, such as hunters and people bitten by a non-human primate, in Gabon, central Africa. A high prevalence of SFV was found in blood samples from non-human primates and in bush meat collected across the country. Mandrills were found to be highly infected with two distinct strains of SFV, depending on their geographical location. Furthermore, samples collected from hunters and non-human primate laboratory workers showed clear, extensive cross-species transmission of SFV. People who had been bitten by mandrills, gorillas and chimpanzees had persistent SFV infection with low genetic drift. Thus, SFV is presumed to be transmitted from non-human primates mainly through severe bites, involving contact between infected saliva and blood. In this review, we summarize and discuss our five-year observations on the prevalence and dissemination of SFV in humans and non-human primates in Gabon.

  14. Effects of Simian Betaretrovirus Serotype 1 (SRV1) Infection on the Differentiation of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells (CD34+) Derived from Bone Marrow of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Nestor A; Todd, Patricia A; Yee, JoAnn; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral blood cytopenias, particularly persistent anemia and neutropenia, are commonly associated with simian betaretrovirus infection of Asian monkeys of the genus Macaca. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying these hematologic abnormalities are not well understood. The current study investigated the in vitro tropism of simian betaretrovirus (SRV) for both hematopoietic progenitor (CD34+) and stromal cells obtained from rhesus macaque bone marrow and assessed the effects of infection on hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation in vitro. After in vitro exposure, SRV proviral DNA could be demonstrated by real-time PCR in cells and the reverse transcriptase assay in supernatants from SRV-exposed progenitor-associated stroma, but not in differentiated colonies derived from SRV-exposed progenitors. Furthermore, in vitro exposure involving cell–cell contact of uninfected CD34+ progenitor cells with SRV-infected stromal cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction in granulocyte–macrophage colony formation in absence of detectable SRV-infection of progenitor cells. Reduction in colony formation occurred in a ‘dose-dependent’ fashion with increasing contact time. No effects on erythroid lineages and RBC differentiation were noted. Our results suggest that hematologic abnormalities observed during SRV disease (natural or experimental) of rhesus macaques may not result from direct effects of viral infection of progenitor cell populations, but rather be (at least in part) a consequence of SRV infection of supportive bone marrow stroma with secondary effects on differentiation of associated progenitor cells. PMID:22330653

  15. Feline immunodeficiency. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosie, Margaret J; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C

    2009-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus closely related to human immunodeficiency virus. Most felids are susceptible to FIV, but humans are not. Feline immunodeficiency virus is endemic in domestic cat populations worldwide. The virus loses infectivity quickly outside the host and is susceptible to all disinfectants. Feline immunodeficiency virus is transmitted via bites. The risk of transmission is low in households with socially well-adapted cats. Transmission from mother to kittens may occur, especially if the queen is undergoing an acute infection. Cats with FIV are persistently infected in spite of their ability to mount antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. Infected cats generally remain free of clinical signs for several years, and some cats never develop disease, depending on the infecting isolate. Most clinical signs are the consequence of immunodeficiency and secondary infection. Typical manifestations are chronic gingivostomatitis, chronic rhinitis, lymphadenopathy, weight loss and immune-mediated glomerulonephritis. Positive in-practice ELISA results obtained in a low-prevalence or low-risk population should always be confirmed by a laboratory. Western blot is the 'gold standard' laboratory test for FIV serology. PCR-based assays vary in performance. Cats should never be euthanased solely on the basis of an FIV-positive test result. Cats infected with FIV may live as long as uninfected cats, with appropriate management. Asymptomatic FIV-infected cats should be neutered to avoid fighting and virus transmission. Infected cats should receive regular veterinary health checks. They can be housed in the same ward as other patients, but should be kept in individual cages. At present, there is no FIV vaccine commercially available in Europe. Potential benefits and risks of vaccinating FIV-infected cats should be assessed on an individual cat basis. Needles and surgical instruments used on FIV-positive cats may transmit the virus to other cats

  16. Comparative analysis of the human and feline c-sis proto-oncogenes : Identification of 5' human c-sis coding sequences that are not homologous to the transforming gene of simian sarcoma virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, Ans M.W. van den; Breuer, M.L.; Steenbergh, P.H.; Schalken, Jack A.; Bloemers, H.P.J.; Ven, Wim J.M. Van de

    1985-01-01

    Feline and human genetic sequences, homologous to the v-sis gene of simian sarcoma virus, have been isolated from cosmid gene libraries and characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis. Comparison of the two loci revealed their related structural organization. In both loci, similar unique gene

  17. Sensitivity of simian virus 40-transformed C57BL/6 mouse embryo fibroblasts to lysis by murine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresa, K L; Karjalainen, H E; Tevethia, S S

    1987-02-15

    The susceptibility of mouse cells expressing full-length or truncated transforming protein (T antigen) of simian virus 40 (SV40) to lysis by murine natural killer (NK) cells was assessed. For these studies, C57BL/6 mouse embryo fibroblasts (B6/MEF) were transformed by transfection with SV40 DNA encoding the entire T antigen. The transformed cell lines were tested for susceptibility to lysis by nonimmune CBA splenocytes as a source of NK cells and to lysis by C57BL/6, SV40-specific cytolytic T cells (CTL). It was found that 13 of 15 clonally derived, SV40-transformed H-2b cell lines were susceptible to lysis by NK cells. However, there was some variation in their susceptibility to lysis by NK cells. There was no correlation between susceptibility to lysis by SV40-specific CTL and to lysis by NK cells. Cells transfected with a plasmid which encodes only the N-terminal half of the SV40 T antigen were consistently less susceptible to lysis by NK cells, suggesting that expression of only the N-terminus of the T antigen was insufficient for optimal susceptibility to lysis by NK cells. Primary mouse embryo fibroblasts transformed by human adenovirus type 5 E1 region DNA were also found to be susceptible to NK cell-mediated lysis. Lysis of SV40-transformed cells by nonimmune CBA splenocytes was mediated by NK cells because: lysis was augmented when the effector cells were treated with interferon before assay; and lysis was abrogated when the effector cells were obtained from mice that had been depleted of NK activity by treatment with antiserum against the asialo GM1 surface marker. These results indicate that primary mouse cells which are transformed by SV40 and which express the native T antigen are susceptible to lysis by mouse NK cells. Conversely, cells transformed by a plasmid encoding only the N-terminal half of the T antigen express reduced susceptibility to lysis by NK cells.

  18. Rhesus monkeys exposed intravaginally to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus have a characteristic pattern of cytokine, chemokine and Foxp3 expression in the genital tract, intestine and lymphoid tissues despite vastly different levels of viral replication and

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.M.; Ma; K.; Abel; T.; Rourke; Y.; Wang; M.B.; McChesney; C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Intravaginal inoculation with pathogenic SIVproduces atypical systemic infectionin most exposed animals andthe rema-ining animals are plasma vRNAnegative and anti-SIVantibody negative.Thusthe animalsfitthe categoryof exposed-un-infected monkeys.However,SIVRNAor DNAcan be detectedinthe tissues of many of these animals,indicatingthatatypical infections occur withconsiderablefrequency afterintravaginal SIVexposure.We pursued anindirect approachtoconfirmthat the exposed-uninfected animals were truly uninfected ...

  19. A polyvalent Clade B virus-like particle HIV vaccine combined with partially protective oral preexposure prophylaxis prevents simian-human immunodeficiency virus Infection in macaques and primes for virus-amplified immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ted M; Pereira, Lara E; Luckay, Amara; McNicholl, Janet M; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid; Eugene, Hermancia S; Pierce-Paul, Brooke R; Zhang, Jining; Hendry, R Michael; Smith, James M

    2014-11-01

    Vaccination and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretrovirals have shown only partial protection from HIV-1 infection in human trials. Oral Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) is FDA approved as PrEP but partial adherence reduces efficacy. If combined as biomedical preventions (CBP), an HIV vaccine could protect when PrEP adherence is low and PrEP could prevent vaccine breakthroughs. The efficacy of combining oral PrEP with an HIV vaccine has not been evaluated in humans. We determined the efficacy of combining a DNA/virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine with partially effective intermittent PrEP in Indian rhesus macaques (RM). Eight RM received intramuscular inoculations of five DNA plasmids encoding four HIV-1 Clade B primary isolate Envs and SIVmac239 Gag (at weeks 0 and 4), followed by intramuscular and intranasal inoculations of homologous Gag VLPs and four Env VLPs (at weeks 12, 16, and 53). At week 61, we initiated weekly rectal exposures with heterologous SHIV162p3 (10 TCID50) along with oral Truvada (TDF, 22 mg/kg; FTC 20 mg/kg) dosing 2 h before and 22 h after each exposure. This PrEP regimen previously demonstrated 50% efficacy. Five controls (no vaccine, no PrEP) received weekly SHIV162p3. All controls were infected after a median of four exposures; the mean peak plasma viral load (VL) was 3.9×10(7) vRNA copies/ml. CBP protected seven of eight (87.5%) RM. The one infected CBP RM had a reduced peak VL of 8.8×10(5) copies/ml. SHIV exposures during PrEP amplified Gag and Env antibody titers in protected RM. These results suggest that combining oral PrEP with HIV vaccines could enhance protection against HIV-1 infection.

  20. A formylpeptide receptor, FPRL1, acts as an efficient coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apichartpiyakul Chatchawann

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 10 members of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs have been shown to work as coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, HIV type 2 (HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs. As a common feature of HIV/SIV coreceptors, tyrosine residues are present with asparagines, aspartic acids or glutamic acids in the amino-terminal extracellular regions (NTRs. We noticed that a receptor for N-formylpeptides, FPRL1, also contains two tyrosine residues accompanied by glutamic acids in its NTR. It was reported that monocytes expressing CCR5 and FPRL1 in addition to CD4 are activated by treatment with ligands or agonists of FPRL1. Activated monocytes down-modulate CCR5 and become resistant to infection by HIV-1 strains. Thus, FPRL1 plays important roles in protection of monocyptes against HIV-1 infection. However, its own coreceptor activity has not been elucidated yet. In this study, we examined coreceptor activities of FPRL1 for HIV/SIV strains including primary HIV-1 isolates. Results A CD4-transduced human glioma cell line, NP-2/CD4, is strictly resistant to HIV/SIV infection. We have reported that when NP-2/CD4 cells are transduced with a GPCR having coreceptor activity, the cells become susceptible to HIV/SIV strains. When NP-2/CD4 cells were transduced with FPRL1, the resultant NP-2/CD4/FPRL1 cells became markedly susceptible to some laboratory-adapted HIV/SIV strains. We found that FPRL1 is also efficiently used as a coreceptor by primary HIV-1 isolates as well as CCR5 or CXCR4. Amino acid sequences linked to the FPRL1 use could not be detected in the V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein. Coreceptor activities of FPRL1 were partially blocked by the forymyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF peptide. Conclusion We conclude that FPRL1 is a novel and efficient coreceptor for HIV/SIV strains. FPRL1 works as a bifunctional factor in HIV-1 infection. Namely, the role of FPRL1 in HIV-1 infection is protective

  1. Type III-Dependent Translocation of HrpB2 by a Nonpathogenic hpaABC Mutant of the Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, Felix; Schulz, Steve; Hausner, Jens; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-01-01

    secretion process and interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of the inner membrane protein HrcU. Here, we localized the secretion and translocation signal of HrpB2 in the N-terminal 40 amino acids and show that this region is sufficient for the interaction with the cytoplasmic domain of HrcU. Our results suggest that the T3S signal of HrpB2 is required for the docking of HrpB2 to the secretion apparatus. Furthermore, we provide experimental evidence that the N-terminal region of HrpB2 is sufficient to target effector proteins for translocation in a nonpathogenic X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strain. PMID:27016569

  2. Interactions of human immunodeficiency virus-1 proteins with neurons : possible role in the development of human immunodeficiency virus-1-associated dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, M; Nottet, HSLM; Pereira, CF

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia is a severe neurological complication of HIV-1 infection that affects 15-20% of the patients in the late stages of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1-associated dementia is most probably a consequence of HIV-1 infection of the brain r

  3. Immunodeficiency in Patients With 49,XXXXY Chromosomal Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Michael D.; Sadeghin, Teresa; Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Boys affected with 49,XXXXY sex chromosomal variation have been described to have high incidence of recurrent otitis media and asthma, the cause of which is unknown. We hypothesized that primary immunodeficiency occurs in patients with XXXXY aneuploidy. To investigate this, 31 boys with known 49,XXXXY were evaluated through a multidisciplinary clinic. Screening history was performed using the “10 Warning Signs of primary immunodeficiency” (Jeffrey Modell Foundation), as well as by history of atopic and autoimmune conditions. Of the 31 boys, 20 had at least two warning signs of primary immunodeficiency, and five had four or more signs. Sixteen had history of recurrent pneumonia, and 15 carried the diagnosis of asthma. Of the 10 who underwent immunologic screening, eight showed some evidence of impaired antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens, and one was diagnosed with specific antibody deficiency. These preliminary results suggest a high incidence of both atopy and antibody deficiency in boys with 49,XXXXY. PMID:23345259

  4. T cell-B cell interactions in primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Ma, Cindy S

    2012-02-01

    Regulated interactions between cells of the immune system facilitate the generation of successful immune responses, thereby enabling efficient neutralization and clearance of pathogens and the establishment of both cell- and humoral-mediated immunological memory. The corollary of this is that impediments to efficient cell-cell interactions, normally necessary for differentiation and effector functions of immune cells, underly the clinical features and disease pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiencies. In affected individuals, these defects manifest as impaired long-term humoral immunity and susceptibility to infection by specific pathogens. In this review, we discuss the importance of, and requirements for, effective interactions between B cells and T cells during the formation of CD4(+) T follicular helper cells and the elicitation of cytotoxic function of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as how these processes are abrogated in primary immunodeficiencies due to loss-of-function mutations in defined genes. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae.

  6. Distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyö, E M; Morfeldt-Månson, L; Chiodi, F; Lind, B; von Gegerfelt, A; Albert, J; Olausson, E; Asjö, B

    1988-01-01

    According to their capacity to replicate in vitro, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates can be divided into two major groups, rapid/high and slow/low. Rapid/high viruses can easily be transmitted to a variety of cell lines of T-lymphoid (CEM, H9, and Jurkat) and monocytoid (U937) origin. In contrast, slow/low viruses replicate transiently, if at all, in these cell lines. Except for a few isolates, the great majority of slow/low viruses replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Jurkat-tatIII cells constitutively expressing the tatIII gene of HIV-1. The viruses able to replicate efficiently cause syncytium formation and are regularly isolated from immunodeficient patients. Poorly replicating HIV isolates, often obtained from individuals with no or mild disease, show syncytium formation and single-cell killing simultaneously or, with some isolates, cell killing only. Images PMID:2459416

  7. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatter, Mary A; Cant, Andrew J

    2011-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is now highly successfully curing a widening range of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Better tissue typing, matching of donors, less toxic chemotherapy, better virus detection and treatment, improved supportive care, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis mean up to a 90% cure for severe combined immunodeficiency patients and a 70-80% cure for other PIDs given a matched unrelated donor, and rising to 95% for young patients with specific PIDs, such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Precise molecular diagnosis, detailed data on prognosis, and careful pre-HSCT assessment of infective lung and liver damage will ensure an informed benefit analysis of HSCT and the best outcome. It is now recognized that the best treatment option for chronic granulomatous disease is HSCT, which can also be curative for CD40 ligand deficiency and complex immune dysregulation disorders.

  9. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  10. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism without causing immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shinta; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    In successive reports from 2014 to 2015, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 4 (XRCC4) has been identified as a novel causative gene of primordial dwarfism. XRCC4 is indispensable for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. As NHEJ is essential for V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development, it is generally believed that abnormalities in XRCC4 cause severe combined immunodeficiency. Contrary to expectations, however, no overt immunodeficiency has been observed in patients with primordial dwarfism harboring XRCC4 mutations. Here, we describe the various XRCC4 mutations that lead to disease and discuss their impact on NHEJ and V(D)J recombination.

  11. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of malignancy in common variable immunodeficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak Manesh, A; Azizi, G; Heydari, A; Kiaee, F; Shaghaghi, M; Hossein-Khannazer, N; Yazdani, R; Abolhassani, H; Aghamohammadi, A

    2017-04-12

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a diagnostic category of primary immunodeficiency (PID) which may present with heterogeneous disorders including recurrent infections, autoimmunity, granulomatous diseases, lymphoid and other types of malignancies. Generally, the incidence of malignancy in CVID patients is around 1.5-20.7% and usually occurs during the 4th-6th decade of life. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the most frequent malignancy, followed by epithelial tumours of stomach, breast, bladder and cervix. The exact pathological mechanisms for cancer development in CVID are not fully determined; however, several mechanisms including impaired genetic stability, genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, impaired clearance of oncogenic viruses and bacterial infections, and iatrogenic causes have been proposed to contribute to the high susceptibility of these patients to malignancies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. Inactivation of bovine immunodeficiency virus by photodynamic therapy with HMME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijuan Yin; Yingxin Li; Zhaohui Zou; Wentao Qiao; Xue Yao; Yang Su; Hongyan Guo

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) can provide the basis theory for photoinactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To assess the protection of HMME-PDT on the cell line Cf2Th infected with BIVR29 by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazol-2-yl-3,5-di-phenytetrazolium bromide (MTT) with power density of 5 and 25 mW/cm2 and energy density from 0.6 to 3 J/cm. To observe the inhibition of membrane fusion using a new reporter cell line BIVE by fluorescence microscope. HMME-PDT has significant protectant effects on Cf2Th-BIVR29 with both power densities, especially in the group of high power density. Fluorescent microscope shows that there is no significant difference between the group of PDT and control, which means PDT could not inhibit the BIV-mediated membrane fusion.

  13. Cardiac Disease Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Leung, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic disease requiring long-term management. Aging, antiretroviral therapy, chronic inflammation, and several other factors contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients infected with HIV. In low-income and middle-income countries where antiretroviral therapy access is limited, cardiac disease is most commonly related to opportunistic infections and end-stage manifestations of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, including HIV-associated cardiomyopathy, pericarditis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Cardiovascular screening, prevention, and risk factor management are important factors in the management of patients infected with HIV worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  15. Molecular and genetic basis of X-linked immunodeficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puck, J.M. (National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Within a short time interval the specific gene defects causing three X-linked human immunodeficiencies, agammaglobulinemia (XLA), hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM), and severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), have been identified. These represent the first human disease phenotypes associated with each of three gene families already recognized to be important in lymphocyte development and signaling: XLA is caused by mutations of a B cell-specific intracellular tyrosine kinase; HIGM, by mutations in the TNF-related CD40 ligand, through which T cells deliver helper signals by direct contact with B cell CD40; and XSCID, by mutations in the [gamma] chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Each patient mutation analyzed to date has been unique, representing both a challenge for genetic diagnosis and management and an important resource for dissecting molecular domains and understanding the physiologic function of the gene products.

  16. Severe combined immunodeficiency resulting from mutations in MTHFD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Michael D; Ganesh, Jaya; Heltzer, Meredith; Paessler, Michele; Bergqvist, A G Christina; Baluarte, H Jorge; Watkins, David; Rosenblatt, David S; Orange, Jordan S

    2013-02-01

    Folate and vitamin B(12) metabolism are essential for de novo purine synthesis, and several defects in these pathways have been associated with immunodeficiency. Here we describe the occurrence of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with megaloblastic anemia, leukopenia, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and neurologic abnormalities in which hydroxocobalamin and folate therapy provided partial immune reconstitution. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the MTHFD1 gene, which encodes a trifunctional protein essential for processing of single-carbon folate derivatives. We now report the immunologic details of this novel genetic cause of SCID and the response to targeted metabolic supplementation therapies. This finding expands the known metabolic causes of SCID and presents an important diagnostic consideration given the positive impact of therapy.

  17. Severe Dermatophytosis and Acquired or Innate Immunodeficiency: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Rouzaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are keratinophilic fungi responsible for benign and common forms of infection worldwide. However, they can lead to rare and severe diseases in immunocompromised patients. Severe forms include extensive and/or invasive dermatophytosis, i.e., deep dermatophytosis and Majocchi’s granuloma. They are reported in immunocompromised hosts with primary (autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency or acquired (solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases requiring immunosuppressive treatments, HIV infection immunodeficiencies. The clinical manifestations of the infection are not specific. Lymph node and organ involvement may also occur. Diagnosis requires both mycological and histological findings. There is no consensus on treatment. Systemic antifungal agents such as terbinafine and azoles (itraconazole or posaconazole are effective. However, long-term outcome and treatment management depend on the site and extent of the infection and the nature of the underlying immunodeficiency.

  18. Immunodeficiency in Patients With 49,XXXXY Chromosomal Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Michael D; Sadeghin, Teresa; Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Boys affected with 49,XXXXY sex chromosomal variation have been described to have high incidence of recurrent otitis media and asthma, the cause of which is unknown. We hypothesized that primary immunodeficiency occurs in patients with XXXXY aneuploidy. To investigate this, 31 boys with known 49,XXXXY were evaluated through a multidisciplinary clinic. Screening history was performed using the “10 Warning Signs of primary immunodeficiency” (Jeffrey Modell Foundation), as well as by history of ...

  19. Disseminated BCG infection in a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Tae Il [Eulji University School of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial infection after bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) accination is a very rare disorder, occurring mostly in patients with immunologic eficiency. We report a case of disseminated BCG infection in a 16-month-old girl with severe combined immunodeficiency. Plain radiographs showed multiple osteolytic lesions in the femora, tibiae, humerus, and phalanges. Abdominal sonography and CT scanning revealed multiple nodules in the spleen, and portocaval lymphadenopathy.

  20. Primary immunodeficiencies appearing as combined lymphopenia, neutropenia, and monocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Laura; Badolato, Raffaele

    2014-10-01

    Recurrent or prolonged severe infections associated to panleukopenia strongly suggest primary immune disorders. In recent years, new immunodeficiency syndromes turned up: besides the importance of continuous clinical characterization throughout added reports, the phenotype can easily lead to diagnosis of known rare entities. Our purpose is to review main emerging genetic syndromes featuring lymphopenia combined to neutropenia and/or monocytopenia in order to facilitate diagnosis of rare primary immune deficiencies.