WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonparabolic conduction band

  1. Effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the optical properties in a single quantum well under hydrostatic pressure and electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Panda; B Panda

    2012-05-01

    The effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the linear and nonlinear optical properties such as absorption coefficients, and changes in the refractive index are calculated in the Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs heterostructure-based symmetric rectangular quantum well under applied hydrostatic pressure and electric field. The electron envelope functions and energies are calculated in the effective mass equation including the conduction band nonparabolicity. The linear and nonlinear optical properties have been calculated in the density matrix formalism with two-level approximation. The conduction band nonparabolicity shifts the positions of the optical properties and decreases their strength compared to those without this correction. Both the optical properties are enhanced with the applied hydrostatic pressure. While the absorption coefficients are bleached under the combined effect of high pressure and electric field, the bleaching effect is reduced when nonparabolicity is included.

  2. Band nonparabolicity effect on spectral properties of quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, L. F.; Revinova, S. Yu.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the effect of the non-parabolicity of the conduction band and of the interband mixing, on the Aharonov Bohm oscillations of the energy levels of a volcano-shaped thin layer, made of InAs material and deposited on the GaAs substrate, by using the Kane model. We derive a simple interpolative relationship between geometrical parameters of the layer and the confinement potential governing the in-plane electron's movement, which allows us to separate the non-linear energy confinement problem in a volcano-shaped structure with a special geometry. Our results show that the nonparabolicity of dispersion of the conduction band, given by the Kane formula, conduces to a significant lowering of the charge carriers' energies and their stronger localization inside the ring. On the contrary, the nonparabolicity almost does not change neither the amplitude nor the period of the Aharonov Bohm oscillations. Additionally, we analyze the interplay between the localization and tunneling of the charge carriers, generated by the external magnetic field in structures with radially directed single, double and quadruple valleys.

  3. The effects of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity on a donor binding energy under the simultaneous effect of pressure and temperature basing on the numerical FEM in a spherical quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, A.; Kharbach, J.; Rezzouk, A.; Ouazzani Jamil, M.

    2017-04-01

    Basing on the numerical Finite Element Method (FEM), we have investigated the influences of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity on the binding energy of the ground state of an on-center hydrogenic donor impurity in a spherical GaAs / Ga1 - x AlxAs quantum dot structure. The calculations have been made with a realistic potential barrier height in the framework of the effective mass approximation including the combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The donor binding energy is computed as a function of dot size, Al concentration x , hydrostatic pressure and temperature both in the absence and presence of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity effects. We have taken into account the electronic effective mass, dielectric constant, and conduction band offset between the dot and barriers varying with pressure and temperature. It has been found that the binding energy is strongly affected by the effect of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity for narrow quantum dot and large Al concentration x. The results show again that the donor binding energy increases linearly with the pressure in direct gap regime and its variation is larger for narrower dots only and drops slightly with the temperature. A good agreement is obtained with the existing literature values.

  4. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  5. Carrier-carrier relaxation kinetics in quantum well semiconductor structures with nonparabolic energy bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dery, H.; Tromborg, Bjarne; Eisenstein, G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe carrier-carrier scattering dynamics in an inverted quantum well structure including the nonparabolic nature of the valance band. A solution of the semiconductor Bloch equations yields strong evidence to a large change in the temporal evolution of the carrier distributions compared...... to the case of parabolic bands. The nonparabolic bands and the consequent change in the density of states reduce considerably the degree of gain saturation while decreasing the time constant governing the relaxation. This results in a measurable reduction of the role played by carrier-carrier scattering...

  6. Strain effect on graphene nanoribbon carrier statistic in the presence of non-parabolic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuani Che Rosid, N. A.; Ahmadi, M. T.; Ismail, Razali

    2016-09-01

    The effect of tensile uniaxial strain on the non-parabolic electronic band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) is investigated. In addition, the density of states and the carrier statistic based on the tight-binding Hamiltonian are modeled analytically. It is found that the property of AGNR in the non-parabolic band region is varied by the strain. The tunable energy band gap in AGNR upon strain at the minimum energy is described for each of n-AGNR families in the non-parabolic approximation. The behavior of AGNR in the presence of strain is attributed to the breakable AGNR electronic band structure, which varies the physical properties from its normality. The linear relation between the energy gap and the electrical properties is featured to further explain the characteristic of the deformed AGNR upon strain. Project supported by the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), Malaysia under the Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS) (Grant No.Q.J130000.7823.4F477). We also thank the Research Management Center (RMC) of Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) for providing an excellent research environment.

  7. Numerical computation of pyramidal quantum dots with band non-parabolicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Shu, Yong-chun; Xu, Jing-jun; Wang, Zhan-guo

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an effective and feasible eigen-energy scanning method to solve polynomial matrix eigenvalues introduced by 3D quantum dots problem with band non-parabolicity. The pyramid-shaped quantum dot is placed in a computational box with uniform mesh in Cartesian coordinates. Its corresponding Schrödinger equation is discretized by the finite difference method. The interface conditions are incorporated into the discretization scheme without explicitly enforcing them. By comparing the eigenvalues from isolated quantum dots and a vertically aligned regular array of them, we investigate the coupling effect for variable distances between the quantum dots and different size.

  8. Effective mass measurement: the influence of hole band nonparabolicity in SiGe/Ge quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössner, Benjamin; von Känel, Hans; Chrastina, Daniel; Isella, Giovanni; Batlogg, Bertram

    2007-01-01

    We show that the common practice of identifying effective masses derived from Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) and cyclotron resonance measurements with zero-field effective density of states (DOS) masses must be scrutinized when nonparabolicity effects come into play. To this end, the temperature dependence of theoretical SdH oscillations expected for strained-Ge quantum wells is explicitly simulated from calculations of the Landau level structure, giving rise to theoretical masses in exact analogy to a SdH measurement. The calculations are performed within a 6 × 6 envelope function approximation (EFA). The same method is used to calculate the zero-field DOS mass. Our analysis shows that the pronounced nonparabolicity of the heavy hole band leads to a nonlinear magnetic field dependence of Landau level energies invalidating the assumption of equal cyclotron and DOS masses. In particular, we show that at high carrier density the DOS mass is significantly underestimated in a SdH measurement.

  9. Influence of nonparabolicity on electronic structure of quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the influence of nonparabolicity on the bound electronic states in the conduction-band of quantum wells in external electric field. Numerical results, obtained by transfer matrix method are presented for active region of GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum cascade laser. The structure was initially optimized by genetic algorithm, using Kane's model of nonparabolicity, with emission wavelength set to λ≈15.1 μm. However, our numerical results indicate the change in lasing wavelength to 14.04 μm when using a more comprehensive description of nonparabolicity.

  10. Importance of non-parabolic band effects in the thermoelectric properties of semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Chen; David Parker; Singh, David J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the thermoelectric properties of of $n$-type GeTe and SnTe in relation to the lead chalcogenides PbTe and PbSe. We find that the singly degenerate conduction bands of semiconducting GeTe and SnTe are highly non-ellipsoidal, even very close to the band edges. This leads to isoenergy surfaces with a strongly corrugated shape that is clearly evident at carrier concentrations well below 0.005 $e$ per formula unit (7 - 9 $\\times$ 10$^{19}$cm$^{-3}$ depending on material) ...

  11. Importance of non-parabolic band effects in the thermoelectric properties of semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Parker, David; Singh, David J

    2013-11-07

    We present an analysis of the thermoelectric properties of of n-type GeTe and SnTe in relation to the lead chalcogenides PbTe and PbSe. We find that the singly degenerate conduction bands of semiconducting GeTe and SnTe are highly non-ellipsoidal, even very close to the band edges. This leads to isoenergy surfaces with a strongly corrugated shape that is clearly evident at carrier concentrations well below 0.005 e per formula unit (7-9 × 10(19) cm(-3) depending on material). Analysis within Boltzmann theory suggests that this corrugation may be favorable for the thermoelectric transport. Our calculations also indicate that values of the power factor for these two materials may well exceed those of PbTe and PbSe. As a result these materials may exhibit n-type performance exceeding that of the lead chalcogenides.

  12. Effect of Quantizing Magnetic Field on Cyclotron Energy and Cyclotron Effective Mass in Size Quantized Films with Non-Parabolic Energy Band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.(I). GUL(I)YEV; R. F. EM(I)NBEYL(I); A. KORKUT

    2007-01-01

    The Fermi energy, cyclotron energy and cyclotron effective mass of degenerate electron gas in a size-quantized semiconductor thin film with non-parabolic energy bands are studied. The influences of quantizing magnetic field on these quantities in two-band approximation of the Kane model are investigated. It is shown that the Fermi energy oscillates in a magnetic field. The period and positions of these oscillations are found as a function of film thickness and concentration of electrons. Cyclotron energy and cyclotron effective mass are investigated as a function of film thickness in detail. The results obtained here are compared with experimental data on GaAs quantum wells.

  13. Low-field mobility spectrum in nonparabolic compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starikov, E [Semiconductor Physics Institute, A Gostauto 11, 2600 Vilnius (Lithuania); Shiktorov, P [Semiconductor Physics Institute, A Gostauto 11, 2600 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gruzinskis, V [Semiconductor Physics Institute, A Gostauto 11, 2600 Vilnius (Lithuania); Reggiani, L [INFM-National Nanotechnology Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Varani, L [CEM2-Centre d' Electronique et de Micro-optoelectronique de Montpellier (CNRS UMR 5507), Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Vaissiere, J C [CEM2-Centre d' Electronique et de Micro-optoelectronique de Montpellier (CNRS UMR 5507), Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Palermo, C [CEM2-Centre d' Electronique et de Micro-optoelectronique de Montpellier (CNRS UMR 5507), Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2004-11-24

    The low-field mobility spectrum and related quantities is calculated for a nonparabolic band by using the exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation within the relaxation time approach. Numerical calculations are applied to bulk nitrides at different lattice temperatures and impurity concentrations.

  14. Non-Parabolic Hydrodynamic Formulations for the Simulation of Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. W.; Brennan, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models are becoming prevalent design tools for small scale devices and other devices in which high energy effects can dominate transport. Most current hydrodynamic models use a parabolic band approximation to obtain fairly simple conservation equations. Interest in accounting for band structure effects in hydrodynamic device simulation has begun to grow since parabolic models cannot fully describe the transport in state of the art devices due to the distribution populating non-parabolic states within the band. This paper presents two different non-parabolic formulations or the hydrodynamic model suitable for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = W(1 + alphaW). The second formulation makes use of a power law ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(exp y)) for the dispersion relation. Hydrodynamic models which use the first formulation rely on the binomial expansion to obtain moment equations with closed form coefficients. This limits the energy range over which the model is valid. The power law formulation readily produces closed form coefficients similar to those obtained using the parabolic band approximation. However, the fitting parameters (x,y) are only valid over a limited energy range. The physical significance of the band non-parabolicity is discussed as well as the advantages/disadvantages and approximations of the two non-parabolic models. A companion paper describes device simulations based on the three dispersion relationships; parabolic, Kane dispersion and power law dispersion.

  15. Non-Parabolic Hydrodynamic Formulations for the Simulation of Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. W.; Brennan, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models are becoming prevalent design tools for small scale devices and other devices in which high energy effects can dominate transport. Most current hydrodynamic models use a parabolic band approximation to obtain fairly simple conservation equations. Interest in accounting for band structure effects in hydrodynamic device simulation has begun to grow since parabolic models cannot fully describe the transport in state of the art devices due to the distribution populating non-parabolic states within the band. This paper presents two different non-parabolic formulations or the hydrodynamic model suitable for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = W(1 + alphaW). The second formulation makes use of a power law ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(exp y)) for the dispersion relation. Hydrodynamic models which use the first formulation rely on the binomial expansion to obtain moment equations with closed form coefficients. This limits the energy range over which the model is valid. The power law formulation readily produces closed form coefficients similar to those obtained using the parabolic band approximation. However, the fitting parameters (x,y) are only valid over a limited energy range. The physical significance of the band non-parabolicity is discussed as well as the advantages/disadvantages and approximations of the two non-parabolic models. A companion paper describes device simulations based on the three dispersion relationships; parabolic, Kane dispersion and power law dispersion.

  16. Conduction band mass determinations for n-type InGaAs/InAlAs single quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.D.; Reno, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kotera, Nobuo [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan); Wang, Y. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.

    1998-05-01

    The authors report the measurement of the conduction band mass in n-type single 27-ML-wide InGaAs/InAlAs quantum well lattice matched to InP using two methods: (1) Magnetoluminescence spectroscopy and (2) far-infrared cyclotron resonance. The magnetoluminescence method utilizes Landau level transitions between 0 and 14 T at 1.4 K. The far infrared cyclotron resonance measurements were made at 4.2 K and to fields as large up to 18 T. The 2D-carrier density N{sub 2D} = 3 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2} at low temperatures. The magnetoluminescence technique yielded an effective conduction-band mass of m{sub c} = 0.062m{sub 0} while the far infrared cyclotron resonance measurements gave m{sub c} = 0.056m{sub 0}, where m{sub 0} is the free electron mass. Both measurements show no evidence for any significant conduction-band nonparabolicity.

  17. Graphene Nanoribbon Conductance Model in Parabolic Band Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Ahmadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental measurements have been done on GNR conductance. In this paper, analytical model of GNR conductance is presented. Moreover, comparison with published data which illustrates good agreement between them is studied. Conductance of GNR as a one-dimensional device channel with parabolic band structures near the charge neutrality point is improved. Based on quantum confinement effect, the conductance of GNR in parabolic part of the band structure, also the temperature-dependent conductance which displays minimum conductance near the charge neutrality point are calculated. Graphene nanoribbon (GNR with parabolic band structure near the minimum band energy terminates Fermi-Dirac integral base method on band structure study. While band structure is parabola, semiconducting GNRs conductance is a function of Fermi-Dirac integral which is based on Maxwell approximation in nondegenerate limit especially for a long channel.

  18. Conduction Band of the Photographic Compound AgCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1999-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations on the photographic compound AgCl are reported. It is shown that the conduction band has a large Cl-4s character, contrary to the common picture of the conduction band being derived from Ag-5s states. Possible consequences for the photographic process are discussed.

  19. Conduction Band of the Photographic Compound AgCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1999-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations on the photographic compound AgCl are reported. It is shown that the conduction band has a large Cl-4s character, contrary to the common picture of the conduction band being derived from Ag-5s states. Possible consequences for the photographic process are discussed.

  20. Transport properties of Fibonacci heterostructures: a nonparabolic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino-Ovando, M.; Cocoletzi, G. H.

    1998-07-01

    A fourth order hamiltonian is used to explore transport properties of semiconductor Fibonacci heterostructures. The tunneling current and time delay are obtained for different Fibonacci sequences constructed withGaAsandAlxGa1 - xAs. Energy minibands are calculated to study the fractal dimension and critical electronic states in quasi-periodic arrays. Results show that nonparabolic corrections produce changes in the tunneling current, time delay and fractal dimension, and a low voltage shift of the current peaks compared with the parabolic theory. The electronic states preserve their critical nature in the presence of nonparabolic effects.

  1. Conduction bands and invariant energy gaps in alkali bromides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations of the alkali bromides LiBr, NaBr, KBr, RbBr and CsBr are reported. It is shown that the conduction band has primarily bromine character. The size of the band gaps of bromides and alkali halides in general is reinterpreted.

  2. Current-Temperature Scaling for a Schottky Interface with Nonparabolic Energy Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Y. S.; Ang, L. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the Schottky transport in a narrow-gap semiconductor and few-layer graphene in which the energy dispersions are highly nonparabolic. We propose that the contrasting current-temperature scaling relation of J ∝T2 in the conventional Schottky interface and J ∝T3 in graphene-based Schottky interface can be reconciled under Kane's k .p nonparabolic band model for narrow-gap semiconductors. Our model suggests a more general form of J ∝(T2+γ kBT3) , where the nonparabolicty parameter γ provides a smooth transition from T2 to T3 scaling. For few-layer graphene, we find that N -layer graphene with A B C stacking follows J ∝T2 /N +1 , while A B A stacking follows a universal form of J ∝T3 regardless of the number of layers. Intriguingly, the Richardson constant extracted from the Arrhenius plot using an incorrect scaling relation disagrees with the actual value by 2 orders of magnitude, suggesting that correct models must be used in order to extract important properties for many Schottky devices.

  3. Electron concentration dependence of optical band gap shift in Ga-doped ZnO thin films by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaqin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Tang, Wu, E-mail: tang@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang, Lan [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhao, Junliang [Shanghai Juntech Co. Ltd., 1378 Xingxian Road, Shanghai 201815 (China)

    2014-08-28

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by a radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The optical properties of the deposited GZO films were evaluated using an optical transmission measurement. The optical band gap increased from 3.32 eV to 3.45 eV with the increasing carrier density from 2.0 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} to 3.24 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Based on the experimental results, the optical band gap as a function of carrier density is systematically investigated with four available theoretical models taken into consideration. The blueshift of the optical band gap in GZO films can be well interpreted with a complex model which combines the Burstein–Moss effect, the band gap renormalization effect and the nonparabolic nature of conduction band. In addition, the BM contribution is almost offset by the BGR effect in both conduction band and valence band due to the approximate equality between electron and hole effective masses in GZO films with a nonparabolic conduction band. The tunability of optical band gap in GZO thin films by carrier density offers a number of potential advantages in the development of semiconductor optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • The effects of electron concentration on optical band gap were analyzed. • The measured optical band gap corresponded well with the calculated ones. • The Burstein–Moss (BM) and band gap renormalization (BGR) effects were considered. • Nonparabolic conduction band parameters were used in theoretical analysis. • The BM effect was offset by the BGR effect in both conduction band and valence band.

  4. Characterization of the valence and conduction bands in Si nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, T.; Terminello, L.; Chase, L.; Callcott, T.; Grush, M.

    1998-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals with a mean diameter between 1 and 4 nm were produced by thermal evaporation of Si in Ar buffer gas and deposited on a substrate. The size-distribution and diameter of the clusters were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The valence and conduction band edges of the Si nanocrystals were measured in-situ using soft x-ray emission (SXE) and absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The valence band of the smallest Si nanocrystals is shifted by much as 0.7 eV relative to bulk Si. Significant changes in the shape of the spectra are also observed between the Si nanocrytals and bulk Si. We interpret the shift and changes in the spectra of the valence band as resulting from an altered electronic band structure in the confined Si structures. A smaller but proportional shift of the conduction band to higher energy is also observed in the XAS spectra of the silicon nanostructures. We compare the experimentally measured bandgap to recent electronic structure calculations and find, that the experimentally measured bandgap is smaller than that predicted by theory. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, BES-Materials Sciences, under Contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  5. Conductivity measurements in a shear-banding wormlike micellar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photinos, Panos J; López-González, M R; Hoven, Corey V; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-07-01

    Shear banding in the cetylpyridinium chloride/sodium salicylate micellar system is investigated using electrical conductivity measurements parallel to the velocity and parallel to the vorticity in a cylindrical Couette cell. The measurements show that the conductivity parallel to the velocity (vorticity) increases (decreases) monotonically with applied shear rate. The shear-induced anisotropy is over one order of magnitude lower than the anisotropy of the N(c) nematic phase. The steady-state conductivity measurements indicate that the anisotropy of the shear induced low-viscosity (high shear rate) phase is not significantly larger than the anisotropy of the high viscosity (low shear rate) phase. We estimate that the micelles in the shear induced low viscosity band are relatively short, with a characteristic length to diameter ratio of 5-15. The relaxation behavior following the onset of shear is markedly different above and below the first critical value γ1, in agreement with results obtained by other methods. The transient measurements show that the overall anisotropy of the sample decreases as the steady state is approached, i.e., the micellar length/the degree of order decrease.

  6. Effects of Conducting-Gesture Instruction on Seventh-Grade Band Students' Performance Response to Conducting Emblems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofer, R. Shayne

    1998-01-01

    Investigates effects of short-term conducting gesture instruction on seventh-grade band students' recognition of and performance response to musical conducting gestures. Indicates that short-term conducting-gesture instruction has a positive, statistically significant impact on recognition of and performance response to conducting gestures.…

  7. Multi-ion conduction bands in a simple model of calcium ion channels

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2012-01-01

    We report self-consistent Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple electrostatic model of the selectivity filters (SF) of calcium ion channels. They reveal regular structure in the conductance and selectivity as functions of the fixed negative charge Qf at the SF. This structure comprises distinct regions of high conductance (conduction bands) M0, M1, M2 separated by regions of zero-conductance (stop-bands). Two of these conduction bands, M1 and M2, demonstrate high calcium selectivity and prominent anomalous mole fraction effects and can be identified with the L-type and RyR calcium channels.

  8. The conduction bands of MgO, MgS and HfO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations for MgO, MgS and HfO2 are reported. It is shown that the conduction bands of MgO and MgS have predominantly anion character, contrary to the common picture of the conduction band being derived from cation states. In transition metal oxides, unoccupied anion states a

  9. Inter-band effects of magnetic field on orbital susceptibility and Hall conductivity - case of bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-07-03

    Interband effects of magnetic field on orbital susceptibility and Hall conductivity have been theoretically studied with special reference to single crystal bismuth (Bi), whose energy bands near the band-edges are similar to those of Dirac electrons. It has long been known that orbital susceptibilty in Bi has a maximum when the Fermi energy is located in the band-gap and then the density of states at the Fermi energy is vanishing. This implies that the magnetic field induces persistent current even in the insulating state. On the other hand, weak-field Hall conductivity, which reflects transport current, has turned out to be vanishing if the Fermi energy is in the band-gap. Interesting possibility has been pointed out of the inter-band contributions to the Hall conductivity once the Fermi energy lies slightly in the energy band. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Direct Observation of Electrostatically Driven Band Gap Renormalization in a Degenerate Perovskite Transparent Conducting Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebens-Higgins, Z.; Scanlon, D. O.; Paik, H.; Sallis, S.; Nie, Y.; Uchida, M.; Quackenbush, N. F.; Wahila, M. J.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Arena, Dario A.; Woicik, J. C.; Schlom, D. G.; Piper, L. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have directly measured the band gap renormalization associated with the Moss-Burstein shift in the perovskite transparent conducting oxide (TCO), La-doped BaSnO 3 , using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We determine that the band gap renormalization is almost entirely associated with the evolution of the conduction band. Our experimental results are supported by hybrid density functional theory supercell calculations. We determine that unlike conventional TCOs where interactions with the dopant orbitals are important, the band gap renormalization in La - BaSnO 3 is driven purely by electrostatic interactions.

  11. Direct Observation of Electrostatically Driven Band Gap Renormalization in a Degenerate Perovskite Transparent Conducting Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebens-Higgins, Z; Scanlon, D O; Paik, H; Sallis, S; Nie, Y; Uchida, M; Quackenbush, N F; Wahila, M J; Sterbinsky, G E; Arena, Dario A; Woicik, J C; Schlom, D G; Piper, L F J

    2016-01-15

    We have directly measured the band gap renormalization associated with the Moss-Burstein shift in the perovskite transparent conducting oxide (TCO), La-doped BaSnO_{3}, using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We determine that the band gap renormalization is almost entirely associated with the evolution of the conduction band. Our experimental results are supported by hybrid density functional theory supercell calculations. We determine that unlike conventional TCOs where interactions with the dopant orbitals are important, the band gap renormalization in La-BaSnO_{3} is driven purely by electrostatic interactions.

  12. Revisiting the Valence and Conduction Band Size Dependence of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Elisa M.; Kroupa, Daniel M.; Zhang, Jianbing; Schulz, Philip; Marshall, Ashley R.; Kahn, Antoine; Lany, Stephan; Luther, Joseph M.; Beard, Matthew C.; Perkins, Craig L.; van de Lagemaat, Jao

    2016-03-22

    We use a high signal-to-noise X-ray photoelectron spectrum of bulk PbS, GW calculations, and a model assuming parabolic bands to unravel the various X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectral features of bulk PbS as well as determine how to best analyze the valence band region of PbS quantum dot (QD) films. X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) are commonly used to probe the difference between the Fermi level and valence band maximum (VBM) for crystalline and thin-film semiconductors. However, we find that when the standard XPS/UPS analysis is used for PbS, the results are often unrealistic due to the low density of states at the VBM. Instead, a parabolic band model is used to determine the VBM for the PbS QD films, which is based on the bulk PbS experimental spectrum and bulk GW calculations. Our analysis highlights the breakdown of the Brillioun zone representation of the band diagram for large band gap, highly quantum confined PbS QDs. We have also determined that in 1,2-ethanedithiol-treated PbS QD films the Fermi level position is dependent on the QD size; specifically, the smallest band gap QD films have the Fermi level near the conduction band minimum and the Fermi level moves away from the conduction band for larger band gap PbS QD films. This change in the Fermi level within the QD band gap could be due to changes in the Pb:S ratio. In addition, we use inverse photoelectron spectroscopy to measure the conduction band region, which has similar challenges in the analysis of PbS QD films due to a low density of states near the conduction band minimum.

  13. The scaling of the effective band gaps in indium-arsenide quantum dots and wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Jeong, Sohee; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Gibbons, Patrick C; Buhro, William E

    2008-09-23

    Colloidal InAs quantum wires having diameters in the range of 5-57 nm and narrow diameter distributions are grown from Bi nanoparticles by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) mechanism. The diameter dependence of the effective band gaps (DeltaE(g)s) in the wires is determined from photoluminescence spectra and compared to the experimental results for InAs quantum dots and rods and to the predictions of various theoretical models. The DeltaE(g) values for InAs quantum dots and wires are found to scale linearly with inverse diameter (d(-1)), whereas the simplest confinement models predict that DeltaE(g) should scale with inverse-square diameter (d(-2)). The difference in the observed and predicted scaling dimension is attributed to conduction-band nonparabolicity induced by strong valence-band-conduction-band coupling in the narrow-gap InAs semiconductor.

  14. Valence and conduction band structure of the quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor Sn S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racke, David A.; Neupane, Mahesh R.; Monti, Oliver L. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the momentum-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of both the valence and the conduction band region in the quasi-two-dimensional van der Waals-layered indirect band gap semiconductor Sn S2 . Using a combination of angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission (AR-2PPE) spectroscopy, we characterize the band structure of bulk Sn S2 . Comparison with density functional theory calculations shows excellent quantitative agreement in the valence band region and reveals several localized bands that likely originate from defects such as sulfur vacancies. Evidence for a moderate density of defects is also observed by AR-2PPE in the conduction band region, leading to localized bands not present in the computational results. The energetic structure and dispersion of the conduction bands is captured well by the computational treatment, with some quantitative discrepancies remaining. Our results provide a broader understanding of the electronic structure of Sn S2 in particular and van der Waals-layered semiconductors in general.

  15. Transient mid-IR study of electron dynamics in TiO2 conduction band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Jacinto; Friedli, Peter; Geiger, Richard; Lerch, Philippe; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes H; Milne, Christopher J; Szlachetko, Jakub; Santomauro, Fabio G; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Chergui, Majed; Rossi, Michel J; Sigg, Hans

    2013-04-07

    The dynamics of TiO2 conduction band electrons were followed with a novel broadband synchrotron-based transient mid-IR spectroscopy setup. The lifetime of conduction band electrons was found to be dependent on the injection method used. Direct band gap excitation results in a lifetime of 2.5 ns, whereas indirect excitation at 532 nm via Ru-N719 dye followed by injection from the dye into TiO2 results in a lifetime of 5.9 ns.

  16. Tunable Band Gap and Conductivity Type of ZnSe/Si Core-Shell Nanowire Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zeng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of zincblende ZnSe/Si core-shell nanowires (NWs with a diameter of 1.1–2.8 nm are calculated by means of the first principle calculation. Band gaps of both ZnSe-core/Si-shell and Si-core/ZnSe-shell NWs are much smaller than those of pure ZnSe or Si NWs. Band alignment analysis reveals that the small band gaps of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs are caused by the interface state. Fixing the ZnSe core size and enlarging the Si shell would turn the NWs from intrinsic to p-type, then to metallic. However, Fixing the Si core and enlarging the ZnSe shell would not change the band gap significantly. The partial charge distribution diagram shows that the conduction band maximum (CBM is confined in Si, while the valence band maximum (VBM is mainly distributed around the interface. Our findings also show that the band gap and conductivity type of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs can be tuned by the concentration and diameter of the core-shell material, respectively.

  17. Tunable Band Gap and Conductivity Type of ZnSe/Si Core-Shell Nanowire Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yijie; Xing, Huaizhong; Fang, Yanbian; Huang, Yan; Lu, Aijiang; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2014-10-31

    The electronic properties of zincblende ZnSe/Si core-shell nanowires (NWs) with a diameter of 1.1-2.8 nm are calculated by means of the first principle calculation. Band gaps of both ZnSe-core/Si-shell and Si-core/ZnSe-shell NWs are much smaller than those of pure ZnSe or Si NWs. Band alignment analysis reveals that the small band gaps of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs are caused by the interface state. Fixing the ZnSe core size and enlarging the Si shell would turn the NWs from intrinsic to p-type, then to metallic. However, Fixing the Si core and enlarging the ZnSe shell would not change the band gap significantly. The partial charge distribution diagram shows that the conduction band maximum (CBM) is confined in Si, while the valence band maximum (VBM) is mainly distributed around the interface. Our findings also show that the band gap and conductivity type of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs can be tuned by the concentration and diameter of the core-shell material, respectively.

  18. Band gap and conductivity variations of ZnO thin films by doping with Aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattappalam, Sunil C.; Thomas, Deepu; T, Raju Mathew; Augustine, Simon; Mathew, Sunny

    2015-02-01

    Zinc Oxide thin films were prepared by Successive Ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique(SILAR). Aluminium was doped for different doping concentrations from 3 at.% to 12 at.% in steps of 3 at.%. Conductivity of the samples were taken at different temperatures. UV Spectrograph of the samples were taken and the band gap of each sample was found from the data. It was observed that as the doping concentration of Aluminium increases, the band gap of the samples decreases and concequently conductivity of the samples increases.

  19. Band gap and conductivity variations of ZnO nano structured thin films annealed under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattappalam, Sunil C.; Thomas, Deepu; T, Raju Mathew; Augustine, Simon; Mathew, Sunny

    2015-02-01

    Zinc Oxide thin films were prepared by Successive Ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique(SILAR). The samples were annealed under vacuum and conductivity of the samples were taken at different temperatures. UV Spectrograph of the samples were taken and the band gap of each sample was found from the data. All the results were compared with that of the sample annealed under air. It was observed that the band gap decreases and concequently conductivity of the samples increases when the samples are annealed under vacuum.

  20. Theory of thermal conductivity in a multi-band superconductor : Application to pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vivek; Vorontsov, A. B.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Vekhter, I.

    2010-03-01

    We calculate low temperature thermal conductivity within a two band model for newly discovered ferro-pnictide superconductors. We consider three different cases, sign changing s-wave state, highly anisotropic s-wave state and a state with order parameter nodes on one band. To include the effect of disorder, we have performed fully self-consistent T-matrix approximation including both intraband and interband impurity scatterings. We also study the behavior of the low temperature thermal conductivity under applied magnetic field using a recently developed variant of the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt approximation, and compare our results with latest experimental data.

  1. Conduction mechanism in Polyaniline-flyash composite material for shielding against electromagnetic radiation in X-band & Ku band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avanish Pratap; Anoop Kumar, S.; Chandra, Amita; Dhawan, S. K.

    2011-06-01

    β-Naphthalene sulphonic acid (β-NSA) doped polyaniline (PANI)-flyash (FA) composites have been prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization route whose conductivity lies in the range 2.37-21.49 S/cm. The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity has also been recorded which shows that composites follow Mott's 3D-VRH model. SEM images demonstrate that β-NSA leads to the formation of the tubular structure with incorporated flyash phase. TGA studies show the improvement in thermal stability of composites with increase in loading level of flyash. Complex parameters i.e. permittivity (ɛ* = ɛ'- iɛ″) and permeability (μ*=μ'- iμ″) of PANI-FA composites have been calculated from experimental scattering parameters (S11 & S21) using theoretical calculations given in Nicholson-Ross and Weir algorithms. The microwave absorption properties of the composites have been studied in X-band (8.2 - 12.4 GHz) & Ku-Band (12.4 - 18 GHz) frequency range. The maximum shielding effectiveness observed was 32dB, which strongly depends on dielectric loss and volume fraction of flyash in PANI matrix.

  2. Conduction mechanism in Polyaniline-flyash composite material for shielding against electromagnetic radiation in X-band & Ku band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanish Pratap Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available β–Naphthalene sulphonic acid (β–NSA doped polyaniline (PANI–flyash (FA composites have been prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization route whose conductivity lies in the range 2.37–21.49 S/cm. The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity has also been recorded which shows that composites follow Mott's 3D–VRH model. SEM images demonstrate that β–NSA leads to the formation of the tubular structure with incorporated flyash phase. TGA studies show the improvement in thermal stability of composites with increase in loading level of flyash. Complex parameters i.e. permittivity (ɛ* = ɛ′- iɛ″ and permeability (μ*=μ′- iμ″ of PANI-FA composites have been calculated from experimental scattering parameters (S11 & S21 using theoretical calculations given in Nicholson–Ross and Weir algorithms. The microwave absorption properties of the composites have been studied in X-band (8.2 – 12.4 GHz & Ku–Band (12.4 – 18 GHz frequency range. The maximum shielding effectiveness observed was 32dB, which strongly depends on dielectric loss and volume fraction of flyash in PANI matrix.

  3. Conduction band edge effective mass of La-doped BaSnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Allen, S.; Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Law, Ka-Ming; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    BaSnO3 has attracted attention as a promising material for applications requiring wide band gap, high electron mobility semiconductors, and moreover possesses the same perovskite crystal structure as many functional oxides. A key parameter for these applications and for the interpretation of its properties is the conduction band effective mass. We measure the plasma frequency of La-doped BaSnO3 thin films by glancing incidence, parallel-polarized resonant reflectivity. Using the known optical dielectric constant and measured electron density, the resonant frequency determines the band edge electron mass to be 0.19 ± 0.01. The results allow for testing band structure calculations and transport models.

  4. OPTICAL BAND GAP AND CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS OF POLYPYRROLE-CHITOSAN COMPOSITE THIN FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahnaz M.Abdi; H.N.M.Ekramul Mahmud; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Anuar Kassim; Mohamad Zaki Ab.Rahman; Josephine Liew Ying Chyi

    2012-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and optical properties of polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI) conducting polymer composites have been investigated to determine the optical transition characteristics and energy band gap of composite films.The two electrode method and Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristic technique were used to measure the conductivity of the PPy-CHI thin films,and the optical band gap was obtained from their ultraviolet absorption edges.Depending upon experimental parameter,the optical band gap (Eg) was found within 1.30-2.32 eV as estimated from optical absorption data.The band gap of the composite films decreased as the CHI content increased.The room temperature electrical conductivity of PPy-CHI thin films was found in the range of 5.84 × 10-7-15.25 × 10-7 S.cm-1 depending on the chitosan content.The thermogravimetry analysis (TGA)showed that the CHI can improve the thermal stability of PPy-CHI composite films.

  5. Kondo effect and impurity band conduction in Co:TiO2 magnetic semiconductor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaneti, R.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2007-01-01

    The nature of charge carriers and their interaction with local magnetic moments in an oxide magnetic semiconductor is established. For cobalt-doped anatase TiO2 films, we demonstrate conduction in a metallic donor-impurity band. Moreover, we observe a clear signature of the Kondo effect in electrica

  6. Determination of Conduction and Valence Band Electronic Structure of LaTiOx Ny Thin Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Markus; Szlachetko, Jakub; Castelli, Ivano E; Marzari, Nicola; Döbeli, Max; Wokaun, Alexander; Pergolesi, Daniele; Lippert, Thomas

    2017-05-09

    The nitrogen substitution into the oxygen sites of several oxide materials leads to a reduction of the band gap to the visible-light energy range, which makes these oxynitride semiconductors potential photocatalysts for efficient solar water splitting. Oxynitrides typically show a different crystal structure compared to the pristine oxide material. As the band gap is correlated to both the chemical composition and the crystal structure, it is not trivial to distinguish which modifications of the electronic structure induced by the nitrogen substitution are related to compositional and/or structural effects. Here, X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy are used to investigate the electronic structures of orthorhombic perovskite LaTiOx Ny thin films in comparison with films of the pristine oxide LaTiOx with similar orthorhombic structure and cationic oxidation state. Experiment and theory show the expected upward shift in energy of the valence band maximum that reduces the band gap as a consequence of the nitrogen incorporation. This study also shows that the conduction band minimum, typically considered almost unaffected by nitrogen substitution, undergoes a significant downward shift in energy. For a rational design of oxynitride photocatalysts, the observed changes of both the unoccupied and occupied electronic states have to be taken into account to justify the total band-gap narrowing induced by the nitrogen incorporation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Conduction band offset determination between strained CdSe and ZnSe layers using DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2013-12-01

    The conduction band offset between strained CdSe layers embedded in unintentionally n-type doped ZnSe is measured and reported. Two samples, consisting of thirty Ultra Thin Quantum Wells (UTQWs) of CdSe embedded in ZnSe, grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy, are used for this study. The thicknesses of the UTQWs are one and three monolayers (MLs) in each sample, respectively. As expected, the sample with one ML UTQWs does not show any energy level in the UTQWs due to the small thickness of the UTQWs, while the thickness of the sample with 3 ML UTQWs is large enough to form an energy level inside the UTQWs. This energy level appears as a majority trap with an activation energy of 223.58 ± 9.54 meV. This corresponds to UTQWs with barrier heights (the conduction band offset) between 742 meV and 784 meV. These values suggest that the band gap misfit between strained CdSe and ZnSe is around 70.5 to 74 % in the conduction band.

  8. Conduction band offset determination between strained CdSe and ZnSe layers using DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler Universität, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2013-12-04

    The conduction band offset between strained CdSe layers embedded in unintentionally n-type doped ZnSe is measured and reported. Two samples, consisting of thirty Ultra Thin Quantum Wells (UTQWs) of CdSe embedded in ZnSe, grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy, are used for this study. The thicknesses of the UTQWs are one and three monolayers (MLs) in each sample, respectively. As expected, the sample with one ML UTQWs does not show any energy level in the UTQWs due to the small thickness of the UTQWs, while the thickness of the sample with 3 ML UTQWs is large enough to form an energy level inside the UTQWs. This energy level appears as a majority trap with an activation energy of 223.58 ± 9.54 meV. This corresponds to UTQWs with barrier heights (the conduction band offset) between 742 meV and 784 meV. These values suggest that the band gap misfit between strained CdSe and ZnSe is around 70.5 to 74 % in the conduction band.

  9. Device Physics Analysis of Parasitic Conduction Band Barrier Formation in SiGe HBTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenker, K. P.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a physics-based model describing the current-induced formation of a parasitic barrier in the conduction band at the base collector heterojunction in npn SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Due to the valence band discontinuity DELTA E(sub v), hole injection into the collector at the onset of base pushout is impeded, which gives rise to formation of a barrier to electron transport which degrades the device's high frequency performance. In this paper, we present results from an analytical model for the height of the barrier calculated from the device's structure as a function of the collector junction bias and collector current density.

  10. Transparent Conducting Oxides for Photovoltaics: Manipulation of Fermi Level, Work Function and Energy Band Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E. Proffit

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Doping limits, band gaps, work functions and energy band alignments of undoped and donor-doped transparent conducting oxides Zn0, In2O3, and SnO2 as accessed by X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/UPS are summarized and compared. The presented collection provides an extensive data set of technologically relevant electronic properties of photovoltaic transparent electrode materials and illustrates how these relate to the underlying defect chemistry, the dependence of surface dipoles on crystallographic orientation and/or surface termination, and Fermi level pinning.

  11. Transition from spin accumulation into interface states to spin injection in silicon and germanium conduction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhinav; Rojas-Sanchez, Juan-Carlos; Cubukcu, Murat; Peiro, Julian; Le Breton, Jean-Christophe; Vergnaud, Céline; Augendre, Emmanuel; Vila, Laurent; Attané, Jean-Philippe; Gambarelli, Serge; Jaffrès, Henri; George, Jean-Marie; Jamet, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Electrical spin injection into semiconductors paves the way for exploring new phenomena in the area of spin physics and new generations of spintronic devices. However the exact role of interface states in the electrical spin injection mechanism from a magnetic tunnel junction into a semiconductor is still under debate. Here we demonstrate a clear transition from spin accumulation into interface states to spin injection in the conduction band of n-Si and n-Ge using a CoFeB/MgO tunnel contact. We observe spin signal amplification at low temperature due to spin accumulation into interface states followed by a clear transition towards spin injection in the conduction band from approximately 150 K up to room temperature. In this regime, the spin signal is reduced down to a value compatible with the standard spin diffusion model. More interestingly, in the case of germanium, we demonstrate a significant modulation of the spin signal by applying a back-gate voltage to the conduction channel. We also observe the inverse spin Hall effect in Ge by spin pumping from the CoFeB electrode. Both observations are consistent with spin accumulation in the Ge conduction band.

  12. Nonlocal Optical Spatial Soliton with a Non-parabolic Symmetry and Real-valued Convolution Response Kernel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; YU Chao-Fan; GAO Zi-You; LIANG Guo-Dong; YU Xiao-Min

    2008-01-01

    Based on the picture of nonlinear and non-parabolic symmetry response, I.e., △n2( I) ≈ p(αo -α1x- α2x2), we propose a model for the transversal beam intensity distribution of the nonlocal spatial soliton. In this model, as a convolution response with non-parabolic symmetry, △n2( I) ≈ p(b0+b1 f - b2 f2 with b2/b1 > 0 is assumed. Furthermore, instead of the wave function Ψ, the high-order nonlinear equation for the beam intensity distribution f has been derived and the bell-shaped soliton solution with the envelope form has been obtained. The results demonstrate that, since the existence of the terms of non-parabolic response, the nonlocal spatial soliton has the bistable state solution. If thefrequency shift of wave number β satisfies 0 0 has been demonstrated.

  13. Study on Band Structure of YbB6 and Analysis of Its Optical Conductivity Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structure of YbB6 crystal was studied by means of density functional (GGA+U) method.The calculations were performed by FLAPW method.The high accurate band structure was achieved.The correlation between the feature of the band structure and the Yb-B6 bonding in YbB6 was analyzed.On this basis, some optical constants of YbB6 such as reflectivity, dielectric function, optical conductivity, and energy-loss function were calculated.The results are in good agreement with the experiments.The real part of the optical conductivity spectrum and the energy-loss function spectrum were analyzed in detail.The assignments of the spectra were carried out to correlate the spectral peaks with the interband electronic transitions, which justify the reasonable part of previous empirical assignments and renew the missed or incorrect ones.

  14. Banding and electronic structures of metal azides——Sensitivity and conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖鹤鸣; 李永富

    1995-01-01

    By using both DV-Xα and EH-CO methods, the calculation studies of the structure-property relationships of a series of metal azides, of their clusters’ electronic structures in ground and excited states, of their systems with cation vacancy and the doped Pb(N3)2, as well as their crystal band structures have been conducted. The results show that the sensitivity of ionic-type metal azides varies with the degree of difficulty of electronic transition of the losing charge on N3. A metal azide with cation vacancies has a greater sensitivity than the perfect one. When doped with monovalent metal ions, lead azide’s sensitivity increased; when with trivalent ones, its sensitivity decreased; when with divalent ones, little of it changed. Compared with heavy metal azides. an alkali metal azide has a larger band gap, a smaller band width and a greater transition energy of frontier electron with a smaller amount of losing charge on N3, and thus has lower sensitivity and conductivity than heavy metal azides.

  15. Controlling the conduction band offset for highly efficient ZnO nanorods based perovskite solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Juan; Shi, Jiangjian; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo, E-mail: qbmeng@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-08-17

    The mechanism of charge recombination at the interface of n-type electron transport layer (n-ETL) and perovskite absorber on the carrier properties in the perovskite solar cell is theoretically studied. By solving the one dimensional diffusion equation with different boundary conditions, it reveals that the interface charge recombination in the perovskite solar cell can be suppressed by adjusting the conduction band offset (ΔE{sub C}) at ZnO ETL/perovskite absorber interface, thus leading to improvements in cell performance. Furthermore, Mg doped ZnO nanorods ETL has been designed to control the energy band levels. By optimizing the doping amount of Mg, the conduction band minimum of the Mg doped ZnO ETL has been raised up by 0.29 eV and a positive ΔE{sub C} of about 0.1 eV is obtained. The photovoltage of the cell is thus significantly increased due to the relatively low charge recombination.

  16. Effects of the non-parabolic kinetic energy on non-equilibrium polariton condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, F; Ruan, X; Alexander, T J

    2017-05-15

    In the study of non-equilibrium polariton condensates it is usually assumed that the dispersion relation of polaritons is parabolic in nature. We show that considering the true non-parabolic kinetic energy of polaritons leads to significant changes in the behaviour of the condensate due to the curvature of the dispersion relation and the possibility of transfer of energy to high wavenumber components in the condensate spatial profile. We present explicit solutions for plane waves and linear excitations, and identify the differences in the theoretical predictions between the parabolic and non-parabolic mean-field models, showing the possibility of symmetry breaking in the latter. We then consider the evolution of wavepackets and show that self-localisation effects may be observed due to the curvature of the dispersion relation. Finally, we revisit the dynamics of dark soliton trains and show that additional localized density excitations may emerge in the dynamics due to the excitation of high frequency components, mimicking the appearance of near-bright solitary waves over short timescales.

  17. Electrons in feldspar II: A consideration of the influence of conduction band-tail states on luminescence processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, H.R.J.; Ozanyan, K.B.; Wallinga, J.

    2002-01-01

    Most natural feldspars contain many charged impurities, and display a range of bond angles, distributed about the ideal. These effects can lead to complications in the structure of the conduction band, giving rise to a tail of energy states (below the high-mobility conduction band) through which ...

  18. Conduction band energy level control of titanium dioxide: toward an efficient visible-light-sensitive photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huogen; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2010-05-26

    Through the use of a strategy that involves narrowing the TiO(2) band gap by shifting its conduction band positively and utilizing the catalytic activity of photoproduced Cu(I) for oxygen reduction, a novel visible-light-sensitive TiO(2) photocatalyst, Cu(II)-grafted Ti(1-3x)W(x)Ga(2x)O(2), was designed and synthesized. The Cu(II)/Ti(1-3x)W(x)Ga(2x)O(2) photocatalyst produced high activity under visible-light irradiation. In fact, it decomposed 2-propanol to CO(2) via acetone under visible light (>400 nm) with a high quantum efficiency of 13%. The turnover number for this reaction exceeded 22, indicating that it functioned catalytically.

  19. Optical conductivity and resistivity in the two-band Emery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh-Tien, Tran

    1994-01-01

    The temperature- and frequency-dependent conductivity due to the scattering of oxygen holes by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations of the copper spins in the two-band Emergy model is calculated. Using the dynamic spin susceptibility obtained in the mean-field Schwinger boson approach, the resistivity obeys a near linear temperature dependence at high temperatures, whereas at low temperatures a quadratic behaviour holds. At the same time, the optical conductivity contains the Drude peak around zero frequency, whereas the scattering rate of quasiparticle appears to be proportional to frequency. Our results are essentially in agreement with experiments, at least qualitatively, and support the conclusion that the normal-state basal-plane resistivity and optical conductivity of high- Tc superconductors may be explained by two-dimensional spin-fluctuation scattering in the Fermi-liquid picture.

  20. Spin-Polarized Electron Emission from Superlattices with Zero Conduction Band Offset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, James E

    1998-11-09

    Electron spin polarization as high as 86% has been reproducibly obtained from strained Al{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x-y}As/GaAs superlattice with minimal conduction band offset at the heterointerfaces. The modulation doping of the SL provides high polarization and high quantum yield at the polarization maximum. The position of the maximum can be easily tuned to an excitation wavelength by choice of the SL composition. Further improvement of the emitter parameters can be expected with additional optimization of the SL structure parameters.

  1. Observation of electron excitation into silicon conduction band by slow-ion surface neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Shchemelinin, S

    2016-01-01

    Bare reverse biased silicon photodiodes were exposed to 3eV He+, Ne+, Ar+, N2+, N+ and H2O+ ions. In all cases an increase of the reverse current through the diode was observed. This effect and its dependence on the ionization energy of the incident ions and on other factors are qualitatively explained in the framework of Auger-type surface neutralization theory. Amplification of the ion-induced charge was observed with an avalanche photodiode under high applied bias. The observed effect can be considered as ion-induced internal potential electron emission into the conduction band of silicon. To the best of our knowledge, no experimental evidence of such effect was previously reported. Possible applications are discussed.

  2. Disorder-free localization around the conduction band edge of crossing and kinked silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleş, Ümit; ćakan, Aslı; Bulutay, Ceyhun

    2015-02-01

    We explore ballistic regime quantum transport characteristics of oxide-embedded crossing and kinked silicon nanowires (NWs) within a large-scale empirical pseudopotential electronic structure framework, coupled to the Kubo-Greenwood transport analysis. A real-space wave function study is undertaken and the outcomes are interpreted together with the findings of ballistic transport calculations. This reveals that ballistic transport edge lies tens to hundreds of millielectron volts above the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, with a substantial number of localized states appearing in between, as well as above the former. We show that these localized states are not due to the oxide interface, but rather core silicon-derived. They manifest the wave nature of electrons brought to foreground by the reflections originating from NW junctions and bends. Hence, we show that the crossings and kinks of even ultraclean Si NWs possess a conduction band tail without a recourse to atomistic disorder.

  3. Disorder-free localization around the conduction band edge of crossing and kinked silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keleş, Ümit; Çakan, Aslı; Bulutay, Ceyhun, E-mail: bulutay@fen.bilkent.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-02-14

    We explore ballistic regime quantum transport characteristics of oxide-embedded crossing and kinked silicon nanowires (NWs) within a large-scale empirical pseudopotential electronic structure framework, coupled to the Kubo-Greenwood transport analysis. A real-space wave function study is undertaken and the outcomes are interpreted together with the findings of ballistic transport calculations. This reveals that ballistic transport edge lies tens to hundreds of millielectron volts above the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, with a substantial number of localized states appearing in between, as well as above the former. We show that these localized states are not due to the oxide interface, but rather core silicon-derived. They manifest the wave nature of electrons brought to foreground by the reflections originating from NW junctions and bends. Hence, we show that the crossings and kinks of even ultraclean Si NWs possess a conduction band tail without a recourse to atomistic disorder.

  4. A simple model for conduction band states of nitride-based double heteroestructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaggero-Sager, L M; Mora-Ramos, M E, E-mail: lgaggero@uaem.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    In this work we propose an analytical expression for the approximate modeling of the potential energy function describing conduction band bending in III-V nitride quantum wells. It is an alternative approach to the self-consistent Poisson-Schoedinger calculation. The model considers the influence of the many electron system and the built-in electric field inside the well. Hartree and exchange contributions are included along the lines of a local-density Thomas-Fermi-based theory. The effects due to the modulated doping in the barriers is also considered. We report the calculation of the energy spectrum as a function of several input parameters: alloy composition in the barriers, barrier doping concentration, and quantum well width. Our results could be of usefulness in the study of optoelectronic properties in this kind of systems.

  5. Fluctuation conductivity in two-band superconductor SmFeAsO0.8F0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askerzade I.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have calculated the fluctuation conductivity near critical temperature of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 superconductor using two-band Ginzburg-Landau theory. It was illustrated that in the absence of external magnetic field, the two-band model reduced to a single effective band theory with modified temperature dependences. The calculations revealed three-dimensional character of fluctuations of conductivity in the new Fe-based superconductor SmFeAsO0.8F0.2. It has been shown that such a model is in good agreement with experimental data for this compound.

  6. Self-consistent treatment of v-groove quantum wire band structure in no parabolic approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crnjanski Jasna V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-consistent no parabolic calculation of a V-groove-quantum-wire (VQWR band structure is presented. A comparison with the parabolic flat-band model of VQWR shows that both, the self-consistency and the nonparabolicity shift sub band edges, in some cases even in the opposite directions. These shifts indicate that for an accurate description of inter sub band absorption, both effects have to be taken into the account.

  7. Effect of interfacial lattice mismatch on bulk carrier concentration and band gap of InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, F-35708 Rennes (France); Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S. M. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore-560064 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The issue of ambiguous values of the band gap (0.6 to 2 eV) of InN thin film in literature has been addressed by a careful experiment. We have grown wurtzite InN films by PA-MBE simultaneously on differently modified c-plane sapphire substrates and characterized by complementary structural and chemical probes. Our studies discount Mie resonances caused by metallic In segregation at grain boundaries as the reason for low band gap values ( Almost-Equal-To 0.6 eV) and also the formation of Indium oxides and oxynitrides as the cause for high band gap value ( Almost-Equal-To 2.0 eV). It is observed that polycrystallinity arising from azimuthal miss-orientation of c-oriented wurtzite InN crystals increases the carrier concentration and the band gap values. We have reviewed the band gap, carrier concentration, and effective mass of InN in literature and our own measurements, which show that the Moss-Burstein relation with a non-parabolic conduction band accounts for the observed variation of band gap with carrier concentration.

  8. Polarization-induced electrical conductivity in ultra-wide band gap AlGaN alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-11-01

    Unintentionally doped (UID) AlGaN epilayers graded over Al compositions of 80%-90% and 80%-100% were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and were electrically characterized using contactless sheet resistance (Rsh) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Strong electrical conductivity in the UID graded AlGaN epilayers resulted from polarization-induced doping and was verified by the low resistivity of 0.04 Ω cm for the AlGaN epilayer graded over 80%-100% Al mole fraction. A free electron concentration (n) of 4.8 × 1017 cm-3 was measured by C-V for Al compositions of 80%-100%. Average electron mobility ( μ ¯ ) was calculated from Rsh and n data for three ranges of Al composition grading, and it was found that UID AlGaN graded from 88%-96% had μ ¯ = 509 cm2/V s. The combination of very large band gap energy, high μ ¯ , and high n for UID graded AlGaN epilayers make them attractive as a building block for high voltage power electronic devices such as Schottky diodes and field effect transistors.

  9. Calculated effect of conduction-band offset on CuInSe{sub 2} solar-cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Sites, J.R. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The band diagram and resulting current-voltage curves for CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells are calculated as functions of conduction-band offset using ADEPT software with and without an indium-rich intermediate layer. In the absence of the intermediate layer, current-voltage curves for CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells show only a weak dependence on conduction-band offset over a wide range from approximately {minus}0.5 eV to 0.4 eV at room temperature. An indium rich {ital n}-type intermediate layer with 1.3 eV band gap and thickness smaller than the depletion width can increase the open-circuit voltage as much as 30{percent} at large positive band offsets. The highest efficiency, however, is increased by a more modest 6{percent}. Again the cell parameters are relatively flat, but over a somewhat narrower conduction-band offset range. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. THE BAND STRUCTURE AND WORK FUNCTION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTING ALUMINUM AND MANGANESE CO-DOPED ZINC OXIDE FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T. Cao; Z.L. Pei; X.B. Zhang; J. Gong; C. Sun; L.S. Wen

    2005-01-01

    Al and Mn co-doped-ZnO films have been prepared at room temperature by DC reactive magnetron sputtering technique. The optical absorption coefficient, apparent and fundamental band gap, and work function of the films have been investigated using optical spectroscopy, band structure analyses and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). ZnO films have direct allowed transition band structure, which has been confirmed by the character of the optical absorption coefficient. The apparent band gap has been found directly proportional to N2/3, showing that the effect of Burstein-Moss shift on the band gap variations dominates over the many-body effect. With only standard cleaning protocols, the work function of ZnO: (Al, Mn) and ZnO: Al films have been measured to be 4.26 and 4.21eV, respectively. The incorporation of Mn element into the matrix of ZnO, as a relatively deep donor, can remove some electrons from the conduction band and deplete the density of occupied states at the Fermi energy, which causes a loss in measured photoemission intensity and an increase in the surface work function. Based on the band gap and work function results, the energy band diagram of the ZnO: (Al, Mn)film near its surface is also given.

  11. Density of States for Warped Energy Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Warping of energy bands can affect the density of states (DOS) in ways that can be large or subtle. Despite their potential for significant practical impacts on materials properties, these effects have not been rigorously demonstrated previously. Here we rectify this using an angular effective mass formalism that we have developed. To clarify the often confusing terminology in this field, “band warping” is precisely defined as pertaining to any multivariate energy function E(k) that does not admit a second-order differential at an isolated critical point in k-space, which we clearly distinguish from band non-parabolicity. We further describe band “corrugation” as a qualitative form of band warping that increasingly deviates from being twice differentiable at an isolated critical point. These features affect the density-of-states and other parameters ascribed to band warping in various ways. We demonstrate these effects, providing explicit calculations of DOS and their effective masses for warped energy dispersions originally derived by Kittel and others. Other physical and mathematical examples are provided to demonstrate fundamental distinctions that must be drawn between DOS contributions that originate from band warping and contributions that derive from band non-parabolicity. For some non-degenerate bands in thermoelectric materials, this may have profound consequences of practical interest.

  12. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure of anatase and rutile TiO2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jakub Szlachetko; Katarzyna Michalow-Mauke; Maarten Nachtegaal; Jacinto Sá

    2014-03-01

    Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti -band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase possesses localized states located in the band gap where electrons can be trapped, which are almost absent in the rutile structure. This could well explain the reported longer lifetimes in anatase. It was revealed that HR-XAS is insufficient to study in-depth unoccupied states of investigated materials because it overlooks the shallow traps.

  13. A mourning dove banding project conducted in Adams County, Illinois, in 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study is a description of a Mourning Dove banding project carried out by personnel of the Gardner Unit of the Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge. The project...

  14. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  15. Band gap bowing in NixMg1-xO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, Christian A.; Råsander, Mikael; Rhode, Sneha; Kachkanov, Vyacheslav; Zou, Bin; Alford, Neil; Moram, Michelle A.

    2016-08-01

    Epitaxial transparent oxide NixMg1-xO (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) thin films were grown on MgO(100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis indicate that the thin films are compositionally and structurally homogeneous, forming a completely miscible solid solution. Nevertheless, the composition dependence of the NixMg1-xO optical band gap shows a strong non-parabolic bowing with a discontinuity at dilute NiO concentrations of x band structure and the density of states demonstrate that deep Ni 3d levels are introduced into the MgO band gap, which significantly reduce the fundamental gap as confirmed by optical absorption spectra. These states broaden into a Ni 3d-derived conduction band for x > 0.074 and account for the anomalously large band gap narrowing in the NixMg1-xO solid solution system.

  16. Band gap and conductivity evaluation of carbon nanotube with hematite for green ammonia synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Zia Ur; Yahya, Noorhana; Shafie, A'fza; Soleimani, Hassan; Alqasim, Bilal Hassan; Irfan, Muhammad; Qureshi, Saima

    2016-11-01

    To understand the change in number of electrons, band gap and total energy in the catalyst simulation was performed using Cambridge Serial Total Energy Package (CASTEP). Two catalyst were taken into consideration namely carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and hematite adjacent with CNTs. The simulation based study of the adsorption of hydrogen and nitrogen with reference to change in number of electron and band-gap of carbon nano tubes and hematite mixed with carbon nanotubes was not reported in literature. For this reason carbon nanotubes band gap for different chirality and number of walls was calculated through simulation. After that simulation for number of electrons, band gap and average total energy of CNTs alone and a mixture hematite with CNTs was performed before and after adsorption of hydrogen and nitrogen. From simulation the number of electrons were found to be doubled for hematite mixed with CNTs and average total energy was also increased as compared to similar parameter for CNTs without hematite. In conclusion the hematite with carbon nanotubes is preferred candidate for ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method. Ammonia synthesis was done using MIM. Ammonia yield was quantified by Kjaldal method.

  17. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anomalous Hall effect (AHE and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA are investigated in epitaxial NixFe1−x thin films grown on MgO (001 substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K1. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K1 vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate NixFe1−x has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings, resulting in the increased b and K1. This remarkable correlation between b and K1 can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface.

  18. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhong; Jiang, Hang-Yu; Zhou, Shi-Ming, E-mail: shiming@tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology & Pohl Institute of Solid State Physics, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hou, Yan-Liang; Ye, Quan-Lin [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Su Si, Ming [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA) are investigated in epitaxial Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x} thin films grown on MgO (001) substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K{sub 1}. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K{sub 1} vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x} has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings), resulting in the increased b and K{sub 1}. This remarkable correlation between b and K{sub 1} can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface.

  19. Nature of the band gap and origin of the conductivity of PbO2 revealed by theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, David O; Kehoe, Aoife B; Watson, Graeme W; Jones, Martin O; David, William I F; Payne, David J; Egdell, Russell G; Edwards, Peter P; Walsh, Aron

    2011-12-09

    Lead dioxide has been used for over a century in the lead-acid battery. Many fundamental questions concerning PbO2 remain unanswered, principally: (i) is the bulk material a metal or a semiconductor, and (ii) what is the source of the high levels of conductivity? We calculate the electronic structure and defect physics of PbO2, using a hybrid density functional, and show that it is an n-type semiconductor with a small indirect band gap of ∼0.2  eV. The origin of electron carriers in the undoped material is found to be oxygen vacancies, which forms a donor state resonant in the conduction band. A dipole-forbidden band gap combined with a large carrier induced Moss-Burstein shift results in a large effective optical band gap. The model is supported by neutron diffraction, which reveals that the oxygen sublattice is only 98.4% occupied, thus confirming oxygen substoichiometry as the electron source.

  20. Valence and Conduction Band Densities of States of Metal Halide Perovskites: A Combined Experimental–Theoretical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Endres, James; Egger, David A.; Kulbak, Michael; Kerner, Ross A.; Zhao, Lianfeng; Silver, Scott H.; Hodes, Gary; Rand, Barry P.; Cahen, David; Kronik, Leeor; Kahn, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We report valence and conduction band densities of states measured via ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies on three metal halide perovskites, specifically methylammonium lead iodide and bromide and cesium lead bromide (MAPbI3, MAPbBr3, CsPbBr3), grown at two different institutions on different substrates. These are compared with theoretical densities of states (DOS) calculated via density functional theory. The qualitative agreement achieved between experiment and theory lead...

  1. Effect of particle size on band gap and DC electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, B. S.; Chaturmukha, V. S.; Jayanna, H. S.; Naveen, C. S.; Rajeeva, M. P.; Harish, B. M.; Suresh, S.; Lamani, Ashok R.

    2016-05-01

    Materials reduced to the Nano scale can exhibit different properties compared to what they exhibit on a micro scale, enabling unique applications. When TiO2 is reduced to Nano scale it shows unique properties, of which the electrical aspect is highly important. This paper presents increase in the energy gap and decrease in conductivity with decrease in particle size of pure Nano TiO2 synthesized by hydrolysis and peptization of titanium isopropoxide. Aqueous solution with various pH and peptizing the resultant suspension will form Nano TiO2 at different particle sizes. As the pH of the solution is made acidic reduction in the particle size is observed. And it is confirmed from XRD using Scherer formula and SEM, as prepared samples are studied for UV absorbance, and DC conductivity from room temperature to 400°C. From the tauc plot it was observed, and calculated the energy band gap increases as the particle size decreases and shown TiO2 is direct band gap. From Arrhenius plot clearly we encountered, decrease in the conductivity for the decrease in particle size due to hopping of charge carriers and it is evident that, we can tailor the band gap by varying particle size.

  2. Conductance of Conjugated Molecular Wires: Length Dependence, Anchoring Groups, and Band Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Guowen; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2009-01-01

    The conductance of π-conjugated molecular wires bonded to gold electrodes at zero bias is studied using density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green’s function method. For all systems considered, we find that the conductance length dependence follows the simple exponential law...

  3. Electrically Conductive Photopatternable Silver Paste for High-Frequency Ring Resonator and Band-Pass Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umarji, Govind; Qureshi, Nilam; Gosavi, Suresh; Mulik, Uttam; Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Taesung; Amalnerkar, Dinesh

    2017-02-01

    In conventional thick-film technology, there are often problems associated with poor edges, rough surfaces, and reproducibility due to process limitations, especially for high-frequency applications. These difficulties can be circumvented by using thin-film technology, but process cost and complexity remain major concerns. In this context, photopatternable thick-film technology can offer a viable alternative due to its Newtonian rheology, which can facilitate formation of the required sharp edges. We present herein a unique attempt to formulate a photopatternable silver paste with organic (photosensitive polymer) to inorganic (silver and glass) ratio of 30:70, developed in-house by us for fabrication of thick-film-based ring resonator and band-pass filter components. The ring resonator and band-pass component structures were realized by exposing screen-printed film to ultraviolet light at wavelength of 315 nm to 400 nm for 30 s to crosslink the photosensitive polymer. The pattern was subsequently developed using 1% sodium carbonate aqueous solution. For comparison, conventional silver and silver-palladium thick films were produced using in-house formulations. The surface topology and microstructural features were examined by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The smoothness and edge definition of the film were assessed by profilometry. The resistivity of the samples was observed and remained in the range from 3.4 μΩ cm to 3.6 μΩ cm. The electrical properties were compared by measuring the insertion loss characteristics. The results revealed that the ring resonator fabricated using the photopatternable silver paste exhibited better high-frequency properties compared with components based on conventional silver or silver-palladium paste, especially in terms of the resonant frequency of 10.1 GHz (versus 10 GHz designed) with bandwidth of 80 MHz. Additionally, the band-pass filter fabricated using the photopatternable silver paste displayed better

  4. Quantum conductance of 4,4-bipyridine molecular junctions: Role of electrode work function and local d band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauba, J.M.C.; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations for the geometry and conductance of 4,4-bipyridine (BPD) nanojunctions with Au and Pt electrodes. The fact that transport takes place via bipyridine's lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) suggests that the Au-BPD junction should have larger...... conductance than the Pt-BPD junction due to the smaller work function of Au as compared to Pt. On the other hand, coupling to the local d band is stronger in the case of Pt and this broadens the LUMO resonance. We find that these effects largely outbalance each other leading to conductances of 0.01G(0) and 0.......02G(0) for the Au and Pt contacts, respectively (G(0)=2e(2)/h is the conductance quantum). The effect of coupling to the electrodes is investigated by means of the group orbital which makes precise the concept of the local band. The construction allows us to explain and rationalize the first...

  5. Carrier concentration dependence of band gap shift in n-type ZnO:Al films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J. G.; Fujita, S.; Kawaharamura, T.; Nishinaka, H.; Kamada, Y.; Ohshima, T.; Ye, Z. Z.; Zeng, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Zhu, L. P.; He, H. P.; Zhao, B. H.

    2007-04-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films have been prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering. The band gap shift as a function of carrier concentration in n-type zinc oxide (ZnO) was systematically studied considering the available theoretical models. The shift in energy gap, evaluated from optical absorption spectra, did not depend on sample preparations; it was mainly related to the carrier concentrations and so intrinsic to AZO. The optical gap increased with the electron concentration approximately as ne2/3 for ne≤4.2×1019 cm-3, which could be fully interpreted by a modified Burstein-Moss (BM) shift with the nonparabolicity of the conduction band. A sudden decrease in energy gap occurred at 5.4-8.4×1019 cm-3, consistent with the Mott criterion for a semiconductor-metal transition. Above the critical values, the band gap increased again at a different rate, which was presumably due to the competing BM band-filling and band gap renormalization effects, the former inducing a band gap widening and the latter an offsetting narrowing. The band gap narrowing (ΔEBGN) derived from the band gap renormalization effect did not show a good ne1/3 dependence predicated by a weakly interacting electron-gas model, but it was in excellent agreement with a perturbation theory considering different many-body effects. Based on this theory a simple expression, ΔEBGN=Ane1/3+Bne1/4+Cne1/2, was deduced for n-type ZnO, as well as p-type ZnO, with detailed values of A, B, and C coefficients. An empirical relation once proposed for heavily doped Si could also be used to describe well this gap narrowing in AZO.

  6. Band Structure and Terahertz Optical Conductivity of Transition Metal Oxides: Theory and Application to CaRuO(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hung T; Mravlje, Jernej; Georges, Antoine; Millis, Andrew J

    2015-09-04

    Density functional plus dynamical mean field calculations are used to show that in transition metal oxides, rotational and tilting (GdFeO(3)-type) distortions of the ideal cubic perovskite structure produce a multiplicity of low-energy optical transitions which affect the conductivity down to frequencies of the order of 1 or 2 mV (terahertz regime), mimicking non-Fermi-liquid effects even in systems with a strictly Fermi-liquid self-energy. For CaRuO(3), a material whose measured electromagnetic response in the terahertz frequency regime has been interpreted as evidence for non-Fermi-liquid physics, the combination of these band structure effects and a renormalized Fermi-liquid self-energy accounts for the low frequency optical response which had previously been regarded as a signature of exotic physics. Signatures of deviations from Fermi-liquid behavior at higher frequencies (∼100  meV) are discussed.

  7. Note: radio frequency inductance-capacitance band-stop filter circuit to perform contactless conductivity measurements in pulsed magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, M M

    2012-09-01

    We present a new technique to perform radio frequency (rf) contactless conductivity measurements in pulsed magnetic fields to probe different ground states in condensed matter physics. The new method utilizes a simple analog band-stop filter circuit implemented in a radio frequency transmission setup to perform contactless conductivity measurements. The new method is more sensitive than the other methods (e.g., the tunnel diode oscillator and the proximity detector oscillator) due to more sensitive dependence of the circuit resonance frequency on the tank circuit inductance (not the transmission line). More important, the new method is more robust than other methods when used to perform measurements in very high magnetic fields, works for a wide range of temperatures (i.e., 300 K-1.4 K) and is less sensitive to noise and mechanical vibrations during pulse magnet operation. The new technique was successfully applied to measure the Shubnikov-de Haas effect in Bi(2)Se(3) in pulsed magnetic fields of up to 60 T.

  8. Thermal conductivity of the iron-based superconductor FeSe: Nodeless gap with strong two-band character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois-Hope, Patrick; Badoux, Sven; Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas; Taillefer, Louis; Chi, Shun; Liang, Ruixing; Hardy, Walter; Bonn, Doug

    The thermal conductivity κ of the iron-based superconductor FeSe was measured at temperatures down to 50 mK in magnetic fields up to 17 T. In zero magnetic field, the residual linear term in the T = 0 limit, κ0 / T , is vanishingly small. Application of a magnetic field H causes no increase in κ0 / T initially. Those two facts show that there are no zero-energy quasiparticles that carry heat and therefore no nodes in the superconducting gap of FeSe. The full field dependence of κ0 / T has the classic shape of a two-band superconductor, such as MgB2. It rises initially with a characteristic field H* ~=Hc 2 / 25 , and then more slowly up to Hc 2 = 14 T. We interpret this in terms of a small gap ΔA ~=Δ0 / 5 on some part of the Fermi surface, with a large gap ΔB =Δ0 in the region that controls Hc 2.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of the Iron-Based Superconductor FeSe: Nodeless Gap with a Strong Two-Band Character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois-Hope, P; Chi, S; Bonn, D A; Liang, R; Hardy, W N; Wolf, T; Meingast, C; Doiron-Leyraud, N; Taillefer, Louis

    2016-08-26

    The thermal conductivity κ of the iron-based superconductor FeSe was measured at temperatures down to 75 mK in magnetic fields up to 17 T. In a zero magnetic field, the electronic residual linear term in the T=0  K limit, κ_{0}/T, is vanishingly small. The application of a magnetic field B causes an exponential increase in κ_{0}/T initially. Those two observations show that there are no zero-energy quasiparticles that carry heat and therefore no nodes in the superconducting gap of FeSe. The full field dependence of κ_{0}/T has the classic two-step shape of a two-band superconductor: a first rise at very low field, with a characteristic field B^{⋆}≪B_{c2}, and then a second rise up to the upper critical field B_{c2}. This shows that the superconducting gap is very small (but finite) on one of the pockets in the Fermi surface of FeSe. We estimate that the minimum value of the gap, Δ_{min}, is an order of magnitude smaller than the maximum value, Δ_{max}.

  10. Conduction band offset engineering in wide-bandgap Ag(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by hybrid buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takeshi; Zulkifly, Faris Akira Bin Mohd; Nakada, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Akira

    2017-08-01

    Ag(In,Ga)Se2 (AIGS) is one of the promising candidates for the top cell absorber in the tandem structure. However, the conversion efficiency of AIGS solar cells is still lower than that required for the top cell. In this study, to improve the conversion efficiency of AIGS solar cells, we controlled the conduction band offset (CBO) at the buffer layer/ZnO and buffer layer/AIGS interfaces. The reduction in interface recombination at the CdS buffer layer/AIGS interface was achieved by introducing a ZnS(O,OH) buffer layer instead of a CdS buffer layer, although the fill factor (FF) decreased markedly because the CBO at the ZnS(O,OH)/ZnO interface prevented the electron flow under a forward bias. We found that the introduction of a CdS/ZnS(O,OH) hybrid buffer layer is efficient in controlling the CBO at both the buffer layer/AIGS and buffer layer/ZnO interfaces and improving the solar cell conversion efficiency.

  11. Effect of energy band gap in graphene on negative refraction through the veselago lens and electron conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Dipendra; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable property of intrinsic graphene is that upon doping, electrons and holes travel through the monolayer thick material with constant velocity which does not depend on energy up to about 0.3 eV (Dirac fermions), as though the electrons and holes are massless particles and antiparticles which move at the Fermi velocity vF. Consequently, there is Klein tunneling at a p-n junction, in which there is no backscattering at normal incidence of massless Dirac fermions. However, this process yielding perfect transmission at normal incidence is expected to be affected when the group velocity of the charge carriers is energy dependent and there is non-zero effective mass for the target particle. We investigate how away from normal incidence the combined effect of incident electron energy ɛ and band gap parameter Δ can determine whether a p-n junction would allow focusing of an electron beam by behaving like a Veselago lens with negative refractive index. We demonstrate that there is a specific region in ɛ - Δ space where the index of refraction is negative, i.e., where monolayer graphene behaves as a metamaterial. Outside this region, the refractive index may be positive or there may be no refraction at all. We compute the ballistic conductance across a p-n junction as a function of Δ and ɛ and compare our results with those for a single electrostatic potential barrier and multiple barriers.

  12. Effects of lattice-mismatch induced built-in strain on the valence band properties of wurtzite ZnO/Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O quantum well heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitouni, K.; Kadri, A. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Materiaux Optoelectronique and Polymeres, L.E.M.O.P., Departement de Physique, Universite d' Oran (Es-Senia), 31100 Oran (Algeria)

    2007-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the effects of lattice-mismatch induced built-in strain on the electronic properties of valence band states in wurtzite ZnO/Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O Quantum Well (QW) heterostructures. In this purpose, a 6x6 k.p method has been used to incorporate the effects of strain and nonparabolicity. The energies corresponding to the transitions between conduction band (C), heavy hole (HH), light hole (LH) and crystal-field split-off hole (CH) bands have been calculated as a function of Mg composition and strain. We have also calculated the energy dispersions and wave functions of strained wurtzite ZnO. It is found that ZnO is always under a biaxial tensile strain, in the whole Mg composition range investigated (x<40%). As a consequence, the light hole valence subband is shifted upwards with respect to the corresponding heavy hole valence subband, resulting in a reduction of ZnO direct band gap by almost 6% when x=35%. This is found to result in turn in a significantly reduced in-plane hole effective mass at the top of the valence band which is always LH-like. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Electronic band structure of Cu(2)O by spin density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M; Schwartz, R; Stolz, H; Redmer, R

    2009-01-07

    The band structure of Cu(2)O is calculated using density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. By taking spin-orbit coupling into account the split between the Γ(7)(+) and the Γ(8)(+) valence band states is obtained as 128 meV. The highest valence band shows a noticeable nonparabolicity close to the Γ point. This is important for the quantitative description of excitons in this material, which is considered to be the best candidate for the confirmation that Bose-Einstein condensation also occurs in excitonic systems.

  14. Optical and fundamental band gaps disparity in transparent conducting oxides: new findings for the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Fernando P; Nunes Oliveira, Luiz; Wei, Su-Huai; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2017-03-01

    The optical band gap, extracted from absorption measurements, defines the figure of merit for transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). In many oxides, such as [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text], inversion symmetry introduces a selection rule that blocks transitions from the valence-band maximum to the conduction-band minimum. This raises the absorption threshold and enlarges the optical gap relative to the fundamental band gap. Here, we present density-functional computations identifying two optical gaps, either of which can be detected, depending on the optical light intensity. Under strong illumination, weak transitions from [Formula: see text]-points near the valence-band maximum contribute significantly to the absorption spectrum and define an optical gap matching the fundamental gap. Low optical intensities by contrast give prominence to the large optical gap determined by the selection rule. While experimental conditions have favored observation of the former optical gap in [Formula: see text], in contrast, absorption measurements in [Formula: see text] have focused on the latter. Our findings explain the disparity between the optical and fundamental gaps in bixbyite [Formula: see text] and predict that, measured under low illumination, the optical gap for rutile [Formula: see text] will increase, from 3.60 eV to 4.34 eV.

  15. Valence and conduction band edges of selenide and sulfide-based kesterites—a study by x-ray based spectroscopy and ab initio theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olar, Tetiana; Manoharan, Archana; Draxl, Claudia; Calvet, Wolfram; Ümsur, Bünyamin; Parvan, Vladimir; Chacko, Binoy; Xie, Haibing; Saucedo, Edgardo; Valle-Rios, Laura Elisa; Neldner, Kai; Schorr, Susan; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch; Lauermann, Iver

    2017-10-01

    Thin film solar cells based on the kesterite material with the general composition Cu2ZnSn(Se,S)4 can be a substitute for the more common chalcopyrites (Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2) with a similar band gap range. When replacing the anion sulfide with selenide, the optical band gap of kesterite changes from 1.5 to 1 eV. Here we report on a study of the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum energies of kesterites with either S or Se as the anion. Knowing these positions is crucial for the design of solar cells in order to match the bands of the absorber material with those of the subsequent functional layers like buffer or window layer. Their relative positions were studied using photoelectron spectroscopy of the valence band edge and x-ray absorption spectroscopy of the cations Cu, Zn, and Sn, respectively. The experimental results are interpreted and confirmed in terms of calculations based on density-functional theory and the GW approach of the many-body theory.

  16. Edge ferromagnetism from Majorana flat bands: application to split tunneling-conductance peaks in high-Tc cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Andrew C; Lee, Patrick A

    2014-03-21

    In mean-field descriptions of nodal d-wave superconductors, generic edges exhibit dispersionless Majorana fermion bands at zero energy. These states give rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy, and are protected by time-reversal symmetry. We argue that the infinite density of states of these flat bands make them inherently unstable to interactions, and show that repulsive interactions lead to edge ferromagnetism which splits the flat bands. This edge ferromagnetism offers an explanation for the observation of the splitting of zero-bias peaks in edge tunneling in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. We argue that this mechanism for splitting is more likely than previously proposed scenarios and describe its experimental consequences.

  17. Interaction of Cr3+ with valence and conduction bands in the long persistent phosphor ZnGa2O4:Cr3+, studied by ENDOR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Laurent; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Gourier, Didier

    2016-09-01

    Cr3+-doped zinc gallate ZnGa2O4 is a red-near infrared (IR) long persistent phosphor that can be excited by orange-red light, in the transparency window of living tissues. With this property, persistent luminescence nanoparticles were recently used for in vivo optical imaging of tumors in mice. In order to understand the origin of the excitability of persistent luminescence by visible light in this material, a Q-band ENDOR investigation of 71/69Ga and 53Cr nuclei was performed in ZnGa2O4:Cr3+ to get information on the interaction of Cr3+ with valence and conduction bands. The positive electron spin density at Ga nuclei revealed a dominant interaction of the 4A2 ground state of Cr3+ with the valence band, and a weaker interaction with the conduction band. The latter may occur only in the excited 2E and 4T2 states of Cr3+. It is proposed that when these two interactions are present, pairs of electrons and holes can be generated from excited Cr3+ in distorted sites undergoing local electric field produced by neighboring defects with opposite charges.

  18. Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and conduction-band discontinuity in GaAs/GaAsAl high electron mobility transistor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliner, J.; Christanell, R.; Hauser, M.; Gornik, E.; Weimann, G.

    1987-06-01

    Oscillatory structure is observed in the dI/dV characteristics of conventional GaAs/GaAlAs high electron mobility transistor samples at liquid-helium temperature, which can be explained using a Fowler-Nordheim tunneling theory. The position of the oscillations allows a determination of the conduction-band discontinuity, and the depth of the deep donor levels in the GaAlAs for high aluminum concentrations. The fit of the data gives a value of Delta Ec/Delta Eg = 0.61 + or - 0.04 for aluminum concentration 30, 36, and 40 percent. The deep donor level in the GaAlAs was determined to be 130 meV below the conduction band.

  19. Annealing induced electrical conduction and band gap variation in thermally reduced graphene oxide films with different sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mukesh [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Yadav, Asha [Centre for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Kumar, Shailendra [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Agarwal, Pratima, E-mail: pratima@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Centre for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Controllable electrical properties of GO from insulator to semimetal behavior with different reduction temperatures. • High conductivity ∼40 S/cm for GO reduced at 400 °C. • Tunable band gap of GO with different reduction temperatures. • A systematic decrease the fraction of sp{sup 3} as compared to sp{sup 2} with increase in reduction temperature. - Abstract: Temperature dependent electrical conductivity of as prepared and thermally reduced graphene oxide (GO) thin films was measured in the range 300–520 K. As prepared GO films show very low conductivity ∼6.8 × 10{sup −6} S/cm at 300 K, which increases slowly till 370 K. A sharp increase in conductivity is observed in the temperature range 370–440 K, beyond which conductivity is thermally activated with activation energy 0.26 eV. Reduced GO films show an increase in conductivity at 300 K with increase in reduction temperature. GO films reduced at 400 °C exhibit high conductivity ∼40 S/cm at 300 K, with very low activation energy 0.05 eV in the measured temperature range 300–520 K. The increase in conductivity after thermal reduction is due to an increase in the ratio sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} bonded carbon atoms. The band gap of as prepared GO is 3.20 eV and it is decreased by approximately 0.4 eV in the case of thermally reduced GO at 400 °C in comparison to as prepared GO.

  20. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, V.; Philipp, S.; Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A.; Stephan, F.

    2017-05-01

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  1. Analysis of the experimental data for impurity-band conduction in Mn-doped InSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Yasutomo [Department of Electric and Control Systems Engineering, Interdisciplinary Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    The experimental data of the temperature-dependent Hall-effect measurements on Mn-doped p -type InSb samples, which exhibit the anomalous sign reversal of the Hall coefficient to negative at low temperatures, have been analyzed on the basis of the nearest-neighbor hopping model in an impurity band. It is shown that the anomalous sign reversal of the Hall coefficient to negative can be well explained with assuming the hopping Hall factor in the form of A{sub hop} = (k{sub B}T/J{sub 3}) exp(K{sub NNH}T{sub 3}/T) with the negative sign of J{sub 3}. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Critical increase in Na-doping facilitates acceptor band movements that yields ~180 meV shallow hole conduction in ZnO bulk crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Narendra S.; Yim, Haena; Choi, Ji-Won

    2017-03-01

    Stable p-type conduction in ZnO has been a long time obstacle in utilizing its full potential such as in opto-electronic devices. We designed a unique experimental set-up in the laboratory for high Na-doping by thermal diffusion in the bulk ZnO single crystals. SIMS measurement shows that Na concentration increases by 3 orders of magnitude, to ~3 × 1020 cm‑3 as doping temperature increases to 1200 °C. Electronic infrared absorption was measured for Na-acceptors. Absorption bands were observed near (0.20–0.24) eV. Absorption bands blue shifted by 0.04 eV when doped at 1200 °C giving rise to shallow acceptor level. NaZn band movements as a function of doping temperature are also seen in Photoluminescence emission (PL), Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and UV-Vis transmission measurements. Variable temperature Hall measurements show stable p-type conduction with hole binding energy ~0.18 eV in ZnO samples that were Na-doped at 1200 °C.

  3. Enhanced p-type conductivity and band gap narrowing in heavily Al doped NiO thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, S; Maiti, U N; Ghosh, C K; Chattopadhyay, K K

    2009-03-18

    Stoichiometric NiO, a Mott-Hubbard insulator at room temperature, shows p-type electrical conduction due to the introduction of Ni(2+) vacancies (V(Ni)('')) and self-doping of Ni(3+) ions in the presence of excess oxygen. The electrical conductivity of this important material is low and not sufficient for active device fabrication. Al doped NiO thin films were synthesized by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering on glass substrates at a substrate temperature of 250 °C in an oxygen + argon atmosphere in order to enhance the p-type electrical conductivity. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the correct phase formation and also oriented growth of NiO thin films. Al doping was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the films were investigated as a function of Al doping (0-4 wt%) in the target. The room temperature electrical conductivity increased from 0.01-0.32 S cm (-1) for 0-4% Al doping. With increasing Al doping, above the Mott critical carrier density, energy band gap shrinkage was observed. This was explained by the shift of the band edges due to the existence of exchange and correlation energies amongst the electron-electron and hole-hole systems and also by the interaction between the impurity quasi-particle system.

  4. Linear and nonlinear intra-conduction band optical absorption in (In,Ga)N/GaN spherical QD under hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2014-11-01

    Linear, third-order nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficients of intra-conduction band 1s-1p transition with hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (In,Ga)N/GaN spherical quantum dot are reported. Hydrostatic pressure effect is investigated within the framework of single band effective-mass approximation using a combination of Quantum Genetic Algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) method. The results show that the pressure has a great influence on optical absorption coefficients of QDs. A blue-shift of the resonant peak is observed while the maximum of the amplitude of optical absorption coefficients decreases under hydrostatic pressure effect. A good agreement is shown compared with results of the finding.

  5. Increased conductivities of Cr doped Al{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} powders due to band gap narrowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badar, Nurhanna [Centre for Nanomaterials Research, Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); School of Physics and Materials Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); Kamarulzaman, Norlida, E-mail: norlyk@salam.uitm.edu.my [Centre for Nanomaterials Research, Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); School of Physics and Materials Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); Rusdi, Roshidah; Abdul Aziz, Nor Diyana [Centre for Nanomaterials Research, Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); School of Physics and Materials Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); Kun Fun, Hoong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-15

    A high Cr content in the synthesized Al{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} materials was achieved via a new synthesis route, the self propagating combustion method, for investigation of the effect of Cr substitution on the electrical, optical band gap and structural characteristics of the modified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the samples were pure and that Cr was successfully substituted in the crystal lattice. The cell parameters and volume are linearly dependent on the Cr content. AC impedance spectroscopy results show that conductivity of the Cr doped samples increases exponentially with Cr content. This is attributed to band gap narrowing of the Al{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} powders as obtained from UV–visible spectrophotometric studies.

  6. Discovery of high-performance low-cost n-type Mg3Sb2-based thermoelectric materials with multi-valley conduction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Pedersen, Steffen Hindborg; Yin, Hao; Hung, Le Thanh; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2017-01-01

    Widespread application of thermoelectric devices for waste heat recovery requires low-cost high-performance materials. The currently available n-type thermoelectric materials are limited either by their low efficiencies or by being based on expensive, scarce or toxic elements. Here we report a low-cost n-type material, Te-doped Mg3Sb1.5Bi0.5, that exhibits a very high figure of merit zT ranging from 0.56 to 1.65 at 300-725 K. Using combined theoretical prediction and experimental validation, we show that the high thermoelectric performance originates from the significantly enhanced power factor because of the multi-valley band behaviour dominated by a unique near-edge conduction band with a sixfold valley degeneracy. This makes Te-doped Mg3Sb1.5Bi0.5 a promising candidate for the low- and intermediate-temperature thermoelectric applications.

  7. Ultra-broad-band electrical spectroscopy of soils and sediments—a combined permittivity and conductivity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewer, M.; Günther, T.; Igel, J.; Kruschwitz, S.; Martin, T.; Wagner, N.

    2017-09-01

    We combined two completely different methods measuring the frequency-dependent electrical properties of moist porous materials in order to receive an extraordinary large frequency spectrum. In the low-frequency (LF) range, complex electrical resistivity between 1 mHz and 45 kHz was measured for three different soils and sandstone, using the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method with a four electrode cell. In the high-frequency (HF) radio to microwave range, complex dielectric permittivity was measured between 1 MHz and 10 GHz for the same samples using dielectric spectroscopy by means of the coaxial transmission line technique. The combined data sets cover 13 orders of magnitude and were transferred into their equivalent expressions: the complex effective dielectric permittivity and the complex effective electrical conductivity. We applied the Kramers-Kronig relation in order to justify the validity of the data combination. A new phenomenological model that consists of both dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity terms in a Debye- and Cole-Cole-type manner was fitted to the spectra. The combined permittivity and conductivity model accounts for the most common representations of the physical quantities with respect to the individual measuring method. A maximum number of four relaxation processes was identified in the analysed frequency range. Among these are the free water and different interfacial relaxation processes, the Maxwell-Wagner effect, the counterion relaxation in the electrical double layer and the direct-current electrical conductivity. There is evidence that free water relaxation does not affect the electrical response in the SIP range. Moreover, direct current conductivity contribution (bulk and interface) dominates the losses in the HF range. Interfacial relaxation processes with relaxations in the HF range are broadly distributed down to the LF range. The slowest observed process in the LF range has a minor contribution to the HF

  8. Geophysical exploration to estimate the surface conductivity of residual argillaceous bands in the groundwater repositories of coastal sediments of EOLGA, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N. J.; Atat, J. G.; Umoren, E. B.; Etebong, Isong

    2017-06-01

    Electrical geophysical applications exploit a petrophysical relationship governing the electrical properties of rocks/sediments when field data are coupled with laboratory data. Given the robust analytical techniques of electrical method and the interrelationship with laboratory measurements, it seems natural to classify, and hence simplify, the spatially aggregated conductivity information on the basis of rock/sediment lithology. This provides a unique link between lithological sediment/rock parameters and the physical parameters controlling bulk conductivity. In this work vertical electrical sounding (VES) technique employing Schlumberger configuration integrated with sediment and water analysis have been used to determine the conductivity of argillaceous bands of aquifer sands (fine- coarse sands) in Eastern Obolo Local Government Area (EOLGA). The analysis of the data shows that the aquifer systems composing of fine sands, siltstones and coarse sand have bulk and pore-water resistivities ranging from 40.1-2049.4 Ω m (average = 995.18 Ω m) to 2.7-256.9 Ω m (average = 91.2 Ω m) respectively. These ranges respectively correspond to porosity and formation factor of (19.5-40.6%; average = 29.2%) and (7.1-19.7%; average = 12.95%). Within the limit of experimental errors clearly specified in the work, the intrinsic (clay-free) formation factor (Fi) was estimated to be 16.34 while the intrinsic porosity and the conductivity of the pore-scale clay (σA) were respectively estimated to be 20.4% and 3.2679 mS/m. Accounting for this conductivity magnitude of argillaceous bands from bulk conductivity (σb) of aquifer sands makes the aquifer systems in the area to be consistent with Archie's law that is valid only in clay-free sandy formation. The graphical deductions and contour distribution of parameters realised from data processing could be used to derive input parameters for contaminant migration modelling and to improve the quality of model in the study area.

  9. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, THERMAL ANALYSIS, CONDUCTIVITY AND BAND GAPS OF OLIGO {4-[(2-HYDROXYL-1-NAPHTHYL)METHYLENE]-AMINOBENZOIC ACID}

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ismet Kaya; Ali Bilici

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative polycondensation reaction conditions of 4-[(2-hydroxyl-l-naphthyl)methylene]aminobenzoic acid (4-HNMABA) with H2O2,air O2 and NaOCl were studied in an aqueous alkaline medium between 40℃ and 90℃.The structure of oligo {4-[(2-hydroxyl-1-naphthyl)methylene]aminobenzoic acid} (O-4-HNMABA) was characterized by using 1H-NMR,13C-NMR,FT-IR,UV-Vis,size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and elemental analysis techniques.At the optimum reaction conditions,the yield of O-4-HNMABA was found to be 70% for H2O2 oxidant,94% for air O2 oxidant and 87% for NaOCl oxidant.According to the SEC analysis,the number-average molecular weight (Mn),weight-average molecular weight (Mw) and polydispersity index (PDI) values of O-4-HNMABA were found to be 850,1350 and 1.59,using H2O2,1800,2200 and 1.22,using air O2 and 2200,3000 and 1.36,using NaOCl,respectively.TGA-DTA analyses showed that O-4-HNMABA was more stable than 4-HNMABA.The highest occupied molecular orbital,the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and electrochemical energy gaps ( Eg) of 4-HNMABA and O-4-HNMABA were found to be -6.34,-6.56; -2.67,-3.04; 3.67 and 3.52 eV,respectively,by cyclic voltammetry (CV).According to UV-Vis measurements,optical band gaps (E,g) of 4-HNMABA and O-4-HNMABA were found to be 3.12 and 3.03 eV,respectively.

  10. TiO 2 Conduction Band Modulation with In 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers in Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-11-21

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to grow subnanometer indium oxide recombination barriers in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on the spiro-OMeTAD hole-transport material (HTM) and the WN1 donor-π-acceptor organic dye. While optimal device performance was achieved after 3-10 ALD cycles, 15 ALD cycles (∼2 Å of In2O 3) was observed to be optimal for increasing open-circuit voltage (VOC) with an average improvement of over 100 mV, including one device with an extremely high VOC of 1.00 V. An unexpected phenomenon was observed after 15 ALD cycles: the increasing VOC trend reversed, and after 30 ALD cycles VOC dropped by over 100 mV relative to control devices without any In2O3. To explore possible causes of the nonmonotonic behavior resulting from In2O3 barrier layers, we conducted several device measurements, including transient photovoltage experiments and capacitance measurements, as well as density functional theory (DFT) studies. Our results suggest that the VOC gains observed in the first 20 ALD cycles are due to both a surface dipole that pulls up the TiO2 conduction band and recombination suppression. After 30 ALD cycles, however, both effects are reversed: the surface dipole of the In2O3 layer reverses direction, lowering the TiO 2 conduction band, and mid-bandgap states introduced by In 2O3 accelerate recombination, leading to a reduced V OC. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Geophysical exploration to estimate the surface conductivity of residual argillaceous bands in the groundwater repositories of coastal sediments of EOLGA, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.J. George

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical geophysical applications exploit a petrophysical relationship governing the electrical properties of rocks/sediments when field data are coupled with laboratory data. Given the robust analytical techniques of electrical method and the interrelationship with laboratory measurements, it seems natural to classify, and hence simplify, the spatially aggregated conductivity information on the basis of rock/sediment lithology. This provides a unique link between lithological sediment/rock parameters and the physical parameters controlling bulk conductivity. In this work vertical electrical sounding (VES technique employing Schlumberger configuration integrated with sediment and water analysis have been used to determine the conductivity of argillaceous bands of aquifer sands (fine- coarse sands in Eastern Obolo Local Government Area (EOLGA. The analysis of the data shows that the aquifer systems composing of fine sands, siltstones and coarse sand have bulk and pore-water resistivities ranging from 40.1–2049.4 Ω m (average = 995.18 Ω m to 2.7–256.9 Ω m (average = 91.2 Ω m respectively. These ranges respectively correspond to porosity and formation factor of (19.5–40.6%; average = 29.2% and (7.1–19.7%; average = 12.95%. Within the limit of experimental errors clearly specified in the work, the intrinsic (clay-free formation factor (Fi was estimated to be 16.34 while the intrinsic porosity and the conductivity of the pore-scale clay (σA were respectively estimated to be 20.4% and 3.2679 mS/m. Accounting for this conductivity magnitude of argillaceous bands from bulk conductivity (σb of aquifer sands makes the aquifer systems in the area to be consistent with Archie’s law that is valid only in clay-free sandy formation. The graphical deductions and contour distribution of parameters realised from data processing could be used to derive input parameters for contaminant migration modelling and to improve the

  12. Influence of interface traps inside the conduction band on the capacitance–voltage characteristics of InGaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Noriyuki; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kim, Sang Hyeon; Suzuki, Rena; Iida, Ryo; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the influences of the AC response with interface/bulk-oxide traps near the conduction band (CB) and a low effective density of states (DOS) on the accumulation capacitance C acc of an n-type InGaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) capacitor. We found that the capacitance associated with the interface traps inside the CB significantly increases C acc compared to the C acc value constrained by a low DOS. These results indicate that accurate characterization inside the CB and considering the capacitance due to the interface traps inside the CB in the MOS capacitance–voltage curves are indispensable for accurate characterization of InGaAs MOS interface properties.

  13. Local measurement of conduction band offset for ZnCdS/ZnSSe nano-structure by Laplace current DLTS cooperated with AFM technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinov, Vladimir [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ryazan State Radioengineering University, Gagarina 59/1, 390005 Ryazan (Russian Federation); Kozlovsky, Vladimir; Sannikov, Denis; Sviridov, Dmitry [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Milovanova, Oksana; Rybin, Nikolay [Ryazan State Radioengineering University, Gagarina 59/1, 390005 Ryazan (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-15

    ZnCdS/ZnSSe SQW structure were investigated by current deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) with Laplace transform cooperated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out also. Basing on Laplace current DLTS with AFM and CL data we estimated the conduction band offset of the ZnCdS/ZnSSe interface in the different regions of the structure. Size of the investigated region was commensurable with the diameter of cantilever tip. We demonstrated that Laplace current DLTS-spectrometer switched in the circuit of an AFM cantilever may be used for an investigation of nanostructures. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Intensive Plasmonic Flash Light Sintering of Copper Nanoinks Using a Band-Pass Light Filter for Highly Electrically Conductive Electrodes in Printed Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yeon-Taek; Chung, Wan-Ho; Jang, Yong-Rae; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-04-06

    In this work, an intensive plasmonic flash light sintering technique was developed by using a band-pass light filter matching the plasmonic wavelength of the copper nanoparticles. The sintering characteristics, such as resistivity and microstructure, of the copper nanoink films were studied as a function of the range of the wavelength employed in the flash white light sintering. The flash white light irradiation conditions (e.g., wavelength range, irradiation energy, pulse number, on-time, and off-time) were optimized to obtain a high conductivity of the copper nanoink films without causing damage to the polyimide substrate. The wavelength range corresponding to the plasmonic wavelength of the copper nanoparticles could efficiently sinter the copper nanoink and enhance its conductivity. Ultimately, the sintered copper nanoink films under optimal light sintering conditions showed the lowest resistivity (6.97 μΩ·cm), which was only 4.1 times higher than that of bulk copper films (1.68 μΩ·cm).

  15. Estimation of various scattering parameters and 2-DEG mobilities from electron mobility calculations in the three conduction bands , L and X of gallium arsenide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sonal Singhal; A K Saxena; S Dasgupta

    2007-10-01

    The electron drift mobility in conduction band of GaAs has been calculated before, but for the first time, we have made attempts to estimate the electron mobilities in higher energy L and X minima. We have also calculated the value of mobility of two-dimensional electron gas needed to predict hetero-structure device characteristics using GaAs. Best scattering parameters have been derived by close comparison between experimental and theoretical mobilities. Room temperature electron mobilities in , L and X valleys are found to be nearly 9094, 945 and 247 cm2 /V-s respectively. For the above valleys, the electron masses, deformation potentials and polar phonon temperatures have been determined to be (0.067, 0.22, 0.39m 0 ), (8.5, 9.5, 6.5 eV), and (416, 382, 542 K) as best values, respectively. The 2-DEG electron mobility in minimum increases to 1.54 × 106 from 1.59 × 105 cm2 /V-s (for impurity concentration of 1014 cm-3) at 10 K. Similarly, the 2-DEG electron mobility values in L and X minima are estimated to be 2.28 × 105 and 1.44 × 105 cm2 /V-s at 10 K, which are about ∼ 4.5 and ∼ 3.9 times higher than normal value with impurity scattering present.

  16. Studies on charge production from Cs2Te photocathodes in the PITZ L-band normal conducting radio frequency photo injector

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Garcia, C; Asova, G; Bakr, M; Boonpornprasert, P; Good, J; Gross, M; Huck, H; Isaev, I; Kalantaryan, D; Khojoyan, M; Kourkafas, G; Lishilin, O; Malyutin, D; Melkumyan, D; Oppelt, A; Otevrel, M; Pathak, G; Renier, Y; Rublack, T; Stephan, F; Vashchenko, G; Zhao, Q

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the behavior of electron bunch charge produced in an L-band normal conducting radio frequency cavity (RF gun) from Cs2Te photocathodes illuminated with ps-long UV laser pulses when the laser transverse distribution consists of a flat-top core with Gaussian-like decaying halo. The produced charge shows a linear dependence at low laser pulse energies as expected in the quantum efficiency limited emission regime, while its dependence on laser pulse energy is observed to be much weaker for higher values, due to space charge limited emission. However, direct plug-in of experimental parameters into the space charge tracking code ASTRA yields lower output charge in the space charge limited regime compared to measured values. The rate of increase of the produced charge at high laser pulse energies close to the space charge limited emission regime seems to be proportional to the amount of halo present in the radial laser profile since the charge from the core has saturated already. By utilizing co...

  17. Stoichiometry gradient, cation interdiffusion, and band alignment between a nanosized TiO2 blocking layer and a transparent conductive oxide in dye-sensitized solar cell front contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvinelli, Gabriele; Drera, Giovanni; Baratto, Camilla; Braga, Antonio; Sangaletti, Luigi

    2015-01-14

    An angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study allowed us to identify cation interdiffusion and stoichiometry gradients at the interface between a nanosized TiO2 blocking layer and a transparent conductive Cd-Sn oxide substrate. A stoichiometry gradient for the Sn cations is already found in the bare Cd-Sn oxide layer. When TiO2 ultrathin layers are deposited by RF sputtering on the Cd-Sn oxide layer, Ti is found to partially replace Sn, resulting in a Cd-Sn-Ti mixed oxide layer with a thickness ranging from 0.85 to 3.3 nm. The band gap profile across the junction has been reconstructed for three TiO2 layers, resulting in a valence band offset decrease (and a conduction band offset increase) with the blocking layer thickness. The results are related to the cell efficiencies in terms of charge injection and recombination processes.

  18. Impedance and a.c. conductivity studies on Ba(Nd0.2Ti0.6Nb0.2)O3 ceramic prepared through conventional and microwave sintering route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syed Mahboob; G Prasad; G S Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Electrical conduction studies on Ba(Nd0.2Ti0.6Nb0.2)O3 ceramic samples prepared through conventional and microwave sintering route are presented in this paper. D.C. and a.c. conductivities of these samples as a function of temperature from 300–900 K have been studied. Two types of conduction processes are evident from the frequency dependant conductivity plots, i.e. low-frequency conduction due to short-range hopping and high-frequency conduction due to the localized relaxation (reorientational) hopping mechanism. Grain and grain boundary contributions to the conductivity in these samples are obtained from impedance/admittance measurements via equivalent circuit modelling.

  19. Theory of Band Warping and its Effects on Thermoelectronic Transport Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian; Fornari, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Transport properties of materials depend upon features of band structures near extrema in the BZ. Such features are generally described in terms of quadratic expansions and effective masses. Such expansions, however, are permissible only under strict conditions that are sometimes violated by materials. Suggestive terms such as ``band warping'' have been used to refer to such situations and ad hoc methods have been developed to treat them. We develop a generally applicable theory, based on radial expansions, and a corresponding definition of angular effective mass which also accounts for effects of band non-parabolicity and anisotropy. Further, we develop precise procedures to evaluate band warping quantitatively and as an example we analyze the warping features of valence bands in silicon using first-principles calculations and we compare those with semi-empirical models. We use our theory to generalize derivations of transport coefficients for cases of either single or multiple electronic bands, with either quadratically expansible or warped energy surfaces. We introduce the transport-equivalent ellipsoid and illustrate the drastic effects that band warping can induce on thermoelectric properties using multi-band models. Vitreous State Laboratory and Samsung's GRO program.

  20. Visible-light-driven Cu(II)-(Sr(1-y)Na(y))(Ti(1-x)Mo(x))O3 photocatalysts based on conduction band control and surface ion modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaoqing; Miyauchi, Masahiro; Yu, Huogen; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2010-11-03

    Band-gap narrowing is generally considered to be a primary method in the design of visible-light-active photocatalysts because it can decrease the photo threshold to lower energies. However, controlling the valence band by up-shifting the top of the band or inducing localized levels above the band results in quantum efficiencies under visible light much lower than those under UV irradiation (such as those reported for N-doped TiO(2): Science 2001, 293, 269. J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 5483). Herein, we report a systematic study on a novel, visible-light-driven photocatalyst based on conduction band control and surface ion modification. Cu(II)-(Sr(1-y)Na(y))(Ti(1-x)Mo(x))O(3) photocatalysts were prepared by a soft chemical method in combination with an impregnation technique. It is found that Mo(6+) as well as Na(+) doping in the SrTiO(3) can lower the bottom of the conduction band and effectively extend the absorption edge to the visible light region. The Cu(II) clusters grafted on the surface act as a co-catalyst to efficiently reduce the oxygen molecules, thus consuming the excited electrons. Consequently, photocatalytic decomposition of gaseous 2-propanol into CO(2) is achieved, that is, CH(3)CHOHCH(3) + (9)/(2)O(2) → 3CO(2) + H(2)O. For Cu(II)-(Sr(1-y)Na(y))(Ti(1-x)Mo(x))O(3) at x = 2.0% under visible light irradiation, the maximum CO(2) generation rate can reach 0.148 μmol/h; the quantum efficiency under visible light is calculated to be 14.5%, while it is 10% under UV light irradiation. Our results suggest that high visible light photocatalytic efficiency can be achieved by combining conduction band control and surface ion modification, which provides a new approach for rational design and development of high-performance photocatalysts.

  1. The roles of the dielectric constant and the relative level of conduction band of high-k composite with Si in improving the memory performance of charge-trapping memory devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Lu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The memory structures Pt/Al2O3/(TiO2x(Al2O31−x/Al2O3/p-Si(nominal composition x = 0.05, 0.50 and 0.70 were fabricated by using rf-magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques, in which the dielectric constant and the bottom of the conduction band of the high-k composite (TiO2x(Al2O31−x were adjusted by controlling the partial composition of Al2O3. With the largest dielectric constant and the lowest deviation from the bottom of the conduction band of Si, (TiO20.7(Al2O30.3 memory devices show the largest memory window of 7.54 V, the fast programming/erasing speed and excellent endurance and retention characteristics, which were ascribed to the special structural design, proper combination of dielectric constant and band alignment in the high-k composite (TiO20.7(Al2O30.3.

  2. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the {gamma}-X conduction band mixing and the binding energy of a donor impurity in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Lopez, S.Y. [Facultad de Educacion, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62210, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2007-06-15

    Mixing between {gamma} and X valleys of the conduction band in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells is investigated taken into account the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure. This effect is introduced via the pressure-dependent values of the corresponding energy gaps and the main band parameters. The mixing is considered along the lines of a phenomenological model. Variation of the confined ground state in the well as a function of the pressure is reported. The dependencies of the variationally calculated binding energy of a donor impurity with the hydrostatic pressure and well width are also presented. It is shown that the inclusion of the {gamma}-X mixing explains the non-linear behavior in the photoluminescence peak of confined exciton states that has been observed for pressures above 20 kbar. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Donor impurity-related optical absorption spectra in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells: hydrostatic pressure and {gamma}-X conduction band mixing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62209, Cuernavaca, MOR (Mexico); Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, S.Y. [Fac. de Educacion, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Duque, C.A. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Velasco, V.R. [Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Using a variational procedure within the effective mass approximation, the mixing between the {gamma} and X conduction band valleys in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells is investigated by taking into account the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure. Some optical properties such as donor and/or acceptor binding energy and impurity-related transition energies are calculated and comparisons with available experimental data are presented. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Structures, energy bands and conductivities of (Me3NEt)[Pd(dmit)2]2 and (NEt4)[Pd(dmit)2]2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方奇; 张斌; 雷虹; 孙岳明; 刘陟; 麦松威

    2002-01-01

    The electrical conductive molecular crystals (Me3NEt)[Pd(dmit)2]2 and (NEt4)[Pd (dmit)2]2 (dmit = 4,5-dimercapto-1,3-dithiole-2-thione) have been prepared, and their crystal structures and conductivity-temperature curves have been determined. The fact that the conductivity at room temperature of (Me3NEt)[Pd(dmit)2]2 (a = 58 Ω· cm-1) is much higher than that of (NEt4)-[Pd(dmit)2]2(cr= 2.2 Q~1 ?cm’1) has been rationally explained by the results of energy band calculations. (MeNEt3)[Pd(dmit)2]2 belongs to monoclinic system, P21/m space group and (NEt4)[Pd (dmit)2]2 belongs to triclinic system, P1 space group. The structural conducting component of the crystals is the planar coordinative anion [Pd(dmit)2]05- which forms the face-to-face dimmer [Pd(dmit)2]2-. These dimers have been further constructed to be a kind of two-dimensional (2-D)conductive molecular sheet by means of S…S intermolecular interactions. The tiny difference of the above 2-D molecular sheets of the two title crystals has resulted in one

  5. A simple model for the band structure and D.C. conductivity of an infinite C dbond O···H bond N chain perpendicular to the protein backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Attila; Bogár, Ferenc; Ladik, János

    The1 Hartree-Fock crystal orbital (CO) method in its linear combination of atomic orbitals form was applied to determine the band structure of histone proteins taking 0.041e charge transfer per nucleotide base from the PO4- groups of poly(guanilic acid) to the arginine, and lysine side chains in histones (see text). Assuming that there are infinite COs, perpendicular to the main chain, formed by the amide groups of one segment of the protein chain bound together by H-bonds with the C dbond O groups of another segment of the chain, we have calculated the band structure. From this, we have determined the mobility using the deformation potential approximation. Multiplying this with the mobile electron concentration due to the charge transfer between the PO4- groups of DNA and the positive side chains in histones, we have obtained for the direct current (D.C.) electron conductivity sigmafib = 1.07 × 10-9 Omega-1 cm for a single fiber and after division by the cross-section of 9.10 × 10-16 cm2, sigmaspec = 1.18 × 106 Omega-1 cm-1 for the specific conductivity.

  6. Explicitly Solvable Model of the Charge Carriers' Phenomena in Isotropic Conducting Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzak, Yaroslav S.; Wacławski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the kinetic properties of the isotropic conducting crystals is presented. The general formulas for these kinetic properties are expressed in terms of the Fermi integrals. These integrals were obtained using methods of statistical ensembles with varying number of particles and the Gibbs's grand canonical distribution. The determination of the scattering function and the exploration of its relation with the mobility of the current carriers inside these crystals have been made. Together with the results of theoretical analysis of the scattering function and its relation with the current carriers' mobility, these formulas constitute the mathematical model of the charge carriers' transport phenomena in conducting crystals (where a non-parabolic energy spectrum is described by Kane's formula) and provide algorithms for the calculation of these properties.

  7. Band Together!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After nearly a decade as band director at St. James High School in St. James, Missouri, Derek Limback knows that the key to building a successful program is putting the program itself above everything else. Limback strives to augment not only his students' musical prowess, but also their leadership skills. Key to his philosophy is instilling a…

  8. Band calculation of lonsdaleite Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Shiang; Fan, Sheng-Ting; Lan, Huang-Siang; Liu, Chee Wee

    2017-01-01

    The band structure of Ge in the lonsdaleite phase is calculated using first principles. Lonsdaleite Ge has a direct band gap at the Γ point. For the conduction band, the Γ valley is anisotropic with the low transverse effective mass on the hexagonal plane and the large longitudinal effective mass along the c axis. For the valence band, both heavy-hole and light-hole effective masses are anisotropic at the Γ point. The in-plane electron effective mass also becomes anisotropic under uniaxial tensile strain. The strain response of the heavy-hole mass is opposite to the light hole.

  9. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of function of an arm or a leg. Congenital bands affecting the hand often cause the most problems. Alternative Names Pseudo-ainhum; Streeter dysplasia; Amniotic band sequence; Amniotic constriction bands; Constriction band ...

  10. Nonparabolic solar concentrators matching the parabola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Thomas; Schmitz, Max; Good, Philipp; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Pedretti, Andrea; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-08-01

    We consider the limit of geometric concentration for a focusing concave mirror, e.g., a parabolic trough or dish, designed to collect all radiation within a finite acceptance angle and direct it to a receiver with a flat or circular cross-section. While a concentrator with a parabolic cross-section indeed achieves this limit, it is not the only geometry capable of doing so. We demonstrate that there are infinitely many solutions. The significance of this finding is that geometries which can be more easily constructed than the parabola can be utilized without loss of concentration, thus presenting new avenues for reducing the cost of solar collectors. In particular, we investigate a low-cost trough mirror profile which can be constructed by inflating a stack of thin polymer membranes and show how it can always be designed to match the geometric concentration of a parabola of similar form.

  11. Micromechanics of shear banding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  12. Holographic Multi-Band Superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Maity, Debaprasad

    2011-01-01

    We propose a gravity dual for the holographic superconductor with multi-band carriers. Moreover, the currents of these carriers are unified under a global non-Abelian symmetry, which is dual to the bulk non-Abelian gauge symmetry. We study the phase diagram of our model, and find it qualitatively agrees with the one for the realistic 2-band superconductor, such as MgB2. We also evaluate the holographic conductivities and find the expected mean-field like behaviors in some cases. However, for a wide range of the parameter space, we also find the non-mean-field like behavior with negative conductivities.

  13. HYBASE : HYperspectral BAnd SElection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to assess the minimum number of spe

  14. Atomic-Monolayer MoS2 Band-to-Band Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Yann Wen

    2016-09-05

    The experimental observation of band-to-band tunneling in novel tunneling field-effect transistors utilizing a monolayer of MoS2 as the conducting channel is demonstrated. Our results indicate that the strong gate-coupling efficiency enabled by two-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2, results in the direct manifestation of a band-to-band tunneling current and an ambipolar transport.

  15. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conduct disorder is often linked to attention-deficit disorder . Conduct disorder also can be an early sign of ... child or teen has a history of conduct disorder behaviors. A physical examination and blood tests can help ...

  16. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  17. Complex band structure and superlattice electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J. N.; McGill, T. C.

    1981-04-01

    The complex band structures of the bulk materials which constitute the alternating layer (001) semiconductor-semiconductor superlattice are investigated. The complex bands near the center of the Brillouin zone in the [001] direction are studied in detail. The decay lengths of superlattice states whose energies lie in the bulk band gaps of one of the semiconductors are determined from the dispersion curves of these bands for imaginary k-->. This method is applied using a tight-binding band-structure calculation to two superlattices: the AlAs-GaAs superlattice and the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. The decay lengths of AlAs-GaAs superlattice conduction-band minimum states are found to be substantially shorter than those for the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. These differences in the decay of the states in the two superlattices result in differences in the variation of the conduction-band effective masses with the thickness of the AlAs and CdTe layers. The conduction-band effective masses increase more rapidly with AlAs thickness in the AlAs-GaAs superlattice than with CdTe thickness in the CdTe-HgTe superlattice.

  18. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...

  19. Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    the E-field and tunneling at the source- pocket junction you form a parasitic NPN + transistor and the injection mechanism of carriers into the...hypothesis that the 1000 ° C, 5s anneal split lead to a very wide pocket and the accidental formation of a NPN + transistor , while the 1000 ° C, 1s anneal...Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors Anupama Bowonder Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley

  20. Toward an Impurity Band PV: Dynamics of Carriers Generated via Sub-band gap Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joseph; Simmons, Christie; Akey, Austin; Aziz, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-03-01

    Intermediate band solar cells are a pathway to cells that surpass the Shockley-Queisser limit by enabling the utilization of sub-band gap photons. A proposed method for fabricating an intermediate band material is to use impurities that introduce electronic levels within the band gap. At sufficiently high dopant concentrations, band formation may lead to a suppression of Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination, an idea known as ``lifetime recovery''. We investigate a proposed intermediate band material, silicon hyper-doped with sulfur. This material system exhibits strong sub-band gap optical absorption and metallic conductivity at sufficiently high sulfur concentrations, which makes it a strong candidate for an impurity-band material. We employ low-temperature photoconductivity using sub-band gap light to estimate the trapping rate of electrons in the conduction band. We vary the sulfur concentration near the critical value for the metal-insulator transition to test the idea of ``lifetime recovery'' in the S:Si system.

  1. Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  2. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  3. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  4. Progressive Band Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  5. Quadratic band touching points and flat bands in two-dimensional topological Floquet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Zhou, Xiaoting; Fiete, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically study, using Floquet-Bloch theory, the influence of circularly and linearly polarized light on two-dimensional band structures with Dirac and quadratic band touching points, and flat bands, taking the nearest neighbor hopping model on the kagome lattice as an example. We find circularly polarized light can invert the ordering of this three-band model, while leaving the flat band dispersionless. We find a small gap is also opened at the quadratic band touching point by two-photon and higher order processes. By contrast, linearly polarized light splits the quadratic band touching point (into two Dirac points) by an amount that depends only on the amplitude and polarization direction of the light, independent of the frequency, and generally renders dispersion to the flat band. The splitting is perpendicular to the direction of the polarization of the light. We derive an effective low-energy theory that captures these key results. Finally, we compute the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity for this three-band model and analyze the various interband contributions of the Floquet modes. Our results suggest strategies for optically controlling band structure and interaction strength in real systems.

  6. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  7. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  8. Bonds and bands in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This classic work on the basic chemistry and solid state physics of semiconducting materials is now updated and improved with new chapters on crystalline and amorphous semiconductors. Written by two of the world's pioneering materials scientists in the development of semiconductors, this work offers in a single-volume an authoritative treatment for the learning and understanding of what makes perhaps the world's most important engineered materials actually work. Readers will find: --' The essential principles of chemical bonding, electron energy bands and their relationship to conductive and s

  9. Diet after gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps people who have a gastric band stay satisfied longer. This includes things like salad with grilled ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  10. HYBASE - HYperspectral BAnd SElection tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2008-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to calculate the minimum number of

  11. Conduction apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochipa, C; Rothi, L J; Heilman, K M

    1994-01-01

    A left hemisphere damaged patient with ideomotor apraxia is described, whose performance on pantomime to verbal command was superior to pantomime imitation. His reception of these same gestures (gesture naming) was spared. This syndrome has been named conduction apraxia. To account for this selective impaired performance on gesture imitation, a separation of the representations for gesture production and reception is proposed and a non-lexical gesture processing route for gesture imitation is suggested. Images PMID:7931387

  12. Conduction apraxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ochipa, C; Rothi, L J; Heilman, K M

    1994-01-01

    A left hemisphere damaged patient with ideomotor apraxia is described, whose performance on pantomime to verbal command was superior to pantomime imitation. His reception of these same gestures (gesture naming) was spared. This syndrome has been named conduction apraxia. To account for this selective impaired performance on gesture imitation, a separation of the representations for gesture production and reception is proposed and a non-lexical gesture processing route for gesture imitation is...

  13. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Sizable band gap in organometallic topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on first principle calculation when Ceperley-Alder and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerh type exchange-correlation energy functional were adopted to LSDA and GGA calculation, electronic properties of organometallic honeycomb lattice as a two-dimensional topological insulator was calculated. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction bulk band gap of organometallic lattice with heavy metals such as Au, Hg, Pt and Tl atoms were investigated. Our results show that the organometallic topological insulator which is made of Mercury atom shows the wide bulk band gap of about ∼120 meV. Moreover, by fitting the conduction and valence bands to the band-structure which are produced by Density Functional Theory, spin-orbit interaction parameters were extracted. Based on calculated parameters, gapless edge states within bulk insulating gap are indeed found for finite width strip of two-dimensional organometallic topological insulators.

  15. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  16. Conductivity and Dielectric Loss of Tungsten-Bronze-Type BaNd2Ti4O12Microwave Ceramics%乌青铜型BaNd2Ti4O12微波介质陶瓷的电导和介电损耗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏海廷; 匡小军; 王春海; 李文先; 荆西平; 赵飞; 岳振星

    2011-01-01

    用固相反应合成了乌青铜型钛酸盐陶瓷BaNd2Ti4O12,并用电化学阻抗和微波介质谐振测试表征了不同热处理和钽掺杂对电导和微波介电损耗的影响.电导率随退火气氛(空气,氧气和氮气)的变化与缺陷反应平衡2Oxo—2V**o+O2↑+2e'和TixTie′←→Ti'Ti随氧分压的变化一致,表明BaNd2Ti4O12具有∏型导电性质.在空气和氧气中退火有利于减少包括Vxo,Ti'Ti和弱束缚电子在内的本征缺陷因而降低电导.而在低氧分压的氮气中进行退火处理,增加了缺陷的浓度,同时提高了电导率.在空气/氧气/氮气中的退火处理对微波介电损耗没有明显的影响,表明本征缺陷对微波介电损耗的影响可以忽略.空气退火处理样品的电导率和微波介电损耗低于空气淬火处理的样品:其中电导的变化与缺陷反应平衡相关,但空气退火降低微波介电损耗可能与退火消除晶格热应力有关.五价钽的掺杂降低了电导但增大了微波介电损耗.本研究表明空气退火处理能有效地改善BaNd2Ti4O12陶瓷的品质因子Q×f,其值提高了约12%.%Tungsten-bronze type titanate BaNd2Ti4O12 ceramics were synthesized by solid state reactions.The conductivity and microwave dielectric loss of the samples that were thermally treated under various conditions and Ta-doped were investigated by electrochemical impedance measurement and microwave dielectric resonator measurement.The variation in conductivity with annealing atmospheres of air,O2,and N2 was consistent with the defect equilibriums 2Oxo←→2V**o +O2↑+2e′ and Ti'Ti+e′←→Ti'Ti suggesting n-type conductance for BaNd2Ti4O12.Thermal treatment in air/O2 was found to favor the elimination of the native defects Vxo,Ti′Ti and weakly bound electrons thus decreasing the conductivity.Thermal treatment in a N2atmosphere,which had a low oxygen partial pressure,increased the defect content and the conductivity.Thermal treatment in air/O2/N2

  17. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Stephenson, Chad A; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William; Wistey, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1-xCx) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying results have been reported. This work uses ab initio simulations with HSE06 hybrid functionals and spin-orbit coupling to study the band structure behavior in the absence of defects. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at k=0 is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys remain nearly unchanged. A vanishing bandgap was observed for all alloys with x>0.017. Conduction bands deviate from a constant-potential band anticrossing model except near the center of the Brillouin zone.

  18. Conducted Vasoreactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Neganova, A Y; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    , the underlying mechanisms are debated. Here, we focus on dynamical aspects of the problem hypothesizing the existence of a bistability-powered mechanism for regenerative pulse transmission along the endothelium. Bistability implies that the cell can have two different stable resting potentials and can switch......Conducted vasodilation is part of the physiological response to increasing metabolic demand of the tissue. Similar responses can be elicited by focal electrical or chemical stimulation. Some evidence suggests an endothelial pathway for nondecremental transmission of hyperpolarizing pulses. However...... a theoretical analysis as well as numerical simulations of both single- and multiunit bistable systems mimicking endothelial cells to investigate the self-consistence and stability of the proposed mechanism. We find that the individual cell may switch readily between two stable potentials. An array of coupled...

  19. Distribution Free Prediction Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Jing

    2012-01-01

    We study distribution free, nonparametric prediction bands with a special focus on their finite sample behavior. First we investigate and develop different notions of finite sample coverage guarantees. Then we give a new prediction band estimator by combining the idea of "conformal prediction" (Vovk et al. 2009) with nonparametric conditional density estimation. The proposed estimator, called COPS (Conformal Optimized Prediction Set), always has finite sample guarantee in a stronger sense than the original conformal prediction estimator. Under regularity conditions the estimator converges to an oracle band at a minimax optimal rate. A fast approximation algorithm and a data driven method for selecting the bandwidth are developed. The method is illustrated first in simulated data. Then, an application shows that the proposed method gives desirable prediction intervals in an automatic way, as compared to the classical linear regression modeling.

  20. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  1. Banded transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  2. [Conduct disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Christina

    2014-05-01

    The diagnosis conduct disorder (CD) is characterized by aggressive (e.g., physical aggression) as well as nonaggressive symptoms (e.g., violation of rules, truancy). Conclusions regarding the course and prognosis, or recommendations for effective interventions, seem not to be equally valid for the whole patient group. DSM-IV-TR included subtyping age-of-onset as a prognostic criterion, even though the evidence base for subtyping from age of onset was rather sparse. The relevant literature on CD has grown substantially since the publication of DSM-IV-TR in 1994. For the new DSM-5 edition, some important issues were discussed, for example, consideration of personality traits, female-specific or dimensional criteria, and adding a childhood-limited subtype (Moffitt et al., 2008). Nevertheless, the diagnostic protocol for CD was not changed in the most parts in the new edition of the DSM-5; the addition of a CD specifier with limited emotions is the most relevant change. On the basis of the existing evidence base, this review discusses whether the modifications in DSM-5 are helpful for fulfilling the requirements of a reliable and valid psychiatric classification.

  3. Exceptionally large banded spherulites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, R. R.

    1994-07-01

    This article concerns the crystallization of maleic anhydride from a blend containing 2 wt% of poly(acrylonitrile). High speed photography and temperature measurements during the crystallization as well as X-ray diffraction from the blend after crystallization are consistent with a banded spherulitic morphology.

  4. Colloquium: Topological band theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansil, A.; Lin, Hsin; Das, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    The first-principles band theory paradigm has been a key player not only in the process of discovering new classes of topologically interesting materials, but also for identifying salient characteristics of topological states, enabling direct and sharpened confrontation between theory and experiment. This review begins by discussing underpinnings of the topological band theory, which involve a layer of analysis and interpretation for assessing topological properties of band structures beyond the standard band theory construct. Methods for evaluating topological invariants are delineated, including crystals without inversion symmetry and interacting systems. The extent to which theoretically predicted properties and protections of topological states have been verified experimentally is discussed, including work on topological crystalline insulators, disorder and interaction driven topological insulators (TIs), topological superconductors, Weyl semimetal phases, and topological phase transitions. Successful strategies for new materials discovery process are outlined. A comprehensive survey of currently predicted 2D and 3D topological materials is provided. This includes binary, ternary, and quaternary compounds, transition metal and f -electron materials, Weyl and 3D Dirac semimetals, complex oxides, organometallics, skutterudites, and antiperovskites. Also included is the emerging area of 2D atomically thin films beyond graphene of various elements and their alloys, functional thin films, multilayer systems, and ultrathin films of 3D TIs, all of which hold exciting promise of wide-ranging applications. This Colloquium concludes by giving a perspective on research directions where further work will broadly benefit the topological materials field.

  5. DUAL BAND MONOPOLE ANTENNA DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jithu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The WLAN and Bluetooth applications become popular in mobile devices, integrating GSM and ISM bands operation in one compact antenna, can reduce the size of mobile devices. Recently, lot many investigations are carried out in designing a dual band antennas with operating frequencies in GSM band and in ISM band for mobile devices. Printed monopoles are under this investigation. In this paper, dual-band printed monopoles are presented to operate at GSM band i.e. 900 MHz and ISM band i.e. 2.4 GHz. We intend to observe the antenna characteristics on the network analyzer and verify the theoretical results with the practical ones.

  6. Substrate-induced Band Gap Renormalization in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj K.

    2014-01-01

    The quasiparticle band gaps of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported on a weakly-interacting hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate are computed using density functional theory and the GW Approximation. We find that the direct band gaps of the (7,0), (8,0) and (10,0) carbon nanotubes are renormalized to smaller values in the presence of the dielectric h-BN substrate. The decrease in the band gap is the result of a polarization-induced screening effect, which alters the correlation energy of the frontier CNT orbitals and stabilizes valence band maximum and conduction band minimum. The value of the band gap renormalization is on the order of 0.25 to 0.5 eV in each case. Accounting for polarization-induced band gap changes is crucial in comparing computed values with experiment, since nanotubes are almost always grown on substrates. PMID:24402238

  7. Effects of Conductor Baton Use on Band and Choral Musicians' Perceptions of Conductor Expressivity and Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nápoles, Jessica; Silvey, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine participants' (college band and choral musicians, N = 143) perceptions of conductor clarity and expressivity after viewing band and choral directors conducting with or without a baton. One band and one choral conductor each prepared and conducted two excerpts of Guy Forbes's "O Nata Lux", a piece…

  8. Band structure approach to the resonant x-ray scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Elfimov, I. S.; Skorikov, N. A.; Anisimov, V. I.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    We study the resonance behaviour of the forbidden 600 and 222 x-ray Bragg peaks in Ge using LDA band structure methods. These Bragg peaks remain forbidden in the resonant dipole scattering approximation even taking into account the non local nature of the band states. However they become allowed at resonance if the eigenstates of the unoccupied conduction band involve a hybridization of p like and d like atomic states. We show that the energy dependence of the resonant behaviour, including th...

  9. Optically detected cyclotron resonance in a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Gregor

    2011-09-23

    Optically detected far-infrared cyclotron resonance (FIR-ODCR) in GaAs/AlGaAs HJs is interpreted in the frame of an exciton-dissociation mechanism. It is possible to explain the ODR mechanism by an exciton drag, mediated by ballistically propagating phonons. Furthermore, very narrow resonances are presented and realistic electron mobility values can be calculated. The exceptionally narrow ODCRs allow to measure conduction-band nonparabolicity effects and resolve satellite resonances, close to the main cyclotron resonance line.

  10. Diffuse interstellar absorption bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG FuYuan; LIANG ShunLin; LI AiGen

    2009-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are a large number of absorption bands that are superposed on the interstellar extinction curve and are of interstellar origin. Since the discovery of the first two DIBs in the 1920s, the exact nature of DIBs still remains unclear. This article reviews the history of the detec-tions of DIBs in the Milky Way and external galaxies, the major observational characteristics of DIBs, the correlations or anti-correlations among DIBs or between DIBs and other interstellar features (e.g. the prominent 2175 Angstrom extinction bump and the far-ultraviolet extinction rise), and the proposed candidate carriers. Whether they are also present in circumstellar environments is also discussed.

  11. Diffuse interstellar absorption bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands(DIBs) are a large number of absorption bands that are superposed on the interstellar extinction curve and are of interstellar origin. Since the discovery of the first two DIBs in the 1920s,the exact nature of DIBs still remains unclear. This article reviews the history of the detections of DIBs in the Milky Way and external galaxies,the major observational characteristics of DIBs,the correlations or anti-correlations among DIBs or between DIBs and other interstellar features(e.g. the prominent 2175 Angstrom extinction bump and the far-ultraviolet extinction rise),and the proposed candidate carriers. Whether they are also present in circumstellar environments is also discussed.

  12. Research on Community Bands: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review of literature was to synthesize findings of studies investigating community bands. This review of literature centers on research that has been conducted on community bands in status studies, historical/cultural studies, pedagogical studies, health and wellness studies, and intergenerational studies. The last section of…

  13. Impurity levels, impurity bands, excited impurity bands, and band tails: The electronic density of states in quantum wells and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.; Gold, A.

    1989-04-01

    We have investigated in quantum wells (QW's) and heterostructures (HS's) the modification of the electronic structure near the band edge, which is induced by selective doping. The density of states has been calculated as a function of the relevant parameters, namely, carrier and impurity concentrations (and depletion concentrations for HS's), QW width, and impurity position. Using a multiple-scattering method which includes a finite-range screened potential and impurity concentration to all orders, we have succeeded in obtaining ground-state and excited-state impurity bands (IB's). We observed these bands merging gradually with the lowest conduction subband as the impurity concentration is increased, leading to the formation of a band tail into the energy gap. Other main results obtained for different values of the parameters are the binding energy for a single impurity, the widths and energy shifts of ground- and excited-state IB's, and the contribution of the electron-impurity interaction to the gap shrinkage in the band-tail regime. Our results are compared with experiments and other theories.

  14. Waterfowl banding, Innoko and Iditarod Rivers, Alaska, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Pintail, widgeon, shoveler, green-winged teal, mallard, white-fronted goose, and lesser Canada goose are mentioned. Banding conducted in July. Logistics, methods,...

  15. Band offsets at the CdS/CuInSe[sub 2] heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, S.; Zunger, A. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The traditional explanation for the successful electron-hole separation in CdS/CuInSe[sub 2] solar cells rests on the assumption of a type-II band lineup: The conduction-band minimum is assumed to be on the CdS window while the valence-band maximum is assumed to be localized on the CuInSe[sub 2] absorber. This picture of negative conduction-band offset [Delta][ital E][sub [ital c

  16. Quasiparticle band structure of antiferromagnetic Eu Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathi Jaya, S.; Nolting, W. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Lehrstuhl Festkoerpertheorie, Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10115 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-11-24

    The temperature-dependent electronic quasiparticle spectrum of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Eu Te is derived by use of a combination of a many-body model procedure with a tight-binding-'linear muffin tin orbital' (TB - LMTO) band structure calculation. The central part is the d-f model for a single band electron ('test electron') being exchange coupled to the anti ferromagnetically ordered localized moments of the Eu ions. The single-electron Bloch energies of the d-f model are taken from a TB-LMTO calculation for paramagnetic Eu Te. The d-f model is evaluated by a recently proposed moment conserving Green function technique to get the temperature-dependent sublattice-quasiparticle band structure (S-QBS) and sublattice-quasiparticle density of states (S-QDOS) of the unoccupied 5 d-6 s energy bands. Unconventional correlation effects and the appearance of characteristic quasiparticles ('magnetic polarons') are worked out in detail. The temperature dependence of the S-QDOS and S-QBS is mainly provoked by the spectral weights of the energy dispersions. Minority- and majority-spin spectra coincide for all temperatures but with different densities of states. Upon cooling from T{sub N} to T = 0 K the lower conduction band edge exhibits a small blue shift of -0.025 eV in accordance with the experiment. Quasiparticle damping manifesting itself in a temperature-dependent broadening of the spectral density peaks arises from spin exchange processes between (5 d-6 s) conduction band electrons and localized 4 f moments. (author)

  17. Estimation of the band gap of InPO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, J. F.; Wilmsen, C. W.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    1983-04-01

    The band gap of a thin layer of InPO4 was estimated to be 4.5 eV using a novel approach employing ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The technique measures the conduction-band minimum and valence-band maximum referenced to the In 4d core line energy. Since this technique is highly surface sensitive, it can be used to measure the band gap of a thin layer. This parameter is difficult to measure in such layers using conventional techniques.

  18. Surface band-gap narrowing in quantized electron accumulation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P D C; Veal, T D; McConville, C F; Zúñiga-Pérez, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Hopkinson, M; Rienks, E D L; Jensen, M Fuglsang; Hofmann, Ph

    2010-06-25

    An energy gap between the valence and the conduction band is the defining property of a semiconductor, and the gap size plays a crucial role in the design of semiconductor devices. We show that the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas near to the surface of a semiconductor can significantly alter the size of its band gap through many-body effects caused by its high electron density, resulting in a surface band gap that is much smaller than that in the bulk. Apart from reconciling a number of disparate previous experimental findings, the results suggest an entirely new route to spatially inhomogeneous band-gap engineering.

  19. Shear bands in a bulk metallic glass after large plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, D.D.; Wang, Y.B.; Liao, X.Z.; Shen, J. (Harbin); (Sydney)

    2012-10-23

    A transmission electron microscopy investigation is conducted to trace shear bands in a Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 18.7}Ni{sub 12}Al{sub 16.3} bulk metallic glass after experiencing 4% plastic deformation. Shear band initiation, secondary shear band interactions, mature shear band broadening and the interactions of shear bands with shear-induced nanocrystals are captured. Results suggest that the plasticity of the bulk metallic glass is enhanced by complex shear bands and their interactions which accommodate large plastic strain and prevent catastrophic shear band propagation.

  20. 47 CFR 15.107 - Conducted limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conducted limits. 15.107 Section 15.107... Conducted limits. (a) Except for Class A digital devices, for equipment that is designed to be connected to... power line on any frequency or frequencies within the band 150 kHz to 30 MHz shall not exceed the...

  1. The Wulf bands of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernath, Peter; Carleer, Michel; Fally, Sophie; Jenouvrier, Alain; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Hermans, Christian; Mérienne, Marie-France; Colin, Reginald

    1998-11-01

    The Wulf bands of oxygen in the 240-290 nm spectral region are caused by collision-induced absorption of the Herzberg III ( A' 3Δu- X3Σ-g) system. These bands had been previously attributed to the oxygen dimer, (O 2) 2. Under atmospheric conditions the Wulf bands are thus the long-wavelength extension of the Herzberg continuum. Absorption of solar radiation by the Wulf bands may be an additional source of NO in the stratosphere.

  2. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  3. Band engineering of thermoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yanzhong; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G J

    2012-12-01

    Lead chalcogenides have long been used for space-based and thermoelectric remote power generation applications, but recent discoveries have revealed a much greater potential for these materials. This renaissance of interest combined with the need for increased energy efficiency has led to active consideration of thermoelectrics for practical waste heat recovery systems-such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. The simple high symmetry NaCl-type cubic structure, leads to several properties desirable for thermoelectricity, such as high valley degeneracy for high electrical conductivity and phonon anharmonicity for low thermal conductivity. The rich capabilities for both band structure and microstructure engineering enable a variety of approaches for achieving high thermoelectric performance in lead chalcogenides. This Review focuses on manipulation of the electronic and atomic structural features which makes up the thermoelectric quality factor. While these strategies are well demonstrated in lead chalcogenides, the principles used are equally applicable to most good thermoelectric materials that could enable improvement of thermoelectric devices from niche applications into the mainstream of energy technologies.

  4. Conductivity and superconductivity in heavily vacant diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Jafari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   Motivated by the idea of impurity band superconductivity in heavily Boron doped diamond, we investigate the doping of various elements into diamond to address the question, which impurity band can offer a better DOS at the Fermi level. Surprisingly, we find that the vacancy does the best job in producing the largest DOS at the Fermi surface. To investigate the effect of disorder in Anderson localization of the resulting impurity band, we use a simple tight-binding model. Our preliminary study based on the kernel polynomial method shows that the impurity band is already localized at the concentration of 10-3. Around the vacancy concentration of 0.006 the whole spectrum of diamond becomes localized and quantum percolation takes place. Therefore to achieve conducting bands at concentrations on the scale of 5-10 percent, one needs to introduce correlations such as hopping among the vacancies .

  5. Ballistic modeling of InAs nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Kristofer; Lind, Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the intrinsic performance of InAs nanowire transistors is evaluated in the ballistic limit. A self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson solver is utilized in the cylindrical geometry, while accounting for conduction band non-parabolicity. The transistor characteristics are derived from simulations of ballistic transport within the nanowire. Using this approach, the performance is calculated for a continuous range of nanowire diameters and the transport properties are mapped. A transconductance exceeding 4S /mm is predicted at a gate overdrive of 0.5V and it is shown that the performance is improved with scaling. Furthermore, the influence from including self-consistency and non-parabolicity in the band structure simulations is quantified. It is demonstrated that the effective mass approximation underestimates the transistor performance due to the highly non-parabolic conduction band in InAs. Neglecting self-consistency severely overestimates the device performance, especially for thick nanowires. The error introduced by both of these approximations gets increasingly worse under high bias conditions.

  6. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  7. Constraints to the flat band potential of hematite photo-electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, A; Alexander, J C; Kelsall, G H

    2014-08-14

    We revisit the fundamental constraints that apply to flat band potential values at semiconductor photo-electrodes. On the physical scale, the Fermi level energy of a non-degenerate semiconductor at the flat band condition, EF(FB), is constrained to a position between the conduction band, EC, and the valence band, EV,: |EC| flat band potentials appear to lie outside these fundamental boundaries. In order to assess the validity of any determined flat band potential, the boundaries set by the conduction band and the valence band must be computed on both scales a priori, where possible. This is accomplished with the aid of an analytical reconstruction of the semiconductor|electrolyte interface in question. To illustrate this approach, we provide a case study based on synthetic hematite, α-Fe2O3. The analysis of this particular semiconductor is motivated by the large variance in the flat band potential values reported in the literature.

  8. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  9. The band gap and band offset in ultrathin oxide-semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeißer, D.; Henkel, K.; Bergholz, M.; Tallarida, M.

    2010-03-01

    In ultrathin high- k oxide layers knowledge of the band line up and band gap is essential for modeling the transport properties and to learn about a device's long term stability and reliability. However, such data are hard to determine in such ultrathin layers and usually are extrapolated from values for bulk samples or are taken from the literature. In our in situ approach we use electron energy loss spectroscopy, valence band photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering to obtain the loss function and the valence and conduction band densities of states. From such data we derive the values of the band offsets and of the band gap. We discuss the ability of this combination of different techniques for the analysis of such complex ultrathin dielectric systems and discuss in detail the properties of the native oxide in SiO 2/Si(001) and SiO 2/3C-SiC(001).

  10. Density of states in a two-dimensional electron gas: Impurity bands and band tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.

    1988-03-01

    We calculate the density of states of a two-dimensional electron gas in the presence of charged impurities within Klauder's best multiple-scattering approach. The silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) system with impurities at the interface is studied in detail. The finite extension of the electron wave function into the bulk is included as well as various dependences of the density of states on the electron, the depletion, and the impurity densities. The transition from an impurity band at low impurity concentration to a band tail at high impurity concentration is found to take place at a certain impurity concentration. If the screening parameter of the electron gas is decreased, the impurity band shifts to lower energy. For low impurity density we find excited impurity bands. Our theory at least qualitatively explains conductivity and infrared-absorption experiments on impurity bands in sodium-doped MOS systems and deep band tails in the gap observed for high doping levels in these systems.

  11. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  12. Multi-band model of quantum electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Mehmet Burcin

    Wigner function equations for multi-band quantum devices are presented in this presentation. These quantum transport equations are derived from the equations of motion of non-equilibrium Green's function with the generalized Kadanoff Baym ansatz, and the multi-band k.p Hamiltonian including the spin-orbit interaction. The results are applied to a two-band resonant inter-band tunneling structure. A Wigner function representation is developed for the quantum transport theory of the conduction band electrons in Rashba effect resonant tunneling structures with a phonon bath. In narrow band gap heterostructures, spin splitting occurs mainly as a result of inversion asymmetry in the spatial dependence of the potential or as a result of external electric field. This "zero magnetic field spin splitting" is due to the Rashba term in the effective mass Hamiltonian. A theoretical study of the spin-dependent resonant tunneling structure based on multi-band non-equilibrium Green's functions is also presented in this work. Again, the quantum transport equations are derived using multiband non-equilibrium Green's function formulation in generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz. Finally, numerical results are presented based on the multi-band Wigner-Poisson code. This code is able to simulate multi-band resonant tunneling structures.

  13. The complex band structure for armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Liu-Jun; Xia Tong-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Using a tight binding transfer matrix method, we calculate the complex band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons. The real part of the complex band structure calculated by the transfer matrix method fits well with the bulk band structure calculated by a Hermitian matrix. The complex band structure gives extra information on carrier's decay behaviour. The imaginary loop connects the conduction and valence band, and can profoundly affect the characteristics of nanoscale electronic device made with graphene nanoribbons. In this work, the complex band structure calculation includes not only the first nearest neighbour interaction, but also the effects of edge bond relaxation and the third nearest neighbour interaction. The band gap is classified into three classes. Due to the edge bond relaxation and the third nearest neighbour interaction term, it opens a band gap for N= 3M-1. The band gap is almost unchanged for N = 3M + 1, but decreased for N = 3M. The maximum imaginary wave vector length provides additional information about the electrical characteristics of graphene nmaoribbons, and is also classified into three classes.

  14. Superfluidity in topologically nontrivial flat bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Törmä, Päivi

    2015-11-20

    Topological invariants built from the periodic Bloch functions characterize new phases of matter, such as topological insulators and topological superconductors. The most important topological invariant is the Chern number that explains the quantized conductance of the quantum Hall effect. Here we provide a general result for the superfluid weight Ds of a multiband superconductor that is applicable to topologically nontrivial bands with nonzero Chern number C. We find that the integral over the Brillouin-zone of the quantum metric, an invariant calculated from the Bloch functions, gives the superfluid weight in a flat band, with the bound Ds⩾|C|. Thus, even a flat band can carry finite superfluid current, provided the Chern number is nonzero. As an example, we provide Ds for the time-reversal invariant attractive Harper-Hubbard model that can be experimentally tested in ultracold gases. In general, our results establish that a topologically nontrivial flat band is a promising concept for increasing the critical temperature of the superconducting transition.

  15. Cluster banding heat source model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Liguo; Ji Shude; Yang Jianguo; Fang Hongyuan; Li Yafan

    2006-01-01

    Concept of cluster banding heat source model is put forward for the problem of overmany increment steps in the process of numerical simulation of large welding structures, and expression of cluster banding heat source model is deduced based on energy conservation law.Because the expression of cluster banding heat source model deduced is suitable for random weld width, quantitative analysis of welding stress field for large welding structures which have regular welds can be made quickly.

  16. Theoretical Simulation for Identical Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-Jing; CHEN Yong-Shou; GAO Zao-Chun

    2004-01-01

    @@ The frequency of occurrence of identical bands is studied by analysing a large number of rotational bands calculated with the reflection asymmetric shell model, and the statistical properties of identical bands indicated in all the experimental observations are reproduced within the mean field approximation and beyond mean field treatment, such as angular momentum projection. The distributions of the calculated J(2), Eγ and the fractional change of J(2) are discussed.

  17. Iliotibial band Z-lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David P; Alan Barber, F; Troop, Randal L

    2003-03-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) is a common overuse injury reported to afflict 1.6% to 12% of runners. It results from an inflammatory response secondary to excessive friction that occurs between the lateral femoral epicondyle and the iliotibial band. Initial treatments include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, modalities (ice or heat), stretching, physical therapy, and possibly a cortisone injection. In recalcitrant cases of ITBFS, surgery has been advocated. This report describes a surgical technique of Z-lengthening of the iliotibial band in patients presenting with lateral knee pain localized to the iliotibial band at the lateral femoral epicondyle and Gerdy's tubercle who failed all nonoperative efforts.

  18. Scarless platysmaplasty for platysmal bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiffman Melvin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Transection of plastysmal bands has required a surgical approach that leaves scars and limits patient activities for a period of time. The author has developed a simple method to transect the platysmal bands under local anesthesia without resorting to skin incisions. The transection is performed with the use of a Vicryl ® suture that is inserted through the skin, around the platysmal band, and then out through the original entry point. A back and forth motion of the suture cuts through the band.

  19. Additive manufacturing of Ka-band antennas for wireless communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armendariz, Unai; Rommel, Simon; Rodríguez Páez, Juan Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of WR-28 waveguide horn antennas operating in the Ka-band frequency range between 26.5 GHz and 40 GHz through 3D printing. Three different antennas are fabricated from polylactide acid filaments in conductive and non-conductive variants; the latter...

  20. Garage Band or GarageBand[R]? Remixing Musical Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakeva, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I suggest that it is perhaps time to consider the pedagogy of popular music in more extensive terms than conventional rock band practices have to offer. One direction in which this might lead is the expansion of the informal pedagogy based on a "garage band" model to encompass various modes of digital artistry wherever this artistry…

  1. Unfolding the band structure of GaAsBi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, R.; Sweeney, S. J.; Florescu, Marian

    2017-02-01

    Typical supercell approaches used to investigate the electronic properties of GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) produce highly accurate, but folded, band structures. Using a highly optimized algorithm, we unfold the band structure to an approximate E≤ft(\\mathbf{k}\\right) relation associated with an effective Brillouin zone. The dispersion relations we generate correlate strongly with experimental results, confirming that a regime of band gap energy greater than the spin-orbit-splitting energy is reached at around 10% bismuth fraction. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the unfolding algorithm throughout the Brillouin zone (BZ), which is key to enabling transition rate calculations, such as Auger recombination rates. Finally, we show the effect of disorder on the effective masses and identify approximate values for the effective mass of the conduction band and valence bands for bismuth concentrations from 0-12%.

  2. Retrospective biodosimetry with small tooth enamel samples using K-Band and X-Band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Jorge A. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kinoshita, Angela [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coracao - USC, 17011-160 Bauru, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Leonor, Sergio J. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Belmonte, Gustavo C. [Universidade Sagrado Coracao - USC, 17011-160 Bauru, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    In an attempt to make the in vitro electron spin resonance (ESR) retrospective dosimetry of the tooth enamel a lesser invasive method, experiments using X-Band and K-Band were performed, aiming to determine conditions that could be used in cases of accidental exposures. First, a small prism from the enamel was removed and ground with an agate mortar and pestle until particles reach a diameter of approximately less than 0.5 mm. This enamel extraction process resulted in lower signal artifact compared with the direct enamel extraction performed with a diamond burr abrasion. The manual grinding of the enamel does not lead to any induced ESR signal artifact, whereas the use of a diamond burr at low speed produces a signal artifact equivalent to the dosimetric signal induced by a dose of 500 mGy of gamma irradiation. A mass of 25 mg of enamel was removed from a sound molar tooth previously irradiated in vitro with a dose of 100 mGy. This amount of enamel was enough to detect the dosimetric signal in a standard X-Band spectrometer. However using a K-Band spectrometer, samples mass between 5 and 10 mg were sufficient to obtain the same sensitivity. An overall evaluation of the uncertainties involved in the process in this and other dosimetric assessments performed at our laboratory indicates that it is possible at K-Band to estimate a 100 mGy dose with 25% accuracy. In addition, the use of K-Band also presented higher sensitivity and allowed the use of smaller sample mass in comparison with X-Band. Finally, the restoration process performed on a tooth after extraction of the 25 mg of enamel is described. This was conducted by dental treatment using photopolymerizable resin which enabled complete recovery of the tooth from the functional and aesthetic viewpoint showing that this procedure can be minimally invasive.

  3. Unified Hamiltonian for conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão Botelho, André; Shin, Yongwoo; Li, Minghai; Jiang, Lili; Lin, Xi

    2011-11-01

    Two transferable physical parameters are incorporated into the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian to model conducting polymers beyond polyacetylene: the parameter γ scales the electron-phonon coupling strength in aromatic rings and the other parameter ɛ specifies the heterogeneous core charges. This generic Hamiltonian predicts the fundamental band gaps of polythiophene, polypyrrole, polyfuran, poly-(p-phenylene), poly-(p-phenylene vinylene), and polyacenes, and their oligomers of all lengths, with an accuracy exceeding time-dependent density functional theory. Its computational costs for moderate-length polymer chains are more than eight orders of magnitude lower than first-principles approaches.

  4. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; /SLAC; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  5. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A. [Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zürich, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  6. Long Lake banding project, 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a banding project on Long Lake in 1965. The dates at the banding site were July 27th through August 8th. As in the past, the...

  7. Quantum conductance of zigzag graphene oxide nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Zhe; Nelson, Christopher; Khatun, Mahfuza, E-mail: mkhatun@bsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for Computational Nanoscience, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    The electronic properties of zigzag graphene oxide nanoribbons (ZGOR) are presented. The results show interesting behaviors which are considerably different from the properties of the perfect graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). The theoretical methods include a Huckel-tight binding approach, a Green's function methodology, and the Landauer formalism. The presence of oxygen on the edge results in band bending, a noticeable change in density of states and thus the conductance. Consequently, the occupation in the valence bands increase for the next neighboring carbon atom in the unit cell. Conductance drops in both the conduction and valence band regions are due to the reduction of allowed k modes resulting from band bending. The asymmetry of the energy band structure of the ZGOR is due to the energy differences of the atoms. The inclusion of a foreign atom's orbital energies changes the dispersion relation of the eigenvalues in energy space. These novel characteristics are important and valuable in the study of quantum transport of GNRs.

  8. Satellite communications application to Pacific countries above Ku band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    An application of satellite communications above the Ku band to the Pacific region is described, focusing on: (1) Lightsat system and (2) a high capacity satellite system. A small geostationary satellite system using Ku band for the Federated States of Micronesia is shown as an example. A concept of multi-gigabits/second high capacity communications system using two satellites in the Ka band is described. The onboard bit-by-bit processing is very useful in the low link margin environment due to rain attenuation. These topics were obtained by the Asia Pacific Telecommunications Study granted by NASA conducted by the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  9. Modified extended Hückel band calculations on conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Y.; Marynick, Dennis S.

    1992-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict band gaps, corresponding to π-π* transitions of one-dimensional conducting polymers, the formula for the off-diagonal elements, Hαβij in the extended Hückel (EH) band calculation method was modified according to the form Hαβij=K1(Hααii +Hββjj)exp(-K2Rαβ) Sαβij. Parametrizations for the constants K1 and K2 were performed so as to yield reasonable band gaps for the pure hydrocarbon polymers trans-polyacetylene, poly(para-phenylene), and poly(phenylene vinylene). Since there is a large difference in bond alternations along polymeric chains between ab initio and modified neglect of diatomic overlap optimized geometries, especially for heterocyclic polymers, the valence orbital exponents of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur were separately adjusted, depending on the chosen geometry, to reproduce the band gaps of polyfuran, polypyrrole, and polythiophene. It is found that geometrical relaxations in the presence of heteroatoms strongly affect the C1-C4 interactions as well as bond alternations, which in turn affect the band gap. Modified EH band calculations were performed for various polymers. The predicted band gaps had average errors of ca. 10% (less than 0.3 eV) compared to the experimental values, and the method produced band structures consistent with electron-energy-loss spectroscopic observations.

  10. Conducted interference, challenges and interference cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Conducted interference has become increasingly problematic in the past few years, especially within the 2-150 kHz band. The high penetration of non-linear loads, combined with distributed generation, will influence the voltage profile, i.e. the power quality. New technologies will introduce new type

  11. Conducted interference, challenges and interference cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Conducted interference has become increasingly problematic in the past few years, especially within the 2-150 kHz band. The high penetration of non-linear loads, combined with distributed generation, will influence the voltage profile, i.e. the power quality. New technologies will introduce new

  12. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Subramanian

    2008-04-01

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are formed by removing the substrate material in a periodic manner. This paper also demonstrates that these structures can serve as a non-destructive characterization tool for materials, a duplexor and frequency selective coupler. The paper presents both experimental results and theoretical simulation based on a commercially available finite element methodology for comparison.

  13. Band head spin assignment of superdeformed bands in 86Zr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadwal, Anshul; Mittal, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    Two parameter expressions for rotational spectra viz. variable moment of inertia (VMI), ab formula and three parameter Harris ω 2 expansion are used to assign the band head spins (I 0) of four rotational superdeformed bands in 86Zr. The least-squares fitting method is employed to obtain the band head spins of these four bands in the A ∼ 80 mass region. Model parameters are extracted by fitting of intraband γ-ray energies, so as to obtain a minimum root-mean-square (rms) deviation between the calculated and the observed transition energies. The calculated transition energies are found to depend sensitively on the assigned spins. Whenever an accurate band head spin is assigned, the calculated transition energies are in agreement with the experimental transition energies. The dynamic moment of inertia is also extracted and its variation with rotational frequency is investigated. Since a better agreement of band head spin with experimental results is found using the VMI model, it is a more powerful tool than the ab formula and Harris ω 2 expansion.

  14. LANDSAT-4 band 6 data evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The radiometric integrity of the LANDSAT-D thematic mapper (TM) thermal infrared channel (band 6) data was evaluated to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Primary data analysis was spent in evaluating the line to line and detector to detector variation in the thermal infrared data. The data studied was in the core area of Lake Ontario where very stable temperatures were expected. The detectors and the scan direction were taken as separate parameters and an analysis of variance was conducted. The data indicate that significant variability exists both between detectors and between scan directions.

  15. Composite fermions for fractionally filled Chern bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, R.

    2012-02-01

    We consider fractionally filled bands with a non-zero Chern index that exhibit the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in zero external fieldootnotetextR. Roy and S. Sondhi, Physics 4, 46 (2011) and papers reviewed therein. a possibility supported by numerical work.ootnotetextIbid. Analytic treatments are complicated by a non-constant Berry flux and the absence of Composite Fermions (CF), which would not only single out preferred fractions, but also allow us compute numerous response functions at nonzero frequencies, wavelengths and temperature using either Chern-Simons field theory or our Hamiltonian formalism.ootnotetextG. Murthy and R. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys., 75, 1101, (2003) We describe a way to introduce CF's by embedding the Chern band in an auxiliary problem involving Landau levels. The embedded band can be designed to approximate a prescribed Chern density in k space which determines the commutation relations of the charge densities and hence preserve all dynamical and algebraic aspects of the original problem. We find some states for which the filling fraction and dimensionless Hall conductance are not equal. The approach extends to two-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators and to composite bosons.

  16. Electron heat conductivity of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Meilanov, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    The diagonal component of the electron heat conductivity tensor of epitaxial graphene formed in a semiconductor has been investigated within a simple analytical model. It is shown that the heat conductivity sharply changes at a chemical potential close to the substrate band gap edge. Low-temperature expressions for the heat conductivity are derived.

  17. Probing the Spin-Polarized Electronic Band Structure in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zefang; Zhao, Liang; Mak, Kin Fai; Shan, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We study the electronic band structure in the K/K' valleys of the Brillouin zone of monolayer WSe2 and MoSe2 by optical reflection and photoluminescence spectroscopy on dual-gated field-effect devices. Our experiment reveals the distinct spin polarization in the conduction bands of these compounds by a systematic study of the doping dependence of the A and B excitonic resonances. Electrons in the highest-energy valence band and the lowest-energy conduction band have antiparallel spins in monolayer WSe2, and parallel spins in monolayer MoSe2. The spin splitting is determined to be hundreds of meV for the valence bands and tens of meV for the conduction bands, which are in good agreement with first principles calculations. These values also suggest that both n- and p-type WSe2 and MoSe2 can be relevant for spin- and valley-based applications

  18. Relativistic Band Structure and Fermi Surface of PdTe2 by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The energy bands of the trigonal layer compound PdTe2 have been calculated, using the relativistic linear muffin-tin orbitals method. The bandstructure is separated into three distinct regions with low-lying Te 5s bands, conduction bands formed by Pd 4d and Te 5p states, and high-lying bands formed...... by Pd 5p, Te 6s and Te 5d states. Density of states and joint density of states have been calculated from the bands determined over the appropriate irreducible zone. The Fermi surface consists of two closed sheets in band 11 and band 13, and sheets in band 12 connected to one another by tubes...

  19. Strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity in diamond: X-ray spectroscopic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baskaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent X-ray absorption study in boron doped diamond, Nakamura et al. have seen a well isolated narrow boron impurity band in non-superconducting samples and an additional narrow band at the chemical potential in a superconducting sample. We interpret the beautiful spectra as evidence for upper Hubbard band of a Mott insulating impurity band and an additional metallic 'mid-gap band' of a conducting 'self-doped' Mott insulator. This supports the basic framework of a recent theory of the present author of strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity (impurity band resonating valence bond, IBRVB theory in a template of a wide-gap insulator, with no direct involvement of valence band states.

  20. Band-structure engineering in conjugated 2D polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzler, Rico

    2016-10-26

    Conjugated polymers find widespread application in (opto)electronic devices, sensing, and as catalysts. Their common one-dimensional structure can be extended into the second dimension to create conjugated planar sheets of covalently linked molecules. Extending π-conjugation into the second dimension unlocks a new class of semiconductive polymers which as a consequence of their unique electronic properties can find usability in numerous applications. In this article the theoretical band structures of a set of conjugated 2D polymers are compared and information on the important characteristics band gap and valence/conduction band dispersion is extracted. The great variance in these characteristics within the investigated set suggests 2D polymers as exciting materials in which band-structure engineering can be used to tailor sheet-like organic materials with desired electronic properties.

  1. Multidimensional Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of multidimensional heat conduction. General heat conduction equation in three dimensions. Steay state, analytical solutions. The Laplace equation. Method of separation of variables. Principle of superposition. Shape factors. Transient, multidimensional heat conduction....

  2. Band bending and electrical transport at chemically modified silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopinski, Greg; Ward, Tim; Hul'Ko, Oleksa; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2002-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and electrical transport measurements have been used to investigate how various chemical modifications give rise to band bending and alter the conductivity of Si(111) surfaces. HREELS is a sensitive probe of band bending through observations of the low frequency free carrier plasmon mode. For hydrogen terminated surfaces, prepared by the standard etch in ammonium flouride, HREELS measurements on both n and n+ substrates are consistent with nearly flat bands. Chlorination of these surfaces results in substantial upward band bending due to the strong electron withdrawing nature of the chlorine, driving the surface into inversion. The presence of this inversion layer on high resistivity n-type samples is observed through a substantial enhancement of the surface conductivity (relative to the H-terminated surface), as well as through broadening of the quasi-elastic peak in the HREELS measurements. We have also begun to examine organically modified silicon surfaces, prepared by various wet chemical reactions with the H-terminated surface. Decyl modified Si(111) surfaces are seen to exhibit a small degree of band bending, attributed to extrinsic defect states cause by a small degree of oxidation accompanying the modification reaction. The prospects of using conductivity as an in-situ monitor of the rate of these reactions will be discussed.

  3. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  4. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  5. Correlations in a Band Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentef, Michael; Kunes, Jan; Kampf, Arno P.; Werner, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Using DMFT we find a discontinuous band-to-Mott insulator transition upon an increase in the local Coulomb repulsion in a covalent band insulator [1,2], defined as a band insulator with partially filled local orbitals. The corresponding band gap is a hybridization gap arising from a particular pattern of hopping integrals. Similar characteristics apply to materials such as FeSi, FeSb2 or CoTiSb [3], some of which exhibit temperature dependent magnetic and transport properties reminiscent of Kondo insulators. Both charge and spin gaps in the covalent band insulator shrink with increasing Coulomb repulsion. At moderate interaction strengths the gap renormalization is well described by a renormalization factor analogous to the quasiparticle weight in a Fermi liquid. [4pt] [1] M. Sentef, J. Kunes, P. Werner, and A.P. Kampf, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155116 (2009) [0pt] [2] A.P. Kampf, M. Kollar, J. Kunes, M. Sentef, and D. Vollhardt, arXiv:0910.5126

  6. William Band at Yenching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  7. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Density Functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Chad A.; O'brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William F.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1- x C x ) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying properties have been reported. This work reports improved band structure calculations for Ge1- x C x using ab initio simulations that employ the HSE06 exchange-correlation density functional. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at Γ is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys change much more slowly. The calculated Ge bandgap is within 11% of experimental values. A decrease in energy at the Γ conduction band valley of (170 meV ± 50)/%C is predicted, leading to a direct bandgap for x > 0.008. These results indicate a promising material for Group IV lasers.

  8. Linear methods in band theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. Krogh

    1975-01-01

    and they specify the boundary conditions on a single MT or atomic sphere in the most convenient way. This method is very well suited for self-consistent calculations. The empty-lattice test is applied to the linear-MTO method and the free-electron energy bands are accurately reproduced. Finally, it is shown how......Two approximate methods for solving the band-structure problem in an efficient and physically transparent way are presented and discussed in detail. The variational principle for the one-electron Hamiltonian is used in both schemes, and the trial functions are linear combinations of energy......-independent augmented plane waves (APW) and muffin-tin orbitals (MTO), respectively. The secular equations are therefore eigenvalue equations, linear in energy. The trial functions are defined with respect to a muffin-tin (MT) potential and the energy bands depend on the potential in the spheres through potential...

  9. X-Band PLL Synthesizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kutin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with design and realization of a PLL synthesizer for the microwave X−band. The synthesizer is intended for use as a local oscillator in a K−band downconverter. The design goal was to achieve very low phase noise and spurious free signal with a sufficient power level. For that purpose a low phase noise MMIC VCO was used in phase locked loop. The PLL works at half the output frequency, therefore there is a frequency doubler at the output of the PLL. The output signal from the frequency doubler is filtered by a band-pass filter and finally amplified by a single stage amplifier.

  10. Analysis of superdeformed rotational bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Hara, K.

    1998-07-01

    Available experimental data for the ΔI=2 transition energies in superdeformed bands are analyzed by using an extended one-point formula. The existence of deviations from the smooth behavior is confirmed in many bands. However, we stress that one cannot necessarily speak about regular staggering patterns as they are mostly irregular. We present a simulation of the experimental data in terms of a simple model, which suggests that the irregularities may stem from the presence of irregular kinks in the rotational spectrum. However, at present, where such kinks may come from is an open question.

  11. X-Band PLL Synthesizer

    OpenAIRE

    P. Kutin; Vagner, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with design and realization of a PLL synthesizer for the microwave X−band. The synthesizer is intended for use as a local oscillator in a K−band downconverter. The design goal was to achieve very low phase noise and spurious free signal with a sufficient power level. For that purpose a low phase noise MMIC VCO was used in phase locked loop. The PLL works at half the output frequency, therefore there is a frequency doubler at the output of the PLL. The output signal ...

  12. Conductivity Measurements of Silverpastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dirix

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of three-dimensional printed circuit boards requires research on new materials which can easily be deformed. Conducting pastes are well suited for deformation even after they are applied to the dielectric carrier. This paper deals with measurements of the electrical conductivity of these conducting pastes. Two different conductivity measurement techniques are explained and carried out. The resulting measurements give an overview of the conductivity of several measured samples.

  13. Dirac Cones, Topological Edge States, and Nontrivial Flat Bands in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors with a Honeycomb Nanogeometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kalesaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically two-dimensional single-crystalline sheets of semiconductors that form a honeycomb lattice with a period below 10 nm. These systems could combine the usual semiconductor properties with Dirac bands. Using atomistic tight-binding calculations, we show that both the atomic lattice and the overall geometry influence the band structure, revealing materials with unusual electronic properties. In rocksalt Pb chalcogenides, the expected Dirac-type features are clouded by a complex band structure. However, in the case of zinc-blende Cd-chalcogenide semiconductors, the honeycomb nanogeometry leads to rich band structures, including, in the conduction band, Dirac cones at two distinct energies and nontrivial flat bands and, in the valence band, topological edge states. These edge states are present in several electronic gaps opened in the valence band by the spin-orbit coupling and the quantum confinement in the honeycomb geometry. The lowest Dirac conduction band has S-orbital character and is equivalent to the π-π^{⋆} band of graphene but with renormalized couplings. The conduction bands higher in energy have no counterpart in graphene; they combine a Dirac cone and flat bands because of their P-orbital character. We show that the width of the Dirac bands varies between tens and hundreds of meV. These systems emerge as remarkable platforms for studying complex electronic phases starting from conventional semiconductors. Recent advancements in colloidal chemistry indicate that these materials can be synthesized from semiconductor nanocrystals.

  14. Familial band-shaped keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticho, U; Lahav, M; Ivry, M

    1979-01-01

    A brother and sister out of a consanguinous family of four siblings are presented as prototypes of primary band-shaped keratopathy. The disease manifested sever progressive changes of secondary nature over two years of follow-up. Histology and treatment are described.

  15. A PHOTONIC BAND GAP FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    An optical fibre having a periodicidal cladding structure provididing a photonic band gap structure with superior qualities. The periodical structure being one wherein high index areas are defined and wherein these are separated using a number of methods. One such method is the introduction...

  16. Metaphyseal bands in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta are undergoing pamidronate therapy to prevent the incidence of fragility fractures. The authors herein report a child aged 3 years who received five cycles of pamidronate, resulting in metaphyseal bands, known as "zebra lines."

  17. Bands for girls and boys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王为成

    2001-01-01

    Like many people, you may be dreaming of a career(职业) as rock and roll stars. There are two ways to go about getting one. First is the traditional way. Find some friends and form a group. Learn to play the guitar or the drums. Write your own songs. Spend hours arguing about the band name. Then go out on the road.

  18. K-Band Latching Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  19. K-band latching switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-05-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  20. Characterization and Conduction Mechanism of Highly Conductive Vanadate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuaki Nishida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent studies of highly conductive barium iron vanadate glass with a composition of 20 BaO ∙ 10 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 (in mol %. Isothermal annealing of the vanadate glass for several ten minutes at a given temperature, higher than glass transition temperature or crystallization temperature, caused an increase in σ. Substitution of CuI (3d10, ZnII (3d10 and CuII (3d9 for FeIII (3d5 was investigated to elucidate the effect of electron configuration on the conductivity (σ. A marked decrease in the activation energy of conduction (Ea was also observed after the annealing. Values of Ea were correlated to the energy gap between the donor level and the conduction band (CB in the n-type semiconductor model. Isothermal annealing of ZnII-substituted vanadate glass (20 BaO ∙ 5 ZnO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 at 450 °C for 30 min showed an increase in σ from 2.5 × 10–6 to 2.1 × 10–1 S cm–1, which was one order of magnitude larger than that of non-substituted vanadate glass (3.4 × 10–2 S cm–1. Under the same annealing condition, σ’s of 2.0 × 10–1 and 3.2 × 10–1 S cm–1 were observed for 20 BaO ∙ 5 Cu2O ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 and 20 BaO ∙ 5 CuO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 glasses, respectively. These results demonstrate an increase in the carrier (electron density in the CB, primarily composed of anti-bonding 4s-orbitals.

  1. Effect of defect bands in β-In2S3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakrishnan, R.; Sebastian, Tina; Sudha kartha, C.; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2012-05-01

    Optical absorption studies in β-In2S3 thin films of band gap 2.66 eV, prepared using chemical spray pyrolysis technique, revealed presence of a defect band which could assist absorption of sub band gap photons. Extrinsic photoconductivity under excitation of 2.33 eV was observed in these films. Photoluminescence studies revealed a green emission from the films providing a recombination path to these carriers. Temperature dependence of photoconductivity showed that the states in the defect band were continuously exchanging carriers with the conduction band which caused the photocurrent to show persistent photoconductivity. Temperature dependence of photocurrent revealed existence of shallow traps located ˜24 meV below the conduction band which played vital role in controlling the photosensitivity of the films. Temporal dependence of photoconductivity revealed decay tails which were identified to be the effect of thermal release of carriers form the shallow traps.

  2. Natural and Laboratory-Induced Compaction Bands in Aztec Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimson, B. C.; Lee, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Aztec sandstone used in this research is from the Valley of Fire State Park area, Nevada. This Jurassic aeolian sandstone is extremely weak (uniaxial compressive strength of 1-2 MPa); porosity averages 26%; grains are subrounded and have a bimodal size distribution (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm); its mineral composition (K. Sternlof, personal comm.) is 93% quartz, 5% k-spar, and 2% kaolinite, Fe carbonate and others; grain bonding is primarily through suturing. Sternlof et al. (EOS, November, 2001) observed substantial exposure of mainly compactive deformation bands in the Aztec sandstone. We studied an SEM image of a compaction band found in a hand sample of the Aztec sandstone. We also conducted a drilling test in a 130x130x180 mm prismatic specimen subjected to a preset far-field true triaxial stress condition (\\sigmah = 15 MPa, \\sigmav = 25 MPa, \\sigmaH = 40 MPa). Drilling of a 20 mm dia. vertical hole created a long fracture-like thin tabular breakout along the \\sigmah springline and perpendicular to \\sigmaH direction. SEM analysis of the zones ahead of the breakout tips revealed narrow bands of presumed debonded intact grains interspersed with grain fragments. We infer that the fragments were formed from multiple splitting or crushing of compacted grains in the band of high compressive stress concentration developed along the \\sigmah springline. SEM images away from the breakout tip surroundings showed no such fragments. SEM study of the natural compaction band showed a similar arrangement of mainly intact grains surrounded by grain fragments. Using the Optimas optical software package, we found the percentage of pore area within the band ahead of the breakout tips to average 17%; outside of this zone it was 23%. In the natural compaction band pore area occupied 8.5% of the band; in the host rock adjacent to the compaction band it averaged 19%. These readings strongly suggest porosity reduction due to compaction in both cases. The close resemblance between the

  3. Electrical conduction properties of Si delta-doped GaAs grown by MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, A., E-mail: yildizab@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Gazi University, Teknikokular, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Ahi Evran University, 40040 Kirsehir (Turkey); Lisesivdin, S.B. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Altuntas, H.; Kasap, M.; Ozcelik, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Gazi University, Teknikokular, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    The temperature dependent Hall effect and resistivity measurements of Si delta-doped GaAs are performed in a temperature range of 25-300 K. The temperature dependence of carrier concentration shows a characteristic minimum at about 200 K, which indicates a transition from the conduction band conduction to the impurity band conduction. The temperature dependence of the conductivity results are in agreement with terms due to conduction band conduction and localized state hopping conduction in the impurity band. It is found that the transport properties of Si delta-doped GaAs are mainly governed by the dislocation scattering mechanism at high temperatures. On the other hand, the conductivity follows the Mott variable range hopping conduction (VRH) at low temperatures in the studied structures.

  4. Electronic band structure of a type-Ⅱ 'W' quantum well calculated by an eight-band k·p model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xiu; Gu Yong-Xian; Wang Qing; Wei Xin; Chen Liang-Hui

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation of type-Ⅱ 'W' quantum wells for the InAs/Ga1-xInxSb/AlSb family, where 'W' denotes the conduction profile of the material. We focus our attention on using the eight-band k·p model to calculate the band structures within the framework of finite element method. For the sake of clarity, the simulation in this paper is simplified and based on only one period-AlSb/InAs/Ga1-xInxSb/InAs/AlSb. The obtained numerical results include the energy levels and wavefunctions of carriers. We discuss the variations of the electronic properties by changing several important parameters, such as the thickness of either InAs or Ga1-xInxSb layer and the alloy composition in Ga1-xInxSb separately. In the last part, in order to compare the eight-band k·p model, we recalculate the conduction bands of the 'W' structure using the one-band k·p model and then discuss the difference between the two results, showing that conduction bands are strongly coupled with valence bands in the narrow band gap structure. The in-plane energy dispersions, which illustrate the suppression of the Auger recombination process, are also obtained.

  5. Band gap tuning of amorphous Al oxides by Zr alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Jones, N. C.; Borca, C. N.;

    2016-01-01

    minimum changes non-linearly as well.Fitting of the energy band gap values resulted in a bowing parameter of 2 eV. The band gap bowing of themixed oxides is assigned to the presence of the Zr d-electron states localized below the conduction bandminimum of anodized Al2O3.......The optical band gap and electronic structure of amorphous Al-Zr mixed oxides, with Zr content ranging from4.8 to 21.9% were determined using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Thelight scattering by the nano-porous structure of alumina at low wavelengths...... was estimated based on the Miescattering theory. The dependence of the optical band gap of the Al-Zr mixed oxides on Zr content deviatesfrom linearity and decreases from 7.3 eV for pure anodized Al2O3 to 6.45 eV for Al-Zr mixed oxide with Zrcontent of 21.9%. With increasing Zr content, the conduction band...

  6. Flat-Band Potentials of Molecularly Thin Metal Oxide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengtao; Milstein, Tyler J; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2016-05-11

    Exfoliated nanosheets derived from Dion-Jacobson phase layer perovskites (TBAxH1-xA2B3O10, A = Sr, Ca, B = Nb, Ta) were grown layer-by-layer on fluorine-doped tin oxide and gold electrode surfaces. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) of the five-layer nanosheet films in contact with aqueous electrolyte solutions were analyzed by the Mott-Schottky method to obtain flat-band potentials (VFB) of the oxide semiconductors as a function of pH. Despite capacitive contributions from the electrode-solution interface, reliable values could be obtained from capacitance measurements over a limited potential range near VFB. The measured values of VFB shifted -59 mV/pH over the pH range of 4-8 and were in close agreement with the empirical correlation between conduction band-edge potentials and optical band gaps proposed by Matsumoto ( J. Solid State Chem. 1996, 126 (2), 227-234 ). Density functional theory calculations showed that A-site substitution influenced band energies by modulating the strength of A-O bonding, and that subsitution of Ta for Nb on B-sites resulted in a negative shift of the conduction band-edge potential.

  7. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  8. Multicolor emission from intermediate band semiconductor ZnO1‑xSex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welna, M.; Baranowski, M.; Linhart, W. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Yu, K. M.; Mayer, M.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2017-03-01

    Photoluminescence and photomodulated reflectivity measurements of ZnOSe alloys are used to demonstrate a splitting of the valence band due to the band anticrossing interaction between localized Se states and the extended valence band states of the host ZnO matrix. A strong multiband emission associated with optical transitions from the conduction band to lower E‑ and upper E+ valence subbands has been observed at room temperature. The composition dependence of the optical transition energies is well explained by the electronic band structure calculated using the kp method combined with the band anticrossing model. The observation of the multiband emission is possible because of relatively long recombination lifetimes. Longer than 1 ns lifetimes for holes photoexcited to the lower valence subband offer a potential of using the alloy as an intermediate band semiconductor for solar power conversion applications.

  9. Insulator to semimetallic transition in conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Franco-Gonzalez, J. F.; Linares, M.; Crispin, X.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    We report a multiscale modeling of electronic structure of a conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiopehene) (PEDOT) based on a realistic model of its morphology. We show that when the charge carrier concentration increases, the character of the density of states (DOS) gradually evolves from the insulating to the semimetallic, exhibiting a collapse of the gap between the bipolaron and valence bands with the drastic increase of the DOS between the bands. The origin of the observed behavior is attributed to the effect of randomly located counterions giving rise to the states in the gap. These results are discussed in light of recent experiments. The method developed in this work is general and can be applied to study the electronic structure of other conducting polymers.

  10. Fiber-wireless links supporting high-capacity W-band channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2013-01-01

    , is seeding the need to use bands located at the millimeter-wave region (30-300 GHz), mainly because of its inherent broadband nature. In our lab, we have conducted extensive research on high-speed photonic-wireless links in the V-band (50-75GHz) and the W-band (75-110GHz). In this paper, we will present our...

  11. Conducting Polymeric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The overall objective of this collection is to provide the most recent developments within the various areas of conducting polymeric materials. The conductivity of polymeric materials is caused by electrically charged particles, ions, protons and electrons. Materials in which electrons...

  12. The Conductivity of Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1993-01-01

    Presents historical background and modern explanations for the popular demonstration of showing conductivity of solutions through the insertion of a light-bulb conductivity tester into deionized water and water with salt in it. (PR)

  13. Limits of proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  14. Model of the Interplay of Band J-T Effect with Magnetic Order Mediated by Exchange Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, G. Gangadhar; Ramakanth, A.; Ghatak, S. K.; Behera, S. N.; Nolting, W.; Rao, T. Venkatappa

    2006-01-01

    A model calculation is presented with the aim to study the interplay between magnetic and structural transitions. The model consists of an orbitally doubly degenerate conduction band and a periodic array of local moments. The band electrons interact with the local spins via the s-f interaction. The interaction of the band electrons with phonons is introduced by including band Jahn-Teller (J-T) interaction. The model Hamiltonian, including the above terms, is solved for the single particle Gre...

  15. Nonideal anion displacement, band gap variation, and valence band splitting in Cu-In-Se compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reena Philip, Rachel [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-682022 Kerala (India)]. E-mail: reenatara@cusat.ac.in; Pradeep, B. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-682022 Kerala (India)

    2005-01-24

    Polycrystalline thin films of ternary chalcopyrite CuInSe{sub 2} and defect compounds CuIn{sub 3}Se{sub 5} and CuIn{sub 5}Se{sub 8} are prepared in vacuum by three-source coevaporation method. Structural and optical characterizations of the films are done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and optical absorbance spectra measurements. With variation in the composition of CuInSe{sub 2}, a change over from p-type to n-type conductivity is observed (as noted by the hot probe method). The deformation parameters and the anion displacements are calculated from the X-ray diffraction data, and the cation-anion bond lengths are deduced. The dependence of band gap variation on nonideal anion displacement in the ternary compounds and the effect of Se-p-Cu-d repulsion on band gap are studied. The threefold optical structure observed in the fundamental absorption region of the absorption spectra is analysed to extract the valence band splitting parameters. Hopfields quasi-cubic model adapted for chalcopyrites with tetragonal deformation is used to determine the crystal field splittings and spin orbit splittings, and the linear hybridization model is used to calculate the percentage of d-orbital and p-orbital contribution to hybridization in the compounds under consideration.

  16. Carrier Lifetimes in a I I I -V -N Intermediate-Band Semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, J. N.; Schwartzberg, A. M.; Yu, K. M.; Luce, A. V.; Dubon, O. D.; Kuang, Y. J.; Tu, C. W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2017-01-01

    We use transient absorption spectroscopy to measure carrier lifetimes in the multiband semiconductor GaPyAs1 -x -yNx . These measurements probe the electron populations in the conduction band, intermediate band, and valence band as a function of time after an excitation pulse. Following photoexcitation of GaP0.32As0.67N0.01 , we find that the electron population in the conduction band decays exponentially with a time constant τCB=23 ps . The electron population in the intermediate band exhibits bimolecular recombination with recombination constant r =2 ×10-8 cm3/s . In our experiment, an optical pump pulse excites electrons from the valence band to the intermediate and conduction bands, and the change in interband absorption due to absorption saturation and induced absorption is probed with a delayed white-light pulse. We model the optical properties of our samples using the band anticrossing model to extract carrier densities as a function of time. These results not only identify the short minority-carrier lifetime as a key factor affecting the performance of GaPyAs1 -x -yNx -based intermediate-band solar cells but also provide guidance on ways to address this issue.

  17. Shear-induced porosity bands in a compacting porous medium with damage rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    Shear-induced porosity bands have been observed experimentally and have been the subject of a number of theoretical and numerical analyses in which a number of rheological laws governing the partial melt system have been proposed. These bands have been suggested to be important in Earth's interior in focussing melt to Earth's mid-ocean ridges, in reducing the effective viscosity of the asthenosphere, and in affecting seismic and electrical properties. Recently, a linear analysis of the formation of melt bands has been presented in which the viscosity of the solid matrix depends on the grain size and a parameter characterizing the roughness of the grain-liquid interface For some parameter values, this ;damage; rheology mimics the effect of very strongly strain-rate dependent viscosity which can produce low angle bands, similar to those seen in experiments. In the present paper, I show full nonlinear simulations of melt bands with damage rheology. In agreement with the linear analysis, low angle bands are possible when the grain size and grain roughness evolve rapidly compared with the deformation of the sample. The grain size field evolves to form bands where grain-size anticorrelates with porosity. The effective viscosity and electrical conductivity of bands are also investigated. For low angle bands, the effective viscosity relative to the mean viscosity decreases and the electrical conductivity anisotropy increases with strain, indicating significant strain and electrical conduction localization.

  18. Radiative thermal escape in intermediate band solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Luque

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve high efficiency, the intermediate band (IB solar cell must generate photocurrent from sub-bandgap photons at a voltage higher than that of a single contributing sub-bandgap photon. To achieve the latter, it is necessary that the IB levels be properly isolated from the valence and conduction bands. We prove that this is not the case for IB cells formed with the confined levels of InAs quantum dots (QDs in GaAs grown so far due to the strong density of internal thermal photons at the transition energies involved. To counteract this, the QD must be smaller.

  19. Macroscopic optical response and photonic bands

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Huerta, J S; Mendoza, Bernardo S; Mochan, W Luis

    2012-01-01

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of the macroscopic dielectric response of composite systems made of particles of one material embedded periodically within a matrix of another material, each of which is characterized by a well defined dielectric function. The nature of these dielectric functions is arbitrary, and could correspond to dielectric or conducting, transparent or opaque, absorptive and dispersive materials. The geometry of the particles and the Bravais lattice of the composite are also arbitrary. Our formalism goes beyond the longwavelenght approximation as it fully incorporates retardation effects. We test our formalism through the study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in 2D photonic crystals made of periodic arrays of cylindrical holes in a dispersionless dielectric host. Our macroscopic theory yields a spatially dispersive macroscopic response which allows the calculation of the full photonic band structure of the system, as well as the characterization of its normal modes, upo...

  20. Band transport model for discotic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, L. J.; Kelsall, R. W.; Bushby, R. J.

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical model is presented for charge transport in discotic liquid crystals in which a charge is delocalized over more than one lattice site. As such, charge transport is via a banded conduction process in a narrow bandwidth system and takes place over coherent lengths of a few molecules. The coherent lengths are disrupted by the geometrical disorder of the system and are treated as being terminated by quantum tunnel barriers. The transmission probabilities at these barriers have been calculated as a function of the charge carrier energy. Phononic interactions are also considered and the charge carrier scattering rates are calculated for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations. The results of the calculations have been used to develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the charge transport model. Simulated data are presented and used to discuss the nature of the tunnel barriers required to reproduce experimental data. We find that the model successfully reproduces experimental time of flight data including temperature dependence.

  1. Tissue characterization by using narrow band imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gono, Kazuhiro

    2010-02-01

    NBI (Narrow Band Imaging) was first introduced in the market in 2005 as a technique enabling to enhance image contrast of capillaries on a mucosal surface(1). It is classified as an Optical-Digital Method for Image-Enhanced Endoscopy(2). To date, the application has widely spread not only to gastrointestinal fields such as esophagus, stomach and colon but also the organs such as bronchus and bladder. The main target tissue of NBI enhancement is capillaries. However, findings of many clinical studies conducted by endoscopy physicians have revealed that NBI observation enables to enhance more other structures in addition to capillaries. There is a close relationship between those enhanced structures and histological microstructure of a tissue. This report introduces the tissue microstructures enhanced by NBI and discusses the possibility of optimized illumination wavelength in observing living tissues.

  2. Enhanced power factor and reduced Lorenz number in the Wiedemann-Franz law due to pudding mold type band structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Hidetomo; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    We study the relationship between the shape of the electronic band structure and the thermoelectric properties. In order to study the band shape dependence of the thermoelectric properties generally, we first adopt models with band structures having the dispersion E ( k ) ˜ | k | n with n = 2, 4, and 6. We consider one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems and calculate the thermoelectric properties using the Boltzmann equation approach within the constant quasi-particle lifetime approximation. n = 2 corresponds to the usual parabolic band structure, while the band shape for n = 4 and 6 has a flat portion at the band edge, so that the density of states diverges at the bottom of the band. We call this kind of band structure the "pudding mold type band". n ≥ 4 belong to the pudding mold type band, but since the density of states diverges even for n = 2 in the one dimensional system, this is also categorized as the pudding mold type. Due to the large density of states and the rapid change of the group velocity around the band edge, the spectral conductivity of the pudding mold type band structures becomes larger than that of the usual parabolic band structures. It is found that the pudding mold type band has a coexistence of a large Seebeck coefficient and a large electric conductivity and a small Lorenz number in the Wiedemann-Franz law due to the specific band shape. We also find that the low dimensionality of the band structure can contribute to large electronic conductivity and hence a small Lorenz number. We conclude that the pudding mold type band, especially in low dimensional systems, can enhance not only the power factor but also the dimensionless figure of merit due to stronger reduction of the Lorenz number.

  3. Conducting polymer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Slobodan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymers represent a very interesting group of polymer materials Investigation of the synthesis, structure and properties of these materials has been the subject of considerable research efforts in the last twenty years. A short presentating of newer results obtained by investigating of the synthesis, structure and properties of two basic groups of conducting polymers: a conducting polymers the conductivity of which is the result of their molecular structure, and b conducting polymer composites (EPC, is given in this paper. The applications and future development of this group of polymer materials is also discussed.

  4. ALMA Band 5 Cartridge Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billade, Bhushan; Lapkin, I.; Nystrom, O.; Sundin, E.; Fredrixon, M.; Finger, R.; Rashid, H.; Desmaris, V.; Meledin, D.; Pavolotsky, A.; Belitsky, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Work presented here concerns the design and performance of the ALMA Band 5 cold cartridge, one of the 10 frequency channels of ALMA project, a radio interferometer under construction at Atacama Desert in Chile. The Band 5 cartridge is a dual polarization receiver with the polarization separation performed by orthomode transducer (OMT). For each polarization, Band 5 receiver employs sideband rejection (2SB) scheme based on quadrature layout, with SIS mixers covering 163-211 GHz with 4-8 GHz IF. The LO injection circuitry is integrated with mixer chip and is implemented on the same substrate, resulting in a compact 2SB assembly. Amongst the other ALMA bands, the ALMA Band 5 being the lowest frequency band that uses all cold optics, has the largest mirror. Consequently, ALMA Band 5 mirror along with its support structure leaves very little room for placing OMT, mixers and IF subsystems. The constraints put by the size of cold optics and limited cartridge space, required of us to revise the original 2SB design and adopt a design where all the components like OMT, mixer, IF hybrid, isolators and IF amplifier are directly connected to each other without using any co-ax cables in-between. The IF subsystem uses the space between 4 K and 15 K stage of the cartridge and is thermally connected to 4 K stage. Avoiding co-ax cabling required use of custom designed IF hybrid, furthermore, due to limited cooling capacity at 4 K stage, resistive bias circuitry for the mixers is moved to 15 K stage and the IF hybrid along with an integrated bias-T is implemented using superconducting micro-strip lines. The E-probes for both LO and RF waveguide-to-microstrip transitions are placed perpendicular to the wave direction (back-piece configuration). The RF choke at the end of the probes provides a virtual ground for the RF/LO signal, and the choke is DC grounded to the chassis. The on-chip LO injection is done using a microstrip line directional coupler with slot-line branches in the

  5. Is there a "native" bandgap in ion conducting glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2003-01-01

    It is suggested that the spectrum of ion site energies in glasses exhibits a 'band' gap, thus establishing an analogy between ion conducting glasses and intrinsic semiconductors. This implies that ion conduction (as in crystals) takes place via vacancies and interstitial ions....

  6. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  7. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  8. S-Band propagation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-08-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  9. A comprehensive evaluation of the toxicology of experimental cigarettes manufactured with banded papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werley, Michael S; Jerome, Ann M; DeSoi, Darren J; Coggins, Christopher R E; Oldham, Michael J; McKinney, Willie J

    2013-01-01

    To comply with state requirements, cigarette manufacturers have added low-permeability bands to the cigarette paper. These bands can extinguish the cigarette when it is no longer being puffed by a smoker. This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicology resulting from the addition of different types of bands to experimental cigarettes. A battery of assays that are typically used in toxicology studies with cigarette smoke, namely smoke chemistry, in vitro mutagenicity and cytotoxicity, and inhalation studies with rats, were used to evaluate different band characteristics added to cigarette paper. Although differences in the amount of band material was associated with an increase in some metals measured in mainstream tobacco smoke, it was not dose responsive to any band design parameter (base paper permeability, band width, band spacing, band chalk amount, or citrate). Occasional, minor differences were produced by the different types of bands; overall, there was no increased toxicity. Although there were increases and decreases in some mainstream smoke constituents, the in vitro and in vivo testing performed demonstrated that low-permeability bands on cigarettes do not modify the toxicity of smoke inhaled by smokers.

  10. An extension to flat band ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulacsi, M.; Kovacs, G.; Gulacsi, Z.

    2014-11-01

    From flat band ferromagnetism, we learned that the lowest energy half-filled flat band gives always ferromagnetism if the localized Wannier states on the flat band satisfy the connectivity condition. If the connectivity conditions are not satisfied, ferromagnetism does not appear. We show that this is not always the case namely, we show that ferromagnetism due to flat bands can appear even if the connectivity condition does not hold due to a peculiar behavior of the band situated just above the flat band.

  11. Conduction quantization in monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the ballistic conduction of a monolayer MoS2 subject to a spatially modulated magnetic field by using the Landauer-Buttiker formalism. The band structure depends sensitively on the field strength, and its change has profound influence on the electron conduction. The conductance is found to demonstrate multi-step behavior due to the discrete number of conduction channels. The sharp peak and rectangular structures of the conductance are stretched out as temperature increases, due to the thermal broadening of the derivative of the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Finally, quantum behavior in the conductance of MoS2 can be observed at temperatures below 10 K.

  12. Voltammetry of conducting polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Gulaboski, Rubin

    2014-01-01

    The search for new materials for enhancing electrical conductivity of various materials is one of the most active research areas today. Conducting polymers represent a unique class of organic materials that have been used in many applications such as bioelectronics, sensors, corrosion protection, electrocatalysis, and energy storage devices. Application of the conductive polymers in electrochemistry is almost inevitable in order to get better features of the voltammetric systems ...

  13. Graphene Conductance Uniformity Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of micro four-point probe (M4PP) and non-contact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements for centimeter scale quantitative mapping of the sheet conductance of large area chemical vapor deposited graphene films. Dual configuration M4PP measurements......, demonstrated on graphene for the first time, provide valuable statistical insight into the influence of microscale defects on the conductance, while THz-TDS has potential as a fast, non-contact metrology method for mapping of the spatially averaged nanoscopic conductance on wafer-scale graphene with scan times......, dominating the microscale conductance of the investigated graphene film....

  14. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  15. Compositional dependence of the band gap in Ga(NAsP) quantum well heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandieri, K., E-mail: kakhaber.jandieri@physik.uni-marburg.de; Ludewig, P.; Wegele, T.; Beyer, A.; Kunert, B.; Springer, P.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Koch, S. W.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W. [Materials Science Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg (Germany)

    2015-08-14

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the composition dependence of the direct band gap energy in Ga(NAsP)/GaP quantum well heterostructures grown on either (001) GaP- or Si-substrates. The theoretical description takes into account the band anti-crossing model for the conduction band as well as the modification of the valence subband structure due to the strain resulting from the pseudomorphic epitaxial growth on the respective substrate. The composition dependence of the direct band gap of Ga(NAsP) is obtained for a wide range of nitrogen and phosphorus contents relevant for laser applications on Si-substrate.

  16. Band-to-band tunneling distance analysis in the heterogate electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, J. L., E-mail: jose.padilladelatorre@epfl.ch [Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de los Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Palomares, A. [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M. [Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Gámiz, F. [Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de los Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we analyze the behavior of the band-to-band tunneling distance between electron and hole subbands resulting from field-induced quantum confinement in the heterogate electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor. We show that, analogously to the explicit formula for the tunneling distance that can be easily obtained in the semiclassical framework where the conduction and valence band edges are allowed states, an equivalent analytical expression can be derived in the presence of field-induced quantum confinement for describing the dependence of the tunneling distance on the body thickness and material properties of the channel. This explicit expression accounting for quantum confinement holds valid provided that the potential wells for electrons and holes at the top and bottom of the channel can be approximated by triangular profiles. Analytical predictions are compared to simulation results showing very accurate agreement.

  17. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  18. Relativistic Model for two-band Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the superconductivity in MgB2, several two-band models of superconductivity were proposed. In this paper, by using the relativistic fermion model, we clearize the effect of the lower band in the superconductivity.

  19. Is Conductive Education Transplantable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairstow, Phillip; Cochrane, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    This article highlights difficulties in replicating the Andras Peto Institute for Motor Disorders in Hungary by establishing the Birmingham (England) Institute for Conductive Education, for children with cerebral palsy. Difficulties included a lack of conductive education principles in clear English, failure to properly identify children who could…

  20. Conductive fabric seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesay, Ronald Jason; Mason, Brandon William; Kuhn, Michael Joseph; Rowe, Nathan Carl

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed are several examples of a system and method for detecting if an article is being tampered with. Included is a covering made of a substrate that is coated with a layer of an electrically conductive material that forms an electrically conductive surface having an electrical resistance. The covering is configured to at least partially encapsulate the article such that the article cannot be tampered with, without modifying the electrical resistance of the electrically conductive surface of the covering. A sensing device is affixed to the electrically conductive surface of the covering and the sensing device monitors the condition of the covering by producing a signal that is indicative of the electrical resistance of the electrically conductive surface of the covering. A measured electrical resistance that differs from a nominal electrical resistance is indicative of a covering that is being tampered with and an alert is communicated to an observer.

  1. Metamaterial Absorbers in Terahertz Band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Ye Wen; Huai-Wu Zhang; Qing-Hui Yang; Man-Man Mo

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of effort has been made to a create terahertz (THz) wave absorber based on metamaterials (MM). Metamaterials absorbers have a variety of potential applications including thermal emitters, detector, stealth technology, phase imaging, etc. In this paper, we firstly introduce the basic structure and work principle of the THz MM absorbers, and a transmission line model is developed for devices analysis. To expand the application of THz absorbers, dual-band and broadband THz MM absorbers are designed, fabricated, and measured. At the end of this article, the future development trends of MM absorbers are discussed.

  2. Topological Design of Cellular Phononic Band Gap Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fan Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper systematically investigated the topological design of cellular phononic crystals with a maximized gap size between two adjacent bands. Considering that the obtained structures may sustain a certain amount of static loadings, it is desirable to ensure the optimized designs to have a relatively high stiffness. To tackle this issue, we conducted a multiple objective optimization to maximize band gap size and bulk or shear modulus simultaneously with a prescribed volume fraction of solid material so that the resulting structures can be lightweight, as well. In particular, we first conducted the finite element analysis of the phononic band gap crystals and then adapted a very efficient optimization procedure to resolve this problem based on bi-directional evolutionary structure optimization (BESO algorithm in conjunction with the homogenization method. A number of optimization results for maximizing band gaps with bulk and shear modulus constraints are presented for out-of-plane and in-plane modes. Numerical results showed that the optimized structures are similar to those obtained for composite case, except that additional slim connections are added in the cellular case to support the propagation of shear wave modes and meanwhile to satisfy the prescribed bulk or shear modulus constraints.

  3. Lifetime enhancement for multiphoton absorption in intermediate band solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Anibal T.; Studart, Nelson

    2017-08-01

    A semiconductor structure consisting of two coupled quantum wells embedded into the intrinsic region of a p-i-n junction is proposed as an intermediate band solar cell with a photon ratchet state, which would lead to increasing the cell efficiency. The conduction subband of the right-hand side quantum well works as the intermediated band, whereas the excited conduction subband of the left-hand side quantum well operates as the ratchet state. The photoelectrons in the intermediate band are scattered through the thin wells barrier and accumulated into the ratchet subband. A rate equation model for describing the charge transport properties is presented. The efficiency of the current generation is analyzed by studying the occupation of the wells subbands, taking into account the charge dynamic behavior provided by the electrical contacts connected to the cell. The current generation efficiency depends essentially from the relations between the generation, recombination rates and the scattering rate to the ratchet state. The inclusion of the ratchet states led to both an increase and a decrease in the cell current depending on the transition rates. This suggests that the coupling between the intermediate band and the ratchet state is a key point in developing an efficient solar cell.

  4. First-principles study of Cu2ZnSnS4 and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoya, A; Asahi, R; Kresse, G

    2011-10-12

    First-principles calculations of the band offsets between Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) and XS (X = Cd, Zn) are performed. While the interface dipole contribution for the band offsets is calculated using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional is employed to introduce the quasiparticle corrections to the band offsets. The calculated conduction band offset between CZTS and CdS is 0.2 eV, validating CdS for the buffer layer of the CZTS solar cell. The small conduction band offset stems from the band gap narrowing of CdS under the interface strain caused by the lattice misfit with CZTS. A large valence band offset over 0.9 eV between CZTS and ZnS indicates that precipitated ZnS is regarded as an inactive insulator phase in CZTS absorbers.

  5. High-energy band structure of gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  6. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  7. Band Structure Calculation of Si and Ge by Non-Local Empirical Pseudo-Potential Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong; RAVAIOLI Umberto

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the princ iple of spatial nonlocal empirical pseudopotential and its detailed calculation procedure is presented. Consequently, this technique is employed to calculate the band structuresof Silicon and Germaniun. By comparing the results with photoemission experimental data, the validity and accuracy of this calculation are fully conformed for valence or conductance band,respectively. Thus it can be concluded that the spin-orbit Hamiltonian will only affect the energy band gap and another conductance or valence band structure. Therefore, this nonlocal approach without spin-orbit part is adequate for the device simulation of only one carrier transport such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET)'s, and it can significantly reduce the complication of band structure calculation.

  8. Berry phase and band structure analysis of the Weyl semimetal NbP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelius, Philip; Gooth, Johannes; Bäßler, Svenja; Zierold, Robert; Wiegand, Christoph; Niemann, Anna; Reith, Heiko; Shekhar, Chandra; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-01-01

    Weyl semimetals are often considered the 3D-analogon of graphene or topological insulators. The evaluation of quantum oscillations in these systems remains challenging because there are often multiple conduction bands. We observe de Haas-van Alphen oscillations with several frequencies in a single crystal of the Weyl semimetal niobium phosphide. For each fundamental crystal axis, we can fit the raw data to a superposition of sinusoidal functions, which enables us to calculate the characteristic parameters of all individual bulk conduction bands using Fourier transform with an analysis of the temperature and magnetic field-dependent oscillation amplitude decay. Our experimental results indicate that the band structure consists of Dirac bands with low cyclotron mass, a non-trivial Berry phase and parabolic bands with a higher effective mass and trivial Berry phase. PMID:27667203

  9. Subsidence Monitoring over the Southern Coalfield, Australia Using both L-Band and C-Band SAR Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheyuan Du

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land subsidence is a global issue and researchers from all over the world are keen to know the causes of deformation and its further influences. This paper reports the findings from time series InSAR (TS-InSAR results over the Southern Coalfield, Australia using both ALOS-1 PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar and ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar datasets. TS-InSAR has been applied to both rural and urban areas with great success, but very few of them have been applied to regions affected by underground mining activities. The TS-InSAR analysis exploited in this paper is based on GEOS-ATSA, and Measurement Point (MP pixels are selected according to different geophysical features. Three experiment sites with different geological settings within the study zone are analysed: (1 Wollongong city, which is a relatively stable area; (2 Tahmoor town, a small town affected by underground mining activities; and (3 the Appin underground mining site, a region containing multiple underground mining activities. The TS-InSAR results show that the performance of both C-band and L-band is equally good over Wollongong, where the subsidence gradient is not significant and most subsidence rates are between −10 mm∙yr−1 to 10 mm∙yr−1. However, over the Tahmoor and Appin sites, difference in performances has been observed. Since the maximum displacement gradients that can be detected are different for L-band and C-band-based TS-InSAR methods, some rapid changes could cause the TS-InSAR to fail to estimate the correct displacements. It is well known that L-band can perform better than C-band, especially in underground mining regions and mining-affected regions where the deformation rate is much higher than city areas because of its wavelength. Statistical analyses are also conducted to further prove the above statement.

  10. DUAL-BAND INFRARED DETECTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    As the infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. Both HgCdTe detectors and quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs photodetectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolor capability in these regions. The main challenges facing all multicolor devices are more complicated device structtures, thicker and multilayer material growth, and more difficult device fabrication, especially when the array size gets larger and pixel size gets smaller. In the paper recent progress in development of two-color HgCdTe photodiodes and quantum well infrared photodetectors is presented.More attention is devoted to HgCdTe detectors. The two-color detector arrays are based upon an n-P-N (the capital letters mean the materials with larger bandgap energy) HgCdTe triple layer heterojunction design. Vertically stacking the two p-n junctions permits incorporation of both detectros into a single pixel. Both sequential mode and simultaneous mode detectors are fabricated. The mode of detection is determined by the fabrication process of the multilayer materials.Also the performances of stacked multicolor QWIPs detectors are presented. For multicolor arrays, QWIP's narrow band spectrum is an advantage, resulting in low spectral crosstalk. The major challenge for QWIP is developing broadband or multicolor optical coupling structures that permit efficient absorption of all required spectral bands.

  11. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  12. Electrically Conducting Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-07

    polypyrrole, the oxidized polythiophene is also unstable in air. A rather different class of conducting polymers lies outside the scope of this review but...AD-A129 488 ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYNERS(U) IBM RESEARCH LAB / SAN JOSE CA W D GILL ET RL. 97 APR 83 TR-B UNCLASSIFIED F/G 7/3 N I Ihhhhhhhhhhhhl...00 Contract N00014-80-C-0779 Technical Report No. 8 *Electrically Conducting Polymers by W. D. Gill, T. C. Clarke, and G. B. Street Prepared for

  13. [Band depth analysis and partial least square regression based winter wheat biomass estimation using hyperspectral measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ji-Hua; Yang, Gui-Jun; Song, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Xin-Gang; Feng, Hai-Kuan

    2013-05-01

    The major limitation of using existing vegetation indices for crop biomass estimation is that it approaches a saturation level asymptotically for a certain range of biomass. In order to resolve this problem, band depth analysis and partial least square regression (PLSR) were combined to establish winter wheat biomass estimation model in the present study. The models based on the combination of band depth analysis and PLSR were compared with the models based on common vegetation indexes from the point of view of estimation accuracy, subsequently. Band depth analysis was conducted in the visible spectral domain (550-750 nm). Band depth, band depth ratio (BDR), normalized band depth index, and band depth normalized to area were utilized to represent band depth information. Among the calibrated estimation models, the models based on the combination of band depth analysis and PLSR reached higher accuracy than those based on the vegetation indices. Among them, the combination of BDR and PLSR got the highest accuracy (R2 = 0.792, RMSE = 0.164 kg x m(-2)). The results indicated that the combination of band depth analysis and PLSR could well overcome the saturation problem and improve the biomass estimation accuracy when winter wheat biomass is large.

  14. Iliotibial band syndrome: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Eric J; Kim, Suezie; Calcei, Jacob G; Park, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Iliotibial band syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in runners, cyclists, and military recruits. Affected patients report lateral knee pain associated with repetitive motion activities. The diagnosis is usually made based on a characteristic history and physical examination, with imaging studies reserved for cases of recalcitrant disease to rule out other pathologic entities. Several etiologies have been proposed for iliotibial band syndrome, including friction of the iliotibial band against the lateral femoral epicondyle, compression of the fat and connective tissue deep to the iliotibial band, and chronic inflammation of the iliotibial band bursa. The mainstay of treatment is nonsurgical; however, in persistent or chronic cases, surgical management is indicated.

  15. Evolutions of Compaction Bands of Saturated Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁晓兵; 王义华; 崔鹏

    2004-01-01

    The development of compaction bands in saturated soils, which is coupling-rate, inertial and pore-pressure-dependent, under axisymmetric loading was discussed, using a simple model and a matching technique at the moving boundary of a band. It is shown that the development of compaction bands is dominated by the coupling-rate and pore-pressure effects of material. The soil strength makes the band shrinking, whilst pore pressure diffusion makes the band expand. Numerical simulations were carried out in this paper.

  16. Conductive open frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Wan, Shun; Doonan, Christian J.; Wang, Bo; Deng, Hexiang

    2016-02-23

    The disclosure relates generally to materials that comprise conductive covalent organic frameworks. The disclosure also relates to materials that are useful to store and separate gas molecules and sensors.

  17. Conductivities from attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Goulart, Prieslei; Witkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    In the context of applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence to condensed matter physics, we compute conductivities for field theory duals of dyonic planar black holes in 3+1-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories at zero temperature. We combine the near-horizon data obtained via Sen's entropy function formalism with known expressions for conductivities. In this way we express the conductivities in terms of the extremal black hole charges. We apply our approach to three different examples for dilaton theories for which the background geometry is not known explicitly. For a constant scalar potential, the thermal conductivity explicitly scales as $\\alpha_{xy}\\sim N^{3/2}$, as expected.

  18. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  19. Dissecting holographic conductivities

    CERN Document Server

    Davison, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    The DC thermoelectric conductivities of holographic systems in which translational symmetry is broken can be efficiently computed in terms of the near-horizon data of the dual black hole. By calculating the frequency dependent conductivities to the first subleading order in the momentum relaxation rate, we give a physical explanation for these conductivities in the simplest such example, in the limit of slow momentum relaxation. Specifically, we decompose each conductivity into the sum of a coherent contribution due to momentum relaxation and an incoherent contribution, due to intrinsic current relaxation. This decomposition is different from those previously proposed, and is consistent with the known hydrodynamic properties in the translationally invariant limit. This is the first step towards constructing a consistent theory of charged hydrodynamics with slow momentum relaxation.

  20. Vicarious Calibration Based Cross Calibration of Solar Reflective Channels of Radiometers Onboard Remote Sensing Satellite and Evaluation of Cross Calibration Accuracy through Band-to-Band Data Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy evaluation of cross calibration through band-to-band data comparison for visible and near infrared radiometers which onboard earth observation satellites is conducted. The conventional cross calibration for visible to near infrared radiometers onboard earth observation satellites is conducted through comparisons of band-to-band data of which spectral response functions are overlapped mostly. There are the following major error sources due to observation time difference, spectral response function difference in conjunction of surface reflectance and atmospheric optical depth, observation area difference. These error sources are assessed with dataset acquired through ground measurements of surface reflectance and optical depth. Then the accuracy of the conventional cross calibration is evaluated with vicarious calibration data. The results show that cross calibration accuracy can be done more precisely if the influences due to the aforementioned three major error sources are taken into account.

  1. Nonequilibrium mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the amplitude of mesoscopic fluctuations of the differential conductance of a metallic wire at arbitrary bias voltage V . For noninteracting electrons, the variance ⟨δg2⟩ increases with V . The asymptotic large- V behavior is ⟨δg2⟩˜V/Vc (where eVc=D/L2 is the Thouless energy), in agreement with the earlier prediction by Larkin and Khmelnitskii. We find, however, that this asymptotics has a very small numerical prefactor and sets in at very large V/Vc only, which strongly complicates its experimental observation. This high-voltage behavior is preceded by a crossover regime, V/Vc≲30 , where the conductance variance increases by a factor ˜3 as compared to its value in the regime of universal conductance fluctuations (i.e., at V→0 ). We further analyze the effect of dephasing due to the electron-electron scattering on ⟨δg2⟩ at high voltages. With the Coulomb interaction taken into account, the amplitude of conductance fluctuations becomes a nonmonotonic function of V . Specifically, ⟨δg2⟩ drops as 1/V for voltages V≫gVc , where g is the dimensionless conductance. In this regime, the conductance fluctuations are dominated by quantum-coherent regions of the wire adjacent to the reservoirs.

  2. Inter-Band Radiometric Comparison and Calibration of ASTER Visible and Near-Infrared Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Obata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates inter-band radiometric consistency across the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER visible and near-infrared (VNIR bands and develops an inter-band calibration algorithm to improve radiometric consistency. Inter-band radiometric comparison of current ASTER data shows a root mean square error (RMSE of 3.8%–5.7% among radiance outputs of spectral bands due primarily to differences between calibration strategies of the NIR band for nadir-looking (Band 3N and the other two bands (green and red bands, corresponding to Bands 1 and 2. An algorithm for radiometric calibration of Bands 2 and 3N with reference to Band 1 is developed based on the band translation technique and is used to obtain new radiometric calibration coefficients (RCCs for sensor sensitivity degradation. The systematic errors between radiance outputs are decreased by applying the derived RCCs, which result in reducing the RMSE from 3.8%–5.7% to 2.2%–2.9%. The remaining errors are approximately equal to or smaller than the intrinsic uncertainties of inter-band calibration derived by sensitivity analysis. Improvement of the radiometric consistency would increase the accuracy of band algebra (e.g., vegetation indices and its application. The algorithm can be used to evaluate inter-band radiometric consistency, as well as for the calibration of other sensors.

  3. Knot strength of nylon-band cerclage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, B M; Wilson, J W

    1989-12-01

    Nylon bands of five sizes were tested to failure using a splint circular jaw mounted on a tensile testing machine. Four treatment groups of each of the five sizes were tested: as supplied by the manufacturer, ethylene oxide sterilized, autoclave sterilized, and saline-soaked. Comparisons were made between groups and to previously reported results of similar testing of stainless steel wire of three sizes. All the bands failed at the lock mechanism. Knot strength increased with increased size of nylon band. There was no difference between untreated and ethylene oxide sterilized bands, whereas bands subjected to autoclaving or saline soaking failed at less force. The knot strength of all the treatment groups in the three smaller sizes of bands was less than twist-knotted 0.8-mm wire cerclage; and when soaked in saline for 24 hours, the knot strength of the two largest size bands dropped to less than 1.2-mm twist-knotted wire.

  4. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  5. Electrical conductivity of Cu-Li alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱达川; 宋明昭; 陈家钊; 涂铭旌; 潘海滨

    2004-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of Cu-Li alloys was studied. And the distribution of electrons near Fermi surface was detected by synchrotron radiation instrument. The results show that the electrical conductivity of Cu-Li alloys decreases from 5. 22 × 10-9 S/m to 3. 69 × 10-9 S/m with the increase of Li content. Li can decrease the oxygen, sulfur and other impurities content in commercial Cu, but Li dissolved in Cu lattice leads to distortion of Cu lattice from 0. 005 %-0. 050 %, affects the valence band of Cu, increases the binding energy of surface electron, and decreases the electron density of Fermi surface simultaneously. So the electrical conductivity decreases gradually with the increase of Li content.

  6. An Emphasis of Electron Energy Calculation in Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOShao-Wen; CAOJun-Cheng; FENGSong-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We investigate various methods for the calculation of the electron energy in semiconductor quantum wells and focus on a matrix algorithm method. The results show better fitness of the factor -h2/2 э/эz 1/m*(z) э/эz than that of -h2/2 1/m*(z) э2/эz2 in the first part of the Schroedinger equation. The effect of nonparabolicity in the conduction band is also discussed.

  7. Control del Factor de Landé en Hilos Cuánticos de GaAs/(Ga,AlAs mediante la Aplicación de Radiación Láser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana M. Ramírez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the electronic Landé factor control by changing of both intensity and frequency intense laser field on cylindrical quantum well wire. We use the laser dressed approximation for treated the “quantum wire + laser” system as quantum wire in the absence of radiation but with parameter (electronic barrier height and electronic effective mass renormalized by laser effects. We consider a magnetic field applied to parallel direction of symmetric axis of quantum well wire. We take into account nonparabolicity and anisotropy effects on the conduction band by Ogg-McCombe Hamiltonian.

  8. Transient Velocity Assessment in Gallium Arsenide, and of Other GaAs Characteristics Related to Device Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    RW-809 ^ C^> Scientific Program Officer: Mr . Sven A. Roosild, DARPA/DSO 1400 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA 22209 Contractor: Oregon Graduate...of acoustic phonons, non-parabolicity of the conduction band minimum and intervaliey scattering through the admixture of p-type states. He concluded...llarrlta 1985 LEC (HP) 50 5 Goutereaux et_ al. lUrrltt 1985 LEC (HP) 50 5 Ilakemore et_ al. MOCSEMHAD 1985 IXC (HP) 50 0.5 Dobrllla et al. MRS /5F0 1985

  9. Band alignment at the interface of PbTe/SnTe heterojunction determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Tianyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Lu, Pengqi; Chen, Lu; Xu, Gangyi; Zhou, Jie; Wu, Huizhen

    2016-11-01

    We report the determination of band alignment of PbTe/SnTe (111) heterojunction interfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Multiple core levels of Pb and Sn were utilized to determine the valence band offset (VBO) of the heterojunction. The XPS result shows a type-III band alignment with the VBO of 1.37+/- 0.18 \\text{eV} and the conduction band offset (CBO) of 1.23+/- 0.18 \\text{eV} . The experimental determination of the band alignment of the PbTe/SnTe heterojunction shall benefit the improvement of PbTe/SnTe-related optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  10. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  11. Variants of lumbosacral elastic band.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cesar Santín Alfaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is made an intervention research, qualitative and quantitative of two variants of lumbosacral elastic bands used in Provincial Laboratory of Technical Orthopedics in Sancti Spiritus Province, taking into account the high demand for this device and that the laboratory do not often count with the raw material needed for the original lumbosacral belt made by denim cloth which is the conventional belt. The main goal of this research is to explain the technological process and to compare the cost of production of both elastic variants with lumbosacral belt made by cloth which are offer to patients who look for this service , giving them a rapid solution so that they can feel comfortable.

  12. k.p theory of freestanding narrow band gap semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning; Liao, Gaohua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from narrow band gap semiconductors GaSb, InSb and InAs. The nanowires are described by the eight-band k.p Hamiltonians and the band structures are computed by means of the finite element method in a mixture basis consisting of linear triangular elements inside the nanowires and constrained Hermite triangular elements near the boundaries. The nanowires with two crystallographic orientations, namely the [001] and [111] orientations, and with different cross-sectional shapes are considered. For each orientation, the nanowires of the three narrow band gap semiconductors are found to show qualitatively similar characteristics in the band structures. However, the nanowires oriented along the two different crystallographic directions are found to show different characteristics in the valence bands. In particular, it is found that all the conduction bands show simple, good parabolic dispersions in both the [001]- and [111]-oriented nanowires, while the top valence bands show double-maximum structures in the [001]-oriented nanowires, but single-maximum structures in the [111]-oriented nanowires. The wave functions and spinor distributions of the band states in these nanowires are also calculated. It is found that significant mixtures of electron and hole states appear in the bands of these narrow band gap semiconductor nanowires. The wave functions exhibit very different distribution patterns in the nanowires oriented along the [001] direction and the nanowires oriented along the [111] direction. It is also shown that single-band effective mass theory could not reproduce all the band state wave functions presented in this work.

  13. Giemsa C-banding of Barley Chromosomes. I: Banding Pattern Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1978-01-01

    Twenty barley (Hordeum vulgare) lines studied had a common basic chromosome banding pattern. Most bands ranged from medium to very small in size. The most conspicuous banding occurred at or near the centromeres, in the proximal, intercalary parts of most chromosome arms and beside the secondary c...... 7. Seventeen differently banded karyotypes were found. Some banding pattern polymorphisms can be used in cytological and cytogenetic studies....

  14. Heat conduction. 3. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, Latif M. [City Coll. of City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This textbook presents the classical topics of conduction heat transfer and extends the coverage to include chapters on perturbation methods, heat transfer in living tissue, and microscale conduction. This makes the book unique among the many published textbook on conduction heat transfer. Other noteworthy features of the book are: The material is organized to provide students with the tools to model, analyze and solve a wide range of engineering applications involving conduction heat transfer. Mathematical techniques are presented in a clear and simplified fashion to be used as instruments in obtaining solutions. The simplicity of one-dimensional conduction is used to drill students in the role of boundary conditions and to explore a variety of physical conditions that are of practical interest. Examples are carefully selected to illustrate the application of principles and the construction of solutions. Students are trained to follow a systematic problem solving methodology with emphasis on thought process, logic, reasoning and verification. Solutions to all examples and end-of-chapter problems follow an orderly problems solving approach. (orig.)

  15. Photonic band gap enhancement in frequency-dependent dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate a general technique for evaluating photonic band structures in periodic d -dimensional microstructures in which the dielectric constant epsilon (omega) exhibits rapid variations with frequency omega . This technique involves the evaluation of generalized electromagnetic dispersion surfaces omega ( k--> ,epsilon) in a (d+1) -dimensional space consisting of the physical d -dimensional space of wave vectors k--> and an additional dimension defined by the continuous, independent, variable epsilon . The physical band structure for the photonic crystal is obtained by evaluating the intersection of the generalized dispersion surfaces with the "cutting surface" defined by the function epsilon (omega) . We apply this method to evaluate the band structure of both two- and three-dimensional (3D) periodic microstructures. We consider metallic photonic crystals with free carriers described by a simple Drude conductivity and verify the occurrence of electromagnetic pass bands below the plasma frequency of the bulk metal. We also evaluate the shift of the photonic band structure caused by free carrier injection into semiconductor-based photonic crystals. We apply our method to two models in which epsilon (omega) describes a resonant radiation-matter interaction. In the first model, we consider the addition of independent, resonant oscillators to a photonic crystal with an otherwise frequency-independent dielectric constant. We demonstrate that for an inhomogeneously broadened distribution of resonators impregnated within an inverse opal structure, the full 3D photonic band gap (PBG) can be considerably enhanced. In the second model, we consider a coupled resonant oscillator mode in a photonic crystal. When this mode is an optical phonon, there can be a synergetic interplay between the polaritonic resonance and the geometrical scattering resonances of the structured dielectric, leading to PBG enhancement. A similar effect may arise when resonant atoms that are

  16. Band gap engineering via doping: A predictive approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriotis, Antonis N., E-mail: andriot@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, FORTH, P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklio, Crete (Greece); Menon, Madhu, E-mail: super250@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Computational Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    We employ an extension of Harrison's theory at the tight binding level of approximation to develop a predictive approach for band gap engineering involving isovalent doping of wide band gap semiconductors. Our results indicate that reasonably accurate predictions can be achieved at qualitative as well as quantitative levels. The predictive results were checked against ab initio ones obtained at the level of DFT/SGGA + U approximation. The minor disagreements between predicted and ab initio results can be attributed to the electronic processes not incorporated in Harrison's theory. These include processes such as the conduction band anticrossing [Shan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1221 (1999); Walukiewicz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1552 (2000)] and valence band anticrossing [Alberi et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 073202 (2008); Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 162105 (2008); Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 051909 (2007); Phys. Rev. B 75, 045203 (2007)], as well as the multiorbital rehybridization. Another cause of disagreement between the results of our predictive approach and the ab initio ones is shown to be the result of the shift of Fermi energy within the impurity band formed at the edge of the valence band maximum due to rehybridization. The validity of our approach is demonstrated with example applications for the systems GaN{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}, GaP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}, AlSb{sub 1−x}P{sub x}, AlP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}, and InP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}.

  17. Conducting everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Pernille

    In the paper I discuss how small children (0-4 year) develop through ‘conducting everyday life’ across contexts (Holzkamp 2013). I discuss how this process of conducting everyday life is essential when discussing the ‘good life for children’ from a child perspective. These issues are addressed...... by using materials from my ongoing Ph.D. project which is based on cultural-historical research traditions and critical psychological conceptualizations. The project is a qualitative study of 6 children, who for various reasons are defined as being children-at-risk. Due to concerns about their development......, they are involved in preventive interventions. I conducted participatory observations with the children in their everyday life. Overall, the study stresses that even small children must be perceived as active participants who act upon and struggle with different conditions and meaning making processes across...

  18. Conducting everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Pernille

    In the paper I discuss how small children (0-4 year) develop through ‘conducting everyday life’ across contexts (Holzkamp 2013). I discuss how this process of conducting everyday life is essential when discussing the ‘good life for children’ from a child perspective. These issues are addressed......, they are involved in preventive interventions. I conducted participatory observations with the children in their everyday life. Overall, the study stresses that even small children must be perceived as active participants who act upon and struggle with different conditions and meaning making processes across...... by using materials from my ongoing Ph.D. project which is based on cultural-historical research traditions and critical psychological conceptualizations. The project is a qualitative study of 6 children, who for various reasons are defined as being children-at-risk. Due to concerns about their development...

  19. Low thermal conductivity oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Phillpot, Simon R.; Wan, Chunlei; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Qu, Zhixue

    2012-10-09

    Oxides hold great promise as new and improved materials for thermal-barrier coating applications. The rich variety of structures and compositions of the materials in this class, and the ease with which they can be doped, allow the exploration of various mechanisms for lowering thermal conductivity. In this article, we review recent progress in identifying specific oxides with low thermal conductivity from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. We explore the mechanisms of lowering thermal conductivity, such as introducing structural/chemical disorder, increasing material density, increasing the number of atoms in the primitive cell, and exploiting the structural anisotropy. We conclude that further systematic exploration of oxide crystal structures and chemistries are likely to result in even further improved thermal-barrier coatings.

  20. Responsible conduct of research

    CERN Document Server

    Shamoo, Adil E

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, the field of Responsible Conduct of Research has become widely recognized as essential to scientific education, investigation, and training. At present, research institutions with public funding are expected to have some minimal training and education in RCR for their graduate students, fellows and trainees. These institutions also are expected to have a system in place for investigating and reporting misconduct in research or violations of regulations in research with human subjects, or in their applications to federal agencies for funding. Public scrutiny of the conduct of scientific researchers remains high. Media reports of misconduct scandals, biased research, violations of human research ethics rules, and moral controversies in research occur on a weekly basis. Since the 2009 publication of the 2nd edition of Shamoo and Resnik's Responsible Conduct of Research, there has been a vast expansion in the information, knowledge, methods, and diagnosis of problems related to RCR and the ...

  1. Electrical Conductivity in Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Copper is the most widely used electrical conductor. Like most metals, though, it has several drawbacks: it is heavy, expensive, and can break. Fibers that conduct electricity could be the solutions to these problems, and they are of great interest to NASA. Conductive fibers provide lightweight alternatives to heavy copper wiring in a variety of settings, including aerospace, where weight is always a chief concern. This is an area where NASA is always seeking improved materials. The fibers are also more cost-effective than metals. Expenditure is another area where NASA is always looking to make improvements. In the case of electronics that are confined to small spaces and subject to severe stress, copper is prone to breaking and losing connection over time. Flexible conductive fibers eliminate that problem. They are more supple and stronger than brittle copper and, thus, find good use in these and similar situations. While clearly a much-needed material, electrically conductive fibers are not readily available. The cost of new technology development, with all the pitfalls of troubleshooting production and the years of testing, and without the guarantee of an immediate market, is often too much of a financial hazard for companies to risk. NASA, however, saw the need for electrical fibers in its many projects and sought out a high-tech textile company that was already experimenting in this field, Syscom Technology, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio. Syscom was founded in 1993 to provide computer software engineering services and basic materials research in the areas of high-performance polymer fibers and films. In 1999, Syscom decided to focus its business and technical efforts on development of high-strength, high-performance, and electrically conductive polymer fibers. The company developed AmberStrand, an electrically conductive, low-weight, strong-yet-flexible hybrid metal-polymer YARN.

  2. Chiral conducting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane-Maguire, Leon A P; Wallace, Gordon G

    2010-07-01

    This critical review describes the preparation and properties of a relatively new class of chiral macromolecules, namely chiral conducting polymers. It focuses in particular on examples based on polypyrrole, polythiophene and polyaniline. They possess remarkable properties, combining not only chirality with electrical conductivity but also the ability to undergo facile redox and pH switching. These unique properties have opened up a range of exciting new potential applications, including as chiral sensors, as novel stationary phases for chiral separations, and as chiral electrodes for electrochemical asymmetric synthesis (153 references).

  3. Natures of Conduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sielemann, Rasmus Basse

    Natures of Conduct explores the rationalities, practices and techniques of government processes in the Danish West Indies in the period between the late eighteenth century to the end of Danish colonial rule in 1917. In doing so, it engages Michel Foucault’s concepts of governmentality and the ‘di......Natures of Conduct explores the rationalities, practices and techniques of government processes in the Danish West Indies in the period between the late eighteenth century to the end of Danish colonial rule in 1917. In doing so, it engages Michel Foucault’s concepts of governmentality...

  4. Band Offsets at the Interface between Crystalline and Amorphous Silicon from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarolimek, K.; Hazrati, E.; de Groot, R. A.; de Wijs, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    The band offsets between crystalline and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a -Si ∶H ) are key parameters governing the charge transport in modern silicon heterojunction solar cells. They are an important input for macroscopic simulators that are used to further optimize the solar cell. Past experimental studies, using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and capacitance-voltage measurements, have yielded conflicting results on the band offset. Here, we present a computational study on the band offsets. It is based on atomistic models and density-functional theory (DFT). The amorphous part of the interface is obtained by relatively long DFT first-principles molecular-dynamics runs at an elevated temperature on 30 statistically independent samples. In order to obtain a realistic conduction-band position the electronic structure of the interface is calculated with a hybrid functional. We find a slight asymmetry in the band offsets, where the offset in the valence band (0.29 eV) is larger than in the conduction band (0.17 eV). Our results are in agreement with the latest XPS measurements that report a valence-band offset of 0.3 eV [M. Liebhaber et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 031601 (2015), 10.1063/1.4906195].

  5. Metal-like Band Structures of Ultrathin Si {111} and {112} Surface Layers Revealed through Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Huang, Michael H

    2017-07-11

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on Si (100), (110), (111), and (112) planes with tunable number of planes for evaluation of their band structures and density of states profiles. The purpose is to see whether silicon can exhibit facet-dependent properties derived from the presence of a thin surface layer having different band structures. No changes have been observed for single to multiple layers of Si (100) and (110) planes with a consistent band gap between the valence band and the conduction band. However, for 1, 2, 4, and 5 Si (111) and (112) planes, metal-like band structures were obtained with continuous density of states going from the valence band to the conduction band. For 3, 6, and more Si (111) planes, as well as 3 and 6 Si (112) planes, the same band structure as that seen for Si (100) and (110) planes has been obtained. Thus, beyond a layer thickness of five Si (111) planes at ≈1.6 nm, normal semiconductor behavior can be expected. The emergence of metal-like band structures for the Si (111) and (112) planes are related to variation in Si-Si bond length and bond distortion plus 3s and 3p orbital electron contributions in the band structure. This work predicts possession of facet-dependent electrical properties of silicon with consequences in FinFET transistor design. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Conducting Social Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruch, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    It is difficult to conduct randomized field experiments. In the past decade, the use of alternative randomization plans and incentives has contributed to their operational feasibility; legal, ethical, and professional arguments for experimentation have matured; and expectations have become better aligned with practical constraints that are likely…

  7. Conducting Educational Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Reeves, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Educational design research blends scientific investigation with systematic development and implementation of solutions to educational problems. Empirical investigation is conducted in real learning settings--not laboratories--to craft usable and effective solutions. At the same time, the research is carefully structured to produce theoretical…

  8. New code of conduct

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    During his talk to the staff at the beginning of the year, the Director-General mentioned that a new code of conduct was being drawn up. What exactly is it and what is its purpose? Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources (HR) Department, talked to us about the whys and wherefores of the project.   Drawing by Georges Boixader from the cartoon strip “The World of Particles” by Brian Southworth. A code of conduct is a general framework laying down the behaviour expected of all members of an organisation's personnel. “CERN is one of the very few international organisations that don’t yet have one", explains Anne-Sylvie Catherin. “We have been thinking about introducing a code of conduct for a long time but lacked the necessary resources until now”. The call for a code of conduct has come from different sources within the Laboratory. “The Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel (read also the "Equal opportuni...

  9. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  10. Transient Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of transient heat conduction.Fourier's law. General heat conducation equation. Thermal diffusivity. Biot and Fourier numbers. Lumped analysis and time constant. Semi-infinite body: fixed surface temperature, convective heat transfer at the surface, or constant surface heat flux...

  11. Conducting Educational Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Reeves, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Educational design research blends scientific investigation with systematic development and implementation of solutions to educational problems. Empirical investigation is conducted in real learning settings--not laboratories--to craft usable and effective solutions. At the same time, the research is carefully structured to produce theoretical…

  12. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.;

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  13. Conductance eigenchannels in nanocontacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1997-01-01

    The electronic conductance of metal nanocontacts is analyzed in terms of eigenchannels for the transmission. The transmission through individual eigenchannels is calculated numerically for realistic models of gold point contacts based on molecular-dynamics simulation of the elongation of a contac...

  14. Conductive Education Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivack, Frieda

    1995-01-01

    This article describes conductive education for children with neuromotor disabilities and identifies its major concepts, including orthofunction, rhythmic intention, and verbal regulation. Also addressed are the role of the conductor and the group and the training of conductors at the Peto Institute in Hungary. Research on the method's…

  15. Effective band structure of random alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2010-06-11

    Random substitutional A(x)B(1-x) alloys lack formal translational symmetry and thus cannot be described by the language of band-structure dispersion E(k(→)). Yet, many alloy experiments are interpreted phenomenologically precisely by constructs derived from wave vector k(→), e.g., effective masses or van Hove singularities. Here we use large supercells with randomly distributed A and B atoms, whereby many different local environments are allowed to coexist, and transform the eigenstates into an effective band structure (EBS) in the primitive cell using a spectral decomposition. The resulting EBS reveals the extent to which band characteristics are preserved or lost at different compositions, band indices, and k(→) points, showing in (In,Ga)N the rapid disintegration of the valence band Bloch character and in Ga(N,P) the appearance of a pinned impurity band.

  16. Band Gap Narrowing and Widening of ZnO Nanostructures and Doped Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Kasim, Muhd Firdaus; Rusdi, Roshidah

    2015-12-01

    Band gap change in doped ZnO is an observed phenomenon that is very interesting from the fundamental point of view. This work is focused on the preparation of pure and single phase nanostructured ZnO and Cu as well as Mn-doped ZnO for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms of band gap narrowing in the materials. ZnO, Zn0.99Cu0.01O and Zn0.99Mn0.01O materials were prepared using a wet chemistry method, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all samples were pure and single phase. UV-visible spectroscopy showed that materials in the nanostructured state exhibit band gap widening with respect to their micron state while for the doped compounds exhibited band gap narrowing both in the nano and micron states with respect to the pure ZnO materials. The degree of band gap change was dependent on the doped elements and crystallite size. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that there were shifts in the valence bands. From both UV-visible and XPS spectroscopy, it was found that the mechanism for band gap narrowing was due to the shifting of the valance band maximum and conduction band minimum of the materials. The mechanisms were different for different samples depending on the type of dopant and dimensional length scales of the crystallites.

  17. Composition dependent band offsets of ZnO and its ternary alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haitao; Chen, Junli; Wang, Yin; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-30

    We report the calculated fundamental band gaps of wurtzite ternary alloys Zn1-xMxO (M = Mg, Cd) and the band offsets of the ZnO/Zn1-xMxO heterojunctions, these II-VI materials are important for electronics and optoelectronics. Our calculation is based on density functional theory within the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) approach where the modified Becke-Johnson (MBJ) semi-local exchange is used to accurately produce the band gaps, and the coherent potential approximation (CPA) is applied to deal with configurational average for the ternary alloys. The combined LMTO-MBJ-CPA approach allows one to simultaneously determine both the conduction band and valence band offsets of the heterojunctions. The calculated band gap data of the ZnO alloys scale as Eg = 3.35 + 2.33x and Eg = 3.36 - 2.33x + 1.77x(2) for Zn1-xMgxO and Zn1-xCdxO, respectively, where x being the impurity concentration. These scaling as well as the composition dependent band offsets are quantitatively compared to the available experimental data. The capability of predicting the band parameters and band alignments of ZnO and its ternary alloys with the LMTO-CPA-MBJ approach indicate the promising application of this method in the design of emerging electronics and optoelectronics.

  18. Detailed balance limit efficiency of silicon intermediate band solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Quan; Ma Zhi-Hua; Xue Chun-Lai; Zuo Yu-Hua; Wang Qi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The detailed balance method is used to study the potential of the intermediate band solar cell (IBSC),which can improve the efficiency of the Si-based solar cell with a bandgap between 1.1 eV to 1.7 eV. It shows that a crystalline silicon solar cell with an intermediate band located at 0.36 eV below the conduction band or above the valence band can reach a limiting efficiency of 54% at the maximum light concentration,improving greatly than 40.7% of the Shockley-Queisser limit for the single junction Si solar cell. The simulation also shows that the limiting efficiency of the siliconbased solar cell increases as the bandgap increases from 1.1 eV to 1.7 eV,and the amorphous Si solar cell with a bandgap of 1.7 eV exhibits a radiative limiting efficiency of 62.47%,having a better potential.

  19. DFPT approach to the temperature dependence of electronic band energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Paul; Cote, Michel; Gonze, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    The energy bands of semiconductors exhibit significant shifts and broadening with temperature at constant volume. This is an effect of the direct renormalization of band energies due to electron-phonon interactions. In search of an efficient linear response DFT approach to this effect, beyond semi-empirical approximation or frozen- phonon DFT, we have implemented formulas derived by Allen and Heine [J. Phys. C 9, 2305 (1976)] inside the ABINIT package. We have found that such formulas need a great number of bands, O(1000), to properly converge the thermal corrections of deep potential well atoms, i.e. elements of the first row. This leads to heavy computational costs even for simple systems like diamond. The DFPT formalism can be used to circumvent entirely the need for conduction bands by computing the first-order wave-functions using the self-consistent Sternheimer equation. We will compare the results of both formalism demonstrating that the DFPT approach reproduces the correct converged results of the formulas of Allen and Heine.

  20. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...... to lighting conditions. Results show that the localisation accuracy of facial features is considerably increased using this appearance representation under diffuse and directional lighting and at multiple scales....

  1. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  2. Coherent band pathways between knots and links

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We categorise coherent band (aka nullification) pathways between knots and 2-component links. Additionally, we characterise the minimal coherent band pathways (with intermediates) between any two knots or 2-component links with small crossing number. We demonstrate these band surgeries for knots and links with small crossing number. We apply these results to place lower bounds on the minimum number of recombinant events separating DNA configurations, restrict the recombination pathways and determine chirality and/or orientation of the resulting recombinant DNA molecules.

  3. Full Band Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron Transport in Ge with Anisotropic Scattering Process%考虑各项异性散射的锗中电子输运的全能带蒙特卡洛模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇; Ravaioli Umberto

    2005-01-01

    在考虑各向异性散射的基础上,对锗中电子输运特性进行了全能带蒙特卡洛模拟.计算过程如下:锗的全能带由nonlocal empirical pseudopotential 方法求得;态密度的相对值通过不同能量的状态数得到;声子色散谱由adiabatic bond-charge模型求出;电子-声子散射率在低能量时采用费米黄金律得出的非抛物线散射率,高能量则通过态密度对其修正而得到;散射后的状态满足能量守恒和动量守恒.通过比较计算结果与实验报道,证实了该模型算法的正确性,由于该模型能正确反映锗中电子的速度与能量特性,同时又能大大降低散射率的计算成本,故可运用在器件模拟中.%The electron transport properties in Ge are calculated by full band Monte Carlo technique with anisotropic scattering consideration.The calculation procedures are as follows:the full band structure is calculated by nonlocal empirical pseudopotential approach;the relative value of density of state (DOS) is computed by counting the number of states located in a certain region of the energy;the phonon dispersion curve is obtained from an adiabatic bond-charge model;the electron-phonon scattering rates are approximated by the nonparabolic model derived from Fermi's golden rule at low energy region and scaled by DOS at higher energy region;the energy and momentum conservations are employed for choosing the final state after scattering.The validity of this Monte Carlo simulator and the physical models that are used is fully confirmed by comparing the program output to experimental results listed in As this Monte Carlo model can accurately reproduce the velocity and energy characteristics of electrons in Ge and the DOS scaled scattering rate can significantly reduce the computational cost for scattering rates,this approach is suitable for device simulation.

  4. Local Bonding Analysis of the Valence and Conduction Band Features of TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    anatase than with rutile .33 The shape of the L3 spectrum in Fig. 2 is also more qualitatively similar to XAS spectra of anatase surfaces shown in the...annealed TiO2 surfaces of anatase and rutile at photon ener- gies of 40–80 eV would appear to reveal a stronger similarity to the resonance behavior...of the anatase surfaces than to rutile , for which the Ti 3p→4sp resonance at 54 eV is dominant.7 However, it is clear from the same study that the CIS

  5. Optically Polarized Conduction-Band Electrons in Tungsten Observed by Spin-Polarized Photoemission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zürcher, P.; Meier, F.; Christensen, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Along the (100) direction of tungsten, interband transitions induced by circularly polarized light of energy 1.5 eV......Along the (100) direction of tungsten, interband transitions induced by circularly polarized light of energy 1.5 eV...

  6. Nanostructured conductive polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are a suitable alternative to metals in many applications due to their light-weight, corrosion resistance, low cost, ease of processing and design flexibility. CPCs have been formulated using different types of conductive fillers. In this PhD thesis, the focus is on CPCs for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and electromagnetic interference (EMI) attenuation. Despite the versatility of conductive fillers, carbon black (CB) has been the dominant filler to make CPCs for ESD protection applications because CB/polymer composites have a cost advantage over all other CPCs. For EMI shielding, stainless steel fibres and metal coated fibers are the preferred fillers, however CPCs made of those fibers are not the dominant EMI shielding materials. Metal coated and polymer plated polymers are the most widely used EMI shielding options. The limited use of CPCs in the EMI shielding market is because the high filler loading required to formulate a composite with an adequate level of shielding remarkably increases the composite price. In order to increase the competitiveness of CPCs, percolation threshold should be minimized as much as possible and composites with high EMI shielding capabilities at low filler loading should be formulated because all conductive fillers are expensive compared to polymers. In this thesis, two different methodologies to reduce percolation threshold in CPCs have been successfully developed and a CPC with exceptional EMI shielding capability has been formulated using copper nanowires as conductive filler. The first percolation threshold reduction technique is based on the selective localization of CB at the interface of immiscible polymer blend. The technique requires adding a copolymer that prefers the blend's interface and for which CB nanoparticles has the highest affinity. The second method is based on producing a CPC powder and then using this powder as a conductive filler to produce composite by dry

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  8. Triaxial superdeformed bands in {sup 86}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.; LaFosse, D.R.; Devlin, M.; Lerma, F. [Chemistry Department, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Wood, V.Q.; Saladin, J.X.; Winchell, D.F. [Physics Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Baktash, C.; Yu, C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; MacLeod, R.W. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Afanasjev, A.V.; Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    Four new superdeformed bands have been found in the nucleus {sup 86}Zr. The good agreement between experiment and configuration-dependent shell correction calculations suggests that three of the bands have triaxial superdeformed shapes. Such unique features in mass A{approximately}80 superdeformed bands have been predicted, but not observed experimentally until now. A fourth band in {sup 86}Zr is interesting due to a fairly constant and unusually high dynamic moment of inertia. Possible interpretations of this structure are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Asymmetric localization in disordered Landau bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nita, M [Institute of Physics and Technology of Materials, PO Box MG7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Aldea, A [Institute of Physics and Technology of Materials, PO Box MG7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Zittartz, J [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Cologne University, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2007-06-06

    We show that, due to band mixing, the eigenstate localization within the disordered Landau bands gets an asymmetric structure: the degree of localization increases in the lower part of the band and decreases in the upper one. The calculation is performed for a two-dimensional lattice with the Anderson disorder potential and we prove that this effect is related to the upper shift of the extended states within the band and is enhanced by the disorder strength. The asymmetric localization and the energy shift disappear when the interband coupling is switched off.

  10. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiemin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Tan, Jun; Hou, Pengxiang; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-11-01

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2T2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons contributing most to the conduction. The conduction is also significantly anisotropic due to the fact that the effective masses of carriers including electrons and holes are remarkably direction-dependent. Such an anisotropic electronic conduction is evidenced by the I-V curves of an individual Ti3C2T2 particulate, which demonstrates that the in-plane electrical conduction is at least one order of magnitude higher than that vertical to the basal plane.

  11. Band head spin assignment of Tl isotopes of superdeformed rotational bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Alpana; Nair, Uma; Yadav, Archana

    2014-09-01

    The Variable Moment of Inertia (VMI) model is proposed for the assignment of band head spin of super deformed (SD) rotational bands, which in turn is helpful in the spin prediction of SD bands. The moment of inertia and stiffness parameter (C), were calculated by fitting the proposed transition energies. The calculated transition energies are highly dependent on the prescribed spins. The calculated and observed transition energies agree well when an accurate band head spin (I 0) is assigned. The results are in good agreement with other theoretical results reported in literature. In this paper, we have reported the band head spin value 16 rotational band of super deformed Tl isotopes.

  12. Proof of concept for a banding scheme to support risk assessments related to multi-product biologics manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Jeffrey W; Fikree, Hana; Haighton, Lois A; Blackwell, James; Felice, Brian; Wright, Teresa L

    2015-11-01

    A banding scheme theory has been proposed to assess the potency/toxicity of biologics and assist with decisions regarding the introduction of new biologic products into existing manufacturing facilities. The current work was conducted to provide a practical example of how this scheme could be applied. Information was identified for representatives from the following four proposed bands: Band A (lethal toxins); Band B (toxins and apoptosis signals); Band C (cytokines and growth factors); and Band D (antibodies, antibody fragments, scaffold molecules, and insulins). The potency/toxicity of the representative substances was confirmed as follows: Band A, low nanogram quantities exert lethal effects; Band B, repeated administration of microgram quantities is tolerated in humans; Band C, endogenous substances and recombinant versions administered to patients in low (interferons), intermediate (growth factors), and high (interleukins) microgram doses, often on a chronic basis; and Band D, endogenous substances present or produced in the body in milligram quantities per day (insulin, collagen) or protein therapeutics administered in milligram quantities per dose (mAbs). This work confirms that substances in Bands A, B, C, and D represent very high, high, medium, and low concern with regard to risk of cross-contamination in manufacturing facilities, thus supporting the proposed banding scheme.

  13. Evaluation and Performance Analysis of 3D Printing Technique for Ka-Band Antenna Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armendariz, Unai; Rommel, Simon; Rodríguez Páez, Juan Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of 3D printed WR-28 waveguide horn antennas operating in the Ka-band frequency range between 26.5GHz and 40GHz. Three antennas are fabricated from polylactide acid filaments in conductive and non-conductive variants; the latter is covered...

  14. 'Stuffed' conducting polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Bjørn; Chen, Jun; West, Keld

    2005-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CP) obtained by oxidative polymerization using iron(III) salts shrink when Fe(II) and the excess counter ions are washed out after polymerization. This phenomenon can be used to incorporate active molecules into the CP matrix via their addition to the wash liquid. In the pres......Conducting polymers (CP) obtained by oxidative polymerization using iron(III) salts shrink when Fe(II) and the excess counter ions are washed out after polymerization. This phenomenon can be used to incorporate active molecules into the CP matrix via their addition to the wash liquid....... In the present work we demonstrate this principle on three different CP's: polypyrrole (PPy), poly-terthiophene (PTTh) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene) (PEDT), using ferrocene as a model molecule to be trapped in the polymer films. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Conducting Polymer Based Nanobiosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Soon Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, conducting polymer (CP nanomaterials have been used in a variety of fields, such as in energy, environmental, and biomedical applications, owing to their outstanding chemical and physical properties compared to conventional metal materials. In particular, nanobiosensors based on CP nanomaterials exhibit excellent performance sensing target molecules. The performance of CP nanobiosensors varies based on their size, shape, conductivity, and morphology, among other characteristics. Therefore, in this review, we provide an overview of the techniques commonly used to fabricate novel CP nanomaterials and their biosensor applications, including aptasensors, field-effect transistor (FET biosensors, human sense mimicking biosensors, and immunoassays. We also discuss prospects for state-of-the-art nanobiosensors using CP nanomaterials by focusing on strategies to overcome the current limitations.

  16. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  17. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Conducting Thermoset Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    polymers conducting. The acetylene-terminated Schiff base and acetylene-terminated polythiophene monomers were first cured, then doped with iodine... Schiff base thermoset was implanted with high energy argon ions using a commercial ion implanter. Electron spin resonance, photoluminescence, and...photoabsorption data suggest that polarons can form in the doped and undoped forms of the acetylene-terminated Schiff base and polythiophene thermoset

  19. Thermally conductive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, N. R.; Jenkins, R. K.; Lister, J. L. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A thermally conductive polymer is provided having physical and chemical properties suited to use as a medium for potting electrical components. The polymer is prepared from hydroquinone, phenol, and formaldehyde, by conventional procedures employed for the preparation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. While the proportions of the monomers can be varied, a preferred polymer is formed from the monomers in a 1:1:2.4 molar or ratio of hydroquinone:phenol:formaldehyde.

  20. STUDIES ON ENHANCED CONDUCTIVITY OF STRETCHED CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Meixiang

    1995-01-01

    A physical model of series of the conductivity on chain and the interchain conductivity between chains is proposed to explain enhanced conductivity of stretched conducting polymers.This model suggests that the enhanced conductivity for stretched conducting polymers might be due to increasing of the interchain conductivity between chains along the elongation direction after drawing processes if the conductivity on chain is assumed much larger than that of the interchain conductivity between chains. According to this model, it is expected that the temperature dependence of conductivity measured by four-probe method for stretched conducting polymers is controlled by a variation of the interchain conductivity between chains with temperature, which can be used to explain that a metallic temperature dependence of conductivity for stretched conducting polymers is not observed although the conductivity along the elongation direction is enhanced by two or three orders of magnitude.

  1. Conductive dense hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremets, M I; Troyan, I A

    2011-11-13

    Molecular hydrogen is expected to exhibit metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature, T(c), of 200-400 K, and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. It may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures. However, experiments carried out at low temperatures, Thydrogen remains in the molecular insulating state. Here we report on the transformation of normal molecular hydrogen at room temperature (295 K) to a conductive and metallic state. At 200 GPa the Raman frequency of the molecular vibron strongly decreased and the spectral width increased, evidencing a strong interaction between molecules. Deuterium behaved similarly. Above 220 GPa, hydrogen became opaque and electrically conductive. At 260-270 GPa, hydrogen transformed into a metal as the conductance of hydrogen sharply increased and changed little on further pressurizing up to 300 GPa or cooling to at least 30 K; and the sample reflected light well. The metallic phase transformed back at 295 K into molecular hydrogen at 200 GPa. This significant hysteresis indicates that the transformation of molecular hydrogen into a metal is accompanied by a first-order structural transition presumably into a monatomic liquid state. Our findings open an avenue for detailed and comprehensive studies of metallic hydrogen.

  2. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. The introduction presents a synopsis on the theory, differential equations, and boundary conditions for conduction heat transfer. Some discussion is given on the use and interpretation of solutions. Supplementary data such as mathematical functions, convection correlations, and thermal properties are included for aiding the user in computing numerical values from the solutions. 155 figs., 92 refs., 9 tabs.

  3. First principles study and empirical parametrization of twisted bilayer MoS2 based on band-unfolding

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yaohua; Ghosh, Avik

    2016-01-01

    We explore the band structure and ballistic electron transport in twisted bilayer $\\textrm{MoS}_2$ using Density Functional Theory (DFT). The sphagetti like bands are unfolded to generate band structures in the primitive unit cell of the original un-twisted $\\textrm{MoS}_2$ bilayer and projected onto an individual layer. The corresponding twist angle dependent indirect bandedges are extracted from the unfolded band structures. Based on a comparison within the same primitive unit cell, an efficient two band effective mass model for indirect conduction and valence valleys is created and parameterized by fitting the unfolded band structures. With the two band effective mass model, transport properties - specifically, we calculate the ballistic transmission in arbitrarily twisted bilayer $\\textrm{MoS}_2$.

  4. Ionic Coulomb Blockade and Resonant Conduction in Biological Ion Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I Kh; Eisenberg, R S

    2014-01-01

    The conduction and selectivity of calcium/sodium ion channels are described in terms of ionic Coulomb blockade, a phenomenon based on charge discreteness and an electrostatic model of an ion channel. This novel approach provides a unified explanation of numerous observed and modelled conductance and selectivity phenomena, including the anomalous mole fraction effect and discrete conduction bands. Ionic Coulomb blockade and resonant conduction are similar to electronic Coulomb blockade and resonant tunnelling in quantum dots. The model is equally applicable to other nanopores.

  5. The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment (MGS/KaBLE-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4-GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-m-diameter parabolic antenna on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) research and development (R&D) 34-meter a ntenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. This Ka-band link experiment (KaBLE-II) allows the performances of the Ka-band and X-band signals to be compared under nearly identical conditions. The two signals have been regularly tracked during the past 2 years. This article presents carrier-signal-level data (P_c/N_o) for both X-band and Ka-band acquired over a wide range of station elevation angles, weather conditions, and solar elongation angles. The cruise phase of the mission covered the period from launch (November 7, 1996) to Mars orbit capture (September 12, 1997). Since September 12, 1997, MGS has been in orbit around Mars. The measurements confirm that Ka-band could increase data capacity by at least a factor of three (5 dB) as compared with X-band. During May 1998, the solar corona experiment, in which the effects of solar plasma on the X-band and Ka-band links were studied, was conducted. In addition, frequency and difference frequency (f_x - f_(Ka)/3.8), ranging, and telemetry data results are presented. MGS/KaBLE-II measured signal strengths (for 54 percent of the experiments conducted) that were in reasonable agreement with predicted values based on preflight knowledge, and frequency residuals that agreed between bands and whose statistics were consistent with expected noise sources. For passes in which measured signal strengths disagreed with predicted values, the problems were traced to known deficiencies, for example, equipment operating under certain conditions, such as a cold Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA

  6. Robust mixed conducting membrane structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane structure, comprising in said order a first electronically conducting layer, an ionically conducting layer, and a second electronically conducting layer, characterized in that the first and second electronically conducting layers are internally short circ...

  7. Electronic Band Structures of TiO2 with Heavy Nitrogen Doping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Jinbo; LI Qi; LIANG Wei; SHANG Jianku

    2008-01-01

    The first-principles density-functional calculation was conducted to investigate the electronic band structures of titanium dioxide with heavy nitrogen doping (TiO2-xNx).The calculation results indicate that when x≤0.25,isolated N 2p states appear above the valence-band maximum of TiO2 without a band-gap narrowing between O 2p and Ti 3d states.When x≥0.50,an obvious band gap narrowing between O 2p and Ti 3d states was observed along with the existence of isolated N 2p states above the valence-band of TiO2,indicating that the mechanism proposed by Asahi et al operates under heavy nitrogen doping condition.

  8. On the origin of inter band gap radiative emission in crystalline silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Burud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystal imperfections degrade the quality of multicrystalline silicon wafers by introducing alternative recombination mechanisms. Here we use non-destructive hyperspectral imaging to detect photoluminescence signals from radiatively active recombination processes over the wafer with a highly resolved spectral third dimension. We demonstrate that band-to-band recombination can be visually separated from recombination through traps across the whole surface of a wafer using hyperspectral imaging. Our samples are studied in the near infrared wavelength region, 900-1700 nm, which includes the region of the so called D-band emission lines. These constitute four resolved emission lines found in the photoluminescence spectrum of silicon, commonly related to recombination through shallow inter-band gap energy levels near the conduction- and valence band edges. The shape and structure of these emissions from our measurements suggest that all the D-lines have different origins.

  9. Orbital-dependent two-band superconductivity in MgB sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Yanagisawa, T

    2003-01-01

    We show that a two-band model with k-dependent superconducting gaps well describes the transmission and optical conductivity measured for MgB sub 2 thin films. It is also shown that the two-band anisotropic modelconsistently describes the specific-heat jump and thermodynamic critical magnetic field H sub c. A single-gap anisotropic model is shown to be insufficient to understand consistently optical and thermodynamic behaviors. In our model, the pairing symmetry in each band has an anisotropic characteristic which is determined almost uniquely; the superconducting gap in the sigma-band has anisotropy in the ab-plane and the gap in the pi-band has a prolate form exhibiting anisotropy in the c-direction. (author)

  10. Dipole Engineering for Conducting Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, William Edward

    A method for the growth of a TiO2 adhesion layer on PEDOT:PSS (poly[3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene]: poly[styrenesulfonate]) and for further functionalization with self-assembled monolayers of phosphonates (SAMPs) was developed. The TiO2 adhesion layer was grown via chemical vapor deposition using a titanium(IV) t-butoxide precursor, and was characterized by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TiO 2 grown on a model system, H-terminated silicon, indicated that the surface was t-butoxide terminated. Phenylphosphonic acids were synthesized with a variety of molecular dipoles and were used to change the work function of PEDOT:PSS through the formation of an aggregate surface dipole. Good correlation was found between the z-component of the molecular dipole and the change in work function, indicating that the film was well-ordered and dense. The magnitude of the changes in work function and goniometry measurements were similar to measurements on ITO, a substrate on which phosphonates form well-ordered monolayers. As-grown PEDOT:PSS/TiO 2 electrodes showed a lower work function compared to PEDOT:PSS, which is attributed to residual t-butoxide groups on the TiO 2 surface. UPS measurements revealed that reductions in work function in the modified electrodes lowered the difference in energy between the Fermi energy (EF) of the conducting polymer and the LUMO of PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester). A reduction of this energy difference should translate into increased electron injection in electron-only diodes; however, devices with modified electrodes showed decreased current densities. UPS/IPES measurements show that TiO2 grown using this method has a much larger band gap than bulk or nanocrystalline TiO2, which is likely responsible for this decrease in device currents. At high bias, device currents increase dramatically, and the effects of the phosphonates or t-butoxide terminated TiO2 vanish. This is attributed to a reduction of the TiO2 to

  11. Effect of the edge states on the conductance and thermopower in zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R.; Geng, H.; Deng, W. Y.; Chen, M. N.; Sheng, L.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-09-01

    We study numerically the effect of the edge states on the conductance and thermopower in zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (ZPNRs) based on the tight-binding model and the scattering-matrix method. It is interesting to find that the band dispersion, conductance, and thermopower can be modulated by applying a bias voltage and boundary potentials to the two layers of the ZPNRs. Under a certain bias voltage, the twofold-degenerate quasi-flat-edge bands split perfectly. The conductance can be switched off, and the thermopower around zero energy increases. In addition, when only the boundary potential of the top layer or bottom layer is adjusted, only one edge band bends and merges into the bulk band. The first conductance plateau is strongly decreased to e2/h around zero energy. In particular, when the two boundary potentials are adjusted, all the edge bands bend and fully merge into the bulk band, and the bulk energy gap is maximized. More interestingly, a pronounced conductance plateau with G =0 is found around zero energy, which is attributable to the opening of the bulk energy gap between the valence and conduction bands. Meanwhile, the thermopower can be enhanced more than twice compared to that of the perfect ZPNRs. The large magnitude of thermopower is ascribed to the appearance of the bulk energy gap around zero energy. Our results show that the modulated ZPNRs are more reliable in a thermoelectric application.

  12. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, C. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge1-xCx (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge0.998C0.002 shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge0.998C0.002 using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III-V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  13. Solid State KA-Band, Solid State W-Band and TWT Amplifiers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I of the proposal describes plans to develop a state of the art transmitter for the W-Band and KA -Band Cloud Radar system. Our focus will be concentrated in...

  14. Results of rubber band ligation of esophageal varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyszyn, J; Łebski, I; Massopust, R; Skoczylas, M; Janus, W

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyze the results of endoscopic rubber band ligation of esophageal varices performed between 1 January 1998 and 1 November 2000 at the Department of GI Surgery of 4th Military University Hospital. Cases of 50 patients with massive upper GI variceal bleeding present on admission or with the history of such a bleeding were reviewed. A total of 85 endoscopic procedures of rubber band ligation were performed. In 9 (18%) cases ligation was performed due to massive variceal bleeding, in 1 case the complementary obliteration of stomach fundus varices with Aethoxysclerol was performed. In 10 (20%) cases in grade C of Child-Pough scale of liver failure, 3 endoscopic procedures were performed, in 15 (30%) in grade B--2 procedures, in the remaining 25 (50%) cases, also in grade B--1 procedure was performed. Procedures were conducted with Wilson-Cook Multi-Band Ligator SAEED SixShooter. In all cases with non-bleeding esophageal varices the overall good result of treatment was achieved, with collapsing of variceal columns. In 8 (88.8%) of 9 cases treated due to variceal bleeding, good hemostasis was achieved and no reintervention was necessary. In 1 case of massive variceal bleeding endoscopic treatment failed and patient eventually died. In 25 (50%) cases the complementary (1 or 2) rubber band ligations were performed. Follow-up period has ranged from 1 to 34 months. No cases of severe complications after the procedure were noted. In early period after the procedure 43 (86%) patients complained of transient, mild retrosternal pain and mild to moderate dysphagia. Endoscopic rubber band ligation is a safe and effective treatment for esophageal varices both in cases of variceal bleeding and as elective procedure.

  15. Link adaptation in unlicensed radio bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, Jaap C.; Schutter, George B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new collaborative mechanism for efficient coordination of radio communication devices, in particular addressing the unlicensed ISM band at 2.4 GHz. As the traffic in the ISM band is increasing tremendously, the potential for interference between uncoordinated devices is becomin

  16. Error Analysis of Band Matrix Method

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Takeo; Soga, Akira

    1984-01-01

    Numerical error in the solution of the band matrix method based on the elimination method in single precision is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the behaviour of the truncation error and the roundoff error is clarified. Some important suggestions for the useful application of the band solver are proposed by using the results of above error analysis.

  17. 47 CFR 90.1213 - Band plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Band plan. 90.1213 Section 90.1213 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1213 Band plan. The following channel center frequencies are permitted to be aggregated...

  18. Low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    Low band gap polymer materials and their application in organic photovoltaics (OPV) are reviewed. We detail the synthetic approaches to low band gap polymer materials starting from the early methodologies employing quinoid homopolymer structures to the current state of the art that relies...... in photovoltaic applications and give a tabular overview of rarely applied materials....

  19. Concert Band Instrumentation: Realities and Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests ways to solve problems resulting from imbalanced instrumentation in school concert bands. Identifies sources of imbalance. Encourages band directors to plan for correct instrumentation, to match students' characteristics and abilities to instruments, and to recruit students to play needed instruments. Discusses the benefits of balanced…

  20. Superdeformed Rotational Bands in 240Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi, M.; Gassmann, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Habs, D.; Csatlos, M.; Eisermann, Y.; Faestermann, T.; Graw, G.; Gulyas, J.; Hertenberger, R.; Maier, H. J.; Mate, Z.; Metz, A.; Thirolf, P.; Chromik, M.; van der Werf, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    The intermediate structure of the fission resonances has been observed in 240Pu. A resonance structure found around the excitation energy of 4.5 MeV was interpreted as a group of Kπ =0+ superdeformed rotational bands. The moments of inertia and level density distributions were also deduced for the individually observed band-heads.

  1. Thermal contact conductance

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudana, Chakravarti V

    2013-01-01

    The work covers both theoretical and practical aspects of thermal contact conductance. The theoretical discussion focuses on heat transfer through spots, joints, and surfaces, as well as the role of interstitial materials (both planned and inadvertent). The practical discussion includes formulae and data that can be used in designing heat-transfer equipment for a variety of joints, including special geometries and configurations. All of the material has been updated to reflect the latest advances in the field.

  2. Electrically Conductive Porous Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth Alan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electrically conductive membrane that can be configured to be used in fuel cell systems to act as a hydrophilic water separator internal to the fuel cell, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a capillary structure in a thin head pipe evaporator, or as a hydrophobic gas diffusion layer covering the fuel cell electrode surface in a fuel cell.

  3. Band alignments at interface of ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tao; Li, Ruifeng; Kong, Weiguang; Zhang, Bingpo; Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The band alignments at ZnO/HC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3} interface were measured by XPS. • The valence-band offset was determined to be 1.86 ± 0.10 eV. • The conduction-band offset was concluded to be 0.05 ± 0.10 eV. • The ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction has a type-I band alignment. • The desired band alignment is benefit for the new generation of solar cells. - Abstract: The band alignments at the interface of ZnO/HC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3} (FAPbI{sub 3}) heterojunction were measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Core levels of Pb 5d and Zn 3d were utilized to align the valence-band offset (VBO). The VBO was determined to be 1.86 ± 0.30 eV, and the conduction-band offset (CBO) was concluded to be 0.05 ± 0.30 eV, manifesting that the ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction has a type-I band alignment. The data of the band alignment of ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction may benefit the design and development of novel perovskite solar cells (PSCs).

  4. First-principles study of band-gap change in deformed nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bin; Lakatos, Gregory W.; Peng, Shu; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2005-10-01

    The effects of cross-sectional deformation and bending on the electronic structures of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are examined. Upon increasing the deformation, semiconducting SWNTs undergo semiconductor-metal transition, and the conduction band and valence band show asymmetric response to the deformation. The metallic tubes' electronic structures are relatively insensitive to similar mechanical deformation. Using the properties of deformed nanotubes, we propose a conceptual design of SWNT-based single-electron quantum-well devices.

  5. Multiple-Scattering Approach to the Formation of the Impurity Band in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, A.; Serre, J.

    1982-03-01

    The electronic structure of doped semiconductors is studied by using the best approximation of Klauder's impurity-scattering theory which yields a wave-vector- and energy-dependent self-energy Σ(k-->,E). An approximation is used for electron correlation effects. It is shown that as the impurity concentration is decreased, the conduction-band tail progressively splits off, giving an impurity band. The link between the formation of the latter and the general theory of bifurcation is outlined.

  6. Band offsets at the crystalline / hydrogenated amorphous silicon interface from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Ebrahim; Jarolimek, Karol; de Wijs, Gilles A.; InstituteMolecules; Materials Team

    2015-03-01

    The heterojunction formed between crystalline silicon (c-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key component of a new type of high-efficiency silicon solar cell. Since a-Si:H has a larger band gap than c-Si, band offsets are formed at the interface. A band offset at the minority carrier band will mitigate recombination and lead to an increased efficiency. Experimental values of band offsets scatter in a broad range. However, a recent meta-analysis of the results (W. van Sark et al.pp. 405, Springer 2012) gives a larger valence offset (0.40 eV) than the conduction offset (0.15 eV). In light of the conflicting reports our goal is to calculate the band offsets at the c-Si/a-Si:H interface from first-principles. We have prepared several atomistic models of the interface. The crystalline part is terminated with (111) surfaces on both sides. The amorphous structure is generated by simulating an annealing process at 1100 K, with DFT molecular dynamics. Once the atomistic is ready it can be used to calculate the electronic structure of the interface. Our preliminary results show that the valence offset is larger than the conduction band offset.

  7. Valence band hybridization in N-rich GaN1-xAsx alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Shan, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Kimura, A.; Tang, H.F.; Kuech, T.F.

    2004-05-04

    We have used photo-modulated transmission and optical absorption spectroscopies to measure the composition dependence of interband optical transitions in N-rich GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} alloys with x up to 0.06. The direct bandgap gradually decreases as x increases. In the dilute x limit, the observed band gap approaches 2.8 eV; this limiting value is attributed to a transition between the As localized level, which has been previously observed in As-doped GaN at 0.6 eV above the valence band maximum in As-doped GaN, and the conduction band minimum. The structure of the valence band of GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} is explained by the hybridization of the localized As states with the extended valence band states of GaN matrix. The hybridization is directly confirmed by soft x-ray emission experiments. To describe the electronic structure of the GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} alloys in the entire composition range a linear interpolation is used to combine the effects of valence band hybridization in N-rich alloys with conduction band anticrossing in As-rich alloys.

  8. Ultra-thin oxide films for band engineering: design principles and numerical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron, E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk

    2014-05-30

    The alignment of band energies between conductive oxides and semiconductors is crucial for the further development of oxide contacting layers in electronic devices. The growth of ultra thin films on the surface of an oxide material can be used to introduce a dipole moment at that surface due to charge differences. The dipole, in turn, alters the electrostatic potential — and hence the band energies — in the substrate oxide. We demonstrate the fundamental limits for the application of thin-films in this context, applying analytical and numerical simulations, that bridge continuum and atomistic. The simulations highlight the different parameters that can affect the band energy shifting potential of a given thin-film layer, taking the examples of MgO and SnO{sub 2}. In particular we assess the effect of formal charge, layer orientation, layer thickness and surface coverage, with respect to their effect on the electrostatic potential. The results establish some design principles, important for further development and application of thin-films for band energy engineering in transparent conductive oxide materials. - Highlights: • Bridging continuum electrostatics and numerical point charge simulations. • Principles for engineering of band energies through application of ultra-thin films. • Effects of thin-film orientation on band energy levels • Effects of film-coverage and thickness on band energy levels.

  9. Conductive dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremets, M.; Troyan, I.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen at ambient pressures and low temperatures forms a molecular crystal which is expected to display metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature Tc of 200-400 K. The superconductor may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures, and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. Recent experiments performed at low temperatures T 220 GPa, new Raman modes arose, providing evidence for the transformation to a new opaque and electrically conductive phase IV. Above 260 GPa, in the next phase V, hydrogen reflected light well. Its resistance was nearly temperature-independent over a wide temperature range, down to 30 K, indicating that the hydrogen was metallic. Releasing the pressure induced the metallic phase to transform directly into molecular hydrogen with significant hysteresis at 200 GPa and 295 K. These data were published in our paper: M. I. Eremets and I. A. Troyan "Conductive dense hydrogen." Nature Materials 10: 927-931. We will present also new results on hydrogen: phase diagram with phases IV and V determined in P,T domain up to 300 GPa and 350 K. We will also discuss possible structures of phase IV based on our Raman and infrared measurements up to 300 GPa.

  10. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  11. Band structure of superdeformed bands in odd-A Hg nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈星渠; 邢正

    1997-01-01

    Through particle-rotor model, band structure of superdeformed bands in odd-A Hg nuclei is analysed. An overall and excellent agreement between the calculated and observed kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia is obtained. The electromagnetic transition properties of SD bands can be used to identify the configuration with certainty.

  12. Influence of band interaction on the spin prediction of superdeformed rotational bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. X.; Xin, X. B.; Lei, Y. A.; Zeng, J. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of band interaction on the spin predictions and the J (2) pattern of superdeformed (SD) bands are investigated. To make a reliable spin prediction using the best-fit method, the transitions with significant band mixing should be excluded from the least-squares fitting. Spin predictions for 15 SD bands in the A ~150 region are made. In particular, the spin of the lowest level of the first discovered high-spin SD band 152 Dy(1) is predicted to be I 0 = 26. A two-band mixing model is used to describe the irregular behaviour of J (2) with angular momentum. Two types of J (2) patterns are discussed. For the band-crossing case, the J (2) pattern in the band-crossing region is of a V (or inverse-V) type, which has been observed in both the A ~190 and 150 regions. For the band-mixing case characterized by a relatively weak band interaction, the J (2) pattern in the band-mixing region is of a W (or inverse-W) type, which was observed only in some SD bands in the A ~150 region.

  13. Band-gap narrowing in the space-charge region of heavily doped silicon diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowney, Jeremiah R.

    1985-02-01

    The densities of states of the valence and conduction bands have been calculated in the space-charge region of a heavily doped linearly graded p- n junction silicon diode. Both the donor and acceptor densities were chosen to be equal to 6.2 × 10 18 cm -3. The results showed the emergence of band tails which penetrated deeply into the energy gap and accounted for the band-gap narrowing observed in such a diode by analysis of capacitance vs voltage measurements of the built-in voltage.

  14. TKS-Vega experiment - NH and NH2 bands in Comet Halley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnopol' skii, V.A.; Tkachuk, A.IU. (AN SSSR, Institut Kosmicheskikh Issledovanii, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-05-01

    An analysis is conducted of the March 9, 1986 distribution of the NH 336-nm band and the NH2 bands in the 580-700 nm region on Comet Halley. Of all candidates considered, only ammonia suggests itself as a parent of both NH2 and NH. The ammonia production rate is obtained from measurements of NH2 bands by dividing the observed Q(NH2) by 0.92, which is the yield of NH2 in NH3 photolysis. The NH3 presently measured is an order of magnitude lower than that derived from the Giotto IMS data. 28 refs.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Small Band-gap Conjugated Polymers - Poly(pyrrolyl methines)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A kind of small band-gap conjugated polymers-poly (pyrrolyl methines) and their precursors-(poly pyrrolyl methanes) have been synthesized by a simple method and characterized by 1HNMR, FT-IR, TGA and UV-Vis. These polymers can be dissolved in high polar solvents such as DMSO, DMF or NMP. The results reveals that the band-gap of the synthesized conjugated polymers are in the range of 0.96~1.14 eV and they all belong to the small band-gap polymers. The conductivity of doped products with iodine is in the range of semiconductor.

  16. Band-type microelectrodes for amperometric immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ga-Yeon; Chang, Young Wook; Ko, Hyuk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min-Jung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyun, Jae-Chul, E-mail: jcpyun@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-20

    A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. A circular-type, mm-scale electrode with the same diameter as the band-type microelectrode was also made with an electrode area that was 5000 times larger than the band-type microelectrode. By comparing the amperometric signals of 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) samples at different optical density (OD) values, the band-type microelectrode was determined to be 9 times more sensitive than the circular-type electrode. The properties of the circular-type and the band-type electrodes (e.g., the shape of their cyclic voltammograms, the type of diffusion layer used, and the diffusion layer thickness per unit electrode area) were characterized according to their electrode area using the COMSOL Multiphysics software. From these simulations, the band-type electrode was estimated to have the conventional microelectrode properties, even when the electrode area was 100 times larger than a conventional circular-type electrode. These results show that both the geometry and the area of an electrode can influence the properties of the electrode. Finally, amperometric analysis based on a band-type electrode was applied to commercial ELISA kits to analyze human hepatitis B surface antigen (hHBsAg) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies. - Highlights: • A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. • The band-type microelectrode was 14-times more sensitive than circular-type electrode. • The influence of geometry on microelectrode properties was simulated using COMSOL. • The band-type electrode was applied to ELISA kits for hHBsAg and hHIV-antibodies.

  17. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  18. Effect of Dopant Concentrations on Conversion Efficiency of SiC-Based Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, H.; Rostami, A.; Dolatyari, M.; Rostami, G.

    It was recognized that the introducing of a narrow metallic band states in the crystal structure of semiconductors make materials that they can be used as intermediate band materials for improving the power conversion efficiency of high band gap single junction solar cells. In these structures intermediate bands would serve as a "stepping stone" for photons with different energies to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction bands. Low-energy photons can be captured by this method that would pass through a conventional solar cell. An optimal IBSC (intermediate band solar cells) has a total band gap of about 1.95 eV and 3C-SiC has the closest band gap to this value (band gap of 2.2 eV). Excellent electronic properties of 3C-SiC such as high electron mobility and saturated electron drift velocity and its suitable band gap makes it an important alternative material for light harvesting technologies instead of conventional semiconductors like silicon. In this condition detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 55 % for an optimized, single junction intermediate band solar cell that it is higher than efficiency of an optimized two junction tandem solar cell. In this study we have analyzed Fe doped 3C-SiC by ab initio calculations for Fe concentration of 1.05, 1.85, 3.22, and 5.55 %. The results show conversion efficiency for designed solar cell change with altering in Fe contents. The maximum efficiency has been obtained for crystals with 3 % Fe3+ as dopant in 3C-SiC structure.

  19. Relaxation of femtosecond photoexcited electrons in a polar indirect band-gap semiconductor nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navinder Singh

    2005-01-01

    A model calculation is given for the energy relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution of hot electrons (holes) prepared in the conduction (valence) band of a polar indirect band-gap semiconductor, which has been subjected to homogeneous photoexcitation by a femtosecond laser pulse. The model assumes that the pulsed photoexcitation creates two distinct but spatially interpenetrating electron and hole non-equilibrium subsystems that initially relax non-radiatively through the electron (hole)–phonon processes towards the conduction (valence) band minimum (maximum), and finally radiatively through the phonon-assisted electron–hole recombination across the band-gap, which is a relatively slow process. This leads to an accumulation of electrons (holes) at the conduction (valence) band minimum (maximum). The resulting peaking of the carrier density and the entire evolution of the hot electron (hole) distribution has been calculated. The latter may be time resolved by a pump-probe study. The model is particularly applicable to a divided (nanometric) polar indirect band-gap semiconductor with a low carrier concentration and strong electron–phonon coupling, where the usual two-temperature model [1–4] may not be appropriate.

  20. Robust mixed conducting membrane structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane structure, comprising in said order a first electronically conducting layer, an ionically conducting layer, and a second electronically conducting layer, characterized in that the first and second electronically conducting layers are internally short...... circuited. The present invention further provides a method of producing the above membrane structure, comprising the steps of : providing a ionically conducting layer; applying at least one layer of electronically conducting material on each side of said ionically conducting layer; sintering the multilayer...

  1. Fermi level and bands offsets determination in insulating (Ga,Mn)N/GaN structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, L; Kunert, G; Sawicki, M; Piskorska-Hommel, E; Gas, K; Jakiela, R; Hommel, D; Kudrawiec, R

    2017-02-02

    The Fermi level position in (Ga,Mn)N has been determined from the period-analysis of GaN-related Franz-Keldysh oscillation obtained by contactless electroreflectance in a series of carefully prepared by molecular beam epitaxy GaN/Ga1-xMnxN/GaN(template) bilayers of various Mn concentration x. It is shown that the Fermi level in (Ga,Mn)N is strongly pinned in the middle of the band gap and the thickness of the depletion layer is negligibly small. For x > 0.1% the Fermi level is located about 1.25-1.55 eV above the valence band, that is very close to, but visibly below the Mn-related Mn(2+)/Mn(3+) impurity band. The accumulated data allows us to estimate the Mn-related band offsets at the (Ga,Mn)N/GaN interface. It is found that most of the band gap change in (Ga,Mn)N takes place in the valence band on the absolute scale and amounts to -0.028 ± 0.008 eV/% Mn. The strong Fermi level pinning in the middle of the band gap, no carrier conductivity within the Mn-related impurity band, and a good homogeneity enable a novel functionality of (Ga,Mn)N as a semi-insulating buffer layers for applications in GaN-based heterostuctures.

  2. Design and realization of a planar ultrawideband antenna with notch band at 3.5 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Rezaul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Misran, Norbahiah; Yatim, Baharudin; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A small antenna with single notch band at 3.5 GHz is designed for ultrawideband (UWB) communication applications. The fabricated antenna comprises a radiating monopole element and a perfectly conducting ground plane with a wide slot. To achieve a notch band at 3.5 GHz, a parasitic element has been inserted in the same plane of the substrate along with the radiating patch. Experimental results shows that, by properly adjusting the position of the parasitic element, the designed antenna can achieve an ultrawide operating band of 3.04 to 11 GHz with a notched band operating at 3.31-3.84 GHz. Moreover, the proposed antenna achieved a good gain except at the notched band and exhibits symmetric radiation patterns throughout the operating band. The prototype of the proposed antenna possesses a very compact size and uses simple structures to attain the stop band characteristic with an aim to lessen the interference between UWB and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) band.

  3. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard L.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2016-06-21

    An ion conducting polymeric composition mixture comprises a copolymer of styrene and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. R.sub.s is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums and pyridiniums. The composition contains 10%-90% by weight of vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. The composition can further comprise a polyolefin comprising substituted polyolefins, a polymer comprising cyclic amine groups, a polymer comprising at least one of a phenylene group and a phenyl group, a polyamide, and/or the reaction product of a constituent having two carbon-carbon double bonds. The composition can be in the form of a membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  4. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2017-02-28

    An ion conducting polymeric composition mixture comprises a copolymer of styrene and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. R.sub.s is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums, pyridiniums, pyrazoliums, pyrrolidiniums, pyrroliums, pyrimidiums, piperidiniums, indoliums, and triaziniums. The composition contains 10%-90% by weight of vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. The composition can further comprise a polyolefin comprising substituted polyolefins, a polymer comprising cyclic amine groups, a polymer comprising at least one of a phenylene group and a phenyl group, a polyamide, and/or the reaction product of a constituent having two carbon-carbon double bonds. The composition can be in the form of a membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  5. [Female conduct disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vloet, Timo D; Großheinrich, Nicola; Konrad, Kerstin; Freitag, Christine; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen much research on girls with conduct disorder (CD). This article summarizes the gender-specific data regarding prevalence, differences with respect to symptomatology (e.g., subtypes of aggression, callous-unemotional (cu)-traits), and it presents data on the autonomic and neuroendocrine stress system as well as genetic, neurocognitive, and neuroimaging data. Differences in the impact of environmental factors on boys and girls for the development of CD are discussed. Taken together, the data indicate that there is great overlap in symptomatology, personality traits, and neurobiological aberrations in girls and boys with CD. Since fewer girls than boys exhibit CD symptomatology, further investigations on CD in girls might help to identify resilience factors that could improve future therapeutic interventions.

  6. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  7. TRES survey of variable diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Charles J.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Johansen, Sommer L.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Margutti, Raffaella; Parrent, Jerod T.; Drout, Maria R.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Latham, David W.

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are absorption features commonly observed in optical/near-infrared spectra of stars and thought to be associated with polyatomic molecules that comprise a significant reservoir of organic material in the Universe. However, the central wavelengths of almost all DIBs do not correspond with electronic transitions of known atomic or molecular species and the specific physical nature of their carriers remains inconclusive despite decades of observational, theoretical and experimental research. It is well established that DIB carriers are located in the interstellar medium, but the recent discovery of time-varying DIBs in the spectra of the extragalactic supernova SN 2012ap suggests that some may be created in massive star environments. Here, we report evidence of short time-scale (∼10-60 d) changes in DIB absorption line substructure towards 3 of 17 massive stars observed as part of a pathfinder survey of variable DIBs conducted with the 1.5-m Tillinghast telescope and Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) at Fred L. Whipple Observatory. The detections are made in high-resolution optical spectra (R ∼ 44 000) having signal-to-noise ratios of 5-15 around the 5797 and 6614 Å features, and are considered significant but requiring further investigation. We find that these changes are potentially consistent with interactions between stellar winds and DIB carriers in close proximity. Our findings motivate a larger survey to further characterize these variations and may establish a powerful new method for probing the poorly understood physical characteristics of DIB carriers.

  8. A conversation with Susan Band Horwitz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Susan Band; Goldman, I David

    2015-01-01

    Susan Band Horwitz is a Distinguished Professor and holds the Falkenstein Chair in Cancer Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. She is co-chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and associate director for therapeutics at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center. After graduating from Bryn Mawr College, Dr. Horwitz received her PhD in biochemistry from Brandeis University. She has had a continuing interest in natural products as a source of new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Her most seminal research contribution has been in the development of Taxol(®). Dr. Horwitz and her colleagues made the discovery that Taxol had a unique mechanism of action and suggested that it was a prototype for a new class of antitumor drugs. Although Taxol was an antimitotic agent blocking cells in the metaphase stage of the cell cycle, Dr. Horwitz recognized that Taxol was blocking mitosis in a way different from that of other known agents. Her group demonstrated that the binding site for Taxol was on the β-tubulin subunit. The interaction of Taxol with the β-tubulin subunit resulted in stabilized microtubules, essentially paralyzing the cytoskeleton, thereby preventing cell division. Dr. Horwitz served as president (2002-2003) of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the C. Chester Stock Award from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Warren Alpert Foundation Prize from Harvard Medical School, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society's Medal of Honor, and the AACR Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research. The following interview was conducted on January 23, 2014.

  9. The current science of gastric banding: an overview of pressure-volume theory in band adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a safe and effective bariatric operation for the treatment of morbid obesity. Optimized long-term weight loss and reduced complications may be facilitated by development of a standardized, accurate, band-fill measurement methodology for use in postoperative LAGB adjustments. A summary of the primary in vitro, theoretical, and in vivo studies of pressure-volume theory relative to gastric banding was undertaken. LAGBs range in mechanisms of action from low-pressure/high-volume to high-pressure/low-volume. Use of both basic and dynamic pressure data obtained experimentally and clinically with a low-pressure/high-volume (LP/HV) band as a research tool revealed that intra-band pressures remained very low even when the band balloon was filled to its maximum fill volume; in contrast, when a high-pressure/low-volume (HP/LV) band was filled, it exhibited a pressure curve markedly steeper and of greater amplitude than that of the LP/HV band. Theoretical calculations of the differences between the bands in terms of the pressures they exerted on a bolus of food passing through a stoma found that the pressure created by the HP/LV band against the gastric wall was >100% higher than that applied by the LP/HV band; these mathematical results were verified by using invasive manometry in 35 patients undergoing band adjustment. In clinical testing, basic band pressure, band volume, and dynamic pressure data (that demonstrated esophageal motility patterns at the stoma during bolus passage) were gathered and correlated. As identified by intra-band pressure readings, a zone of disruptive peristaltic activity that obstructed bolus passage through the stoma was observed; slightly beneath this zone, it was hypothesized that successful patient adjustments might be carried out. The manometrically delineated measure of mean band pressure sufficient to exert a significant yet not disruptive restriction (i.e., 20 mm Hg; mean volume of 5.4 m

  10. The Influence of Preparation Conditions on the Electrical Conductivity of Poly N-Methyl-pyrrole Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidanapathirana, K.; Careem, M.A.; Skaarup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    on the electrical conductivity has been investigated. The conductivity was measured by the in situ method using a specially prepared two-band microelectrode. The current density used during the polymerization has a considerable influence on the conductivity, as earlier observed for polypyrrole in non...

  11. The organic chemistry of conducting polymers. Annual technical report, February 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, L.M.

    1994-08-19

    This paper is divided into: solitons in a box (polyacetylene), cyanines as molecular switches/beyond the cyanine limit, low band-gap heteropolymers, ``dimeric`` and ``trimeric monomers,`` and electrically conductive polymeric interconnects.

  12. A correlation between RSSI and height in UHF band and comparison of geolocation spectrum database view of TVWS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maliwatu, R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) dependency on receiver antenna height in UHF band is conducted. The results show a high correlation between RSSI and height on channels with high signal strength...

  13. Citizen Science Air Sensor Project with Clean Air Carolina and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA scientists are partnering with Clean Air Carolina (CAC) in Charlotte, N.C., and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) in Cherokee, N.C., to conduct a citizen science air quality project in these regions.

  14. Convergence of electronic bands for high performance bulk thermoelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yanzhong; Shi, Xiaoya; LaLonde, Aaron; Wang, Heng; Chen, Lidong; Snyder, G Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Thermoelectric generators, which directly convert heat into electricity, have long been relegated to use in space-based or other niche applications, but are now being actively considered for a variety of practical waste heat recovery systems-such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. Although these devices can be very reliable and compact, the thermoelectric materials themselves are relatively inefficient: to facilitate widespread application, it will be desirable to identify or develop materials that have an intensive thermoelectric materials figure of merit, zT, above 1.5 (ref. 1). Many different concepts have been used in the search for new materials with high thermoelectric efficiency, such as the use of nanostructuring to reduce phonon thermal conductivity, which has led to the investigation of a variety of complex material systems. In this vein, it is well known that a high valley degeneracy (typically ≤6 for known thermoelectrics) in the electronic bands is conducive to high zT, and this in turn has stimulated attempts to engineer such degeneracy by adopting low-dimensional nanostructures. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to direct the convergence of many valleys in a bulk material by tuning the doping and composition. By this route, we achieve a convergence of at least 12 valleys in doped PbTe(1-x)Se(x) alloys, leading to an extraordinary zT value of 1.8 at about 850 kelvin. Band engineering to converge the valence (or conduction) bands to achieve high valley degeneracy should be a general strategy in the search for and improvement of bulk thermoelectric materials, because it simultaneously leads to a high Seebeck coefficient and high electrical conductivity.

  15. Gamma Vibrational Bands and Chiral Doublet Bands in A≈100 Neutron-rich Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Sheng-jiang; DING Huai-bo; J.H.Hamilton; A.V.Ramayya; CHE Xing-lai; J.K.Hwang; Y.X.Luo; J.O.Rasmussen; K.Li; WANG Jian-guo; XU Qiang; GU Long; YANG Yun-yi; S.Frauendorf; V.Dimitrov

    2009-01-01

    The level structures of neutron-rich ~(105)Mo,~(106)Mo,~(108)Mo and 110Ru nuclei in A≈100 region have been carefully investigated by coincidence measurements of the prompt γ-rays populated in the spontaneous fission of ~(252)Cf with the Gammasphere detector array.In 105Mo,one-phonon K =9/2 and two-phonon K=13/2 γ-vibrational bands have been identified.In ~(108)Mo,one-phonon γ-vibrational band is expanded and two-phonon γ-vibrational band has been identified.Two similar sets of bands in ~(106)Mo and ~(110)Ru are observed to high spins,which have been proposed as the soft chiral γ-vibrational bands.The characteristics for these γ-vibrational bands and chiral doublet bands have been discussed.

  16. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hong-xiang, E-mail: jsdxshx@ujs.edu.cn [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yuan, Shou-qi, E-mail: Shouqiy@ujs.edu.cn [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Shu-yi [Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  17. One-Dimensional Anisotropic Band Gap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The band gap structure of one-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal has been studied by means of the transfer matrix formalism. From the analytic expressions and numeric calculations we see some general characteristics of the band gap structure of anisotropic photonic crystals, each band separates into two branches and the two branches react to polarization sensitively. In the practical case of oblique incidence, gaps move towards high frequency when the angle of incidence increases. Under some special conditions, the two branches become degenerate again.

  18. Quasiparticle Band Structure of BaS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Tie-Yu; CHEN De-Yan; HUANG Mei-Chun

    2006-01-01

    @@ We calculate the band structure of BaS using the local density approximation and the GW approximation (GWA),i.e. in combination of the Green function G and the screened Coulomb interaction W. The Ba 4d states are treated as valence states. We find that BaS is a direct band-gap semiconductor. The result shows that the GWA band gap (Eg-Gw = 3.921 eV) agrees excellently with the experimental result (Eg-EXPT = 3.88 eV or 3.9eV).

  19. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    Earlier work has demonstrated generative models capable of synthesising near photo-realistic grey-scale images of objects. These models have been augmented with colour information, and recently with edge information. This paper extends the active appearance model framework by modelling...... the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  20. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    Earlier work has demonstrated generative models capable of synthesising near photo-realistic grey-scale images of objects. These models have been augmented with colour information, and recently with edge information. This paper extends the Active Appearance Model framework by modelling...... the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  1. Catalogue of diffuse interstellar band measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Diffuse-band data have been collected from the literature and reduced statistically to a common measurement system, enabling correlation analyses to be made with a larger quantity of data than previously possible. A full listing of the catalogued data is presented, along with some discussion of the correlations. One important application of such studies is the identification of cases of peculiar diffuse-band behavior, and a table is given showing all cases of band strengths deviating by more than twice the mean dispersion from the best-fit correlations. This table may be useful in planning further observations.

  2. First-principles calculation of nitrogen-tungsten codoping effects on the band structure of anatase-titania

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The electronic properties and photocatalytic activity of nitrogen (N) and/or tungsten (W)-doped anatase are calculated using density functional theory. For N-doping, isolated N 2p states above the top of the valence band are responsible for experimentally observed redshifts in the optical absorption edge. For W-doping, W 5d states below the conduction band lead to band gap narrowing; the transition energy is reduced by 0.2 eV. Addition of W to the N-doped system yields significant band gap na...

  3. UAVSAR: Airborne L-band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objectives of the UAVSAR Project were to: a) develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for use on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or piloted vehicle. b) develop the associated processing algorithms for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements using a single antenna. c) conduct measurements of geophysical interest, particularly changes of rapidly deforming surfaces such as volcanoes or earthquakes. Two complete systems were developed. Operational Science Missions began on February 18, 2009 ... concurrent development and testing of the radar system continues.

  4. CONDUCTIVITY OF DONKEY MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Conte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The electrical conductivity (EC of milk is considered as one of the most important parameters which supports the diagnosis of mastitis in cows.Milk ions have a considerable influence on EC and their concentrations vary depending on animal species, season, lactation stage, etc. Some components of milk can change the EC, e.g. lactose. A negative correlation between EC values and the concentration of lactose is noticed, as a consequence of the inverse relation between this disaccharide and the chlorine content in milk. Fat and casein contents exert some influence on the EC, too. This study provides preliminary results on the physiological EC values in donkey milk and aims to highlight any correlation with some of its chemical-physical parameters and Somatic Cell Count (SCC. Mean EC value in donkey milk was found to be 3.57 mS. Statistically significant correlations were found between EC and SCC (r = 0.57 , p < 0.01 and between EC and (r = 0.30 , p < 0.05. The EC and lactose were not correlated although a reduction of EC was often observed when the lactose content increased, as reported in the literature for bovine milk. According to the EC can be considered as a reliable parameter to identify any breast disorder, taking into account the physiological factors that influence EC.

  5. Thermal Contact Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The performance of cryogenic instruments is often a function of their operating temperature. Thus, designers of cryogenic instruments often are required to predict the operating temperature of each instrument they design. This requires accurate thermal models of cryogenic components which include the properties of the materials and assembly techniques used. When components are bolted or otherwise pressed together, a knowledge of the thermal performance of such joints are also needed. In some cases, the temperature drop across these joints represents a significant fraction of the total temperature difference between the instrument and its cooler. While extensive databases exist on the thermal properties of bulk materials, similar databases for pressed contacts do not. This has often lead to instrument designs that avoid pressed contacts or to the over-design of such joints at unnecessary expense. Although many people have made measurements of contact conductances at cryogenic temperatures, this data is often very narrow in scope and even more often it has not been published in an easily retrievable fashion, if published at all. This paper presents a summary of the limited pressed contact data available in the literature.

  6. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  7. Experimental study of energy harvesting in UHF band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacki, Ł.; Gozdur, R.; Salamon, N.

    2016-04-01

    A huge progress of down-sizing technology together with trend of decreasing power consumption and, on the other hand, increasing efficiency of electronics give the opportunity to design and to implement the energy harvesters as main power sources. This paper refers to the energy that can be harvested from electromagnetic field in the unlicensed frequency bands. The paper contains description of the most popular techniques and transducers that can be applied in energy harvesting domain. The overview of current research and commercial solutions was performed for bands in ultra-high frequency range, which are unlicensed and where transmission is not limited by administrative arrangements. During the experiments with Powercast’s receiver, the same bands as sources of electromagnetic field were taken into account. This power source is used for conducting radio-communication process and excess energy could be used for powering the extra electronic circuits. The paper presents elaborated prototype of energy harvesting system and the measurements of power harvested in ultra-high frequency range. The evaluation of RF energy harvesters for powering ultra-low power (ULP) electronic devices was performed based on survey and results of the experiments.

  8. Band selection for hyperspectral image classification using extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaojiao; Kingsdorf, Benjamin; Du, Qian

    2017-05-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) is a feedforward neural network with one hidden layer, which is similar to a multilayer perceptron (MLP). To reduce the complexity in the training process of MLP using the traditional backpropagation algorithm, the weights in ELM between input and hidden layers are random variables. The output layer in the ELM is linear, as in a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), so the output weights can be easily estimated with a least squares solution. It has been demonstrated in our previous work that the computational cost of ELM is much lower than the standard support vector machine (SVM), and a kernel version of ELM can offer comparable performance as SVM. In our previous work, we also investigate the impact of the number of hidden neurons to the performance of ELM. Basically, more hidden neurons are needed if the number of training samples and data dimensionality are large, which results in a very large matrix inversion problem. To avoid handling such a large matrix, we propose to conduct band selection to reduce data dimensionality (i.e., the number of input neurons), thereby reducing network complexity. Experimental results show that ELM using selected bands can yield similar or even better classification accuracy than using all the original bands.

  9. Electronic materials with a wide band gap: recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlef Klimm

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of semiconductor electronics is reviewed briefly, beginning with the development of germanium devices (band gap Eg = 0.66 eV after World War II. A tendency towards alternative materials with wider band gaps quickly became apparent, starting with silicon (Eg = 1.12 eV. This improved the signal-to-noise ratio for classical electronic applications. Both semiconductors have a tetrahedral coordination, and by isoelectronic alternative replacement of Ge or Si with carbon or various anions and cations, other semiconductors with wider Eg were obtained. These are transparent to visible light and belong to the group of wide band gap semiconductors. Nowadays, some nitrides, especially GaN and AlN, are the most important materials for optical emission in the ultraviolet and blue regions. Oxide crystals, such as ZnO and β-Ga2O3, offer similarly good electronic properties but still suffer from significant difficulties in obtaining stable and technologically adequate p-type conductivity.

  10. Two novel silicon phases with direct band gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qingyang; Chai, Changchun; Wei, Qun; Yang, Yintang

    2016-05-14

    Due to its abundance, silicon is the preferred solar-cell material despite the fact that many silicon allotropes have indirect band gaps. Elemental silicon has a large impact on the economy of the modern world and is of fundamental importance in the technological field, particularly in the solar cell industry. Looking for direct band gap silicon is still an important field in material science. Based on density function theory with the ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme in the frame of the local density approximation and the generalized gradient approximation, we have systematically studied the structural stability, absorption spectra, electronic, optical and mechanical properties and minimum thermal conductivity of two novel silicon phases, Cm-32 silicon and P21/m silicon. These are both thermally, dynamically and mechanically stable. The absorption spectra of Cm-32 silicon and P21/m silicon exhibit significant overlap with the solar spectrum and thus, excellent photovoltaic efficiency with great improvements over Fd3[combining macron]m Si. These two novel Si structures with direct band gaps could be applied in single p-n junction thin-film solar cells or tandem photovoltaic devices.

  11. Hall conductance and topological invariant for open systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H Z; Wang, W; Yi, X X

    2014-09-24

    The Hall conductivity given by the Kubo formula is a linear response of quantum transverse transport to a weak electric field. It has been intensively studied for quantum systems without decoherence, but it is barely explored for systems subject to decoherence. In this paper, we develop a formulism to deal with this issue for topological insulators. The Hall conductance of a topological insulator coupled to an environment is derived, the derivation is based on a linear response theory developed for open systems in this paper. As an application, the Hall conductance of a two-band topological insulator and a two-dimensional lattice is presented and discussed.

  12. Shear bands in magnesium alloy AZ31

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平; 毛卫民; 任学平; 唐全波

    2004-01-01

    During deformation of magnesium at low temperatures, cracks always develop at shear bands. The origin of the shear bands is the {101-1} twinning in basal-oriented grains and the mobility of this type of twin boundary is rather low. The most frequent deformation mechanisms in magnesium at low temperature are basal slip and {1012} twinning, all leading to the basal texture and therefore the formation of shear bands with subsequent fracture. The investigation on the influences of initial textures and grain sizes reveals that a strong prismatic initial texture of parallels to TD and fine grains of less than 5 μm can restrict the formation and expansion of shear bands effectively and therefore improve the mechanical properties and formability of magnesium.

  13. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Margo F; Hughes, Philip A

    2010-01-01

    The properties of blazar variability in the radio band are studied using the unique combination of temporal resolution from single dish monitoring and spatial resolution from VLBA imaging; such measurements, now available in all four Stokes parameters, together with theoretical simulations, identify the origin of radio band variability and probe the characteristics of the radio jet where the broadband blazar emission originates. Outbursts in total flux density and linear polarization in the optical-to-radio bands are attributed to shocks propagating within the jet spine, in part based on limited modeling invoking transverse shocks; new radiative transfer simulations allowing for shocks at arbitrary angle to the flow direction confirm this picture by reproducing the observed centimeter-band variations observed more generally, and are of current interest since these shocks may play a role in the gamma-ray flaring detected by Fermi. Recent UMRAO multifrequency Stokes V studies of bright blazars identify the spec...

  14. Magnetic Dipole Band in 113^In

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马克岩; 杨东; 陆景彬; 王烈林; 王辉东; 刘运祚; 刘弓冶; 李黎; 马英君; 杨森; 李广生; 贺创业; 李雪琴

    2012-01-01

    High spin states in the odd-A nucleus 113^In have been investigated using the re- action 110^Pd(7^Li, 4n) at a beam energy of 50 MeV. A new positive parity dipole band with the configuration of π(g9/2)^-lv(h11/2)^2 v (g7/2)^2 is established. The effective interaction V(θ) values of this band have been successfully described by a semiclassical geometric model based on shear mechanism, which show that the dipole band has the characteristics of magnetic rotation. In addition the collective rotational angular momentum for this band is extracted. The results show that the core contribution increases gradually with the increase of the rotation frequency.

  15. Multi Band Gap High Efficiency Converter (RAINBOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekey, I.; Lewis, C.; Phillips, W.; Shields, V.; Stella, P.

    1997-01-01

    The RAINBOW multi band gap system represents a unique combination of solar cells, concentrators and beam splitters. RAINBOW is a flexible system which can readily expand as new high efficiency components are developed.

  16. New band-notched UWB antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiao-xiang; DENG Hong-wei

    2009-01-01

    A simple and compact ultra wideband (UWB) printed monopole antenna with band-notched performance is proposed in this paper. The antenna is partially grounded so that the Q value is depressed and the impedance bandwidth is broadened. A small strip bar is loaded on each arm of the similar U-shaped radiator. The impedance bandwidth of the antenna overlap with IEEE 802.11a is rejected consequently. The geometry parameters of the antenna are investigated and optimized with HFSS. The measured bandwidth of the proposed antenna occupies about 7.89 GHz covering from 3.05 GHz to 10.94 GHz with expected notched band from 4.96 GHz to 5.98 GHz. A quasi-omnidirectional and quasi-symmetrical radiation pattern in the whole band is also obtained. As a result, a UWB wireless communication system can be simplified with the band-notched UWB antenna presented.

  17. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with

  18. First-principles study of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagoya, A; Asahi, R [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Incorporated, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kresse, G, E-mail: e1405@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Faculty of Physics, Universitaet Wien and Center for Computational Materials Science, Sensengasse 8/12, A-1090, Wien (Austria)

    2011-10-12

    First-principles calculations of the band offsets between Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) and XS (X = Cd, Zn) are performed. While the interface dipole contribution for the band offsets is calculated using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional is employed to introduce the quasiparticle corrections to the band offsets. The calculated conduction band offset between CZTS and CdS is 0.2 eV, validating CdS for the buffer layer of the CZTS solar cell. The small conduction band offset stems from the band gap narrowing of CdS under the interface strain caused by the lattice misfit with CZTS. A large valence band offset over 0.9 eV between CZTS and ZnS indicates that precipitated ZnS is regarded as an inactive insulator phase in CZTS absorbers.

  19. Intraluminal penetration of the band in patients with adjustable silicone gastric banding: radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretolesi, F.; Derchi, L.E. [Cattedra di Radiologia R, Univ. di Genova (Italy); Camerini, G.; Gianetta, E.; Marinari, G.M.; Scopinaro, N. [Semeiotica Chirurgica R, Univ. di Genova (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse radiological findings in patients surgically treated for adjustable silicone gastric banding (ASGB) for morbid obesity complicated by band penetration into the gastric lumen. We reviewed the records of four patients with surgically confirmed penetration of gastric band into the gastric lumen; three had preoperative opaque meal, one only a plain abdominal film. Vomiting was the presenting symptom in two cases, whereas others had new weight gain and loss of early satiety. Two patients had normally closed bands: radiography showed that their position had changed from previous controls and the barium meal had passed out of their lumen. Two patients had an open band. One patient had the band at the duodeno-jejunal junction, and the tube connecting the band to the subcutaneous port presented a winding course suggesting the duodenum. In the other case, both plain film and barium studies failed to demonstrate with certainty the intragastric position of the band. As ASGB is becoming widely used, radiologists need to be familiar with its appearances and its complications. Band penetration into the stomach is a serious complication which needs band removal. Patients with this problem, often with non-specific symptoms and even those who are asymptomatic, are encountered during radiographic examinations requested either for gastric problems or follow-up purposes, and have to be properly diagnosed. (orig.)

  20. Design of Compact Penta-Band and Hexa-Band Microstrip Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kunal; Kumar, Ashwani; Kanaujia, Binod K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the design of two multi-band microstrip antennas. The antenna-1 gives Penta-Band and antenna-2 gives Hexa-band in the WLAN band. The frequency bands of the antenna-1 are Bluetooth 2.47 GHz (2.43 GHz-2.54 GHz), WiMax band 3.73 GHz (3.71 GHz-3.77 GHz), WLAN 5.1 GHz (4.99 GHz-5.13 GHz), upper WLAN 6.36 GHz (6.29 GHz-6.43 GHz), C band band 7.42 GHz (7.32 GHz-7.50 GHz) and the antenna-2 are WLAN band 2.6 GHz (2.56 GHz-2.63 GHz), 3.0 GHz (2.94 GHz-3.05 GHz), WiMax band 3.4 GHz (3.34 GHz-3.55 GHz), 4.85 GHz (4.81 GHz-4.92 GHz), WLAN 5.3 GHz (5.27 GHz-5.34 GHz) and upper WLAN 6.88 GHz. Both the antennas are fabricated and their measured results are presented to validate the simulated results. Proposed antennas have compact sizes and good radiation performances.

  1. Home-use cancer detecting band aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Sheinman, Victor; Tzoy, Andrey; Toktosunov, Aitmamat; Adashov, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel concept in which special band aid is developed for early detection of cancer. The band aid contains an array of micro needles with small detection array connected to each needle which inspects the color of the surface of the skin versus time after being pinched with the needles. We were able to show in pre-clinical trials that the color varies differently if the skin is close to tumor tissue.

  2. Band spectrum is D-brane

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We show that band spectrum of topological insulators can be identified as the shape of D-branes in string theory. The identification is based on a relation between the Berry connection associated with the band structure and the ADHM/Nahm construction of solitons whose geometric realization is available with D-branes. We also show that chiral and helical edge states are identified as D-branes representing a noncommutative monopole.

  3. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayank; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  4. Development of Sintered Iron Driving Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Khanna

    1974-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation reports some detailed studies carried out on the development testing and proving of sintered Iron Driving Bands. Sintering studies on two different types of iron powders together with a few Fe-Cu compositions have been made and based on the results there of, parameters for development iron driving bands have been standardised. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that substitution of copper by sintered iron is highly practicable alternative.

  5. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mayank, E-mail: mayank30134@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S. [Department of Physics, ISLE, IPS Academy, Indore (M.P.) (India); Mishra, A. [School of Physics, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore (M.P.) (India); Shrivastava, B. D. [Govt. P. G. College, Biora (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-06

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  6. Spin alignment in superdeformed rotational bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, F.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

    1990-12-24

    Many superdeformed bands in different nuclei are found to have virtually identical moments of inertia and alignments that differ from each other by quantized amounts - multiples of 1/2 {Dirac h}. Pseudo spins represent the only source of quantized alignment that has been thought of to date. Additional puzzles in these bands are the absence of other larger effects on the moments of inertia, and a surprising number of alignments of 1 {Dirac h}. (orig.).

  7. Spectrum Occupancy Measurements in the 2.3-2.4 GHz band: Guidelines for Licensed Shared Access in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Höyhtyä

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from spectrum occupancy measurements in the 2.3-2.4 GHz band at Turku, Finland. The band is currently under study in European regulation and standardization for mobile communication systems. We review the recently introduced Licensed Shared Access (LSA concept as a potential means for making the 2.3-2.4 GHz band available for mobile communications on a shared basis while protecting the rights of the incumbent spectrum users. The spectrum occupancy measurements conducted in one location in Finland show that the use of this band is rather low indicating that there might be potential for mobile communication systems to share this band with the incumbents under the LSA approach. Based on the obtained knowledge about the use of the studied band in Finland we create a set of guidelines for LSA to make the operation efficient both from the technical and economic viewpoint.

  8. Terahertz Current Oscillation in Wurtzite InN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wei

    2012-01-01

    Current self-oscillation in doped n+nn+ wurtzite InN diodes driven by a dc electric field is theoretically investigated by solving the time-dependent drift-diffusion model. Current self-oscillation is associated with the negative differential mobility effect in the highly non-parabolic conduction band of InN. A detailed analysis of the dependence of current oscillations on the doping concentration and the applied electric Reid is presented. The current oscillation frequencies can reach up to the terahertz (THz) region. The n+nn+ InN self-oscillating diode may be a promising candidate for THz generation, and the calculation results may guide the design of the devices.%Current self-oscillation in doped n+nn+ wurtzite InN diodes driven by a dc electric field is theoretically investigated by solving the time-dependent drift-diffusion model.Current self-oscillation is associated with the negative differential mobility effect in the highly non-parabolic conduction band of InN.A detailed analysis of the dependence of current oscillations on the doping concentration and the applied electric field is presented.The current oscillation frequencies can reach up to the terahertz (THz) region.The n + nn+ InN self-oscillating diode may be a promising candidate for THz generation,and the calculation results may guide the design of the devices.

  9. The Synthesis of NiO/TiO2 Heterostructures and Their Valence Band Offset Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Ibupoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a heterojunction based on p-type NiO/n-type TiO2 nanostructures has been prepared on the fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO glass substrate by hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-Ray diffraction techniques were used for the morphological and crystalline arrays characterization. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to determine the valence-band offset (VBO of the NiO/TiO2 heterojunction prepared on FTO glass substrate. The core levels of Ni 2p and Ti 2p were utilized to align the valence-band offset of p-type NiO/n-type TiO2 heterojunction. The valence band offset was found to be ∼0.41 eV and the conduction band was calculated about ∼0.91 eV. The ratio of conduction band offset and the valence-band offset was found to be 2.21.

  10. Theoretical Study of One-Intermediate Band Quantum Dot Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou El-Maaty Aly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intermediate bands (IBs between the valence and conduction bands play an important role in solar cells. Because the smaller energy photons than the bandgap energy can be used to promote charge carriers transfer to the conduction band and thereby the total output current increases while maintaining a large open circuit voltage. In this paper, the influence of the new band on the power conversion efficiency for the structure of the quantum dots intermediate band solar cell (QDIBSC is theoretically investigated and studied. The time-independent Schrödinger equation is used to determine the optimum width and location of the intermediate band. Accordingly, achievement of maximum efficiency by changing the width of quantum dots and barrier distances is studied. Theoretical determination of the power conversion efficiency under the two different ranges of QD width is presented. From the obtained results, the maximum power conversion efficiency is about 70.42% for simple cubic quantum dot crystal under full concentration light. It is strongly dependent on the width of quantum dots and barrier distances.

  11. Discrete Electronic Bands in Semiconductors and Insulators: Potential High-Light-Yield Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Bulk semiconductors and insulators typically have continuous valence and conduction bands. Here, we show that valence and conduction bands of a multinary semiconductor or insulator can be split to narrow discrete bands separated by large energy gaps. This unique electronic structure is demonstrated by first-principles calculations in several quaternary elpasolite compounds, i.e., Cs2NaInBr6 , Cs2NaBiCl6 , and Tl2NaBiCl6 . The narrow discrete band structure in these quaternary elpasolites is due to the large electronegativity difference among cations and the large nearest-neighbor distances in cation sublattices. We further use Cs2NaInBr6 as an example to show that the narrow bands can stabilize self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons (in which both the electron and the hole are strongly localized in static positions on adjacent sites) and promote strong exciton emission at room temperature. The discrete band structure should further suppress thermalization of hot carriers and may lead to enhanced impact ionization, which is usually considered inefficient in bulk semiconductors and insulators. These characteristics can enable efficient room-temperature light emission in low-gap scintillators and may overcome the light-yield bottleneck in current scintillator research.

  12. Band Structure Analysis of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 Perovskite Manganite Using a Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Sub Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide semiconductors and their application in next-generation devices have received a great deal of attention due to their various optical, electric, and magnetic properties. For various applications, an understanding of these properties and their mechanisms is also very important. Various characteristics of these oxides originate from the band structure. In this study, we introduce a band structure analysis technique using a soft X-ray energy source to study a La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO oxide semiconductor. The band structure is formed by a valence band, conduction band, band gap, work function, and electron affinity. These can be determined from secondary electron cut-off, valence band spectrum, O 1s core electron, and O K-edge measurements using synchrotron radiation. A detailed analysis of the band structure of the LSMO perovskite manganite oxide semiconductor thin film was established using these techniques.

  13. Chromosome complement, C-banding, Ag-NOR and replication banding in the zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, R R; Thode, G; Amores, A

    1996-01-01

    The chromosome complement of Danio rerio was investigated by Giemsa staining and C-banding, Ag-NORs and replication banding. The diploid number of this species is 2n = 50 and the arm number (NF) = 100. Constitutive heterochromatin was located at the centromeric position of all chromosome pairs. Nucleolus organizer regions appeared in the terminal position of the long arms of chromosomes 1, 2 and 8. Replication banding pattern allowed the identification of each chromosome pair.

  14. Band-to-Band Tunnel Transistor Design and Modeling for Low Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    tunneling phenomenon which was first observed over 50 years ago in narrow bandgap germanium p-n junction diodes by Esaki [2.1], operates by having electrons...Tunneling devices utilizing the band-to-band tunneling mechanism have been known to overcome this fundamental limit. In this thesis , the tunneling...band gap Ge devices and Strained Si/Ge hetero-structure devices utilizing a lower effective bandgap are also explored to improve the performance of the

  15. Comparing proton conductivity of polymer electrolytes by percent conducting volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pivovar, Bryan [NREL

    2009-01-01

    Proton conductivity of sulfonated polymers plays a key role in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Mass based water uptake and ion exchange capacity of sulfonated polymers have been failed to correlating their proton conductivity. In this paper, we report a length scale parameter, percent conductivity volume, which is rather simply obtained from the chemical structure of polymer to compare proton conductivity of wholly aromatic sulfonated polymer perflurosulfonic acid. Morphology effect on proton conductivity at lower RH conditions is discussed using the percent conductivity volume parameter.

  16. Selective feeding by coral reef fishes on coral lesions associated with brown band and black band disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong-Seng, K. M.; Cole, A. J.; Pratchett, M. S.; Willis, B. L.

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that corallivorous fishes may be vectors for coral disease, but the extent to which fishes actually feed on and thereby potentially transmit coral pathogens is largely unknown. For this study, in situ video observations were used to assess the level to which fishes fed on diseased coral tissues at Lizard Island, northern Great Barrier Reef. Surveys conducted at multiple locations around Lizard Island revealed that coral disease prevalence, especially of brown band disease (BrB), was higher in lagoon and backreef locations than in exposed reef crests. Accordingly, video cameras were deployed in lagoon and backreef habitats to record feeding by fishes during 1-h periods on diseased sections of each of 44 different coral colonies. Twenty-five species from five fish families (Blennidae, Chaetodontidae, Gobiidae, Labridae and Pomacentridae) were observed to feed on infected coral tissues of staghorn species of Acropora that were naturally infected with black band disease (BBD) or brown band disease (BrB). Collectively, these fishes took an average of 18.6 (±5.6 SE) and 14.3 (±6.1 SE) bites per hour from BBD and BrB lesions, respectively. More than 40% (408/948 bites) and nearly 25% (314/1319 bites) of bites were observed on lesions associated with BBD and BrB, respectively, despite these bands each representing only about 1% of the substratum available. Moreover, many corallivorous fishes ( Labrichthys unilineatus, Chaetodon aureofasciatus, C. baronessa, C. lunulatus, C. trifascialis, Cheiloprion labiatus) selectively targeted disease lesions over adjacent healthy coral tissues. These findings highlight the important role that reef fishes may play in the dynamics of coral diseases, either as vectors for the spread of coral disease or in reducing coral disease progression through intensive and selective consumption of diseased coral tissues.

  17. Automatic Speaker Recognition Dependency on Both the Shape of Auditory Critical Bands and Speaker Discriminative MFCCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOKIC, I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy of an automatic speaker recognition system predominantly depends on speaker models and features that are used. An influence of the shape of auditory critical bands and a contribution of individual components of MFCC-based feature vectors are investigated in the paper and some experimental results are presented and showed their impact on the accuracy of automatic speaker recognition. The speaker-discrimination capability of the MFCCs was experimentally determined by comparing training and test models for the same speaker. The experiments are conducted with three speech databases and showed that 0th and 19th (the last one MFCCs are non speaker discriminative. The values of MFCCs are determined by the type of applied auditory critical band. The exponential auditory critical bands based on the lower part of exponential function have outperformed the speaker recognition accuracy of other auditory critical bands such as rectangular or triangular shape.

  18. Determination of band alignment in the single-layer MoS2/WSe2 heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Chiu, Ming-Hui

    2015-07-16

    The emergence of two-dimensional electronic materials has stimulated proposals of novel electronic and photonic devices based on the heterostructures of transition metal dichalcogenides. Here we report the determination of band offsets in the heterostructures of transition metal dichalcogenides by using microbeam X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy. We determine a type-II alignment between MoS2 and WSe2 with a valence band offset value of 0.83 eV and a conduction band offset of 0.76 eV. First-principles calculations show that in this heterostructure with dissimilar chalcogen atoms, the electronic structures of WSe2 and MoS2 are well retained in their respective layers due to a weak interlayer coupling. Moreover, a valence band offset of 0.94 eV is obtained from density functional theory, consistent with the experimental determination.

  19. TiO2 Band Restructuring by B and P Dopants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Meng, Fanling; Hu, Xiaoying; Qiao, Liang; Sun, Chang Q; Tian, Hongwei; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    An examination of the effect of B- and P-doping and codoping on the electronic structure of anatase TiO2 by performing density functional theory calculations revealed the following: (i) B- or P-doping effects are similar to atomic undercoordination effects on local bond relaxation and core electron entrapment; (ii) the locally entrapped charge adds impurity levels within the band gap that could enhance the utilization of TiO2 to absorb visible light and prolong the carrier lifetime; (iii) the core electron entrapment polarizes nonbonding electrons in the upper edges of the valence and conduction bands, which reduces not only the work function but also the band gap; and (iv) work function reduction enhances the reactivity of the carriers and band gap reduction promotes visible-light absorption. These observations may shed light on effective catalyst design and synthesis.

  20. Topological invariants of band insulators derived from the local-orbital based embedding potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H.; Liebsch, A.; Wortmann, D.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate that topological invariants of band insulators can be derived efficiently from the eigenvalues of the local-orbital (LO) based embedding potential, called also the contact (lead) self-energy. The LO based embedding potential is a bulk quantity. Given the tight-binding Hamiltonian describing the bulk valence and conduction bands, it is constructed straightforwardly from the bulk wave functions satisfying the generalized Bloch condition. When the one-electron energy ɛ is located within a projected bulk band gap at a given planar wave vector k , the embedding potential becomes Hermitian. Its real eigenvalues exhibit distinctly different behavior depending on the topological properties of the valence bands, thus enabling unambiguous identification of bulk topological invariants. We consider the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model as an example of a time-reversal invariant topological insulator and tin telluride (SnTe) crystallized in a rock-salt structure as an example of a topological crystalline insulator.

  1. Band gap narrowing models tested on low recombination phosphorus laser doped silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlinger, Morris; Carstens, Kai

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript discusses bandgap narrowing models for highly phosphorus doped silicon. We simulate the recombination current pre-factor J0,phos in PC1Dmod 6.2 of measured doping profiles and apply the theoretical band gap narrowing model of Schenk [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 3684 (1998)] and an empirical band gap narrowing model of Yan and Cuevas [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 044508 (2013)]. The recombination current pre-factor of unpassivated and passivated samples measured by the photo conductance measurement and simulated J0,phos agrees well, when the band gap narrowing model of Yan and Cuevas is applied. With the band gap narrowing model of Schenk, the simulation cannot reproduce the measured J0,phos. Furthermore, the recombination current pre-factor of our phosphorus laser doped silicon samples are comparable with furnace diffused samples. There is no indication of recombination active defects, thus no laser induced defects in the diffused volume.

  2. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-05

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  3. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  4. Valence band structure of strained Si/(111)Si1-xGex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The strained Si techique has been widely adopted in the high-speed and high-performance devices and circuits. Based on the valence band E-k relations of strained Si/(111)Si1-xGex, the valence band and hole effective mass along the [111] and [-110] directions were obtained in this work. In comparison with the relaxed Si, the valence band edge degeneracy was partially lifted, and the significant change was observed band structures along the [111] and [-110] directions, as well as in its corresponding hole effective masses with the increasing Ge fraction. The results obtained can provide valuable references to the investigation concerning the Si-based strained devices enhancement and the conduction channel design related to stress and orientation.

  5. Summary and Analysis of the U.S. Government Bat Banding Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the U.S. Government Bat Banding Program (BBP) from 1932 to 1972. More than 2 million bands were issued during the program, of which approximately 1.5 million bands were applied to 36 bat species by scientists in many locations in North America including the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Central America. Throughout the BBP, banders noticed numerous and deleterious effects on bats, leading to a moratorium on bat banding by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and a resolution to cease banding by the American Society of Mammalogists in 1973. One of the main points of the memorandum written to justify the moratorium was to conduct a 'detailed evaluation of the files of the bat-banding program.' However, a critical and detailed evaluation of the BBP was never completed. In an effort to satisfy this need, I compiled a detailed history of the BBP by examining the files and conducting a literature review on bat banding activities during the program. I also provided a case study in managing data and applying current mark-recapture theory to estimate survival using the information from a series of bat bands issued to Clyde M. Senger during the BBP. The majority of bands applied by Senger were to Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii), a species of special concern for many states within its geographic range. I developed a database management system for the bat banding records and then analyzed and modeled survival of hibernating Townsend's big-eared bats at three main locations in Washington State using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) open models and the modeling capabilities of Program MARK. This analysis of a select dataset in the BBP files provided relatively precise estimates of survival for wintering Townsend's big-eared bats. However, this dataset is unique due to its well-maintained and complete state and because there were high recapture rates over the course of banding; it is doubtful that other unpublished datasets of the same quality exist

  6. Deformation bands evolving from dilation to cementation bands in a hydrocarbon reservoir (Vienna Basin, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Ulrike; Kaiser, Jasmin; Gier, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    In this study we analyzed five core samples from a hydrocarbon reservoir, the Matzen Field in the Vienna Basin (Austria). Deformation bands occur as single bands or as strands of several bands. In contrast to most published examples of deformation bands in terrigeneous sandstones, the reduction of porosity is predominantly caused by the precipitation of Fe-rich dolomite cement within the bands, and only subordinately by cataclasis of detrital grains. The chemical composition of this dolomite cement (10–12 wt% FeO) differs from detrital dolomite grains in the host rock (<2 wt% FeO). This observation in combination with stable isotope data suggests that the cement is not derived from the detrital grains, but precipitated from a fluid from an external, non-meteoric source. After an initial increase of porosity by dilation, disaggregation and fragmentation of detrital grains, a Fe-rich carbonate fluid crystallized within the bands, thereby reducing the porosity relative to the host sediment. The retention of pyrite cement by these cementation bands as well as the different degree of oil staining on either side of the bands demonstrate that these cementation bands act as effective barriers to the migration of fluids and should be considered in reservoir models. PMID:26321782

  7. GelBandFitter--a computer program for analysis of closely spaced electrophoretic and immunoblotted bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, Mihail I; Greaser, Marion L; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2009-03-01

    GelBandFitter is a computer program that uses non-linear regression techniques to fit mathematical functions to densitometry profiles of protein gels. This allows for improved quantification of gels with partially overlapping and potentially asymmetric protein bands. The program can also be used to analyze immunoblots with closely spaced bands. GelBandFitter was developed in Matlab and the source code and/or a Windows executable file can be downloaded at no cost to academic users from http://www.gelbandfitter.org.

  8. The 30-band k ṡ p theory of valley splitting in silicon thin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čukarić, Nemanja A.; Partoens, Bart; Tadić, Milan Ž.; Arsoski, Vladimir V.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-05-01

    The valley splitting of the conduction-band states in a thin silicon-on-insulator layer is investigated using the 30-band k ṡ p theory. The system composed of a few nm thick \\text{Si} layer embedded within thick SiO2 layers is analyzed. The valley split states are found to cross periodically with increasing quantum well width, and therefore the energy splitting is an oscillatory function of the quantum well width, with period determined by the wave vector K 0 of the conduction band minimum. Because the valley split states are classified by parity, the optical transition between the ground hole state and one of those valley split conduction band states is forbidden. The oscillations in the valley splitting energy decrease with electric field and with smoothing of the composition profile between the well and the barrier by diffusion of oxygen from the SiO2 layers to the Si quantum well. Such a smoothing also leads to a decrease of the interband transition matrix elements. The obtained results are well parametrized by the effective two-valley model, but are found to disagree from previous 30-band calculations. This discrepancy could be traced back to the fact that the basis for the numerical solution of the eigenproblem must be restricted to the first Brillouin zone in order to obtain quantitatively correct results for the valley splitting.

  9. Broadening of effective photonic band gaps in biological chiral structures: From intrinsic narrow band gaps to broad band reflection spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, W. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Solis, Á.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.

    2015-09-01

    Under normal illumination with non-polarized light, reflection spectra of the cuticle of golden-like and red Chrysina aurigans scarabs show a structured broad band of left-handed circularly polarized light. The polarization of the reflected light is attributed to a Bouligand-type left-handed chiral structure found through the scarab's cuticle. By considering these twisted structures as one-dimensional photonic crystals, a novel approach is developed from the dispersion relation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves traveling through chiral media, to show how the broad band characterizing these spectra arises from an intrinsic narrow photonic band gap whose spectral position moves through visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  10. Study of band bending effect in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell through Constant-Current-Discharging Voltage Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    A measurement method of constant-current-discharging voltage decay is established to characterize the band bending effect in the heterojunction of conducting glass/TiO2 for typical dye-sensitized solar cells. Furthermore, a dark-state electron transport regarding the TiO2 conduction band bending is proposed based upon the viewpoints of thermionic emission mechanism, which suggests an origin of the band bending effect in a theoretical model. This model quantitatively agrees well with our experimental results and indicates that both the Fermi level decay in TiO2 and the potential difference across the heterojunction will lead to the TiO2 conduction band bending downwards.

  11. Electronic Band Structure of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides from Ab Initio and Slater–Koster Tight-Binding Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ángel Silva-Guillén

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides present a complex electronic band structure with a rich orbital contribution to their valence and conduction bands. The possibility to consider the electronic states from a tight-binding model is highly useful for the calculation of many physical properties, for which first principle calculations are more demanding in computational terms when having a large number of atoms. Here, we present a set of Slater–Koster parameters for a tight-binding model that accurately reproduce the structure and the orbital character of the valence and conduction bands of single layer MX 2 , where M = Mo, W and X = S, Se. The fit of the analytical tight-binding Hamiltonian is done based on band structure from ab initio calculations. The model is used to calculate the optical conductivity of the different compounds from the Kubo formula.

  12. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  13. Collective Band Structures in Neutron-Rich 108Mo Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Huai-Bo; WANG Jian-Guo; XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; J. H. Hamilton; A. V. Ramayya; J. K. Hwang; Y. X. Luo; J. O. Rasmussen; I. Y. Lee; CHE Xing-Lai

    2007-01-01

    High spin states in the neutron-rich 108Mo nucleus are studied by measuring prompt γ-rays following the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with a Gammasphere detector array. The ground-state band is confirmed, and the one-phonon γ-vibrational band is updated with spin up to 12 h. A new collective band with the band head level at 1422.4 keV is suggested as a two-phonon γ-vibrational band. Another new band is proposed as a two-quasi-proton excitation band. Systematic characteristics of the collective bands are discussed.

  14. Endoscopic iliotibial band release in snapping hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Raul; Munegato, Daniele; De Benedetto, Massimo; Carraro, Andrea; Bigoni, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Several open surgical techniques have been used to treat recalcitrant cases of snapping iliotibial band with varying results. Recently, endoscopic techniques have become available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the results of a modified endoscopic iliotibial band release using a longitudinal retrospective case series.
 Fifteen patients (three men and 12 women) with symptomatic external snapping hip were treated with an endoscopic release of the iliotibial band. The average age was 25 years (range 16-37 years). The procedure was performed in the lateral decubitus position using two portals; the iliotibial band was transversally released using a radiofrequency hook probe. The mean follow-up period was 33.8 months (range 12-84 months).
 The snapping phenomenon was overcome in all the patients. The mean pre-op pain VAS score was 5.5 mm (range 5-7 mm) and the mean post-op pain VAS score was 0.53 mm (range 0-2 mm) with a statistically significant reduction with respect to the preoperative value (piliotibial band release is a safe and reproducible technique with excellent results in terms of snapping phenomenon resolution, patient satisfaction, and return to previous level of activity. After strenuous sporting activities 40% of patients complained of very slight pain.

  15. Automated coregistration of MTI spectral bands.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, J. P. (James P.); Galbraith, A. E. (Amy E.); Pope, P. A. (Paul A.); Ramsey, K. A. (Keri A.); Szymanski, J. J. (John J.)

    2002-01-01

    In the focal plane of a pushbroom imager, a linear array of pixels is scanned across the scene, building up the image one row at a time. For the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), each of fifteen different spectral bands has its own linear array. These arrays are pushed across the scene together, but since each band's array is at a different position on the focal plane, a separate image is produced for each band. The standard MTI data products resample these separate images to a common grid and produce coregistered multispectral image cubes. The coregistration software employs a direct 'dead reckoning' approach. Every pixel in the calibrated image is mapped to an absolute position on the surface of the earth, and these are resampled to produce an undistorted coregistered image of the scene. To do this requires extensive information regarding the satellite position and pointing as a function of time, the precise configuration of the focal plane, and the distortion due to the optics. These must be combined with knowledge about the position and altitude of the target on the rotating ellipsoidal earth. We will discuss the direct approach to MTI coregistration, as well as more recent attempts to 'tweak' the precision of the band-to-band registration using correlations in the imagery itself.

  16. Mesoscopic colonization of a spectral band

    CERN Document Server

    Bertola, M; Mo, M Y

    2009-01-01

    We consider the unitary matrix model in the limit where the size of the matrices become infinite and in the critical situation when a new spectral band is about to emerge. In previous works the number of expected eigenvalues in a neighborhood of the band was fixed and finite, a situation that was termed "birth of a cut" or "first colonization". We now consider the transitional regime where this microscopic population in the new band grows without bounds but at a slower rate than the size of the matrix. The local population in the new band organizes in a "mesoscopic" regime, in between the macroscopic behavior of the full system and the previously studied microscopic one. The mesoscopic colony may form a finite number of new bands, with a maximum number dictated by the degree of criticality of the original potential. We describe the delicate scaling limit that realizes/controls the mesoscopic colony. The method we use is the steepest descent analysis of the Riemann-Hilbert problem that is satisfied by the asso...

  17. Dielectric relaxation and hopping conduction in reduced graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guidan; Yu, Ji; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2016-06-01

    Graphite oxide reduced by sodium borohydride was characterised and its electrical conduction investigated with impedance spectroscopy. Thermal dependence of electrical modulus (instead of permittivity, its inverse) was calculated from complex impedance spectra, an approach that prevents any peak in dielectric loss (imaginary component) from being swarmed by large dc conductivity. Two loss peaks appeared at each tested frequency, in a sample of either degree of reduction. The set of weaker peak should arise from the relaxation of some polar bonds, as proposed earlier by us. The stronger loss peaks may correspond to the hopping of conduction electrons; variable range hopping is also consistent with the observed thermal dependence of conductivity. However, nearer ambient temperature there is a change in mechanism, to band transport, with an activation energy of fairly similar values as derived from both loss peaks and conductivity.

  18. Electrical Conductivity of HgTe at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Su, C.-H.; Scripa, R. N.

    2004-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of HgTe was measured using a rotating magnetic field method from 300 K to the melting point (943 K). A microscopic theory for electrical conduction was used to calculate the expected temperature dependence of the HgTe conductivity. A comparison between the measured and calculated conductivities was used to obtain the estimates of the temperature dependence of Gamma(sub 6)-Gamma(sub 8) energy gap from 300 K to 943 K. The estimated temperature coefficient for the energy gap was comparable to the previous results at lower temperatures (less than or equal to 300 K). A rapid increase in the conductivity just above 300 K and a subsequent decrease at 500 K is attributed to band crossover effects. This paper describes the experimental approach and some of the theoretical calculation details.

  19. Communication: Band bending at the interface in polyethylene-MgO nanocomposite dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubyshkina, Elena; Unge, Mikael; Jonsson, B. L. G.

    2017-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposite dielectrics are promising materials for electrical insulation in high voltage applications. However, the physics behind their performance is not yet fully understood. We use density functional theory to investigate the electronic properties of the interfacial area in magnesium oxide-polyethylene nanocomposite. Our results demonstrate polyethylene conduction band matching with conduction bands of different surfaces of magnesium oxide. Such band bending results in long range potential wells of up to 2.6 eV deep. Furthermore, the fundamental influence of silicon treatment on magnesium oxide surface properties is assessed. We report a reduction of the surface-induced states at the silicon-treated interface. The simulations provide information used to propose a new model for charge trapping in nanocomposite dielectrics.

  20. Dissepiments, density bands and signatures of thermal stress in Porites skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Thomas M.; Cohen, Anne L.

    2017-09-01

    The skeletons of many reef-building corals are accreted with rhythmic structural patterns that serve as valuable sclerochronometers. Annual high- and low-density band couplets, visible in X-radiographs or computed tomography scans, are used to construct age models for paleoclimate reconstructions and to track variability in coral growth over time. In some corals, discrete, anomalously high-density bands, called "stress bands," preserve information about coral bleaching. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation of coral skeletal density banding remain unclear. Dissepiments—thin, horizontal sheets of calcium carbonate accreted by the coral to support the living polyp—play a key role in the upward growth of the colony. Here, we first conducted a vital staining experiment to test whether dissepiments were accreted with lunar periodicity in Porites coral skeleton, as previously hypothesized. Over 6, 15, and 21 months, dissepiments consistently formed in a 1:1 ratio to the number of full moons elapsed over each study period. We measured dissepiment spacing to reconstruct multiple years of monthly skeletal extension rates in two Porites colonies from Palmyra Atoll and in another from Palau that bleached in 1998 under anomalously high sea temperatures. Spacing between successive dissepiments exhibited strong seasonality in corals containing annual density bands, with narrow (wide) spacing associated with high (low) density, respectively. A high-density "stress band" accreted during the 1998 bleaching event was associated with anomalously low dissepiment spacing and missed dissepiments, implying that thermal stress disrupts skeletal extension. Further, uranium/calcium ratios increased within stress bands, indicating a reduction in the carbonate ion concentration of the coral's calcifying fluid under stress. Our study verifies the lunar periodicity of dissepiments, provides a mechanistic basis for the formation of annual density bands in Porites, and reveals the

  1. Composition dependent band offsets of ZnO and its ternary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haitao; Chen, Junli; Wang, Yin; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    We report the calculated fundamental band gaps of wurtzite ternary alloys Zn1−xMxO (M = Mg, Cd) and the band offsets of the ZnO/Zn1−xMxO heterojunctions, these II-VI materials are important for electronics and optoelectronics. Our calculation is based on density functional theory within the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) approach where the modified Becke-Johnson (MBJ) semi-local exchange is used to accurately produce the band gaps, and the coherent potential approximation (CPA) is applied to deal with configurational average for the ternary alloys. The combined LMTO-MBJ-CPA approach allows one to simultaneously determine both the conduction band and valence band offsets of the heterojunctions. The calculated band gap data of the ZnO alloys scale as Eg = 3.35 + 2.33x and Eg = 3.36 − 2.33x + 1.77x2 for Zn1−xMgxO and Zn1−xCdxO, respectively, where x being the impurity concentration. These scaling as well as the composition dependent band offsets are quantitatively compared to the available experimental data. The capability of predicting the band parameters and band alignments of ZnO and its ternary alloys with the LMTO-CPA-MBJ approach indicate the promising application of this method in the design of emerging electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:28134298

  2. Topological flat bands from dipolar spin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N Y; Laumann, C R; Gorshkov, A V; Bennett, S D; Demler, E; Zoller, P; Lukin, M D

    2012-12-28

    We propose and analyze a physical system that naturally admits two-dimensional topological nearly flat bands. Our approach utilizes an array of three-level dipoles (effective S=1 spins) driven by inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields. The dipolar interactions produce arbitrary uniform background gauge fields for an effective collection of conserved hard-core bosons, namely, the dressed spin flips. These gauge fields result in topological band structures, whose band gap can be larger than the corresponding bandwidth. Exact diagonalization of the full interacting Hamiltonian at half-filling reveals the existence of superfluid, crystalline, and supersolid phases. An experimental realization using either ultracold polar molecules or spins in the solid state is considered.

  3. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A.; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-01

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors.

  4. Three Magnetic Rotation Bands in 84^Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Shuifa; Han, Guangbing; Wen, Shuxian; Yan, Yupeng; Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Lihua; He, Chuangye; Li, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    High-spin states in $^{84}$Rb are studied by using the $^{70}$Zn($^{18}$O, p3n)$^{84}$Rb reaction at beam energy of 75 MeV. Three high-lying negative-parity bands are established, whose level spacings are very regular, i.e., there don't exist signature splitting. The dipole character of the transitions of these three bands is assigned by the $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ directional correlations of oriented states (DCO) intensity ratios and the multipolarity M1 is suggested by the analogy to multiparticle excitations in neighboring nuclei. The strong M1 and weak or no E2 transitions are observed. All these characteristic features show they are magnetic rotation bands.

  5. Photonic band gap in thin wire metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Kai Meng

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the band structure of a class of photonic crystals made from only thin wires. Using a different method, we demonstrate that a complete photonic band gap is possible for such materials. Band gap materials normally consist of space filling dielectric or metal, whereas thin wires occupy a very small fraction of the volume. We show that this is related to the large increase in scattering at the Brillouin zone boundary. The method we developed brings together the calculation techniques in three different fields. The first is the calculation of scattering from periodic, tilted antennas, which we improve upon. The second is the standard technique for frequency selective surface design. The third is obtained directly from low energy electron diffraction theory. Good agreements with experiments for left handed materials, negative materials, and frequency selective surfaces are demonstrated.

  6. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  7. Simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data

    KAUST Repository

    López-Pintado, Sara

    2014-03-05

    We propose notions of simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data that extend the univariate functional band depth. The proposed simplicial band depths provide simple and natural criteria to measure the centrality of a trajectory within a sample of curves. Based on these depths, a sample of multivariate curves can be ordered from the center outward and order statistics can be defined. Properties of the proposed depths, such as invariance and consistency, can be established. A simulation study shows the robustness of this new definition of depth and the advantages of using a multivariate depth versus the marginal depths for detecting outliers. Real data examples from growth curves and signature data are used to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed depths. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  8. The electrical conductivity and surface conduction of consolidated rock cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2007-05-15

    A fully computerized high-pressure and high-temperature core holder device is simultaneously used to determine the electrical conductivity, zeta potential, and surface conductivity of consolidated rock cores in aqueous and nonaqueous systems. The total electrical conductivity of rock cores was determined by coupling streaming current and potential measurements. This shows that neglecting the surface conductivity Ksigma is crucial to converting the streaming potential into zeta potentials. It is observed that plots of the core total conductivity as a function of the electrolyte conductivity KL exhibit two behaviors. At low ionic strength, the core conductivity clearly depends on the contribution of surface conductivity behind the slip plane, whereas at higher ionic strength, the magnitude of the surface conductivity becomes negligible. The electrical conductivity of rock cores was found to be in good agreement with the O'Brien theory and the Briggs method. The contribution of the stagnant layer to the surface conductivity in nonaqueous systems has been shown to be significant. This shows that the stagnant layer displays significantly different behavior in different nonaqueous systems, depending on the core porosity and the double-layer overlap. The results indicate that the application of electrokinetics in petroleum reservoirs can provide important insights into reservoir fluid flow characterization.

  9. Energy-banded ions in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Badman, S. V.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kivelson, M. G.; Kurth, W. S.

    2017-05-01

    Using data from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer ion mass spectrometer, we report the first observation of energy-banded ions at Saturn. Observed near midnight at relatively high magnetic latitudes, the banded ions are dominantly H+, and they occupy the range of energies typically associated with the thermal pickup distribution in the inner magnetosphere (L distance (or time or decreasing latitude). Their pitch angle distribution suggests a source at low (or slightly southern) latitudes. The band energies, including their pitch angle dependence, are consistent with a bounce-resonant interaction between thermal H+ ions and the standing wave structure of a field line resonance. There is additional evidence in the pitch angle dependence of the band energies that the particles in each band may have a common time of flight from their most recent interaction with the wave, which may have been at slightly southern latitudes. Thus, while the particles are basically bounce resonant, their energization may be dominated by their most recent encounter with the standing wave.Plain Language SummaryDuring an outbound passage by the Cassini spacecraft through Saturn's inner magnetosphere, ion energy distributions were observed that featured discrete flux peaks at regularly spaced energies. The peaks persisted over several hours and several Saturn radii of distance away from the planet. We show that these "bands" of ions are plausibly the result of an interaction between the Saturnian plasma and standing waves that form along the magnetospheric magnetic field lines. These observations are the first reported evidence that such standing waves may be present in the inner magnetosphere, where they could contribute to the radial transport of Saturn's radiation belt particles.

  10. Band selection study for SMILES-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Mizuno, Akira; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Submillimeter limb sounding is very useful technique to investigate Earth's middle atmosphere since it can measure both reactive minor species (ClO, BrO, HO¬2, etc) and stable species (O3, HCl, etc) at day/night conditions as already established by UARS/MLS, Odin/SMR, and Aura/MLS. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES) was the first instrument to use 4K cooled SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detection system for the limb sounding of the atmosphere in the frequency regions 625 GHz (Bands A and B) and 650 GHz (Band C) [1]. It has demonstrated its very high sensitivity (System Temperature, Tsys ~250K) for measuring stratospheric and mesospheric species, O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, and O3 isotopes from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010 [2-5]. Since SMILES operation has terminated after only 6 months operation due to failure of sub-mm local oscillator (and later 4K cooler system), there exist strong scientific demand to develop successor of SMILES, the SMILES-2, which has optimized and enhanced frequency coverage to observe: (a) BrO and HOCl without interferences of stronger emission lines, (b) N2O, H2O, NO2, and CH3Cl not covered by the SMILES frequency regions, and (c) O2 line to measure temperature. This paper discusses possible SMILES-2 band selection considering limited instrument resources (number of SIS mixers and sub-mm local oscillator) and scientific requirements. This paper describes current status of SMILES-2 band selection study; (1) known issues of SMILES observations, (2) SMILES-2 scientific requirements, (3) methods of band selection study, (4) temperature, horizontal wind speed, H2O sensitivity study, (5) BrO and HOCl line selection, and (6) current band selection and possible instrument design.

  11. Fuzzy Riesz subspaces, fuzzy ideals, fuzzy bands and fuzzy band projections

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Fuzzy ordered linear spaces, Riesz spaces, fuzzy Archimedean spaces and $\\sigma$-complete fuzzy Riesz spaces were defined and studied in several works. Following the efforts along this line, we define fuzzy Riesz subspaces, fuzzy ideals, fuzzy bands and fuzzy band projections and establish their fundamental properties.

  12. Research and development report. Digital audio broadcasting: Comparison of coverage at Band 2 and Band 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, I. R.; Doherty, P. J.; Maddocks, M. C. D.

    A Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) system capable of reliable reception in vehicles and portables has been developed by the EUREKA 147 project. This report describes a set of experiments performed to compare the coverage area when radiating a DAB signal of equal power in Band 2 and Band 3.

  13. Conductivity effect in electrorheological fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Yu; WEN; Shizhu; MENG; Yonggang

    2004-01-01

    Based on conduction model and cubic particle model, the relationship between current density and shear yield stress of electrorheological (ER) fluids was calculated and compared with some reported experimental results. The conductivity of the insulating oils is found to have been changed by the mixed particles. Several ways to decrease insulating liquid conductivity and increase the conductivity ratio of ER fluids have been proposed to prepare ER fluids with high shear yield stresses but low current densities.

  14. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF METALLIC WIRES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU XIANG; GU JI-HUA; CHU JUN-HAO

    2001-01-01

    The effect of radial thickness on the thermal conductivity of a free standing wire is investigated. The thermal conductivity is evaluated using the Boltzmann equation. A simple expression for the reduction in conductivity due to the increase of boundary scattering is presented. A comparison is made between the experimental results of indium wires and the theoretical calculations. It is shown that this decrease of conductivity in wires is smaller than that in film where heat flux is perpendicular to the surface.

  15. Innovative solutions for iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericson, M; Guillet, M; Debenedictis, L

    2000-02-01

    Though recognizing the sharp, burning lateral knee pain of iliotibial band syndrome isn't difficult, treating the condition can be a challenge because underlying myofascial restrictions can significantly contribute to the patient's pain and disability. The physical exam should include a thorough evaluation to identify tender trigger points as well as tenderness and possible swelling at the distal iliotibial band. After acute symptoms are alleviated with activity restriction and modalities, problematic trigger points can be managed with massage therapy or other treatments. A stepwise stretching and strengthening program can expedite patients' return to running.

  16. Inversion of band patterns in spherical tumblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengfei; Lochman, Bryan J; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2009-04-10

    Bidisperse granular mixtures in spherical tumblers segregate into three bands: one at each pole and one at the equator. For low fill levels, large particles are at the equator; for high fill levels, the opposite occurs. Segregation is robust, though the transition depends on fill level, particle size, and rotational speed. Discrete element method simulations reproduce surface patterns and reveal internal structures. Particle trajectories show that small particles flow farther toward the poles than large particles in the upstream portion of the flowing layer for low fill levels leading to a band of small particles at each pole. The opposite occurs for high fill levels, though more slowly.

  17. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...... periodic plate using Bloch theory, which conveniently reduces the maximization problem to that of a single base cell. Secondly, we construct a finite periodic plate using a number of the optimized base cells in a postprocessed version. The dynamic properties of the finite plate are investigated...

  18. Proximal iliotibial band syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Guadagnini Falotico

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The overuse injuries in the hip joint occur commonly in sports practitioners and currently due to technical advances in diagnostic imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, are often misdiagnosed. Recently, a group of people were reported, all female, with pain and swelling in the pelvic region.T2-weighted MRI showed increased signal in the enthesis of the iliotibial band (ITB along the lower border of the iliac tubercle. We report a case of a 34 year old woman, non-professional runner, with pain at the iliac crest with no history of trauma and whose MRI was compatible with the proximal iliotibial band syndrome.

  19. Diffuse Interstellar Bands and Their Families

    CERN Document Server

    Wszolek, B

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) still await an explanation. One expects that some progress in this field will be possible when all the known DIBs are divided into families in such a way that only one carrier is responsible for all bands belonging to the given family. Analysing high resolution optical spectra of reddened stars we try to find out spectroscopic families for two prominent DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 angstroms. Among the DIBs, observed in the spectral range from 5590 to 6830 angstroms, we have found 8 candidates to belong to 5780 spectroscopic family and the other 12 DIBs candidating to family of 5797 structure.

  20. Shear banding phenomena in a Laponite suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Ianni, F; Gentilini, S; Ruocco, G

    2007-01-01

    Shear localization in an aqueous clay suspension of Laponite is investigated through dynamic light scattering, which provides access both to the dynamics of the system (homodyne mode) and to the local velocity profile (heterodyne mode). When the shear bands form, a relaxation of the dynamics typical of a gel phase is observed in the unsheared band soon after flow stop, suggesting that an arrested dynamics is present during the shear localization regime. Periodic oscillations of the flow behavior, typical of a stick-slip phenomenon, are also observed when shear localization occurs. Both results are discussed in the light of various theoretical models for soft glassy materials.