WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonoverlapping autosomal inversions

  1. Nonoverlap Property of the Thue-Morse Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    Fibonacci Numbers & Applic. 2010. 14. ABSTRACT In this note, we provide a new proof for the nonoverlap property of the Thue- Morse sequence using a...Nonoverlap Property of the Thue-Morse Sequence T.W. Cusicka, P. Stănicăb aDepartment of Mathematics, The State University of New York Buffalo, NY...2010 Abstract In this note, we provide a new proof for the nonoverlap property of the Thue- Morse sequence using a Boolean functions approach and

  2. A NONOVERLAPPING DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHOD FOR EXTERIOR 3-D PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-hao Yu; Ji-ming Wu; Ji-ming Wu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a nonoverlapping domain decomposition method, which is based on the natural boundary reduction(cf. [4, 13, 15]), is developed to solve the boundary value problem in exterior three-dimensional domain of general shape. Convergence analyses both for the exterior spherical domain and the general exterior domain are made. Some numerical examples are also provided to illustrate the method.

  3. A PARALLEL NONOVERLAPPING DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHOD FOR STOKES PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-qun Jiang; Pei-liang Dai

    2006-01-01

    A nonoverlapping domain decomposition iterative procedure is developed and analyzed for generalized Stokes problems and their finite element approximate problems in RN(N=2,3). The method is based on a mixed-type consistency condition with two parameters as a transmission condition together with a derivative-free transmission data updating technique on the artificial interfaces. The method can be applied to a general multi-subdomain decomposition and implemented on parallel machines with local simple communications naturally.

  4. Gate current modeling and optimal design of nanoscale non-overlapped gate to source/drain MOSFET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashwani K.Rana; Narottam Chand; Vinod Kapoor

    2011-01-01

    A novel nanoscale MOSFET with a source/drain-to-gate non-overlapped and high-k spacer structure has been demonstrated to reduce the gate leakage current for the first time.The gate leakage behaviour of the novel MOSFET structure has been investigated with the help of a compact analytical model and Sentaurus simulation.A fringing gate electric field through the dielectric spacer induces an inversion layer in the non-overlap region to act as an extended S/D (source/drain) region.It is found that an optimal source/drain-to-gate non-overlapped and high-k spacer structure has reduced the gate leakage current to a great extent as compared to those of an overlapped structure.Further,the proposed structure had improved off current,subthreshold slope and drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) characteristics.It is concluded that this structure solves the problem of high leakage current without introducing extra series resistance.

  5. Non-overlapping domain decomposition methods in structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gosselet, Pierre; 10.1007/BF02905857

    2012-01-01

    The modern design of industrial structures leads to very complex simulations characterized by nonlinearities, high heterogeneities, tortuous geometries... Whatever the modelization may be, such an analysis leads to the solution to a family of large ill-conditioned linear systems. In this paper we study strategies to efficiently solve to linear system based on non-overlapping domain decomposition methods. We present a review of most employed approaches and their strong connections. We outline their mechanical interpretations as well as the practical issues when willing to implement and use them. Numerical properties are illustrated by various assessments from academic to industrial problems. An hybrid approach, mainly designed for multifield problems, is also introduced as it provides a general framework of such approaches.

  6. Diffusion in the two-dimensional nonoverlapping Lorentz gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Corinne P.; Evans, Glenn T.

    1987-10-01

    The self-diffusion coefficient, velocity autocorrelation function, and distribution of collision times for a two-dimensional nonoverlapping Lorentz gas were calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. The systems studied covered a range of densities, from a packing fraction (πNr2/L2) of 0.01 to 0.8. Self-diffusion coefficients were found to agree to all densities with kinetic theory predictions [A. Weijland and J. M. J. van Leeuwen, Physica 38, 35 (1968)] if the radial distribution function (rdf) was taken into account. The density dependence of the decay of the velocity autocorrelation function was qualitatively different from that predicted by kinetic theory. The distribution of collision times was nearly exponential for all but the highest density studied.

  7. Interpersonal perception and metaperception in nonoverlapping social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, T E; Albright, L; Kenny, D A; Agatstein, F; Winquist, L

    1997-02-01

    Consensus, self-other agreement, and meta-accuracy were studied within and across nonoverlapping social groups. Thirty-one target persons were judged on the Big Five factors by 9 informants: 3 family members, 3 friends, and 3 coworkers. Although well acquainted within groups, informants were unacquainted between groups. A social relations analysis conducted within each social group showed reliable consensus on the Big Five personality factors. A model specified to estimate the consistency of a target person's effect on perceptions by others across social groups showed weaker agreement across groups. That is, targets were perceived consensually within groups, but these consensual perceptions differed between groups. The data suggest that personality and identity are context specific; however, there was some evidence of agreement in perceptions across groups.

  8. Autosomal dominant lamellar ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, J; Fernández Redondo, V; Peteiro, C; Zulaica, A; Fabeiro, J M

    1986-08-01

    Five members of two generations of one family were affected with lamellar ichthyosis, suggesting autosomal dominant transmission. The clinical and histopathological characteristics of the cases described here are similar to those reported by Traupe et al. (1984) as autosomal dominant lamellar ichthyosis and thus confirm the existence of this new form of ichthyosis.

  9. A Simple Method to Control Positive Baseline Trend within Data Nonoverlap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard I.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Davis, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Nonoverlap is widely used as a statistical summary of data; however, these analyses rarely correct unwanted positive baseline trend. This article presents and validates the graph rotation for overlap and trend (GROT) technique, a hand calculation method for controlling positive baseline trend within an analysis of data nonoverlap. GROT is…

  10. Packing of nonoverlapping cubic particles: Computational algorithms and microstructural characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmir, Hessam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi

    2016-12-01

    Packing of cubic particles arises in a variety of problems, ranging from biological materials to colloids and the fabrication of new types of porous materials with controlled morphology. The properties of such packings may also be relevant to problems involving suspensions of cubic zeolites, precipitation of salt crystals during CO_{2} sequestration in rock, and intrusion of fresh water in aquifers by saline water. Not much is known, however, about the structure and statistical descriptors of such packings. We present a detailed simulation and microstructural characterization of packings of nonoverlapping monodisperse cubic particles, following up on our preliminary results [H. Malmir et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 35024 (2016)2045-232210.1038/srep35024]. A modification of the random sequential addition (RSA) algorithm has been developed to generate such packings, and a variety of microstructural descriptors, including the radial distribution function, the face-normal correlation function, two-point probability and cluster functions, the lineal-path function, the pore-size distribution function, and surface-surface and surface-void correlation functions, have been computed, along with the specific surface and mean chord length of the packings. The results indicate the existence of both spatial and orientational long-range order as the the packing density increases. The maximum packing fraction achievable with the RSA method is about 0.57, which represents the limit for a structure similar to liquid crystals.

  11. Packing of nonoverlapping cubic particles: Computational algorithms and microstructural characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmir, Hessam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi

    2016-12-01

    Packing of cubic particles arises in a variety of problems, ranging from biological materials to colloids and the fabrication of new types of porous materials with controlled morphology. The properties of such packings may also be relevant to problems involving suspensions of cubic zeolites, precipitation of salt crystals during CO2 sequestration in rock, and intrusion of fresh water in aquifers by saline water. Not much is known, however, about the structure and statistical descriptors of such packings. We present a detailed simulation and microstructural characterization of packings of nonoverlapping monodisperse cubic particles, following up on our preliminary results [H. Malmir et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 35024 (2016), 10.1038/srep35024]. A modification of the random sequential addition (RSA) algorithm has been developed to generate such packings, and a variety of microstructural descriptors, including the radial distribution function, the face-normal correlation function, two-point probability and cluster functions, the lineal-path function, the pore-size distribution function, and surface-surface and surface-void correlation functions, have been computed, along with the specific surface and mean chord length of the packings. The results indicate the existence of both spatial and orientational long-range order as the the packing density increases. The maximum packing fraction achievable with the RSA method is about 0.57, which represents the limit for a structure similar to liquid crystals.

  12. [Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V; Penkova, S; Lalev, I

    1990-01-01

    A case of a 22 years old woman with autosomal-recessive form of kidney polycystosis is presented. The diagnosis was made in early childhood. A combination of renal anomaly and hepatic fibrosis with manifestations of portal hypertension was present. No deviations from the other internal organs were found. At the age of 12 she entered into the stage of chronic renal failure. The last five years she is on dialysis treatment. She had survived several acute bleedings from esophageal varices. The authors are of the opinion that the case is of interest since patients with autosomal-recessive renal polycystosis very rarely reach majority.

  13. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Jens; Henriksen, Kim; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk

    2013-01-01

    Systematic studies of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO) were followed by the identification of underlying mutations giving unique possibilities to perform translational studies. What was previously designated ADO1 turned out to be a high bone mass phenotype caused by a missense mutation...

  14. Non-overlapped random decrement technique for parameter identification in operational modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Song, H. W.

    2016-03-01

    The random decrement technique (RDT) is used to estimate free vibration response from output data generated by Gaussian white noise. The principle is to decay the excitation via averaging of segments in output data. With RDT, the triggering condition for determining the initial points of segments causes overlap during averaging; the consequence is a residual excitation, peaking at the first natural frequency. This paper presents a modified RDT with non-overlapped segments to eliminate this peak. Numerical comparison between non-overlapped RDT (NRDT) and RDT shows the accuracy improvement of damping. However, time history data is sometimes not long enough in NRDT, which results in an inevitable overlap. In order to keep the accuracy of NRDT, the first natural period is viewed as the critical length between adjacent initial points to distinguish the inevitable overlap from that in RDT.

  15. NACS: non-overlapping AP's caching scheme to reduce handoff in 802.11 wireless LAN

    CERN Document Server

    Tariq, Usman; Hong, Man-Pyo

    2011-01-01

    With the escalation of the IEEE 802.11 based wireless networks, voice over IP and analogous applications are also used over wireless networks. Recently, the wireless LAN systems are spaciously deployed for public Internet services. In public wireless LAN systems, reliable user authentication and mobility support are indispensable issues. When a mobile device budges out the range of one access point (AP) and endeavor to connect to new AP, it performs handoff. Contemporarily, PNC and SNC were proposed to propagate the MN context to the entire neighboring AP's on the wireless network with the help of neighbor graph. In this paper, we proposed a non-overlapping AP's caching scheme (NACS), which propagates the mobile node context to those AP's which do not overlap with the current AP. To capture the topology of non-overlapping AP's in the wireless network, non-overlapping graph (NOG) is generated at each AP. Simulation results shows that NACS reduces the signaling cost of propagating the MN context to the neighbor...

  16. Autosomal recessive epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaleh, Q A; Teebi, A S

    1990-08-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of disorders. Epidermolytic PPK is a well delineated autosomal dominant entity, but no recessive form is known. Here we report two sons of phenotypically normal, consanguineous, Arab parents with features suggestive of PPK. They presented with patchy eczematous skin lesions followed by PPK and raised serum levels of IgE. Skin biopsy from the keratotic lesions showed the features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Autosomal recessive inheritance is suggested and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  17. Perceived Non-Overlap of Objects in an Audiovisual Stream/Bounce Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuke Kawachi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In a stream/bounce display in which two identical visual objects move toward each other, coincide (completely overlap, and then move apart, the objects can be perceived as either streaming through or bouncing off each other. Despite the perceptual ambiguity in this display, the streaming percept is dominant. However, a sound burst presented at the time that the objects coincide facilitates the bouncing percept. Herein, we report a perceptual phenomenon in which the overlap between objects is illusorily perceived as a non-overlap in the stream/bounce display accompanied with sound. In the experiment, the amount of overlap between two objects was systematically manipulated in the presence/absence of a sound. Observers were asked to judge whether the two objects overlapped with each other and then asked whether the objects appeared to stream through or bounce off each other. The results were consistent with those of previous studies showing that sound promoted the bouncing percept. Most importantly, the sound presentation facilitated the perception of a non-overlap between the objects instead of a physical overlap, suggesting that the momentary overlap was inadequately perceived. We discuss the possibility that an abrupt sound temporally interrupts visual processing such as the formation of dynamic object representations.

  18. On the convergence rate of a parallel nonoverlapping domain decomposition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years,a nonoverlapping domain decomposition iterative procedure,which is based on using Robin-type boundary conditions as information transmission conditions on the subdomain interfaces,has been developed and analyzed.It is known that the convergence rate of this method is 1-O(h),where h is mesh size.In this paper,the convergence rate is improved to be 1-O(h1/2 H-1/2)sometime by choosing suitable parameter,where H is the subdomain size.Counter examples are constructed to show that our convergence estimates are sharp,which means that the convergence rate cannot be better than 1-O(h1/2H-1/2)in a certain case no matter how parameter is chosen.

  19. Dynamic Principal Component Analysis with Nonoverlapping Moving Window and Its Applications to Epileptic EEG Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of electroencephalography (EEG is the most useful diagnostic and monitoring procedure for epilepsy study. A reliable algorithm that can be easily implemented is the key to this procedure. In this paper a novel signal feature extraction method based on dynamic principal component analysis and nonoverlapping moving window is proposed. Along with this new technique, two detection methods based on extracted sparse features are applied to deal with signal classification. The obtained results demonstrated that our proposed methodologies are able to differentiate EEGs from controls and interictal for epilepsy diagnosis and to separate EEGs from interictal and ictal for seizure detection. Our approach yields high classification accuracy for both single-channel short-term EEGs and multichannel long-term EEGs. The classification performance of the method is also compared with other state-of-the-art techniques on the same datasets and the effect of signal variability on the presented methods is also studied.

  20. Dynamic principal component analysis with nonoverlapping moving window and its applications to epileptic EEG classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shengkun; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Classification of electroencephalography (EEG) is the most useful diagnostic and monitoring procedure for epilepsy study. A reliable algorithm that can be easily implemented is the key to this procedure. In this paper a novel signal feature extraction method based on dynamic principal component analysis and nonoverlapping moving window is proposed. Along with this new technique, two detection methods based on extracted sparse features are applied to deal with signal classification. The obtained results demonstrated that our proposed methodologies are able to differentiate EEGs from controls and interictal for epilepsy diagnosis and to separate EEGs from interictal and ictal for seizure detection. Our approach yields high classification accuracy for both single-channel short-term EEGs and multichannel long-term EEGs. The classification performance of the method is also compared with other state-of-the-art techniques on the same datasets and the effect of signal variability on the presented methods is also studied.

  1. On the convergence rate of a parallel nonoverlapping domain decomposition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN LiZhen; SHI ZhongCi; XU XueJun

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a nonoverlapping domain decomposition iterative procedure, which is based on using Robin-type boundary conditions as information transmission conditions on the subdomain interfaces, has been developed and analyzed. It is known that the convergence rate of this method is 1 - O(h), where h is mesh size. In this paper, the convergence rate is improved to be 1 - O(h1/2H-1/2) sometime by choosing suitable parameter, where H is the subdomain size. Counter examples are constructed to show that our convergence estimates are sharp, which means that the convergence rate cannot be better than 1 - O(h1/2H-1/2) in a certain case no matter how parameter is chosen.

  2. Configuring compute nodes of a parallel computer in an operational group into a plurality of independent non-overlapping collective networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Inglett, Todd A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-03-02

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for configuring compute nodes of a parallel computer in an operational group into a plurality of independent non-overlapping collective networks, the compute nodes in the operational group connected together for data communications through a global combining network, that include: partitioning the compute nodes in the operational group into a plurality of non-overlapping subgroups; designating one compute node from each of the non-overlapping subgroups as a master node; and assigning, to the compute nodes in each of the non-overlapping subgroups, class routing instructions that organize the compute nodes in that non-overlapping subgroup as a collective network such that the master node is a physical root.

  3. A method for identification and analysis of non-overlapping myeloid immunophenotypes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Gustafson

    Full Text Available The development of flow cytometric biomarkers in human studies and clinical trials has been slowed by inconsistent sample processing, use of cell surface markers, and reporting of immunophenotypes. Additionally, the function(s of distinct cell types as biomarkers cannot be accurately defined without the proper identification of homogeneous populations. As such, we developed a method for the identification and analysis of human leukocyte populations by the use of eight 10-color flow cytometric protocols in combination with novel software analyses. This method utilizes un-manipulated biological sample preparation that allows for the direct quantitation of leukocytes and non-overlapping immunophenotypes. We specifically designed myeloid protocols that enable us to define distinct phenotypes that include mature monocytes, granulocytes, circulating dendritic cells, immature myeloid cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. We also identified CD123 as an additional distinguishing marker for the phenotypic characterization of immature LIN-CD33+HLA-DR- MDSCs. Our approach permits the comprehensive analysis of all peripheral blood leukocytes and yields data that is highly amenable for standardization across inter-laboratory comparisons for human studies.

  4. Nonoverlapping Clinical and Mutational Patterns in Melanomas from the Female Genital Tract and Atypical Genital Nevi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yélamos, Oriol; Merkel, Emily A; Sholl, Lauren Meldi; Zhang, Bin; Amin, Sapna M; Lee, Christina Y; Guitart, Gerta E; Yang, Jingyi; Wenzel, Alexander T; Bunick, Christopher G; Yazdan, Pedram; Choi, Jaehyuk; Gerami, Pedram

    2016-09-01

    Genital melanomas (GM) are the second most common cancer of the female external genitalia and may be confused with atypical genital nevi (AGN), which exhibit atypical histological features but have benign behavior. In this study, we compared the clinical, histological, and molecular features of 19 GM and 25 AGN. We described chromosomal copy number aberrations and the mutational status of 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in both groups. Our study showed that a pigmented lesion occurring in mucosal tissue, particularly in postmenopausal women, was more likely to be a melanoma than a nevus. GM had high levels of chromosomal instability, with many copy number aberrations. Furthermore, we found a completely nonoverlapping pattern of oncogenic mutations when comparing GM and AGN. In GM, we report somatic mutations in KIT and TP53. Conversely, AGN had frequent BRAF V600E mutations, which were not seen in any of the GM. Our results show that GM and AGN have distinct clinical and molecular changes and that GM have a different mutational pattern compared with AGN.

  5. Overlapping and non-overlapping functions of condensins I and II in neural stem cell divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nishide

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During development of the cerebral cortex, neural stem cells (NSCs divide symmetrically to proliferate and asymmetrically to generate neurons. Although faithful segregation of mitotic chromosomes is critical for NSC divisions, its fundamental mechanism remains unclear. A class of evolutionarily conserved protein complexes, known as condensins, is thought to be central to chromosome assembly and segregation among eukaryotes. Here we report the first comprehensive genetic study of mammalian condensins, demonstrating that two different types of condensin complexes (condensins I and II are both essential for NSC divisions and survival in mice. Simultaneous depletion of both condensins leads to severe defects in chromosome assembly and segregation, which in turn cause DNA damage and trigger p53-induced apoptosis. Individual depletions of condensins I and II lead to slower loss of NSCs compared to simultaneous depletion, but they display distinct mitotic defects: chromosome missegregation was observed more prominently in NSCs depleted of condensin II, whereas mitotic delays were detectable only in condensin I-depleted NSCs. Remarkably, NSCs depleted of condensin II display hyperclustering of pericentric heterochromatin and nucleoli, indicating that condensin II, but not condensin I, plays a critical role in establishing interphase nuclear architecture. Intriguingly, these defects are taken over to postmitotic neurons. Our results demonstrate that condensins I and II have overlapping and non-overlapping functions in NSCs, and also provide evolutionary insight into intricate balancing acts of the two condensin complexes.

  6. Extrinsic calibration of a non-overlapping camera network based on close-range photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuai; Shao, Xinxing; Kang, Xin; Yang, Fujun; He, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-10

    In this paper, an extrinsic calibration method for a non-overlapping camera network is presented based on close-range photogrammetry. The method does not require calibration targets or the cameras to be moved. The visual sensors are relatively motionless and do not see the same area at the same time. The proposed method combines the multiple cameras using some arbitrarily distributed encoded targets. The calibration procedure consists of three steps: reconstructing the three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of the encoded targets using a hand-held digital camera, performing the intrinsic calibration of the camera network, and calibrating the extrinsic parameters of each camera with only one image. A series of experiments, including 3D reconstruction, rotation, and translation, are employed to validate the proposed approach. The results show that the relative error for the 3D reconstruction is smaller than 0.003%, the relative errors of both rotation and translation are less than 0.066%, and the re-projection error is only 0.09 pixels.

  7. Autosomal dominant adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, Peter C.G.

    2011-01-01

    this thesis investigates a family with autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, with chapters on clinical neurology, neuropathology, neurogenetics, neurophysiology, auditory and visual aspects.

  8. Boy with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney and autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zingg-Schenk, A.; Caduff, J.; Azzarello-Burri, S.; Bergmann, C.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Neuhaus, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) shows a great phenotypic variability between patients, ranging from perinatal demise to mildly affected adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (PCLD) does not manifest in childhood. CASE-DIAGNOSIS/TREATMENT: A boy was

  9. Structurally distinct nicotine immunogens elicit antibodies with non-overlapping specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravetoni, M; Keyler, DE; Pidaparthi, RR; Carroll, FI; Runyon, SP; Murtaugh, MP; Earley, CA; Pentel, PR

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine conjugate vaccine efficacy is limited by the concentration of nicotine-specific antibodies that can be reliably generated in serum. Previous studies suggest that the concurrent use of 2 structurally distinct nicotine immunogens in rats can generate additive antibody responses by stimulating distinct B cell populations. In the current study we investigated whether it is possible to identify a third immunologically distinct nicotine immunogen. The new 1′-SNic immunogen (2S)-N,N′-(disulfanediyldiethane-2,1-diyl)bis[4-(2-pyridin-3-ylpyrrolidin-1-yl)butanamide] conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) differed from the existing immunogens 3′-AmNic-rEPA and 6-CMUNic-BSA in linker position, linker composition, conjugation chemistry, and carrier protein. Vaccination of rats with 1′-SNic-KLH elicited high concentrations of high affinity nicotine-specific antibodies. The antibodies produced in response to 1′-SNic-KLH did not appreciably cross-react in ELISA with either 3′-AmNic-rEPA or 6-CMUNic-BSA or vice-versa, showing that the B cell populations activated by each of these nicotine immunogens were non-overlapping and distinct. Nicotine retention in serum was increased and nicotine distribution to brain substantially reduced in rats vaccinated with 1′-SNic-KLH compared to controls. Effects of 1′-SNic-KLH on nicotine distribution were comparable to those of 3′-AmNic-rEPA which has progressed to late stage clinical trials as an adjunct to smoking cessation. These data show that it is possible to design multiple immunogens from a small molecule such as nicotine which elicit independent immune responses. This approach could be applicable to other addiction vaccines or small molecule targets as well. PMID:22100986

  10. Comparison of Patient Outcomes in 3725 Overlapping vs 3633 Nonoverlapping Neurosurgical Procedures Using a Single Institution's Clinical and Administrative Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Keefe, Malla; Lee, Janelle; Barba, Julio; McDermott, Michael W; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    Overlapping surgery is a common practice to improve surgical efficiency, but there are limited data on its safety. To analyze the patient outcomes of overlapping vs nonoverlapping surgeries performed by multiple neurosurgeons. Retrospective review of 7358 neurosurgical procedures, 2012 to 2015, at an urban academic hospital. Collected variables: patient age, gender, insurance, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, severity of illness, mortality risk, admission type, transfer source, procedure type, surgery date, number of cosurgeons, presence of neurosurgery resident/fellow/another attending, and overlapping vs nonoverlapping surgery. Outcomes: procedure time, length of stay, estimated blood loss, discharge location, 30-day mortality, 30-day readmission, return to operating room, acute respiratory failure, and severe sepsis. Statistics: univariate, then multivariate mixed-effect models. Overlapping surgery patients (n = 3725) were younger and had lower American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, severity of illness, and mortality risk (P < .0001) than nonoverlapping surgery patients (n = 3633). Overlapping surgeries had longer procedure times (214 vs 172 min; P < .0001), but shorter length of stay (7.3 vs 7.9 d; P = .010) and lower estimated blood loss (312 vs 363 mL’s; P = .003). Overlapping surgery patients were more likely to be discharged home (73.6% vs 66.2%; P < .0001), and had lower mortality rates (1.3% vs 2.5%; P = .0005) and acute respiratory failure (1.8% vs 2.6%; P = .021). In multivariate models, there was no significant difference between overlapping and nonoverlapping surgeries for any patient outcomes, except for procedure duration, which was longer in overlapping surgery (estimate = 23.03; P < .001). When planned appropriately, overlapping surgery can be performed safely within the infrastructure at our academic institution.

  11. Autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome revisited.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Guillard, M.; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes is highly heterogeneous with respect to organ involvement and severity. One of the major diagnostic criteria is to detect abnormal elastin fibers. In several other clinically similar autosomal recessive syndromes, however, the

  12. Autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis: An incidental finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajathi Maria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis is a descriptive term that refers to a group of rare, heritable disorders of the skeleton. Osteopetrotic conditions vary greatly in their presentation and severity, from just as an incidental finding on radiographs to causing life-threatening complications such as bone marrow suppression. It is caused by failure of osteoclast development and function. Osteopetrosis can be inherited as autosomal-recessive, autosomal-dominant or as X-linked traits, with the most severe forms being the autosomal-recessive ones. The severity of the disease is mild to moderate in the autosomal-dominant forms, with normal life expectancy. Diagnosis is largely based on clinical and radiographic evaluation. The present paper reports a case of autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis complicated by osteomyelitis with a short review of the condition.

  13. Autosomal recessive hereditary auditory neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋菊; 顾瑞; 曹菊阳

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a sensorineural hearing disorder characterized by absent or abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and normal cochlear outer hair cell function as measured by otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Many risk factors are thought to be involved in its etiology and pathophysiology. Three Chinese pedigrees with familial AN are presented herein to demonstrate involvement of genetic factors in AN etiology. Methods: Probands of the above - mentioned pedigrees, who had been diagnosed with AN, were evaluated and followed up in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, China PLA General Hospital. Their family members were studied and the pedigree diagrams were established. History of illness, physical examination,pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, ABRs and transient evoked and distortion- product otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs and DPOAEs) were obtained from members of these families. DPOAE changes under the influence of contralateral sound stimuli were observed by presenting a set of continuous white noise to the non - recording ear to exam the function of auditory efferent system. Some subjects received vestibular caloric test, computed tomography (CT)scan of the temporal bone and electrocardiography (ECG) to exclude other possible neuropathy disorders. Results: In most affected subjects, hearing loss of various degrees and speech discrimination difficulties started at 10 to16 years of age. Their audiological evaluation showed absence of acoustic reflex and ABRs. As expected in AN, these subjects exhibited near normal cochlear outer hair cell function as shown in TEOAE & DPOAE recordings. Pure- tone audiometry revealed hearing loss ranging from mild to severe in these patients. Autosomal recessive inheritance patterns were observed in the three families. In Pedigree Ⅰ and Ⅱ, two affected brothers were found respectively, while in pedigree Ⅲ, 2 sisters were affected. All the patients were otherwise normal without

  14. Genetically enhanced asynapsis of autosomal chromatin promotes transcriptional dysregulation and meiotic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, David; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2012-02-01

    During meiosis, pairing of homologous chromosomes and their synapsis are essential prerequisites for normal male gametogenesis. Even limited autosomal asynapsis often leads to spermatogenic impairment, the mechanism of which is not fully understood. The present study was aimed at deliberately increasing the size of partial autosomal asynapsis and analysis of its impact on male meiosis. For this purpose, we studied the effect of t(12) haplotype encompassing four inversions on chromosome 17 on mouse autosomal translocation T(16;17)43H (abbreviated T43H). The T43H/T43H homozygotes were fully fertile in both sexes, while +/T43H heterozygous males, but not females, were sterile with meiotic arrest at late pachynema. Inclusion of the t(12) haplotype in trans to the T43H translocation resulted in enhanced asynapsis of the translocated autosome, ectopic phosphorylation of histone H2AX, persistence of RAD51 foci, and increased gene silencing around the translocation break. Increase was also on colocalization of unsynapsed chromatin with sex body. Remarkably, we found that transcriptional silencing of the unsynapsed autosomal chromatin precedes silencing of sex chromosomes. Based on the present knowledge, we conclude that interference of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed autosomes with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is the most likely cause of asynapsis-related male sterility.

  15. Inverse PCR for Point Mutation Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diogo; Santos, Gustavo; Barroca, Mário; Collins, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Inverse PCR is a powerful tool for the rapid introduction of desired mutations at desired positions in a circular double-stranded DNA sequence. Here, custom-designed mutant primers oriented in the inverse direction are used to amplify the entire circular template with incorporation of the required mutation(s). By careful primer design it can be used to perform such diverse modifications as the introduction of point mutations and multiple mutations, the insertion of new sequences, and even sequence deletions. Three primer formats are commonly used; nonoverlapping, partially overlapping and fully overlapping primers, and here we describe the use of nonoverlapping primers for introduction of a point mutation. Use of such a primer setup in the PCR reaction, with one of the primers containing the desired mismatch mutation, results in the amplification of a linear, double-stranded, mutated product. Methylated template DNA is removed from the nonmethylated PCR product by DpnI digestion and the PCR product is then phosphorylated by polynucleotide kinase treatment before being recircularized by ligation, and transformed to E. coli. This relatively simple site-directed mutagenesis procedure is of major importance in biology and biotechnology today where it is commonly employed for the study and engineering of DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  16. Boy with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney and autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zingg-Schenk, A.; Caduff, J.; Azzarello-Burri, S.; Bergmann, C.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Neuhaus, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) shows a great phenotypic variability between patients, ranging from perinatal demise to mildly affected adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (PCLD) does not manifest in childhood. CASE-DIAGNOSIS/TREATMENT: A boy was rep

  17. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  18. Overlapping and non-overlapping brain regions for theory of mind and self reflection in individual subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Rebecca; Moran, Joseph M; Scholz, Jonathan; Gabrieli, John

    2006-12-01

    When subjects are required to reason about someone's false belief, a consistent pattern of brain regions are recruited including the medial prefrontal cortex, medial precuneus and bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Previous group analyses suggest that the two medial regions, but not the lateral regions, are also recruited when subjects engage in self-reflection. The current study directly compared the results of the 'false belief' and 'self' tasks in individual subjects. Consistent with previous reports, the medial prefrontal and medial precuneus regions recruited by the two tasks significantly overlap in individual subjects, although there was also evidence for non-overlapping voxels in medial regions. The temporo-parietal regions are only recruited for the 'theory of mind' task. Six possible models of the relationship between theory of mind, self-reflection and autobiographical memory, all consistent with both neurobiological and developmental evidence to date, are discussed.

  19. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Nielsen, J E; Fallentin, E

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus...

  20. A boy with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, A.; Vissers, M.N.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a 9-year-old Iranian boy with tuberous xanthomas, elevated LDL-cholesterol levels of 15.5 mmol/l, and vague complaints of chest pain while playing soccer. The consanguineous parents of the boy had normal cholesterol concentrations, which indicated an autosomal recessive disorder rather

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  2. Inverse disjuncties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malepaard, J.

    2007-01-01

    Balansschikkingen (of negatief gebonden of-constructies) zijn volgens de in dit artikel ontwikkelde hypothese inverse disjuncties (id's). Het zijn tweeledige zinnen waarvan het eerste lid een verplichte negatieve of minimaliserende constituent bevat en het tweede lid met of begint. Evenals

  3. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, I E

    2000-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Rolandic Epilepsy with Speech Dyspraxia (ADRESD) is a rare disorder which highlights the relationship between Benign Rolandic Epilepsy (BRE) and speech and language disorders. Subtle speech and language disorders have recently been well characterised in BRE. ADRESD is associated with long term, more severe speech and language difficulties. The time course of rolandic epilepsy in ADRESD is typical of that of BRE. ADRESD is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with anticipation. It is postulated that the anticipation may be due to an, as yet unidentified, triplet repeat expansion in a gene for rolandic epilepsy. BRE follows complex inheritance but it is possible that ADRESD may hold some valuable clues to the pathogenesis of BRE.

  4. An Improved Hybrid Genetic Algorithm for Chemical Plant Layout Optimization with Novel Non-overlapping and Toxic Gas Dispersion Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; WANG Zhenyu; ZHU Qunxiong

    2013-01-01

    New approaches for facility distribution in chemical plants are proposed including an improved non-overlapping constraint based on projection relationships of facilities and a novel toxic gas dispersion constraint.In consideration of the large number of variables in the plant layout model,our new method can significantly reduce the number of variables with their own projection relationships.Also,as toxic gas dispersion is a usual incident in a chemical plant,a simple approach to describe the gas leakage is proposed,which can clearly represent the constraints of potential emission source and sitting facilities.For solving the plant layout model,an improved genetic algorithm (GA) based on infeasible solution fix technique is proposed,which improves the globe search ability of GA.The case study and experiment show that a better layout plan can be obtained with our method,and the safety factors such as gas dispersion and minimum distances can be well handled in the solution.

  5. Autosomal dominant craniosynostosis of the sutura metopica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennekam, R C; Van den Boogaard, M J

    1990-11-01

    Trigonocephaly due to craniosynostosis of the sutura metopica was found in two sibs with normal intelligence. Both were microcephalic. The father had a sloping forehead and possibly partial metopic craniosynostosis. The paternal grandfather had a bony ridge at the upper half of the metopic suture without significant head deformity. A paternal sister was possibly also affected. None of the affected persons showed significant other anomalies. Craniosynostosis of the metopic suture may be an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder, not associated with functional brain or other abnormalities.

  6. Clinical neurogenetics: autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Fogel, Brent L

    2013-11-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are a diverse and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of the cerebellum and its associated pathways. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation can be challenging because of phenotypic overlap among causes, and a stratified and systematic approach is essential. Recent advances include the identification of additional genes causing dominant genetic ataxia, a better understanding of cellular pathogenesis in several disorders, the generation of new disease models that may stimulate development of new therapies, and the use of new DNA sequencing technologies, including whole-exome sequencing, to improve diagnosis.

  7. Overlap and Nonoverlap Between the ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss and Otology and Audiology Intake Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Lisette M; Merkus, Paul; Pronk, Marieke; van der Torn, Marein; Maré, Marcel; Goverts, S Theo; Kramer, Sophia E

    Factors). One extra ICF category emerged from the intake documentation that is currently not included in the Core Sets: sleep functions. Various Personal Factors emerged from the intake documentation that are currently not defined in the ICF classification. The results showed substantial overlap between the ICF Core Sets for HL and the intake documentation of otology and audiology, but also revealed areas of nonoverlap. These findings contribute to the evaluation of the content validity of the Core Sets. The overlap can be viewed as supportive of the Core Sets' content validity. The nonoverlap in Core Sets categories indicates that current Dutch intake procedures may not cover all aspects relevant to patients with ear/hearing problems. The identification of extra constructs suggests that the Core Sets may not include all areas of functioning that are relevant to Dutch Otology and Audiology patients. Consideration of incorporating both aspects into future intake practice deserves attention. Operationalization of the ICF Core Sets categories, including the extra constructs identified in this study, into a practical and integral intake instrument seems an important next step.

  8. Mutation rate analysis at 19 autosomal microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Cai-Yong; Ji, Qiang; Li, Kai; Fan, Han-Ting; Yu, Yan-Fang; Bu, Fan-Li; Hu, Ling-Li; Wang, Jian-Wen; Mu, Hao-Fang; Haigh, Steven; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a large sample size is needed to reliably estimate population- and locus-specific microsatellite mutation rates. Therefore, we conducted a long-term collaboration study and performed a comprehensive analysis on the mutation characteristics of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci. The STR loci located on 15 of 22 autosomal chromosomes were analyzed in a total of 21,106 samples (11,468 parent-child meioses) in a Chinese population. This provided 217,892 allele transfers at 19 STR loci. An overall mutation rate of 1.20 × 10(-3) (95% CI, 1.06-1.36 × 10(-3) ) was observed in the populations across 18 of 19 STR loci, except for the TH01 locus with no mutation found. Most STR mutations (97.7%) were single-step mutations, and only a few mutations (2.30%) comprised two and multiple steps. Interestingly, approximately 93% of mutation events occur in the male germline. The mutation ratios increased with the paternal age at child birth (r = 0.99, ptesting, kinship analysis, and population genetics.

  9. A strict error bound with separated contributions of the discretization and of the iterative solver in non-overlapping domain decomposition methods

    CERN Document Server

    Rey, Valentine; Gosselet, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of the distance between the solution of a static linear mechanic problem and its approximation by the finite element method solved with a non-overlapping domain decomposition method (FETI or BDD). We propose a new strict upper bound of the error which separates the contribution of the iterative solver and the contribution of the discretization. Numerical assessments show that the bound is sharp and enables us to define an objective stopping criterion for the iterative solver

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with autonomic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MalaCards: autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with autonomic disease Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of ... Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Leukodystrophy The Brain Foundation ( ...

  11. Genetic architecture of autosome-mediated hybrid male sterility in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, I. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Several estimators have been developed for assesing the number of sterility factors in a chromosome based on the sizes of fertile and sterile introgressed fragments. Assuming that two factors are required for producing sterility, simulations show that one of these, twice the inverse of the relative size of the largest fertile fragment, provides good average approximations when as few as five fertile fragments are analyzed. The estimators have been used for deducing the number of factors from previous data on several pairs of species. A particular result contrasts with the authors` interpretations: instead of the high number of sterility factors suggested, only a few per autosome are estimated in both reciprocal crosses involving Drosophila buzzatii and D. koepferae. It has been possible to map these factors, between three and six per chromosome, in the autosomes 3 and 4 of these species. Out of 203 introgressions of different fragments or combinations of fragments, the outcome of at least 192 is explained by the mapped zones. These results suggest that autosome-mediated sterility in the male hybrids of these species is mediated by a few epistatic factors, similarly to X-mediated sterility in the hybrids of other Drosophila species. 48 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Enamelin and autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J C-C; Yamakoshi, Y

    2003-01-01

    Dental enamel forms as a progressively thickening extracellular layer by the action of proteins secreted by ameloblasts. The most abundant enamel protein is amelogenin, which is expressed primarily from a gene on the X-chromosome (AMELX). The two most abundant non-amelogenin enamel proteins are ameloblastin and enamelin, which are expressed from the AMBN and ENAM genes, respectively. The human AMBN and ENAM genes are located on chromosome 4q13.2. The major secretory products of the human AMELX, AMBN, and ENAM genes have 175, 421, and 1103 amino acids, respectively, and are all post-translationally modified, secreted, and processed by proteases. Mutations in AMELX have been shown to cause X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), which accounts for 5% of AI cases. Mutations in ENAM cause a severe form of autosomal-dominant smooth hypoplastic AI that represents 1.5%, and a mild form of autosomal-dominant local hypoplastic AI that accounts for 27% of AI cases in Sweden. The discovery of mutations in the ENAM gene in AI kindreds proved that enamelin is critical for proper dental enamel formation and that it plays a role in human disease. Here we review how enamelin was discovered, what is known about enamelin protein structure, post-translational modifications, processing by proteases, and its potentially important functional properties such as its affinity for hydroxyapatite and influence on crystal growth in vitro. The primary structures of human, porcine, mouse, and rat enamelin are compared, and the human enamelin gene, its structure, chromosomal localization, temporal and spatial patterns of expression, and its role in the etiology of amelogenesis imperfecta are discussed.

  13. Topological inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yongwen

    2004-01-01

    That the projective limit of any projective system of compact inverse semigroups is also a compact inverse semigroup,the injective limit of any injective system of inverse semigroups is also an inverse semigroup, and that a compact inverse semigroup is topologically isomorphic to a strict projective limit of compact metric inverse semigroups are proved. It is also demonstrated that Horn (S,T) is a topological inverse semigroup provided that S or T is a topological inverse semigroup with some other conditions. Being proved by means of the combination of topological semigroup theory with inverse semigroup theory,all these results generalize the corresponding ones related to topological semigroups or topological groups.

  14. Identification of polymorphic inversions from genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic inversions are a source of genetic variability with a direct impact on recombination frequencies. Given the difficulty of their experimental study, computational methods have been developed to infer their existence in a large number of individuals using genome-wide data of nucleotide variation. Methods based on haplotype tagging of known inversions attempt to classify individuals as having a normal or inverted allele. Other methods that measure differences between linkage disequilibrium attempt to identify regions with inversions but unable to classify subjects accurately, an essential requirement for association studies. Results We present a novel method to both identify polymorphic inversions from genome-wide genotype data and classify individuals as containing a normal or inverted allele. Our method, a generalization of a published method for haplotype data 1, utilizes linkage between groups of SNPs to partition a set of individuals into normal and inverted subpopulations. We employ a sliding window scan to identify regions likely to have an inversion, and accumulation of evidence from neighboring SNPs is used to accurately determine the inversion status of each subject. Further, our approach detects inversions directly from genotype data, thus increasing its usability to current genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Conclusions We demonstrate the accuracy of our method to detect inversions and classify individuals on principled-simulated genotypes, produced by the evolution of an inversion event within a coalescent model 2. We applied our method to real genotype data from HapMap Phase III to characterize the inversion status of two known inversions within the regions 17q21 and 8p23 across 1184 individuals. Finally, we scan the full genomes of the European Origin (CEU and Yoruba (YRI HapMap samples. We find population-based evidence for 9 out of 15 well-established autosomic inversions, and for 52 regions

  15. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M. [Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegaard alle 30, DK-2650 Hvidovre (Denmark); Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K. [Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Section of Neurogenetics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ``corpus-callosum index`` expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ``corpus-callosum index`` than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions between X chromosome and autosomal genes. Whereas male to female ratios of expression of autosomal genes were distributed around a mean of 1, X chromosome genes were clearly shifted towards higher expression in females. We generated gene coexpression networks and identified a major module of genes with correlated gene expression that includes female-biased X genes and sexually dimorphic autosomal genes for which the sexual dimorphism is likely driven by the X genes. In this module, expression of X chromosome genes correlates with autosome genes, more than the expression of autosomal genes with each other. Our study identifies correlated patterns of autosomal and X-linked genes that are likely influenced by the sexual imbalance of X gene expression when X inactivation is inefficient. PMID:24817096

  17. Symptom onset in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Aisen, Paul S.; Bird, Thomas; Danek, Adrian; Fox, Nick C.; Goate, Alison; Frommelt, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lopera, Francisco; Martins, Ralph; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard P.; McDade, Eric; Moreno, Sonia; Reiman, Eric M.; Ringman, John M.; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa; Tariot, Pierre N.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors influencing age at symptom onset and disease course in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD), and develop evidence-based criteria for predicting symptom onset in ADAD. Methods: We have collected individual-level data on ages at symptom onset and death from 387 ADAD pedigrees, compiled from 137 peer-reviewed publications, the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) database, and 2 large kindreds of Colombian (PSEN1 E280A) and Volga German (PSEN2 N141I) ancestry. Our combined dataset includes 3,275 individuals, of whom 1,307 were affected by ADAD with known age at symptom onset. We assessed the relative contributions of several factors in influencing age at onset, including parental age at onset, age at onset by mutation type and family, and APOE genotype and sex. We additionally performed survival analysis using data on symptom onset collected from 183 ADAD mutation carriers followed longitudinally in the DIAN Study. Results: We report summary statistics on age at onset and disease course for 174 ADAD mutations, and discover strong and highly significant (p 0.38) correlations between individual age at symptom onset and predicted values based on parental age at onset and mean ages at onset by mutation type and family, which persist after controlling for APOE genotype and sex. Conclusions: Significant proportions of the observed variance in age at symptom onset in ADAD can be explained by family history and mutation type, providing empirical support for use of these data to estimate onset in clinical research. PMID:24928124

  18. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias : the current state of affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; van de Warrenburg, B. P. C.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Cluitmans, M.; Scheffer, H.; Kremer, B. P.; Knoers, N. V. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the hereditary ataxias, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs) encompass a diverse group of rare neurodegenerative disorders in which a cerebellar syndrome is the key clinical feature. The clinical overlap between the different cerebellar ataxias, the occasional atypical phenotypes, an

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions ADPEAF autosomal dominant partial epilepsy ...

  20. Autosomal dominant inheritance of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Marjolein; Berger, Rudolphus; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M E; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Hoogeboom, Jeanette J M; Mancini, Grazia S; Bartelings, Margot M; Krijger, Ronald de; Wladimiroff, Jury W; Niermeijer, Martinus F; Grossfeld, Paul; Willems, Patrick J

    2005-01-01

    Most nonsyndromic congenital heart malformations (CHMs) in humans are multifactorial in origin, although an increasing number of monogenic cases have been reported recently. We describe here four new families with presumed autosomal dominant inheritance of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction

  1. Locally Inverse Semigroups with Inverse Transversals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Yong; ZHAO Xian Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Let S be a locally inverse semigroup with an inverse transversal S°. In this paper, we construct an amenable partial order on S by an R-cone. Conversely, every amenable partial order on S can be constructed in this way. We give some properties of a locally inverse semigroup with a Clifford transversal. In particular, if S is a locally inverse semigroup with a Clifford transversal, then there is an order-preserving bijection from the set of all amenable partial orders on S to the set of all R-cones of S.

  2. Meiotic behaviour of evolutionary sex-autosome translocations in Bovidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozdova, Miluse; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Fernandez, Jonathan; Cernohorska, Halina; Frohlich, Jan; Sebestova, Hana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    The recurrent occurrence of sex-autosome translocations during mammalian evolution suggests common mechanisms enabling a precise control of meiotic synapsis, recombination and inactivation of sex chromosomes. We used immunofluorescence and FISH to study the meiotic behaviour of sex chromosomes in six species of Bovidae with evolutionary sex-autosome translocations (Tragelaphus strepsiceros, Taurotragus oryx, Tragelaphus imberbis, Tragelaphus spekii, Gazella leptoceros and Nanger dama ruficollis). The autosomal regions of fused sex chromosomes showed normal synapsis with their homologous counterparts. Synapsis in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) leads to the formation of characteristic bivalent (in T. imberbis and T. spekii with X;BTA13/Y;BTA13), trivalent (in T. strepsiceros and T. oryx with X/Y;BTA13 and G. leptoceros with X;BTA5/Y) and quadrivalent (in N. dama ruficollis with X;BTA5/Y;BTA16) structures at pachynema. However, when compared with other mammals, the number of pachynema lacking MLH1 foci in the PAR was relatively high, especially in T. imberbis and T. spekii, species with both sex chromosomes involved in sex autosome translocations. Meiotic transcriptional inactivation of the sex-autosome translocations assessed by γH2AX staining was restricted to their gonosomal regions. Despite intraspecies differences, the evolutionary fixation of sex-autosome translocations among bovids appears to involve general mechanisms ensuring sex chromosome pairing, synapsis, recombination and inactivation.

  3. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  4. Locative Inversion in Cantonese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Sui-Sang

    This study investigates the phenomenon of "Locative Inversion" in Cantonese. The term "Locative Inversion" indicates that the locative phrase (LP) syntactic process in Cantonese and the appears at the sentence-initial position and its logical subject occurs postverbally. It is demonstrated that this Locative Inversion is a…

  5. Efficient computation of turbulent flow in ribbed passages using a non-overlapping near-wall domain decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adam; Utyuzhnikov, Sergey

    2017-08-01

    Turbulent flow in a ribbed channel is studied using an efficient near-wall domain decomposition (NDD) method. The NDD approach is formulated by splitting the computational domain into an inner and outer region, with an interface boundary between the two. The computational mesh covers the outer region, and the flow in this region is solved using the open-source CFD code Code_Saturne with special boundary conditions on the interface boundary, called interface boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are of Robin type and incorporate the effect of the inner region on the flow in the outer region. IBCs are formulated in terms of the distance from the interface boundary to the wall in the inner region. It is demonstrated that up to 90% of the region between the ribs in the ribbed passage can be removed from the computational mesh with an error on the friction factor within 2.5%. In addition, computations with NDD are faster than computations based on low Reynolds number (LRN) models by a factor of five. Different rib heights can be studied with the same mesh in the outer region without affecting the accuracy of the friction factor. This is tested with six different rib heights in an example of a design optimisation study. It is found that the friction factors computed with NDD are almost identical to the fully-resolved results. When used for inverse problems, NDD is considerably more efficient than LRN computations because only one computation needs to be performed and only one mesh needs to be generated.

  6. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Antenatal Diagnosis and Histopathological Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayananda Kumar Rajanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD is one of the most common inheritable disease manifesting in infancy and childhood with a frequency of 1:6,000 to 1:55,000 births. The patient in her second trimester presented with a history of amenorrhea. Ultrasound examination revealed bilateral, enlarged, hyperechogenic kidneys, placentomegaly, and severe oligohydramnios. The pregnancy was terminated. An autopsy was performed on the fetus. Both the kidneys were found to be enlarged and the cut surface showed numerous cysts. The liver sections showed changes due to fibrosis. The final diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made based on these findings. In this article, we correlate the ante-natal ultrasound and histopathological findings in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

  7. Gonadal mosaicism as a rare cause of autosomal recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anazi, S; Al-Sabban, E; Alkuraya, F S

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal recessive diseases are typically caused by the biparental inheritance of familial mutant alleles. Unusual mechanisms by which the recessiveness of a mutant allele is unmasked include uniparental isodisomy and the occurrence of a de novo chromosomal rearrangement that disrupts the other allele. Gonadal mosaicism is a condition in which a postfertilization mutation is confined to the gamete precursors and is not detected in somatic tissues. Gonadal mosaicism is known to give the impression of autosomal recessive inheritance when recurrence of an autosomal-dominant condition among offspring of phenotypically normal parents is observed. Here, we report an extremely rare event in which maternal gonadal mosaicism for a recessive mutation in COL4A4 caused the recurrence of Alport syndrome within a consanguineous family. Such rare occurrence should be taken into account when analyzing pedigrees both for clinical and research purposes.

  8. Genetics of non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroze, Bushra; Chaudhry, Bushra

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic mental retardation is one of the most serious neurodevelopmental disorders, which has a serious impact not only on the affected individuals and their families but also on the health care system and society. Previously research has been more focused on the X-linked mental retardation and only recently studies have shown that non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation is extremely heterogeneous and contributes much more than the X-linked mental retardation. But very little is known about the genes and loci involved in nonsyndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation than the X-linked mental retardation. To date only thirty loci and ten genes have been established associated with the non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation. This short review presents an overview of the current knowledge on clinical information available for the ten genes associated with this unexplored group of genetic disorder.

  9. Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy with unique clinical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Young; Min, Ju Hong; Hong, Yoon Ho; Sung, Jung Joon; Park, Sung Hye; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Kwang Woo; Park, Kyung Seok

    2007-12-01

    Centronuclear myopathies are clinically and genetically heterogenous diseases with common histological findings, namely, centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers with a predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers. We describe two cases from one family with autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy with unusual clinical features that had initially suggested distal myopathy. Clinically, the patients presented with muscle weakness and atrophy localized mainly to the posterior compartment of the distal lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed predominant atrophy and fatty changes of bilateral gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. This report demonstrates the expanding clinical heterogeneity of autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy.

  10. Tolvaptan in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, Vicente E.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Devuyst, Olivier; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Grantham, Jared J.; Higashihara, Eiji; Perrone, Ronald D.; Krasa, Holly B.; Ouyang, John; Czerwiec, Frank S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is often associated with pain, hypertension, and kidney failure. Preclinical studies indicated that vasopressin V-2-receptor antagonists inhibit cyst growth and slow the decline of kidney function. METHODS In this phase 3,

  11. STAT1 mutations in autosomal dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Plantinga, T.S.; Hoischen, A.; Smeekens, S.P.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Arts, P.; Rosentul-Amram, D.C.; Carmichael, A.J.; Smits-van der Graaf, C.A.; Kullberg, B.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Lilic, D.; Veltman, J.A.; Netea, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by susceptibility to candida infection of skin, nails, and mucous membranes. Patients with recessive CMC and autoimmunity have mutations in the autoimmune regulator AIRE. The cause of autosomal dominant CMC is unknown. METHODS: We

  12. [Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias in the Netherlands: a national inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive estimate of the number of Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) families and patients and thus estimate the minimal prevalence of ADCA in the Netherlands. Furthermore, to observe the relative frequency of SCA mutations and to study genotype-phenotyp

  13. SPATACSIN mutations cause autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlacchio, Antonio; Babalini, Carla; Borreca, Antonella; Patrono, Clarice; Massa, Roberto; Basaran, Sarenur; Munhoz, Renato P; Rogaeva, Ekaterina A; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Bernardi, Giorgio; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2010-02-01

    The mutation of the spatacsin gene is the single most common cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum. Common clinical, pathological and genetic features between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia motivated us to investigate 25 families with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival for mutations in the spatascin gene. The inclusion criterion was a diagnosis of clinically definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis according to the revised El Escorial criteria. The exclusion criterion was a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum in line with an established protocol. Additional pathological and genetic evaluations were also performed. Surprisingly, 12 sequence alterations in the spatacsin gene (one of which is novel, IVS30 + 1 G > A) were identified in 10 unrelated pedigrees with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival. The countries of origin of these families were Italy, Brazil, Canada, Japan and Turkey. The variants seemed to be pathogenic since they co-segregated with the disease in all pedigrees, were absent in controls and were associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis neuropathology in one member of one of these families for whom central nervous system tissue was available. Our study indicates that mutations in the spatascin gene could cause a much wider spectrum of clinical features than previously recognized, including autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  14. Prenatal detection of rare chromosomal autosomal abnormalities in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baena, N; De Vigan, C; Cariati, E; Clementi, M; Stoll, C; Caballin, MR; Guitart, M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prenatal detection of rare chromosomal autosomal abnormalities by ultrasound (US) examination. Data were obtained from 19 congenital malformation registries from 11 European countries, between 01/07/96 and 31/12/98. A total of 664,340 births were cove

  15. Prenatal detection of rare chromosomal autosomal abnormalities in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baena, N; De Vigan, C; Cariati, E; Clementi, M; Stoll, C; Caballin, MR; Guitart, M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prenatal detection of rare chromosomal autosomal abnormalities by ultrasound (US) examination. Data were obtained from 19 congenital malformation registries from 11 European countries, between 01/07/96 and 31/12/98. A total of 664,340 births were

  16. A new phenotype of autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, I.M.P.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Laak, H.J. ter; Brunner, H.G.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Vogels, O.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a five-generation family with a novel phenotype of autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy not linked to the three genes known to be causative for nemaline myopathy (alpha-tropomyosin-3, nebulin, and alpha-actin). Although there was muscle weakness in the neck flexors and proximal muscles of

  17. Direct Waveform Inversion by Iterative Inverse Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Schlottmann, R B

    2009-01-01

    Seismic waves are the most sensitive probe of the Earth's interior we have. With the dense data sets available in exploration, images of subsurface structures can be obtained through processes such as migration. Unfortunately, relating these surface recordings to actual Earth properties is non-trivial. Tomographic techniques use only a small amount of the information contained in the full seismogram and result in relatively low resolution images. Other methods use a larger amount of the seismogram but are based on either linearization of the problem, an expensive statistical search over a limited range of models, or both. We present the development of a new approach to full waveform inversion, i.e., inversion which uses the complete seismogram. This new method, which falls under the general category of inverse scattering, is based on a highly non-linear Fredholm integral equation relating the Earth structure to itself and to the recorded seismograms. An iterative solution to this equation is proposed. The res...

  18. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....... suite, developed in this project and in [4]. Source code developed for this project includes the CCD method , improvements on the BFGS method and Jacobian inverse originally developed in [4]....

  19. Inverse periodic shadowing properties

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Alexey V

    2011-01-01

    We consider inverse periodic shadowing properties of discrete dynamical systems generated by diffeomorphisms of closed smooth manifolds. We show that the $C^1$-interior of the set of all diffeomorphisms having so-called inverse periodic shadowing property coincides with the set of $\\Omega$-stable diffeomorphisms. The equivalence of Lipschitz inverse periodic shadowing property and hyperbolicity of the closure of all periodic points is proved. Besides, we prove that the set of all diffeomorphisms that have Lipschitz inverse periodic shadowing property and whose periodic points are dense in the nonwandering set coincides with the set of Axiom A diffeomorphisms.

  20. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARSACS autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay , more commonly known as ARSACS , ...

  2. Analyzing Two-Phase Single-Case Data with Non-overlap and Mean Difference Indices: Illustration, Software Tools, and Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolov, Rumen; Losada, José L; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase single-case designs, including baseline evaluation followed by an intervention, represent the most clinically straightforward option for combining professional practice and research. However, unless they are part of a multiple-baseline schedule, such designs do not allow demonstrating a causal relation between the intervention and the behavior. Although the statistical options reviewed here cannot help overcoming this methodological limitation, we aim to make practitioners and applied researchers aware of the available appropriate options for extracting maximum information from the data. In the current paper, we suggest that the evaluation of behavioral change should include visual and quantitative analyses, complementing the substantive criteria regarding the practical importance of the behavioral change. Specifically, we emphasize the need to use structured criteria for visual analysis, such as the ones summarized in the What Works Clearinghouse Standards, especially if such criteria are complemented by visual aids, as illustrated here. For quantitative analysis, we focus on the non-overlap of all pairs and the slope and level change procedure, as they offer straightforward information and have shown reasonable performance. An illustration is provided of the use of these three pieces of information: visual, quantitative, and substantive. To make the use of visual and quantitative analysis feasible, open source software is referred to and demonstrated. In order to provide practitioners and applied researchers with a more complete guide, several analytical alternatives are commented on pointing out the situations (aims, data patterns) for which these are potentially useful.

  3. Inverse Symmetric Inflationary Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Odintsov, S D

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of inflationary potentials which are invariant under a special symmetry, which depends on the parameters of the models. As we show, in certain limiting cases, the inverse symmetric potentials are qualitatively similar to the $\\alpha$-attractors models, since the resulting observational indices are identical. However, there are some quantitative differences which we discuss in some detail. As we show, some inverse symmetric models always yield results compatible with observations, but this strongly depends on the asymptotic form of the potential at large $e$-folding numbers. In fact when the limiting functional form is identical to the one corresponding to the $\\alpha$-attractors models, the compatibility with the observations is guaranteed. Also we find the relation of the inverse symmetric models with the Starobinsky model and we highlight the differences. In addition, an alternative inverse symmetric model is studied and as we show, not all the inverse symmetric models are viable. Moreove...

  4. 0-Semidistributive Inverse Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田振际

    2004-01-01

    @@ For an inverse semigroup S, the set L(S) of all inverse subsemigroups (including the empty set) of S forms a lattice with respect to intersection denoted as usual by ∩ and union, where the union is the inverse subsemigroup generated by inverse subsemigroups A, B of S. The set LF(S) of all full inverse subsemigroups of S forms a complete sublattice of L(S), with Es as zero element (Es is the set of all idempotent of S)(see [3,5,6]). Note, that if S a group, then LF(S)=L(S), its lattice of all subgroups of S. If S = G0 is a group with adjoined zero, then clearly LF(S) ≌ L(G).

  5. Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease: a review and proposal for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, R. J.; Aisen, P.S.; De Strooper, B.; Fox, N C.; Lemere, C. A.; Ringman, J.M.; Salloway, S.; Sperling, R. A.; Windisch, M.; Xiong, C.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease has provided significant understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. The present review summarizes clinical, pathological, imaging, biochemical, and molecular studies of autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the similarities and differences between the dominantly inherited form of Alzheimer's disease and the more common sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease. Current developments in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease are...

  6. A gene for autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy assigned to chromosome 2q by linkage analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallgren-Pettersson, C.; Avela, K.; Marchand, S.; Kolehmainen, J.; Tahvanainen, E.; Hansen, F.J.; Muntoni, F.; Dubowitz, V.; de Visser, Marianne; Van Langen, I.M.; Laing, N.G.; Faure, S.; De la Chapelle, A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical genetic evidence suggests the existence of an autosomal recessive form of congenital nemaline myopathy in addition to the autosomal dominant one(s). One mutation in an Australian kindred has been identified as causing an autosomal dominant form of the disease. This mutation in the

  7. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with a unique imaging finding: multiple encephaloceles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saglam, Dilek; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Bekci, Tuemay [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey); Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Osteopetrosis is a hereditary form of sclerosing bone dysplasia with various radiological and clinical presentations. The autosomal recessive type, also known as malignant osteopetrosis, is the most severe type, with the early onset of manifestations. A 5-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with recurrent respiratory tract infections. Chest X-ray and skeletal survey revealed the classic findings of osteopetrosis, including diffuse osteosclerosis and bone within a bone appearance. At follow-up, the patient presented with, thickened calvarium, multiple prominent encephaloceles, and dural calcifications leading to the intracranial clinical manifestations with bilateral hearing and sight loss. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is one of the causes of encephaloceles and this finding may become dramatic if untreated. (orig.)

  8. Dosage compensation of the sex chromosomes and autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disteche, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Males are XY and females are XX in most mammalian species. Other species such as birds have a different sex chromosome make-up: ZZ in males and ZW in females. In both types of organisms one of the sex chromosomes, Y or W, has degenerated due to lack of recombination with its respective homolog X or Z. Since autosomes are present in two copies in diploid organisms the heterogametic sex has become a natural "aneuploid" with haploinsufficiency for X- or Z-linked genes. Specific mechanisms have evolved to restore a balance between critical gene products throughout the genome and between males and females. Some of these mechanisms were co-opted from and/or added to compensatory processes that alleviate autosomal aneuploidy. Surprisingly, several modes of dosage compensation have evolved. In this review we will consider the evidence for dosage compensation and the molecular mechanisms implicated.

  9. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  10. Hypertension in children with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting 1 in 1000 individuals. Previously termed "adult polycystic kidney disease", ADPKD is now known to have important clinical manifestations beginning early in life and even in utero. Hypertension is an important risk factor for progressive renal and cardiovascular disease in children with ADPKD and may signify irremediable organ injury. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and treatment strategies in hypertension associated with pediatric ADPKD.

  11. Sacral radicular cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Campos, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    This is the first report of a case of sacral radicular cysts in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A 46-year-old woman with ADPKD was found to have bilateral sacral radicular cysts discovered incidentally by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cysts arising from arachnoid or spinal meningeal sac should be considered one of the manifestations of a more widespread connective tissue disorder associated with ADPKD.

  12. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions b...

  13. Autosomal Dominant Centronuclear Myopathy with Unique Clinical Presentations

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jee-Young; Min, Ju-Hong; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Sung, Jung-Joon; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Seong-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Park, Kyung Seok

    2007-01-01

    Centronuclear myopathies are clinically and genetically heterogenous diseases with common histological findings, namely, centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers with a predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers. We describe two cases from one family with autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy with unusual clinical features that had initially suggested distal myopathy. Clinically, the patients presented with muscle weakness and atrophy localized mainly to the posterior compartment of th...

  14. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions b...

  15. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-05

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population.

  16. Y-autosome translocation interferes with meiotic sex inactivation and expression of autosomal genes: a case study in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasc, H; Mary, N; Letron, R; Calgaro, A; Dudez, A M; Bonnet, N; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Yerle, M; Ducos, A; Pinton, A

    2012-01-01

    Y-autosome translocations are rare in humans and pigs. In both species, these rearrangements can be responsible for meiotic arrest and subsequent infertility. Chromosome pairing abnormalities on the SSCX, SSCY and SSC1 chromatin domains were identified by analyzing pachytene spermatocytes from a boar carrying a (Y;1) translocation by immunolocalization of specific meiotic protein combined with FISH. Disturbance of the meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) was observed by Cot-RNA-FISH and analysis of ZFY gene expression by sequential RNA- and DNA-FISH on spermatocytes. We hypothesized that the meiotic arrest observed in this boar might be due to the silencing of critical autosomal genes and/or the reactivation of some sex chromosome genes.

  17. Dielectric properties and study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms by non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkari, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the synthesis and characterization of the Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound are presented. The structure of this compound is analyzed by X-ray diffraction which confirms the formation of single phase and is in good agreement the literature. Indeed, the Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA) shows that the decomposition of the compound is observed in the range of 420-520 K. However, the differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates the presence of a phase transition at T=363 k. Furthermore, the dielectric properties and AC conductivity were studied over a temperature range (338-413 K) and frequency range (200 Hz-5 MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopy. Dielectric measurements confirmed such thermal analyses by exhibiting the presence of an anomaly in the temperature range of 358-373 K. The complex impedance plots are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of resistance, constant phase element (CPE) and capacitance. The activation energy values of two distinct regions are obtained from log σT vs 1000/T plot and are found to be E=1.27 eV (Tdependence of ac conductivity, σac, has been analyzed by Jonscher's universal power law σ(ω)=σdc+Aωs. The value of s is to be temperature-dependent, which has a tendency to increase with temperature and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling (NSPT) model is the most applicable conduction mechanism in the title compound. Complex impedance spectra of [C8H10NO]2CuCl4 at different temperatures.

  18. Two maize END-1 orthologs, BETL9 and BETL9like, are transcribed in a non-overlapping spatial pattern on the outer surface of the developing endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín eRoyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a project aimed to isolate transfer cells-specific genes in maize endosperm we have identified the BETL9 gene. BETL9 encodes for a small protein very similar in sequence to the product of the barley transfer cell-specific gene end-1. Both BETL9 and END-1 proteins are lipid transfer proteins, but their function is currently unknown. In situ hybridization analysis confirms that the BETL9 gene is exclusively transcribed in the basal endosperm transfer cell layer during seed development since 10 days after pollination. However, immunolocalization data indicates that the BETL9 protein accumulates in the maternal placento-chalaza cells located just beside the transfer cell layer. This suggests that the BETL9 protein should be transported to the maternal side to exert its, still unknown, function. In addition, we have identified a second maize gene very similar in sequence to BETL9 and we have named it BETL9like. In situ hybridization shows that BETL9like is also specifically transcribed in the developing maize endosperm within the same time frame that BETL9, but in this case it is exclusively expressed in the aleurone cell layer. Consequently, the BETL9 and BETL9like genes are transcribed in a non-overlapping pattern on the outer surface of the maize endosperm. The BETL9 and BETL9like promoter sequences, fused to the GUS reporter gen, accurately reflected the expression pattern observed for the genes in maize. Finally, we have identified in the Arabidopsis genome a set of four genes orthologous to BETL9 and BETL9like and analysed the activity of their promoters in Arabidopsis transgenic plants carrying fusions of their promoter sequences to the GUS reporter. As in the case of the maize genes, the Arabidopsis orthologs showed highly complementary expression patterns.

  19. On Generalized Inverse Transversals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Hua ZHANG; Shou Feng WANG

    2008-01-01

    Let S be a regular semigroup,S° an inverse subsemigroup of S.S° is called a generalized inverse transversal of S,if V(x) ∩N S°≠φ.In this paper,some properties of this kind of semigroups are discussed.In particular,a construction theorem is obtained which contains some recent results in the literature as its special cases.

  20. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  1. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations.

  2. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10−31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  3. PENCALC: a program for penetrance estimation in autosomal dominant diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa R.V. Russo Horimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a computer program developed for estimating penetrance rates in autosomal dominant diseases by means of family kinship and phenotype information contained within the pedigrees. The program also determines the exact 95% credibility interval for the penetrance estimate. Both executable (PenCalc for Windows and web versions (PenCalcWeb of the software are available. The web version enables further calculations, such as heterozygosity probabilities and assessment of offspring risks for all individuals in the pedigrees. Both programs can be accessed and down-loaded freely at the home-page address http://www.ib.usp.br/~otto/software.htm.

  4. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  5. Gene therapy in animal models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmiller, Brian; Mao, Haoyu; Lewin, Alfred S

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy for dominantly inherited genetic disease is more difficult than gene-based therapy for recessive disorders, which can be treated with gene supplementation. Treatment of dominant disease may require gene supplementation partnered with suppression of the expression of the mutant gene either at the DNA level, by gene repair, or at the RNA level by RNA interference or transcriptional repression. In this review, we examine some of the gene delivery approaches used to treat animal models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, focusing on those models associated with mutations in the gene for rhodopsin. We conclude that combinatorial approaches have the greatest promise for success.

  6. Guadalajara camptodactyly type III: a new probably autosomal dominant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuera, L E; Ramírez-Dueñas, M L; Dávalos, I P; Cantú, J M

    2002-10-01

    A Mexican family is presented with the main clinical features of camptodactyly, a distinctive facial appearance because of ocular hypertelorism, telecanthus, symblepharon and spinal defects. Other clinical manifestations included: multiple nevi, simplified ears, retrognathia, congenital shortness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, thin hands and feet, a small penis and mild mental retardation. Radiographic studies revealed spina bifida occulta at cervical and dorso-lumbar levels, increased bone trabeculae, cortical thickening and delayed bone age. The presence of five affected members through four generations suggests autosomal dominant inheritance although no male-to-male transmission was documented. The authors propose this as a new entity, and have designated it Guadalajara camptodactyly type III.

  7. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in an Iraqi population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Diez, Isabel E; Moncada, Enrique;

    2013-01-01

    Forty-nine of the 52 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SNPforID 52plex were typed in 101 unrelated Iraqis living in Denmark. No significant deviation from HWE was found in all but one of the 49 SNP systems and no significant pairwise linkage disequilibrium was observed for any...... SNP pair. When 18 worldwide populations were compared (including populations in Iraq, Turkey, Israel, Pakistan, India, China, Taiwan, Japan, Siberia, Algeria, Somalia, Uganda, Mozambique, Angola, Nigeria, Denmark, Portugal, Spain), a significant global F(ST) value was obtained. All but six F...

  8. Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features: Defining the phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Hauser, W. Allen; Pedley, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors previously reported linkage to chromosome 10q22-24 for autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features. This study describes seizure semiology in the original linkage family in further detail. Auditory hallucinations were most common, but other sensory symptoms (visual, olfactory, vertiginous, and cephalic) were also reported. Autonomic, psychic, and motor symptoms were less common. The clinical semiology points to a lateral temporal seizure origin. Auditory hallucinations, the most striking clinical feature, are useful for identifying new families with this synome. PMID:10851389

  9. Paracentric inversions in humans: A review of 446 paracentric inversions with presentation of 120 new cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettenati, M.J.; Rao, P.N. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Grss, F. [Carolina Medical Center, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1995-01-16

    We present a large review of 446 cases of paracentric inversions (PAI), including 120 new cases, to assess their incidence, distribution, inheritance, modes of ascertainment, interchromosomal effects, viable recombinant offspring, and clinical relevance. All 23 autosomes and sex chromosomes had inversions. However, none were identified in chromosome arms 18p, 19q, 20q, and Yp. PAI were most commonly reported in chromosomes 4, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, and Y. Inversions were most common in chromosome arms 6p, 7q, 11q, and 14q and observed least in chromosome arms 2p, 2q, 3q, 4q, and 6q. Frequently encountered breakpoints included 3(p13p25), 6(p12p23), 6(p12p25), 7(q11q22), and 11(q21q23). Ascertainment was primarily incidental (54.5%), mental retardation and/or congenital anomalies (22.2%), spontaneous abortions (11.4%), associations with syndromes (3.0%), and infertility (2.0%) accounted for the remainder. Ascertainment was neither related to the length of the inverted segment nor to specific inversions except for PAI of Xq which often presented with manifestations of Ullrich-Turner syndrome. Sixty-six percent of PAI were inherited while 8.5% were de novo. Recombination was observed in 17 cases, 15 of which resulted in a monocentric chromosomal deletion or duplication. No common factors were identified that suggested a tendency toward recombination. The incidence of viable recombinants was estimated to be 3.8%. This review documents that PAI are perhaps more commonly identified than suggested in previous reviews. Despite the possible bias of ascertainment in some cases, there may be associated risks with PAI that require further examination. Our data suggest that PAI carriers do not appear to be free of risks of abnormalities or abnormal progeny and caution is recommended when counseling. 162 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes......, the results are compatible with the data and, at the same time, favor sharp transitions. The focusing strategy can also be used to constrain the 1D solutions laterally, guaranteeing that lateral sharp transitions are retrieved without losing resolution. By means of real and synthetic datasets, sharp...

  11. Taxonomic characterization of honey bee (Apis mellifera) pollen foraging based on non-overlapping paired-end sequencing of nuclear ribosomal loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, Robert S.; Otto, Clint R.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2015-01-01

    Identifying plant taxa that honey bees (Apis mellifera) forage upon is of great apicultural interest, but traditional methods are labor intensive and may lack resolution. Here we evaluate a high-throughput genetic barcoding approach to characterize trap-collected pollen from multiple North Dakota apiaries across multiple years. We used the Illumina MiSeq platform to generate sequence scaffolds from non-overlapping 300-bp paired-end sequencing reads of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS). Full-length sequence scaffolds represented ~530 bp of ITS sequence after adapter trimming, drawn from the 5’ of ITS1 and the 3’ of ITS2, while skipping the uninformative 5.8S region. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were picked from scaffolds clustered at 97% identity, searched by BLAST against the nt database, and given taxonomic assignments using the paired-read lowest common ancestor approach. Taxonomic assignments and quantitative patterns were consistent with known plant distributions, phenology, and observational reports of pollen foraging, but revealed an unexpected contribution from non-crop graminoids and wetland plants. The mean number of plant species assignments per sample was 23.0 (+/- 5.5) and the mean species diversity (effective number of equally abundant species) was 3.3 (+/- 1.2). Bray-Curtis similarities showed good agreement among samples from the same apiary and sampling date. Rarefaction plots indicated that fewer than 50,000 reads are typically needed to characterize pollen samples of this complexity. Our results show that a pre-compiled, curated reference database is not essential for genus-level assignments, but species-level assignments are hindered by database gaps, reference length variation, and probable errors in the taxonomic assignment, requiring post-hoc evaluation. Although the effective per-sample yield achieved using custom MiSeq amplicon primers was less than the machine maximum, primarily due to lower “read2” quality

  12. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on our......-heuristics are inefficient for large-scale, non-linear inverse problems, and that the 'no-free-lunch' theorem holds. We discuss typical objections to the relevance of this theorem. A consequence of the no-free-lunch theorem is that algorithms adapted to the mathematical structure of the problem perform more efficiently than...

  13. 'Inverse' temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán Navas, R M; Martínez Mendoza, M G

    2011-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation can be classified into four groups (anterior, posterior, lateral, and superior) depending on the direction of displacement and the location of the condylar head. All the groups are rare except for anterior dislocation. 'Inverse' TMJ dislocation is a bilateral anterior and superior dislocation with impaction of the mandible over the maxilla; to the authors' knowledge only two cases have previously been reported in the literature. Inverse TMJ dislocation has unique clinical and radiographic findings, which are described for this case. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The genetic content of chromosomal inversions across a wide latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Simões

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence regarding the role of chromosomal inversions in relevant biological processes such as local adaptation and speciation. A classic example of the adaptive role of chromosomal polymorphisms is given by the clines of inversion frequencies in Drosophila subobscura, repeatable across continents. Nevertheless, not much is known about the molecular variation associated with these polymorphisms. We characterized the genetic content of ca. 600 individuals from nine European populations following a latitudinal gradient by analysing 19 microsatellite loci from two autosomes (J and U and the sex chromosome (A, taking into account their chromosomal inversions. Our results clearly demonstrate the molecular genetic uniformity within a given chromosomal inversion across a large latitudinal gradient, particularly from Groningen (Netherlands in the north to Málaga (Spain in the south, experiencing highly diverse environmental conditions. This low genetic differentiation within the same gene arrangement across the nine European populations is consistent with the local adaptation hypothesis for th evolutionof chromosomal polymorphisms. We also show the effective role of chromosomal inversions in maintaining different genetic pools within these inverted genomic regions even in the presence of high gene flow. Inversions represent thus an important barrier to gene flux and can help maintain specific allelic combinations with positive effects on fitness. Consistent patterns of microsatellite allele-inversion linkage disequilibrium particularly in loci within inversions were also observed. Finally, we identified areas within inversions presenting clinal variation that might be under selection.

  15. Regional variability of imaging biomarkers in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzinger, Tammie L S; Blazey, Tyler; Jack, Clifford R; Koeppe, Robert A; Su, Yi; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus E; Snyder, Abraham Z; Ances, Beau M; Bateman, Randall J; Cairns, Nigel J; Fagan, Anne M; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Aisen, Paul S; Christensen, Jon J; Ercole, Lindsay; Hornbeck, Russ C; Farrar, Angela M; Aldea, Patricia; Jasielec, Mateusz S; Owen, Christopher J; Xie, Xianyun; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam; McDade, Eric; Klunk, William; Mathis, Chester A; Ringman, John; Thompson, Paul M; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Salloway, Stephen; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L; Martins, Ralph; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Cash, David M; Weiner, Michael W; Holtzman, David M; Buckles, Virginia D; Moulder, Krista; Morris, John C

    2013-11-19

    Major imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease include amyloid deposition [imaged with [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET], altered glucose metabolism (imaged with [(18)F]fluro-deoxyglucose PET), and structural atrophy (imaged by MRI). Recently we published the initial subset of imaging findings for specific regions in a cohort of individuals with autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We now extend this work to include a larger cohort, whole-brain analyses integrating all three imaging modalities, and longitudinal data to examine regional differences in imaging biomarker dynamics. The anatomical distribution of imaging biomarkers is described in relation to estimated years from symptom onset. Autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carrier individuals have elevated PiB levels in nearly every cortical region 15 y before the estimated age of onset. Reduced cortical glucose metabolism and cortical thinning in the medial and lateral parietal lobe appeared 10 and 5 y, respectively, before estimated age of onset. Importantly, however, a divergent pattern was observed subcortically. All subcortical gray-matter regions exhibited elevated PiB uptake, but despite this, only the hippocampus showed reduced glucose metabolism. Similarly, atrophy was not observed in the caudate and pallidum despite marked amyloid accumulation. Finally, before hypometabolism, a hypermetabolic phase was identified for some cortical regions, including the precuneus and posterior cingulate. Additional analyses of individuals in which longitudinal data were available suggested that an accelerated appearance of volumetric declines approximately coincides with the onset of the symptomatic phase of the disease.

  16. Microcephaly-chorioretinopathy syndrome, autosomal recessive form. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The autosomal recessive form of microcephaly-chorioretinopathy syndrome is a rare genetic condition that is considered to be an important differential diagnosis with congenital toxoplasmosis.CASE REPORT: Our patient was a seven-year-old white boy who was initially diagnosed with congenital toxoplasmosis. However, his serological tests for congenital infections, including toxoplasmosis, were negative. He was the first child of young, healthy and consanguineous parents (fourth-degree relatives. The parents had normal head circumferences and intelligence. The patient presented microcephaly and specific abnormalities of the retina, with multiple diffuse oval areas of pigmentation and patches of chorioretinal atrophy associated with diffuse pigmentation of the fundus. Ophthalmological evaluations on the parents were normal. A computed tomography scan of the child's head showed slight dilation of lateral ventricles and basal cisterns without evidence of calcifications. We did not find any lymphedema in his hands and feet. He had postnatal growth retardation, severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy.CONCLUSIONS: The finding of chorioretinal lesions in a child with microcephaly should raise suspicions of the autosomal recessive form of microcephaly-chorioretinopathy syndrome, especially in cases with an atypical pattern of eye fundus and consanguinity. A specific diagnosis is essential for an appropriate clinical evaluation and for genetic counseling for the patients and their families.

  17. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related.

  18. FOXE3 plays a significant role in autosomal recessive microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya; Stoler, Joan M; Melancon, Serge B; Semina, Elena V

    2010-03-01

    FOXE3 forkhead transcription factor is essential to lens development in vertebrates. The eyes of Foxe3/foxe3-deficient mice and zebrafish fail to develop normally. In humans, autosomal dominant and recessive mutations in FOXE3 have been associated with variable phenotypes including anterior segment anomalies, cataract, and microphthalmia. We undertook sequencing of FOXE3 in 116 probands with a spectrum of ocular defects ranging from anterior segment dysgenesis and cataract to anophthalmia/microphthalmia. Recessive mutations in FOXE3 were found in four of 26 probands affected with bilateral microphthalmia (15% of all bilateral microphthalmia and 100% of consanguineous families with this phenotype). FOXE3-positive microphthalmia was accompanied by aphakia and/or corneal defects; no other associated systemic anomalies were observed in FOXE3-positive families. The previously reported c.720C > A (p.C240X) nonsense mutation was identified in two additional families in our sample and therefore appears to be recurrent, now reported in three independent microphthalmia families of varied ethnic backgrounds. Several missense variants were identified at varying frequencies in patient and control groups with some apparently being race-specific, which underscores the importance of utilizing race/ethnicity-matched control populations in evaluating the relevance of genetic screening results. In conclusion, FOXE3 mutations represent an important cause of nonsyndromic autosomal recessive bilateral microphthalmia.

  19. Locative Inversion in English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, H.

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at reformulating in more current terms Hoekstra and Mulder’s (1990) analysis of the Locative Inversion (LI) construction. The new proposal is crucially based on the assumption that Small Clause (SC) predicates agree with their external argument in phi-features, which may be morphol

  20. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  1. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  2. Pseudo waveform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Soo; Park, Keun Pil [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Hee; Hyun, Byung Koo; Shin, Sung Ryul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The seismic reflection exploration technique which is one of the geophysical methods for oil exploration became effectively to image the subsurface structure with rapid development of computer. However, the imagining of subsurface based on the conventional data processing is almost impossible to obtain the information on physical properties of the subsurface such as velocity and density. Since seismic data are implicitly function of velocities of subsurface, it is necessary to develop the inversion method that can delineate the velocity structure using seismic topography and waveform inversion. As a tool to perform seismic inversion, seismic forward modeling program using ray tracing should be developed. In this study, we have developed the algorithm that calculate the travel time of the complex geologic structure using shooting ray tracing by subdividing the geologic model into blocky structure having the constant velocity. With the travel time calculation, the partial derivatives of travel time can be calculated efficiently without difficulties. Since the current ray tracing technique has a limitation to calculate the travel times for extremely complex geologic model, our aim in the future is to develop the powerful ray tracer using the finite element technique. After applying the pseudo waveform inversion to the seismic data of Korea offshore, we can obtain the subsurface velocity model and use the result in bring up the quality of the seismic data processing. If conventional seismic data processing and seismic interpretation are linked with this inversion technique, the high quality of seismic data processing can be expected to image the structure of the subsurface. Future research area is to develop the powerful ray tracer of ray tracing which can calculate the travel times for the extremely complex geologic model. (author). 39 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Extra-large Tribolium confusum: a new autosomal recessive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, H H; Brower, J H

    1975-12-01

    A new mutant of Tribolium confusum Jacquelin duVal (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), extra-large (designated xl), was isolated in mating competition tests with red-eye (re) and wild-type (+). Crosses showed that it was autosomal recessive gene with subvital effects. The pupal weights averaged 6.1 and 7.3 mg for males and females, respectively, about twice the weights of the ancestral wild-type. The generation time (egg to adult) was approximately 8 to 9 weeks compared with about 4 weeks for the wild-type. This increase resulted from a lengthening of the larval stage since the durations of the egg and pupal stages were within the ranges of the wild-type. Mean longivity of xl males and females was reduced to 8.5 and 6.0 weeks, respectively at 26.7 +/- 1 degree C and 60% RH.

  4. The Autosomal Recessive Inheritance of Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF is a rare condition which is marked by enlargement of gingival tissue that covers teeth to various extents leading to aesthetic disfigurement. This study presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient and 18-year-old male who belong to the same family suffering from HGF with chief complaint of overgrowing swelling gingiva. The presence of enlarged gingiva with the same eruption was found in their other family members with no concomitant drug or medical history, and the occurrence of HGF has been found in one generation of this family which may indicate the autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of HGF. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is an idiopathic condition as its etiology is unknown and it was found to recur in some cases even after surgical treatment. Both patients underwent thorough oral prophylaxis and later surgical therapy to correct the deformity.

  5. Frontonasal dysplasia: a family presenting autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçak, H; Ceylaner, G

    2009-01-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia (FND, also called frontonasal dysostosis or median cleft face syndrome) includes a spectrum of abnormalities affecting the eyes, forehead and nose, and resulting from midfacial dysraphia. The clinical picture is highly variable, but major findings in FND include ocular hypertelorism, a broad nasal root, median cleft affecting nose or both the nose and upper lip, and widow's peak. It is usually a sporadic disorder, although a few familial cases have been reported. We report here a three-generation family with multiple affected members with frontonasal dysplasia. This observation suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. Furthermore, some of the features e.g. over-riding toes, nail changes, vertical crease on plantar region of the feet in the index patient were not reported up to now.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of an autosomal translocation with regular trisomy 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Yusuf; Deveci, M Salih; Koc, Altug; Kaya, Halide; Alanbay, Ibrahim; Coksuer, Hakan; Dede, Murat

    2013-06-01

    The coincidence of trisomy 21 and a structural rearrangement is very rare, and even it has not been reported as a prenatal diagnosis yet. In this article, we present an autosomal translocation carrier fetus with trisomy 21: 47,XX,+21, t(3;8)(p21;q24). Although the coincidence of reciprocal translocation and trisomy may be seen in reciprocal translocation carrier families, de novo cases are extremely rare. The presented case is diagnosed by amniocentesis, which was performed because of abnormal fetal ultrasonographic findings and increased trisomy 21 risk at maternal serum screening test. The postmortem pathologic examination of the fetus revealed that the findings of hypertelorism and right lung with two lobes are interesting novel findings of our cases associated with the breakpoints 3p21 and 8q24.

  7. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Barbelanne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a rare hereditary neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a marked reduction in brain size and intellectual disability. MCPH is genetically heterogeneous and can exhibit additional clinical features that overlap with related disorders including Seckel syndrome, Meier-Gorlin syndrome, and microcephalic osteodysplastic dwarfism. In this review, we discuss the key proteins mutated in MCPH. To date, MCPH-causing mutations have been identified in twelve different genes, many of which encode proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation or are present at the centrosome, an organelle crucial for mitotic spindle assembly and cell division. We highlight recent findings on MCPH proteins with regard to their role in cell cycle progression, centrosome function, and early brain development.

  8. A review on autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayasreh Fierro, Nadia; Miquel Rodríguez, Rosa; Matamala Gastón, Ana; Ars Criach, Elisabet; Torra Balcells, Roser

    In recent years there has been a reclassification of hereditary tubulointerstitial renal diseases. The old concepts of nephronoptisis or medullary cystic disease have been reordered based on the discovery of new genes. The 2015 KDIGO guidelines proposed a unification of terminology, diagnostic criteria and monitoring. So far 4genes causing autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease have been described: MUC1, UMOD, HNF1B and REN. Although the mutation in each of them causes distinctive features in how they present, all have in common the progressive tubulointerstitial damage and renal fibrosis. In this article, we present a review of the guidelines and the literature, and some practical recommendations for dealing with this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Urinary electrolyte excretion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V; Iordanova, P; Penkova, S

    1991-01-01

    In 33 patients with autosomal dominant renal polycystosis the urine excretion of the electrolytes sodium and potassium was examined and analyzed in relation to the renal function and the arterial pressure. The clearances, the urine ratio and the excreted fractions of both electrolytes were calculated. It was established that by normal renal function and without arterial hypertension there were no significant differences in the parameters studied between the patients and the healthy controls. In the patients with arterial hypertension and preserved renal function the sodium clearance and urine excretion were lower, but the differences with the normotensive patients were not statistically significant. In the patients with chronic renal failure (when diuretic was applied) higher mean values of the excreted fractions of sodium and potassium were established. The results support the thesis that hypertension in renal polycystosis is of volumetric character.

  10. Connexin 26 and autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Monisha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Prelingual deafness occurs with a frequency of 1 in 1000 live births and is divided into syndromic and non-syndromic forms contributing 40 and 60% respectively. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL is responsible for 80% cases of childhood deafness. Nearly all genes localized for ARNSHL cause prelingual, severe to profound, sensorineural hearing impairment. ARNSHL is genetically heterogeneous and at least 39 loci have been identified. The most significant finding to date has been the discovery of mutations in GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 as the major cause of profound prelingual deafness. This was first reported in a Tunisian family in 1994 and thereafter in many different countries. GJB2 gene encodes the gap-junction protein, connexin 26 (Cx26, mutations in which have become the first genetic marker of inherited hearing loss. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR, single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP and sequencing methods have been developed for the detection of mutations in Cx26 gene. In India as well, the Cx26 mutations are being screened in families with hearing impaired children using these molecular methods. Therefore, in order to create awareness among the clinicians and the affected families; we have attempted to review the Cx26 gene mutations responsible for autosomal recessive type of non-syndromic hearing loss. The efficacy and utility of Cx26 gene analysis might open the path to proper counseling of families for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. It may even facilitate the development of strategies in future for the treatment of this common genetic disorder.

  11. Renal and extrarenal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Romão

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of the most common clinical features in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a sample of the Brazilian population. The medical records of 92 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease attended during the period from 1985 to 2003 were reviewed. The following data were recorded: age at diagnosis, gender, associated clinical manifestations, occurrence of stroke, age at loss of renal function (beginning of dialysis, and presence of a family history. The involvement of abdominal viscera was investigated by ultrasonography. Intracranial alterations were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography in 42 asymptomatic patients, and complemented with digital subtraction arteriography when indicated. Mean age at diagnosis was 35.1 ± 14.9 years, and mean serum creatinine at referral was 2.4 ± 2.8 mg/dL. The most frequent clinical manifestations during the disease were arterial hypertension (63.3%, lumbar pain (55.4%, an abdominal mass (47.8%, and urinary infection (35.8%. Loss of renal function occurred in 27 patients (mean age: 45.4 ± 9.5 years. The liver was the second organ most frequently affected (39.1%. Stroke occurred in 7.6% of the patients. Asymptomatic intracranial aneurysm was detected in 3 patients and arachnoid cysts in 3 other patients. In conclusion, the most common clinical features were lumbar pain, arterial hypertension, abdominal mass, and urinary infection, and the most serious complications were chronic renal failure and stroke. Both intracranial aneurysms and arachnoid cysts occurred in asymptomatic patients at a frequency of 7.14%.

  12. Reduced Bayesian Inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Himpe, Christian; Ohlberger, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian inversion of models with large state and parameter spaces proves to be computationally complex. A combined state and parameter reduction can significantly decrease the computational time and cost required for the parameter estimation. The presented technique is based on the well-known balanced truncation approach. Classically, the balancing of the controllability and observability gramians allows a truncation of discardable states. Here the underlying model, being a linear or nonline...

  13. The Fukushima Inverse Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Camara, Marta; Dokmanic, Ivan; Ranieri, Juri; Scheibler, Robin; Vetterli, Martin; STOHL Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Knowing what amount of radioactive material was released from Fukushima in March 2011 and at what time instants is crucial to assess the risk, the pollution, and to understand the scope of the consequences. Moreover, it could be used in forward simulations to obtain accurate maps of deposition. But these data are often not publicly available. We propose to estimate the emission waveforms by solving an inverse problem. Previous approaches have relied on a detailed expert guess of how the relea...

  14. [Total inversion of the uterus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novachkov, V; Baltadzhieva, B; Ilieva, A; Rachev, E

    2008-01-01

    Non puerperal inversion of the uterus is very uncommon. Patients may present with pelvic pain, vaginal bleeding or hemodynamic shock. We report a fifty five old woman with uterus inversion second stage.

  15. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  16. Chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome : Another family with autosomal dominant inheritance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, R; VandeLogt, F; Houtman, WA; VanEssen, AJ

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy and his father with the chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome (CDMMS). Our report extends the phenotypic spectrum of autosomal dominant CDMMS by describing microphthalmia for the first time in an autosomal dominant family. The boy was also severely

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of recurrent autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta associated with unaffected parents and paternal gonadal mosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Recurrent autosomal dominant OI may occur in the offspring of unaffected parents with parental gonadal mosaicism. Genetic counseling of recurrent autosomal dominant OI should include a thorough mutational analysis of the family members, and mutational analysis of the sperm may detect paternal gonadal mosaicism for the mutation.

  18. Progeria (Hutchison-Gilford syndrome) in siblings: in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, T Y; Venkatesulu, G A; Kantharaj, G R; Suresh, T; Veeresh, V; Hanumanthappa, Y

    2001-01-01

    Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclerodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  19. Chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome : Another family with autosomal dominant inheritance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, R; VandeLogt, F; Houtman, WA; VanEssen, AJ

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy and his father with the chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome (CDMMS). Our report extends the phenotypic spectrum of autosomal dominant CDMMS by describing microphthalmia for the first time in an autosomal dominant family. The boy was also severely mental

  20. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study of weak scattering from inhomogeneous media or interface roughness has long been of interest in sonar applications. In an acoustic backscattering model of a stationary field of volume inhomogeneities, a stochastic description of the field is more useful than a deterministic description...... due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  1. Inverse Degree and Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-ling; TIAN Ying-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V(G),order n =丨V(G)丨,minimum degree δ(G) and connectivity κ(G).The graph G is called maximally connected if κ(G) =δ(G).Define the inverse degree of G with no isolated vertices as R(G) =Σv∈V(G)1/d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of the vertex v.We show that G is maximally connected if R(G) < 1 + 2/δ + n-2δ+1/(n-1)(n-3).

  2. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Jared J; Mulamalla, Sumanth; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I

    2011-08-23

    The weight of evidence gathered from studies in humans with hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 disorders, as well as from experimental animal models, indicates that cysts are primarily responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs fairly late in the course of the disease. The processes underlying this decline include anatomic disruption of glomerular filtration and urinary concentration mechanisms on a massive scale, coupled with compression and obstruction by cysts of adjacent nephrons in the cortex, medulla and papilla. Cysts prevent the drainage of urine from upstream tributaries, which leads to tubule atrophy and loss of functioning kidney parenchyma by mechanisms similar to those found in ureteral obstruction. Cyst-derived chemokines, cytokines and growth factors result in a progression to fibrosis that is comparable with the development of other progressive end-stage renal diseases. Treatment of renal cystic disorders early enough to prevent or reduce cyst formation or slow cyst growth, before the secondary changes become widespread, is a reasonable strategy to prolong the useful function of kidneys in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  3. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  4. PARK1 gene mutation of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ligang Jiang; Guohua Hu; Qiuhui Chen; Ying Zhang; Xinyu Hu; Jia Fan; Lifeng Liu; Rui Guo; Yajuan Sun; Yixhi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that PARK1 gene is associated with the autosomal dominant inheritance of Parkinson's disease.PARK1 gene contains two mutation sites, namely Ala30Pro and AIa53Thr, which are located on exons 3 and 4, respectively.However, the genetic loci of the pathogenic genes remain unclear.In this study, blood samples were collected from 11 members of a family with high prevalence of Parkinson's disease, including four affected cases, five suspected cases,and two non-affected cases.Point mutation screening of common mutation sites on PARK1 gene exon 4 was conducted using PCR, to determine the genetic loci of the causative gene for Parkinson's disease.Gene identification and sequencing results showed that a T base deletion mutation was observed in the PARK1 gene exon 4 of all 11 collected samples.It was confirmed that the PARKf gene exon 4 gene mutation is an important pathogenic mutation for Parkinson's disease.

  5. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-20

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  6. Seasonal palmar keratoderma in erythropoietic protoporphyria indicates autosomal recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, S Alexander; Whatley, Sharon D; Roberts, Andrew G; Anstey, Alexander V; Elder, George H; Ead, Russell D; Stewart, M Felicity; Farr, Peter M; Lewis, Helen M; Davies, Nicholas; White, Marion I; Ackroyd, R Simon; Badminton, Michael N

    2009-03-01

    Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is an inherited disorder that results from partial deficiency of ferrochelatase (FECH). It is characterized clinically by acute photosensitivity and, in 2% of patients, liver disease. Inheritance is usually autosomal dominant with low penetrance but is recessive in about 4% of families. A cross-sectional study of 223 patients with EPP in the United Kingdom identified six individuals with palmar keratoderma. We now show that these and three additional patients, from six families, have an inherited subtype of EPP which is characterized by seasonal palmar keratoderma, relatively low erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations, and recessive inheritance. No patient had evidence of liver dysfunction; four patients had neurological abnormalities. Patients were hetero- or homoallelic for nine different FECH mutations; four of which were previously unreported. Prokaryotic expression predicted that FECH activities were 2.7-25% (mean 10.6%) of normal. Neither mutation type nor FECH activity provided an explanation for the unusual phenotype. Our findings show that palmar keratoderma is a clinical indicator of recessive EPP, identify a phenotype that occurs in 38% of reported families with recessive EPP that to our knowledge is previously unreported, and suggest that patients with this phenotype may carry a lower risk of liver disease than other patients with recessive EPP.

  7. [Related reproductive issues on male autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong-cai; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a most common inherited renal disease, about 50% with a family history, although the exact etiology not yet clear. To date, ADPKD, a multisystem disorder without effective preventive and therapeutic means, has been shown to be detrimental to human health. Recent studies show that severe oligoasthenozoospermia, necrospermia, immotile sperm, azoospermia, epididymal cyst, seminal vesicle cyst, and ejaculatory duct cyst found in male ADPKD patients may lead to male infertility, though the specific mechanisms remain unknown. Structural anomaly of spermatozoa, defect of polycystin, mutation of PKD genes, and micro-deletion of the AZF gene could be the reasons for the higher incidence of abnormal semen quality in male ADPKD patients. Assisted reproductive techniques can increase the chances of pregnancy, whereas the health of the offspring should be taken into consideration. This article presents an overview of reproductive issues concerning infertile male ADPKD patients from the perspective of the morbidity, pathophysiological mechanism, diagnosis, and management of the disease.

  8. Research on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Bing; MEI Chang-lin

    2006-01-01

    Objective To review the history and recent development of research on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in China.Data sources Both Chinese and English literatures were searched in MEDLINE/CD ROM (1979 - 2006) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Disk (1979 - 2006).Study selection Published articles about ADPKD from mainland of China were selected. Data were mainly extracted from 58 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results Some preliminary reports on cyst decompression surgeries and mutation analysis represent the contribution to the ADPKD research from China in the history. A serial of basic research and clinical studies on ADPKD in recent years also have been summarized. A technique platform for ADPKD research was firstly established. The genomics/proteomics/bioinformatics approach was introduced, which provide a lot of valuable information for understanding the pathogenesis. By denature high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC)technique the entire PKD1 and PKD2 gene sequence screening system for Chinese Han population has been successfully established. Based on the characteristic data of Chinese patients, an integrated therapy protocol was put forward and won an advantage over the traditional therapy. Some novel experimental studies on therapy also were encouraging. Conclusions Remarkable progress of ADPKD research in China have been made recently. Still many works, including the government support, international collaboration and active participation of more Chinese nephrologists, should be enhanced to advance this process in the near future.

  9. Subjective memory complaints in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Daniel J; Amariglio, Rebecca; Protas, Hillary; Chen, Kewei; Aguirre-Acevedo, Daniel C; Pulsifer, Brendan; Castrillon, Gabriel; Tirado, Victoria; Munoz, Claudia; Tariot, Pierre; Langbaum, Jessica B; Reiman, Eric M; Lopera, Francisco; Sperling, Reisa A; Quiroz, Yakeel T

    2017-10-03

    To cross-sectionally study subjective memory complaints (SMC) in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). We examined self-reported and study partner-based SMC in 52 young, cognitively unimpaired individuals from a Colombian kindred with early-onset ADAD. Twenty-six carried the PSEN-1 E280A mutation, averaging 7 years of age younger than the kindred's expected clinical onset. Twenty-six were age-matched noncarriers. Participants also underwent structural MRI and cognitive testing. Self-reported SMC were greater in carriers than noncarriers (p = 0.02). Study partner-based SMC did not differ between groups (p = 0.21), but in carriers increased with age (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) and decreased with hippocampal volume (r = -0.35, p = 0.08). Cognitively unimpaired PSEN-1 carriers have elevated SMC. Self-reported SMC may be a relatively early indicator of preclinical AD, while partner- reported SMC increases later in preclinical AD, closer to clinical onset. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Linkage of autosomal recessive lamellar ichthyosis to chromosome 14q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.J.; Compton, J.G.; Bale, S.J. [National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); DiGiovanna, J.J. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hashem, N. [Ains-Shams Univ. Medical Genetics Center, Cairo (Egypt)

    1994-12-01

    The authors have mapped the locus for lamellar ichthyosis (LI), an autosomal recessive skin disease characterized by abnormal cornification of the epidermis. Analysis using both inbred and outbred families manifesting severe LI showed complete linkage to several markers within a 9.3-cM region on chromosome 14q11. Affected individuals in inbred families were also found to have striking homozygosity for markers in this region. Linkage-based genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis is now available for informative at-risk families. Several transcribed genes have been mapped to the chromosome 14 region containing the LI gene. The transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1), which encodes one of the enzymes responsible for cross-linking epidermal proteins during formation of the stratum corneum, maps to this interval. The TGM1 locus was completely linked to LI (Z = 9.11), suggesting that TGM1 is a good candidate for further investigation of this disorder. The genes for four serine proteases also map to this region but are expressed only in hematopoietic or mast cells, making them less likely candidates.

  11. Spectrum of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström Pigg, Maritta; Bygum, Anette; Gånemo, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) represents a heterogeneous group of rare disorders of cornification with 3 major subtypes: harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). A 4th subtype has also been proposed: pleomorphic...... ichthyosis (PI), characterized by marked skin changes at birth and subsequently mild symptoms. In nationwide screenings of suspected cases of ARCI in Denmark and Sweden, we identified 132 patients (age range 0.1-86 years) classified as HI (n = 7), LI (n = 70), CIE (n = 17) and PI (n = 38). At birth......-100%). A scoring (0-4) of ichthyosis/ery-thema past infancy showed widely different mean values in the subgroups: HI (3.2/3.1), LI (2.4/0.6), CIE (1.8/1.6), PI (1.1/0.3). Novel or recurrent mutations were found in 113 patients: TGM1 (n = 56), NIPAL4 (n = 15), ALOX12B (n = 15), ABCA12 (n = 8), ALOXE3 (n = 9), SLC27...

  12. Patterns of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases in black Africans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fary Ka Elhadj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is not well described in black Africans while some data suggesting the disease is exceptional in this race. A retrospective study of patients with ADPKD followed in nephrology department of a teaching hospital in Dakar (January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2005 was therefore undertaken. Prevalence of ADPKD was one in 250. Mean age was 47 ± 5 years with a predominance of male (57%. High blood pressure (HBP was present in 68% of patients. Other renal manifestations were flank pain, hematuria and proteinuria. Majority of patients had impaired renal function at time of diagnosis. Extra-renal cysts were essentially found in liver (45.5%, pancreas and seminal vesicles. Main complications: ESRD (51% occurred within a 6 year mean period, urinary tract infection (13% and cerebral haemorrhage (2%. HBP control, in general needed 2 or more antihypertensive drugs. Fourteen patients died, ten patients had been on haemodialysis and four others died from uremic compli-cations. In conclusion, ADPKD in black African adults is not rare and probably underdiagnosed. Early HBP and ESRD are likely more frequent than in other races. Earlier ultrasound detection and strategies to preserve renal function should be offered to at-risk individuals to improve outcomes.

  13. The population genetics of X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A; True, John R

    2011-11-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation-selection balance conditions for X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X-autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane's rule.

  14. Discriminative Features in Three Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa Syndromes: Cutis Laxa IIA, Cutis Laxa IIB, and Geroderma Osteoplastica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariminejad, A.; Afroozan, F.; Bozorgmehr, B.; Ghanadan, A.; Akbaroghli, S.; orram Khorshid, H.R. Kh; Mojahedi, F.; Setoodeh, A.; Loh, A.; Tan, Y.X.; Escande-Beillard, N.; Malfait, F.; Reversade, B.; Gardeitchik, T.; Morava, E.

    2017-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous condition characterized by redundant, sagging, inelastic, and wrinkled skin. The inherited forms of this disease are rare and can have autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked inheritance. Three of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes, namely cutis

  15. A novel approach identifying hybrid sterility QTL on the autosomes of Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Christopher T D; Moehring, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    When species interbreed, the hybrid offspring that are produced are often sterile. If only one hybrid sex is sterile, it is almost always the heterogametic (XY or ZW) sex. Taking this trend into account, the predominant model used to explain the genetic basis of F1 sterility involves a deleterious interaction between recessive sex-linked loci from one species and dominant autosomal loci from the other species. This model is difficult to evaluate, however, as only a handful of loci influencing interspecies hybrid sterility have been identified, and their autosomal genetic interactors have remained elusive. One hindrance to their identification has been the overwhelming effect of the sex chromosome in mapping studies, which could 'mask' the ability to accurately map autosomal factors. Here, we use a novel approach employing attached-X chromosomes to create reciprocal backcross interspecies hybrid males that have a non-recombinant sex chromosome and recombinant autosomes. The heritable variation in phenotype is thus solely caused by differences in the autosomes, thereby allowing us to accurately identify the number and location of autosomal sterility loci. In one direction of backcross, all males were sterile, indicating that sterility could be entirely induced by the sex chromosome complement in these males. In the other direction, we identified nine quantitative trait loci that account for a surprisingly large amount (56%) of the autosome-induced phenotypic variance in sterility, with a large contribution of autosome-autosome epistatic interactions. These loci are capable of acting dominantly, and thus could contribute to F1 hybrid sterility.

  16. Dark Radiative Inverse Seesaw

    CERN Document Server

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah

    2016-01-01

    We present a minimal model that simultaneously accounts for neutrino masses and the origin of dark matter (DM) and where the electroweak phase transition is strong enough to allow for electroweak baryogenesis. The Standard Model is enlarged with a Majorana fermion, three generations of chiral fermion pairs, and a single complex scalar that plays a central role in DM production and phenomenology, neutrino masses, and the strength of the phase transition. All the new fields are singlets under the SM gauge group. Neutrino masses are generated via a new variant of radiative inverse seesaw where the required small mass term is generated via loops involving DM and no large hierarchy is assumed among the mass scales. The model offers all the advantage of low-scale neutrino mass models as well as a viable dark matter candidate that is testable with direct detection experiments.

  17. Inverse Queries For Multidimensional Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bernecker, Thomas; Kriegel, Hans-Peter; Mamoulis, Nikos; Renz, Matthias; Zhang, Shiming; Züfle, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Traditional spatial queries return, for a given query object $q$, all database objects that satisfy a given predicate, such as epsilon range and $k$-nearest neighbors. This paper defines and studies {\\em inverse} spatial queries, which, given a subset of database objects $Q$ and a query predicate, return all objects which, if used as query objects with the predicate, contain $Q$ in their result. We first show a straightforward solution for answering inverse spatial queries for any query predicate. Then, we propose a filter-and-refinement framework that can be used to improve efficiency. We show how to apply this framework on a variety of inverse queries, using appropriate space pruning strategies. In particular, we propose solutions for inverse epsilon range queries, inverse $k$-nearest neighbor queries, and inverse skyline queries. Our experiments show that our framework is significantly more efficient than naive approaches.

  18. Rapid detection of autosomal aneuploidy using microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P.N.; Teshima, I.E. [Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada); Winsor, E.J.T. [Toronto Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy occurs in at least 4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies, making it the most common type of chromosome abnormality in humans. The most commonly occurring trisomies are those of chromosomes 13, 18, 21 and aneuploidy of X and Y, accounting for about 0.3% of all newborns and a much higher percentage of conceptuses. In Canada, prenatal chromosome analysis by amniocentesis is offered to those women {ge} 35 years of age at the time of delivery or equivalent risk by maternal serum screen. We are developing a rapid molecular diagnostic test to detect the most common autosomal aneuploidies in prenatal and neonatal samples. The tests makes use of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat markers labeled with fluorescent tags which allow analysis on a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyzer (ABI). Multiple polymorphic markers have been selected on each of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. At a given locus, trisomic fetuses/neonates will have either three alleles or two alleles with one allele having twice the intensity of the other. Unaffected individuals have two equal intensity alleles. We are conducting a blind study that will compare the detection efficiencies of FISH analysis on uncultured cells and the molecular method on confirmation amniotic fluid samples collected at the time of termination of affected fetuses. Results on cultured amniocytes from one such patient confirmed that trisomy 21 can be detected. FISH was not done on this sample. In addition, detection efficiency of the molecular method in whole blood samples from affected neonates is also being studied. To date, two such samples have been tested, one with trisomy 13 and one with trisomy 18, and both samples were diagnosed correctly. Preliminary results suggest that this method may provide a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy.

  19. Impaired default network functional connectivity in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatwal, Jasmeer P.; Schultz, Aaron P.; Johnson, Keith; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Jack, Clifford; Ances, Beau M.; Sullivan, Caroline A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Ringman, John M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Thompson, Paul; Saykin, Andrew J.; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Fox, Nick C.; Brickman, Adam M.; Mayeux, Richard; McDade, Eric; Bateman, Randall; Fagan, Anne M.; Goate, Allison M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Buckles, Virginia D.; Morris, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in a large cross-sectional cohort of subjects from families harboring pathogenic presenilin-1 (PSEN1), presenilin-2 (PSEN2), and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations participating in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network. Methods: Eighty-three mutation carriers and 37 asymptomatic noncarriers from the same families underwent fMRI during resting state at 8 centers in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Using group-independent component analysis, fcMRI was compared using mutation status and Clinical Dementia Rating to stratify groups, and related to each participant's estimated years from expected symptom onset (eYO). Results: We observed significantly decreased DMN fcMRI in mutation carriers with increasing Clinical Dementia Rating, most evident in the precuneus/posterior cingulate and parietal cortices (p < 0.001). Comparison of asymptomatic mutation carriers with noncarriers demonstrated decreased fcMRI in the precuneus/posterior cingulate (p = 0.014) and right parietal cortex (p = 0.0016). We observed a significant interaction between mutation carrier status and eYO, with decreases in DMN fcMRI observed as mutation carriers approached and surpassed their eYO. Conclusion: Functional disruption of the DMN occurs early in the course of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease, beginning before clinically evident symptoms, and worsening with increased impairment. These findings suggest that DMN fcMRI may prove useful as a biomarker across a wide spectrum of disease, and support the feasibility of DMN fcMRI as a secondary endpoint in upcoming multicenter clinical trials in Alzheimer disease. PMID:23884042

  20. AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT HYPOCALCEMIA (HYPOPARATHYROIDISM TYPES 1 AND 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Lauter Roszko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular calcium is essential for life and its concentration in the blood is maintained within a narrow range. This is achieved by a feedback loop that receives input from the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR, expressed on the surface of parathyroid cells. In response to low ionized calcium, the parathyroids increase secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH which increases serum calcium. The CASR is also highly expressed in the kidneys, where it regulates the reabsorption of calcium from the primary filtrate. Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH type 1 is caused by heterozygous activating mutations in the CASR which increase the sensitivity of the CASR to extracellular ionized calcium. Consequently, PTH synthesis and secretion is suppressed at normal ionized calcium concentrations. Patients present with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, low magnesium levels, and low or low-normal levels of PTH. Urinary calcium excretion is typically increased due to the decrease in circulating PTH concentrations and by the activation of the renal tubular CASR. Therapeutic attempts using CASR antagonists (calcilytics to treat ADH are currently under investigation. Recently, heterozygous mutations in the alpha subunit of the G protein G11 (GNA11 have been identified in patients with ADH, and this has been classified as ADH type 2. ADH2 mutations lead to a gain-of-function of Gα11, a key mediator of CASR signaling. Therefore, the mechanism of hypocalcemia appears similar to that of activating mutations in the CASR, namely an increase in the sensitivity of parathyroid cells to extracellular ionized calcium. Studies of activating mutations in the CASR and gain-of-function mutations in GNA11 can help define new drug targets and improve medical management of patients with ADH types 1 and 2.

  1. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  2. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Bastos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is one of the most common human life-threatening monogenic disorders. The disease is characterized by bilateral, progressive renal cystogenesis and cyst and kidney enlargement, often leading to end-stage renal disease, and may include extrarenal manifestations. ADPKD is caused by mutation in one of two genes, PKD1 and PKD2, which encode polycystin-1 (PC1 and polycystin-2 (PC2, respectively. PC2 is a non-selective cation channel permeable to Ca2+, while PC1 is thought to function as a membrane receptor. The cyst cell phenotype includes increased proliferation and apoptosis, dedifferentiation, defective planar polarity, and a secretory pattern associated with extracellular matrix remodeling. The two-hit model for cyst formation has been recently extended by the demonstration that early gene inactivation leads to rapid and diffuse development of renal cysts, while inactivation in adult life is followed by focal and late cyst formation. Renal ischemia/reperfusion, however, can function as a third hit, triggering rapid cyst development in kidneys with Pkd1 inactivation induced in adult life. The PC1-PC2 complex behaves as a sensor in the primary cilium, mediating signal transduction via Ca2+ signaling. The intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is impaired in ADPKD, being apparently responsible for the cAMP accumulation and abnormal cell proliferative response to cAMP. Activated mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR and cell cycle dysregulation are also significant features of PKD. Based on the identification of pathways altered in PKD, a large number of preclinical studies have been performed and are underway, providing a basis for clinical trials in ADPKD and helping the design of future trials.

  3. Approximation Theorems of Moore-Penrose Inverse by Outer Inverses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianglian Huang; Zheng Fang

    2006-01-01

    Let X and Y be Hilbert spaces and T a bounded linear operator from X into Y with a separable range. In this note, we prove, without assuming the closeness of the range of T, that the Moore-Penrose inverse T+ of T can be approximated by its bounded outer inverses T#n with finite ranks.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Stroke Health Topic: Dementia Health Topic: Ischemic Stroke Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy Additional NIH ... Educational Resources (6 links) ...

  5. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  6. Autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia: a novel non-sense mutation in CD79a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Abbas; Plebani, Alessandro; Vitali, Massimiliano; Abolhassani, Hassan; Lougaris, Vassilios; Mirminachi, Babak; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the fifth case worldwide of autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia due to a novel non-sense mutation in CD79a gene with a severe unusual onset due to an invasive central nervous system infection.

  7. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Chen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study.

  8. A gene for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus localizes to 6p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrison, J.B.; Arnould, V.J.; Koenekoop, R.K. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Congenital nystagmus is an idiopathic disorder characterized by bilateral ocular oscillations usually manifest during infancy. Vision is typically decreased due to slippage of images across the fovea. As such, visual acuity correlates with nystagmus intensity, which is the amplitude and frequency of eye movements at a given position of gaze. X-linked, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive pedigrees have been described, but no mapping studies have been published. We recently described a large pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus. A genome-wide search resulted in six markers on 6p linked by two-point analysis at {theta} = 0 (D6S459, D6S452, D6S465, FTHP1, D6S257, D6S430). Haplotype analysis localizes the gene for autosomal dominant congenital motor mystagmus to an 18-cM region between D6S271 and D6S455. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Vertical corneal striae in families with autosomal dominant hearing loss: DFNA9/COCH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.M.L.C.; Pauw, R.J.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Investigation of a possible association between vertical corneal striae and mutations in the COCH gene, observed in four DFNA9 families with autosomal dominant hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. DESIGN: Prospective case series. METHODS: Ophthalmologic examinations with photography of

  10. Object Matching Across Multiple Non-overlapping Fields of View Using Fuzzy Logic%基于模糊逻辑的多相机非重叠场景的物体匹配

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOKE Yuan Ren; KUMAR Pankaj; RANGANATH Surendra; 黄为民

    2006-01-01

    An approach based on fuzzy logic for matching both articulated and non-articulated objects across multiple non-overlapping field of views (FoVs) from multiple cameras is proposed.We call it fuzzy logic matching algorithm (FLMA). The approach uses the information of object motion, shape and camera topology for matching objects across camera views. The motion and shape information of targets are obtained by tracking them using a combination of ConDensation and CAMShift tracking algorithms. The information of camera topology is obtained and used by calculating the projective transformation of each view with the common ground plane. The algorithm is suitable for tracking non-rigid objects with both linear and non-linear motion. We show videos of tracking objects across multiple cameras based on FLMA. From our experiments, the system is able to correctly match the targets across views with a high accuracy.

  11. 无交叠垂直梳齿平动微镜的驱动特性%Driving characteristics of non-overlap vertical electrostatic combdriver for optical translational micromirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟雷应; 徐静; 钟少龙; 吴亚明

    2012-01-01

    To design a non-overlap vertical electrostatic combdriver for the optical translational micromirror of ..an optical phase modulator, a mathematic model based on the conformal mapping was built to research the driving performance of the combdriver in detail. According to the theory of complex variable function, an analytical model was established for the electrostatic field of comb actuator by conformal mapping. Then, the electrostatic force in a certain displacement range was deduced by the analytical model for researching the movable comb finger. The results were compared with the corresponding resolution by the Finite Element Method (FEM). Finally, a non-overlap vertical combdriver was successfully fabricated by Micro Electronic Mechanic System(MEMS) process, and an optical Michelson interference system was constructed to measure the static driving charateristics of thecomb driver. The result shows that the displacement of proposed non-overlap vertical electrostatic combdriver is 325 nm (phase difference 2-n) with a dc driving voltage of 28 V and the offset vertical comb actuator can be actuated to 2. 07 pm under a dc driving voltage of 90 V. The measured results accord excellently with the simulated results using the conformal mapping and FEM method, which proves proposed analytical model to be correct. It can provide theoretical and pratical bases for design of non-overlap vertical electrostatic combdrivers.%为了设计用于光相位调制器平动微镜的无交叠梳齿驱动器,建立了保角变换数学模型,研究了驱动器的驱动特性.从复变函数理论出发,建立了驱动器的保角变换静电场解析模型;以动齿受力为研究对象,根据不同情形下的动齿受力特点,求解了一定区间内动齿的静电力并与有限元模拟计算结果进行了对比分析.采用微机电系统(MEMS)工艺制作出了无交叠梳齿驱动器,搭建了Michelson干涉仪光学测试系统,测试了无交叠梳齿驱动器的静态驱

  12. An 11-Year-Old Child with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Who Presented with Nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Firinci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease become symptomatic and are diagnosed usually at adulthood. The rate of nephrolithiasis in these patients is 5–10 times the rate in the general population, and both anatomic and metabolic abnormalities play role in the formation of renal stones. However, nephrolithiasis is rare in childhood age group. In this paper, an 11-year-old child with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presenting with nephrolithiasis is discussed.

  13. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA).......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  14. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  15. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  16. Inverse problems for Maxwell's equations

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, V G

    1994-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.

  17. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  18. Confidence intervals for single-case effect size measures based on randomization test inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Bart; Heyvaert, Mieke; Meulders, Ann; Onghena, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    In the current paper, we present a method to construct nonparametric confidence intervals (CIs) for single-case effect size measures in the context of various single-case designs. We use the relationship between a two-sided statistical hypothesis test at significance level α and a 100 (1 - α) % two-sided CI to construct CIs for any effect size measure θ that contain all point null hypothesis θ values that cannot be rejected by the hypothesis test at significance level α. This method of hypothesis test inversion (HTI) can be employed using a randomization test as the statistical hypothesis test in order to construct a nonparametric CI for θ. We will refer to this procedure as randomization test inversion (RTI). We illustrate RTI in a situation in which θ is the unstandardized and the standardized difference in means between two treatments in a completely randomized single-case design. Additionally, we demonstrate how RTI can be extended to other types of single-case designs. Finally, we discuss a few challenges for RTI as well as possibilities when using the method with other effect size measures, such as rank-based nonoverlap indices. Supplementary to this paper, we provide easy-to-use R code, which allows the user to construct nonparametric CIs according to the proposed method.

  19. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons.

  20. Multiscale Modelling and Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J; Stuart, A M

    2010-01-01

    The need to blend observational data and mathematical models arises in many applications and leads naturally to inverse problems. Parameters appearing in the model, such as constitutive tensors, initial conditions, boundary conditions, and forcing can be estimated on the basis of observed data. The resulting inverse problems are often ill-posed and some form of regularization is required. These notes discuss parameter estimation in situations where the unknown parameters vary across multiple scales. We illustrate the main ideas using a simple model for groundwater flow. We will highlight various approaches to regularization for inverse problems, including Tikhonov and Bayesian methods. We illustrate three ideas that arise when considering inverse problems in the multiscale context. The first idea is that the choice of space or set in which to seek the solution to the inverse problem is intimately related to whether a homogenized or full multiscale solution is required. This is a choice of regularization. The ...

  1. A rainbow inverse problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvez V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the radiative transfer equation (RTE with reflection in a three-dimensional domain, infinite in two dimensions, and prove an existence result. Then, we study the inverse problem of retrieving the optical parameters from boundary measurements, with help of existing results by Choulli and Stefanov. This theoretical analysis is the framework of an attempt to model the color of the skin. For this purpose, a code has been developed to solve the RTE and to study the sensitivity of the measurements made by biophysicists with respect to the physiological parameters responsible for the optical properties of this complex, multi-layered material. On étudie l’équation du transfert radiatif (ETR dans un domaine tridimensionnel infini dans deux directions, et on prouve un résultat d’existence. On s’intéresse ensuite à la reconstruction des paramètres optiques à partir de mesures faites au bord, en s’appuyant sur des résultats de Choulli et Stefanov. Cette analyse sert de cadre théorique à un travail de modélisation de la couleur de la peau. Dans cette perspective, un code à été développé pour résoudre l’ETR et étudier la sensibilité des mesures effectuées par les biophysiciens par rapport aux paramètres physiologiques tenus pour responsables des propriétés optiques de ce complexe matériau multicouche.

  2. Multidimensional NMR Inversion without Kronecker Products: Multilinear Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Medellín, David; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required...

  3. Givental graphs and inversion symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Dunin-Barkowski, P; Spitz, L

    2012-01-01

    Inversion symmetry is a very non-trivial discrete symmetry of Frobenius manifolds. It was obtained by Dubrovin from one of the elementary Schlesinger transformations of a special ODE associated to Frobenius manifold. In this paper, we review the Givental group action on Frobenius manifolds in terms of Feynman graphs and then we obtain an interpretation of the inversion symmetry in terms of the action of the Givental group. We also consider the implication of this interpretation of the inversion symmetry for the Schlesinger transformations and for the Hamiltonians of the associated principle hierarchy.

  4. Inverse Doppler Effects in Flute

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao P; Liu, Song; Shen, Fang L; Li, Lin L; Luo, Chun R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the observation of the inverse Doppler effects in a flute. It is experimentally verified that, when there is a relative movement between the source and the observer, the inverse Doppler effect could be detected for all seven pitches of a musical scale produced by a flute. Higher tone is associated with a greater shift in frequency. The effect of the inverse frequency shift may provide new insights into why the flute, with its euphonious tone, has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  5. High serum soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Funda; Inci, Ayca; Dolu, Suleyman; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Cetinkaya, Ramazan; Ersoy, Fettah Fevzi

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to determine fibroblast growth factor-23 and soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. A total of 76 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and 32 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Serum fibroblast growth factor-23 and soluble α-Klotho levels were measured with ELISA kits. Parathyroid hormone, phosphate, calcium, creatinine, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels, urinary protein to creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate were also measured or calculated. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease had significantly higher serum parathyroid hormone (pserum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels (pSerum fibroblast growth factor-23, soluble α-Klotho and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were similar in all five chronic kidney disease stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (p>0.05). Fibroblast growth factor-23 (r=-0.251, p=0.034) and soluble α-Klotho levels (r=-0.251, p=0.034) were found to be negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. This study shows increased fibroblast growth factor-23 levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease which is in harmony with the general trend in patients with chronic kidney disease of other aetiologies, but, unlike them, also a significant increase in serum soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease suggesting an aberrant production or a decreased clearance of α-Klotho molecule. Considering the unique increases in erythropoietin levels due to erythropoietin production in renal cysts, we assume, patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may potentially have different soluble α-Klotho production/clearance characteristics than the patients with other parenchymal renal diseases.

  6. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2005-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems primarily serves as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and introductory graduate courses. Class notes have been developed and reside on the World Wide Web for faciliting use and feedback by teaching colleagues. The authors'' treatment promotes an understanding of fundamental and practical issus associated with parameter fitting and inverse problems including basic theory of inverse problems, statistical issues, computational issues, and an understanding of how to analyze the success and limitations of solutions to these probles. The text is also a practical resource for general students and professional researchers, where techniques and concepts can be readily picked up on a chapter-by-chapter basis.Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems is structured around a course at New Mexico Tech and is designed to be accessible to typical graduate students in the physical sciences who may not have an extensive mathematical background. It is accompanied by a Web site that...

  7. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    KAUST Repository

    Page, Morgan T.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  8. Statistical perspectives on inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil

    of the interior of an object from electrical boundary measurements. One part of this thesis concerns statistical approaches for solving, possibly non-linear, inverse problems. Thus inverse problems are recasted in a form suitable for statistical inference. In particular, a Bayesian approach for regularisation...... is obtained by assuming that the a priori beliefs about the solution before having observed any data can be described by a prior distribution. The solution to the statistical inverse problem is then given by the posterior distribution obtained by Bayes' formula. Hence the solution of an ill-posed inverse...... problem is given in terms of probability distributions. Posterior inference is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and new, powerful simulation techniques based on e.g. coupled Markov chains and simulated tempering is developed to improve the computational efficiency of the overall simulation...

  9. Bayesian Approach to Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Many scientific, medical or engineering problems raise the issue of recovering some physical quantities from indirect measurements; for instance, detecting or quantifying flaws or cracks within a material from acoustic or electromagnetic measurements at its surface is an essential problem of non-destructive evaluation. The concept of inverse problems precisely originates from the idea of inverting the laws of physics to recover a quantity of interest from measurable data.Unfortunately, most inverse problems are ill-posed, which means that precise and stable solutions are not easy to devise. Regularization is the key concept to solve inverse problems.The goal of this book is to deal with inverse problems and regularized solutions using the Bayesian statistical tools, with a particular view to signal and image estimation

  10. Inversion Therapy: Can It Relieve Back Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Conditions Back pain Does inversion therapy relieve back pain? Is it safe? Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. Inversion therapy doesn't provide lasting relief from back pain, and it's not safe for everyone. Inversion therapy ...

  11. Inversion-symmetric topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Taylor L.; Prodan, Emil; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2011-06-01

    We analyze translationally invariant insulators with inversion symmetry that fall outside the current established classification of topological insulators. These insulators exhibit no edge or surface modes in the energy spectrum and hence they are not edge metals when the Fermi level is in the bulk gap. However, they do exhibit protected modes in the entanglement spectrum localized on the cut between two entangled regions. Their entanglement entropy cannot be made to vanish adiabatically, and hence the insulators can be called topological. There is a direct connection between the inversion eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian band structure and the midgap states in the entanglement spectrum. The classification of protected entanglement levels is given by an integer N, which is the difference between the negative inversion eigenvalues at inversion symmetric points in the Brillouin zone, taken in sets of 2. When the Hamiltonian describes a Chern insulator or a nontrivial time-reversal invariant topological insulator, the entirety of the entanglement spectrum exhibits spectral flow. If the Chern number is zero for the former, or time reversal is broken in the latter, the entanglement spectrum does not have spectral flow, but, depending on the inversion eigenvalues, can still exhibit protected midgap bands similar to impurity bands in normal semiconductors. Although spectral flow is broken (implying the absence of real edge or surface modes in the original Hamiltonian), the midgap entanglement bands cannot be adiabatically removed, and the insulator is “topological.” We analyze the linear response of these insulators and provide proofs and examples of when the inversion eigenvalues determine a nontrivial charge polarization, a quantum Hall effect, an anisotropic three-dimensional (3D) quantum Hall effect, or a magnetoelectric polarization. In one dimension, we establish a link between the product of the inversion eigenvalues of all occupied bands at all inversion

  12. -Colour Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geetika Narang; A K Agarwal

    2006-08-01

    MacMahon’s definition of self-inverse composition is extended to -colour self-inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence relations, generating functions and a summation formula are obtained. Two new binomial identities with combinatorial meaning are also given.

  13. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  14. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-08-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible.

  15. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  16. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  17. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.B.; Jones, S.M.; Lesicki, A.; Reinglass, T. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sharp, G.B.; Lange, B.M. [Arkansas Children`s Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States); Varvil, T.; Otterud, B.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant, uncomplicated familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by insidiously progressive lower-extremity spasticity. Recently, a locus on chromosome 14q was shown to be tightly linked with the disorder in one of three families. We performed linkage analysis in a kindred with autosomal dominant uncomplicated FSP. After excluding the chromosome 14q locus, we observed tight linkage of the disorder to a group of markers on chromosome 15q (maximum two-point lod score 9.70; {theta} = .05). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant FSP in the centromeric region of chromosome 15q. Comparing clinical and genetic features in FSP families linked to chromosome 14q with those linked to chromosome 15q may provide insight into the pathophysiology of this disorder. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Novel large deletion in the ACTA1 gene in a child with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bethany; Simpson, Kara; Tesi-Rocha, Carolina; Zhou, Delu; Palmer, Cheryl A; Suchy, Sharon F

    2014-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder resulting from a disruption of the thin filament proteins of the striated muscle sarcomere. The disorder is typically characterized by muscle weakness including the face, neck, respiratory, and limb muscles and is clinically classified based on the age of onset and severity. Mutations in the ACTA1 gene contribute to a significant proportion of NM cases. The majority of ACTA1 gene mutations are missense mutations causing autosomal dominant NM by producing an abnormal protein. However, approximately 10% of ACTA1 gene mutations are associated with autosomal recessive NM; these mutations are associated with loss of protein function. We report the first case of a large deletion in the ACTA1 gene contributing to autosomal recessive NM. This case illustrates the importance of understanding disease mechanisms at the molecular level to accurately infer the inheritance pattern and potentially aid with clinical management. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Reinvestigations of six unusual paternity cases by typing of autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2012-01-01

    and published as case work examples in forensic journals. Here, the cases were reinvestigated by typing the samples for 49 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the SNPforID multiplex assay. RESULTS: Three cases were solved by the SNP investigation without the need for any additional testing....... In two cases, the SNP results supported the conclusions based on STRs. In the last case, the SNP results spoke in favor of paternity, and the combined paternity index based on autosomal STRs and SNPs was 12.3 billion. Nevertheless, the alleged father was excluded by X-chromosome typing. CONCLUSION...

  1. A case of false mother included with 46 autosomal STR markers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Ruxin; Zhao, Zhenmin; Que, Tingzhi

    2015-01-01

    Background For solving a maternity case, 19 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) were amplified using the AmpFℓSTR® SinofilerTM kit and PowerPlex® 16 System. Additional 27 autosomal STR loci were analyzed using two domestic kits AGCU 21+1 and STRtyper-10G. The combined maternity index (CMI) was calculated to be 3.3 × 1013, but the putative mother denied that she had given birth to the child. In order to reach an accurate conclusion, further testing of 20 X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (X...

  2. Subadditive functions and their (pseudo-)inverses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The paper considers non-negative increasing functions on intervals with left endpoint closed at zero and investigates the duality between subadditivity and superadditivity via the inverse function and pseudo-inverses......The paper considers non-negative increasing functions on intervals with left endpoint closed at zero and investigates the duality between subadditivity and superadditivity via the inverse function and pseudo-inverses...

  3. The representation and computation of generalized inverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xingping; Chen, Guoliang; Gong, Yi

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel representation for the generalized inverse . Based on this, we give an algorithm to compute this generalized inverse. As an application, we use Gauss-Jordan elimination to compute the weighted Moore-Penrose inverse and the Drazin inverse Ad.

  4. Exploring the Hamiltonian inversion landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Ashley; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-08-07

    The identification of quantum system Hamiltonians through the use of experimental data remains an important research goal. Seeking a Hamiltonian that is consistent with experimental measurements constitutes an excursion over a Hamiltonian inversion landscape, which is the quality of reproducing the data as a function of the Hamiltonian parameters. Recent theoretical work showed that with sufficient experimental data there should be local convexity about the true Hamiltonian on the landscape. The present paper builds on this result and performs simulations to test whether such convexity is observed. A gradient-based Hamiltonian search algorithm is incorporated into an inversion routine as a means to explore the local inversion landscape. The simulations consider idealized noise-free as well as noise-ridden experimental data. The results suggest that a sizable convex domain exists about the true Hamiltonian, even with a modest amount of experimental data and in the presence of a reasonable level of noise.

  5. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  6. Inverse methods for radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Keith C.

    Implicit optimization methods for solving the inverse transport problems of interface location identification, source isotope weight fraction identification, shield material identification, and material mass density identification are explored. Among these optimization methods are the Schwinger inverse method, Levenberg-Marquardt method, and evolutionary algorithms. Inverse problems are studied in one-dimensional spherical and two-dimensional cylindrical geometries. The scalar fluxes of unscattered gamma-ray lines, leakages of neutron-induced gamma-ray lines, and/or neutron multiplication in the system are assumed to be measured. Each optimization method is studied on numerical test problems in which the measured data is simulated using the same deterministic transport code used in the optimization process (assuming perfectly consistent measurements) and using a Monte Carlo code (assuming less-consistent, more realistic measurements). The Schwinger inverse method and Levenberg-Marquardt methods are found to be successful for problems with relatively few (i.e. 4 or fewer) unknown parameters, with the former being the best for unknown isotope problems and the latter being more adept at interface location, unknown material mass density, and mixed parameter problems. A study of a variety of evolutionary algorithms indicates that the differential evolution method is the best for inverse transport problems, and outperforms the Levenberg-Marquardt method on problems with large numbers of unknowns. An algorithm created by combining different variants of the differential evolution method is shown to be highly successful on spherical problems with unscattered gamma-ray lines, while a basic differential evolution approach is more useful for problems with scattering and in cylindrical geometries. A hybrid differential evolution/Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm also was found to show promise for fast and robust solution of inverse problems.

  7. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  8. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  9. Population inversion by chirped pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Tianshi [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas 67260-0033 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, we analyze the condition for complete population inversion by a chirped pulse over a finite duration. The nonadiabatic transition probability is mapped in the two-dimensional parameter space of coupling strength and detuning amplitude. Asymptotic forms of the probability are derived by the interference of nonadiabatic transitions for sinusoidal and triangular pulses. The qualitative difference between the maps for the two types of pulses is accounted for. The map is used for the design of stable inversion pulses under specific accuracy thresholds.

  10. Size Estimates in Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Cristo, Michele

    2014-01-06

    Detection of inclusions or obstacles inside a body by boundary measurements is an inverse problems very useful in practical applications. When only finite numbers of measurements are available, we try to detect some information on the embedded object such as its size. In this talk we review some recent results on several inverse problems. The idea is to provide constructive upper and lower estimates of the area/volume of the unknown defect in terms of a quantity related to the work that can be expressed with the available boundary data.

  11. Inverse methods in hydrologic optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard R. Gordon

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods for solving the hydrologic-optics inverse problem, i.e., estimating the inherent optical properties of a water body based solely on measurements of the apparent optical properties, are reviewed in detail. A new method is developed for the inverse problem in water bodies in which fluorescence is important. It is shown that in principle, given profiles of the spectra of up- and downwelling irradiance, estimation of the coefficient of inelastic scattering from any wave band to any other wave band can be effected.

  12. Darwin's "strange inversion of reasoning".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-06-16

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive "inversion of reasoning" (according to a 19th century critic): "to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it" [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own.

  13. An analysis on the inversion of polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    M. F. González-Cardel; R. Díaz-Uribe

    2006-01-01

    In this work the application and the intervals of validity of an inverse polynomial, according to the method proposed by Arfken [1] for the inversion of series, is analyzed. It is shown that, for the inverse polynomial there exists a restricted domain whose longitude depends on the magnitude of the acceptable error when the inverse polynomial is used to approximate the inverse function of the original polynomial. A method for calculating the error of the approximation and its use in determini...

  14. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  15. Identification of Mutations in SDR9C7 in 6 Families with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotz, A; Fagerberg, C; Vahlquist, A

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of keratinization. To date, ARCI has been associated with following genes: ABCA12, ALOX12B, ALOXE3, CERS3, CYP4F22, NIPAL4, TGM1, PNPLA1 and recently SDR9C7 and SULT2B1.(1-6) Furthermore, seven patients from...

  16. Mutations in KIF11 cause autosomal-dominant microcephaly variably associated with congenital lymphedema and chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostergaard, P.; Simpson, M.A.; Mendola, A.; Vasudevan, P.; Connell, F.C.; Impel, A. van; Moore, A.T.; Loeys, B.L.; Ghalamkarpour, A.; Onoufriadis, A.; Martinez-Corral, I.; Devery, S.; Leroy, J.G.; Laer, L. van; Singer, A.; Bialer, M.G.; McEntagart, M.; Quarrell, O.; Brice, G.; Trembath, R.C.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Makinen, T.; Vikkula, M.; Mortimer, P.S.; Mansour, S.; Jeffery, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have identified KIF11 mutations in individuals with syndromic autosomal-dominant microcephaly associated with lymphedema and/or chorioretinopathy. Initial whole-exome sequencing revealed heterozygous KIF11 mutations in three individuals with a combination of microcephaly and lymphedema from a mic

  17. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Gevers, Tom J. G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe,

  18. Mutations in KIF11 cause autosomal-dominant microcephaly variably associated with congenital lymphedema and chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostergaard, P.; Simpson, M.A.; Mendola, A.; Vasudevan, P.; Connell, F.C.; van Impel, A.; Moore, A.T.; Loeys, B.L.; Ghalamkarpour, A.; Onoufriadis, A.; Martinez-Corral, I.; Devery, S.; Leroy, J.G.; van Laer, L.; Singer, A.; Bialer, M.G.; McEntagart, M.; Quarrell, O.; Brice, G.; Trembath, R.C.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Makinen, T.; Vikkula, M.; Mortimer, P.S.; Mansour, S.; Jeffery, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have identified KIF11 mutations in individuals with syndromic autosomal-dominant microcephaly associated with lymphedema and/or chorioretinopathy. Initial whole-exome sequencing revealed heterozygous KIF11 mutations in three individuals with a combination of microcephaly and lymphedema from a

  19. A Nonsense Mutation in PDE6H Causes Autosomal-Recessive Incomplete Achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, S.; Coppieters, F.; Meire, F.; Schaich, S.; Roosing, S.; Brennenstuhl, C.; Bolz, S.; Genderen, M.M. van; Riemslag, F.C.; Lukowski, R.; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M.; Baere, E. de; Hoyng, C.B.; Wissinger, B.

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal-recessive retinal dystrophy characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus, and severely reduced visual acuity. Its prevalence has been estimated to about 1 in 30,000 individuals. Four genes, GNAT2, PDE6C, CNGA3, and CNGB3, have been implicated in ACHM,

  20. Renal replacement therapy for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Still, there are few epidemiological data on the prevalence of, and survival on RRT for ADPKD. METHODS: This study used data from the ERA-EDTA Registry...

  1. Improved prognosis in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørskov, Bjarne; Rømming Sørensen, Vibeke; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies, including agents that block the renin-angiotensin system, may have affected progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated whether the age when reaching ESRD and survival during renal replacement therapy in Danish patients...

  2. Typing of 49 autosomal SNPs by SNaPshot in the Slovenian population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drobnic, Katja; Børsting, Claus; Rockenbauer, Eszter

    2010-01-01

    A total of 157 unrelated individuals residing in Slovenia were typed for 49 of the autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SNPforID 52plex with the SNaPshot assay. We obtained full SNP profiles in all but one individual and perfect concordance was obtained in duplicated analyses...

  3. Management of renal cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantinga, Marten A; Casteleijn, Niek F; Geudens, Alix; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; van Assen, Sander; Leliveld, Anna; Gansevoort, Ron T; Drenth, Joost P H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal cyst infection is one of the complications faced by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Cyst infection is often difficult to treat and potentially leads to sepsis and death. No evidence-based treatment strategy exists. We therefore performed a system

  4. CNGB3 mutations account for 50% of all cases with autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, S.; Varsanyi, B.; Antunes, G.A.; Baumann, B.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jagle, H.; Rosenberg, T.; Kellner, U.; Lorenz, B.; Salati, R.; Jurklies, B.; Farkas, A.; Andreasson, S.; Weleber, R.G.; Jacobson, S.G.; Rudolph, G.; Castellan, C.; Dollfus, H.; Legius, E.; Anastasi, M.; Bitoun, P.; Lev, D.; Sieving, P.A.; Munier, F.L.; Zrenner, E.; Sharpe, L.T.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Wissinger, B.

    2005-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a congenital, autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by a lack of color discrimination, low visual acuity (<0.2), photophobia, and nystagmus. Mutations in the genes for CNGA3, CNGB3, and GNAT2 have been associated with this disorder. Here, we analyzed the spectrum

  5. Multiple thoracic paraspinal meningeal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Persu, Alexandre; Cosnard, Guy; Quoidbach, Albert; Pirson, Yves

    2003-02-01

    Spinal meningeal cysts have been reported in 3 patients as an extrarenal manifestation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The authors report on a fourth patient with ADPKD who was found to harbor 7 thoracic meningeal cysts, appearing as paraspinal masses on plain films. The authors provide a comprehensive radiologic description of this abnormality.

  6. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D;

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examine...

  7. Comparative genetic mapping in Fragaria virginiana reveals autosomal origin of sex chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although most flowering plants are hermaphrodite, separate sexes (dioecy) have evolved repeatedly. The evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes can often, but not always, accompany this transition. Thus, many have argued that plant genera that contain both hermaphroditic and dioecious members pro...

  8. Autosomal STR allele frequencies for the CODIS system from a large random population sample in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Ismael A; Villouta, Pamela; Herrera, Sandra; Melo, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    The thirteen autosomal STR loci of the CODIS system were typed from DNA of 732 unrelated male individuals sampled from different locations in Chile. This is the first report of allele frequencies for the thirteen STRs loci defined in the CODIS system from the Chilean population.

  9. Autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and sensorineual hearing loss associated with a novel mutation of WFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewind, B.F.T.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Hol, F.A.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Hoefsloot, E.H.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of a novel Wolframin (WFS1) mutation in a family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy and deafness. The study is designed as a retrospective observational case series. METHODS: Seven members of a Dutch family underwent ophthalmological, otological, and genetica

  10. MEFV mutations affecting pyrin amino acid 577 cause autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Monique; Szperl, Agata; Simon, Anna; Netea, Mihai G.; Plantinga, Theo S.; van Deuren, Marcel; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Lachmann, Helen J.; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Frenkel, Joost; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Gijn, Marielle; van der Meer, Jos W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Autoinflammatory disorders are disorders of the innate immune system. Standard genetic testing provided no correct diagnosis in a female patient from a non-consanguineous family of British descent with a colchicine-responsive autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome. We aimed to unravel

  11. Macular sensitivity and fixation patterns in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to test macular sensitivity, fixation stability and fixation location using microperimetry in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and mutation-free relatives. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 43 patients...

  12. A Nonsense Mutation in PDE6H Causes Autosomal-Recessive Incomplete Achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, S.; Coppieters, F.; Meire, F.; Schaich, S.; Roosing, S.; Brennenstuhl, C.; Bolz, S.; Genderen, M.M. van; Riemslag, F.C.; Lukowski, R.; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M.; Baere, E. de; Hoyng, C.B.; Wissinger, B.

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal-recessive retinal dystrophy characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus, and severely reduced visual acuity. Its prevalence has been estimated to about 1 in 30,000 individuals. Four genes, GNAT2, PDE6C, CNGA3, and CNGB3, have been implicated in ACHM,

  13. Linkage of DFNB1 to non-syndromic neurosensory autosomal-recessive deafness in Mediterranean families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasparini, P; Estivill, [No Value; Volpini, [No Value; Totaro, A; CastellviBel, S; Govea, N; Mila, M; DellaMonica, M; Ventruto, [No Value; DeBenedetto, M; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L; Mansfield, ES; Sandkuijl, L; Surrey, S; Fortina, P

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies show a susceptibility locus (DFNB1) responsible for non-syndromic neurosensory autosomal-recessive deafness (NSRD) mapping to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13q, In order to better understand the frequency with which DFNB1 is the gene for deafness in our patient population a

  14. Behavioral Retardation in a Macaque with Autosomal Trisomy and Aging Mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waal, Frans B. M. de; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The social development of a female rhesus monkey was followed from birth until death, age 32 months. The monkey had an extra autosome and was hydrocephalic. The monkey showed serious motor deficiencies, delayed social development, poorly established dominance relationships, and heavy dependence on mother and kin. The monkey was, however, well…

  15. CNGB3 mutations account for 50% of all cases with autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, S.; Varsanyi, B.; Antunes, G.A.; Baumann, B.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jagle, H.; Rosenberg, T.; Kellner, U.; Lorenz, B.; Salati, R.; Jurklies, B.; Farkas, A.; Andreasson, S.; Weleber, R.G.; Jacobson, S.G.; Rudolph, G.; Castellan, C.; Dollfus, H.; Legius, E.; Anastasi, M.; Bitoun, P.; Lev, D.; Sieving, P.A.; Munier, F.L.; Zrenner, E.; Sharpe, L.T.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Wissinger, B.

    2005-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a congenital, autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by a lack of color discrimination, low visual acuity (<0.2), photophobia, and nystagmus. Mutations in the genes for CNGA3, CNGB3, and GNAT2 have been associated with this disorder. Here, we analyzed the spectrum

  16. Autosomal recessive disorder with retardation of growth, mental deficiency, ptosis, pectus excavatum and camptodactyly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaldi, F.; Bennaceur, B.; Hammou, A.; Hamza, M.; Gharbi, H.A.

    1988-07-01

    Two strikingly similar brothers issued from consanguineous parents in the second degree present the following patterns of anomalies: Retardation of growth, mental deficiency, ocular abnormalities, pectus excavatum and camptodactyly. The ocular abnormalities include ptosis, microphthalmia and hypertelorism. No endocrine or metabolic aberrations are found. The authors conclude that the disorder has probably an autosomal recessive mode of transmission.

  17. Biallelic Mutations in CRB1 Underlie Autosomal Recessive Familial Foveal Retinoschisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, A.; Ng, J.; Gerth-Kahlert, C.; Tavares, E.; Maynes, J.T.; Wright, T.; Tiwari, A.; Tumber, A.; Li, S.; Hanson, J.V.; Bahr, A.; MacDonald, H.; Bahr, L.; Westall, C.; Berger, W.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Heon, E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the genetic cause of autosomal recessive familial foveal retinoschisis (FFR). METHODS: A female sibship with FFR was identified (Family-A; 17 and 16 years, respectively); panel based genetic sequencing (132 genes) and comparative genome hybridization (142 genes) were performed.

  18. Mutations in AGBL5, Encoding alpha-Tubulin Deglutamylase, Are Associated With Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuti, G.D.; Arno, G.; Hull, S.; Pierrache, L.; Venselaar, H.; Carss, K.; Raymond, F.L.; Collin, R.W.J.; Faradz, S.M.; Born, L.I. van den; Webster, A.R.; Cremers, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: AGBL5, encoding ATP/GTP binding protein-like 5, was previously proposed as an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) candidate gene based on the identification of missense variants in two families. In this study, we performed next-generation sequencing to reveal additional RP cases

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in the PEX2 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Sevin; S. Ferdinandusse; H.R. Waterham; R.J. Wanders; P. Aubourg

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To expand the spectrum of genetic causes of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA). Case report: Two brothers are described who developed progressive cerebellar ataxia at 3 1/2 and 18 years, respectively. After ruling out known common genetic causes of ARCA, analysis of bl

  20. Asynchronous replication and autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devkanya Dutta

    Full Text Available A number of mammalian genes exhibit the unusual properties of random monoallelic expression and random asynchronous replication. Such exceptional genes include genes subject to X inactivation and autosomal genes including odorant receptors, immunoglobulins, interleukins, pheromone receptors, and p120 catenin. In differentiated cells, random asynchronous replication of interspersed autosomal genes is coordinated at the whole chromosome level, indicative of chromosome-pair non-equivalence. Here we have investigated the replication pattern of the random asynchronously replicating genes in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, using fluorescence in situ hybridization based assay. We show that allele-specific replication of X-linked genes and random monoallelic autosomal genes occur in human embryonic stem cells. The direction of replication is coordinated at the whole chromosome level and can cross the centromere, indicating the existence of autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanism(s that randomly distinguish between two parental alleles are emerging in the cells of the inner cell mass, the source of human embryonic stem cells.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG4) using direct mutation detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen E; Koefoed, Pernille; Kjaergaard, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a report on prenatal diagnosis using direct SPG4 gene analysis in a family with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP). METHODS: Genetic linkage and haplotype analysis were previously carried out with chromosome 2p markers. DNA was obtained from affected...

  2. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) to chromosome 4q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsman, K.; Lind. L.; Westermark, E. [Univ. of Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disorder affecting the formation of enamel, is significantly more common in Northern Sweden than in other parts of the world. The disease is genetically and clinically heterogenous, and autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been recognized. Linkage analysis has identified two different loci for X-linked AI, one of which is identical to the gene encoding the enamel protein amelogenin. However, in families with an autosomal inheritance pattern for AI, the genetic basis of the disease still remains unknown. We report a linkage analysis study performed on three Swedish families where the affected members had an autosomal dominant variant of AI (ADAI) clinically characterized as local hypoplastic. Significant linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q were obtained, with a maximum lod score of 5.55 for the marker D4S428. Recombinations in the family localized the ADAI locus to the interval between D4S392 and D4S395. This chromosome region contains both a locus for the dental disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta and the albumin gene. Serum albumin has been suggested to play a role in enamel formation, and the albumin gene is therefore a candidate gene for this genetic disease.

  3. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan;

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...

  4. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  5. MEFV mutations affecting pyrin amino acid 577 cause autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, M.; Szperl, A.; Simon, A.; Netea, M.G.; Plantinga, T.S.; Deuren, M. van; Kamphuis, S.; Lachmann, H.J.; Cuppen, E.; Kloosterman, W.P.; Frenkel, J.; Diemen, C.C. van; Wijmenga, C.; Gijn, M. van; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Autoinflammatory disorders are disorders of the innate immune system. Standard genetic testing provided no correct diagnosis in a female patient from a non-consanguineous family of British descent with a colchicine-responsive autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome. We aimed to

  6. MEFV mutations affecting pyrin amino acid 577 cause autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Monique; Szperl, Agata; Simon, Anna; Netea, Mihai G.; Plantinga, Theo S.; van Deuren, Marcel; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Lachmann, Helen J.; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Frenkel, Joost; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Gijn, Marielle; van der Meer, Jos W. M.

    Objectives Autoinflammatory disorders are disorders of the innate immune system. Standard genetic testing provided no correct diagnosis in a female patient from a non-consanguineous family of British descent with a colchicine-responsive autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome. We aimed to unravel

  7. MEFV mutations affecting pyrin amino acid 577 cause autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Monique; Szperl, Agata; Simon, Anna; Netea, Mihai G; Plantinga, Theo S; van Deuren, Marcel; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Lachmann, Helen J; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Frenkel, Joost; van Diemen, Cleo C; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Gijn, Marielle; van der Meer, Jos W M

    OBJECTIVES: Autoinflammatory disorders are disorders of the innate immune system. Standard genetic testing provided no correct diagnosis in a female patient from a non-consanguineous family of British descent with a colchicine-responsive autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome. We aimed to

  8. The combined evidential value of autosomal and Y-chromosomal DNA profiles obtained from the same sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zoete, J.; Sjerps, M.; Meester, R.; Cator, E.

    2014-01-01

    When a Y-chromosomal and a (partial) autosomal DNA profile are obtained from one crime sample, and both profiles match the suspect's profiles, we would like to know the combined evidential value. To calculate the likelihood ratio of observing the autosomal and Y-chromosomal DNA profiles combined, we

  9. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical ...

  10. Inversion of the perturbation series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Division Quimica Teorica, Diag 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-01-18

    We investigate the inversion of the perturbation series and its resummation, and prove that it is related to a recently developed parametric perturbation theory. Results for some illustrative examples show that in some cases series reversion may improve the accuracy of the results.

  11. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  12. Inverse Expander Mixing for Hypergraphs

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Emma; Mubayi, Dhruv; Ralli, Peter; Tetali, Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We formulate and prove inverse mixing lemmas in the settings of simplicial complexes and k-uniform hypergraphs. In the hypergraph setting, we extend results of Bilu and Linial for graphs. In the simplicial complex setting, our results answer a question of Parzanchevski et al.

  13. Autosomal admixture levels are informative about sex bias in admixed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Amy; Verdu, Paul; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2014-11-01

    Sex-biased admixture has been observed in a wide variety of admixed populations. Genetic variation in sex chromosomes and functions of quantities computed from sex chromosomes and autosomes have often been examined to infer patterns of sex-biased admixture, typically using statistical approaches that do not mechanistically model the complexity of a sex-specific history of admixture. Here, expanding on a model of Verdu and Rosenberg (2011) that did not include sex specificity, we develop a model that mechanistically examines sex-specific admixture histories. Under the model, multiple source populations contribute to an admixed population, potentially with their male and female contributions varying over time. In an admixed population descended from two source groups, we derive the moments of the distribution of the autosomal admixture fraction from a specific source population as a function of sex-specific introgression parameters and time. Considering admixture processes that are constant in time, we demonstrate that surprisingly, although the mean autosomal admixture fraction from a specific source population does not reveal a sex bias in the admixture history, the variance of autosomal admixture is informative about sex bias. Specifically, the long-term variance decreases as the sex bias from a contributing source population increases. This result can be viewed as analogous to the reduction in effective population size for populations with an unequal number of breeding males and females. Our approach suggests that it may be possible to use the effect of sex-biased admixture on autosomal DNA to assist with methods for inference of the history of complex sex-biased admixture processes.

  14. Workflows for Full Waveform Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian; Krischer, Lion; Afanasiev, Michael; van Driel, Martin; May, Dave A.; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Despite many theoretical advances and the increasing availability of high-performance computing clusters, full seismic waveform inversions still face considerable challenges regarding data and workflow management. While the community has access to solvers which can harness modern heterogeneous computing architectures, the computational bottleneck has fallen to these often manpower-bounded issues that need to be overcome to facilitate further progress. Modern inversions involve huge amounts of data and require a tight integration between numerical PDE solvers, data acquisition and processing systems, nonlinear optimization libraries, and job orchestration frameworks. To this end we created a set of libraries and applications revolving around Salvus (http://salvus.io), a novel software package designed to solve large-scale full waveform inverse problems. This presentation focuses on solving passive source seismic full waveform inversions from local to global scales with Salvus. We discuss (i) design choices for the aforementioned components required for full waveform modeling and inversion, (ii) their implementation in the Salvus framework, and (iii) how it is all tied together by a usable workflow system. We combine state-of-the-art algorithms ranging from high-order finite-element solutions of the wave equation to quasi-Newton optimization algorithms using trust-region methods that can handle inexact derivatives. All is steered by an automated interactive graph-based workflow framework capable of orchestrating all necessary pieces. This naturally facilitates the creation of new Earth models and hopefully sparks new scientific insights. Additionally, and even more importantly, it enhances reproducibility and reliability of the final results.

  15. A pericentric inversion of chromosome X disrupting F8 and resulting in haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Zhou, Jingyi; Ding, Qiulan; Chen, Changming; Wu, Xi; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongli; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    The frequency of X chromosome pericentric inversion is much less than that of autosome chromosome. We hereby characterise a pericentric inversion of X chromosome associated with severe factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency in a sporadic haemophilia A (HA) pedigree. PCR primer walking and genome walking strategies were adopted to identify the exact breakpoints of the inversion. Copy number variations (CNVs) of the F8 and the whole chromosomes were detected by AccuCopy and Affymetrix CytoScan High Definition (HD) assays, respectively. A karyotype analysis was performed by cytogenetic G banding technique. We identified a previously undescribed type of pericentric inversion of the X chromosome [inv(X)(p11.21q28)] in the proband with FVIII:C homologous end joining is responsible for pathogensis of severe HA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Generation of non-overlapping fiber architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Lévesque, M.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    of overlapping sphero-cylinders. At the end of the first step, a system of overlapping fibers is obtained. In order to obtain a hard-core configuration where fibers cannot overlap other fibers, we use an iterative method called the force-biased algorithm. It applies virtual forces on each point of the fiber...

  17. Finding nonoverlapping substructures of a sparse matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2004-08-09

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices, thus the design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of non overlapping rectangular dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which has not been studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum non overlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm for 2 times 2 blocks that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. We discuss alternatives to rectangular blocks such as diagonal blocks and cross blocks and present complexity analysis and approximation algorithms.

  18. Application of Non-overlapping Mortar Finite Element Method to Electromagnetic Analysis%非重叠Mortar有限元法在电磁分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘守豹; 阮江军; 彭迎; 杜志叶; 黄道春; 王栋

    2011-01-01

    The mortar element method (MEM) is a new domain decomposition technique. MEM allows to take benefit of the presence of the subdomains in order to choose the discretization method, which is best adapted to the local behavior of the solution of the partial differential equation. In mortar finite element method (MFEI~I) a discretized mortar space is introduced to approximate the original continuous function space. The continuity of degree of freedoms across the non-conforming interface is ensured by the surface integration in a weak sense. The MFEM could "Mortar" the inter face between subdomains effectively. This paper gave the fundamental of non-overlapping MFEM (NO-MFEM); the procedures of calculating the mortar condition were discussed; the calculation and construction of the global matrix was proposed. By two dimensional static magnetic model and three dimensional electrostatic model, the validity of NO-MFEM was proved. This work is fundamental for extending MFEM to the other applications in computational electromagnetics.%Mortar元法(mortarelement method,MEM)是一种新型区域分解算法,它允许将求解区域分解为多个子域,在各个区域以最适合子域特征的方式离散。在各个区域的交界面上,边界节点不要求逐点匹配,而是通过建立加权积分形式的Mortar条件使得交界面上的传递条件在分布意义上满足。Mortar有限元法(mortar finite element method,MFEM)将MEM和有限元法(finite element method,FEM)相结合,在各区域中分别使用FEM网格离散,区域的交界面上通

  19. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  20. Mixed-norm estimates for the M/EEG inverse problem using accelerated gradient methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Kowalski, Matthieu; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2012-04-07

    Magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the electromagnetic fields produced by the neural electrical currents. Given a conductor model for the head, and the distribution of source currents in the brain, Maxwell's equations allow one to compute the ensuing M/EEG signals. Given the actual M/EEG measurements and the solution of this forward problem, one can localize, in space and in time, the brain regions that have produced the recorded data. However, due to the physics of the problem, the limited number of sensors compared to the number of possible source locations, and measurement noise, this inverse problem is ill-posed. Consequently, additional constraints are needed. Classical inverse solvers, often called minimum norm estimates (MNE), promote source estimates with a small ℓ₂ norm. Here, we consider a more general class of priors based on mixed norms. Such norms have the ability to structure the prior in order to incorporate some additional assumptions about the sources. We refer to such solvers as mixed-norm estimates (MxNE). In the context of M/EEG, MxNE can promote spatially focal sources with smooth temporal estimates with a two-level ℓ₁/ℓ₂ mixed-norm, while a three-level mixed-norm can be used to promote spatially non-overlapping sources between different experimental conditions. In order to efficiently solve the optimization problems of MxNE, we introduce fast first-order iterative schemes that for the ℓ₁/ℓ₂ norm give solutions in a few seconds making such a prior as convenient as the simple MNE. Furthermore, thanks to the convexity of the optimization problem, we can provide optimality conditions that guarantee global convergence. The utility of the methods is demonstrated both with simulations and experimental MEG data.

  1. Ultrahigh-intensity inverse bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Rax, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    We study inverse bremsstrahlung in the ultrahigh intensity relativistic regime. The fully relativistic ultrahigh intensity absorption (emission) coefficient is derived for an arbitrary scattering potential and small-angle scattering. We find that in the Coulomb field case this absorption (emission) coefficient can be calculated as a function of the quiver energy, drift momentum, and impact parameter in two complementary regimes: (i) for remote collisions when the impact parameter is larger than the amplitude of the quiver motion, and (ii) for instantaneous collisions when the scattering time is shorter than the period of the wave. Both circular and linear polarizations are considered, and this study reveals that in this relativistic regime inverse bremsstrahlung absorption can be viewed as a harmonic Compton resonance heating of the laser-driven electron by the virtual photon of the ion Coulomb field. The relativistic modification of Marcuse's effect [Bell Syst. Tech. J. 41, 1557 (1962)] are also discussed, and relations with previous nonrelativistic results are elucidated.

  2. Analysis of RAE-1 inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedland, D. A.; Degonia, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    The RAE-1 spacecraft inversion performed October 31, 1972 is described based upon the in-orbit dynamical data in conjunction with results obtained from previously developed computer simulation models. The computer simulations used are predictive of the satellite dynamics, including boom flexing, and are applicable during boom deployment and retraction, inter-phase coast periods, and post-deployment operations. Attitude data, as well as boom tip data, were analyzed in order to obtain a detailed description of the dynamical behavior of the spacecraft during and after the inversion. Runs were made using the computer model and the results were analyzed and compared with the real time data. Close agreement between the actual recorded spacecraft attitude and the computer simulation results was obtained.

  3. Inverse imbalance reconstruction in rotordynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramlau, R. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Linz (Austria). Johann Radon Inst. for Computational and Applied Mathematics; Dicken, V. [MeVis GmbH, Bremen (Germany); Maass, P. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Technomathematik; Streller, C. [Rolls-Royce Germany GmbH, Dahlewitz (Germany); Rienaecker, A. [MTU Aero Engines GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    The goal of this work is to establish and compare algorithms for inverse imbalance reconstruction in aircraft turbines. Such algorithms are based on a validated whole engine model of a turbo engine under consideration. Base on the model, the impact of an imbalance distribution on the vibration behaviour of the turbine can be described as a matrix-vector multiplication Af = g, where f is the imbalance distribution and g the vibration response. It turns out that the matrix A is very ill-conditioned. As the measured data is highly affected with noise, we have to use regularization methods in order to stabilize the inversion. Our main interest was in the use of nonlinear regularization methods, in particular nonlinear filtered singular value decomposition and conjugate gradient regularization. (orig.)

  4. Broadband synthetic aperture geoacoustic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bien Aik; Gerstoft, Peter; Yardim, Caglar; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-07-01

    A typical geoacoustic inversion procedure involves powerful source transmissions received on a large-aperture receiver array. A more practical approach is to use a single moving source and/or receiver in a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) setting. This paper uses single-receiver, broadband, frequency coherent matched-field inversion and exploits coherently repeated transmissions to improve estimation of the geoacoustic parameters. The long observation time creates a synthetic aperture due to relative source-receiver motion. This approach is illustrated by studying the transmission of multiple linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulses which results in a multi-tonal comb spectrum that is Doppler sensitive. To correlate well with the measured field across a receiver trajectory and to incorporate transmission from a source trajectory, waveguide Doppler and normal mode theory is applied. The method is demonstrated with low SNR, 100-900 Hz LFM pulse data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment.

  5. Sex Inversion Operations in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    IN July 1992, Dr. Xia Zhaoji, 58, and his assistants surprised the world by successfully completing the world’s first operation to partially replant human internal reproductive organs. BBC broadcast this 8-minute news story ten days later, followed by AP, Reuters and AFP, as well as some other domestic and international media. What is a sex inversion operation? Why should people change their sex? And how is it

  6. Inverse Gibbs-Thomson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershanov, V. Yu.; Garmashov, S. I.

    2015-01-01

    We prove the existence of an effect inverse to the Gibbs-Thomson effect for mass transfer in systems consisting of a solid phase and the solution of the solid phase material in a certain solvent. The effect involves a change in the shape of the interface due to a variation of the equilibrium concentrations under it, which is induced by external conditions, and exists in the presence of a negative feedback for mass transfer associated with capillary effects.

  7. Action understanding as inverse planning

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Christopher Lawrence; Saxe, Rebecca R.; Joshua B Tenenbaum

    2009-01-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents’ actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents’ behavior based on the principle of rationality: the expectation that agents will plan approximately rationally to achieve their goals, given their beliefs about the world. ...

  8. Meiotic pairing and gene expression disturbance in germ cells from an infertile boar with a balanced reciprocal autosome-autosome translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasc, Harmonie; Congras, Annabelle; Mary, Nicolas; Trouilh, Lidwine; Marquet, Valentine; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Mouney-Bonnet, Nathalie; Acloque, Hervé; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Individuals carrying balanced constitutional reciprocal translocations generally have a normal phenotype, but often present reproductive disorders. The aim of our research was to analyze the meiotic process in an oligoasthenoteratospermic boar carrying an asymmetric reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 14. Different multivalent structures (quadrivalent and trivalent plus univalent) were identified during chromosome pairing analysis. Some of these multivalents were characterized by the presence of unpaired autosomal segments with histone γH2AX accumulation sometimes associated with the XY body. Gene expression in spermatocytes was studied by RNA-DNA-FISH and microarray-based testis transcriptome analysis. Our results revealed a decrease in gene expression for chromosomes 1 and 14 and an up-regulated expression of X-chromosome genes for the translocated boar compared with normal individuals. We hypothesized that the observed meiotic arrest and reproductive failure in this boar might be due to silencing of crucial autosomal genes (MSUC) and disturbance of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Further analysis revealed abnormal meiotic recombination (frequency and distribution) and the production of a high rate of unbalanced spermatozoa.

  9. Neglected puerperal inversion of the uterus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2012-07-27

    Jul 27, 2012 ... Key words: Inversion of uterus, acute puerperal inversion, shock, post partum bleeding, neglect ... anesthesia, vaginal manual reposition was attempted, which failed due to tight cervical ring. Then, O .... Int J Gynecol Cancer.

  10. Autosomal recessive hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria is not caused by mutations in the type II renal sodium/phosphate cotransporter gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Koul, K. Op de; Knots, E.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present the genetic defect for autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH) is unknown. Type II sodium/phosphate cotransporter (NPT2) gene is a serious candidate for being the causative gene in either or both autosomal recessive and a

  11. Generalized Inverses of Matrices over Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩瑞珠; 陈建龙

    1992-01-01

    Let R be a ring,*be an involutory function of the set of all finite matrices over R. In this pa-per,necessary and sufficient conditions are given for a matrix to have a (1,3)-inverse,(1,4)-inverse,or Morre-Penrose inverse,relative to *.Some results about generalized inverses of matrices over division rings are generalized and improved.

  12. A novel HSF4 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Lu-xin; Tang, Zhao-hui

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to identify the mutation of the whole coding region of shock transcription factor 4 (HSF4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC). All exons of HSF4 were amplified by PCR. Sequence analysis of PCR products was performed. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was conducted to confirm the pathogenic mutation. The results showed that a C to T substitution occurred at nucleotide 331 in patients of this family, leading to the replacement of the amino acid arginine-111 with cysteine in exon 3. RFLP analysis showed that the amino acid change was co-segregated with all affected individuals. It was concluded that the new mutation of c.331C>T in HSF4 DNA may be responsible for the autosomal dominant congenital cataract in this family.

  13. Imaging characteristics of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Dragan; Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra; Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Tasic, Aleksandar; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images (“blooming effect”). PMID:25725137

  14. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casimir, C.M.; Bu-Ghanim, H.N.; Rowe, P.; Segal, A.W. (University College London (England)); Rodaway, A.R.F.; Bentley, D.L. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund Lab., London (England))

    1991-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b{sub 245}). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, {gt}90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene.

  15. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy in a Chinese pedigree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erhe Xu; Huiqing Dong; Milan Zhang; Min Xu

    2012-01-01

    The present study enrolled a Chinese family that comprised 34 members and spanned three generations. Eight members were diagnosed with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, and disease diagnoses corresponded with autosomal incomplete dominance inheritance. The primary clinical manifestations included paralysis, dysarthria, and mild cognitive deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse leukoencephalopathy with involvement of bilateral anterior temporal lobes, in particular the pons. In addition, multiple cerebral infarction was identified in the proband. Sural nerve biopsy findings of the proband revealed granular osmophilic material deposits in the extracellular matrix, which were adjacent to smooth muscle cells of dermal arterioles. Screening exons 2-4 for NOTCH 3 mutations by direct sequencing did not reveal any abnormalities.

  16. [Clinical and molecular study in a family with autosomal dominant hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callea, Michele; Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Willoughby, Colin E; Giglio, Sabrina R; Sani, Ilaria; Bargiacchi, Sara; Traficante, Giovanna; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Tadini, Gianluca; Yavuz, Izzet; Galeotti, Angela; Clarich, Gabriella

    2017-02-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a rare disease characterized by deficiency in development of structure derived from the ectoderm and is caused by mutations in the genes EDA, EDAR, or EDARADD. Phenotypes caused by mutations in these three may exhibit similar clinical features, explained by a common signaling pathway. Mutations in EDA gene cause X linked HED, which is the most common form. Mutations in EDAR and EDARADD genes cause autosomal dominant and recessive form of HED. The most striking clinical findings in HED are hypodontia, hypotrichosis and hypohidrosis that can lead to episodes of hyperthermia. We report on clinical findings in a child with HED with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with a heterozygous mutation c.1072C>T (p.Arg358X) in the EDAR gene. A review of the literature with regard to other cases presenting the same mutation has been carried out and discussed.

  17. Locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia: Evidence for the existence of a fifth locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A. [Montreal General Hospital, Quebec (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, four loci have been identified: the SCA-1 locus (on chromosome (chr) 6p), the SCA-2 locus (on chr 12q), the SCA-3/MJD locus (on chr 14q), and more recently an SCA-4 locus was described (chr 16q) in a Utah kindred. We have studied one large French Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers which flank the four previously described loci significantly excludes the French Canadian kindred from the SCA-1, SCA-2, SCA-3/MJD and SCA-4 loci. Therefore a fifth, still unmapped, SCA locus remains to be identified.

  18. Autosomal recessive disorders in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec, Canada): a study of inbreeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Braekeleer, M; Gauthier, S

    1996-01-01

    Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) is a geographically isolated region of northeastern Quebec in which several autosomal recessive disorders have a high incidence. We calculated the inbreeding coefficients of 567 probands and compared them to 1701 matched control individuals. The mean inbreeding coefficient of the group containing all 567 probands was 2.73 times higher than that of the controls (0.001772 versus 0.00065). Thirteen percent (75/567) of the probands were inbred, but only 5% were born to matings between spouses related as second-degree cousins or closer. No marriage between uncle and niece and only two marriages between first-degree cousins were identified in the disorder group. These results strongly suggest that the high incidence of the autosomal recessive disorders in SLSJ is the result of a founder effect.

  19. Imaging Characteristics of Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Stojanov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs, lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs. WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images (“blooming effect”.

  20. A robust linkage map of the porcine autosome based on gene-associated SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vingborg, Rikke K K; Gregersen, Vivi R; Zhan, Bujie;

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are necessary for mapping of mendelian traits and quantitative trait loci (QTLs). To identify the actual genes, which control these traits, a map based on gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is highly valuable. In this study, the SNPs were...... genotyped in a large family material comprising more than 5,000 piglets derived from 12 Duroc boars crossed with 236 Danish Landrace/Danish Large White sows. The SNPs were identified in sequence alignments of 4,600 different amplicons obtained from the 12 boars and containing coding regions of genes derived...... from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genomic shotgun sequences. Results Linkage maps of all 18 porcine autosomes were constructed based on 456 gene-associated and six porcine EST-based SNPs. The total length of the averaged-sex whole porcine autosome was estimated to 1,711.8 cM resulting...

  1. Inverse Computation and the Universal Resolving Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We survey fundamental concepts for inverse programming and thenpresent the Uni v ersal Resolving Algorithm, an algorithm for inverse computation in a first-orde r , functional programming language. We discuss the key concepts of the algorithm, including a three-step approach based on the notion of a perfect process tree, and demonstrate our implementation with several examples of inverse computation.

  2. -Colour even Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu-hong Guo

    2010-02-01

    An -colour even self-inverse composition is defined as an -colour self-inverse composition with even parts. In this paper, we get generating functions, explicit formulas and recurrence formulas for -colour even self-inverse compositions. One new binomial identity is also obtained.

  3. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-09-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination.

  4. Abnormal X : autosome ratio, but normal X chromosome inactivation in human triploid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwood Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation (XCI is that aspect of mammalian dosage compensation that brings about equivalence of X-linked gene expression between females and males by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes (Xi in normal female cells, leaving them with a single active X (Xa as in male cells. In cells with more than two X's, but a diploid autosomal complement, all X's but one, Xa, are inactivated. This phenomenon is commonly thought to suggest 1 that normal development requires a ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set, and 2 that an early event in XCI is the marking of one X to be active, with remaining X's becoming inactivated by default. Results Triploids provide a test of these ideas because the ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set cannot be achieved, yet this abnormal ratio should not necessarily affect the one-Xa choice mechanism for XCI. Previous studies of XCI patterns in murine triploids support the single-Xa model, but human triploids mostly have two-Xa cells, whether they are XXX or XXY. The XCI patterns we observe in fibroblast cultures from different XXX human triploids suggest that the two-Xa pattern of XCI is selected for, and may have resulted from rare segregation errors or Xi reactivation. Conclusion The initial X inactivation pattern in human triploids, therefore, is likely to resemble the pattern that predominates in murine triploids, i.e., a single Xa, with the remaining X's inactive. Furthermore, our studies of XIST RNA accumulation and promoter methylation suggest that the basic features of XCI are normal in triploids despite the abnormal X:autosome ratio.

  5. A New PKD1 Mutation Discovered in a Chinese Family with Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhendi Wang; Yang Wang; Jing Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by massive kidney enlargement and progressive chronic kidney disease, is due to abnormal proliferation of renal tubular epithelium. ADPKD is known to be caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Methods: In the present study, the mutation analysis of PKD genes was performed in a new Chinese family with ADPKD using Long-Range (LR) PCR sequencing and targeted next-generation s...

  6. A Drug Development Tool for Trial Enrichment in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald D. Perrone

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: These results suggest that, when eGFR is preserved, patients with larger TKV are more likely to progress to a 30% decline of eGFR within the course of a clinical trial, whereas eGFR and age displayed limited predictive value of disease progression in early disease. Pharmaceutical sponsors and academic investigators are encouraged to prospectively employ the above drug development tool to optimize trial designs in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  7. Autosomal genomic scan for loci linked to obesity and energy metabolism in Pima Indians.

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, R. A.; Tataranni, P A; Pratley, R; Thompson, D B; Hanson, R. L.; Prochazka, M; Baier, L; Ehm, M. G.; Sakul, H; Foroud, T; Garvey, W. T.; Burns, D.; Knowler, W. C.; Bennett, P. H.; Bogardus, C

    1998-01-01

    An autosomal genomic scan to search for linkage to obesity and energy metabolism was completed in Pima Indians, a population prone to obesity. Obesity was assessed by percent body fat (by hydrodensitometry) and fat distribution (the ratio of waist circumference to thigh circumference). Energy metabolism was measured in a respiratory chamber as 24-h metabolic rate, sleeping metabolic rate, and 24-h respiratory quotient (24RQ), an indicator of the ratio of carbohydrate oxidation to fat oxidatio...

  8. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 util...

  9. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME: Probable first family from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME is an extremely rare syndrome characterized by familial occurrence of postural and action-induced tremors of the hands but showing electrophysiologic findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. Patients also have cognitive decline and tonic-clonic seizures, often precipitated by sleep deprivation or photic stimulation. We describe probably the first family from India of this ill-defined syndrome.

  10. [Autosomal-recessive renal cystic disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis: clinico-anatomic case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostol'tsev, K V; Burenkov, R A; Kuz'micheva, I A

    2012-01-01

    Clinico-anatomic observation of autosomal-recessive renal cystic disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis at two fetuses from the same family was done. Mutation of His3124Tyr in 58 exon of PKHD1 gene in heterozygous state was found out. The same pathomorphological changes in the epithelium of cystic renal tubules and bile ducts of the liver were noted. We suggest that the autopsy research of fetuses with congenital abnormalities, detected after prenatal ultrasonic screening, has high diagnostic importance.

  11. A New Multiplex Assay of 17 Autosomal STRs and Amelogenin for Forensic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suhua; Tian, Huaizhou; Wu, Jun; Zhao, Shumin; Li, Chengtao

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a newly devised autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems for 17 autosomal loci (D1S1656, D2S441, D3S1358, D3S3045, D6S477, D7S3048, D8S1132, D10S1435, D10S1248, D11S2368, D13S325, D14S608, D15S659, D17S1290, D18S535, D19S253 and D22-GATA198B05) and Amelogenin. Primers for the loci were designed and optimized so that all of the amplicons were distributed from 50 base pairs (bp) to less than 500 bp within a five-dye chemistry design with the fifth dye reserved for the sizing standard. Strategies were developed to overcome challenges that encountered in creating the final assay. The limits of the multiplex were tested, resulting in the successful amplification of genomic DNA range from 0.25–4 ng with 30 PCR cycles. A total of 681 individuals from the Chinese Han population were studied and forensic genetic data were present. No significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. A total of 180 alleles were detected for the 17 autosomal STRs. The cumulative mean exclusion chance in duos (CMECD) was 0.999967, and cumulative mean exclusion chance in trios (CMECT) was 0.99999995. We conclude that the present 17plex autosomal STRs assay provides an additional powerful tool for forensic applications. PMID:23451235

  12. Autosomal recessive cutis laxa Type II: Report of novel mutation in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type-II (ARCLII is a spectrum of clinical disorders with prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, cutis laxa, dysmorphism, and skeletal abnormalities. We report the case of a 14-month-old boy with developmental delay, hypotonia, dysmorphism, and loose skin. A novel homozygous variant was observed in ATP6VOA2 gene. Clinical spectrum of ARCLII is highly heterogeneous and molecular analysis should be done to confirm the diagnosis.

  13. A new multiplex assay of 17 autosomal STRs and Amelogenin for forensic application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhua Zhang

    Full Text Available This paper describes a newly devised autosomal short tandem repeat (STR multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR systems for 17 autosomal loci (D1S1656, D2S441, D3S1358, D3S3045, D6S477, D7S3048, D8S1132, D10S1435, D10S1248, D11S2368, D13S325, D14S608, D15S659, D17S1290, D18S535, D19S253 and D22-GATA198B05 and Amelogenin. Primers for the loci were designed and optimized so that all of the amplicons were distributed from 50 base pairs (bp to less than 500 bp within a five-dye chemistry design with the fifth dye reserved for the sizing standard. Strategies were developed to overcome challenges that encountered in creating the final assay. The limits of the multiplex were tested, resulting in the successful amplification of genomic DNA range from 0.25-4 ng with 30 PCR cycles. A total of 681 individuals from the Chinese Han population were studied and forensic genetic data were present. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed. A total of 180 alleles were detected for the 17 autosomal STRs. The cumulative mean exclusion chance in duos (CMECD was 0.999967, and cumulative mean exclusion chance in trios (CMECT was 0.99999995. We conclude that the present 17plex autosomal STRs assay provides an additional powerful tool for forensic applications.

  14. New form of autosomal-recessive axonal hereditary sensory motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, S M; Hicks, E M; Herron, B; Morrison, P J; Aicardi, J

    1998-09-01

    Two siblings, a male and a female, had severe axonal neuropathy and sideroblastic anemia. Despite a distinct clinical picture with areflexia, ataxia, hypotonia, optic atrophy, and progressive sensory neural hearing loss, no definite diagnosis could be reached and the older sibling died at 6 years of age of respiratory failure. It is proposed that the two affected siblings have a new form of autosomal-recessive axonal hereditary sensory motor neuropathy.

  15. Macroepiphyseal dysplasia with symptomatic osteoporosis, wrinkled skin, and aged appearance: A presumed autosomal recessive condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlister, W.H.; Coe, J.D.; Whyte, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    We report our detailed investigation of a 7-1/2-year-old girl with short stature, aged appearance, decreased subcutaneous fat and muscle mass, dry coarse hair, foot deformities, macroepiphyses with prominent but lax joints, and osteoporosis with recurrent fractures who is the offspring of first cousins. This constellation of abnormalities differs from previously reported cases where macroepiphyses were a prominent finding. Our patient appears, therefore, to have a new, autosomal recessively inherited, syndrome.

  16. A Novel Mutation in the Transglutaminase-1 Gene in an Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaigundan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure-function implication on a novel homozygous Trp250/Gly mutation of transglutaminase-1 (TGM1 observed in a patient of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis is invoked from a bioinformatics analysis. Structural consequences of this mutation are hypothesized in comparison to homologous enzyme human factor XIIIA accepted as valid in similar structural analysis and are projected as guidelines for future studies at an experimental level on TGM1 thus mutated.

  17. Ichthyin (NIPAL4-autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis with atopic diathesis: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Binamer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI, is a rare form of ichthyosis with multiple mutations identified. Ichthyin (NIPAL4 gene mutation is identified in about 18% of cases. In addition to the usual ichthyosis phenotype we are presenting a new association between ARCI and atopic diathesis with multiple allergies. To the best of our knowledge this is the second case to report such an association between ARCI and atopic diathesis.

  18. A novel heterozygous mutation in cardiac calsequestrin causes autosomal dominant catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Belinda; Bagnall, Richard D.; Lam, Lien; Ingles, Jodie; Turner, Christian; Haan, Eric; Davis, Andrew; Yang, Pei-Chi; Clancy, Colleen E.; Sy, Raymond W.; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Background Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a lethal inherited arrhythmia syndrome characterized by adrenergically stimulated ventricular tachycardia. Mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RYR2) cause an autosomal dominant form of CPVT, while mutations in the cardiac calsequestrin 2 gene (CASQ2) cause an autosomal recessive form. Objective The aim of this study was to clinically and genetically evaluate a large family with severe autosomal dominant CPVT. Methods Clinical evaluation of family members was performed, including detailed history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, exercise stress test, and autopsy review of decedents. We performed genome-wide linkage analysis in 12 family members and exome sequencing in 2 affected family members. In silico models of mouse and rabbit myocyte electrophysiology were used to predict potential disease mechanisms. Results Severe CPVT with dominant inheritance in 6 members was diagnosed in a large family with 2 sudden deaths, 2 resuscitated cardiac arrests, and multiple appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac arrhythmia genes did not reveal a pathogenic variant. Exome sequencing identified a novel heterozygous missense variant in CASQ2 (Lys180Arg) affecting a highly conserved residue, which cosegregated with disease and was absent in unaffected family members. Genome-wide linkage analysis confirmed a single linkage peak at the CASQ2 locus (logarithm of odds ratio score 3.01; θ = 0). Computer simulations predicted that haploinsufficiency was unlikely to cause the severe CPVT phenotype and suggested a dominant negative mechanism. Conclusion We show for the first time that a variant in CASQ2 causes autosomal dominant CPVT. Genetic testing in dominant CPVT should include screening for heterozygous CASQ2 variants. PMID:27157848

  19. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation.

  20. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 util...

  1. A missense mutation S228P in the CRYBB1 gene causes autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; MA Xu; GU Feng; LIU Ning-pu; HAO Xiao-lin; WANG Kai-jie; WANG Ning-li; ZHU Si-quan

    2007-01-01

    Background Congenital cataract is a highly heterogeneous disorder at both the genetic and phenotypic levels. This study was conducted to identify disease locus for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts in a four generation Chinese family.Methods Family history and clinical data were recorded. All the members were genotyped with microsatellite markers which are close to the known genetic loci for autosomal congenital cataracts. Two-point Lod scores were obtained using the MLINK of the LINKAGE program package (ver 5.1). Candidate genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct cycle sequencing.Results The maximum Lod score of Zmax=2.11 was obtained with three microsatellite markers D22S258, D22S315,and D22S1163 at recombination fraction θ= 0. Haplotype analysis showed that the disease gene was localized to a 18.5 Mbp region on chromosome 22 flanked by markers D22S1174 and D22S270, spanning the β-crystallin gene cluster. A c.752T-->C mutation in exon 6 of CRYBB1 gene, which resulted in a heterozygous S228P mutation in predicted protein,was found to cosegregate with cataract in the family.Conclusions This study identified a novel mutation in CRYBB1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. These results provide strong evidence that CRYBB1 is a pathogenic gene for congenital cataract.

  2. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9 Inhibition for Autosomal Recessive Hypercholesterolemia-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedrez, Aurélie; Sjouke, Barbara; Passard, Maxime; Prampart-Fauvet, Simon; Guédon, Alexis; Croyal, Mikael; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Peter, Jorge; Blom, Dirk; Ciccarese, Milco; Cefalù, Angelo B; Pisciotta, Livia; Santos, Raul D; Averna, Maurizio; Raal, Frederick; Pintus, Paolo; Cossu, Maria; Hovingh, Kees; Lambert, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the vast majority of patients with autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia. Will PCSK9 inhibition with monoclonal antibodies, in particular alirocumab, be of therapeutic value for patients with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH)? Primary lymphocytes were obtained from 28 genetically characterized ARH patients and 11 controls. ARH lymphocytes treated with mevastatin were incubated with increasing doses of recombinant PCSK9 with or without saturating concentrations of alirocumab. Cell surface LDL receptor expression measured by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy was higher in ARH than in control lymphocytes. PCSK9 significantly reduced LDL receptor expression in ARH lymphocytes albeit to a lower extent than in control lymphocytes (25% versus 76%, respectively), an effect reversed by alirocumab. Fluorescent LDL cellular uptake, also measured by flow cytometry, was reduced in ARH lymphocytes compared with control lymphocytes. PCSK9 significantly lowered LDL cellular uptake in ARH lymphocytes, on average by 18%, compared with a 46% reduction observed in control lymphocytes, an effect also reversed by alirocumab. Overall, the effects of recombinant PCSK9, and hence of alirocumab, on LDL receptor expression and function were significantly less pronounced in ARH than in control cells. PCSK9 inhibition with alirocumab on top of statin treatment has the potential to lower LDL cholesterol in some autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia patients. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Variation of autosomes and X chromosome STR in breast cancer and gynecological cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Youxiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses 1000 cases of patients with breast cancer and 2000 cases of patients with gynecological cancer (1000 cases of malignant tumor, 1000 cases of benign tumors, where breast cancer and malignant tumor patients comprise the observation group, while patients with benign tumors comprise the control group. Through DNA extraction, STR genotyping and variation verification, microdissection, individual STR mutation rate and loci STR mutation rate of the two groups of patients were calculated. Results show that there are no significant (P > 0.05 differences in the STR variation of autosomes and X chromosome between patients in the observation group and those in the reference group. However, significant (P < 0.05 intergroup differences were found for STR variation typing between patients with malignant and benign tumors. Using STR genotyping for autosomes and X chromosomes, gynecological cancer patients were found to be more likely to mutate, with a clear relationship between STR variation and tumor differentiation degrees. The study on the variation analysis of autosomes and X chromosome STR in breast and gynecological cancer tissues is expected to have a high application value when applied to medical research and identification processes.

  4. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K J Kelly

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  5. Enhanced apoptosis during early neuronal differentiation in mouse ES cells with autosomal imbalance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiteru Kai; Teruhiko Wakayama; Mitsuo Oshimura; Chi Chiu Wang; Satoshi Kishigami; Yasuhiro Kazuki; Satoshi Abe; Masato Takiguchi; Yasuaki Shirayoshi; Toshiaki Inoue; Hisao Ito

    2009-01-01

    Although particular chromosomal syndromes are phenotypically and clinically distinct, the majority of individuals with autosomai imbalance, such as aneuploidy, manifest mental retardation. A common abnormal phenotype of Down syndrome (DS), the most prevalent autosomal aneuploidy, shows a reduction in both the number and the density of neurons in the brain. As a DS model, we have recently created chimeric mice from ES cells containing a single human chromosome 21. The mice mimicked the characteristic phenotypic features of DS, and ES cells showed a higher incidence of apoptosis during early neuronal differentiation in vitro. In this study, we examined the induction of anomalous early neural development by aneuploidy in mouse ES cells by transferring various human chromosomes or additional mouse chromosomes. Results showed an elevated incidence of apoptosis in all autosome-aneuploid clones examined during early neuronal differentiation in vitro. Further, cDNA microarray analysis revealed a common cluster of down-regulated genes, of which eight known genes are related to cell proliferation, neurite outgrowth and differentiation. Importantly, targeting of these genes by siRNA knockdown in normal mouse ES cells led to enhanced apoptosis during early neuronal differentiation. These findings strongly suggest that autosomal imbalance is associated with general neuronal loss through a common molecular mechanism for apoptosis.

  6. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  7. Random monoallelic expression of genes on autosomes: Parallels with X-chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Marion-Poll, Lucile; Katoh, Kimiko; Heard, Edith

    2016-08-01

    Genes are generally expressed from their two alleles, except in some particular cases such as random inactivation of one of the two X chromosomes in female mammals or imprinted genes which are expressed only from the maternal or the paternal allele. A lesser-known phenomenon is random monoallelic expression (RME) of autosomal genes, where genes can be stably expressed in a monoallelic manner, from either one of the parental alleles. Studies on autosomal RME face several challenges. First, RME that is based on epigenetic mechanisms has to be distinguished from biased expression of one allele caused by a DNA sequence polymorphism in a regulatory element. Second, RME should not be confused with transient monoallelic expression often observed in single cell analyses, and that often corresponds to dynamic bursting of expression. Thanks to analyses on clonal cell populations, the existence of RME in cultured cells is now well established. Future studies of RME in vivo will have to overcome tissue heterogeneity and certain technical limitations. Here, we discuss current knowledge on autosomal RME, as well as possible mechanisms controlling these expression patterns and potential implications for development and disease, drawing parallels with what is known for X-chromosome inactivation, a paradigm of random monoallelic expression.

  8. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  10. An algorithm for constructing minimal order inverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper an algorithm is presented for constructing minimal order inverses of linear, time invariant, controllable and observable, multivariable systems. By means of simple matrix operations, a 'state-overdescribed' system is first constructed which is an inverse of the given multivariable system. A simple Gauss-Jordan type reduction procedure is then used to remove the redundancy in the state vector of the inverse system to obtain a minimal order inverse. When the given multivariable system is not invertible, the algorithm enables a minimal order inverse of an invertible subsystem to be constructed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the use of the algorithm.

  11. Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm and inverse driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    variant of the Universal Resolving Algorithm for inverse interpretation. The new variant outperforms the original algorithm in several cases, e.g., when unpacking a list using inverse interpretation of a pack program. It uses inverse driving as its main technique, which has not been described in detail......Inverse interpretation is a semantics based, non-standard interpretation of programs. Given a program and a value, an inverse interpreter finds all or one of the inputs, that would yield the given value as output with normal forward evaluation. The Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm is a new...

  12. Inversion of GPS meteorology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available The GPS meteorology (GPS/MET experiment, led by the Universities Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR, consists of a GPS receiver aboard a low earth orbit (LEO satellite which was launched on 3 April 1995. During a radio occultation the LEO satellite rises or sets relative to one of the 24 GPS satellites at the Earth's horizon. Thereby the atmospheric layers are successively sounded by radio waves which propagate from the GPS satellite to the LEO satellite. From the observed phase path increases, which are due to refraction of the radio waves by the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, the atmospheric parameter refractivity, density, pressure and temperature are calculated with high accuracy and resolution (0.5–1.5 km. In the present study, practical aspects of the GPS/MET data analysis are discussed. The retrieval is based on the Abelian integral inversion of the atmospheric bending angle profile into the refractivity index profile. The problem of the upper boundary condition of the Abelian integral is described by examples. The statistical optimization approach which is applied to the data above 40 km and the use of topside bending angle profiles from model atmospheres stabilize the inversion. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared with corresponding profiles which have already been calculated by scientists of UCAR and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, using Abelian integral inversion too. The comparison shows that in some cases large differences occur (5 K and more. This is probably due to different treatment of the upper boundary condition, data runaways and noise. Several temperature profiles with wavelike structures at tropospheric and stratospheric heights are shown. While the periodic structures at upper stratospheric heights could be caused by residual errors of the ionospheric correction method, the periodic temperature fluctuations at heights below 30 km are most likely caused by atmospheric waves (vertically

  13. Inverse Star, Borders, and Palstars

    OpenAIRE

    Rampersad, Narad; Shallit, Jeffrey; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-01

    A language L is closed if L = L*. We consider an operation on closed languages, L-*, that is an inverse to Kleene closure. It is known that if L is closed and regular, then L-* is also regular. We show that the analogous result fails to hold for the context-free languages. Along the way we find a new relationship between the unbordered words and the prime palstars of Knuth, Morris, and Pratt. We use this relationship to enumerate the prime palstars, and we prove that neither the language of a...

  14. Spray formation: an inverse cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yue; Tryggvason, Gretar; zaleski, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of droplet formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer using direct numerical simulation. It is seen that two mechanisms compete to generate the droplets: fingering at the tip of the waves and hole formation in the thin liquid sheet. The three dimensional liquid structures are much shorter than the longitudinal wavelength of the instability at the first instant of their formation. As time evolves, the structures evolves to larger and larger scales, in a way similar to the inverse cascade of length scales in droplet impact and impact crown formation.

  15. Iterative optimization in inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Iterative Optimization in Inverse Problems brings together a number of important iterative algorithms for medical imaging, optimization, and statistical estimation. It incorporates recent work that has not appeared in other books and draws on the author's considerable research in the field, including his recently developed class of SUMMA algorithms. Related to sequential unconstrained minimization methods, the SUMMA class includes a wide range of iterative algorithms well known to researchers in various areas, such as statistics and image processing. Organizing the topics from general to more

  16. The Inverse of Banded Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    of Br,n. For these sequences to be well-defined, we assume that none of the denominators kis are zero (which is equivalent to the below-defined U...numbers of summed or subtracted terms in computing the inverse of a term of an upper (lower) triangular matrix are the generalized order-k Fibonacci ... Fibonacci numbers are the usual Fibonacci numbers, that is, f 2m = Fm (mth Fibonacci number). When also k = 3, c1 = c2 = c3 = 1, then the generalized order-3

  17. The role of noise and positive feedback in the onset of autosomal dominant diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosl William J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant (AD diseases result when a single mutant or non-functioning gene is present on an autosomal chromosome. These diseases often do not emerge at birth. There are presently two prevailing theories explaining the expression of AD diseases. One explanation originates from the Knudson two-hit theory of hereditary cancers, where loss of heterozygosity or occurrence of somatic mutations impairs the function of the wild-type copy. While these somatic second hits may be sufficient for stable disease states, it is often difficult to determine if their occurrence necessarily marks the initiation of disease progression. A more direct consequence of a heterozygous genetic background is haploinsufficiency, referring to a lack of sufficient gene function due to reduced wild-type gene copy number; however, haploinsufficiency can involve a variety of additional mechanisms, such as noise in gene expression or protein levels, injury and second hit mutations in other genes. In this study, we explore the possible contribution to the onset of autosomal dominant diseases from intrinsic factors, such as those determined by the structure of the molecular networks governing normal cellular physiology. Results First, simple models of single gene insufficiency using the positive feedback loops that may be derived from a three-component network were studied by computer simulation using Bionet software. The network structure is shown to affect the dynamics considerably; some networks are relatively stable even when large stochastic variations in are present, while others exhibit switch-like dynamics. In the latter cases, once the network switches over to the disease state it remains in that state permanently. Model pathways for two autosomal dominant diseases, AD polycystic kidney disease and mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY were simulated and the results are compared to known disease characteristics. Conclusions By identifying the

  18. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong; Wang Xuben; Li Zhirong; Li Qiong; Li Zhengwen

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  19. Kidney Function and Plasma Copeptin Levels in Healthy Kidney Donors and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zittema, Debbie; van den Berg, Else; Meijer, Esther; Boertien, Wendy E.; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Franssen, Casper F. M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Navis, Gerjan; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Background and objectives Plasma copeptin, a marker of arginine vasopressin, is elevated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and predicts disease progression. It is unknown whether elevated copeptin levels result from decreased kidney clearance or as compensation for

  20. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  1. C-terminal truncations in human 3 '-5 ' DNA exonuclease TREX1 cause autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Jen, Joanna C.; Kavanagh, David; Bertram, Paula; Spitzer, Dirk; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Barilla-LaBarca, Maria-Louise; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Kasai, Yumi; McLellan, Mike; Grand, Mark Gilbert; Vanmolkot, Kaate R. J.; de Vries, Boukje; Wan, Jijun; Kane, Michael J.; Mamsa, Hafsa; Schaefer, Ruth; Stam, Anine H.; Haan, Joost; Paulus, T. V. M. de Jong; Storimans, Caroline W.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Oosterhuis, Jendo A.; Gschwendter, Andreas; Dichgans, Martin; Kotschet, Katya E.; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Hardy, Todd A.; Delatycki, Martin B.; Hajj-Ali, Rula A.; Kothari, Parul H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Frants, Rune R.; Baloh, Robert W.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Atkinson, John P.

    Autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy is a microvascular endotheliopathy with middle- age onset. In nine families, we identified heterozygous C- terminal frameshift mutations in TREX1, which encodes a 3'-5' exonuclease. These truncated proteins retain exonuclease

  2. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  3. THE SYNDROME OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA, MICROCEPHALY, AND EXTRAPYRAMIDAL DYSKINESIA (PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA TYPE-2) - COMPILED DATA FROM 10 PEDIGREES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARTH, PG; BLENNOW, G; LENARD, HG; BEGEER, JH; VANDERKLEY, JM; HANEFELD, F; PETERS, ACB; Valk, J.

    1995-01-01

    The syndrome of autosomal recessive pontocerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, severely impaired mental and motor development, and extrapyramidal dyskinesia is a distinct system degeneration, previously designated pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2). To further characterize its clinical and neu

  4. Effect of lanreotide on polycystic liver and kidneys in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: an observational trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, T.J.G.; Hol, J.C.; Monshouwer, R.; Dekker, H.M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIM: Several trials have demonstrated that somatostatin analogues decrease liver volume in mixed populations of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and isolated polycystic liver disease. Chronic renal dysfunction in ADPKD may affect treatment efficacy of

  5. Seismic Waveform Inversion Using the Finite-Difference Contrast Source Inversion Method

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Han; Qinglong He; Yong Chen; Yixin Dou

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the finite-difference contrast source inversion method to reconstruct the mass density for two-dimensional elastic wave inversion in the framework of the full-waveform inversion. The contrast source inversion method is a nonlinear iterative method that alternatively reconstructs contrast sources and contrast function. One of the most outstanding advantages of this inversion method is the highly computational efficiency, since it does not need to simulate a fu...

  6. LHC Report: 2 inverse femtobarns!

    CERN Document Server

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is enjoying a confluence of twos. This morning (Friday 5 August) we passed 2 inverse femtobarns delivered in 2011; the peak luminosity is now just over 2 x1033 cm-2s-1; and recently fill 2000 was in for nearly 22 hours and delivered around 90 inverse picobarns, almost twice 2010's total.   In order to increase the luminosity we can increase of number of bunches, increase the number of particles per bunch, or decrease the transverse beam size at the interaction point. The beam size can be tackled in two ways: either reduce the size of the injected bunches or squeeze harder with the quadrupole magnets situated on either side of the experiments. Having increased the number of bunches to 1380, the maximum possible with a 50 ns bunch spacing, a one day meeting in Crozet decided to explore the other possibilities. The size of the beams coming from the injectors has been reduced to the minimum possible. This has brought an increase in the peak luminosity of about 50% and the 2 x 1033 cm...

  7. Inverse Medea as a novel gene drive system for local population replacement: a theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John M; Hay, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    One strategy to control mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria and dengue fever, on a regional scale is to use gene drive systems to spread disease-refractory genes into wild mosquito populations. The development of a synthetic Medea element that has been shown to drive population replacement in laboratory Drosophila populations has provided encouragement for this strategy but has also been greeted with caution over the concern that transgenes may spread into countries without their consent. Here, we propose a novel gene drive system, inverse Medea, which is strong enough to bring about local population replacement but is unable to establish itself beyond an isolated release site. The system consists of 2 genetic components--a zygotic toxin and maternal antidote--which render heterozygous offspring of wild-type mothers unviable. Through population genetic analysis, we show that inverse Medea will only spread when it represents a majority of the alleles in a population. The element is best located on an autosome and will spread to fixation provided any associated fitness costs are dominant and to very high frequency otherwise. We suggest molecular tools that could be used to build the inverse Medea system and discuss its utility for a confined release of transgenic mosquitoes.

  8. Inverse problems and inverse scattering of plane waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh Roy, Dilip N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to present the theory and mathematics of inverse scattering, in a simple way, to the many researchers and professionals who use it in their everyday research. While applications range across a broad spectrum of disciplines, examples in this text will focus primarly, but not exclusively, on acoustics. The text will be especially valuable for those applied workers who would like to delve more deeply into the fundamentally mathematical character of the subject matter.Practitioners in this field comprise applied physicists, engineers, and technologists, whereas the theory is almost entirely in the domain of abstract mathematics. This gulf between the two, if bridged, can only lead to improvement in the level of scholarship in this highly important discipline. This is the book''s primary focus.

  9. Coincidence the Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease With Placenta Membranacea (A Probably Genetic Relation with PKHD1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Hosseini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Placenta membranacea is one of the most barley anomalies happens in pregnancy defined by chorionic villi (partially or completely covered the fetus membrane. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease in fetus is also a rare case with an incidence of 1: 20,000 live births resulting in a 30% death rate in neonates. In this case for the first time, we reported a placenta membranacea and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease occurred with together. A 25-year-old woman was admitted at 16 weeks of gestation for inducing abortion with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease in fetus diagnosed in routine sonography fellowship. Post-delivery examination revealed a placenta totally enveloped the fetus, oligohydramnious and bilateral enlarged polycystic kidneys of fetus. Histological study indicated umbilicus has only one artery and one vein as well as autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and directly attachment of chorionic villi to fetal membrane eventually diagnosed as complete placenta membranacea. The etiology of placenta membranacea is not completely clarified. As autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a result of mutation in PKHD1 gene, so our finding may be initiates a new investigation about genetic relation between placenta membranacea and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

  10. AutoSOME: a clustering method for identifying gene expression modules without prior knowledge of cluster number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper James B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clustering the information content of large high-dimensional gene expression datasets has widespread application in "omics" biology. Unfortunately, the underlying structure of these natural datasets is often fuzzy, and the computational identification of data clusters generally requires knowledge about cluster number and geometry. Results We integrated strategies from machine learning, cartography, and graph theory into a new informatics method for automatically clustering self-organizing map ensembles of high-dimensional data. Our new method, called AutoSOME, readily identifies discrete and fuzzy data clusters without prior knowledge of cluster number or structure in diverse datasets including whole genome microarray data. Visualization of AutoSOME output using network diagrams and differential heat maps reveals unexpected variation among well-characterized cancer cell lines. Co-expression analysis of data from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells using AutoSOME identifies >3400 up-regulated genes associated with pluripotency, and indicates that a recently identified protein-protein interaction network characterizing pluripotency was underestimated by a factor of four. Conclusions By effectively extracting important information from high-dimensional microarray data without prior knowledge or the need for data filtration, AutoSOME can yield systems-level insights from whole genome microarray expression studies. Due to its generality, this new method should also have practical utility for a variety of data-intensive applications, including the results of deep sequencing experiments. AutoSOME is available for download at http://jimcooperlab.mcdb.ucsb.edu/autosome.

  11. Constrained and joint inversion on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetsch, J.; Jordi, C.; Rieckh, V.; Guenther, T.; Schmelzbach, C.

    2015-12-01

    Unstructured meshes allow for inclusion of arbitrary surface topography, complex acquisition geometry and undulating geological interfaces in the inversion of geophysical data. This flexibility opens new opportunities for coupling different geophysical and hydrological data sets in constrained and joint inversions. For example, incorporating geological interfaces that have been derived from high-resolution geophysical data (e.g., ground penetrating radar) can add geological constraints to inversions of electrical resistivity data. These constraints can be critical for a hydrogeological interpretation of the inversion results. For time-lapse inversions of geophysical data, constraints can be derived from hydrological point measurements in boreholes, but it is difficult to include these hard constraints in the inversion of electrical resistivity monitoring data. Especially mesh density and the regularization footprint around the hydrological point measurements are important for an improved inversion compared to the unconstrained case. With the help of synthetic and field examples, we analyze how regularization and coupling operators should be chosen for time-lapse inversions constrained by point measurements and for joint inversions of geophysical data in order to take full advantage of the flexibility of unstructured meshes. For the case of constraining to point measurements, it is important to choose a regularization operator that extends beyond the neighboring cells and the uncertainty in the point measurements needs to be accounted for. For joint inversion, the choice of the regularization depends on the expected subsurface heterogeneity and the cell size of the parameter mesh.

  12. Solution for Ill-Posed Inverse Kinematics of Robot Arm by Network Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of controlling a robot arm with multiple joints, the method of estimating the joint angles from the given end-effector coordinates is called inverse kinematics, which is a type of inverse problems. Network inversion has been proposed as a method for solving inverse problems by using a multilayer neural network. In this paper, network inversion is introduced as a method to solve the inverse kinematics problem of a robot arm with multiple joints, where the joint angles are estimated from the given end-effector coordinates. In general, inverse problems are affected by ill-posedness, which implies that the existence, uniqueness, and stability of their solutions are not guaranteed. In this paper, we show the effectiveness of applying network inversion with regularization, by which ill-posedness can be reduced, to the ill-posed inverse kinematics of an actual robot arm with multiple joints.

  13. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  14. Statistical Inversion of Seismic Noise Inversion statistique du bruit sismique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler P. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation of wave propagation in random media is presented. Spectral analysis, inversion of codas and attenuation of the direct wave front are studied for synthetic data obtained in isotropic or anisotropic, 2D or 3D media. A coda inversion process is developed and checked on two sets of real data. In both cases, it is possible to compare the correlation lengths obtained by inversion to characteristic lengths measured on seismic logs, for the full scale seismic survey, or on a thin section, for the laboratory experiment. These two experiments prove the feasibility and the efficiency of the statistical inversion of codas. Correct characteristic lengths can be obtained which cannot be determined by another method. Le problème de la géophysique est la recherche d'informations concernant le sous-sol, dans des signaux sismiques enregistrés en surface ou dans des puits. Ces informations sont habituellement recherchées sous forme déterministe, c'est-à-dire sous la forme de la donnée en chaque point d'une valeur du paramètre étudié. Notre point de vue est différent puisque notre objectif est de déduire certaines propriétés statistiques du milieu, supposé hétérogène, à partir des sismogrammes enregistrés après propagation. Il apparaît alors deux moyens de remplir l'objectif fixé. Le premier est l'analyse spectrale des codas ; cette analyse permet de déterminer les tailles moyennes des hétérogénéités du sous-sol. La deuxième possibilité est l'étude de l'atténuation du front direct de l'onde, qui conduit aussi à la connaissance des longueurs caractéristiques du sous-sol ; contrairement à la première méthode, elle ne semble pas pouvoir être transposée efficacement à des cas réels. Dans la première partie, on teste numériquement la proportionnalité entre le facteur de rétrodiffraction, relié aux propriétés statistiques du milieu, et le spectre des codas. Les distributions de vitesse, à valeur

  15. Bayesian multitask inverse reinforcement learning

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrakakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    We generalise the problem of inverse reinforcement learning to multiple tasks, from a set of demonstrations. Each demonstration may represent one expert trying to solve a different task. Alternatively, one may see each demonstration as given by a different expert trying to solve the same task. Our main technical contribution is to solve the problem by formalising it as statistical preference elicitation, via a number of structured priors, whose form captures our biases about the relatedness of different tasks or expert policies. We show that our methodology allows us not only to learn to efficiently from multiple experts but to also effectively differentiate between the goals of each. Possible applications include analysing the intrinsic motivations of subjects in behavioural experiments and imitation learning from multiple teachers.

  16. Inverse Diffusion Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reconstruction of diffusion and absorption parameters in an elliptic equation from knowledge of internal data. In the application of photo-acoustics, the internal data are the amount of thermal energy deposited by high frequency radiation propagating inside a domain of interest. These data are obtained by solving an inverse wave equation, which is well-studied in the literature. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines two constitutive parameters in diffusion and Schroedinger equations. Stability of the reconstruction is guaranteed under additional geometric constraints of strict convexity. No geometric constraints are necessary when $2n$ internal data for well-chosen boundary conditions are available, where $n$ is spatial dimension. The set of well-chosen boundary conditions is characterized in terms of appropriate complex geometrical optics (CGO) solutions.

  17. Inverse Transport Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume; Jugnon, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    We consider the reconstruction of optical parameters in a domain of interest from photoacoustic data. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) radiates high frequency electromagnetic waves into the domain and measures acoustic signals emitted by the resulting thermal expansion. Acoustic signals are then used to construct the deposited thermal energy map. The latter depends on the constitutive optical parameters in a nontrivial manner. In this paper, we develop and use an inverse transport theory with internal measurements to extract information on the optical coefficients from knowledge of the deposited thermal energy map. We consider the multi-measurement setting in which many electromagnetic radiation patterns are used to probe the domain of interest. By developing an expansion of the measurement operator into singular components, we show that the spatial variations of the intrinsic attenuation and the scattering coefficients may be reconstructed. We also reconstruct coefficients describing anisotropic scattering of ...

  18. Inverse Magnetic/Shear Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ``inverse magnetic catalysis'', signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magne...

  19. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer's disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition ((11)C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants underwent clinical and imaging follow-up examinations after 2.8 ± 0.6 years. By using linear

  20. Optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Wiak, Sławomir

    2003-01-01

    From 12 to 14 September 2002, the Academy of Humanities and Economics (AHE) hosted the workshop "Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism". After this bi-annual event, a large number of papers were assembled and combined in this book. During the workshop recent developments and applications in optimization and inverse methodologies for electromagnetic fields were discussed. The contributions selected for the present volume cover a wide spectrum of inverse and optimal electromagnetic methodologies, ranging from theoretical to practical applications. A number of new optimal and inverse methodologies were proposed. There are contributions related to dedicated software. Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism consists of three thematic chapters, covering: -General papers (survey of specific aspects of optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism), -Methodologies, -Industrial Applications. The book can be useful to students of electrical and electronics engineering, computer sci...

  1. Autosomal Dominant Inheritance of a Predisposition to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections and Intracranial Saccular Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Ellen; Medrek, Sarah; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Golabbakhsh, Hossein; Smart, Suzanne; Chen, Julia H.; Shete, Sanjay; Kim, Dong H.; Stern, Ralph; Braverman, Alan C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    A genetic predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with decreased penetrance and variable expression. Four genes identified to date for familial TAAD account for approximately 20% of the heritable predisposition. In a cohort of 514 families with two or more members with presumed autosomal dominant TAAD, 48 (9.3%) families have one or more members who were at 50% risk to inherit the presumptive gene causing TAAD had an intracranial vascular event. In these families, gender is significantly associated with disease presentation (p <0.001), with intracranial events being more common in women (65.4%) while TAAD events occurred more in men (64.2%,). Twenty-nine of these families had intracranial aneurysms (ICA) that could not be designated as saccular or fusiform due to incomplete data. TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and ACTA2 mutations were found in 4 families with TAAD and predominantly fusiform ICAs. In 15 families, of which 14 tested negative for 3 known TAAD genes, 17 family members who were at risk for inheriting TAAD had saccular ICAs. In 2 families, women who harbored the genetic mutation causing TAAD had ICAs. In 2 additional families, intracranial, thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms were observed. This study documents the autosomal dominant inheritance of TAADs with saccular ICAs, a previously recognized association that has not been adequately characterized as heritable.I these families, routine cerebral and aortic imaging for at risk members could prove beneficial for timely medical and surgical management to prevent a cerebral hemorrhage or aortic dissection. PMID:21815248

  2. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-03-07

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans.

  3. Fourteen non-CODIS autosomal short tandem repeat loci multiplex data from Taiwanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Lee, James Chun-I; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the development of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers unlinked to the CODIS loci is growing among forensic practitioners. We developed a multiplex system in which14 autosomal STR (D3S1744, D4S2366, D8S1110, D12S1090, D13S765, D14S608, Penta E, D17S1294, D18S536, D18S1270, D20S470, D21S1437, Penta D, and D22S683) could be amplified in one single polymerase chain reaction. DNA samples from 572 unrelated Taiwanese Han subjects were analyzed using this 14 STR multiplex system. Thirty parent-child pairs of parentage testing cases with a combined paternity index (CPI) below 1,000 and 32 parent-child pairs with single-step mutations found in AmpFℓSTR Identifiler loci were also recruited for validation of the newly developed system. DNA sequencing was performed for novel STRs and novel alleles found in these subjects. The distributions of allelic frequencies for these autosomal STRs and sequence data, allele nomenclature for the STRs, and forensic parameters are presented. The discrimination power in our multiplex loci ranged from 0.6858 (D18S536) to 0.9168 (Penta E), with a combined discrimination power of 0.999999999. It provides additional power to distinguish the possible single-step mutations in parent-child pairs and improves the ability to prove parentage by increasing the CPI. The combined power of exclusion of these 14 loci in Taiwanese Han in this study was 0.9999995913. In conclusion, this 14-autosomal STRs multiplex system provides highly informative STR data and appears useful in forensic casework and parentage testing.

  4. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal dominant ataxia families with an MJD phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, I.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Paciel, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration which was originally described in patients originating from the Portuguese islands of the Azores. The first non-Portuguese kindred was described in 1979 and was an American black family originating from North Carolina. Since then the number of pedigrees of non-Azorean, non-Portuguese origin has increased with families being reported from other European countries, as well as Brazil, Japan, India, The United States and Australia. The autosomal dominant ataxias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. To date, genetic analysis of families with autosomal dominant ataxias has permitted the identification of four loci, the SCA1 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 1) locus on chromosome 6p, the SCA2 locus on chromosome 12q, a third locus on chromosome 14q, the MJD/SCA3 and, more recently, the DRPLA (Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy) locus on chromosome 12p. We ascertained a total of 181 individuals with 60 affected from eight Indian, two Brazilian and one Sicilian-American family; all of them have received the clinical diagnosis of MJD. Recently, we have begun molecular genetic studies in these families in order to test these four candidate regions. The SCA1 mutation and the DRPLA mutation has been found to be an expansion of a CAG repeat. Direct analysis of the SCA1 and DRPLA expansion has been performed in all families and no expansion was found in the affected individuals. We are now running flanking markers for the SCA2 and MJD/SCA3 loci. These results will also be presented.

  5. Linkage of the late onset autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia (DFSPII) to chromosome 2p markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentati, A.; Wasserman, B.; Siddique, T. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Pure familial spastic paraplegias (FSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by spasticity of lower limbs. FSP in inherited as an autosomal dominant (DFSP) or an autosomal recessive (RFSP) trait. DFSP has been classified into early onset (DFSPI) and late onset (DFSPII) based on the mean age of onset in families. A locus for RFSP has been mapped to chromosome 8, while a locus for DFSPI has been mapped to chromosome 14q. Genetic locus heterogeneity was observed in both of these forms. The location of DFSPII locus (or loci) is unknown. We collected DNA samples from 81 individuals including 26 affecteds from three DFSPII families (9998, 840, 581). The mean age of onset of systems was 26.5, 42.5, and 35.2 years, respectively. We first tested 156 DNA markers distributed throughout the human 22 autosomes with family 9998 and positive lod scores were obtained with chromosome 2p markers D2S174 (Z({theta})=2.93 at {theta}=0.00), D2S146 (Z({theta})=1.03 at {theta}=0.00) and D2S177 (Z({theta})=1.04 at {theta}=0.00). Analysis of the 2 additional families confirmed the linkage with a peak lod score of Z({theta})=4.62 at {theta}=0.105 with D2S174. The multipoint linkage analysis using the map D2S175-10cM-D2S174-14cM-D2DS177 suggested that the DFSPII locus most likely maps between D2S174 and D2S177 with Z({theta})=6.11. There was no evidence in our data supporting genetic locus heterogeneity for the DFSPII.

  6. Mutations in KLHL40 are a frequent cause of severe autosomal-recessive nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Miyatake, Satoko; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Todd, Emily J; Vornanen, Pauliina; Yau, Kyle S; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Osaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Ohya, Takashi; Sakamoto, Yuko; Koshimizu, Eriko; Imamura, Shintaro; Yamashita, Michiaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J; Vaz, Raquel; Ceyhan, Ozge; Brownstein, Catherine A; Swanson, Lindsay C; Monnot, Sophie; Romero, Norma B; Amthor, Helge; Kresoje, Nina; Sivadorai, Padma; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Haliloglu, Goknur; Talim, Beril; Orhan, Diclehan; Kale, Gulsev; Charles, Adrian K; Fabian, Victoria A; Davis, Mark R; Lammens, Martin; Sewry, Caroline A; Manzur, Adnan; Muntoni, Francesco; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N; Bertini, Enrico; Nevo, Yoram; Willichowski, Ekkhard; Silberg, Inger E; Topaloglu, Haluk; Beggs, Alan H; Allcock, Richard J N; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Laing, Nigel G

    2013-07-11

    Nemaline myopathy (NEM) is a common congenital myopathy. At the very severe end of the NEM clinical spectrum are genetically unresolved cases of autosomal-recessive fetal akinesia sequence. We studied a multinational cohort of 143 severe-NEM-affected families lacking genetic diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing of six families and targeted gene sequencing of additional families. We identified 19 mutations in KLHL40 (kelch-like family member 40) in 28 apparently unrelated NEM kindreds of various ethnicities. Accounting for up to 28% of the tested individuals in the Japanese cohort, KLHL40 mutations were found to be the most common cause of this severe form of NEM. Clinical features of affected individuals were severe and distinctive and included fetal akinesia or hypokinesia and contractures, fractures, respiratory failure, and swallowing difficulties at birth. Molecular modeling suggested that the missense substitutions would destabilize the protein. Protein studies showed that KLHL40 is a striated-muscle-specific protein that is absent in KLHL40-associated NEM skeletal muscle. In zebrafish, klhl40a and klhl40b expression is largely confined to the myotome and skeletal muscle, and knockdown of these isoforms results in disruption of muscle structure and loss of movement. We identified KLHL40 mutations as a frequent cause of severe autosomal-recessive NEM and showed that it plays a key role in muscle development and function. Screening of KLHL40 should be a priority in individuals who are affected by autosomal-recessive NEM and who present with prenatal symptoms and/or contractures and in all Japanese individuals with severe NEM. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel FIR Inversion with Only FIRS

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, G

    2005-01-01

    The inversion of an FIR data sampling is usually stated to be possible with the use of a potentially unstable IIR, and in particular circumstances. It is possible to accomplish the same inversion with the doubling of an FIR sampling and with only FIRs for the sampling and the inversion. This note presents the configuration, which appently is not in the literature, for perfect signal reconstruction.

  8. Mechanisms and management of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Williams, Olubunmi; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most commonly inherited kidney disease, characterized by progressive cyst growth and renal enlargement, resulting in renal failure. Hypertension is common and occurs early, prior to loss of kidney function. Whether hypertension in ADPKD is a primary vasculopathy secondary to mutations in the polycystin genes or secondary to activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by cyst expansion and intrarenal ischemia is unclear. Dysregulation of the primary cilium causing endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction is a component of ADPKD. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypertension in ADPKD and give specific recommendations for its treatment.

  9. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD go back at least 500 years to the late 16th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade.

  10. [Mapping of pathogenic genes in two families with autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Wu, Ling-Qian; Liang, De-Sheng; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Pan, Qian; Bu, Feng-Xiao; Peng, Yu; Xia, Kun; Xia, Jia-Hui

    2008-07-01

    To localize the pathogenic genes of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris, we ascertained two ichthyosis vulgaris families from Hunan Province. Venous blood samples were collected from affected and unaffected family members and genomic DNA was extracted. We then performed genome scan and linkage analysis using microsatellite markers around known ichthyosis vulgaris loci in chromosomes 1 and 10. In family 1, the locus linked to ichthyosis vulgaris was located near D1S498 (1q21), which overlapped with known ichthyosis vulgaris loci. In family 2, however, all known loci for ichthyosis vulgaris were excluded and the new locus remains to be identified.

  11. Native American population data based on the Globalfiler(®) autosomal STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jillian; Oldt, Robert F; McCulloh, Kelly L; Weise, Jessica A; Viray, Joy; Budowle, Bruce; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan

    2016-09-01

    Native American population data are limited and thus impact computing accurate statistical parameters for forensic investigations. Thus, additional information should be generated from geographically representative tribes in North America, particularly from those that are not included in existing population databases for forensic use. The Globafiler(®) PCR Amplification kit was used to produce STR genotypic data for 533 individuals who represent 31 Native American tribal populations derived from eight geographically diverse regions in North America. Population genetic estimates from 21 autosomal STRs are reported.

  12. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet

    2013-01-01

    in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted...... in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal...

  13. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in three ethnic groups from Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharafi Farzad, M; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Børsting, C

    2013-01-01

    A total number of 149 individuals from Iran (Persians, Lurs and Kurds) were analyzed for 49 autosomal SNPs using PCR, SBE and capillary electrophoresis. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed. One SNP pair (rs1015250-rs251934) showed significant linkage disequilibrium in Kurds....... However, this was most likely due to chance. High intrapopulation variability and no significant population structure were observed among the three ethnic groups from Iran. Pairwise FST values obtained from the mean numbers of pairwise differences between SNP profiles were calculated for Persians, Lurs...

  14. Prediction of autosomal STR typing success in ancient and Second World War bone samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanič Pajnič, Irena; Zupanc, Tomaž; Balažic, Jože; Geršak, Živa Miriam; Stojković, Oliver; Skadrić, Ivan; Črešnar, Matija

    2017-03-01

    Human-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been developed for forensic use in the last 10 years and is the preferred DNA quantification technique since it is very accurate, sensitive, objective, time-effective and automatable. The amount of information that can be gleaned from a single quantification reaction using commercially available quantification kits has increased from the quantity of nuclear DNA to the amount of male DNA, presence of inhibitors and, most recently, to the degree of DNA degradation. In skeletal remains samples from disaster victims, missing persons and war conflict victims, the DNA is usually degraded. Therefore the new commercial qPCR kits able to assess the degree of degradation are potentially able to predict the success of downstream short tandem repeat (STR) typing. The goal of this study was to verify the quantification step using the PowerQuant kit with regard to its suitability as a screening method for autosomal STR typing success on ancient and Second World War (WWII) skeletal remains. We analysed 60 skeletons excavated from five archaeological sites and four WWII mass graves from Slovenia. The bones were cleaned, surface contamination was removed and the bones ground to a powder. Genomic DNA was obtained from 0.5g of bone powder after total demineralization. The DNA was purified using a Biorobot EZ1 device. Following PowerQuant quantification, DNA samples were subjected to autosomal STR amplification using the NGM kit. Up to 2.51ng DNA/g of powder were extracted. No inhibition was detected in any of bones analysed. 82% of the WWII bones gave full profiles while 73% of the ancient bones gave profiles not suitable for interpretation. Four bone extracts yielded no detectable amplification or zero quantification results and no profiles were obtained from any of them. Full or useful partial profiles were produced only from bone extracts where short autosomal (Auto) and long degradation (Deg) PowerQuant targets were detected. It is

  15. [Massive inferior vena cava thrombosis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic hepatorenal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Gil, F; Costero, O; Pobes, A

    2002-01-01

    We report a 68-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who developed multiple venous thromboses (inferior vena cava, left renal vein and iliofemoral veins) caused by local compression of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava by hepatic cysts. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of inferior vena cava thrombosis caused by hepatic cysts compression. Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were effective in documenting the venous thromboses and the underlying lesions non-invasively. Long-term anticoagulation was an efficient and safe treatment.

  16. Octreotide reduces hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) received octreotide for 12 months, and this was associated with a 6.3% reduction in liver volume, an 8% reduction in total kidney volume and stabilization of renal function. There was also a reduction of cyst size in fibrocystic disease of breast. These data suggest that the cyst fluid accumulation in different organs from patients with ADPKD is a dynamic process which can be reversed by octreotide. This is the first report of a case of simultaneous reduction in hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume with preservation of renal function in a patient with ADPKD receiving octreotide.

  17. Typing of 49 autosomal SNPs by single base extension and capillary electrophoresis for forensic genetic testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Morling, Niels

    2012-01-01

    We describe a method for simultaneous amplification of 49 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by multiplex PCR and detection of the SNP alleles by single base extension (SBE) and capillary electrophoresis. All the SNPs may be amplified from only 100 pg of genomic DNA and the length o...... victim identifications, where the DNA from the victims may be highly degraded and the victims are identified via investigation of their relatives. The assay was validated according to the ISO 17025 standard and used for routine case work in our laboratory....

  18. Activation of AMP-activated kinase as a strategy for managing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    There is evidence that overactivity of both mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes importantly to the progressive expansion of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent research has established that AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can suppress the activity of each of these proteins. Clinical AMPK activators such as metformin and berberine may thus have potential in the clinical management of ADPKD. The traditional use of berberine in diarrhea associated with bacterial infections may reflect, in part, the inhibitory impact of AMPK on chloride extrusion by small intestinal enterocytes.

  19. The use of whole exome sequencing for the diagnosis of autosomal recessive malignant infantile osteopetrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, O; Shaag, A; Yaacov, B; NaserEddin, A; Weintraub, M; Elpeleg, O; Stepensky, P

    2017-07-01

    Autosomal recessive malignant infantile osteopetrosis is a congenital disease characterized by pathologically increased bone density. Recently, the use of whole exome sequencing has been utilized as a clinical diagnostic tool in a number of Mendelian disorders. In this study, whole exome sequencing (WES) was successfully used in six patients with malignant infantile osteopetrosis (MIOP) and identified mutations in four MIOP-related genes (CLCN7, TCIRG1, SNX10, and TNFRSF11A). We report these patients, describe the mutations and review the current literature. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Multifocal renal cell carcinoma of different histological subtypes in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ki Yong; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Park, Yong-Koo; Chang, Sung-Goo; Kim, Youn Wha

    2012-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney (ADPKD) is rare. To date, 54 cases of RCC in ADPKD have been reported. Among these, only 2 cases have different histologic types of RCC. Here we describe a 45-year-old man who received radical nephrectomy for multifocal RCC with synchronous papillary and clear cell histology in ADPKD and chronic renal failure under regular hemodialysis. The case reported herein is another example of the rare pathological finding of RCC arising in a patient with ADPKD.

  1. FAMILI AUTOSOME TRANSLACATION (13/14) AT PARENTS WITH TRISOMYC CHILD IN 21-Th. CHROMOSOME

    OpenAIRE

    A. LAKOVSKI; M. KJAEVA-PEJKOVSKA; B. APOSTOLOVSKI; S. NIKOLOVSKA

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a case study about family autosome translocation is presented. On the basis of the evidence of chromosome`s abnormalities at the on parent (it was proved that the father has translocation between acrocentric chromosomes 13 and 14 or well known as Robertson’s or centric fusion’s) it was discovered that predisposition for nondisjunction could be expected. This is precondition for hereditary abnormality or for trisomia`s child to be born. These well-known facts are based on the pro...

  2. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT.......GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding...

  3. SCN9A channelopathy associated autosomal recessive Congenital Indifference to Pain. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekharan, S; Martens, L; Domingues, L; Cauwels, R

    2017-03-01

    Congenital Indifference to Pain (CIP) is a rare condition that inhibits the ability of patients to perceive physical pain but otherwise keeps normal sensory modalities. The condition has been mapped to an autosomal recessive trait to chromosome 2q 24.3 with mutations on the SCN9A gene. A 2 year old Caucasian female presented with CIP. Bite injuries, tongue wounds and unaccounted dental trauma episodes were frequently reported. Preventive instructions and possible treatment modalities were discussed with the parents. The cornerstone of treating CIP patients is an extensive preventive approach alongside regular oral examination at home by parents as well as routine recall appointments with dentists.

  4. A new autosomal STR nineplex for canine identification and parentage testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Asch, Barbara; Alves, Cíntia; Gusmão, Leonor

    2009-01-01

    A single multiplex PCR assay capable of simultaneously amplifying nine canine-specific autosomal STR markers (FH3210, FH3241, FH2004, FH2658, FH4012, REN214L11, FH2010, FH2361 and the newly described C38) was developed for individual identification and parentage testing in domestic dogs. In order......-breed origin. Co-dominant inheritance of STR alleles was investigated in 101 father, mother and son trios. Expected heterozygosity values vary between 0.5648 for REN214L11 and 0.9050 for C38. The high level of genetic diversity observed for most markers provides this multiplex with a very high discriminating...

  5. Seizure semiology in autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features, due to novel LGI1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Agher, Dahbia; Chabrol, Elodie; Elkouby, Léa; Leguern, Eric; Paterson, Sarah J; Harty, Rosie; Bellows, Susannah T; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in LGI1 are found in 50% of families with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF). In ADEAF, family members have predominantly lateral temporal lobe seizures but mesial temporal lobe semiology may also occur. We report here three families with novel LGI1 mutations (p.Ile82Thr, p.Glu225*, c.432-2_436del). Seven affected individuals reported an auditory aura and one a visual aura. A 10-year old boy described a cephalic aura followed by an unpleasant taste and oral automatisms without auditory, visual or psychic features. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. No Interstitial Telomeres on Autosomes but Remarkable Amplification of Telomeric Repeats on the W Sex Chromosome in the Sand Lizard (Lacerta agilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Matsuda, Yoichi; Miller, Emily; Olsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are repeat (TTAGGG) n sequences that form terminal ends of chromosomes and have several functions, such as protecting the coding DNA from erosion at mitosis. Due to chromosomal rearrangements through evolutionary history (e.g., inversions and fusions), telomeric sequences are also found between the centromere and the terminal ends (i.e., at interstitial telomeric sites, ITSs). ITS telomere sequences have been implicated in heritable disease caused by genomic instability of ITS polymorphic variants, both with respect to copy number and sequence. In the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis), we have shown that telomere length is predictive of lifetime fitness in females but not males. To assess whether this sex specific fitness effect could be traced to ITSs differences, we mapped (TTAGGG) n sequences using fluorescence in situ hybridization in fibroblast cells cultured from 4 specimens of known sex. No ITSs could be found on autosomes in either sex. However, females have heterogametic sex chromosomes in sand lizards (ZW, 2n = 38) and the female W chromosome showed degeneration and remarkable (TTAGGG) n amplification, which was absent in the Z chromosomes. This work warrants further research on sex chromosome content, in particular of the degenerate W chromosome, and links to female fitness in sand lizards.

  7. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  8. Bayesian approach to inverse statistical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inverse statistical mechanics aims to determine particle interactions from ensemble properties. This article looks at this inverse problem from a Bayesian perspective and discusses several statistical estimators to solve it. In addition, a sequential Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed that draws the interaction parameters from their posterior probability distribution. The posterior probability involves an intractable partition function that is estimated along with the interactions. The method is illustrated for inverse problems of varying complexity, including the estimation of a temperature, the inverse Ising problem, maximum entropy fitting, and the reconstruction of molecular interaction potentials.

  9. The structure of (L)*-inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueming; SHUM Karping

    2006-01-01

    The concepts of (L)*-inverse semigroups and left wreath products of semigroups are introduced. It is shown that the (L)*-inverse semigroup can be described as the left wreath product of a type A semigroup Γ and a left regular band B together with a mapping which maps the semigroup Γ into the endomorphism semigroup End(B). This result generalizes the structure theorem of Yamada for the left inverse semigroups in the class of regular semigroups.We shall also provide a constructed example for the (L)*-inverse semigroups by using the left wreath products.

  10. Analysis of nonlinear channel friction inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Weiping; LIU Guohua

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Backus-Gilbert inverse theory, the singular value decomposition (SVD) for general inverse matrices and the optimization algorithm are used to solve the channel friction inverse problem. The resolution and covari- ance friction inverse model in matrix form is developed to examine the reliability of solutions. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the convergence rate of the general Newton optimization algorithm is in the second-order. The Wiggins method is also incorporated into the algorithm. Using the method, noise can be suppressed effectively, and the results are close to accurate solutions with proper control parameters. Also, the numerical stability can be improved.

  11. Inverse Kinematics of a Serial Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amici Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a technique to treat the inverse kinematics of a serial manipulator. The inverse kinematics is obtained through the numerical inversion of the Jacobian matrix, that represents the equation of motion of the manipulator. The inversion is affected by numerical errors and, in different conditions, due to the numerical nature of the solver, it does not converge to a reasonable solution. Thus a soft computing approach is adopted to mix different traditional methods to obtain an increment of algorithmic convergence.

  12. A novel deletion mutation in ASPM gene in an Iranian family with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinaz AKBARIAZAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Akbarizar E, Ebrahimpour M, Akbari S, Arzhanghi S, Abedini SS, Najmabadi H, Kahrizi K. A Novel Deletion Mutation in ASPM Gene in an Iranian Family with Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly. Iran J Child Neurol.  2013 Spring;7(2:23-30. ObjectiveAutosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a neurodevelopmental and genetically heterogeneous disorder with decreased head circumference due to the abnormality in fetal brain growth. To date, nine loci and nine genes responsible for the situation have been identified. Mutations in the ASPM gene (MCPH5 is the most common cause of MCPH. The ASPM gene with 28 exons is essential for normal mitotic spindle function in embryonic neuroblasts.Materials & MethodsWe have ascertained twenty-two consanguineous families withintellectual disability and different ethnic backgrounds from Iran. Ten out of twenty-two families showed primary microcephaly in clinical examination. We investigated MCPH5 locus using homozygosity mapping by microsatellite marker. ResultSequence analysis of exon 8 revealed a deletion of nucleotide (T in donor site of splicing site of ASPM in one family. The remaining nine families were not linked to any of the known loci. More investigation will be needed to detect the causative defect in these families.ConlusionWe detected a novel mutation in the donor splicing site of exon 8 of the ASPM gene. This deletion mutation can alter the ASPM transcript leading to functional impairment of the gene product. References1. Pattison L, Crow YJ, Deeble VJ, Jackson AP, Jafri H, Rashid Y, et al. A Fifth Locus for Primary Autosomal Recessive Microcephaly Maps to Chromosome 1q31. Am J Hum Genet 2000;67(6:1578-80.2. Darvish H, Esmaeeli-Nieh S, Monajemi G, Mohseni M, Ghasemi-Firouzabadi S, Abedini S, et al. A clinical and molecular genetic study of 112 Iranian families with primary microcephaly. Journal of Medical Genetics 2010;47(12:823-8.3. Tolmie JL, M M, JB S, D D, JM C

  13. The structure of *-inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN; Xueming

    2006-01-01

    [1]Hall T E.Orthodox semigroups.Pacific J Math,1971,39:677-686[2]Howie J M.An Introduction to Semigroup Theory.Now York:Academic Press,1976[3]Fountain J B.Abundant semigroups.Proc Lond Math Soc,1982,44 (3):103-129[4]El-Qallali A,Fountain J B.Idempotent-connected abundant semigroups.Proc Roy Soc Edinburgh,1981,Sec.A:79-90[5]El-Qallali A,Fountain J B.Quasi-adequate semigroups.Proc Roy Soc Edinburgh,1981,Sec.A:91-99[6]Fountain J B.Adequate semigroups.Proc Edinburgh Math Soc,1979,22:113-125[7]Guo X J.Abundant C-lpp proper semigroups.Southeast Asian Bull Math,2000,24 (1):41-50[8]Guo X J,Shum K P,Guo Y Q.Perfect rpp semigroups.Communications in Algebra,2001,29(6):2447-2459[9]Ren X M,Shum K P.Structure theorems for right pp-semigroups with left central idempotents.Discussions Math General Algebra and Applications,2000,20:63-75[10]Ren X M,Shum K P.The structure of superabundant semigroups.Sci China Ser A-Math,2004,47(5):756-771[11]Shum K P,Ren X M.Abundant semigroups with left central idempotents.Pure Math Appl,1999,10(1):109-113[12]Armstrong S.The structure of type A semigroups.Semigroup Forum,1984,29:319-336[13]Lawson M V.The structure of type A semigroups.Quart J Math Oxford,1986,37(2):279-298[14]Bailes G L.Right inverse semigroups.J Algebra,1973,26:492-507[15]Venkatesan P S.Right (left) inverse semigroups.J Algebra,1974,31:209-217[16]Yamada M.Orthodox semigroups whose idempotents satisfy a certain identity.Semigroup Forum,1973,6:113-128[17]Preston G B.Semiproducts of semigroups.Proc Roy Soc Edinburgh,1986,102A:91-102[18]Preston G B:Products of semigroups.In:Shum K P,Yuen P C,eds.Proc.of the conference"Ordered structures and algebra of computer languages",1991 (Hong Kong).Singapore:World Scientific Inc,1993.161-169[19]Lawson M V.The natural partial order on an abundant semigroup.Proc Edinburgh Math Soc,1987,30:169-186[20]El-Qallali A.(L)*-unipotent semigroups.J Pure and Applied Algebra,1989,62:19-23

  14. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 utilizing pairwise combinations of disease-related terms (autosomal recessive ataxia, ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), Friedreich ataxia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and symptom-related terms (movement disorder, dystonia, chorea, choreoathetosis, myoclonus). Results Involuntary movements occur in the majority of patients with ataxia–telangiectasia and AOA1, and less frequently in patients with AOA2, Friedreich ataxia, and ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Clinical presentations with an isolated hyperkinetic movement disorder in the absence of ataxia include dystonia or dystonia with myoclonus with predominant upper limb and cervical involvement (ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and generalized chorea (ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1, ataxia-telangiectasia). Discussion An awareness of atypical presentations facilitates early and accurate diagnosis in these challenging cases. Recognition of involuntary movements is important not only for diagnosis, but also because of the potential for effective targeted symptomatic treatment. PMID:27536460

  15. Current knowledge of prenatal diagnosis of mosaic autosomal trisomy in amniocytes: karyotype/phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Robert; Misra, Sonya; Dugar, R Bryce; Alem, Monika; Mazzoni, Ronit; Garabedian, Matthew J

    2015-09-01

    Genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis of autosomal trisomy is complex because of the uncertainty of outcome, which is important for management decisions. Compilation of cases of prenatally diagnosed autosomal trisomies in amniocytes has been done previously in an attempt to elucidate the clinical phenotype of these pregnancies. It has been greater than a decade since these studies were completed. To update this work, we reviewed cases reported in the literature since that time. These cases are correlated with the prior reports to increase knowledge about outcomes and to hopefully improve the data available for genetic counseling. The risk of abnormal outcome can be summarized as: very high risk (>60%) for 47,+2/46; 47,+9/46; 47,+16/46; 47,+20/46; and 47,+22/46; high risk (40-59%) for 47,+5/46; 47,+14/46; and 47,+15/46; moderately high risk (20-39%) for 47,+7/46 47,+12/46; and 47,+17/46; moderate risk (up to 19%) for 47,+6/46 and 47,+8/46, and none were low risk. 47,+6/46 was originally indeterminate, 47,+7/46 was originally moderate risk, 47,+9/46 was originally high risk, and 47,+17/46 was originally low risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz P W Radner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3 and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289. Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3 and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.

  17. A novel mutation in CRYAB associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Ma, Junjie; Yan, Ming; Mothobi, Maneo Emily; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Fang

    2009-07-10

    To identify the genetic defects associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Clinical data were collected, and the phenotypes of the affected members in this family were recorded by slit-lamp photography. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. Mutations were screened in cataract-associated candidate genes through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses and sequencing. Structural models of the wild-type and mutant alphaB-crystallin were generated and analyzed by SWISS-MODEL. Mutation screening identified only one heterozygous G-->A transition at nucleotide 32 in the first exon of alphaB-crystallin (CRYAB), resulting in an amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 11 (R11H). This mutation segregated in all available affected family members but was not observed in any of the unaffected persons of the family. The putative mutation disrupted a restriction site for the enzyme, Fnu4HI, in the affected family members. The disruption, however, was not found in any of the randomly selected ophthalmologically normal individuals or in 40 unrelated senile cataract patients. Computer-assisted prediction suggested that this mutation affected the biochemical properties as well as the structure of alphaB-crystallin. These results supported the idea that the novel R11H mutation was responsible for the autosomal dominant nuclear congenital cataract in this pedigree.

  18. A nonsense mutation in CRYGC associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ke; Jin, Chongfei; Zhu, Ning; Wang, Wei; Wu, Renyi; Jiang, Jin; Shentu, Xingchao

    2008-07-09

    To identify the genetic defect associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Family history and phenotypic data were recorded, and the phenotypes were documented by slit lamp photography. The genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. All the exons and flanking intronic sequences of CRYGC and CRYGD were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screened for mutation by direct DNA sequencing. Structural models of the wild type and mutant gammaC-crystallin were generated and analyzed by SWISS-MODEL. Sequencing of the coding regions of CRYGC and CRYGD showed the presence of a heterozygous C>A transversion at c.327 of the coding sequence in exon 3 of CRYGC (c.327C>A), which results in the substitution of a wild type cysteine to a nonsense codon (C109X). One and a half Greek key motifs at the COOH-terminus were found to be absent in the structural model of the mutant truncated gammaC-crystallin. A novel nonsense mutation in CRYGC was detected in a Chinese family with consistent autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract, providing clear evidence of a relationship between the genotype and the corresponding cataract phenotype.

  19. Ethnically distinct populations of historical Tibet exhibit distinct autosomal STR compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsering, Thupten; Gayden, Tenzin; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-03-01

    At an average altitude of 4000m above sea level, the Tibetan plateau is one of the highest plains on the planet. It is surrounded on three sides by massive mountain ranges: the Kunlun, the Karakoram and the Himalayas. These natural barriers have kept Tibet relatively isolated. In the present study, 15 autosomal STR loci were genotyped in 338 unrelated individuals from three traditional provinces of historical Tibet: Amdo (86), Kham (101) and U-Tsang (151). All the studied loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except for the D19S433 locus in the Kham province. FGA, D21S11 and D2S1338 show the highest observed heterozygosity values in Amdo (0.8954), Kham (0.9208) and U-Tsang (0.8940), respectively, whereas TPOX is the least variable marker displaying the lowest value for the same parameter. U-Tsang exhibits the highest total numbers of alleles (139) followed by Kham (130) and Amdo (128) groups. The allele frequency data from this study were compared to relevant global reference populations. Our results indicate that although these three Tibetan populations group together in both the Correspondence Analysis (CA) plot and the Neighbor Joining (NJ) tree, they exhibit some degree of genetic differentiation among themselves congruent with their unique dialects, cultures and traditions. The 15 autosomal STR loci studied were found to be informative and discriminating, thereby providing a useful set of markers for population genetic studies.

  20. Detrimental effects of an autosomal selfish genetic element on sperm competitiveness in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Andreas; Lindholm, Anna K

    2015-07-22

    Female multiple mating (polyandry) is widespread across many animal taxa and indirect genetic benefits are a major evolutionary force favouring polyandry. An incentive for polyandry arises when multiple mating leads to sperm competition that disadvantages sperm from genetically inferior mates. A reduction in genetic quality is associated with costly selfish genetic elements (SGEs), and studies in invertebrates have shown that males bearing sex ratio distorting SGEs are worse sperm competitors than wild-type males.We used a vertebrate model species to test whether females can avoid an autosomal SGE, the t haplotype, through polyandry. The t haplotype inhouse mice exhibits strong drive in t heterozygous males by affecting spermatogenesis and is associated with homozygous in utero lethality. We used controlled matings to test the effect of the t haplotype on sperm competitiveness. Regardless of mating order, t heterozygous males sired only 11% of zygotes when competing against wild-type males, suggesting a very strong effect of the t haplotype on sperm quality. We provide, to our knowledge,the first substantial evidence that polyandry ameliorates the harmful effects of an autosomal SGE arising through genetic incompatibility. We discuss potential mechanisms in our study species and the broader implications for the benefits of polyandry.

  1. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz P W Radner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3 and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289. Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3 and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.

  2. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P. [Univ. of Cape Town (South Africa)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Autosomal recessive dilated cardiomyopathy due to DOLK mutations results from abnormal dystroglycan O-mannosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J Lefeber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5-13 years with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG. Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations.

  4. Inferring the geographic mode of speciation by contrasting autosomal and sex-linked genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jui-Hua; Wegmann, Daniel; Yeh, Chia-Fen; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Lei, Fu-Min; Yao, Cheng-Te; Zou, Fa-Sheng; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2013-11-01

    When geographic isolation drives speciation, concurrent termination of gene flow among genomic regions will occur immediately after the formation of the barrier between diverging populations. Alternatively, if speciation is driven by ecologically divergent selection, gene flow of selectively neutral genomic regions may go on between diverging populations until the completion of reproductive isolation. It may also lead to an unsynchronized termination of gene flow between genomic regions with different roles in the speciation process. Here, we developed a novel Approximate Bayesian Computation pipeline to infer the geographic mode of speciation by testing for a lack of postdivergence gene flow and a concurrent termination of gene flow in autosomal and sex-linked markers jointly. We applied this approach to infer the geographic mode of speciation for two allopatric highland rosefinches, the vinaceous rosefinch Carpodacus vinaceus and the Taiwan rosefinch C. formosanus from DNA polymorphisms of both autosomal and Z-linked loci. Our results suggest that the two rosefinch species diverged allopatrically approximately 0.5 Ma. Our approach allowed us further to infer that female effective population sizes are about five times larger than those of males, an estimate potentially useful when comparing the intensity of sexual selection across species.

  5. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract, intellectual disability phenotype linked to STX3 in a consanguineous Tunisian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chograni, M; Alkuraya, F S; Ourteni, I; Maazoul, F; Lariani, I; Chaabouni, H B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability phenotype in a consanguineous Tunisian family. The whole genome scan of the studied family was performed with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The resulted runs of homozygosity (ROH) were analyzed through the integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery (iSyTE) in order to prioritize candidate genes associated with congenital cataract. Selected genes were amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted to predict the function of the mutant gene. We identified a new specific lens gene named syntaxin 3 linked to the studied phenotype. The direct sequencing of this gene revealed a novel missense mutation c.122A>G which results in p.E41G. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a deleterious effect of this mutation on protein structure and function. Here, we report for the first time a missense mutation of a novel lens specific gene STX3 in a phenotype associating autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability.

  6. A genomic audit of newly-adopted autosomal STRs for forensic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C

    2017-07-01

    In preparation for the growing use of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology to genotype forensic STRs, a comprehensive genomic audit of 73 STRs was made in 2016 [Parson et al., Forensic Sci. Int. Genet. 22, 54-63]. The loci examined included miniSTRs that were not in widespread use, but had been incorporated into MPS kits or were under consideration for this purpose. The current study expands the genomic analysis of autosomal STRs that are not commonly used, to include the full set of developed miniSTRs and an additional 24 STRs, most of which have been recently included in several supplementary forensic multiplex kits for capillary electrophoresis. The genomic audit of these 47 newly-adopted STRs examined the linkage status of new loci on the same chromosome as established forensic STRs; analyzed world-wide population variation of the newly-adopted STRs using published data; assessed their forensic informativeness; and compiled the sequence characteristics, repeat structures and flanking regions of each STR. A further 44 autosomal STRs developed for forensic analyses but not incorporated into commercial kits, are also briefly described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease: diagnosis, classification, and management--A KDIGO consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Alper, Seth L; Antignac, Corinne; Bleyer, Anthony J; Chauveau, Dominique; Dahan, Karin; Deltas, Constantinos; Hosking, Andrew; Kmoch, Stanislav; Rampoldi, Luca; Wiesener, Michael; Wolf, Matthias T; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Rare autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding uromodulin (UMOD), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF1B), renin (REN), and mucin-1 (MUC1). Multiple names have been proposed for these disorders, including 'Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease (MCKD) type 2', 'Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy (FJHN)', or 'Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease (UAKD)' for UMOD-related diseases and 'MCKD type 1' for the disease caused by MUC1 mutations. The multiplicity of these terms, and the fact that cysts are not pathognomonic, creates confusion. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) proposes adoption of a new terminology for this group of diseases using the term 'Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease' (ADTKD) appended by a gene-based subclassification, and suggests diagnostic criteria. Implementation of these recommendations is anticipated to facilitate recognition and characterization of these monogenic diseases. A better understanding of these rare disorders may be relevant for the tubulointerstitial fibrosis component in many forms of chronic kidney disease.

  8. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Michael

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500 is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported in ADOA, the frequency of OPA1 genomic rearrangements in Denmark, where ADOA has a high prevalence, is unknown. The aim of the study was to identify copy number variations in OPA1 in Danish ADOA patients. Methods Forty unrelated ADOA patients, selected from a group of 100 ADOA patients as being negative for OPA1 point mutations, were tested for genomic rearrangements in OPA1 by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA. When only one probe was abnormal results were confirmed by additional manually added probes. Segregation analysis was performed in families with detected mutations when possible. Results Ten families had OPA1 deletions, including two with deletions of the entire coding region and eight with intragenic deletions. Segregation analysis was possible in five families, and showed that the deletions segregated with the disease. Conclusion Deletions in the OPA1 gene were found in 10 patients presenting with phenotypic autosomal dominant optic neuropathy. Genetic testing for deletions in OPA1 should be offered for patients with clinically diagnosed ADOA and no OPA1 mutations detected by DNA sequencing analysis.

  9. Genetic structure of Indian populations based on fifteen autosomal microsatellite loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu G Hima

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indian populations endowed with unparalleled genetic complexity have received a great deal of attention from scientists world over. However, the fundamental question over their ancestry, whether they are all genetically similar or do exhibit differences attributable to ethnicity, language, geography or socio-cultural affiliation is still unresolved. In order to decipher their underlying genetic structure, we undertook a study on 3522 individuals belonging to 54 endogamous Indian populations representing all major ethnic, linguistic and geographic groups and assessed the genetic variation using autosomal microsatellite markers. Results The distribution of the most frequent allele was uniform across populations, revealing an underlying genetic similarity. Patterns of allele distribution suggestive of ethnic or geographic propinquity were discernible only in a few of the populations and was not applicable to the entire dataset while a number of the populations exhibited distinct identities evident from the occurrence of unique alleles in them. Genetic substructuring was detected among populations originating from northeastern and southern India reflective of their migrational histories and genetic isolation respectively. Conclusion Our analyses based on autosomal microsatellite markers detected no evidence of general clustering of population groups based on ethnic, linguistic, geographic or socio-cultural affiliations. The existence of substructuring in populations from northeastern and southern India has notable implications for population genetic studies and forensic databases where broad grouping of populations based on such affiliations are frequently employed.

  10. Founder mutation in dystonin-e underlying autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, T; Nanda, A; Liu, L; Aristodemou, S; McMillan, J R; Sugiura, K; Akiyama, M; Al-Ajmi, H; Simpson, M A; McGrath, J A

    2015-02-01

    Only two homozygous nonsense mutations in the epidermal isoform of the dystonin gene, DST-e, have been reported previously in autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS); the affected pedigrees were Kuwaiti and Iranian. This subtype of EBS is therefore considered to be a rare clinicopathological entity. In this study, we identified four seemingly unrelated Kuwaiti families in which a total of seven individuals had predominantly acral trauma-induced blistering since infancy. All affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation p.Gln1124* in DST-e, the same mutation that was identified in the originally reported family from Kuwait. Haplotype analysis in the five pedigrees (including the previous case) revealed a shared block of ~60 kb of genomic DNA across the site of the mutation, consistent with a founder effect. Most heterozygotes had no clinical abnormalities although one subject had mild transient skin fragility during childhood, an observation noted in the previously reported Iranian pedigree, suggesting that the condition may also be semidominant in some pedigrees rather than purely autosomal recessive. Our study reveals propagation of a mutant ancestral allele in DST-e throughout Kuwait, indicating that this subtype of EBS may be more common in Kuwait, and perhaps other Middle Eastern countries, than is currently appreciated.

  11. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia; Linkage analysis and evidence for linkage to chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figlewicz, D.A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. Little is known about the pathophysiology of this disorder. FSP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or X-linked trait. We have undertaken linkage analysis for a group of 36 AD FSP families from which we have collected blood samples from 427 individuals, including 148 affected individuals. Typing of polymorphic markers has allowed us to exclude more than 50% of the genome. Recently, linkage for AD FSP to a locus on chromosome 14q was reported. Our AD FSP kindreds were tested for linkage to markers spanning the 20 cM region between D14S69 and D14S66; however, we were not able to establish linkage for any of our families to chromosome 14. Lod scores suggestive of linkage for some AD FSP kindreds have been obtained for markers on chromosome 2p. We have tested seven polymorphic markers spanning the region between D2S405 and D2S177. Our highest aggregate lod score, including all families tested, was obtained at the locus D2S352: 2.4 at 20 cM. Results from HOMOG analysis for linkage heterogeneity will be reported.

  12. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jessica X; Burrage, Lindsay C; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Harrell, Tanya M; Buckingham, Kati J; Bacino, Carlos A; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A; Carey, John C; Gibbs, Richard A; Lee, Brendan H; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development.

  13. Gene mapping of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Li-li; SUN Da-wei; WANG Zheng; FU Song-bin; HUANG Shang-zhi; ZHANG Zhong-yu; ZENG Guang; PENG Shao-min

    2009-01-01

    Background The autosomal dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) can be caused by mutations in 14 genes and further loci remains to be identified. This study was intended to identify mutations in a Chinese pedigree with ADRP. Methods A large Chinese family with retinitis pigmentosa was collected. The genetic analysis of the family suggested an autosomal dominant pattern. Microsatellite (STR) markers tightly linked to genes known to be responsible for ADRP were selected for linkage analysis. Exons along with adjacent splice junctions of PRPF31 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screened by direct sequencing.Results The caused gene of ADRP was mapped to 19q13.4 between markers D19S572 and D19S877, with a maximum LOD score of 3.01 at marker D19S418 (recombination fraction=0).Conclusion The affected gene linked to the 19q13.4 in a Chinese family with ADRP, which is different from other mutations at the same loci in other Chinese families.

  14. Familial clustering of medullary sponge kidney is autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris, Antonia; Lupo, Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro M; Anglani, Franca; Pei, York; Danza, Francesco M; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a renal malformation typically associated with nephrocalcinosis and recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis. Approximately 12% of recurrent stone formers have MSK, which is generally considered a sporadic disorder. Since its discovery, three pedigrees have been described in which an apparently autosomal dominant inheritance was suggested. Here, family members of 50 patients with MSK were systematically investigated by means of interviews, renal imaging, and biochemical studies in an effort to establish whether MSK is an inheritable disorder. Twenty-seven MSK probands had 59 first- and second-degree relatives of both genders with MSK in all generations. There were progressively lower mean levels of serum calcium, urinary sodium, pH, and volume, combined with higher serum phosphate and potassium from probands to relatives with bilateral, to those with unilateral, and to those unaffected by MSK. This suggests that most affected relatives have a milder form of MSK than the probands, which would explain why they had not been so diagnosed. Thus, our study provides strong evidence that familial clustering of MSK is common, and has an autosomal dominant inheritance, a reduced penetrance, and variable expressivity.

  15. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Shanghai, China: Evidence for an autosomal major locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marazita, M.L. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)); Hu, Dan-Ning; Liu, You-E. (Zhabei Eye Institute, Shanghai (China)); Spence, A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Melnick, M. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Orientals are at higher risk for cleft lip with our without cleft palate (CL[+-] P) than Caucasians or blacks. The authors collected demographic and family data to study factors contributing to the etiology of CL[+-]P in Shanghai. The birth incidence of nonsyndromic CL[+-]P (SHanghai 1980-87) was 1.11/1,000, with a male/female ratio of 1.42. Almost 2,000 nonsyndromic CL[+-]P probands were ascertained from individuals operated on during the years 1956-83 at surgical hospitals in Shanghai. Detailed family histories and medical examinations were obtained for the probands and all available family members. Genetic analysis of the probands' families were performed under the mixed model with major locus (ML) and multifactorial (MFT) components. The hypothesis of no familial transmission and of MFT alone could be rejected. Of the ML models, the autosomal recessive was significantly most likely and was assumed for testing three complex hypothesis: (1) ML and sporadics; (2) ML and MFT; (3) ML, MFT, and sporadics. None of the complex models were more likely than the ML alone model. In conclusion, the best-fitting, most parsimonious model for CL[+-]P in Shanghai was that of an autosomal recessive major locus. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-09-15

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X-linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation.

  17. Life history effects on the molecular clock of autosomes and sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amster, Guy; Sella, Guy

    2016-02-01

    One of the foundational results in molecular evolution is that the rate at which neutral substitutions accumulate on a lineage equals the rate at which mutations arise. Traits that affect rates of mutation therefore also affect the phylogenetic "molecular clock." We consider the effects of sex-specific generation times and mutation rates in species with two sexes. In particular, we focus on the effects that the age of onset of male puberty and rates of spermatogenesis have likely had in hominids (great apes), considering a model that approximates features of the mutational process in mammals, birds, and some other vertebrates. As we show, this model can account for a number of seemingly disparate observations: notably, the puzzlingly low X-to-autosome ratios of substitution rates in humans and chimpanzees and differences in rates of autosomal substitutions among hominine lineages (i.e., humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas). The model further suggests how to translate pedigree-based estimates of human mutation rates into split times among extant hominoids (apes), given sex-specific life histories. In so doing, it largely bridges the gap reported between estimates of split times based on fossil and molecular evidence, in particular suggesting that the human-chimpanzee split may have occurred as recently as 6.6 Mya. The model also implies that the "generation time effect" should be stronger in short-lived species, explaining why the generation time has a major influence on yearly substitution rates in mammals but only a subtle one in human pedigrees.

  18. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnes, Brett, E-mail: matmcinn@nus.edu.sg

    2016-05-15

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark–Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce “inverse magnetic catalysis”, signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  19. Inversion based on computational simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Saquib, S.S.

    1998-09-01

    A standard approach to solving inversion problems that involve many parameters uses gradient-based optimization to find the parameters that best match the data. The authors discuss enabling techniques that facilitate application of this approach to large-scale computational simulations, which are the only way to investigate many complex physical phenomena. Such simulations may not seem to lend themselves to calculation of the gradient with respect to numerous parameters. However, adjoint differentiation allows one to efficiently compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to all the variables of a simulation. When combined with advanced gradient-based optimization algorithms, adjoint differentiation permits one to solve very large problems of optimization or parameter estimation. These techniques will be illustrated through the simulation of the time-dependent diffusion of infrared light through tissue, which has been used to perform optical tomography. The techniques discussed have a wide range of applicability to modeling including the optimization of models to achieve a desired design goal.

  20. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark–Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce “inverse magnetic catalysis”, signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  1. MODEL SELECTION FOR SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC INVERSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Socas-Navarro, H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Viticchie, B. [ESA/ESTEC RSSD, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Orozco Suarez, D., E-mail: aasensio@iac.es [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Inferring magnetic and thermodynamic information from spectropolarimetric observations relies on the assumption of a parameterized model atmosphere whose parameters are tuned by comparison with observations. Often, the choice of the underlying atmospheric model is based on subjective reasons. In other cases, complex models are chosen based on objective reasons (for instance, the necessity to explain asymmetries in the Stokes profiles) but it is not clear what degree of complexity is needed. The lack of an objective way of comparing models has, sometimes, led to opposing views of the solar magnetism because the inferred physical scenarios are essentially different. We present the first quantitative model comparison based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence ratios for spectropolarimetric observations. Our results show that there is not a single model appropriate for all profiles simultaneously. Data with moderate signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) favor models without gradients along the line of sight. If the observations show clear circular and linear polarization signals above the noise level, models with gradients along the line are preferred. As a general rule, observations with large S/Ns favor more complex models. We demonstrate that the evidence ratios correlate well with simple proxies. Therefore, we propose to calculate these proxies when carrying out standard least-squares inversions to allow for model comparison in the future.

  2. Inverse problems and uncertainty quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2013-12-18

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ)— the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) model—are strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. This is especially the case as together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time- consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling- free non-linear Bayesian update is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisa- tion to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and quadratic Bayesian update on the small but taxing example of the chaotic Lorenz 84 model, where we experiment with the influence of different observation or measurement operators on the update.

  3. Inverse Problems and Uncertainty Quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ) - the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) modelare strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. This is especially the case as together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time- consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling- free non-linear Bayesian update is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisa- tion to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and quadratic Bayesian update on the small but taxing example of the chaotic Lorenz 84 model, where we experiment with the influence of different observation or measurement operators on the update.

  4. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  5. Inversion and approximation of Laplace transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of inverting Laplace transforms by using a set of orthonormal functions is reported. As a byproduct of the inversion, approximation of complicated Laplace transforms by a transform with a series of simple poles along the left half plane real axis is shown. The inversion and approximation process is simple enough to be put on a programmable hand calculator.

  6. Integrative inversion of land surface component temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wenjie; XU Xiru

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the row winter wheat was selected as the example to study the component temperature inversion method of land surface target in detail. The result showed that the structural pattern of row crop can affect the inversion precision of component temperature evidently. Choosing appropriate structural pattern of row crop can improve the inversion precision significantly. The iterative method combining inverse matrix was a stable method that was fit for inversing component temperature of land surface target. The result of simulation and field experiment showed that the integrative method could remarkably improve the inversion accuracy of the lighted soil surface temperature and the top layer canopy temperature, and enhance inversion stability of components temperature. Just two parameters were sufficient for accurate atmospheric correction of multi-angle and multi-spectral thermal infrared data: atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric upwelling radiance. If the atmospheric parameters and component temperature can be inversed synchronously, the really and truly accurate atmospheric correction can be achieved. The validation using ATSRII data showed that the method was useful.

  7. Non-Linear Logging Parameters Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The non-linear logging parameters inversion is based on the field theory, information optimization and predication theory. It uses seismic charaoters,geological model and logging data as a restriction to inverse 2D, 3D logging parameters data volume. Using this method,

  8. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd...

  9. Inversion in Mathematical Thinking and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inversion is a fundamental relational building block both within mathematics as the study of structures and within people's physical and social experience, linked to many other key elements such as equilibrium, invariance, reversal, compensation, symmetry, and balance. Within purely formal arithmetic, the inverse relationships between addition and…

  10. Normal Orthodox Semigroups with Inverse Transversals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUFeng-lin

    2003-01-01

    A normal orthodox semigroup is an orthodox semigroup whose idempotent elements form a normal band.We deal with congruces on a normal orthodox semigroup with an iverse transversal .A structure theorem for such semigroup is obtained.Munn(1966)gave a fundamental inverse semigroup Following Munn's idea ,we give a fundamental normal orthodox semigroup with an inverse transversal.

  11. Treatment of inverse psoriasis with efalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Dornechia; Rosen, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Various topical and systemic treatments have shown efficacy in plaque and palmoplantar psoriasis; however, studies regarding efficacy in inverse psoriasis are few. The authors present a case of a patient with severe inverse psoriasis who was successfully treated with efalizumab, resulting in complete and sustained remission during prolonged maintenance therapy.

  12. Approximation of the Inverse -Frame Operator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Abdollahpour; A Najati

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of (strong) projection method for -frames which works for all conditional -Riesz frames. We also derive a method for approximation of the inverse -frame operator which is efficient for all -frames. We show how the inverse of -frame operator can be approximated as close as we like using finite-dimensional linear algebra.

  13. An inversion algorithm for general tridiagonal matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-sheng RAN; Ting-zhu HUANG; Xing-ping LIU; Tong-xiang GU

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for the inverse of a general tridiagonal matrix is presented. For a tridiagonal matrix having the Doolittle factorization, an inversion algorithm is established.The algorithm is then generalized to deal with a general tridiagonal matrix without any restriction. Comparison with other methods is provided, indicating low computational complexity of the proposed algorithm, and its applicability to general tridiagonal matrices.

  14. Resolution analysis in full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fichtner, A.; Trampert, J.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method for the quantitative resolution analysis in full seismic waveform inversion that overcomes the limitations of classical synthetic inversions while being computationally more efficient and applicable to any misfit measure. The method rests on (1) the local quadratic approximat

  15. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkrantz, L.; Groen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance.

  16. A Construction of Weakly Inverse Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Jun YU; Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Let S° be an inverse semigroup with semilattice biordered set E° of idempotents and E a weakly inverse biordered set with a subsemilattice Ep = { e ∈ E |(V) f ∈ E, S(f , e)(C) w(e) } isomorphic to E° by θ:Ep→E°. In this paper, it is proved that if(V)f, g∈E, f ←→ ,g(→) f°θ (ζ)s° g°θand there exists a mapping φ from Ep into the symmetric weakly inverse semigroup (ζξ)(E ∪S°) satisfying six appropriate conditions, then a weakly inverse semigroup ∑ can be constructed in (ζξ)(S°), called the weakly inverse hull of a weakly inverse system (S°, E, θ, φ) with I(∑) ≌ S°, E(∑) (≌) E. Conversely,every weakly inverse semigroup can be constructed in this way. Furthermore, a sufficient and necessary condition for two weakly inverse hulls to be isomorphic is also given.

  17. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkrantz, L.; Groen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance. F

  18. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  19. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  20. A Novel Genome-Wide Association Study Approach Using Genotyping by Exome Sequencing Leads to the Identification of a Primary Open Angle Glaucoma Associated Inversion Disrupting ADAMTS17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver P Forman

    Full Text Available Closed breeding populations in the dog in conjunction with advances in gene mapping and sequencing techniques facilitate mapping of autosomal recessive diseases and identification of novel disease-causing variants, often using unorthodox experimental designs. In our investigation we demonstrate successful mapping of the locus for primary open angle glaucoma in the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen dog breed with 12 cases and 12 controls, using a novel genotyping by exome sequencing approach. The resulting genome-wide association signal was followed up by genome sequencing of an individual case, leading to the identification of an inversion with a breakpoint disrupting the ADAMTS17 gene. Genotyping of additional controls and expression analysis provide strong evidence that the inversion is disease causing. Evidence of cryptic splicing resulting in novel exon transcription as a consequence of the inversion in ADAMTS17 is identified through RNAseq experiments. This investigation demonstrates how a novel genotyping by exome sequencing approach can be used to map an autosomal recessive disorder in the dog, with the use of genome sequencing to facilitate identification of a disease-associated variant.

  1. Inverse scattering: applications to nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mackintosh, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    In what follows we first set the context for inverse scattering in nuclear physics with a brief account of inverse problems in general. We then turn to inverse scattering which involves the S-matrix, which connects the interaction potential between two scattering particles with the measured scattering cross section. The term `inverse' is a reference to the fact that instead of determining the scattering S-matrix from the interaction potential between the scattering particles, we do the inverse. That is to say, we calculate the interaction potential from the S-matrix. This review explains how this can now be done reliably, but the emphasis will be upon reasons why one should wish to do this, with an account of some of the ways this can lead to understanding concerning nuclear interactions.

  2. Forward modeling. Route to electromagnetic inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R.; Walker, P. [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Inversion of electromagnetic data is a topical subject in the literature, and much time has been devoted to understanding the convergence properties of various inverse methods. The relative lack of success of electromagnetic inversion techniques is partly attributable to the difficulties in the kernel forward modeling software. These difficulties come in two broad classes: (1) Completeness and robustness, and (2) convergence, execution time and model simplicity. If such problems exist in the forward modeling kernel, it was demonstrated that inversion can fail to generate reasonable results. It was suggested that classical inversion techniques, which are based on minimizing a norm of the error between data and the simulated data, will only be successful when these difficulties in forward modeling kernels are properly dealt with. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  4. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, W.L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  5. Inverse m-matrices and ultrametric matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Dellacherie, Claude; San Martin, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The study of M-matrices, their inverses and discrete potential theory is now a well-established part of linear algebra and the theory of Markov chains. The main focus of this monograph is the so-called inverse M-matrix problem, which asks for a characterization of nonnegative matrices whose inverses are M-matrices. We present an answer in terms of discrete potential theory based on the Choquet-Deny Theorem. A distinguished subclass of inverse M-matrices is ultrametric matrices, which are important in applications such as taxonomy. Ultrametricity is revealed to be a relevant concept in linear algebra and discrete potential theory because of its relation with trees in graph theory and mean expected value matrices in probability theory. Remarkable properties of Hadamard functions and products for the class of inverse M-matrices are developed and probabilistic insights are provided throughout the monograph.

  6. Analysis of 16 autosomal STRs and 17 Y-STRs in an indigenous Maya population from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Sergio; Sevillano, Rubén; Illescas, María J; de Pancorbo, Marian Martínez

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to contribute new data on autosomal STR and Y-STR markers of the Mayas from Guatemala in order to improve available databases of forensic interest. We analyzed 16 autosomal STR markers in a population sample of 155 indigenous Maya and 17 Y-chromosomal STR markers in the 100 males of the sample. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium between autosomal STR markers were not observed at any loci. The combined power of exclusion was estimated as 99.9991% and the combined power of discrimination was >99.999999999999%. Haplotype diversity of Y-STRs was calculated as 0.9984 ± 0.0018 and analysis of pairwise genetic distances (Rst) supported the Native American background of the population.

  7. Robustness of the inference of human population structure: A comparison of X-chromosomal and autosomal microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sohini

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, data on 20 X-chromosomal microsatellite polymorphisms from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel are used to infer human population structure. Inferences from these data are compared to those obtained from autosomal microsatellites. Some of the major features of the structure seen with 377 autosomal markers are generally visible with the X-linked markers, although the latter provide less resolution. Differences between the X-chromosomal and autosomal results can be explained without requiring major differences in demographic parameters between males and females. The dependence of the partitioning on the number of individuals sampled from each region and on the number of markers used is discussed.

  8. Post Stack Seismic data-impedance Inversion using Multi-Point Stochastic Inversion in Yme field, Norwegian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Inácio, Celso dos Santos Laurinda

    2011-01-01

    The Multi-Point Stochastic Inversion (MPSI) is a method based on both deterministic inversion and stochastic inversion. The deterministic inversion is used prior to the stochastic inversion and it is more general and works well for thick layers while the stochastic inversion works well for thin layers. Because of its combination, the MPSI method is one of suitable methods for reservoir characterization. Apart from being used for post-stack seismic acoustic impedance (AI) inversion, the MPSI m...

  9. A novel frameshift mutation in KCNQ4 in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasano, Koichiro; Mutai, Hideki; Obuchi, Chie; Masuda, Sawako; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Mutation of KCNQ4 has been reported to cause autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNA2A) that usually presents as progressive hearing loss starting from mild to moderate hearing loss during childhood. Here, we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation, c.1044_1051del8, in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. The proband was homozygous for the mutation and was born to consanguineous parents; she showed severe hearing loss that was either congenital or of early childhood onset. The proband had a sister who was heterozygous for the mutation but showed normal hearing. The mutation caused a frameshift that eliminated most of the cytoplasmic C-terminus, including the A-domain, which has an important role for protein tetramerization, and the B-segment, which is a binding site for calmodulin (CaM) that regulates channel function via Ca ions. The fact that the heterozygote had normal hearing indicates that sufficient tetramerization and CaM binding sites were present to preserve a normal phenotype even when only half the proteins contained an A-domain and B-segment. On the other hand, the severe hearing loss in the homozygote suggests that complete loss of the A-domain and B-segment in the protein caused loss of function due to the failure of tetramer formation and CaM binding. This family suggests that some KCNQ4 mutations can cause autosomal recessive hearing loss with more severe phenotype in addition to autosomal dominant hearing loss with milder phenotype. This genotype-phenotype correlation is analogous to that in KCNQ1 which causes autosomal dominant hereditary long QT syndrome 1 with milder phenotype and the autosomal recessive Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 with more severe phenotype due to deletion of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the potassium channel.

  10. Similar Levels of X-linked and Autosomal Nucleotide Variation in African and non-African populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Jeffrey D

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Levels of molecular diversity in Drosophila have repeatedly been shown to be higher in ancestral, African populations than in derived, non-African populations. This pattern holds for both coding and noncoding regions for a variety of molecular markers including single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites. Comparisons of X-linked and autosomal diversity have yielded results largely dependent on population of origin. Results In an attempt to further elucidate patterns of sequence diversity in Drosophila melanogaster, we studied nucleotide variation at putatively nonfunctional X-linked and autosomal loci in sub-Saharan African and North American strains of D. melanogaster. We combine our experimental results with data from previous studies of molecular polymorphism in this species. We confirm that levels of diversity are consistently higher in African versus North American strains. The relative reduction of diversity for X-linked and autosomal loci in the derived, North American strains depends heavily on the studied loci. While the compiled dataset, comprised primarily of regions within or in close proximity to genes, shows a much more severe reduction of diversity on the X chromosome compared to autosomes in derived strains, the dataset consisting of intergenic loci located far from genes shows very similar reductions of diversities for X-linked and autosomal loci in derived strains. In addition, levels of diversity at X-linked and autosomal loci in the presumably ancestral African population are more similar than expected under an assumption of neutrality and equal numbers of breeding males and females. Conclusion We show that simple demographic scenarios under assumptions of neutral theory cannot explain all of the observed patterns of molecular diversity. We suggest that the simplest model is a population bottleneck that retains an ancestral female-biased sex ratio, coupled with higher rates of positive selection at

  11. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis - an unusual association: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Vinay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an inherited disorder that is characterized by the development and growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Urinary protein excretion is usually less than 1 g/24 hours in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and an association of nephrotic syndrome with this condition is considered rare. There are only anecdotal case reports of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome, with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis being the most commonly reported histopathological diagnosis. Nephrotic-range proteinuria in the presence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with or without an accompanying decline in renal function, should be investigated by open renal biopsy to exclude coexisting glomerular disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with histologically proven diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis presenting with nephrotic-range proteinuria. No other reports of this could be found in a global electronic search of the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 35-year-old Indo-Aryan man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome and a concomitant decline in his glomerular filtration rate. Open renal biopsy revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. An accurate diagnosis enabled us to manage him conservatively with a successful outcome, without the use of corticosteroid which is the standard treatment and the drug most commonly used to treat nephrotic syndrome empirically. Conclusion Despite the reluctance of physicians to carry out a renal biopsy on patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, our case supports the idea that renal biopsy is needed in patients with polycystic kidney disease with nephrotic-range proteinuria to make an accurate diagnosis. It also illustrates the

  12. A Three-Generation Family with Idiopathic Facial Palsy Suggesting an Autosomal Dominant Inheritance with High Penetrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Grønhøj Larsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic facial palsy (IFP, also known as Bell’s palsy, is a common neurologic disorder, but recurrent and familial forms are rare. This case series presents a three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy. The mode of inheritance of IFP has previously been suggested as autosomal dominant with low or variable penetrance, but the present family indicates an autosomal dominant trait with high or complete penetrance. Chromosome microarray studies did not reveal a pathogenic copy number variation, which could enable identification of a candidate gene.

  13. A genetic portrait of Oraon Indian tribe drawn with 15 autosomal and 17 Y chromosomal STR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Pankaj; Jain, Toshi; Trivedi, V B

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci and 17 Y-STR loci was performed in 123 unrelated members of the Oraon tribal community of Central India. The combined power of discrimination (CPD) and combined power of exclusion (CPE) were greater than 0.99999 and 0.999989, respectively, for autosomal STRs. In addition, a total of 58 distinct Y-STR haplotypes were observed out of which 54 Y-STR haplotypes were observed only once. The haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity for 17 Y-STR loci was 0.997 and 0.906, respectively.

  14. Mutations and/or close relatives? Six case work examples where 49 autosomal SNPs were used as supplementary markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Six case work examples are presented, where the individuals were typed for 15 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) and 49 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The 15 STRs were typed with the AmpFlSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit and the 49 SNPs were typed with the SNPfor...... father would have been falsely included based on the STR results, while the SNP results showed that the alleged father was not the true parent. These case work examples underline the importance of performing supplementary investigations in selected cases and demonstrate the usefulness of the SNPfor...

  15. A new autosomal recessive disorder of bilateral frontotemporal pachygyria without microcephaly: Report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadke Shubha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pachygyria is a disorder of neuronal migration. We report an Indian family with four siblings with developmental delay, infrequent seizures, normal head size and mild to moderate mental retardation. Two of them had bilaterally symmetrical frontotemporal pachygyria. Dysmorphism and neurological signs were absent in the affected subjects. Affected male and female siblings with normal parents suggests autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. We believe these cases represent a new autosomal recessive disorder of neuronal migration. Other similar cases of lissencephaly are reviewed.

  16. Sparse CSEM inversion driven by seismic coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenwei; Dong, Hefeng; Kristensen, Åge

    2016-12-01

    Marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data inversion for hydrocarbon exploration is often challenging due to high computational cost, physical memory requirement and low resolution of the obtained resistivity map. This paper aims to enhance both the speed and resolution of CSEM inversion by introducing structural geological information in the inversion algorithm. A coarse mesh is generated for Occam’s inversion, where the parameters are fewer than in the fine regular mesh. This sparse mesh is defined as a coherence-based irregular (IC) sparse mesh, which is based on vertices extracted from available geological information. Inversion results on synthetic data illustrate that the IC sparse mesh has a smaller inversion computational cost compared to the regular dense (RD) mesh. It also has a higher resolution than with a regular sparse (RS) mesh for the same number of estimated parameters. In order to study how the IC sparse mesh reduces the computational time, four different meshes are generated for Occam’s inversion. As a result, an IC sparse mesh can reduce the computational cost while it keeps the resolution as good as a fine regular mesh. The IC sparse mesh reduces the computational cost of the matrix operation for model updates. When the number of estimated parameters reduces to a limited value, the computational cost is independent of the number of parameters. For a testing model with two resistive layers, the inversion result using an IC sparse mesh has higher resolution in both horizontal and vertical directions. Overall, the model representing significant geological information in the IC mesh can improve the resolution of the resistivity models obtained from inversion of CSEM data.

  17. On the inversion-indel distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Eyla; Zaccaria, Simone; Braga, Marília D V; Stoye, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The inversion distance, that is the distance between two unichromosomal genomes with the same content allowing only inversions of DNA segments, can be computed thanks to a pioneering approach of Hannenhalli and Pevzner in 1995. In 2000, El-Mabrouk extended the inversion model to allow the comparison of unichromosomal genomes with unequal contents, thus insertions and deletions of DNA segments besides inversions. However, an exact algorithm was presented only for the case in which we have insertions alone and no deletion (or vice versa), while a heuristic was provided for the symmetric case, that allows both insertions and deletions and is called the inversion-indel distance. In 2005, Yancopoulos, Attie and Friedberg started a new branch of research by introducing the generic double cut and join (DCJ) operation, that can represent several genome rearrangements (including inversions). Among others, the DCJ model gave rise to two important results. First, it has been shown that the inversion distance can be computed in a simpler way with the help of the DCJ operation. Second, the DCJ operation originated the DCJ-indel distance, that allows the comparison of genomes with unequal contents, considering DCJ, insertions and deletions, and can be computed in linear time. In the present work we put these two results together to solve an open problem, showing that, when the graph that represents the relation between the two compared genomes has no bad components, the inversion-indel distance is equal to the DCJ-indel distance. We also give a lower and an upper bound for the inversion-indel distance in the presence of bad components.

  18. Graph inverse semigroups: their characterization and completion

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, David G

    2011-01-01

    Graph inverse semigroups generalize the polycyclic inverse monoids and play an important role in the theory of C*-algebras. This paper has two main goals: first, to provide an abstract characterization of graph inverse semigroups; and second, to show how they may be completed, under suitable conditions, to form what we call the Cuntz-Krieger semigroup of the graph. This semigroup is the ample semigroup of a topological groupoid associated with the graph, and the semigroup analogue of the Leavitt path algebra of the graph.

  19. 3rd Annual Workshop on Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding volume is based on papers presented on the Third Annual Workshop on Inverse Problems which was organized by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, and took place in May 2013 in Stockholm. The purpose of this workshop was to present new analytical developments and numerical techniques for solution of inverse problems for a wide range of applications in acoustics, electromagnetics, optical fibers, medical imaging, geophysics, etc. The contributions in this volume reflect these themes and will be beneficial to researchers who are working in the area of applied inverse problems.

  20. Parallel Algorithm in Surface Wave Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In Surface wave waveform inversion, we want to reconstruct 3Dshear wav e velocity structure, which calculation beyond the capability of the powerful pr esent day personal computer or even workstation. So we designed a high parallele d algorithm and carried out the inversion on Parallel computer based on the part itioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large scale optimization pro blem into a number of independent small scale problems and reduces the computati onal effort by several orders of magnitude. We adopted surface waveform inversio n with a equal block(2°×2°) discretization.

  1. New recursive algorithm for matrix inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Jianshu; Wang Xuegang

    2008-01-01

    To reduce the computational complexity of matrix inversion, which is the majority of processing in many practical applications, two numerically efficient recursive algorithms (called algorithms Ⅰ and Ⅱ, respectively)are presented. Algorithm Ⅰ is used to calculate the inverse of such a matrix, whose leading principal minors are all nonzero. Algorithm Ⅱ, whereby, the inverse of an arbitrary nonsingular matrix can be evaluated is derived via improving the algorithm Ⅰ. The implementation, for algorithm Ⅱ or Ⅰ, involves matrix-vector multiplications and vector outer products. These operations are computationally fast and highly parallelizable. MATLAB simulations show that both recursive algorithms are valid.

  2. Nonlinear system compound inverse control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan ZHANG; Zengqiang CHEN; Peng YANG; Zhuzhi YUAN

    2005-01-01

    A compound neural network is utilized to identify the dynamic nonlinear system.This network is composed of two parts: one is a linear neural network,and the other is a recurrent neural network.Based on the inverse theory a compound inverse control method is proposed.The controller has also two parts:a linear controller and a nonlinear neural network controller.The stability condition of the closed-loop neural network-based compound inverse control system is demonstrated based on the Lyapunov theory.Simulation studies have shown that this scheme is simple and has good control accuracy and robustness.

  3. Voxel inversion of airborne EM data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present a geophysical inversion algorithm working directly in a voxel grid disconnected from the actual measuring points, which allows for straightforward integration of different data types in joint inversion, for informing geological/hydrogeological models directly and for easier incorporation...... for jointly inverting airborne and ground-based geophysical data. Furthermore, geological and groundwater models most often refer to a regular voxel grid not correlated to the geophysical model space, and incorporating the geophysical data into the geological/hydrological modelling grids is problematic. We...... present a voxel grid inversion routine that overcomes these problems and we discuss in detail the algorithm implementation....

  4. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snarey, A. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Schneider, M.C. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T. (and others)

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Disseminated kidney tuberculosis complicating autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Hideki; Amemiya, Morimasa; Chiba, Koji; Urushibara, Masayasu; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Noro, Akira

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is rare, and its diagnosis and treatment are difficult because numerous cysts are exposed to infection and antibiotics do not easily penetrate infected cysts. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old Japanese man with disseminated urogenital tuberculosis (TB) and ADPKD without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Delayed diagnosis and ineffective anti-TB chemotherapy worsened his condition. Finally, he underwent bilateral nephrectomy but experienced postoperative complications. In conclusion, kidney TB should be recognized as a cause of renal infection in ADPKD, and surgical treatment should be instituted without delay. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment cannot be overemphasized to prevent kidney TB deterioration.

  6. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and cholangitis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Yazdanpanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is an inherited disorder associated with multiple cyst formation in the different organs. Development of pancreatic cyst in ADPKD is often asymptomatic and is associated with no complication. A 38-year-old man with ADPKD was presented with six episodes of acute pancreatitis and two episodes of cholangitis in a period of 12 months. Various imaging studies revealed multiple renal, hepatic and pancreatic cysts, mild ectasia of pancreatic duct, dilation of biliary system and absence of biliary stone. He was managed with conservative treatment for each attack. ADPKD should be considered as a potential risk factor for recurrent acute and/or chronic pancreatitis and cholangitis.

  7. Novel LMNA Mutation in a Taiwanese Family with Autosomal Dominant Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chen Liang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, and muscle wasting in humeroperoneal muscles, and adult-onset cardiomyopathy with conduction block. We analyzed blood samples from an EDMD family, including a mother and two daughters, and found a novel mutation in codon 520 in exon 9 of the lamin A/C (LMNA gene, resulting in a substitution of tryptophan (W by glycine (G in all three patients. The mother died after a stroke-like episode at the age of 43. The elder sister received pacemaker implantation, which improved symptoms of exercise intolerance and dizziness. These cases illustrate the necessity of correct diagnosis, evaluation, and follow-up of cardiac problems due to the wide clinical spectrum and high prevalence of cardiac conduction block in patients with autosomal dominant EDMD. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S27-S31

  8. AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE (ADPKD IN A LARGE IRANIAN FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Farhud

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Study of a family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD in five generations, including 96 healthy and 47 affected individuals, has been carried out in Tehran. Investigation on individuals, including final diagnoses by clinical findings, sonography, radiography and laboratory results, have Lead to the completion of genealogical chart of the family. The affected individuals have reached a stage of the disease with confirmed occurrence of renal damages. Uncertain diagnoses, unconfirmed statements of the family members about probable presence of the disease in some other members, and also the death of some members by other reasons were not possible to be registered in the chart. Up to now the chart has been the largest and the most complete in Iran, compared with the ones reported in the available literature.

  9. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay: a family report from South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Burguêz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS is an early-onset, neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in SACS, firstly reported in Quebec, Canada. The disorder is typically characterized by childhood onset ataxia, spasticity, neuropathy and retinal hypermyelination. The clinical picture of patients born outside Quebec, however, is often atypical. In the present article, the authors describe clinical and neuroradiological findings that raised the suspicion of an ARSACS diagnosis in two female cousins with Germanic background from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. We present a review on the neuroimaging, ophthalmologic and neurophysiologic clues for ARSACS diagnosis. The early-onset, slowly progressive, spastic-ataxia phenotype of reported patients was similar to ARSACS patients from Quebec. The SACS sequencing revealed the novel homozygous c.5150_5151insA frameshift mutation confirming the ARSACS diagnosis. ARSACS is a frequent cause of early onset ataxia/spastic-ataxia worldwide, with unknown frequency in Brazil.

  10. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay: a family report from South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguêz, Daniela; Oliveira, Camila Maria de; Rockenbach, Marcio Aloísio Bezerra Cavalcanti; Fussiger, Helena; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti; Winckler, Pablo Brea; Maestri, Marcelo Krieger; Finkelsztejn, Alessandro; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales

    2017-06-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is an early-onset, neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in SACS, firstly reported in Quebec, Canada. The disorder is typically characterized by childhood onset ataxia, spasticity, neuropathy and retinal hypermyelination. The clinical picture of patients born outside Quebec, however, is often atypical. In the present article, the authors describe clinical and neuroradiological findings that raised the suspicion of an ARSACS diagnosis in two female cousins with Germanic background from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. We present a review on the neuroimaging, ophthalmologic and neurophysiologic clues for ARSACS diagnosis. The early-onset, slowly progressive, spastic-ataxia phenotype of reported patients was similar to ARSACS patients from Quebec. The SACS sequencing revealed the novel homozygous c.5150_5151insA frameshift mutation confirming the ARSACS diagnosis. ARSACS is a frequent cause of early onset ataxia/spastic-ataxia worldwide, with unknown frequency in Brazil.

  11. A Novel CRYBB2 Stopgain Mutation Causing Congenital Autosomal Dominant Cataract in a Chinese Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Zhai, Yaru; Huang, Lulin; Gong, Bo; Li, Jie; Hao, Fang; Wu, Zhengzheng

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is the most common cause of the visual disability and blindness in childhood. This study aimed to identify gene mutations responsible for autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC) in a Chinese family using next-generation sequencing technology. This family included eight unaffected and five affected individuals. After complete ophthalmic examinations, the blood samples of the proband and two available family members were collected. Then the whole exome sequencing was performed on the proband and Sanger sequencing was applied to validate the causal mutation in the two family members and control samples. After the whole exome sequencing data were filtered through a series of existing variation databases, a heterozygous mutation c.499Tcongenital cataract population and illustrated the important role of CRYBB2 in the genetics research of congenital cataract. PMID:28025620

  12. Wolfram gene (WFS1) mutation causes autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Vanita; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl; Emmett, Warren; Waseem, Naushin; Raby, Jacob; Prescott, DeQuincy; Moore, Anthony T; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2013-12-01

    Congenital cataracts are an important cause of bilateral visual impairment in infants. Through genome-wide linkage analysis in a four-generation family of Irish descent, the disease-associated gene causing autosomal-dominant congenital nuclear cataract was mapped to chromosome 4p16.1. The maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score was 2.62 at a recombination fraction θ=0, obtained for marker D4S432 physically close to the Wolfram gene (WFS1). By sequencing the coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of WFS1, we identified a DNA substitution (c.1385A-to-G) in exon 8, causing a missense mutation at codon 462 (E462G) of the Wolframin protein. This is the first report of a mutation in this gene causing an isolated nuclear congenital cataract. These findings suggest that the membrane trafficking protein Wolframin may be important for supporting the developing lens.

  13. [Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and complex nephronophtisis medullary cystic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Reseach during the past decade has led to the discovery that defects in some proteins that localize to primary cilia or the basal body are the main contributors to renal cyst development. Autosomal recessive polycystic disease and nephronophthisis- medullary cystic kidney disease are named ciliopathies. The cilium is a microtubule-based organelle that is found on most mammalian cells. Cilia-mediated hypothesis has evolved into the concept of cystogenesis, cilia bend by fluid initiate a calcium influx that prevents cyst formation. Cilia might sense stimuli in the cell enviroment and control cell polarity and mitosis. A new set of pathogenic mechanisms in renal cystic disease defined new therapeutic targets, control of intracellular calcium, inhibition of cAMP and down regulation cannonical Wnt signaling.

  14. Late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia a family description and linkage analysis with the hla system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available A family suffering an autosomal dominant form of late onset hereditary cerebellar ataxia is described. Eight affected family members were personally studied, and data from another four were obtained through anamnesis. The mean age of onset was 37.1±5.4 years (27-47 years. The clinical picture consisted basically of a pure ataxic cerebellar syndrome. CT-scan disclosed diffuse cerebellar atrophy with relative sparing of the brainstem (and no involvement of supratentorial structures. Neurophysiological studies (nerve conduction, VEP and BAEP were normal. Twenty-six individuals were typed for HLA histocompatibility antigens. Lod scores were calculated with the computer program LINKMAP. Close linkage of the ataxia gene with the HLA system in this family could be excluded - 0==0,02, z=(-2,17 - and the overall analysis of the lod scores suggest another chromossomal location than chromosome 6.

  15. FAMILI AUTOSOME TRANSLACATION (13/14 AT PARENTS WITH TRISOMYC CHILD IN 21-Th. CHROMOSOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. LAKOVSKI

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a case study about family autosome translocation is presented. On the basis of the evidence of chromosome`s abnormalities at the on parent (it was proved that the father has translocation between acrocentric chromosomes 13 and 14 or well known as Robertson’s or centric fusion’s it was discovered that predisposition for nondisjunction could be expected. This is precondition for hereditary abnormality or for trisomia`s child to be born. These well-known facts are based on the proven risks for born of the children with trisomia because of the evidences that the bearers of the translocations have not any possibilities for child-bird of healthy descendants, nor descendants with balanced homological translocations, that were proved in our researched case.

  16. [Seminal vesicle cysts and infertility in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Venegas, J L

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic hereditary disorder characterized by bilateral diffuse renal cysts. Extrarenal involvement is a well known manifestation of ADPKD. Cysts in the liver, pancreas, lung, spleen, oesophagus, ovary, testis, epididymis, prostate, thyroid, bladder, uterus, brain, paraespinal, and seminal vesicle have also been described. The occurrence of seminal vesicle cysts is often unrecognised. We report here a man with seminal vesicle cysts and azoospermia associated with ADPKD. Seminal vesicle cysts are not uncommon in ADPKD and in some cases it is associated with infertility. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively. Studies evaluating fertility in patients with seminal vesicle cysts and ADPKD are needed.

  17. Birth prevalence and mutation spectrum in danish patients with autosomal recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Ek, Jakob; Sand, Annie;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study was initiated to investigate the mutation spectrum of four OCA genes and to calculate the birth prevalence in patients with autosomal recessive albinism. METHODS: Mutation analysis using dHPLC or direct DNA sequencing of TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and MATP was performed in 62 patients....... Two mutations in one OCA gene explained oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) in 44% of the patients. Mutations in TYR were found in 26% of patients, while OCA2 and MATP caused OCA in 15% and 3%, respectively. No mutations were found in TYRP1. Of the remaining 56% of patients, 29% were heterozygous...... recessive ocular albinism (AROA) based on clinical findings was 55 to 45. CONCLUSIONS: TYR is the major OCA gene in Denmark, but several patients do not have mutations in the investigated genes. A relatively large fraction of patients were observed with AROA, and of those 52% had no mutations compared...

  18. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  19. Root anomalies and dentin dysplasia in autosomal recessive hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Lee, Moses; Vairo, Filippo; Leite, Julio Cesar Loguercio; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Visioli, Fernanda; D’Ávila, Stéphanie Rodrigues; Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC, OMIM #211900) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by hyperphosphatemia, tooth root defects, and the progressive deposition of calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces, soft tissues, and sometimes bone.1 In this HFTC case report, we document the dental phenotype associated with a homozygous missense mutation (g.29077 C>T; c.484 C>T; p.Arg162*) in GALNT3 (OMIM 6017563), a gene encoding UDP-GalNAc transferase 3 that catalyzes the first step of O-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis in the Golgi. The medical and dental pathology is believed to be caused primarily by high serum phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia), which, in turn, is caused by failure of GALNT3 to glycosylate the phosphate regulator protein FGF23, impairing its ability inhibit reabsorption of filtered phosphate in the kidneys. PMID:26337219

  20. [Cardiac tamponade as first manifestation in Mediterranean fever with autosomal dominant form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ferrer, F; Martinez Villar, M; Fernández Bernal, A; Martín de Lara, I; Paya Elorza, I

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary disease characterized by brief, recurring and self-limited episodes of fever and pain with inflammation, of one or several serous (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium, synovial or vaginal tunic of the testicle). Amyloidosis is its more important complication and the principal reason of death in the cases in which it appears. Diagnosis is based on the clinic and is confirmed by genetic tests. The treatment with Colchicine (0,02-0,03 mg/kg/day) prevents the recurrence of FMF attacks and the development of secondary (AA) amyloidosis. We report a case of a 13-year-old child in which FMF was diagnosed after several coincidental episodes with fever, pericarditis and cardiac tamponade. The genetic confirmation showed an autosomal dominant inheritance that is less frecuent than the recesive form, in this disease. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M; Kim, Helen J; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W; Stevenson, David A; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L

    2015-09-21

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema.

  2. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in three ethnic groups from Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharafi Farzad, M; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Børsting, C;

    2013-01-01

    A total number of 149 individuals from Iran (Persians, Lurs and Kurds) were analyzed for 49 autosomal SNPs using PCR, SBE and capillary electrophoresis. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed. One SNP pair (rs1015250-rs251934) showed significant linkage disequilibrium in Kurds....... However, this was most likely due to chance. High intrapopulation variability and no significant population structure were observed among the three ethnic groups from Iran. Pairwise FST values obtained from the mean numbers of pairwise differences between SNP profiles were calculated for Persians, Lurs......, Kurds and eighteen other worldwide populations. For each of the three Iranian ethnic groups, the lowest FST values calculated between an Iranian and non-Iranian populations were observed between Iranians and populations in Iraq and Turkey. The three Iranian ethnic groups grouped together with other West...

  3. A Linkage Study in 8 Pakistani Families Segregating as Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hassanullah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to find the most frequent MCPH phenotype in inbred Pakistani families. Primary microcephaly is marked by small brain size and is usually inherited as recessive trait. In the present study, we performed linkage analysis on 8 Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH and linked 6 of them to known MCPH genes/loci like MCPH1 (Microcephalin, MCPH3 (CDK5RAP2 and MCPH5 (ASPM. Majority of the families showed linkage with MCPH5, the most common MCPH locus in Pakistan. The linked families were then subjected to mutational analysis, revealing a previously known G to A transition at nucleotide position 3978 in exon 17 of ASPM gene in three of the families. To decrease its incidence, it is indispensible to train the people of the possible devastating outcome of cousin marriages and to find the carriers through carrier screening programs.

  4. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease presenting with cutaneous dermatoses and ocular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, L C M; Manson, A L; Hardman, C; Carton, J; Seneviratne, S L; Ninis, N

    2013-04-01

    Dermatoses such as eczematous dermatitis and cutaneous infection are recognized presentations of primary immunodeficiency (PID). However, atopic dermatitis affects approximately 10% of infants, and cutaneous infections are not uncommon in children, therefore the challenge for the dermatologist is to distinguish the few patients that have PID from the many that do not. We report on a 6-year-old girl who was ultimately diagnosed with autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease (AR-CGD) after presenting to various hospitals with dermatitis, scalp plaques recalcitrant to treatment, and recurrent infections over a 3-year period, and describe some aspects of her diagnosis and management. This report highlights the importance of considering rare disorders such as AR-CGD in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or recalcitrant dermatological infections in children.

  5. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy and speech dyspraxia: a new syndrome with anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, I E; Jones, L; Pozzebon, M; Howell, R A; Saling, M M; Berkovic, S F

    1995-10-01

    We describe a family of 9 affected individuals in three generations with nocturnal oro-facio-brachial partial seizures, secondarily generalized partial seizures, and centro-temporal epileptiform discharges, associated with oral and speech dyspraxia and cognitive impairment. The speech disorder was prominent, but differed from that of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and of epilepsy with continuous spike and wave during slow-wave sleep. The electroclinical features of this new syndrome of autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy resemble those of benign rolandic epilepsy, a common inherited epilepsy of childhood. This family shows clinical anticipation of the seizure disorder, the oral and speech dyspraxia, and cognitive dysfunction, suggesting that the genetic mechanism could be expansion of an unstable triplet repeat. Molecular studies on this syndrome, where the inheritance pattern is clear, could also be relevant to identifying a gene for benign rolandic epilepsy where anticipation does not occur and the mode of inheritance is uncertain.

  6. Primary shunt hyperbilirubinaemia in a large four-generation family confirming autosomal dominant genetic disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lian Wang; Xiao-Wei Liu; Fang-Gen Lu; Xiao-Ping Wu; Chun-Hui Ouyang; Dong-Ye Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To describe the pattern of inheritance and confirm the diagnosdc criteria of primary shunt hyperbilirubinaemia (PSH).METHODS: Forty members of a family pedigree across four generations were included in this study. All family members were interviewed and investigated by physical examination, hematology and liver function test and the pattern of inheritance was analyzed.RESULTS: Nine of the forty family members suffered primary shunt hyperbilirubinaemia. The mature erythrocytes of the propositus were irregular in shape and size.The pedigree showed transmission of the trait through four generations with equal distribution in male and female. No individual with a primary shunt hyperbilirubinaemia was born to unaffected parents. The penetrance was complete in adult.CONCLUSION: The pattern of inheritance is autosomal dominant. The abnormality of erythrocytes and decrease in white blood cell could be supplemented in the diagnosis of PSH. The PSH is a genetic disorder and could by renamed as hereditary shunt hyperbilirubinaemia.

  7. Real-world costs of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in the Nordics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    -3. CONCLUSIONS: Costs associated with ADPKD are significant and the progression of the disease is associated with an increased frequency and intensity of medical resource utilisation. Interventions that can slow the progression of the disease have the potential to lead to substantial reductions in costs......BACKGROUND: There is limited real-world data on the economic burden of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The objective of this study was to estimate the annual direct and indirect costs of patients with ADPKD by severity of the disease: chronic kidney disease (CKD...... in absolute terms across all disease strata. Mean total annual costs were highest in dialysis patients, driven by maintenance dialysis care, while the use of immunosuppressants was the main cost component for transplant care. Costs were twice as high in patients with CKD stages 4-5 compared to CKD stages 1...

  8. Analysis of Temperature Distributions in Nighttime Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telyak, Oksana; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    Adequate prediction of temperature inversion in the atmospheric boundary layer is one of prerequisites for successful forecasting of meteorological parameters and severe weather events. Examples include surface air temperature and precipitation forecasting as well as prediction of fog, frosts and smog with hazardous levels of atmospheric pollution. At the same time, reliable forecasting of temperature inversions remains an unsolved problem. For prediction of nighttime inversions over some specific territory, it is important to study characteristic features of local circulation cells formation and to properly take local factors into account to develop custom modeling techniques for operational use. The present study aims to investigate and analyze vertical temperature distributions in tropospheric inversions (isotherms) over the territory of Belarus. We study several specific cases of formation, evolution and decay of deep nighttime temperature inversions in Belarus by means of mesoscale numerical simulations with WRF model, considering basic mechanisms of isothermal and inverse temperature layers formation in the troposphere and impact of these layers on local circulation cells. Our primary goal is to assess the feasibility of advance prediction of inversions formation with WRF. Modeling results reveal that all cases under consideration have characteristic features of radiative inversions (e.g., their formation times, development phases, inversion intensities, etc). Regions of "blocking" layers formation are extensive and often spread over the entire territory of Belarus. Inversions decay starts from the lowermost (near surface) layer (altitudes of 5 to 50 m). In all cases, one can observe formation of temperature gradients that substantially differ from the basic inversion gradient, i.e. the layer splits into smaller layers, each having a different temperature stratification (isothermal, adiabatic, etc). As opposed to various empirical techniques as well as

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  10. A homozygous mutation in TRIM36 causes autosomal recessive anencephaly in an Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nivedita; Kumble Bhat, Vishwanath; Tiwari, Ankana; Kodaganur, Srinivas G; Tontanahal, Sagar J; Sarda, Astha; Malini, K V; Kumar, Arun

    2017-01-13

    Anencephaly is characterized by the absence of brain tissues and cranium. During primary neurulation stage of the embryo, the rostral part of the neural pore fails to close, leading to anencephaly. Anencephaly shows a heterogeneous etiology, ranging from environmental to genetic causes. The autosomal recessive inheritance of anencephaly has been reported in several populations. In this study, we employed whole-exome sequencing and identified a homozygous missense mutation c.1522C>A (p.Pro508Thr) in the TRIM36 gene as the cause of autosomal recessive anencephaly (APH) in an Indian family. The TRIM36 gene is expressed in the developing brain, suggesting a role in neurogenesis. In silco analysis showed that proline at codon position 508 is highly conserved in 26 vertebrate species, and the mutation is predicted to affect the conformation of the B30.2/SPRY domain of TRIM36. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed that the mutation renders the TRIM36 protein less stable. TRIM36 is known to associate with microtubules. Transient expression of the mutant TRIM36 in HeLa and LN229 cells resulted in microtubule disruption, disorganized spindles, loosely arranged chromosomes, multiple spindles, abnormal cytokinesis, reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis as compared to cells transfected with its wild-type counterpart. The siRNA knock down of TRIM36 in HeLa and LN229 cells also led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We suggest that microtubule disruption and disorganized spindles mediated by mutant TRIM36 affect neural cell proliferation during neural tube formation, leading to anencephaly.

  11. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN, an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  12. Autosomal recessive PGM3 mutations link glycosylation defects to atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and neurocognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xiaomin; Ichikawa, Mie; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Datta, Shrimati; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Kim, Emily S.; Biancalana, Matthew; Wolfe, Lynne A.; DiMaggio, Thomas; Matthews, Helen F.; Kranick, Sarah M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Holland, Steven M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Hughes, Jason D.; Mehmet, Huseyin; McElwee, Joshua; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Freeze, Hudson H.; Su, Helen C.; Milner, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying genetic syndromes that lead to significant atopic disease can open new pathways for investigation and intervention in allergy. Objective To define a genetic syndrome of severe atopy, elevated serum IgE, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and motor and neurocognitive impairment. Methods Eight patients from two families who had similar syndromic features were studied. Thorough clinical evaluations, including brain MRI and sensory evoked potentials, were performed. Peripheral lymphocyte flow cytometry, antibody responses, and T cell cytokine production were measured. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations. Immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, enzymatic assays, nucleotide sugar and sugar phosphate analyses along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of glycans were used to determine the molecular consequences of the mutations. Results Marked atopy and autoimmunity were associated with increased TH2 and TH17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. Bacterial and viral infection susceptibility were noted along with T cell lymphopenia, particularly of CD8+ T cells, and reduced memory B cells. Apparent brain hypomyelination resulted in markedly delayed evoked potentials and likely contributed to neurological abnormalities. Disease segregated with novel autosomal recessive mutations in a single gene, phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3). Although PGM3 protein expression was variably diminished, impaired function was demonstrated by decreased enzyme activity and reduced UDP-GlcNAc, along with decreased O- and N-linked protein glycosylation in patients’ cells. These results define a new Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation. Conclusions Autosomal recessive, hypomorphic PGM3 mutations underlie a disorder of severe atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, intellectual disability and hypomyelination. PMID:24589341

  13. Involvement of interstitial telomeric sequences in two new cases of mosaicism for autosomal structural rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Jonathan; Receveur, Aline; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Renaldo, Florence; Gondry, Jean; Andrieux, Joris; Copin, Henri; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Portnoï, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    Mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement that does not involve ring or marker chromosomes is rare. The mechanisms responsible for genome instability have not always been explained. Several studies have shown that interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs), involved in some mosaic constitutional anomalies, are potent sources of genomic instability. Here we describe two cases of mosaicism for uncommon constitutional autosomal rearrangements, involving ITSs, identified by karyotyping and characterized by FISH and SNP-array analysis. The first patient, a boy with global developmental delay, had a rare type of pure distal 1q inverted duplication (1q32-qter), attached to the end of the short arm of the same chromosome 1, in approximately 35% of his cells. The second patient, a phenotypically normal man, was diagnosed as having mosaic for a balanced non-reciprocal translocation of the distal segment of 7q (7q33qter), onto the terminal region of the short arm of a whole chromosome 12, in approximately 80% of his cells. The remaining 20% of the cells showed an unbalanced state of the translocation, with only the der(7) chromosome. He was ascertained through his malformed fetus carrying a non-mosaic partial monosomy 7q, identified at prenatal diagnosis. We show that pan-telomeric and subtelomeric sequences were observed at the interstitial junction point of the inv dup(1q) and of the der(12)t(7;12), respectively. The present cases and review of the literature suggest that the presence of ITSs at internal sites of the chromosomes may explain mechanisms of the patients's mosaic structural rearrangements.

  14. Association between Y haplogroups and autosomal AIMs reveals intra-population substructure in Bolivian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Carlos; Gomes, Verónica; Romanini, Carola; Oliveira, Andréa M; Rocabado, Omar; Aquino, Juliana; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2015-07-01

    For the correct evaluation of the weight of genetic evidence in a forensic context, databases must reflect the structure of the population, with all possible groups being represented. Countries with a recent history of admixture between strongly differentiated populations are usually highly heterogeneous and sub-structured. Bolivia is one of these countries, with a high diversity of ethnic groups and different levels of admixture (among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans) across the territory. For a better characterization of the male lineages in Bolivia, 17 Y-STR and 42 Y-SNP loci were genotyped in samples from La Paz and Chuquisaca. Only European and Native American Y-haplogroups were detected, and no sub-Saharan African chromosomes were found. Significant differences were observed between the two samples, with a higher frequency of European lineages in Chuquisaca than in La Paz. A sample belonging to haplogroup Q1a3a1a1-M19 was detected in La Paz, in a haplotype background different from those previously found in Argentina. This result supports an old M19 North-south dispersion in South America, possibly via two routes. When comparing the ancestry of each individual assessed through his Y chromosome with the one estimated using autosomal AIMs, (a) increased European ancestry in individuals with European Y chromosomes and (b) higher Native American ancestry in the carriers of Native American Y-haplogroups were observed, revealing an association between autosomal and Y-chromosomal markers. The results of this study demonstrate that a sub-structure does exist in Bolivia at both inter- and intrapopulation levels, a fact which must be taken into account in the evaluation of forensic genetic evidence.

  15. Reconstructing the origin and dispersal patterns of village chickens across East Africa: insights from autosomal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwacharo, J M; Nomura, K; Hanada, H; Han, J L; Amano, T; Hanotte, O

    2013-05-01

    Unravelling the genetic history of any livestock species is central to understanding the origin, development and expansion of agricultural societies and economies. Domestic village chickens are widespread in Africa. Their close association with, and reliance on, humans for long-range dispersal makes the species an important biological marker in tracking cultural and trading contacts between human societies and civilizations across time. Archaezoological and linguistic evidence suggest a complex history of arrival and dispersion of the species on the continent, with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop analysis revealing the presence of five distinct haplogroups in East African village chickens. It supports the importance of the region in understanding the history of the species and indirectly of human interactions. Here, through a detailed analysis of 30 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 657 village chickens from four East African countries (Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Sudan), we identify three distinct autosomal gene pools (I, II and III). Gene pool I is predominantly found in Ethiopia and Sudan, while II and III occur in both Kenya and Uganda. A gradient of admixture for gene pools II and III between the Kenyan coast and Uganda's hinterland (P = 0.001) is observed, while gene pool I is clearly separated from the other two. We propose that these three gene pools represent genetic signatures of separate events in the history of the continent that relate to the arrival and dispersal of village chickens and humans across the region. Our results provide new insights on the history of chicken husbandry which has been shaped by terrestrial and maritime contacts between ancient and modern civilizations in Asia and East Africa. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. ATM promotes the obligate XY crossover and both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity on autosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Barchi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis in most sexually reproducing organisms, recombination forms crossovers between homologous maternal and paternal chromosomes and thereby promotes proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. The number and distribution of crossovers are tightly controlled, but the factors that contribute to this control are poorly understood in most organisms, including mammals. Here we provide evidence that the ATM kinase or protein is essential for proper crossover formation in mouse spermatocytes. ATM deficiency causes multiple phenotypes in humans and mice, including gonadal atrophy. Mouse Atm-/- spermatocytes undergo apoptosis at mid-prophase of meiosis I, but Atm(-/- meiotic phenotypes are partially rescued by Spo11 heterozygosity, such that ATM-deficient spermatocytes progress to meiotic metaphase I. Strikingly, Spo11+/-Atm-/- spermatocytes are defective in forming the obligate crossover on the sex chromosomes, even though the XY pair is usually incorporated in a sex body and is transcriptionally inactivated as in normal spermatocytes. The XY crossover defect correlates with the appearance of lagging chromosomes at metaphase I, which may trigger the extensive metaphase apoptosis that is observed in these cells. In addition, control of the number and distribution of crossovers on autosomes appears to be defective in the absence of ATM because there is an increase in the total number of MLH1 foci, which mark the sites of eventual crossover formation, and because interference between MLH1 foci is perturbed. The axes of autosomes exhibit structural defects that correlate with the positions of ongoing recombination. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a role in both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity and further suggests that ATM is important for coordinating these features of meiotic chromosome dynamics.

  17. Culture creates genetic structure in the Caucasus: Autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal variation in Daghestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpending Henry C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near the junction of three major continents, the Caucasus region has been an important thoroughfare for human migration. While the Caucasus Mountains have diverted human traffic to the few lowland regions that provide a gateway from north to south between the Caspian and Black Seas, highland populations have been isolated by their remote geographic location and their practice of patrilocal endogamy. We investigate how these cultural and historical differences between highland and lowland populations have affected patterns of genetic diversity. We test 1 whether the highland practice of patrilocal endogamy has generated sex-specific population relationships, and 2 whether the history of migration and military conquest associated with the lowland populations has left Central Asian genes in the Caucasus, by comparing genetic diversity and pairwise population relationships between Daghestani populations and reference populations throughout Europe and Asia for autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal markers. Results We found that the highland Daghestani populations had contrasting histories for the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome data sets. Y-chromosomal haplogroup diversity was reduced among highland Daghestani populations when compared to other populations and to highland Daghestani mitochondrial DNA haplogroup diversity. Lowland Daghestani populations showed Turkish and Central Asian affinities for both mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data sets. Autosomal population histories are strongly correlated to the pattern observed for the mitochondrial DNA data set, while the correlation between the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome distance matrices was weak and not significant. Conclusion The reduced Y-chromosomal diversity exhibited by highland Daghestani populations is consistent with genetic drift caused by patrilocal endogamy. Mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal phylogeographic comparisons indicate a common Near Eastern

  18. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  19. Population genetic data for 15 autosomal STR markers in Turkish Cypriots from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan, Cemal; Demirdov, Damla Kanliada; Yamaci, Rezan Fahrioglu; Sevay, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers [D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, THO1, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA] were analyzed in 501 unrelated, randomly selected Turkish Cypriot individuals from the island of Cyprus. While no locus duplications or null alleles were detected in these samples, eight allelic variants were observed in total, 75% of which were intermediate allelic variants that were absent in the system allelic ladder. Allelic frequencies and statistical parameters of forensic interest were calculated at each locus. For the 15 STR loci tested, combined matching probability (pM) was 2.15717 × 10(-18) and combined power of exclusion (PE) was 0.9999995213. No deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed, except for the vWA locus, which became insignificant after the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Locus-by-locus comparisons of the Turkish Cypriot allelic frequencies with those published for the neighboring and/or historically related populations with similar loci coverage (Turkish, Greek, Greek Cypriot, Italian and Lebanese) revealed some statistically significant differences at one to five loci. In general, an increase in the number of such significant differences between the Turkish Cypriot data and those for other populations correlated closely with an increase in the geographic distance and/or a decrease in the amount of historical contact. The Turkish Cypriot autosomal STR population study will find immediate use in the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus Project on the "Exhumation, Identification and Return of Remains of Missing Persons" and it will also be available for criminal, parentage and other missing person investigations.

  20. Autosomal STRs provide genetic evidence for the hypothesis that Tai people originate from southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    Full Text Available Tai people are widely distributed in Thailand, Laos and southwestern China and are a large population of Southeast Asia. Although most anthropologists and historians agree that modern Tai people are from southwestern China and northern Thailand, the place from which they historically migrated remains controversial. Three popular hypotheses have been proposed: northern origin hypothesis, southern origin hypothesis or an indigenous origin. We compared the genetic relationships between the Tai in China and their "siblings" to test different hypotheses by analyzing 10 autosomal microsatellites. The genetic data of 916 samples from 19 populations were analyzed in this survey. The autosomal STR data from 15 of the 19 populations came from our previous study (Lin et al., 2010. 194 samples from four additional populations were genotyped in this study: Han (Yunnan, Dai (Dehong, Dai (Yuxi and Mongolian. The results of genetic distance comparisons, genetic structure analyses and admixture analyses all indicate that populations from northern origin hypothesis have large genetic distances and are clearly differentiated from the Tai. The simulation-based ABC analysis also indicates this. The posterior probability of the northern origin hypothesis is just 0.04 [95%CI: (0.01-0.06]. Conversely, genetic relationships were very close between the Tai and populations from southern origin or an indigenous origin hypothesis. Simulation-based ABC analyses were also used to distinguish the southern origin hypothesis from the indigenous origin hypothesis. The results indicate that the posterior probability of the southern origin hypothesis [0.640, 95%CI: (0.524-0.757] is greater than that of the indigenous origin hypothesis [0.324, 95%CI: (0.211-0.438]. Therefore, we propose that the genetic evidence does not support the hypothesis of northern origin. Our genetic data indicate that the southern origin hypothesis has higher probability than the other two hypotheses

  1. Autosomal dominant coralliform cataract related to a missense mutation of the γD-crystallin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟珍; 郑树; 徐世杰; 黄薇; 姚克; 张苏展

    2004-01-01

    Background Congenital cataract is a sight-threatening disease that affects about 1-6 cases per 10?@000 live births and causes 10%-30% of all blindness in children. About 25% of all cases are due to genetic defects. We identified autosomal dominant congenital coralliform cataracts-related genetic defect in a four-generation Chinese family.Methods Complete ophthalmological examinations were performed prior to lens extraction. Lens samples were then studied by electron microscopy. Genomic DNA from family members were examined using whole-genomic linkage analysis, with two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores calculated using the Linkage program package (version 5.1). Mutation analysis of candidate genes was performed by direct sequencing. Finally, a three-dimensional protein model was predicted using Swiss-Model (version 2.0).Results Eleven of the 23 examined individuals had congenital cataracts. Ultrastructure studies revealed crystal deposits in the lens, and granules extensively dispersed in transformed lens fiber cells. The maximum two-point LOD score, 3.5 at θ=0.1, was obtained for the marker D2S325. Mutation analysis of the γ-crystallin (CRYG) gene cluster identified a mutation (P23T) in exon 2 of γD-crystallin (CRYGD). Protein structure modeling demonstrated that the P23T mutation caused a subtle change on the surface of the γD protein.Conclusions The results suggest that the coralliform cataract phenotype is due to a mutated CRYGD gene, and that this sequence change is identical to one reported by Santhiya to be related to another distinct clinical condition, lamellar cataract. This study provides evidence that this same genetic defect may be associated with a different phenotype. This is the first report identifying the genetic defect associated with an autosomal dominant congenital coralliform cataract.

  2. ABCA4 gene analysis in patients with autosomal recessive cone and cone rod dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B D; Grau, Tanja; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Jägle, Herbert; Renner, Agnes B; Kellner, Ulrich; Rudolph, Günther; Jacobson, Samuel G; Cideciyan, Artur V; Schaich, Simone; Kohl, Susanne; Wissinger, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a family of large membrane proteins, which transport a variety of substrates across membranes. The ABCA4 protein is expressed in photoreceptors and possibly functions as a transporter for N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-retinylidene-PE), the Schiff base adduct of all-trans-retinal with PE. Mutations in the ABCA4 gene have been initially associated with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Subsequent studies have shown that mutations in ABCA4 can also cause a variety of other retinal dystrophies including cone rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa. To determine the prevalence and mutation spectrum of ABCA4 gene mutations in non-Stargardt phenotypes, we have screened 64 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive cone (arCD) and cone rod dystrophy (arCRD) applying the Asper Ophthalmics ABCR400 microarray followed by DNA sequencing of all coding exons of the ABCA4 gene in subjects with single heterozygous mutations. Disease-associated ABCA4 alleles were identified in 20 of 64 patients with arCD or arCRD. In four of 64 patients (6%) only one mutant ABCA4 allele was detected and in 16 patients (25%), mutations on both ABCA4 alleles were identified. Based on these data we estimate a prevalence of 31% for ABCA4 mutations in arCD and arCRD, supporting the concept that the ABCA4 gene is a major locus for various types of degenerative retinal diseases with abnormalities in cone or both cone and rod function.

  3. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  4. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Chen; Xiang-Hui Lu; Hui-Fang Wang; Rui Ban; Hua-Xu Liu; Qiang Shi; Qian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies.Here,we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected.Methods:A clinical study including family history,obstetric,pediatric,and development history was recorded.Clinical examinations including physical examination,electromyography (EMG),serum creatine kinase (CK),bone X-rays,and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family.Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother.To find the causative gene,the whole-exome sequencing was carried out.Results:Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood,but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations.Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria,dysphagia,external ophthalmoplegia,limb weakness,hypophrenia,deafness,and impaired vision.However,not every patient manifested all symptoms.Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern.Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy.Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy.The whole-exome sequencing was performed,but the causative gene has not been found.Conclusions:We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria,dysphagia,external ophthalmoplegia,limb weakness,hypophrenia,deafness,and impaired vision,but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study.

  5. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Willer, Jason R; Davis, Erica E; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Brunner, Han G; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R; Lupski, James R; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yang, Yaping

    2015-12-03

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5' end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1(st) coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6(∗)) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs(∗)4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5' end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5' to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS.

  6. Clinical features and linkage analysis for a Chinese family with autosomal dominant central areolar choroidal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Kai; LIU Ning-pu; YANG Xiu-fen; HAN Cui; ZHANG Ning; XU Jun; LIU Shou-bin; LU Hal; Torkel Snellingen; WANG Ning-li

    2009-01-01

    Background A Chinese family with autosomal dominant central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD) was identified.The purpose of this study was to collect the clinical findings from the family and to identify the genetic entity by linkage nalysis.Methods Forty-three individuals from 3 generations of the family underwent ophthalmologic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, examination of the anterior segments, and inspection of the ocular fundus after pharmacologic mydriasis. Affected family members further underwent color vision test, color fundus photography,fluorescein angiography, automated perimetry, and electroretinography. The family was followed up for 30 months.Peripheral venous blood or buccal swabs were collected from each family member and genomic DNA was extracted.Linkage analysis was performed for candidate genes or loci using microsatellite markers.Results Seven family members in 3 continuous generations were diagnosed as having autosomal dominant CACD.The family showed progressive development of the disease, affecting both male and female. Age of onset of visual disturbances varied between 11 and 50 years. Phenotypic variability among affected individuals was apparent and ranged from relatively normal-appearing fundus with mild parafoveal pigment mottling to geographic atrophy of the macula. Fluorescein angiography showed hyperfluorescent parafoveal changes in early stage or well-demarcated area of chorioretinal atrophy with enhanced visibility of the residual underlying choroidal vessels in the late stage. Peripheral retina and visual fields were normal in affected individuals. Electroretinogram showed normal or mild reduction in the photopic amplitude. Eight candidate genes (STGD4, RCD1, peripherin/RDS, GUCA1A, RIMS1, UNC119, GUC Y2D, and AIPL1) and two genetic loci (4p15.2-16.3, and 17p13) were excluded to be responsible for the disease by linkage analysis.Conclusions The clinical findings of this Chinese family with CACD shared

  7. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  8. Mutational screening of 320 Brazilian patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Vívian Pedigone; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Marques, Sandra Elisabete; de Oliveira, Luana Michelli; Tumas, Vitor; Marques, Wilson

    2014-12-15

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a clinical and genetically heterogeneous group of debilitating neurodegenerative diseases that are related to at least 36 different genetic loci; they are clinically characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and are frequently accompanied by other neurological and non-neurological manifestations. The relative frequency of SCA varies greatly among different regions, presumably because of a founder effect or local ethnicities. Between July 1998 and May 2012, we investigated 320 Brazilian patients with an SCA phenotype who belonged to 150 unrelated families with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and 23 sporadic patients from 13 Brazilian states. A total of 265 patients (82.8%) belonging to 131 unrelated families (87.3%) were found to have a definite mutation, and SCA3 accounted for most of the familial cases (70.7%), followed by SCA7 (6%), SCA1 (5.3%), SCA2 (2.7%), SCA6 (1.3%), SCA8 (0.7%) and SCA10 (0.7%). In the Ribeirão Preto mesoregion, which is located in the northeast part of São Paulo State, the prevalence of SCA3 was approximately 5 per 100,000 inhabitants, which is the highest prevalence found in Brazil. No mutation was found in the SCA12, SCA17 and DRPLA genes, and all the sporadic cases remained without a molecular diagnosis. This study further characterizes the spectrum of SCA mutations found in Brazilian patients, which suggests the existence of regional differences and demonstrates the expansion of the SCA8 locus in Brazilian families.

  9. Regional variability of imaging biomarkers in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Blazey, Tyler; Jack, Clifford R.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Su, Yi; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus E.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Fagan, Anne M.; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S.; Aisen, Paul S.; Christensen, Jon J.; Ercole, Lindsay; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Aldea, Patricia; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Owen, Christopher J.; Xie, Xianyun; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam; McDade, Eric; Klunk, William; Mathis, Chester A.; Ringman, John; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L.; Martins, Ralph; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rossor, Martin N.; Fox, Nick C.; Cash, David M.; Weiner, Michael W.; Holtzman, David M.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Moulder, Krista; Morris, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Major imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease include amyloid deposition [imaged with [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET], altered glucose metabolism (imaged with [18F]fluro-deoxyglucose PET), and structural atrophy (imaged by MRI). Recently we published the initial subset of imaging findings for specific regions in a cohort of individuals with autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease. We now extend this work to include a larger cohort, whole-brain analyses integrating all three imaging modalities, and longitudinal data to examine regional differences in imaging biomarker dynamics. The anatomical distribution of imaging biomarkers is described in relation to estimated years from symptom onset. Autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease mutation carrier individuals have elevated PiB levels in nearly every cortical region 15 y before the estimated age of onset. Reduced cortical glucose metabolism and cortical thinning in the medial and lateral parietal lobe appeared 10 and 5 y, respectively, before estimated age of onset. Importantly, however, a divergent pattern was observed subcortically. All subcortical gray-matter regions exhibited elevated PiB uptake, but despite this, only the hippocampus showed reduced glucose metabolism. Similarly, atrophy was not observed in the caudate and pallidum despite marked amyloid accumulation. Finally, before hypometabolism, a hypermetabolic phase was identified for some cortical regions, including the precuneus and posterior cingulate. Additional analyses of individuals in which longitudinal data were available suggested that an accelerated appearance of volumetric declines approximately coincides with the onset of the symptomatic phase of the disease. PMID:24194552

  10. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaramurthy Srilekha

    Full Text Available Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and retinitis pigmentosa (RP are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 - 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60% mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier.

  11. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion...... estimation system uses a single camera to estimate the motion of a human. The results show that inverse kinematics can significantly speed up the estimation process, while retaining a quality comparable to a full pose motion estimation system. Our novelty lies primarily in use of inverse kinematics...... to significantly speed up the particle filtering. It should be stressed that the observation part of the system has not been our focus, and as such is described only from a sense of completeness. With our approach it is possible to construct a robust and computationally efficient system for human motion estimation....

  12. Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Shocked Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Ellison, D C; Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    There has recently been interest in the role of inverse bremsstrahlung, the emission of photons by fast suprathermal ions in collisions with ambient electrons possessing relatively low velocities, in tenuous plasmas in various astrophysical contexts. This follows a long hiatus in the application of suprathermal ion bremsstrahlung to astrophysical models since the early 1970s. The potential importance of inverse bremsstrahlung relative to normal bremsstrahlung, i.e. where ions are at rest, hinges upon the underlying velocity distributions of the interacting species. In this paper, we identify the conditions under which the inverse bremsstrahlung emissivity is significant relative to that for normal bremsstrahlung in shocked astrophysical plasmas. We determine that, since both observational and theoretical evidence favors electron temperatures almost comparable to, and certainly not very deficient relative to proton temperatures in shocked plasmas, these environments generally render inverse bremsstrahlung at b...

  13. The Transmuted Generalized Inverse Weibull Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faton Merovci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A generalization of the generalized inverse Weibull distribution the so-called transmuted generalized inverse Weibull distribution is proposed and studied. We will use the quadratic rank transmutation map (QRTM in order to generate a flexible family of probability distributions taking the generalized inverseWeibull distribution as the base value distribution by introducing a new parameter that would offer more distributional flexibility. Various structural properties including explicit expressions for the moments, quantiles, and moment generating function of the new distribution are derived. We propose the method of maximum likelihood for estimating the model parameters and obtain the observed information matrix. A real data set are used to compare the flexibility of the transmuted version versus the generalized inverse Weibull distribution.

  14. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  15. Full traveltime inversion in source domain

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a new method of source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI). The objective of this study is automatically building near-surface velocity using the early arrivals of seismic data. This method can generate the inverted velocity that can kinetically best match the reconstructed plane-wave source of early arrivals with true source in source domain. It does not require picking first arrivals for tomography, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based tomographic inversion. Besides, this method does not need estimate the source wavelet, which is a necessity for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. Furthermore, we applied our method on one synthetic dataset; the results show our method could generate a reasonable background velocity even when shingling first arrivals exist and could provide a good initial velocity for the conventional full waveform inversion (FWI).

  16. Self-Inverse Interleavers for Turbo Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Sakzad, Amin; Panario, Daniel; Eshghi, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    In this work we introduce and study a set of new interleavers based on permutation polynomials and functions with known inverses over a finite field $\\mathbb{F}_q$ for using in turbo code structures. We use Monomial, Dickson, M\\"{o}bius and R\\'edei functions in order to get new interleavers. In addition we employ Skolem sequences in order to find new interleavers with known cycle structure. As a byproduct we give an exact formula for the inverse of every R\\'edei function. The cycle structure of R\\'edei functions are also investigated. Finally, self-inverse versions of permutation functions are used to construct interleavers. These interleavers are their own de-interleavers and are useful for turbo coding and turbo decoding. Experiments carried out for self-inverse interleavers constructed using these kind of permutation polynomials and functions show excellent agreement with our theoretical results.

  17. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  18. Nonlinear Least Squares for Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chavent, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Presents an introduction into the least squares resolution of nonlinear inverse problems. This title intends to develop a geometrical theory to analyze nonlinear least square (NLS) problems with respect to their quadratic wellposedness, that is, both wellposedness and optimizability

  19. An Inverse Problem Statistical Methodology Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-12

    R. Vogel, Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2002. [36] D. D. Wackerly, W. Mendenhall III, and R. L. Scheaffer , Mathematical Statistics with Applications, Duxbury Thompson Learning, USA, 2002. 56

  20. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    .... With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally...