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Sample records for nonocclusive intestinal ischemic

  1. Widespread Myocardial Delivery of Heart-Derived Stem Cells by Nonocclusive Triple-Vessel Intracoronary Infusion in Porcine Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Superior Attenuation of Adverse Remodeling Documented by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histology.

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    Eleni Tseliou

    Full Text Available Single-vessel, intracoronary infusion of stem cells under stop-flow conditions has proven safe but achieves only limited myocardial coverage. Continuous flow intracoronary delivery to one or more coronary vessels may achieve broader coverage for treating cardiomyopathy, but has not been investigated. Using nonocclusive coronary guiding catheters, we infused allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs either in a single vessel or sequentially in all three coronary arteries in porcine ischemic cardiomyopathy and used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to assess structural and physiological outcomes. Vehicle-infused animals served as controls. Single-vessel stop-flow and continuous-flow intracoronary infusion revealed equivalent effects on scar size and function. Sequential infusion into each of the three major coronary vessels under stop-flow or continuous-flow conditions revealed equal efficacy, but less elevation of necrotic biomarkers with continuous-flow delivery. In addition, multi-vessel delivery resulted in enhanced global and regional tissue function compared to a triple-vessel placebo-treated group. The functional benefits after global cell infusion were accompanied histologically by minimal inflammatory cellular infiltration, attenuated regional fibrosis and enhanced vessel density in the heart. Sequential multi-vessel non-occlusive delivery of CDCs is safe and provides enhanced preservation of left ventricular function and structure. The current findings provide preclinical validation of the delivery method currently undergoing clinical testing in the Dilated cardiomYopathy iNtervention With Allogeneic MyocardIally-regenerative Cells (DYNAMIC trial of CDCs in heart failure patients.

  2. Protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on intestinal

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    DING Jun-tao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To explore the protective effects of two types of ischemic postconditioning (IP on intestinal mucosa barrier in rabbits with crush injury of the hind limb. Methods: This study was conducted between August and December 2008 in the Department of Trauma Surgery, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. The model of crush injury to the hind limb of rabbits was firstly developed by a 25 kg object with the right hind limbs fixed by wooden splints, and then two types of IP were established, including occluding/opening the common iliac artery and vein alternatively (traditional IP, IP A and binding/loosening the proximum of the injured hind limb alternatively (modified IP, IP B. Thirty-six male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: IP A group, IP B group and control group, with 12 rabbits in each group. The serum levels of diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP were detected at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury. Pathological changes of ileum were examined at 24 hours after injury. Results: The serum levels of I-FABP at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury in both IP A and IP B groups had a significant decrease, compared with control group. DAO levels also showed the same change trend at 2 and 6 hours after injury, but showed no significant difference between two IP groups. No difference in pathological changes of ileum was found among the three groups. Conclusions: IP can protect intestinal mucosa barrier function on the model of hind limb crush injury in rabbits. Meanwhile the modified IP B shows the same protection as the traditional IP A, and is worth applying in clinic. Key words: Ischemic postconditioning; Crush syndrome; Intestinal mucosa

  3. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

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    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia.

  4. [Segmental ischemic lesions of the mesenteric small intestine].

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    Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; de Lutio di Castelguidone, E; Fondacaro, R

    1987-01-01

    Segmental ischemic disease consists of segmental infarctions and ischemic stenoses. Vasculitis (LES, polyarteritis nodosa, Schönlein-Henoch syndrome), thrombosis, arteriosclerotic changes, mechanical obstructions (adhesions, hernia, volvulus, traumas), hemorrhagic disorders are the most common causes of these intestinal lesions. The authors report their experience achieved during three years on 428 small bowel examinations; among these, 197 were double contrast enemas. Ten patients showed roentgenographic features referred to vascular diseases: 1 LES, 1 Schönlein-Henoch syndrome, 3 polyarteritis nodosa, 5 spontaneous hemorrhagic disorders or due to treatment with anticoagulants. The authors, after a review of the radiological findings, emphasize the high sensitivity and low specificity of double contrast small bowel enema. Furthermore they underline the usefulness of this method in demonstrating and monitoring intestinal pathologic changes.

  5. Commensal microbiota affects ischemic stroke outcome by regulating intestinal γδT cells

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    Benakis, Corinne; Brea, David; Caballero, Silvia; Faraco, Giuseppe; Moore, Jamie; Murphy, Michelle; Sita, Giulia; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric G.; Iadecola, Costantino; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Commensal gut bacteria impact the host immune system and can influence disease processes in several organs, including the brain. However, it remains unclear whether the microbiota has an impact on the outcome of acute brain injury. Here we show that antibiotic-induced alterations in the intestinal flora reduces ischemic brain injury in mice, an effect transmissible by fecal transplants. Intestinal dysbiosis alters immune homeostasis in the small intestine leading to an increase in regulatory ...

  6. Topical intraperitoneal papaverine to minimize non-viable bowel resection from non-occlusive bowel ischemia in neonatal segmental volvulus: A case report

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    Roger Chen Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Arrest in the embryologic intestinal rotation around the superior mesenteric artery prevents proper mesenteric attachment and subjects the gut to volvulus and ischemia which may lead to bowel resection. The length of non-viable resected bowel has been shown by Teitelbaum et al. to be an independent predictor of survival in patients with postoperative short bowel syndrome (RR = 5.74, P = .003. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI is a feed-forward loop of vasoconstriction that aggravates the primary ischemic injury. It is an initially reversible process and a potential point of intervention for preservation of viable bowel. The Boley et al. algorithm for management of adult NOMI utilizes intravascular papaverine infusion to increase intracellular cAMP, decreasing calcium concentration and halting vasospasm. We present a modified version of this approach using topical papaverine in the setting of neonatal post-ischemic NOMI, with the goal of minimizing bowel resection.

  7. Validation of Intraluminal and Intraperitoneal microdialysis in ischemic small intestine

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    Pynnönen, Lauri; Minkkinen, Minna; Perner, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    We sought to define the sensitivity and specificity of intraperitoneal (IP) and intraluminal (IL) microdialysate metabolites in depicting ex vivo small intestinal total ischemia during GI-tract surgery. We hypothesized that IL as opposed to IP microdialysis detects small intestinal ischemia...

  8. Ischemic colitis associated with intestinal vasculitis: Histological proof in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Rok Lee; Chang Nyol Paik; Jin Dong Kim; Woo Chul Chung; Kang-Moon Lee; Jin Mo Yang

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is an uncommon complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SIE). In previously reported cases of colitis caused by SLE, intestinal vasculitis is implicated as the causative process, but is rarely confirmed histologically. We described a case of a 32-year-old man with increased activity of SLE, who presented with hematochezia and abdominal pain due to ischemic colitis with small vessel vasculitis which was proven by sigmoidoscopic biopsy. The clinical course of the patient was improved after steroid and conservative management.

  9. Ischemic post-conditioning attenuates the intestinal injury induced by limb ischemia/reperfusion in rats

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    Y.F. Leng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of ischemic post-conditioning on damage to the barrier function of the small intestine caused by limb ischemia-reperfusion injury. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (N = 36 each: sham operated (group S, lower limb ischemia-reperfusion (group LIR, and post-conditioning (group PC. Each group was divided into subgroups (N = 6 according to reperfusion time: immediate (0 h; T1, 1 h (T2, 3 h (T3, 6 h (T4, 12 h (T5, and 24 h (T6. In the PC group, 3 cycles of reperfusion followed by ischemia (each lasting 30 s were applied immediately. At all reperfusion times (T1-T6, diamine oxidase (DAO, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, malondialdehyde (MDA intestinal tissue concentrations, plasma endotoxin concentrations, and serum DAO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-10 (IL-10 concentrations were measured in sacrificed rats. Chiu’s pathology scores for small intestinal mucosa were determined under a light microscope and showed that damage to the small intestinal mucosa was lower in group PC than in group LIR. In group PC, tissue DAO and SOD concentrations at T2 to T6, and IL-10 concentrations at T2 to T5 were higher than in group LIR (P < 0.05; however, tissue MPO and MDA concentrations, and serum DAO and plasma endotoxin concentrations at T2 to T6, as well as TNF-α at T2 and T4 decreased significantly (P < 0.05. These results show that ischemic post-conditioning attenuated the permeability of the small intestines after limb ischemia-reperfusion injury. The protective mechanism of ischemic post-conditioning may be related to inhibition of oxygen free radicals and inflammatory cytokines that cause organ damage.

  10. Early protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on small intestinal graft in rats

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    Shu-Feng Wang; Guo-Wei Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the early protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on small intestinal graft in rats.METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into the following groups: sham operation group (S group, n=6),small bowel transplantation group (SBT group, n=12),ischemic preconditioning plus small bowel transplantation group (ISBT group, n=12). Heterotopic SBT was performed with a technique modified from that described by Monchik et al.When the graft was revascularized successfully and reperfused for 1 h, samples were obtained from the different groups. Laminin was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Quantitative analysis of laminin positive signals was performed using image acquiring analysis system. Apoptotic epithelia of small intestinal graft were detected by the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. The morphological change of epithelial basement membrane was observed by transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: The mean optical density value of laminin positive signals was 39.52±2.60, 13.53±0.44, 25.40±1.79,respectively, in S, SBT and ISBT groups. The average optical density value of laminin positive products in SBT group was sharply lower than that in S group (P<0.05). However,the mean optical density value of laminin positive products in ISBT group was significantly higher than that in SBT group (P<0.05). The apoptotic index (AI) in S, SBT and ISBT group was 2.2±0.83,30.8±3.2, 13.2±2.86, respectively.The AI in SBT group was significantly higher than that in S group (P<0.05), and AI in ISBT group was sharply lower than that in SBT group (P<0.05). On transmission electron microscopy, the epithelial basement membrane in S group stayed normal, but in SBT group it became disrupted and collapsed, even disappeared. The lesion of epithelial basement membrane in ISBT group was slighter compared with that in SBT group.CONCLUSION: Ischemic preconditioning has an early protective effect on epithelial cells and extracellur matrix of small

  11. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia: etiology, diagnosis, and interventional therapy

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    Trompeter, Markus; Brazda, Thurid; Remy, Christopher T.; Reimer, Peter [Department of Radiology, Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany); Vestring, Thomas [Department of Radiology, Diakonie-Krankenhaus Rotenburg/Wuemme, Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) compromises all forms of mesenteric ischemia with patent mesenteric arteries. It generally affects patients over 50 years of age suffering from myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, aortic insufficiency, renal or hepatic disease and patients following cardiac surgery. Non-occlusive disease accounts for 20-30% of all cases of acute mesenteric ischemia with a mortality rate of the order of 50%. Acute abdominal pain may be the only early presenting symptom of mesenteric ischemia. Non-invasive imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI, and ultrasound, are able to evaluate the aorta and the origins of splanchnic arteries. Despite the technical evolution of those methods, selective angiography of mesenteric arteries is still the gold standard in diagnosing peripheral splanchnic vessel disease. In early non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia, as opposed to occlusive disease, there is no surgical therapy. It is known that mesenteric vasospasm persists even after correction of the precipitating event. Vasospasm frequently responds to direct intra-arterial vasodilator therapy, which is the only treatment that has been shown to be effective. (orig.)

  12. Immediate non-occlusal loading of single implants in the aesthetic zone : a randomized clinical trial

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    den Hartog, Laurens; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Stellingsma, Kees; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    2011-01-01

    P>Aim This study compared the outcome of immediate non-occlusal loading with conventional loading for single implants in the maxillary aesthetic zone. It was hypothesized that immediate non-occlusal loading is not inferior to conventional loading. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients with a miss

  13. Ischemic preconditioning and the gene expression of enteric endothelial cell biology of rats submitted to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion

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    Murched Omar Taha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC on the expression of pro and anti-apoptotic genes in rat endothelial cells undergoing enteric ischemia (I and reperfusion (R. METHODS: Thirty rats underwent clamping of the superior mesenteric vessels. Sham group (GS laparotomy only; Ischemia (GI: intestinal ischemia (60 min; Ischemia and Reperfusion (GIR: ischemia (60 min and reperfusion (120 min; Ischemia and intestinal ischemic preconditioning (GI + IPC : 5 minutes of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion before sustained ischemia (60 min ischemia and reperfusion and IPC (GIR + IPC: 5 min ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion before sustained ischemia (60min and reperfusion (120 min. Rat Endothelial Cell Biology (PCR array to determine the expression of genes related to endothelial cell biology. RESULTS: Gene expression of pro-apoptotic markers (Casp1, Casp6, Cflar, Fas, and Pgl was down regulated in GI+IPC and in GIR + IPC. In contrast, the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl2 and Naip2, was up-regulated in GI + IPC and in GIR + IPC. CONCLUSION: Ischemic preconditioning may protect against cell death caused by ischemia and reperfusion.

  14. Reliability of an occlusal and nonocclusal tooth wear grading system: clinical use versus dental cast assessment.

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    Wetselaar, Peter; Lobbezoo, Frank; Koutris, Michail; Visscher, Corine M; Naeije, Machiel

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of a newly developed tooth wear grading system was assessed both clinically and on dental casts by two observers using 20 participants. The reliability of clinical occlusal/incisal tooth wear grading was fair-to-good to excellent, while that of most of the clinical nonocclusal/nonincisal grades was at least fair-to-good. Dental cast assessment frequently yielded poor reliabilities, especially for nonocclusal/nonincisal surfaces. Hence, occlusal/incisal wear could be graded more reliably than nonocclusal/nonincisal wear, while the clinical assessment of tooth wear was more reliable than the grading of dental casts.

  15. Ischemic colitis complicating reconstruction of the abdominal aorta

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    Schroeder, T V; Christoffersen, J K; Andersen, J

    1985-01-01

    A review of 23 patients with ischemic colitis after surgical treatment of the abdominal aorta disclosed a pathogenetic heterogeneous finding. Ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery, abolished collateral blood supply or nonocclusive low flow state, or both, was a common feature. An incidence...

  16. Comparison of the chloride channel activator lubiprostone and the oral laxative Polyethylene Glycol 3350 on mucosal barrier repair in ischemic-injured porcine intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam J Moeser; Prashant K Nighot; Birgit Roerig; Ryuji Ueno; Anthony T Blikslager

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of lubiprostone and Polyethylene Glycol 3350 (PEG) on mucosal barrier repair in ischemic-injured porcine intestine.METHODS: Ileum from 6 piglets (approximately 15 kg body weight) was subjected to ischemic conditions by occluding the local mesenteric circulation for 45 min in vivo. Ileal tissues from each pig were then harvested and mounted in Ussing chambers and bathed in oxygenated Ringer's solution in vitro. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of 3H-mannitol and 14C-inulin. Statistical analyses of data collected over a 120-min time course included 2-way ANOVA for the effects of time and treatment on indices of barrier function.RESULTS: Application of 1 μmol/L lubiprostone to the mucosal surface of ischemic-injured ileum in vitro induced significant elevations in TER compared to non-treated tissue. Lubiprostone also reduced mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of 3H-mannitol and 14C-inulin. Alternatively, application of a polyethylene laxative (PEG, 20 mmol/L) to the mucosal surface of ischemic tissues significantly increased flux of 3H-mannitol and 14C-inulin.CONCLUSION: This experiment demonstrates that lubiprostone stimulates recovery of barrier function in ischemic intestinal tissues whereas the PEG laxative had deleterious effects on mucosal repair. These results suggest that, unlike osmotic laxatives, lubiprostone stimulates repair of the injured intestinal barrier.

  17. Ischemic post-conditioning attenuates acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in mice: role of Nrf2.

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    Meng, Qing-Tao; Cao, Chen; Wu, Yang; Liu, Hui-Min; Li, Wei; Sun, Qian; Chen, Rong; Xiao, Yong-Guang; Tang, Ling-Hua; Jiang, Ying; Leng, Yan; Lei, Shao-Qing; Lee, Chris C; Barry, Devin M; Chen, Xiangdong; Xia, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemic post-conditioning (IPo) protects against lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) partly through promotion of expression and function of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor that interacts with HO-1 and regulates antioxidant defense. However, the role of Nrf2 in IPo protection of IIR-induced pulmonary injury is not completely understood. Here we show that IPo significantly attenuated IIR-induced lung injury and suppressed oxidative stress and systemic inflammatory responses. IPo also increased the expression of both Nrf2 and HO-1. Consistently, the beneficial effects of IPo were abolished by ATRA and Brusatol, potent inhibitors of Nrf2. Moreover, the Nrf2 agonist t-BHQ showed similar activity as IPo. Taken together, our data suggest that Nrf2 activity, along with HO-1, plays an important role in the protective effects of IPo against IIR-induced acute lung injury.

  18. Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Is Injured by BMP2/4 via Activation of NF-κB Signals after Ischemic Reperfusion

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    Kang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal ischemic reperfusion (I/R can cause dysfunction of the intestinal mucosal barrier; however, the mechanism of the intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction caused by I/R remains unclear. In this study, using intestinal epithelial cells under anaerobic cultivation and an in vivo rat intestinal I/R model, we found that hypoxia and I/R increased the expression of BMP2/4 and upregulated BMP type Ia receptor and BMP type II receptor expression. We also found that exogenous BMP2/4 can activate the ERK and AKT signaling pathways in rat small intestine (IEC-6 cells, thereby activating NF-κB signaling, which leads to increased levels of inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Furthermore, recombinant BMP2/4 decreased the expression of the tight junction protein occludin via the activation of the NF-κB pathway; these effects were abolished by treatment with the BMP-specific antagonist noggin or the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC. All these factors can destroy the intestinal mucosal barrier, thereby leading to weaker barrier function. On the basis of these data, we conclude that BMP2/4 may act as the pathogenic basis for intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction when the intestines suffer an I/R injury. Our results provide background for the development pharmacologic interventions in the management of I/R injury.

  19. Reliability of an occlusal and nonocclusal tooth wear grading system: clinical use versus dental cast assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Lobbezoo, F.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of a newly developed tooth wear grading system was assessed both clinically and on dental casts by two observers using 20 participants. The reliability of clinical occlusal/incisal tooth wear grading was fair-to-good to excellent, while that of most of the clinical nonocclusal/noninc

  20. Evaluation and further development of the Excimer Laser Assisted Non-occlusive Anastomosis (ELANA) technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doormaal, T.P.C.

    2010-01-01

    The research described in this thesis had 2 main goals. The first goal was to evaluate the clinical results of the Excimer Laser Assisted Non-occlusive Anastomosis (ELANA) technique. The most important subgroups of patients were separately evaluated in the first part of this thesis (chapters 2 to 5)

  1. Intestine.

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    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  2. Ischemic colitis:Clinical practice in diagnosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angeliki Theodoropoulou; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is the most common form of ischemic injury of the gastrointestinal tract and can present either as an occlusive or a non-occlusive form.It accounts for 1 in 1000 hospitalizations but its incidence is underestimated because it often has a mild and transient nature.The etiology of ischemic colitis is multifactorial and the clinical presentation variable.The diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical suspicion,radiographic,endoscopic and histological findings.Therapy and outcome depends on the severity of the disease.Most cases of the non-gangrenous form are transient and resolve spontaneously without complications.On the other hand,high morbidity and mortality and urgent operative intervention are the hallmarks of gangrenous ischemic colitis.

  3. In vivo ultrasound visualization of non-occlusive blood clots with thrombin-sensitive contrast agents.

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    Nakatsuka, Matthew A; Barback, Christopher V; Fitch, Kirsten R; Farwell, Alexander R; Esener, Sadik C; Mattrey, Robert F; Cha, Jennifer N; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    The use of microbubbles as ultrasound contrast agents is one of the primary methods to diagnose deep venous thrombosis. However, current microbubble imaging strategies require either a clot sufficiently large to produce a circulation filling defect or a clot with sufficient vascularization to allow for targeted accumulation of contrast agents. Previously, we reported the design of a microbubble formulation that modulated its ability to generate ultrasound contrast from interaction with thrombin through incorporation of aptamer-containing DNA crosslinks in the encapsulating shell, enabling the measurement of a local chemical environment by changes in acoustic activity. However, this contrast agent lacked sufficient stability and lifetime in blood to be used as a diagnostic tool. Here we describe a PEG-stabilized, thrombin-activated microbubble (PSTA-MB) with sufficient stability to be used in vivo in circulation with no change in biomarker sensitivity. In the presence of actively clotting blood, PSTA-MBs showed a 5-fold increase in acoustic activity. Specificity for the presence of thrombin and stability under constant shear flow were demonstrated in a home-built in vitro model. Finally, PSTA-MBs were able to detect the presence of an active clot within the vena cava of a rabbit sufficiently small as to not be visible by current non-specific contrast agents. By activating in non-occlusive environments, these contrast agents will be able to detect clots not diagnosable by current contrast agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A scoring system for the assessment of angiographic findings in non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI)

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    Minko, P.; Stroeder, J.; Miodek, J.; Buecker, A.; Katoh, M. [Saarland Univ. Hospital, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Groesdonk, H.; Schaefers, H.J. [Saarland Univ. Hospital, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Dept. of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery; Graeber, S. [Saarland Univ. Hospital, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Inst. of Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To establish a standardized scoring system for angiographic findings in patients with non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI). Materials and Methods: In 36 patients (mean age: 72 years), 53 angiographies of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) were performed for suspected NOMI after cardiac or major aortic surgery. All examinations were performed using a standardized DSA technique. Two experienced radiologists performed a consensus reading blinded to the clinical information, on two occasions with an interval of two weeks. In order to investigate the reproducibility of the criteria, the images were assessed once by an intensivist and a medical student. Image analysis was performed with respect to vessel morphology, reflux of contrast medium into the aorta, small bowel parenchymal contrast enhancement and distension and the delay between arterial injection and portal vein filling. Results: Almost perfect intra-observer correlation was obtained for the assessment of the contrast medium reflux ({kappa} = 0.82) and substantial correlation for the time of portal vein filling ({kappa} = 0.66). Moderate correlations were obtained for the vessel morphology ({kappa} = 0.51), small bowel enhancement ({kappa} = 0.63) and distension ({kappa} = 0.53). Contrast medium reflux into the aorta ({kappa} = 0.77 and 0.63) and the time of portal vein filling ({kappa} = 0.42 and 0.58) resulted in the highest inter-observer correlations between the radiologists and the intensivist as well as the radiologists and the student. Conclusion: In patients with suspected NOMI, using our scoring system yields high intra- and inter-observer correlations, allowing a standardized evaluation of angiographic findings. (orig.)

  5. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  6. CT Findings in Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Ischemic Colitis: Suggestions for Diagnosis

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    Francesca Iacobellis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper aims at evaluating CT findings of occlusive and nonocclusive ischemic colitis (IC, in correlation with the etiology and the different phases of the disease. Materials and Methods. CT examination and clinical history of 32 patients with proven IC were retrospectively reviewed. The CT findings were analyzed according to the different phases of the disease (acute, subacute, and chronic. Results. Among the 32 CT examinations performed in the acute phase, 62.5% did not present signs of occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA or inferior mesenteric artery (IMA, whereas IMA occlusion was detected in 37.5% of CT examinations. In the acute phase, the presence of pericolic fluid was found in 100% of patients undergoing progressive resorption from acute to subacute phase if an effective reperfusion occurred; the bowel wall thickening was observed in 28.1% patients in acute phase and in 86.4% patients evaluated in subacute phase. The unthickened colonic wall was found in all conditions where ischemia was not followed by effective reperfusion (71.9% of cases, and it was never found in chronic phase, when the colon appeared irregularly thickened. Conclusion. CT allows determining the morphofunctional alterations associated with the IC discriminating the occlusive forms from the nonocclusive forms. CT, furthermore, allows estimating the timing of ischemic damage.

  7. Atividade da catalase no pulmão, rim e intestino delgado não isquemiado de ratos após reperfusão intestinal Catalase activity in lung, kidney and small bowel non-ischemic in rats after intestinal reperfusion

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    Camila de Oliveira Ferro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a atividade catalase, após lesão por isquemia e reperfusão intestinal e estudar as alterações deste antioxidante em órgãos situados à distância do insulto inicial. MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 18 ratos do tipo Wistar, aleatoriamente distribuídos em três grupos. 1-Controle, 2-Simulação e 3-Isquemia/Reperfusão. Neste último, realizou-se isquemia no íleo, por 60 minutos, seguida de reperfusão por 30 minutos. No grupo 2 efetuou-se apenas uma laparotomia. Foram retirados, de todos os animais, segmentos do intestino com e sem reperfusão, além do pulmão e rim direitos para exame com microscopia óptica. A atividade da catalase foi aferida em espectrofotômetro ajustado para 240 nm. Utilizaram-se os testes estatísticos Mann e Whitney e Kruskal Wallis. RESULTADOS: Observou-se aumento significante (p OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the catalase activity after ischemia and reperfusion and to study the changes of this antioxidant in organs located far from the initial insult. METHODS: Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. 1-Control, 2-Simulation and 3-Ischemia and Reperrfusion. In the latter it was done an ischemia of the ileum for 60 minutes followed by reperfusion for 30 minutes. In group 2 only laparotomy was performed. From all animals it was taken segments of the reperfused and non reperfused intestine, as well of the right kidney and lung to be evaluated under light microscopy. Catalase activity was measured in spectrophotometer with a wavelength set to 240 nm. It was used Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis statistical tests. RESULTS: There was a significant increase (p <0.05 in the catalase activity not only at small bowel ischemic and non-ischemic segments but also at lungs. However the enzymatic activity decreases in the kidney. In all organs studied at reperfusion group it was found a slight villi derangement, mild congestion and infiltration with inflammatory cells, and areas of

  8. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada. En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuentemente afectado, sobre todo a nivel rectosigmodeo. La clínica de presentación es inespecífica, siendo lo más frecuente el dolor abdominal y/o pélvico de tipo cólico que coincide o se exacerba con la menstruación. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, diverticulitis, colitis isquémica y procesos neoplásicos, siendo el diagnóstico definitivo anatomopatológico. En cuanto al tratamiento, éste dependerá de la clínica y de la edad de la paciente, así como de sus deseos de embarazo.Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation. In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment

  9. Ischemic preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić-Anđelkov Anđelka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ischemic preconditioning is a phenomenon during which myocardium, subjected to brief episodes of ischemia followed by reperfusion, tolerates better the subsequent, more prolonged episode of this ischemia, thus reducing the infarction size substantially. Case report. Two patients with acute left anterior descendent artery occlusion received fibrinolytic therapy (alteplase within 6 hours of the onset of chest pain, but developed myocardial infarctions of different sizes. The first patient, without the history of preinfarction angina, developed large anterior infarct, because there was no time either for ischemic preconditioning or for the coronary collateral vessels development. In the second patient, with 4-day history of preinfarction angina, the more favorable outcome was seen he developed smaller apical necrosis, with the great degree of myocardial viability in the infarct-related area. Conclusion. Ischemic preconditioning in patients with acute myocardal infarction results in the reduction of mortality, infarction size, as well as in the frequency of malignant arrhythmias.

  10. Olanzapine-induced ischemic colitis

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    Esteban Sáez-González

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic colitis (IC is an uncommon adverse event associated with antipsychotic agents, more commonly found with phenothiazine drugs and atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine. The risk of developing ischemic colitis increases when anticholinergic drugs are associated. Case report: We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with a history of schizoaffective disorder who had been on chronic quetiapine for 3 years, and presented to the ER because of diarrhea for 5 days. Four months previously, olanzapine had been added to her psychiatric drug regimen. Physical examination revealed abdominal distension with abdominal tympanic sounds and tenderness. Emergency laboratory tests were notable for increased acute phase reagents. Tomography revealed a concentric thickening of the colonic wall in the transverse, descending and sigmoid segments, with no signs of intestinal perforation. Colonoscopy demonstrated severe mucosal involvement from the sigmoid to the hepatic flexure, with ulcerations and fibrinoid exudate. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of ischemic colitis. The only relevant finding in her history was the newly added drug to her baseline regimen. An adverse effect was suspected because of its anticholinergic action at the intestinal level, and the drug was withdrawn. After 6 months of follow-up clinical, laboratory and endoscopic recovery was achieved. Discussion: Antipsychotic medication should be considered as a potential cause of ischemic colitis, particularly atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine and olanzapine; despite being uncommon, this adverse event may result in high morbidity and mortality.

  11. 缺血后处理对大鼠小肠缺血-再灌注损伤的保护作用%Protective effect of ischemic postconditioning on the intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁勇; 郭皓; 张毅; 甘平; 周东; 陈嘉勇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate protective effect and mechanism of ischemic postconditioning on the rat model of intestinal ischemiareperfusion.Methods Forty healthy SPF male rats were randomly divided into four groups.The sham group, which underwent a laparotomy and dissection of superior mesenteric artery(SMA) hefore the peritoneal cavity was closed : the IR group,undergoing mesenterte ischemia(45 minutes) and reperfusion(two hours) ;the IPr group,three cycles of tschemia alternated with three cycles of reperfusion lasting two minutes each were performed before 45 minutes ischemia and 120 minutes reperfusion; and the IPo group, undergoing ischemia(45 minutes) and reperfusion(two hours) (before the beginning of reperfusion, three cycles of reperfusion alternated with three cycles of ischemia lasting two minutes each were performed.At the end of procedure.the intestinal mor phometric study was measured by ChiU's classification,the TNF-α,IL-1β,IL-6 and IL-10 in serum were measured by FLISA and the colony forming units/g(CFU/g) were counted.Results The degree of pathological impaired of small intestine in IPr and IPo groups were lighter than IR group(P<0.05).The IPr and IPo rats had enhancement of IL-10 and suppressed production of serum TNF-α,IL-1β and IL-6 ,compared to IR group rats(P<0.05).The E.coli DH5α was hardly detected in the S group.And the levels of bacterial translocation in the IR group were higher than those of IPr and IPo groups(P<0.05).Conclusion The IPo has a positive effect on lessening intestinal mucosa injury, on inhibiting secretion of proinflammatory cytokines , and reducing levels of the bacterial translocation.%目的 探讨缺血后处理(IPo)对大鼠小肠缺血-再灌注损伤的保护作用.方法 40只健康无特殊病原体级雄性SD大鼠随机分为4组.S组:假手术组;IR组:缺血-再灌注组,夹闭肠系膜上动脉(SMA)45 min,再灌注2 h;IPr组:缺血预处理组,分离SMA后给予3个循环的缺血及再灌注各2 min

  12. Current diagnosis and therapy of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia; Aktuelle Diagnostik und Therapie der nicht okklusiven mesenterialen Ischaemie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, S.; Fuerst, G. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Luther, B.; Boehner, H.; Wilke, R. [Klinik fuer Gefaesschirurgie und Nierentransplantation, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Zimmermann, N.; Feindt, P. [Klinik fuer Thorax- und Kardiovaskulaere Chirurgie, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Purpose: Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) is a life threatening disease. Therapy and prognosis depend upon the length of time elapsed between primary clinical manifestation and the time of definitive diagnosis and treatment. Materials and Methods: NOMI was diagnosed by intraarterial selective angiography in four patients. After a bolus administration of 20 g Alprostadil (Prostavasin trademark) into the superior mesenteric artery, intraarterial perfusion was continued with 60 {mu}g Alprostadil/day via the catheter for three days. Results: The mesenteric ischemia resolved in all patients. One patient recovered completely. Three patients recovered from mesenteric ischemia, but died subsequently due to complications of their primary diseases. Conclusion: When NOMI without perforation or necrosis of the bowel wall is suspected clinically, immediate intraarterial angiography is the diagnostic method of choice. If NOMI is confirmed, the appropriate treatment is the intraarterial application of potent vasodilators for several days. The diagnostic work-up in suspected NOMI and the impact of different radiological examinations are explained. The literature is reviewed. (orig.) [German] Einleitung: Die nicht okklusive mesenteriale Ischaemie (NOMI) ist eine lebensbedrohliche Erkrankung. Therapie und Prognose haengen von der Zeitspanne zwischen Auftreten der ersten Beschwerden und Diagnosesicherung ab. Material und Methode: 4 Patienten mit einer NOMI wurden mittels intraarterieller Gabe eines Bolus von 20 {mu}g Alprostadil (Prostavasin trademark) in die A. mesenterica superior und fortgesetzter intraarterieller Infusion von 60 {mu}g Alprostadil pro Tag ueber 3 Tage behandelt. Ergebnisse: Alle 4 Patienten zeigten eine Rueckbildung der mesenterialen Ischaemie. Ein Patient konnte beschwerdefrei entlassen werden. Bei drei Patienten bildete sich die Darmischaemie vollstaendig zurueck, sie verstarben aber im weiteren Verlauf an Komplikationen der Grunderkrankung

  13. Volkmann ischemic contracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischemic contracture - Volkmann; Compartment syndrome - Volkmann ischemic contracture ... Volkmann contracture occurs when there is a lack of blood flow (ischemia) to the forearm. This occurs when there ...

  14. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some generally recognized patterns. Symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia typically ... confusion in older adults Symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia can ...

  15. Reduced Ischemia-Reoxygenation Injury in Rat Intestine After Luminal Preservation With a Tailored Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskott, A.M.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Leuvenink, H.G.D.; Dijkstra, G.; Ottens, P.; de Jager, M.H.; Pereira, P.G.D.; Fidler, V.; Groothuis, G.M.M.; Ploeg, R.J.; de Graaf, I.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. The intestine is extremely sensitive to ischemic preservation and reoxygenation injury. Current vascular perfusion and cold storage with University of Wisconsin (UW) solution neglect the intestinal lumen and the ongoing mucosal metabolism during hypothermia. This study was designed to

  16. Ischemic colitis due to obstruction of mesenteric and splenic veins: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seong-Su Hwang; Woo-Chul Chung; Kang-Moon Lee; Hyun-Jin Kim; Chang-Nyol Paik; Jin-Mo Yang

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic injury to the bowel is a well known disease entity that has a wide spectrum of pathological and clinical findings. A sudden drop in the colonic blood supply is essential to its development. We encountered a 41-year-old male patient, who presented with abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. A colonoscopy showed markedly edematous mucosa with tortuous dilatation of the veins and a deep ulceration at the rectosigmoid junction. On an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan and CT angiography, the mesenteric and splenic veins were absent with numerous venous collaterals for drainage. The patient gradually responded to oral aminosalicylate therapy, and was in remission after nine months. In most cases, non-occlusive ischemic injury is caused by idiopathic form and occlusive ischemia is caused by abnormalities of arteries and acute venous thrombosis. However, chronic venous insufficiency due to obstruction of macrovascular mesenteric vein rarely causes ischemia of the bowel. This report describes the first case of ischemic colitis caused by obstruction of the mesenteric and splenic veins.

  17. 从小肠缺血预处理对急性心梗大鼠 SOD、MDA的影响探讨“心合小肠”%Discussion on“Heart Connected with the Small Intestine” Based on the Effect of SOD and MDA of Rats with Intestinal Ischemic Preconditioning on Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程岩岩; 王晓凤

    2015-01-01

    目的:本实验旨在通过动物实验观察小肠缺血预处理对急性心梗大鼠心肌梗死时抗氧化系统的影响,从而探索中医理论“心合小肠相表里”。方法:选用体质量在160~250 g之间的健康雄性SD大鼠120只随机分为5组,分别为小肠缺血预适应2分钟组(A组),小肠缺血预适应5分钟组(B组),小肠缺血预适应10分钟组(C组),小肠假手术+心梗手术组(D组),直接心梗手术组(E组)。采用手术的方法进行小肠缺血预适应并用冠状动脉结扎法制造心梗模型。造模成功后,取血检测CK-MB、SOD、MDA指标。结果:D组CK-MB含量与E组比较差别无显著意义( P>0.05);A、B、C组CK-MB含量明显较D、E组低(P<0.05);C组中CK-MB含量明显低于A组(P<0.05)。 A、B、C组SOD水平与D、E组相比也有显著性差异(P<0.01);A组与C组有差异(P<0.05);B、C组组间无显著性差异。MDA含量均增高,其中以D、E组MDA含量增高最为显著,与其它组相比差异极为显著( P<0.01)。结论:小肠缺血预处理可以减少急性心梗时氧自由基的产生,增强机体对氧自由基的清除能力,从而起到保护心肌细胞的作用。%Objective:This study was designed to observe the small intestine through animal experiments of ischemic pre-conditioning on antioxidant system in rats with acute myocardial infarction.Chinese medicine theory “heart connected with the small intestine” provides evidence of modern medicine.Methods:120 healthy male SD rats with 160~250g were randomly divided into five groups, namely intestinal ischemia preconditioning 2 minutes group, intestinal ischemia preconditioning 5 minutes group, intestinal ischemia preconditioning 10 minutes group, intestinal surgery, sham plus MI group, the direct MI-operated group.Surgical approach was to the small intestine by using preconditioning and myocar

  18. Ischemia-reperfusion histopathology alterations of the rabbit intestinal wall with and without ischemic preconditioning Alterações histopatológicas da parede intestinal de coelhos na isquemia-reperfusão com e sem precondicionamento isquêmico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otoni Moreira Gomes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the histopathology alterations of the intestinal mucosa of rabbits submitted to mesenteric artery ischemia and reperfusion with and without ischemic preconditioning. METHODS: Two groups of ten male New Zealand white rabbits body (weight 2.2-3.0, average 2.5 kg. For mesenteric ischemia induction in all animals the small bowel and mesentery were cut 30cm and 60cm far from the gastroduodenal pyloric transition before the proximal mesenteric artery occlusion. In the Group 1 animals, the proximal mesenteric artery was occluded for 45 min with an atraumatic vascular clamp, followed by reperfusion for 30 min. In the Group 2 the 45 min ischemic phase was preceded by three cycles of ischemia (2 minutes each alternated with three cycles of reperfusion (2 minutes each. For istopathology study small bowel biopsies were obtained before ischemia (control, after 45 min of mesenteric ischemia and at 30 min. of mesenteric artery reperfusion. RESULTS: In the Group I animals, the followings histopathology grade results were observed: t1, mean 2,8; t2, mean 3,3. Using the Kruskal-Wallis non-parameter test, differences between t0 and t1 and t0 and t2 were significants (p0.05. In the Group 2 animals histopathology grade results were: t1 mean 2,6 and t2, mean 2,1. Differences between t0 and t1, t0 and t2 were significant (p0.05 between results of t1 in both groups but histopathology injury observed in Group 1 t2 biopsies were higher (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações histopatológicas da mucosa intestinal de coelhos submetidos a isquemia-reperfusão com e sem precondicionamento isquêmicol. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados dois grupos de dez coelhos Nova Zelândia machos com pesos variáveis entre 2,2 e 3,0 kg (média de 2,5 kg de peso corpóreo. Para indução da isquemia, em todos os animais, o intestino delgado e o mesentério foram seccionados 30 cm e 60 cm após a transição pilórica gastroduodenal, antes da oclusão da artéria mesent

  19. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-meng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αv ß 3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αv ß 3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αv ß 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia.

  20. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  1. Intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  2. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Transient Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood ... The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage is transient (temporary). ...

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only difference between a stroke ...

  4. MASSIVE INTESINAL HAEMORRHAGE SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR BLEEDING DUE TO ISCHEMIC COLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic colitis presenting with massive exsangu inating lower gastro - intestinal hemorrhage in five patients aged between thirty to forty years is described. After conservative measures failed to arrest the hemorrhage , the patients underwent laparotomy and colectomy. Intra operative colotomy was used to locate the diseased bleeding colonic segment. All the patients made uneventful post - operative recovery. Because of this unusual manner of presentation , new category of ischemic colitis - Exsangu inating ischemic colitis of young adults is proposed

  5. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uni Wong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urticarial vasculitis (UV is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia.

  6. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Staykov, Dimitre; Schwab, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This short review focuses on recent practically relevant studies in stroke treatment and prevention and discusses their implications on clinical practice and future research, including 3 shortly published randomized controlled trials investigating interventional treatment in acute ischemic stroke (The Interventional Management of Stroke phase III trial [IMS III], Synthesis Expansion: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Intra-Arterial Versus Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and ...

  7. Nonocclusal dental microwear analysis of 300,000-year-old Homo heilderbergensis teeth from Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, A; Bermúdez De Castro, J M; Arsuaga, J L

    1999-04-01

    Casts of nonocclusal enamel surfaces of 190 teeth from the Middle Pleistocene site of Sima de los Huesos have been micrographed by scanning electron microscopy. Microscopic analyses of striation density and length by orientation show distinct patterns of intrapopulation variability. Significant differences in the number and length of the striations by orientation are found between maxillary and mandibular teeth. This probably reflects differences in the mechanical forces involved in the process of chewing food. Significant differences are present between isolated and in situ teeth that could be caused by postdepositional processes differentially affecting the isolated teeth. In addition, a distinct and very unusual striation pattern is observed in a sample of teeth that can be explained only by a strong nondietary, most probably postmortem abrasion of the enamel surfaces. These teeth have a very high density of scratches, shorter in length than those found on other teeth, that are not indicative of dietary habits. No known depositional process may account for the presence of such postmortem wear since heavy transportation of materials within the clayish sediments has been discarded for the site. Despite this, a characteristic dietary striation pattern can be observed in most of the teeth analyzed. Most likely the diet of the Homo heidelbergensis hominids from Sima de los Huesos was highly abrasive, probably with a large dependence on hard, poorly processed plant foods, such as roots, stems, and seeds. A highly significant sex-related difference in the striation pattern can also be observed in the teeth analyzed, suggesting a differential consistency in the foods eaten by females and males.

  8. Double ischemic ileal stenosis secondary to mesenteric injury after blunt abdominal trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valérie Bougard; Claude Avisse; Martine Patey; Denis Germain; Nathalie Levy-Chazal; Jean-Francois Delattre

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case in which blunt abdominal trauma resulted in mesenteric injury with delayed double ischemic ileal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated stenotic ileal loop with mural thickening. At surgery, a double stenotic bowel loop was found adjacent to a healed defect in the mesentery. Histological examination of the two resected segments showed fibrotic and ischemic lesions within the mesentery. Ischemic intestinal stenosis from mesenteric injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients suffering from intestinal occlusion with a history of blunt abdominal trauma.

  9. Ischemic colitis as a manifestation of thrombotic microangiopathy following bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Ishida, Tateru; Takeuchi, Kengo; Tsujino, Shiho; Kurokawa, Mineo; Aoki, Katsunori; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Fukayama, Masashi; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a microvascular disorder characterized by platelet aggregation and hemolytic anemia. In the setting of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), ischemic colitis due to TMA is difficult to differentiate from acute graft-versus-host disease. We report a 32-year-old man who presented ischemic colitis due to TMA after unrelated BMT for myelodysplastic syndrome. He suffered from treatment-resistant bloody diarrhea, and died of renal failure and Aspergillus pleuritis on day 253 post-BMT. Autopsy revealed endothelial injuries of arterioles and ischemic changes in the intestines and kidneys. Clinical and pathological characteristics of ischemic colitis due to BMT-associated TMA are described.

  10. Lubiprostone induced ischemic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherid, Muhammed; Sifuentes, Humberto; Samo, Salih; Deepak, Parakkal; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2013-01-14

    Ischemic colitis accounts for 6%-18% of the causes of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. It is often multifactorial and more commonly encountered in the elderly. Several medications have been implicated in the development of colonic ischemia. We report a case of a 54-year old woman who presented with a two-hour history of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloody stool. The patient had recently used lubiprostone with close temporal relationship between the increase in the dose and her symptoms of rectal bleeding. The radiologic, colonoscopic and histopathologic findings were all consistent with ischemic colitis. Her condition improved without any serious complications after the cessation of lubiprostone. This is the first reported case of ischemic colitis with a clear relationship with lubiprostone (Naranjo score of 10). Clinical vigilance for ischemic colitis is recommended for patients receiving lubiprostone who are presenting with abdominal pain and rectal bleeding.

  11. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  12. Preterm Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna G Gopagondanahalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic ischemic injury, its clinical course, monitoring and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized, and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies.

  13. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  14. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  15. The Role of the Intestinal Microcirculation in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daniel J.; Besner, Gail E.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) continues to be a devastating inflammatory disease of the newborn intestine. Despite advances in management, morbidity and mortality remain high. While it is clear that intestinal ischemia plays a large role in disease pathogenesis, attempts to link NEC to intestinal macrovascular derangement have been largely unsuccessful. More recently, there has been a concerted effort to characterize the pathologic changes of the intestinal microcirculation in response to intestinal injury, including NEC. This microcirculatory regulation is controlled by a balance of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator forces. Vasoconstriction is mediated primarily by endothelin-1 (ET-1) while vasodilation is mediated primarily by nitric oxide (NO). These chemical mediators have been implicated in many aspects of intestinal ischemic injury and NEC, with the balance shifting towards increased vasoconstriction associated with intestinal injury. With a proper understanding of these antagonistic forces, potential therapeutic avenues may result from improving this pathologic microcirculatory dysregulation. PMID:23611611

  16. Intestinal leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most often found when a person has an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy or colonoscopy for another reason. Rarely, these tumors can cause bleeding, blockage or rupture of the intestines If this ...

  17. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... source and a camera through which a small clipper can be inserted). The tissue that is removed ... can help. Malabsorption Overview of Malabsorption Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome Celiac Disease Intestinal Lymphangiectasia Lactose Intolerance Short Bowel ...

  18. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up.

  19. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  20. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  1. [Ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Megumi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-04-01

    It has been reported that antihypertensive therapy reduces the risk of ischemic heart disease. Except for the antihypertensive effects, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are proved to be very effective in primary and secondary event onset prophylaxis by many clinical trials. The angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) used briskly in recent years inhibits angiotensin II type 1 receptor alternatively. Although ARBs protect organs, especially blood vessel, heart, brain and kidney in sites of pharmacology, ARBs are still not much as effective results as ACE inhibitors for the patients with ischemic heart disease, by many clinical trials.

  2. Acute extensive ischemic enteritis in a young man diagnosed with wireless capsule endoscopy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Seong; Song, Hyun Joo; Na, Soo Young; Boo, Sun Jin; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jinseok; Choi, Guk Myung

    2013-03-25

    Ischemic enteritis is caused by either the interruption or significant reduction of arterial inflow to the small intestine. Risk factors are old age, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. It is very rare in young patients. We experienced a 21-year-old man with recurrent acute ischemic enteritis who was diagnosed with capsule endoscopy. He had previously taken medications for pulmonary hypertension and obstruction of both carotid arteries, and about 20 months earlier, he had been admitted due to hematochezia. Two sessions of angiography did not reveal the cause of hematochezia. At that time, capsule endoscopy showed mucosal edema and erythema in the terminal ileum, suggesting healed ischemic enteritis. The patient was admitted again due to hematochezia. Abdominal computed tomography showed focal celiac trunk stenosis and diffuse wall thickening of the small intestine, suggesting ischemic enteritis. Capsule endoscopy showed multiple active ulcers and severe hemorrhage with exudate, extending from the proximal jejunum to the terminal ileum. Using capsule endoscopy, the patient was diagnosed with acute extensive ischemic enteritis. Because endoscopic images of ischemic enteritis have rarely been reported, we report a case of a 21-year-old man who was diagnosed acute extensive ischemic enteritis with capsule endoscopy.

  3. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-11-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG).

  4. [Nutritional management of intestinal failure and potential stimulation mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de la Cruz, A J; Moreno-Torres Herrera, R; Pérez Roca, C

    2007-05-01

    Severe forms of intestinal failure represent one of the most complex pathologies to manage, in both children and adults. In adults, the most common causes are chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and severe short bowel syndrome following large intestinal resections, particularly due to massive mesenteric ischemic, within the context of cardiopathies occurring with atrial fibrillation. The essential management after stabilizing the patient consists in nutritional support, either by parenteral or enteral routes, with tolerance to oral diet being the final goal of intestinal adaptation in these pathologies. Surgery may be indicated in some cases to increase the absorptive surface area. Parenteral nutrition is an essential support measure that sometimes has to be maintained for long time, even forever, except for technique-related complications or unfavorable clinical course that would lead to extreme surgical alternatives such as intestinal transplantation. Hormonal therapy with trophism-stimulating factors opens new alternatives that are already being tried in humans.

  5. Intestinal Coccidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycle that has 20% thin layer and 80% thick layer. Oocyst with thick layer is able to live a long time in nature. They are the third or forth of gastroentritis disease that have digestive disorder like anorexia, nausea, persistent diarrhoea, malabsorption and leanness. The disease forms choronic and acute stages and it is able to kill the immunodeficiency cases. Sometimes it has HIV symptoms similar to pneumonia and respiratory track infection. Laboratory diagnosis is based on Oocyst finding in stool exam and that shitter floatation and Cr (KOH2 are the best methods. Modified zyh-lnelson and fleocroum are the best staining methods too. This parasite is transmitted by zoonotic and Antroponotic origin. Molecular studies have shown two Genotypes (I&II. Genotype I is aquatic and II is zoonotic. The prevalence rate is 3% in infants and 10% in calves. Cyclospora: This parasite is novel and is bigger than cryptosporidium.It isn't known a clear life cycle but is transmitted by water, vegetables and fruits as raspberries. and mulberries. Human is a specific host. When a parasite is in the intestine it causes inflammatory reaction in Entrocyte.The patient shows watery diarrhoea with nausea, vomitting, pain, Stomach cramp, anorexia, malabsorption and cachexia. The disease period is 3 monthes in immunodeficiency cases but it is selflimited in normal cases. Autofluorescence characteristic is differential diagnosis, prevalence rate of disease is unknown. Isospora: This

  6. Blood Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jickling, Glen C; Sharp, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    .... Though many candidate blood based biomarkers for ischemic stroke have been identified, none are currently used in clinical practice. With further well designed study and careful validation, the development of blood biomarkers to improve the care of patients with ischemic stroke may be achieved.

  7. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  8. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Ischemic hepatitis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squella, Freddy; Zapata, Rodrigo

    2003-06-01

    Ischemic hepatitis or shock liver is defined as an extensive hepatocellular necrosis associated with a decrease in hepatic perfusion due to systemic hypotension. Serum aminotransferase levels (ALAT and ASAT) increase rapidly after the ischemic episode and peak within 1 to 3 days to at least 20 times the upper normal limit. After recovery, aminotransferases return to near normal levels in 7-10 days of the initial insult. Histological it is characterized by centrolobular necrosis without inflammation. We report a 47 years old woman with a rheumatic mitral valve disease, atrial fibrillation on anticoagulation and congestive heart failure. She was admitted due to a rapid auricular arrhythmia and secondary severe hypotension. She developed rapidly progressive jaundice (bilirubin up to 8.9 mg/dl) and her aminotransferases (ALAT and ASAT) increased rapidly to levels near 100 times the upper normal limit. Other causes of liver disease were excluded. With hemodynamic support and after heart rate control she improved rapidly within the following 10 days with normalization of liver function tests and complete clinical recovery.

  10. Microecology, intestinal epithelial barrier and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Renu; Tepas, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Soon after birth, the neonatal intestine is confronted with a massive antigenic challenge of microbial colonization. Microbial signals are required for maturation of several physiological, anatomical, and biochemical functions of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) after birth. Commensal bacteria regulate intestinal innate and adaptive immunity and provide stimuli for ongoing repair and restitution of IEB. Colonization by pathogenic bacteria and/or dysmature response to microbial stimuli can result in flagrant inflammatory response as seen in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Characterized by inflammation and hemorrhagic-ischemic necrosis, NEC is a devastating complication of prematurity. Although there is evidence that both prematurity and presence of bacteria, are proven contributing factors to the pathogenesis of NEC, the molecular mechanisms involved in IEB dysfunction associated with NEC have begun to emerge only recently. The metagenomic advances in the field of intestinal microecology are providing insight into the factors that are required for establishment of commensal bacteria that appear to provide protection against intestinal inflammation and NEC. Perturbations in achieving colonization by commensal bacteria such as premature birth or hospitalization in intensive care nursery can result in dysfunction of IEB and NEC. In this article, microbial modulation of functions of IEB and its relationship with barrier dysfunction and NEC are described.

  11. Amyloidosis of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kala, Zdenek [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: zkala@tiscali.cz; Valek, Vlastimil [Department of Radiology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Kysela, Petr [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: pkysel@email.cz

    2007-07-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease characterized by forming pathological protein deposits - amyloid - in many organs and tissues. This decreases their functionality. The aim of this small study was to determine, whether the radiological picture of the small intestine involvement in amyloidosis is in some sense specific as sometimes described in literature giving rise to high suspicion for the disease in symptomatic patients. Material and methods: The prospective study comprising seven patients hospitalized in surgical department is presented together with a survey on the disease, its appearance in radiological imaging. All patients underwent abdominal ultrasound (ATL 5000 HDI, 7-12 MHz linear probe, no contrast enhancement, supine position), abdominal CT (Somatom Plus, Siemens, single detector, conventional abdominal CT protocol) and enteroclysis (Micropaque suspension 300 ml, application rate of 75 ml/min, dilution with HP-7000 being 1:1 and HP-7000 solution 2000 ml, application rate of 120 ml/min.). Results: The amyloid deposits in the small intestine could be visualized in five of seven patients with the disease. Enteroclysis revealed a diffuse slowed down intestinal motility with an obstruction-like picture in all of our seven patients. The intestinal secretion was normal, plicae were getting polyp-like shape in five of them forming so called 'thumb printing' picture. CT showed thickening of the intestinal wall due to deposits with poor blood supply and contrast retention in five of seven patients. Ultrasound visualized thickened, hypoechoic nodular plicae and slowed down motility in these five patients. The most striking finding was the pathological deposits in the intestinal wall were highly hypo-vascular. However, this picture is very similar to that of ischemic enteritis. All seven patients had proven amyloid deposits from bioptic specimens. Conclusion: The diagnosis of amyloidosis must be supported by bioptic examination as it has no pathognomic

  12. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  13. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  14. Usefulness of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for the diagnosis of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI): Assessment of morphology and diameter of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) on multi-planar reconstructed (MPR) images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhams, Reiko, E-mail: reikow@hotmail.co.j [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Nishimaki, Hiroshi, E-mail: emgrad@yhb.att.ne.j [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Emergency Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 228-8555 (Japan); Fujii, Kaoru, E-mail: kaorufujii@yahoo.co.j [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Kakita, Satoko, E-mail: skakita@kitasato-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige, E-mail: hayakazu@med.kitasato-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for the diagnosis of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) by analyzing morphology and diameter of superior mesenteric artery (SMA). We assessed whether MDCT was as useful as angiography for the diagnosis of NOMI. Materials and methods: Four patients who were diagnosed with NOMI were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had 8-row MDCT followed by laparotomy. Two of them underwent angiography after MDCT. The morphology and diameter of SMA of these cases was analyzed on multi-planar reconstructed (MPR) images. The mean diameter of SMA of NOMI cases was compared to that of 13 control cases. Results: MPR images of all NOMI cases showed irregular narrowing of the SMA, spasm of the arcades of SMA, and poor demonstration of intramural vessels. MPR images of two patients who had angiography were concordant with their angiograms. The mean diameter of SMA of NOMI patients was 3.4 {+-} 1.1 mm, which was statistically smaller than that of 13 control patients, 6.0 {+-} 1.5 mm (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank sum tests). Conclusion: Angiography has been recognized essential for the diagnosis of NOMI. This study shows the possibility of MDCT to be an equivalently useful modality compared to angiography for the diagnosis of NOMI by interpreting morphologic appearance and diameter of SMA. Introduction of MDCT in the decision tree of NOMI treatment may bring the benefit of prompt diagnosis and subsequent early and efficient initiation of therapy, which may improve the mortality.

  15. Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Let's Talk About Ischemic Stroke Updated:Dec 9,2015 The majority of strokes ... Should I Limit Sodium? How Do I Understand "Nutrition Facts" Labels? How Can I Quit Smoking? How ...

  16. Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, J.; Luijckx, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decennium, thrombolytic therapy has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. Randomized clinical studies have demonstrated that intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator improves functional outcomes. Recently the time window for intravenous thrombolysis has been

  17. Cryoglobulins in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, L. A.; Ayvazyan, V. A.; Boyajyan, A. S.

    Cryoglobulins (Cgs) are pathogenic immune complexes, non specific markers of the inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In this study we for the first time, revealed Cgs in the blood of ischemic stroke patients and analyze their composition.

  18. Malacoplaquia intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto José Frem Aun

    Full Text Available Malacoplakia is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown origin. However immunodeficiency states (immunossuppressive medication, old people, renal transplantation, leukaemia, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition and others have been associated with patients with malacoplakia. An infectious cause of malakoplakia is suggested by the finding of coliform bacteria in the phagolysosomes of macrophages. The histologic study is characterized by a infiltrate of large macrophages (Hansenmann cells with pathognomonic inclusions containing siderocalcific structures (Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Most of the cases reported in literature, involve the genitourinary tract, but other structures can be affected (brain, bone, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, intestine, and others. A 66-year-old man whith a abdominal mass, went to our hospital with a colonic tumour diagnosis. The patient was submitted to a surgery, with resection of the rigth colon. The disease was invading a portion of the retroperitoneal tissue that was removed. The histopatologic study showed the pathognomonic sign of malakoplakia (Hansenmann cells and Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Norfloxacin have been used to the complementar treatment with total cure of the patient.

  19. Effect of acute mesenteric ischemia on rat small intestinal contractility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    bath containing physiological Krebs solution. Luminal pressure and intestinal diameter changes were obtained for (i) basic contractions, (ii) flow-induced contractions with different outlet resistance pressures, and (iii) contractions induced by ramp distension. Contraction frequency and amplitude were......Objective: Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) accounts for 1–2% of gastrointestinal illnesses. This study investigated changes of intestinal motility in relation to time-dependent exposure to AMI. Methods: After anesthesia with Hypnorm and Dormicum, a midline laparotomy incision was made in 40 male...... Wistar rats. A segment of middle jejunum was made ischemic by ligating five mesenteric arterial branches to the segment. The ischemic period lasted for 15, 30, 60, and 120 min with 10 rats in each group. Another 10 rats were used as normal controls. The motility experiments were carried out in an organ...

  20. [Intestinal and colonic ischaemia in the surgery of subdiaphragmatic aorta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tealdi, D G; Casana, R; Nano, G

    2004-01-01

    Ischemic colitis resulting in colonic infarction after aortic reconstruction is a highly lethal complication. The etiology and pathogenesis of this condition demonstrate that in many instances it may be prevented. Early recognition, particularly of the transmural ischemic injury is essential. Numerous techniques used during surgery for assessing the adequacy of colonic perfusion have been evaluated and found to be inaccurate in terms of predicting colonic ischemia. The purpose of this study is to assess the main monitoring technique for prediction of ischemic colitis during aortic surgery as: colonic mesenteric Doppler signal, inferior mesenteric arteries stump pressure, sigmoidal intramucosal pH and measurement of mucosal capillary haemoglobin oxygen saturation by reflectance spectrophotometry. A 15-year experience with 1912 patients undergoing abdominal aortic reconstruction was reviewed to determined both the incidence of intestinal ischemia and the clinical anatomic, and technical factors associated with this complication of aortic surgery

  1. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  2. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  3. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible residue of food. The ileocecal valve of the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the ...

  4. Intestinal ischemia and infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001151.htm Small intestinal ischemia and infarction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intestinal ischemia and infarction occurs when there is a narrowing ...

  5. Pathogenic mechanisms following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnam, Seyed Esmaeil; Winlow, William; Farzaneh, Maryam; Farbood, Yaghoob; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi

    2017-07-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and the leading cause of disability worldwide. Brain injury following stroke results from a complex series of pathophysiological events including excitotoxicity, oxidative and nitrative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Moreover, there is a mechanistic link between brain ischemia, innate and adaptive immune cells, intracranial atherosclerosis, and also the gut microbiota in modifying the cerebral responses to ischemic insult. There are very few treatments for stroke injuries, partly owing to an incomplete understanding of the diverse cellular and molecular changes that occur following ischemic stroke and that are responsible for neuronal death. Experimental discoveries have begun to define the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in stroke injury, leading to the development of numerous agents that target various injury pathways. In the present article, we review the underlying pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and reveal the intertwined pathways that are promising therapeutic targets.

  6. Salvia miltiorrhiza and ischemic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yan JI; Benny K-H TAN; Yi-Zhun ZHU

    2000-01-01

    The demonstration of beneficial effects of salvia miltiorrhiza (DanShen) on ischemic diseases has revolutionized the management of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke in Chinese society. Experimental studies have shown that DanShen dilated coronary arteries, increased coronary blood flow, and scavenged free radicals in ischemic diseases, so that it reduced the cellular damage from ischemia and improved heart functions. Clinical trials also indicated that DanShen was an effective medicine for angina pectoris, MI, and stroke. This review will focus on DanShen's effects in angina pectoris, MI and stroke.

  7. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  8. Vertebrate intestinal endoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Jason R; Lauf, Ryan; Shroyer, Noah F

    2011-03-01

    The endoderm gives rise to the lining of the esophagus, stomach and intestines, as well as associated organs. To generate a functional intestine, a series of highly orchestrated developmental processes must occur. In this review, we attempt to cover major events during intestinal development from gastrulation to birth, including endoderm formation, gut tube growth and patterning, intestinal morphogenesis, epithelial reorganization, villus emergence, as well as proliferation and cytodifferentiation. Our discussion includes morphological and anatomical changes during intestinal development as well as molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Advances in understanding ischemic acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmelfarb Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Ischemia is the leading cause of AKI, and short of supportive measures, no currently available therapy can effectively treat or prevent ischemic AKI. This paper discusses recent developments in the understanding of ischemic AKI pathophysiology, the emerging relationship between ischemic AKI and development of progressive chronic kidney disease, and promising novel therapies currently under investigation. On the basis of recent breakthroughs in understanding the pathophysiology of ischemic AKI, therapies that can treat or even prevent ischemic AKI may become a reality in the near future.

  10. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...

  11. Neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, Jacques; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Elting, Jan Willem; Sulter, Geert; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert Jan

    2005-01-01

    Neuroprotection of patients with acute ischemic stroke should start at the scene and continue in the ambulance with the assessment and treatment of the airway, breathing, circulation, body temperature, and blood glucose. The key goal in eligible patients should be fast vessel recanalization with int

  12. Ischemic glans penis after circumcision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-ShengTzeng; Shou-HungTang; EnMeng; Teng-FuLin; Guang-HuanSun

    2004-01-01

    A 33-year-old male receiving dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) for circumcision exhibited a postoperative ischemic change over the glans penis. The event occurred nearly 24 hours after the procedure. The patient was treated with intravenous pentoxifyllin and hyperbaric oxygenation. Total reverse of the ischemia was observed. The complications associated with circumcision and DPNB were reviewed and discussed.

  13. Bowel obstruction as a result of ischemic colitis: Review of literature with contribution of one case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyko Koroukov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ischemic colitis is comparatively rare disease. In most of the cases it has indistinctive clinical picture and its diagnosis requires persistence in performing of the diagnostic procedures. In very rare cases it can manifest with some of its complications, mucous membrane hemorrhage or subileus symptoms. We present a case of a male patient at the age of 64, who was operated on the occasion of intestinal obstruction, which developed as a result of ischemic colitis in the sigmoid colon region, complicated with stenosis. The consequent two-step surgery led to patient’s health recovery in the three-year period of follow-up.

  14. Jejunum ileal intestinal atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio J. Puente Fonseca

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal atresia is one of the most important causes of intestinal obstruction in newborn. They constitute aorund 95% of total intestinal obstructions in this age group. Most of intestinal atresias are jejunoieal atresia. Although it is not frequent their relationship with other congenital anomalies, has been described the association in some cases with defects of intestine rotation, meconium peritonitis, with meconium ileus and rarely with the Hirschsprung diseases. The hereditary character has also been described in certain multiple intestinal atresias. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Jejunoileal atresia, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  15. Intestinal M cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer's patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions.

  16. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  17. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  18. Risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in patients under age 50

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.W.M.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Janssen, M.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in young adults under the age of 50. To make recommendations for additional research and practical consequences. From 97 patients with ischemic stroke or TIA under the age of 50, classical cardiovascular risk factors, co

  19. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, R.R.; Borst, J.; Lucas, M.; Boers, A.M.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Roos, Y.B.; Walderveen, M.A. van; Jenniskens, S.F.M.; Zwam, W.H. van; Dippel, D.W.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to

  20. Neuromodulation of intestinal inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costes, L.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system have been shown to exert a crucial role in the tight regulation of the immune response in the intestine. In particular, the vagus nerve was recently unraveled as an important player in this neuromodulation of intestinal inflammati

  1. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and/or pro...

  2. Effect of glutamate on inflammatory responses of intestine and brain after focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Jie Sun; Ran Lu; Qing Ji; Jian-Guo Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the modulation of glutamate on post-ischemic intestinal and cerebral inflammatory responses in a ischemic and excitotoxic rat model.METHODS: Adult male rats were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min and injection of monosodium glutamate intraperitoneally, to decapitate them at selected time points. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively.Hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously during the whole process of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.RESULTS: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) treated rats displayed statistically significant high levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissuess within the first 6 h of ischemia. The rats with cerebral ischemia showed a minor decrease of TNF-α production in cerebral and intestinal tissuess. The rats with cerebral ischemia and treated with MSG displayed statistically significant low levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissues. These results correlated significantly with NF-κB production calculated at the same intervals. During experiment, the mean blood pressure and heart rates in all groups were stable.CONCLUSION: Glutamate is involved in the mechanism of intestinal and cerebral inflammation responses. The effects of glutamate on cerebral and intestinal inflammatory responses after ischemia are up-regulated at the transcriptional level,through the NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

  3. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  4. Effect of firocoxib or flunixin meglumine on recovery of ischemic-injured equine jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Vanessa L; Meyer, Colleen T; Campbell, Nigel B; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2009-08-01

    To determine whether treatment of horses with firocoxib affects recovery of ischemic-injured jejunum, while providing effective analgesia. 18 horses. Horses (n = 6 horses/group) received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (1 mL/50 kg, IV), flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 12 h), or firocoxib (0.09 mg/kg, IV, q 24 h) before 2 hours of jejunal ischemia. Horses were monitored via pain scores and received butorphanol for analgesia. After 18 hours, ischemic-injured and control mucosa were placed in Ussing chambers for measurement of transepithelial resistance and permeability to lipopolysaccharide. Histomorphometry was used to determine denuded villus surface area. Western blots for cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 were performed. Plasma thromboxane B(2) and prostaglandin E(2) metabolite (PGEM) concentrations were determined. Pain scores did not significantly increase after surgery in horses receiving flunixin meglumine or firocoxib. Transepithelial resistance of ischemic-injured jejunum from horses treated with flunixin meglumine was significantly lower than in saline- or firocoxib-treated horses. Lipopolysaccharide permeability across ischemic-injured mucosa was significantly increased in horses treated with flunixin meglumine. Treatment did not affect epithelial restitution. Cyclooxygenase-1 was constitutively expressed and COX-2 was upregulated after 2 hours of ischemia. Thromboxane B(2) concentration decreased with flunixin meglumine treatment but increased with firocoxib or saline treatment. Flunixin meglumine and firocoxib prevented an increase in PGEM concentration after surgery. Flunixin meglumine retarded mucosal recovery in ischemic-injured jejunum, whereas firocoxib did not. Flunixin meglumine and firocoxib were effective visceral analgesics. Firocoxib may be advantageous in horses recovering from ischemic intestinal injury.

  5. Intestinal invagination Invaginación intestinal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayamnelys Aguilar Atanay

    Full Text Available Intestinal intussusceptions are the most frequent cause of acute surgical occlusive syndrome in infants; it is idiopathic in more than 90% of cases. Their treatment can be conservative, with reduction by means of imaging and hydrostatic procedures, or surgical. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Intestinal intussusceptions, approved by consensus in the 3th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Camagüey, Cuba; February 23 – 26, 2004.
    La invaginación intestinal es la causa más frecuente del síndrome de abdomen agudo quirúrgico oclusivo en lactantes y es idiopática en más del 90 % de los casos. Su tratamiento puede ser conservador, con reducción mediante procedimientos hidrostáticos combinados con vigilancia imaginológica, o quirúrgico. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para invaginación intestinal, aprobada por consenso en el 3er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Camagüey, 23 al 26 de febrero de 2004.

  6. Mycotoxins and the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Broom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biochemical pathways can yield various compounds that are not considered to be necessary for their growth and are thus referred to as secondary metabolites. These compounds have been found to have wide ranging biological effects and include potent poisons (mycotoxins. Mycotoxins invariably contaminate crops and (thus animal feeds. The intestine is the key link between ingested mycotoxins and their detrimental effects on the animal. Effects on the intestine, or intestinal environment, and immune system have been reported with various mycotoxins. These effects are almost certainly occurring across species. Most, if not all, of the reported effects of mycotoxins are negative in terms of intestinal health, for example, decreased intestinal cell viability, reductions in short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentrations and elimination of beneficial bacteria, increased expression of genes involved in promoting inflammation and counteracting oxidative stress. This challenge to intestinal health will predispose the animal to intestinal (and systemic infections and impair efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients, with the associated effect on animal productivity.

  7. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...... chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression...

  8. Remote Ischemic Conditioning: Its Benefits and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloner, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    This editorial describes benefits and limitations of remote ischemic conditioning. Remote ischemic conditioning was shown to reduce myocardial intact size in at least 4 sizeable clinical trials of acute myocardial infarction. It was not effective in recent studies of cardiac surgery. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

  9. Genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research described in this thesis was to investigate the role of genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke. We therefore performed several retrospective studies and one prospective case-control study of patients with recent ischemic stroke (the COCOS

  10. Persistent cognitive impairment after transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, F.G. van; Schaapsmeerders, P.; Maaijwee, N.A.; Duijnhoven, D.A. van; Leeuw, F.E. de; Kessels, R.P.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: By definition, the symptoms of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) subside completely within 24 hours. Imaging studies show signs of persistent ischemic tissue damage in a substantial amount of patients with TIA. Cerebral infarction can cause permanent cognitive impairment. Whe

  11. Persistent Cognitive Impairment After Transient Ischemic Attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, F.G. van; Schaapsmeerders, P.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Duijnhoven, D.A. van; de Leeuw, F.E.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose—By definition, the symptoms of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) subside completely within 24 hours. Imaging studies show signs of persistent ischemic tissue damage in a substantial amount of patients with TIA. Cerebral infarction can cause permanent cognitive impairment. Whet

  12. Persimmon leaf flavonoid promotes brain ischemic tolerance**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsan Miao; Xuexia Zhang; Ming Bai; Linan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Persimmon leaf flavonoid has been shown to enhance brain ischemic tolerance in mice, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The bilateral common carotid arteries were occluded using a micro clip to block blood flow for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes of ischemic preconditioning, 200, 100, and 50 mg/kg persimmon leaf flavonoid or 20 mg/kg ginaton was intragastrical y administered per day for 5 days. At 1 hour after the final administration, ischemia/reperfusion models were estab-lished by blocking the middle cerebral artery for 2 hours. At 24 hours after model establishment, compared with cerebral ischemic rats without ischemic preconditioning or drug intervention, plasma endothelin, thrombomodulin and von Wil ebrand factor levels significantly decreased and intercel-lular adhesion molecule-1 expression markedly reduced in brain tissue from rats with ischemic pre-conditioning. Simultaneously, brain tissue injury reduced. Ischemic preconditioning combined with drug exposure noticeably improved the effects of the above-mentioned indices, and the effects of 200 mg/kg persimmon leaf flavonoid were similar to 20 mg/kg ginaton treatment. These results indicate that ischemic preconditioning produces tolerance to recurrent severe cerebral ischemia. However, persimmon leaf flavonoid can elevate ischemic tolerance by reducing inflammatory reactions and vascular endothelial injury. High-dose persimmon leaf flavonoid showed an identical effect to ginaton.

  13. [Acute ischemic proctitis following an epileptic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klintmann, C.K.; Hillingso, J.G.; Glenthøj, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Acute ischemic proctitis is a rare diagnosis mainly because the rectum is supplied by an extensive arterial network. Consequently, in more than 90% of patients with ischemic colitis the rectum is spared. Previously reported cases are related to severe vascular insufficiency of the rectal circulat......Acute ischemic proctitis is a rare diagnosis mainly because the rectum is supplied by an extensive arterial network. Consequently, in more than 90% of patients with ischemic colitis the rectum is spared. Previously reported cases are related to severe vascular insufficiency of the rectal...... circulation caused by systemic atherosclerosis, usually following aortic or aortoiliac operations. We report one case of acute ischemic proctitis following an epileptic attack Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/29...

  14. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, F.

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane

  15. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  16. Morbidity predictors in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although ischemic CVA is one of the leading causes for death and disability, parameters for predicting long-term outcome in such patients have not been clearly delineated, especially in the Indian context. Methods: A prospective hospital-based study of 105 patients of ischemic stroke, focal neurological deficits and functional score was assessed and the C-reactive protein level (CRP was measured. A follow-up was done at 5 days and at 6 months and outcome variable was the functional status at 6 months using Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Accordingly, patients were grouped into 3 - Barthel Index < 41: Severely disabled, Barthel Index 41-60: Moderately disabled and Barthel Index > 60: Mildly disabled. Results: At admission, if upper limb power was less than Medical Research Council (MRC grade 4, or aphasia was present or CRP assay was positive, then at 6 months, these patients most likely belonged to the severely disabled group. If upper limb or lower limb power was greater than MRC grade 3 or there was no aphasia or conjugate gaze deviation or CRP assay was negative, these patients most likely belonged to the mildly disabled group at 6 months. Follow-up rate was 86%. Conclusion: Patients can be stratified according to the predicted prognosis. The treatment and rehabilitation can be properly planned and strictly adhered to in patients predicted to have worse prognosis.

  17. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the small intestine during an upper GI endoscopy. Biopsy A gastroenterologist can obtain a biopsy of the ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  18. Intestinal failure in childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    citrulline levels are predictive of intestinal recovery, or not, remains to be confirmed. ... GI secretions, salivary Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) release and gallbladder .... This cause of neonatal diarrhoea requires permanent PN. However,.

  19. Small intestine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  20. The intestinal stem cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to

  1. Mechanism of acute pancreatitis complicated with injury of intestinal mucosa barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common acute abdomen in clinic with a rapid onset and dangerous pathogenetic condition.AP can cause an injury of intestinal mucosa barrier, leading to translocation of bacteria or endotoxin through multiple routes,bacterial translocation (BT), gutorigin endotoxaemia, and secondary infection of pancreatic tissue, and then cause systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), which are important factors influencing AP's severity and mortality. Meanwhile, the injury of intestinal mucosa barrier plays a key role in AP's process. Therefore, it is clinically important to study the relationship between the injury of intestinal mucosa barrier and AP. In addition, many factors such as microcirculation disturbance, ischemical reperfusion injury, excessive release of inflammatory mediators and apoptosis may also play important roles in the damage of intestinal mucosa barrier. In this review, we summarize studies on mechanisms of AP.

  2. Effects of lazaroids on intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessas, Ioannis I; Papalois, Apostolos E; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Zagouri, Flora; Zografos, George C

    2011-04-01

    Mesenteric ischemia occurs in a number of clinically relevant pathophysiologic processes, including sepsis, hemorrhage, intestinal transplantation, severe burns, and mesenteric thrombosis. The readmission of molecular oxygen into an ischemic tissue promotes the oxidation of resuscitated tissue with certain pathophysiologic mechanisms. Depending on the duration and the intensity of ischemia, reoxygenation of the intestine that has been reperfused may further induce tissue injury. Intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury can accelerate complex processes between the endothelium and different cell types leading to microvascular injury, cellular necrosis, and apoptosis. The injury due to reperfusion is found predominantly in the intestinal mucosa and submucosa, causing endothelial detachment. The 21-aminosteroids (lazaroids) are a family of compounds that inhibit lipid membrane peroxidation. Many of the performed studies show conflicting results, which reflect differences in experimental design, evolving time that (I/R) is induced, total or partial vascular occlusion, dosage of the lazaroid, and the exact period of time that the lazaroid is administered.

  3. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Berni Canani; Margherita Di Costanzo; Ludovica Leone; Monica Pedata; Rosaria Meli; Antonio Calignano

    2011-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects on human health of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, synthesized from nonabsorbed carbohydrate by colonic microbiota, are well documented. At the intestinal level, butyrate plays a regulatory role on the transepithelial fluid transport,ameliorates mucosal inflammation and oxidative status,reinforces the epithelial defense barrier, and modulates visceral sensitivity and intestinal motility. In addition,a growing number of studies have stressed the role of butyrate in the prevention and inhibition of colorectal cancer. At the extraintestinal level, butyrate exerts potentially useful effects on many conditions, including hemoglobinopathies, genetic metabolic diseases,hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, and ischemic stroke. The mechanisms of action of butyrate are different;many of these are related to its potent regulatory effects on gene expression. These data suggest a wide spectrum of positive effects exerted by butyrate, with a high potential for a therapeutic use in human medicine.

  4. Ischemic preconditioning reduces ischemic brain injury by suppressing nuclear factor kappa B expression and neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songsheng Shi; Weizhong Yang; Xiankun Tu; Chunmei Chen; Chunhua Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke induces a series of complex pathophysiological events including blood-brain barrier disruption, inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrate that ischemic preconditioning attenuates ischemic brain damage via inhibiting blood-brain barrier disruption and the inflammatory response. Rats underwent transient (15 minutes) occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery with 48 hours of reperfusion, and were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. This study explored whether ischemic preconditioning could reduce ischemic brain injury and relevant molecular mechanisms by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. Results found that at 72 hours following cerebral ischemia, myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced, malondialdehyde levels increased, and neurological function was obviously damaged. Simultaneously, neuronal apoptosis increased, and nuclear factor-κB and cleaved caspase-3 expression was significantly increased in ischemic brain tissues. Ischemic preconditioning reduced the cerebral ischemia-induced inflammatory response, lipid peroxidation, and neurological function injury. In addition, ischemic preconditioning decreased nuclear factor-κB p65 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. These results suggested that ischemic preconditioning plays a protective effect against ischemic brain injury by suppressing the inflammatory response, reducing lipid peroxidation, and neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and cleaved caspase-3 expression.

  5. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (Pcentral vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  6. Immune mechanisms in cerebral ischemic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia eGarcia-Bonilla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stressor-induced tolerance is a central mechanism in the response of bacteria, plants, and animals to potentially harmful environmental challenges. This response is characterized by immediate changes in cellular metabolism and by the delayed transcriptional activation or inhibition of genetic programs that are not generally stressor specific (cross-tolerance. These programs are aimed at countering the deleterious effects of the stressor. While induction of this response (preconditioning can be established at the cellular level, activation of systemic networks is essential for the protection to occur throughout the organs of the body. This is best signified by the phenomenon of remote ischemic preconditioning, whereby application of ischemic stress to one tissue or organ induces ischemic tolerance in remote organs through humoral, cellular and neural signaling. The immune system is an essential component in cerebral ischemic tolerance acting simultaneously both as mediator and target. This dichotomy is based on the fact that activation of inflammatory pathways is necessary to establish ischemic tolerance and that ischemic tolerance can be, in part, attributed to a subdued immune activation after index ischemia. Here we describe the components of the immune system required for induction of ischemic tolerance and review the mechanisms by which a reprogrammed immune response contributes to the neuroprotection observed after preconditioning. Learning how local and systemic immune factors participate in endogenous neuroprotection could lead to the development of new stroke therapies.

  7. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph R E G Geuskens

    Full Text Available CT perfusion (CTP is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up.This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0. Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT regions. False discovery ratio (FDR, defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests.Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml; median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml. Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%. Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289% and 342% (IQR:249%-432% for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43-1.79 ml/100g (P<0.01 and 1.38 (IQR:1.15-1.49 ml/100g (P<0.01 for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly.For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core is misclassified. CTP parameters significantly

  8. The intestine is a blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  9. Unilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin, which is sensitive to blue light. Previous chromatic pupillometry studies have shown that the post-illumination response is considered an indicator of the melanopsin activation. The aim......-affected eyes, compared with the non-affected fellow eyes, suggesting dysfunction of the ipRGCs. Compared with the responses of the healthy controls, the blue light post-illumination pupil responses were similar in the affected eyes and increased in the fellow non-affected eyes. This suggests a possible...... of this study was to investigate the ipRGC mediated pupil response in patients with a unilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Consensual pupil responses during and after exposure to continuous 20 s blue (470 nm) or red (660 nm) light of high intensity (300 cd/m(2)) were recorded...

  10. Ischemic heart disease in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Iraklianou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease has long been recognized as the leading cause of death among middle-aged men and an equally important cause of death and disability among older women. Women with acute ischemic syndromes tend to be older than men with such syndromes. This is considered to be attributed to the protective effects of female ovarian sex hormones. Estrogen express an antiatherogenic profile via mechanisms that cause favorable modifications of lipoprotein levels, coagulation and fibrolytic system and alterations in the wall of vessels that cause vasodilation. Women are susceptible to coronary heart disease because of differences in the anatomy and physiology of their vessels. Women's coronary arteries are smaller and have more diffuse disease than men's. Ischemia can be induced in women without flow limiting stenosis because of endothelial dysfunction or coronary spasm. Usually, the way of manifestation of the disease and ECG abnormalities are not typical in women. Female patients usually delay to seek treatment for their symptoms .The way of evaluation and treatment is usually conservative in women than male counterparts. The diagnosis of the disease is overestimated in men and the treatment is more often invasive, even in the category of low risk. Reversely, women of high risk are less likely to undergo a full assessment and invasive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions are seldom. Recommendations of the American Heart Association for ischemic heart disease in women are in accordance to alterations in the way of life interventions in major risk factors such as arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, preventive use of medications and drugs that are not recommended. In this category of medications belong hormone replacement therapy (HRT.The last is not recommended for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in women.

  11. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute is...... ischemic stroke. The method offers a low cost and noninvasive tool for future clinical interventional physiotherapeutic and early mobilization studies. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01560520....

  12. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population. METHODS: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen...... City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...... were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend ≤ 2 × 10(-3) ). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  13. Bacterial pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fu Chen

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: Pneumonia after acute ischemic stroke is a severe complication. Once stroke-related pneumonia develops, neurologic assessment, CURB-65 score, and shock can be used to predict the ultimate prognosis.

  14. ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, α-Lipoic acid, Cerebral infarct area, Edema, Antioxidants,. Inflammatory markers .... were then moved back to their respective dams and immediately ..... various pro-inflammatory cytokines is stimulated.

  15. Modifiable risk factors for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Gianoulakis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death after cardiac disease and cancer in the developed countries. In patients older than 65 years old, ischemic stroke is one of the main causes of disability. They are also responsible for approximately 4.5 million deaths each year globally.The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.The method οf this study included bibliographic research from both reviews and researches from literature, mainly of the last 8 years. The words used in pub med data base, referred to the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.Results: In the majority of research studies, responsible risk factors for ischemic stroke are classified according to their ability of modification, in modifiable and non–modifiable risk factors. Some of the modifiable risk factors have been fully documented whereas some others need further research. The main modifiable risk factor is hypertension because on the one hand it promotes atherosclerosis and, on the other hand, leads to deteriorative changes and constrictions of small brain vessels. Atrial fibrillation is the most significant risk factor for ischemic stroke, since it is responsible for more than 50% of thromboembolic cases. Also, patients with diabetes mellitus are in higher risk for developing ischemic stroke compared to healthy population, whereas the danger is increasing in insuline-depented individuals. Increase of lipids in blood and disorders of cholesterol are responsible for atherosclerosis in coronary vessels and carotid. More in detail, carotid stenosis >50% in individuals over than 65 years old consist a significant risk factor for ischemic stroke. Though, the relation of smoking to ischemic stroke is still not fully understood, however smokers are in high risk for developing ischemic stroke for the reason that smoking is significantly related to

  16. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome.

  17. Pediatric intestinal leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Amit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports an infant presenting with leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine. The patient presented with intermittent abdominal pain. Examination revealed a hard and mobile intraperitoneal mass. The tumor arose from the mid-ileum with regional lymphadenopathy. Excision of the tumor along with the involved bowel was performed followed by three cycles of chemotherapy. Histological diagnosis was that of a low-grade malignant leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine. Surgical excision was followed by three cycles of chemotherapy. After surgery and three cycles of chemotherapy, the patient was followed up for four years with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Surgery followed by chemotherapy was curative for leiomyosarcoma in our patient. Intestinal leiomyosarcoma should be kept as a differential diagnosis for mobile solid intraabdominal tumors in childhood.

  18. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  19. Gallstones: an intestinal disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Erpecum, K J; Van Berge-Henegouwen, G P

    1999-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that impaired intestinal motility may facilitate gallstone formation by influencing biliary deoxycholate levels or by modulating interdigestive gall bladder motility (fig 2), although a primary intestinal defect in gallstone pathogenesis has not yet been demonstrated. In the cold war period, most interesting events, from a political point of view, occurred at the border between capitalist and communist systems, near the iron curtain. Similarly, the gall bladder and biliary tract can be viewed as the border between liver and intestinal tract, where many interesting things occur with profound impact on both systems. Combined efforts by researchers in the field of hepatology and gastrointestinal motility should brake down the Berlin wall of ignorance of one of the most common diseases in the Western world.

  20. Neural Stem Cells and Ischemic Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, ZhengGang; Chopp, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Stroke activates neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) of the lateral ventricle, which increases neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Within the ischemic brain, neural stem cells, neuroblasts and OPCs appear to actively communicate with cerebral endothelial cells and other brain parenchymal cells to mediate ischemic brain repair; however, stroke-induced neurogenesis unlikely plays any significant roles in neuronal replacement. In this mini-review...

  1. The Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Stephen S

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular basis for the genetic risk of ischemic stroke is likely to be multigenic and influenced by environmental factors. Several small case-control studies have suggested associations between ischemic stroke and polymorphisms of genes that code for coagulation cascade proteins and platelet receptors. Our aim is to investigate potential associations between hemostatic gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke, with particular emphasis on detailed characterization of the phenotype. Methods/Design The Ischemic Stroke Genetic Study is a prospective, multicenter genetic association study in adults with recent first-ever ischemic stroke confirmed with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients are evaluated at academic medical centers in the United States and compared with sex- and age-matched controls. Stroke subtypes are determined by central blinded adjudication using standardized, validated mechanistic and syndromic classification systems. The panel of genes to be tested for polymorphisms includes β-fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein Ia, Iba, and IIb/IIIa. Immortalized cell lines are created to allow for time- and cost-efficient testing of additional candidate genes in the future. Discussion The study is designed to minimize survival bias and to allow for exploring associations between specific polymorphisms and individual subtypes of ischemic stroke. The data set will also permit the study of genetic determinants of stroke outcome. Having cell lines will permit testing of future candidate risk factor genes.

  2. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started.

  3. Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke after recent transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, María; Fuentes, Blanca; Masjuan, Jaime; Simal, Patricia; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Reig, Gemma; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Gil-Nuñez, Antonio; Vivancos, Jose; Egido, Jose-Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Safety and efficacy of intravenous thrombolysis in stroke patients with recent transient ischemic attack are hotly debated. Patients suffering transient ischemic attack may present with diffusion-weighted imaging lesions, and although normal computed tomography would not preclude thrombolysis, the concern is that they may be at higher risk for hemorrhage post-thrombolysis treatment. Prior ipsilateral transient ischemic attack might provide protection due to ischemic preconditioning. We assessed post-thrombolysis outcomes in stroke patients who had prior transient ischemic attack. Multicentered prospective study of consecutive acute stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Ipsilateral transient ischemic attack, baseline characteristics, risk factors, etiology, and time-lapse to treatment were recorded. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at seven-days and modified Rankin Scale at three-months, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and mortality were compared in patients with and without transient ischemic attack. There were 877 patients included, 60 (6·84%) had previous ipsilateral transient ischemic attack within one-month prior to the current stroke (65% in the previous 24 h). Transient ischemic attack patients were more frequently men (70% vs. 53%; P = 0·011), younger (63 vs. 71 years of age; P = 0·011), smokers (37% vs. 25%; P = 0·043), and with large vessel disease (40% vs. 25%; P = 0·011). Severity of stroke at onset was similar to those with and without prior transient ischemic attack (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 12 vs. 14 P = 0·134). Those with previous transient ischemic attack were treated earlier (117 ± 52 vs. 144 ± 38 mins; P ischemic attack was not associated with differences in stroke outcome such as independence (modified Rankin Scale 0-2) (odds ratios: 1·035 (0·57-1·93) P = 0·91), mortality (odds ratios: 0·99 (0·37-2·67) P = 0

  4. [Intestinal microbiocenosis in children with intestinal enzymopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilova, A T; Akhmedov, N N; Pulatova, D B; Nurmatov, B A

    2001-01-01

    141 children with different kinds of intestinal enzymopathy were examined; of these, 33 had celiac disease, 39--the syndrome of celiac disease, 12--congenital lactase deficiency and 57--the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency. In these patients a significant decrease in the average characteristics of the main protective flora and the growth of hemolytic and lactose-negative enterobacteria were established. In all groups of patients increased amounts of Proteus were detected, which was indicative of profound dysbiosis. The content of bifidobacteria was found to be decreased in 89.5-97% of the patients and the content of lactic acid bacteria, in 15.8-33.3%. The decreased content of Escherichia coli with normal enzymatic activity (less than 10(7) colony-forming units) was noted in one-third of the patients with the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency, in about a half of the patients with the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency and least of all in patients with celiac disease (9.1%). The association of opportunistic microbes was detected in 15.6% of the patients, more often in those with celiac disease, the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency. The severity of disturbances in intestinal eubiosis was found to depend on the gravity of the patients' state.

  5. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  6. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  7. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  8. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  9. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase may decrease intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and improve intestinal epithelial barrier function after ischemia- reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Yun Zheng; Xiao-Bing Fu; Jian-Guo Xu; Jing-Yu Zhao; Tong-Zhu Sun; Wei Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat small intestine after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)insult and the relationship between activation of p38 MAPK and apoptotic cell death of intestine.METHODS: Ninety Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups, namely sham-operated group (C), I/R vehicle group (R) and SB203580 pre-treated group(S).In groups R and S, the superior mesenteric artery(SMA)was separated and occluded for 45 min, then released for reperfusion for0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h. In group C, SMA was separated without occlusion. Plasma D-lactate levels were examined and histological changes were observed under a light microscope. The activity of p38 MAPK was determined by Western immunoblotting and apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUDP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL).RESULTS: Intestinal ischemia followed by reperfusion activated p38 MAPK, and the maximal level of activation (7.3-fold vs sham-operated group) was reached 30 min after I/R. Treatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor,reduced intestinal apoptosis (26.72±3.39% vs62.50±3.08%in I/R vehicle, P<0.01) and decreased plasma D-lactate level (0.78±0.15 mmol/L in I/R vehicle vs0.42±0.17 mmol/L in SB-treated group) and improved post-ischemic intestinal histological damage.CONCLUSION: p38 MAPK plays a crucial role in the signal transduction pathway mediating post-ischemic intestinal apoptosis, and inhibition of p38 MAPK may attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  10. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  11. Genetically elevated C-reactive protein and ischemic vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risks of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. Methods: We studied 10,276 persons from a general population cohort, including 1786 in whom...... ischemic heart disease developed and 741 in whom ischemic cerebrovascular disease developed. We examined another 31,992 persons from a cross-sectional general population study, of whom 2521 had ischemic heart disease and 1483 had ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we compared 2238 patients...... with ischemic heart disease with 4474 control subjects and 612 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease with 1224 control subjects. We measured levels of high-sensitivity CRP and conducted genotyping for four CRP polymorphisms and two apolipoprotein E polymorphisms. Results: The risk of ischemic heart...

  12. Occurrence and predictors of persistent impaired glucose tolerance after acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Fonville (Susanne); H.M. den Hertog (Heleen); A.A.M. Zandbergen (Adrienne); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); H.F. Lingsma (Hester)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Impaired glucose tolerance is often present in patients with a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke and doubles the risk of recurrent stroke. This impaired glucose tolerance can be transient, reflecting an acute stress response, or persistent, representing undiag

  13. The ischemic preconditioning effect of adenosine in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berglund Margareta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In vivo and in vitro evidence suggests that adenosine and its agonists play key roles in the process of ischemic preconditioning. The effects of low-dose adenosine infusion on ischemic preconditioning have not been thoroughly studied in humans. Aims We hypothesised that a low-dose adenosine infusion could reduce the ischemic burden evoked by physical exercise and improve the regional left ventricular (LV systolic function. Materials and methods We studied nine severely symptomatic male patients with severe coronary artery disease. Myocardial ischemia was induced by exercise on two separate occasions and quantified by Tissue Doppler Echocardiography. Prior to the exercise test, intravenous low-dose adenosine or placebo was infused over ten minutes according to a randomized, double blind, cross-over protocol. The LV walls were defined as ischemic if a reduction, no increment, or an increment of Results PSV increased from baseline to maximal exercise in non-ischemic walls both during placebo (P = 0.0001 and low-dose adenosine infusion (P = 0.0009. However, in the ischemic walls, PSV increased only during low-dose adenosine infusion (P = 0.001, while no changes in PSV occurred during placebo infusion (P = NS. Conclusion Low-dose adenosine infusion reduced the ischemic burden and improved LV regional systolic function in the ischemic walls of patients with exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, confirming that adenosine is a potential preconditioning agent in humans.

  14. Aging and the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Over the lifetime of the animal, there are many changes in the function of the body's organ systems. In the gastrointestinal tract there is a general modest decline in the function of the esophagus, stomach, colon,pancreas and liver. In the small intestine, there may be subtle alterations in the intestinal morphology, as well as a decline in the uptake of fatty acids and sugars.The malabsorption may be partially reversed by aging glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) or dexamethasone.Modifications in the type of lipids in the diet will influence the intestinal absorption of nutrients: for example, in mature rats a diet enriched with saturated as compared with polysaturated fatty acids will enhance lipid and sugar uptake, whereas in older animals the opposite effect is observed. Thus, the results of studies of the intestinal adaptation performed in mature rats does not necessarily apply in older animals. The age-associated malabsorption of nutrients that occurs with aging may be one of the several factors which contribute to the malnutrition that occurs with aging.

  15. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increases with the duration and severity of the disease. A link between colorectal cancer and Crohn’s disease is less strong, but it applies more to ... usually effective in the replacement of nutrients. BILE SALT DIARRHEA ... in Crohn’s disease. This is the principal area for intestinal absorption ...

  16. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Lei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO. METHODS: Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26 and non-ischemic (n=24 groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS: In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%, instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%, showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5% in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05. The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION: Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO.

  17. Interaction between food components, intestinal microbiota and intestinal mucosa as a function of intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Sandt, H. van de

    2003-01-01

    Interaction between food components, intestinal microbiota and intestinal mucosa was studied as a function of intestinal health. A microbiota was found to be important for the onset and progression of inflammatory diseases. Studies revealed a prominent effect of micro-organisms on the gene expressio

  18. Critical care in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M; Jacobs, T; Morgenstern, L

    2017-01-01

    Most ischemic strokes are managed on the ward or on designated stroke units. A significant proportion of patients with ischemic stroke require more specialized care. Several studies have shown improved outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke when neurocritical care services are available. Features of acute ischemic stroke patients requiring intensive care unit-level care include airway or respiratory compromise; large cerebral or cerebellar hemisphere infarction with swelling; infarction with symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation; infarction complicated by seizures; and a large proportion of patients require close management of blood pressure after thrombolytics. In this chapter, we discuss aspects of acute ischemic stroke care that are of particular relevance to a neurointensivist, covering neuropathology, neurodiagnostics and imaging, blood pressure management, glycemic control, temperature management, and the selection and timing of antithrombotics. We also focus on the care of patients who have received intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Complex clinical decision making in decompressive hemicraniectomy for hemispheric infarction and urgent management of basilar artery thrombosis are specifically addressed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialized countries and the most frequent cause of permanent disability in adults worldwide. Despite advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, therapeutic options remain limited. Only recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rt-PA for thrombolysis is currently approved for use in the treatment of this devastating disease. However, its use is limited by its short therapeutic window (three hours, complications derived essentially from the risk of hemorrhage, and the potential damage from reperfusion/ischemic injury. Two important pathophysiological mechanisms involved during ischemic stroke are oxidative stress and inflammation. Brain tissue is not well equipped with antioxidant defenses, so reactive oxygen species and other free radicals/oxidants, released by inflammatory cells, threaten tissue viability in the vicinity of the ischemic core. This review will discuss the molecular aspects of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischemic stroke and potential therapeutic strategies that target neuroinflammation and the innate immune system. Currently, little is known about endogenous counterregulatory immune mechanisms. However, recent studies showing that regulatory T cells are major cerebroprotective immunomodulators after stroke suggest that targeting the endogenous adaptive immune response may offer novel promising neuroprotectant therapies.

  20. Acute antithrombotic treatment of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Grotta, James C

    2014-05-01

    Antithrombotic medication is a cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke treatment and secondary prevention. The efficacy of thrombolysis with alteplase in acute stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. This safe and costeffective therapy has transformed the practice of stroke care and has led to subsequent trials of other antithrombotic medications for treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase. These antithrombotics include thrombolytic, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. While, no other medication has yet demonstrated adequate efficacy, our current and evolving understanding of infarct expansion, ischemic penumbra, collateral circulation and the blood brain barrier is allowing testing of antithrombotic medications tailored to individual patient pathophysiology in clinical trials. This understanding accompanies developments in neuroimaging and organization of stroke care that allow for wide-spread recruitment in these trials. Alteplase remains the mainstay treatment of arterial acute ischemic stroke; however, anticoagulation is the standard therapy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Antithrombotic use in acute stroke, arterial and venous, has demonstrated efficacy but leaves many questions unanswered. This patient population is a fertile ground for novel research, especially as it relates to; combination antithrombotic therapy, combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis, and the transition to secondary prevention. Here we review the current antithrombotics in the acute phase of ischemic stroke highlighting the evidence-base and areas of uncertainty.

  1. Thrombophilia And Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Abrishamizadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS is a common cause of morbidity and mortality with significant socioeconomic impact especially when it affects young patients. Compared to the older adults, the incidence, risk factors, and etiology are distinctly different in younger IS. Hypercoagulable states are relatively more commonly detected in younger IS patients. Thrombophilic states are disorders of hemostatic mechanisms that result in a predisposition to thrombosis .Thrombophilia is an established cause of venous thrombosis. Therefore, it is tempting to assume that these disorders might have a similar relationship with arterial thrombosis. Despite this fact that 1-4 % of ischemic strokes are attributed to Thrombophillia, this   alone rarely causes arterial occlusions .Even in individuals with a positive thrombophilia screen and arterial thrombosis, the former might not be the primary etiological factor. Thrombophilic   disorders can be broadly divided into inherited or acquired conditions. Inherited thrombophilic states include deficiencies of natural anticoagulants such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (AT III deficiency, polymorphisms causing resistance to activated protein C(Factor V Leiden mutation, and disturbance in the clotting balance (prothrombin gene 20210G/A variant. Of all the inherited  thrombophilic disorders, Factor V Leiden mutation is perhaps the commonest cause. On the contrary, acquired thrombophilic disorders are more common and include conditions such as the antiphospholipid syndrome, associated with lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. The more useful and practical approach of ordering various diagnostic tests for the uncommon thrombophilic states tests should be determined by a detailed clinical history, physical examination, imaging studies and evaluating whether an underlying hypercoagulable state appears more likely. The laboratory thrombophilia   screening should be comprehensive and avoid missing the

  2. Intestinal ascariasis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Imtiaz; Rather, Muddasir; Naikoo, Ghulam; Amin, Abid; Mushtaq, Syed; Nazir, Mir

    2010-05-01

    Ascariasis is a staggering health problem commonly seen in children of endemic areas. In the abdomen, ascaris lumbricoides can cause a myriad of surgical complications. Intestinal obstruction by ascaris lumbricoides is commonly seen in children. Most cases are managed conservatively. The purpose was to study the clinical presentation and management of symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. A 3-year study was performed from April 2006 to April 2009 of pediatric-age patients who had symptomatic intestinal ascariasis. All patients had detailed clinical history, examination, plain X-ray of abdomen, and ultrasonography of abdomen. Peroperative findings were recorded in all patients who had surgical intervention. This prospective study had 360 patients. Male to female ratio was 1.37:1. 187 patients (52%) presented within 2-4 days of duration of illness. Mean +/- standard deviation (SD) age of patients was 6.35 +/- 2.25 years. Age group of 4-7 years (80%) was commonest group affected. Abdominal pain was a leading symptom in 357 patients (99%) with the pain in periumbilical area present in 215 patients (60%). In 227 patients (63%) abdominal distension was seen and was the commonest physical finding. Palpable worm masses were seen in 129 patients (36%); 81 patients (63%) had palpable worm masses in the umbilical quadrant. On X-ray of abdomen, visible worm masses were seen in 83 patients (23%). Abdominal sonography showed interloop fluid in 177 patients (49%) and free fluid in the pelvis of 97 patients (27%). The number of patients who were managed conservatively was 281 (78%), and 79 patients (22%) had surgical intervention. In patients who had surgical intervention, 39 patients (49%) had enterotomy and 7 patients (9%) had kneading of worms. Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients, and an overall mortality of 1% (1 patient) was seen. Ascaridial intestinal obstruction is common in children in the Kashmir. Abdominal pain is the leading symptom in

  3. Ischemic heart disease: effectiveness and safety of statin treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ischemic heart disease: effectiveness and safety of statin treatment in a malaysian tertiary healthcare facility. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... and safety of statins in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients in a Malaysian tertiary ...

  4. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP.

  5. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. ME

  6. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke : An underexplored therapeutic area?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated

  7. Dual antiplatelet therapy after noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik

    2014-07-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy simultaneously blocks different platelet activation pathways and might thus be more potent at inhibiting platelet activation and more effective at reducing major ischemic vascular events compared to antiplatelet monotherapy. Aspirin plus clopidogrel dual therapy is now the standard therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, dual antiplatelet therapy carries an increased risk of bleeding. Patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are generally older and likely to have a fragile cerebrovascular bed, which further increases the risk of systemic major bleeding events and intracranial hemorrhage. Clinical trials and meta-analyses suggest that in comparison to antiplatelet monotherapy, dual antiplatelet therapy initiated early after noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA further reduces the rate of recurrent stroke and major vascular events without significantly increasing the rate of major bleeding events. In contrast, studies of long-term therapy in patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA have yielded inconsistent data regarding the benefit of dual antiplatelet therapy over monotherapy. However, the harm associated with major bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, which is generally more disabling and more fatal than ischemic stroke, is likely to increase with dual antiplatelet therapy. Physicians should carefully assess the benefits and risks of dual antiplatelet therapy versus antiplatelet monotherapy when managing patients with ischemic stroke or TIA.

  8. Intestinal Malakoplakia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mahjoub

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Malakoplakia is a rare inflammatory disease, related to enterobacterial infection in the context of a disorder of cell-mediated immunity. Malakoplakia is exceptional in children and usually involves the gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis is exclusively based on histological analysis.Cases Presentation: In this paper we have reported 3 children with intestinal malakoplakia which were enrolled during a period of 6 years between 2001 to 2006 at Childrens Medical Center. Two were male, and one female. The main clinical manifestations were: chronic bloody and mucosal diarrhea, abdominal pain and polypoid masses detected by diagnostic colonoscopy. Histological diagnosis proved to be definite in these cases. The response to drug treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole in all three patients was good. Conclusion: The presence of intestinal malakoplakia must be ruled out in every child having chronic bloody mucosal diarrhea.

  9. Intestinal sugar transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie A Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrates are an important component of the diet.The carbohydrates that we ingest range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose) to disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) to complex polysaccharides. Most carbohydrates are digested by salivary and pancreatic amylases, and are further broken down into monosaccharides by enzymes in the brush border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes. For example, lactase-phloridzin hydrolase and sucraseisomaltase are two disaccharidases involved in the hydrolysis of nutritionally important disaccharides. Once monosaccharides are presented to the BBM, mature enterocytes expressing nutrient transporters transport the sugars into the enterocytes. This paper reviews the early studies that contributed to the development of a working model of intestinal sugar transport, and details the recent advances made in understanding the process by which sugars are absorbed in the intestine.

  10. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  11. Neutrophil proteomic analysis reveals the participation of antioxidant enzymes, motility and ribosomal proteins in the prevention of ischemic effects by preconditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arshid, S; Tahir, M; Fontes, B

    2017-01-01

    and proteasome, after intestinal ischemic preconditioning. Furthermore, enzyme prediction analysis revealed the regulation of some important antioxidant enzymes and having their role in reactive oxygen species production. To our knowledge, this work describes the most comprehensive and detailed quantitative...... therapeutic application; however the exact underlying mechanism is not clear. Neutrophils play an important role in the mechanism of injuries caused by ischemia and reperfusion while IPC led to a decrease in neutrophil stimulation and activation. The effect of preconditioning on the neutrophil proteome...

  12. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  13. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller Madrid, Alexander; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... logistic and instrumental variable analysis for genetic estimates. RESULTS: Observationally, a 200-bp-shorter telomere length was associated with a multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for ischemic heart disease of 1.02 (95% CI, 1.01-1.03). Per allele, telomeres were shorter by 67 bp (73-60). In meta...

  14. Cerebrovascular arteriopathy (arteriosclerosis) and ischemic childhood stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, S R; Bates, S; Lukin, R R; Benton, C; Third, J; Glueck, C J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the intracranial cerebrovascular abnormalities and clinical status of 8 children who had familial lipoprotein disorders and evidence of thromboembolic cerebrovascular disease. Six of the 8 children had low levels of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, two had high triglyceride levels, and all came from kindreds characterized by familial lipoprotein abnormalities and premature cardio- and/or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis. Vascular occlusion, irregularities of the arterial lumen, beading, tortuosity, and evidence of collateralization were consistently noted. We speculate that cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in pediatric ischemic stroke victims who have familial lipoprotein abnormalities may be related to lipoprotein-mediated endothelial damage and thrombosis formation, or to the failure to restore endothelial cells' integrity following damage. The apparent association of lipoproteins and strokes in children and their families merits further exploration, particularly when assessing cerebral angiograms in pediatric ischemic stroke victims. In children with unexplained ischemic cerebrovascular accidents, the diagnostic possibility of occlusive arteriosclerosis with thrombosis must be entertained.

  15. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance determinants of functional mitral regurgitation in ischemic and non ischemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; De Agustin, Alberto; Manzano, M Carmen; Bustos, Ana; Sánchez, Tibisay; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Fuentes, Manuel; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2011-04-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent in left ventricular (LV) dilatation/dysfunction. Echocardiographic predictors of FMR are known. However, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of FMR have not been fully addressed. The aim of the study was to evaluate CMR mitral valve (MV) parameters associated with FMR in ischemic and non ischemic LV dysfunction. 80 patients with LV ejection fraction below 45% and/or left ventricular dilatation of ischemic and non ischemic etiology were included. Cine-MR images (steady state free-precession) were acquired in a short-axis and 4 chambers views where MV evaluation was performed. Delayed enhancement was performed as well. Significant FMR was established as more than mild MR according to the echocardiographic report. Mean age was 59 years, males 79%. FMR was detected in 20 patients (25%) Significant differences were noted in LV functional parameters and in most MV parameters according to the presence of significant FMR. However, differences were noted between ischemic and non ischemic groups. In the first, differences in most MV parameters remained significant while in the non ischemic, only systolic and diastolic interpapillary muscle distance (1.60 vs. 2.19 cm, P = 0.001; 2. 51 vs. 3.04, P = 0.008) were predictors of FMR. FMR is associated with a more severe LV dilatation/dysfunction in the overall population. CMR MV parameters are associated with the presence of significant FMR and are different between ischemic and non ischemic patients. CMR evaluation of these patients may help in risk stratification as well as in surgical candidate selection.

  17. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown.......Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown....

  18. [Nonfasting triglycerides and risk of ischemic stroke--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    The role of triglycerides in the risk of ischemic stroke remains controversial. We tested the hypothesis that increased levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with ischemic stroke in the general population. Men with a nonfasting triglyceride level 5 mmol/l had a multivariable, adjusted...... hazard ratio for ischemic stroke of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-4.8) compared with men with a nonfasting triglyceride level triglycerides is associated with risk of ischemic stroke Udgivelsesdato...

  19. Osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Louis; Skallerup, Anders; Olesen, Søren Schou

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure are associated with malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients that may negatively influence bone metabolism and increase the risk for developing osteoporosis. However, information regarding prevalence and contribution of individual...... risk factors is scarce. We investigated the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure and identified associated risk factors. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including 167 clinically stable outpatients with intestinal...... insufficiency or intestinal failure. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry and the prevalence of osteoporosis was compared to a gender and age matched population. Several clinical and demographic parameters, including body mass index (BMI), vitamin-D, smoking habits...

  20. Ultrasound of selected pathologies of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestines, especially the small bowel, are rarely subject to US assessment due to the presence of gases and chyme. The aim of this paper was to analyze ultrasound images in selected pathologies of the small intestine in adults, including the aspects of differential diagnosis. Material and methods: In 2001–2012, abdominal ultrasound examinations were conducted in 176 patients with the following small bowel diseases: Crohn’s disease (n=35, small bowel obstruction (n=35, yersiniosis (n=28, infectious diarrhea (n=26, bacterial overgrowth syndrome (n=25, coeliac disease (n=15 and small bowel ischemia (n=12. During examinations patients were fasting and no other particular preparations were needed. Convex transducers of 3.5–6 MHz and linear ones of 7–12 MHz were used. The assessment of the small intestine in four abdominal quadrants constituted an integral element of the examination. The following features of the small bowel ultrasound presentation were subject to analysis: thickness and perfusion of the walls, presence of thickened folds in the jejunum, reduction of their number, presence of fluid and gas contents in the intestine, its peristaltic activity, jejunization of the ileum and enteroenteric intussusception. Furthermore, the size of the mesenteric lymph nodes and the width of the superior mesenteric artery were determined and the peritoneal cavity was evaluated in terms of the presence of free fluid. Results: Statistically significant differences were obtained between the thickness of the small intestine in Crohn’s disease or in ischemic conditions and the thickness in the remaining analyzed pathological entities. Small bowel obstruction was manifested by the presence of distended loops due to gas and fluid as well as by severe peristaltic contractions occurring periodically. In the course of ischemic disease, the intestinal walls were thickened without the signs of increased perfusion and

  1. Anticoagulant Therapy In Ischemic Stroke Or TIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Mehrvar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death  . Anticoagulants   have been used to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke for many years. Despite their widespread use, the usefulness of emergency anticoagulation is a subject of debate. Disagreements exist about the best agent to administer, the route of administration, the use of a bolus dose to start treatment, the level of anticoagulation required, and the duration of treatment. There are 2 types of anticoagulants: Parenteral and oral. Heparin is an anticoagulant that used parenteral. Oral anticoagulants are including Warfarin and new anticoagulants such as Dabigatrn,Rivaroxaban ,Apixaban and other newer drugs. In patients with noncardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA antiplatelet agents are treatment of choice and preferred to anticoagulants. In cardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA with high risk of reembolization  anticoagulants  are considered as preferred treatment.  Warfarin, apixaban10mg/d ,Rivaroxaban20mg/d, and dabigatran 150 mg/d are all indicated for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF, whether paroxysmal or permanent.Also anticoagulant therapy is recommended for ischemic stroke or TIA patients in the setting of acute MI, atrial or ventricular thrombosis or dilated and restricted cardiomyopathy. Some valvular heart diseases are other indication for anticoagulant therapy in ischemic stroke or TIA patients. Ischemic  Stroke or TIA in patients with Cerebral vein thrombosis and  known hypercoagulable state specially anti phospholipid antibody syndrome are other indications for anticoagulant treatment.

  2. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Daher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  3. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  4. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Chronic exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles increases ischemic-reperfusion injuries in isolated rat hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milivojević, Tamara; Drobne, Damjana; Romih, Tea; Mali, Lilijana Bizjak; Marin, Irena; Lunder, Mojca; Drevenšek, Gorazd

    2016-10-01

    The use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in numerous products is increasing, although possible negative implications of their long-term consumption are not known yet. Our aim was to evaluate the chronic, 6-week oral exposure to two different concentrations of ZnO NPs on isolated rat hearts exposed to ischemic-reperfusion injury and on small intestine morphology. Wistar rats of both sexes ( n = 18) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) 4 mg/kg ZnO NPs, (2) 40 mg/kg ZnO NPs, and (3) control. After 6 weeks of treatment, the hearts were isolated, the left ventricular pressure (LVP), the coronary flow (CF), the duration of arrhythmias and the lactate dehydrogenase release rate (LDH) were measured. A histological investigation of the small intestine was performed. Chronic exposure to ZnO NPs acted cardiotoxic dose-dependently. ZnO NPs in dosage 40 mg/kg maximally decreased LVP (3.3-fold) and CF (2.5-fold) and increased the duration of ventricular tachycardia (all P < 0.01) compared to control, whereas ZnO NPs in dosage 4 mg/kg acted less cardiotoxic. Goblet cells in the small intestine epithelium of rats, treated with 40 mg ZnO NPs/kg, were enlarged, swollen and numerous, the intestinal epithelium width was increased. Unexpectedly, ZnO NPs in both dosages significantly decreased LDH. A 6-week oral exposure to ZnO NPs dose-dependently increased heart injuries and caused irritation of the intestinal mucosa. A prolonged exposure to ZnO NPs might cause functional damage to the heart even with exposures to the recommended daily doses, which should be tested in future studies.

  6. Blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular and ischemic heart disease, and longevity in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity.......Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity....

  7. Microbes, intestinal inflammation and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad W; Kale, Amod A; Bere, Praveen; Vajjala, Sriharsha; Gounaris, Elias; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya

    2012-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is known for causing disturbed homeostatic balance among the intestinal immune compartment, epithelium and microbiota. Owing to the emergence of IBD as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, great efforts have been put into understanding the sequence of intestinal inflammatory events. Intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells act in a synergistic fashion with intestinal epithelial cells and microbiota to initiate the triad that governs the intestinal immune responses (whether inflammatory or regulatory). In this review, we will discuss the interplay of intestinal epithelial cells, bacteria and the innate immune component. Moreover, whether or not genetic intervention of probiotic bacteria is a valid approach for attenuating/mitigating exaggerated inflammation and IBD will also be discussed.

  8. Long-term impact of diabetes in patients hospitalized with ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Weeke, Peter; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. Diabetes mellitus (DM) in combination with heart failure (HF) is associated with a high risk of death, but it is uncertain whether the prognosis differs in ischemic and non-ischemic HF groups. Design. One thousand, three hundred and six patients with ischemic HF and 1315...

  9. CT imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.

    2016-01-01

    Time is of the essence when treating acute ischemic stroke, to limit the damage caused. One form of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) used in such cases is the mechanical removal of the blood clot using stent-retrievers. It is thought that patient selection for IAT requires improvement and that CT

  10. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lévigne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.. In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia.

  11. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Del Zotto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy.

  12. Surgical strategy for mild ischemic mitral insufficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Cheng-xiong; WEI Hua; YU Yang

    2010-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: We read with the interest the article by FAN Hong-guang and colleagues~1 having obtained outstanding early and long-term clinical outcomes of left ventricular restoration for the patients with postinfarction ventricular aneurysm and low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of mean 37.7%. We would like to comment on surgical strategy for mild ischemic mitral insufficiency.

  13. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS. ... comes; In-hospital or 30 days mortality and Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 ..... 8. Bamford J, Sandercock P, Dennis M, Burn J, Warlow C.

  14. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride...

  15. The neuroprotective mechanism of brain ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qian LIU; Rui SHENG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2009-01-01

    Brain ischemia is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the world. Brain ischemic pre- conditioning (BIP) refers to a transient, sublethal ischemia which results in tolerance to later, otherwise lethal, cerebral ischemia. Many attempts have been made to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotection offered by ischemic preconditioning. Many studies have shown that neuroprotective mechanisms may involve a series of molecular regulatory pathways including activation of the N-methyI-D-aspartate (NMDA) and adenosine receptors; activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) and other protein kinases; upregulation of Bcl-2 and heat shock proteins (HSPs); and activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagic-lysosomal pathway. A better understanding of the processes that lead to cell death after stroke as well as of the endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms by which BIP protects against brain ischemic insults could help to develop new therapeutic strategies for this devastating neurological disease. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the neuroprotective mechanisms of BIP and to discuss the possibility of mimicking ischemic preconditioning as a new strategy for preventive treatment of ischemia.

  16. The diagnosis of transient ischemic attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe diagnosis of transient ischemic attack (TIA) is fraught with difficulty, since the diagnosis rests entirely upon the history of the patient's symptoms and the neurologist's skill in questioning the patient. The aim of this thesis is to investigate various measures to improve the reli

  17. Spinal cord stimulation for ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJongste, MJL

    2000-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are suffering from angina pectoris that is chronically refractory to standard anti-ischemic treatment such as pharmacological and surgical strategies. To improve the quality of life of these severely disabled patients, without adversely affecting their prognosis, a n

  18. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Perna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n=172 or hemorrhagic stroke (n=112 within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program. Participants completed three months of postacute neurorehabilitation and the Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4 at admission and discharge. Admission MPAI-4 scores and level of functioning were comparable. Results. Group ANOVA comparisons show no significant group differences at admission or discharge or difference in change scores. Both groups showed considerably reduced levels of productivity/employment after discharge as compared to preinjury levels. Conclusions. Though the pathophysiology of these types of strokes is different, both ultimately result in ischemic injuries, possibly accounting for lack of findings of differences between groups. In the present study, participants in both groups experienced similar functional levels across all three MPAI-4 domains both at admission and discharge. Limitations of this study include a highly educated sample and few outcome measures.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J.; Krogstrup, Nicoline V.; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J. M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part o

  20. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Navarro; SJ Alonso; R Navarro; J Trujillo; E Jorge

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaphthalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastrointestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats.METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses,intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanolplant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg),cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2× 10-4, 6.4 × 10-4 and 1.2 × 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated.RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase.Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride.CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs.Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain.

  1. Remote Ischemic Conditioning and Renal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Vrachatis, Dimitrios A; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Vavuranakis, Manolis; Cleman, Michael W; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2017-07-01

    Over the course of the last 2 decades, the concept of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) has attracted considerable research interest, because RIC, in most of its embodiments offers an inexpensive way of protecting tissues against ischemic damage inflicted by a number of medical conditions or procedures. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common side effect in the context of various medical procedures, and RIC has been suggested as a means of reducing its incidence. Outcomes regarding kidney function have been reported in numerous studies that evaluated the effects of RIC in a variety of settings (eg, cardiac surgery, interventions requiring intravenous administration of contrast media). Although several individual studies have implied a beneficial effect of RIC in preserving kidney function, 3 recently published randomized controlled trials evaluating more than 1000 patients each (Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Cardiac Surgery, Remote Ischaemic Preconditioning for Heart Surgery, and ERICCA) were negative. However, AKI or any other index of renal function was not a stand-alone primary end point in any of these trials. On the other hand, a range of meta-analyses (each including thousands of participants) have reported mixed results, with the most recent among them showing benefit from RIC, pinpointing at the same time a number of shortcomings in published studies, adversely affecting the quality of available data. The present review provides a critical appraisal of the current state of this field of research. It is the opinion of the authors of this review that there is a clear need for a common clinical trial framework for ischemic conditioning studies. If the current babel of definitions, procedures, outcomes, and goals persists, it is most likely that soon ischemic conditioning will be "yesterday's news" with no definitive conclusions having been reached in terms of its real clinical utility.

  2. CT findings in isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Khurana, Bharti; Ros, Pablo R. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Glickman, Jonathan N. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the CT features of ischemic proctosigmoiditis in correlation with clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. Our study included seven patients with isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis. Patients were identified by a retrospective review of all histopathologic records of colonoscopic biopsies performed during a time period of 4 years. All patients presented with left lower abdominal quadrant pain, bloody stools, and leukocytosis, and four patients had fever at the time of presentation. Four of seven patients suffered from diarrhea, one of seven was constipated and two of seven had normal stool consistency. The CT examinations were reviewed by two authors by consensus and compared with clinical and histopathologic results as well as with the initial CT diagnosis. The CT showed a wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon in seven of seven patients, stranding of the pararectal fat in four of seven, and stranding of the perisigmoidal fat in one of seven patients. There were no enlarged lymph nodes, but five of seven patients showed coexistent diverticulosis and in three of these patients CT findings were initially misinterpreted as sigmoid diverticulitis. Endoscopies and histopathologic analyses of endoscopic biopsies confirmed non-transmural ischemic proctosigmoiditis in all patients. Isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis often presents with unspecific CT features and potentially misleading clinical and laboratory findings. In an elderly patient or a patient with known cardiovascular risk factors the diagnosis of ischemic proctosigmoiditis should be considered when wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon is seen that is associated with perirectal fat stranding. (orig.)

  3. Liver Cirrhosis and Intestinal Bacterial Translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microlfora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microlfora may lead to microbial translocation, deifned as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal lfora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.

  4. Modified techniques of heterotopic total small intestinal transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ting Wu; Jie-Shou Li; Xiao-Fei Zhao; Wen Zhuang; Xie-Lin Feng

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To establish a successful model of heterotopictotal small intestinal transplantation (SIT) in rats inorder to reduce the complications and increase thesurvival rate.METHODS: A total of 196 Wistar rats underwentheterotopic SIT with microsurgical technique. Technicalmodifications included shortening fasting time andsupplying energy before surgery, administering optimalvolume of crystalloid fluid to the donor and recipientduring surgical procedures, reducing mechanical andischemic injuries to donor intestine, revascularizingsmall intestinal graft with a combination ofconventional aorta to aorta anastomosis and a cuffedportal vein to left renal vein anastomosis which resultedin an acceptably short warm ischemic time, and alsoan adequate blood supply and drainage of the graft.RESULTS: The average time for the donor surgery was86min±20min, the mean operative time for therecipient was 115min±20min and warm ischemia timewas shortened to 40min±5min. There was a shorterrevascularizing time of the graft, the abdominal aorta(AA) to AA anastomosis being 21min±10min, and thecuffed portal vein (PV) to the renal vein anastomosisbeing 5min±5min.The one-week survival rate of 98 ratswith SIT was 88.78% (87/98), without thrombosis andstenosis of anastomosis. The longest survival time ofrecipient rats was more than 389 days after SIT, therats were maintaining normal weight, with perfectintestinal function and intact intestinal histology.CONCLUSION: These modified techniques for SIT wouldremarkably reduce the complications and improve survival rate in rats, which provided a potentially more consistent and practical model for experimental andclinical studies.

  5. Changes of Intestinal Permeability in Cholelithiasis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-long Sun; Shuo-dong Wu; Dong-xu Cui; Bao-lin Liu; Xian-wei Dai

    2009-01-01

    @@ In normal condition,intestine mucosa possesses barrier function.When the barrier function of intestine mucosa was damaged,intestinal bacteria,endotoxin,or other substances would enter blood.It is generally accepted that biliary bacteria origins from the intestine either via duodenal papilla or intestinal mucosa.In this study,we aimed to investigate the intestinal permeability changes of cholelithiasis patients to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of cholelithiasis.

  6. Exercise, Intestinal Absorption, and Rehydration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ KEYPOINTS 1. The proximal small intestine (duodenum & jejunum) is the primary site of fluid absorption. It absorbs about 50% to 60% of any given fluid load. The colon or large intestine absorbs approximately 80 to 90% of the fluid it receives, but accounts for only about 15% of the total fluid load.

  7. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Martino, Antonio [Trauma Center, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Di Pietto, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Department ' Magrassi-Lanzara' , Section of Radiology, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation.

  8. Intestinal failure in obstructive jaundice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F. Assimakopoulos; Constantine E. Vagianos; Aristides Charonis; Vassiliki N. Nikolopoulou; Chrisoula D. Scopa

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR We read with great interest the article by Ding LA and LiJS, which aimed to review the current knowledge on the physiology of normal intestinal barrier function and highlight the role of intestinal failure after various injurious insults in the development of septic complications or multiple organ failure with subsequent rapid clinical deterioration or even death.

  9. Sevoflurane Preconditioning Reduces Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: Role of Protein Kinase C and Mitochondrial ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuiliang Liu

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning (IPC has been considered to be a potential therapy to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI since the 1980s. Our previous study indicated that sevoflurane preconditioning (SPC also reduced intestinal IRI in rats. However, whether the protective effect of SPC is similar to IPC and the mechanisms of SPC are unclear. Thus, we compared the efficacy of SPC and IPC against intestinal IRI and the role of protein kinase C (PKC and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mKATP in SPC. A rat model of intestinal IRI was used in this study. The superior mesenteric artery (SMA was clamped for 60 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Rats with IPC underwent three cycles of SMA occlusion for 5 min and reperfusion for 5 min before intestinal ischemia. Rats with SPC inhaled sevoflurane at 0.5 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC for 30 min before the intestinal ischemic insult. Additionally, the PKC inhibitor Chelerythrine (CHE or mKATP inhibitor 5-Hydroxydecanoic (5-HD was injected intraperitoneally before sevoflurane inhalation. Both SPC and IPC ameliorated intestinal IRI-induced histopathological changes, decreased Chiu's scores, reduced terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL positive cells in the epithelium, and inhibited the expression of malondialdehyde (MDA and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. These protective effects of SPC were similar to those of IPC. Pretreatment with PKC or mKATP inhibitor abolished SPC-induced protective effects by increasing Chiu's scores, down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and activated caspase-3. Our results suggest that pretreatment with 0.5 MAC sevoflurane is as effective as IPC against intestinal IRI. The activation of PKC and mKATP may be involved in the protective mechanisms of SPC.

  10. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Treatment of children with intestinal failure: intestinal rehabilitation, home parenteral nutrition or small intestine transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, E.G.; Oers, H.A. van; Escher, J.C.; Damen, G.M.; Rings, E.H.; Tabbers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterised by inadequate absorption of food or fluids, which is caused by insufficient bowel surface area or functioning. Children with chronic intestinal failure are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), which can be provided at home (HPN). In the Netherlands, HPN for chi

  12. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohammad

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the status and epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Iran. The information was driven from an extensive Health Survey which was done by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, deputy of Research Affairs in 1990-92. Sampling fraction was 1 per 1000 of individuals aged between 2 and 69, the sampling method was cluster sampling and each cluster consisted of 7 families. Formal-ether was the method of finding parasites which included: Oxior, Ascariasis, Giardiasis, Entamoeba-histolytica, Tinea, Strongyloidiasis, Ancylostoma, and Trichocephaliasis. The highest prevalence rate belonged to Giardiasis with 14.4% and the lowest one belonged to Tinea and Ancylostoma with 0.2%. The prevalence rate in rural area was significantly lower than urban area (p<0.0001.

  13. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care...... and outcomes in a cohort of first-time ischemic stroke patients with and without atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Based on linkage of public medical databases, we did a population-based follow-up study among 3,849 stroke patients from the County of Aarhus, Denmark admitted in the period of 2003......-2007 and prospectively registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation was associated with an adverse prognostic profile but not with an overall poorer quality of in-hospital care. Patients with atrial fibrillation had a longer total length of stay (median: 15 vs 9 days), and were...

  14. [Ischemic cholangiopathy induced by extended burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Laurence; Angot, Emilie; Goria, Odile; Koning, Edith; François, Arnaud; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Ischemic cholangiopathy is a recently described entity occurring mainly after hepatic grafts. Very few cases after intensive care unit (ICU) for extended burn injury were reported. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman consulting in an hepatology unit, for a jaundice appearing during a hospitalisation in an intensive care unit and increasing from her leaving from ICU, where she was treated for an extended burn injury. She had no pre-existing biological features of biliary disease. Biological tests were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of biliary tracts pointed out severe stenosing lesions of diffuse cholangiopathy concerning intrahepatic biliary tract, mainly peri-hilar. Biopsie from the liver confirmed the diagnosis, showing a biliary cirrhosis with bile infarcts. This case is the fourth case of ischemic cholangiopathy after extended burn injury, concerning a patient without a prior history of hepatic or biliary illness and appearing after hospitalisation in intensive care unit.

  15. Cardiac Connexin 43 and Ischemic Cardioprotection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-yi LI; Guo-qiang ZHONG; Yan HE; Yun LING

    2009-01-01

    The connexin 43 (Cx43) proteins, which is the predominant protein that can form gap junctions and non-junctional hemichannels in ventricular myocardium, are central to the cardioprotection afforded by ischemic precondi-tioning (IP) and maybe ischemic postconditioning (PC) too. Recent studies showed that recruitment of Cx43 to the mitochondria in IP might play a role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediates IP. The localiza-tion of Cx43 at mitochondria appears to be important for the achieved cardioprotection and opens a new door for us to reveal the exact mechanisms of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and cardioprotection, and it might be new targets of pharmacological modulator to achieved cardioprotection.

  16. Cost and Outcome in Pediatric Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, William; Huang, Haijuan; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2015-10-01

    The cost of childhood stroke receives little notice. The authors examined potential drivers of cost and outcome to test whether (1) neonatal strokes cost less than childhood strokes, (2) associated diseases influence cost, (3) arterial ischemic stroke is more costly than sinovenous thrombosis, and (4) cost correlates with outcome. The authors reviewed records of 111 children who sustained arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis between 2005 and 2010 to identify costs for the following year. They assessed outcomes in 46 with the Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Neonatal strokes cost less than childhood stroke. Strokes associated with congenital heart disease or vasculopathy cost the most, while perinatal or idiopathic strokes cost the least. Higher costs are correlated with worse impairment and poorer quality of life. Stroke etiology significantly influences the cost of pediatric stroke. Future cost-benefit studies must consider etiology when estimating the incremental costs associated with stroke.

  17. Genetics of ischemic stroke: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kaul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stroke is still a major cause of long-term disability and the third largest killer in the world after heart attack and cancer. Inherited genetic variation has been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis and therefore, there is a need to identify the culprit genetic variants. They may provide novel targets for preventive therapeutics. The most intensively investigated candidate gene is PDE4D. There are several positive replication studies of PDE4D gene with stroke. The genetic contribution to ischemic stroke risk in India has not been explored adequately. Reports on few candidate genes are available but we are still lagging behind in this aspect. Most of the reports are from Andhra Pradesh, a province in south India and a few parts of north India. PDE4D has been identified as a predisposition gene for ischemic stroke in Southern as well as the Northern population of India.

  18. [Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, Noriyuki; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Okada, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015 was published. Here, we describe several points revised from the 2009 edition about "Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack (TIA)". The revision points are as follows; 1. Extension of possible time window of intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator treatment (from within 3 hours to within 4.5 hours); 2. Antiplatelet therapy in acute stage (dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA); 3. Endovascular recanalization therapy in acute stage; 4. Antiplatelet therapy in chronic stage (Cilostazol is recommended similar to aspirin or clopidogrel); 5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) stroke or TIA patients; 6. Management of TIA. We explain the revised points of the guideline in the text.

  19. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  20. Stem Cell Therapies in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Ince

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been a great interest in the treatment of neurological diseases. However, technical and ethical issues are still not resolved. Despite all difficulties, there has been a great effort for the translation of knowledge from animal studies to human stroke. To establish standardized protocols, guidelines have been published for the preclinical and clinical stem cell studies. This review summarizes the stem cells applications in patients with ischemic stroke in recent years.

  1. Ischemic Colitis after Weight-Loss Medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Comay

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous weight-loss medications have received cautious support due to their association with pulmonary hypertension and valvular heart disease. However, newer drugs are increasingly being recommended as potentially safer and more efficacious. We report a case of ischemic colitis possibly linked to the use of a weight-loss drug, and review the literature to highlight an important latent consequence of these medications.

  2. Ischemic Colitis in an Endurance Runner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase Grames

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old female running the Marine Corps Marathon developed diarrhea at mile 12. After finishing the race she noted that she was covered in bloody stool. A local emergency department suspected ischemic colitis. After discharge, her primary care physician instructed her to discontinue the use of all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Her symptoms resolved and she returned to running without any complications. This paper describes the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management options.

  3. Promoting thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Maaike; Niessen, Louis W; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Koudstaal, Peter J; Franke, Cees L; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Huijsman, Robbert; Lingsma, Hester F; Minkman, Mirella M N; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2011-05-01

    Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but the number of treatable patients is limited. The PRomoting ACute Thrombolysis in Ischemic StrokE (PRACTISE) trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multidimensional implementation strategy for thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke. The PRACTISE trial was a national multicenter cluster-randomized controlled trial with randomization after pairwise matching. Twelve hospitals, both urban and community, academic and nonacademic, in the Netherlands participated. All patients admitted with stroke within 24 hours from onset of symptoms were registered. The intervention included 5 implementation meetings based on the Breakthrough Series model. The primary outcome was treatment with thrombolysis. Secondary outcomes were admission within 4 hours after onset of symptoms, death or disability at 3 months, and quality of life. Overall 5515 patients were included in the study' 308 patients (12.2%) in the control centers and 393 patients (13.1%) in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis (adjusted OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.68). Among the 1657 patients with ischemic stroke admitted within 4 hours from onset, 391 (44.5%) of 880 in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis and 305 (39.3%) of 777 in the control centers; the adjusted OR for treatment with thrombolysis was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.27). An intensive implementation strategy increases the proportion of patients with acute stroke treated with thrombolysis in real-life settings. An apparently pivotal factor in the improvement of the treatment rate is better application of contraindications for thrombolysis.

  4. Hydrophilic Polymer-associated Ischemic Enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Jesus A; Chen, Wei; Frankel, Wendy L; Arnold, Christina A

    2017-02-01

    Hydrophilic polymer coating of medical devices serves to lubricate the device and prevent device-related complications. The coating can be mechanically disrupted and result in downstream injury via presumed thromboembolism. This process has been reported in the brain, heart, lung, and skin, and has been replicated through animal studies and in vitro histologic processing of the polymer coating. We report the first description of hydrophilic polymer-associated ischemic enterocolitis in a series of 7 specimens (small bowel=2, colon=4, aortic thrombus=1) from 3 patients. We report a 4% incidence among all patients with an ischemic bowel resection between April 29, 2014 and August 8, 2016. All patients developed bowel ischemia within 1 day of aortic repair, and all bowel resection specimens showed polymers, mainly in the submucosal vessels in areas of extensive ischemia. The polymers appeared as basophilic, intravascular, serpiginous structures. In a patient who developed acute paralysis after the aortic repair, identical polymers were identified in the aortic thrombus and the ischemic bowel segment. We demonstrate that the polymers display an altered morphology over time and with various graft types, and that the degrading polymers are associated with a foreign body giant cell reaction. Special stains can aid in diagnosis, with the polymers turquoise on a colloidal iron stain, pink on von Kossa and mucicarmine stains, and pale blue on trichrome. Clinical follow-up was available up to 115 weeks: 1 patient died, and 2 are alive and well. In summary, we report a new diagnostic entity to be considered in the differential diagnosis of iatrogenic ischemic injuries in the gastrointestinal tract. Awareness of this entity is important to elucidate the cause of ischemia and to prevent misdiagnosis of the polymers and their associated giant cell reaction as a parasitic infection, granulomatous vasculitis, sarcoidosis, and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  6. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  7. Neurovascular Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The brain has high energetic requirements and is therefore highly dependent on adequate cerebral blood supply. To compensate for dangerous fluctuations in cerebral perfusion, the circulation of the brain has evolved intrinsic safeguarding measures. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The vascular network of the brain incorporates a high degree of redundancy, allowing the redirection and redistribution of blood flow in the event of vascular occlusion. Furthermore, active responses such as cerebral autoregulation, which acts to maintain constant cerebral blood flow in response to changing blood pressure, and functional hyperemia, which couples blood supply with synaptic activity, allow the brain to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion in the face of varying supply or demand. In the presence of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, these protective processes are impaired and the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury is increased. One potential mechanism for the increased injury is that collateral flow arising from the normally perfused brain and supplying blood flow to the ischemic region is suppressed, resulting in more severe ischemia. Future Directions: Approaches to support collateral flow may ameliorate the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia by rescuing cerebral perfusion in potentially viable regions of the ischemic territory. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 149–160. PMID:24328757

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  9. TOWARD THE QUESTION OF ISCHEMIC MYOCARDIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kalyuzhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the review have analyzed papers published on the problem of ischemic myocardial dysfunction. They begin with a definition of the term “ischemia” (derived from two Greek words: ischō, meaning to hold back, and haima, meaning blood - a condition at which the arterial blood flow is insufficient to provide enough oxygen to prevent intracellular respiration from shifting from the aerobic to the anaerobic form. The poor rate of ATP generation from this process causes a decrease in cellular ATP, a concomitant rise in ADP, and ultimately, to depression inotropic (systolic and lusitropic (diastolic function of the affected segments of the myocardium. But with such simplicity of basic concepts, the consequences of ischemia so diverse. Influence of an ischemia on myocardial function so unequally at different patients, which is almost impossible to find two identical cases (as in the case of fingerprints. It depends on the infinite variety of lesions of coronary arteries, reperfusion (time and completeness of restoration of blood flow and reactions of a myocardium which, apparently, has considerable flexibility in its response. Ischemic myocardial dysfunction includes a number of discrete states, such as acute left ventricular failure in angina, acute myocardial infarction, ischemic cardiomyopathy, stunning, hibernation, pre- and postconditioning. There are widely differing underlying pathophysiologic states. The possibility exists that several of these states can coexist.

  10. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  11. Multimodal MR examination in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzapesa, D.M.; Petruzzellis, M.; Lucivero, V.; Prontera, M.; Tinelli, A.; Sancilio, M.; Carella, A.; Federico, F. [University of Bari, Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Bari (Italy)

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, combined diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with perfusion imaging (PI) has become an important investigational tool in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, as it may differentiate reversible from irreversible brain tissue damage. We consecutively examined 20 subjects within 12 h of stroke onset using a multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) examination consisting of DWI, mean transit time (MTT) as PI parameter, and MR angiography (MRA). T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) on day 7 were also acquired in order to obtain final infarct volume. The following MR parameters were considered: volumetric measures of lesion growth and MTT abnormalities, quantification of regional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and visual inspection of MRA findings. Our results showed: (1) an acute DWI lesion was not predictive of lesion growth and the DWI abnormality did not represent the irreversibly infarcted tissue; (2) ADC values in the ischemic penumbra could not predict tissue at risk; (3) the DWI-PI mismatch did not predict lesion growth, and the PI abnormality overestimated the amount of tissue at risk; and (4) patients with proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion had greater initial and final infarct volumes. This study did not demonstrate the prognostic value of a multimodal MR approach in early ischemic stroke; MRA alone provided predictive information about the volumetric evolution of the lesion. (orig.)

  12. Ischemic preconditioning—an unfulfilled promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Timothy M. [Ashford & St. Peter' s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford Road, Surrey, KT16 0PZ (United Kingdom); Waksman, Ron [Washington Hospital Centre, 110 Irving Street, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); De Silva, Kalpa; Jacques, Adam [Ashford & St. Peter' s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford Road, Surrey, KT16 0PZ (United Kingdom); Mahmoudi, Michael, E-mail: m.mahmoudi@surrey.ac.uk [Ashford & St. Peter' s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford Road, Surrey, KT16 0PZ (United Kingdom); University of Surrey, 13AY04, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Myocardial reperfusion injury has been identified as a key determinant of myocardial infarct size in patients undergoing percutaneous or surgical interventions. Although the molecular mechanisms underpinning reperfusion injury have been elucidated, attempts at translating this understanding into clinical benefit for patients undergoing cardiac interventions have produced mixed results. Ischemic conditioning has been applied before, during, or after an ischemic insult to the myocardium and has taken the form of local induction of ischemia or ischemia of distant tissues. Clinical studies have confirmed the safety of differing conditioning techniques, but the benefit of such techniques in reducing hard clinical event rates has produced mixed results. The aim of this article is to review the role of ischemic conditioning in patients undergoing percutaneous and surgical coronary revascularization. - Highlights: • There are a multitude of techniques for conditioning. • Conditioning has been utilized in percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiac surgery. • There is a lack of consistency in the techniques utilized and outcomes that have been measured. • The results of studies to date lack a consistency in the benefits of conditioning.

  13. Cardioprotection by remote ischemic conditioning: Mechanisms and clinical evidences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto; Aimo; Chiara; Borrelli; Alberto; Giannoni; Luigi; Emilio; Pastormerlo; Andrea; Barison; Gianluca; Mirizzi; Michele; Emdin; Claudio; Passino

    2015-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning(RIC), several cycles of ischemia and reperfusion render distant organ and tissues more resistant to the ischemia-reperfusion injury. The intermittent ischemia can be applied before the ischemic insult in the target site(remote ischemic preconditioning), during the ischemic insult(remote ischemic perconditioning) or at the onset of reperfusion(remote ischemic postconditioning). The mechanisms of RIC have not been completely defined yet; however, these mechanisms must be represented by the release of humoral mediators and/or the activation of a neural reflex. RIC has been discovered in the heart, and has been arising great enthusiasm in the cardiovascular field. Its efficacy has been evaluated in many clinical trials, which provided controversial results. Our incomplete comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the RIC could be impairing the design of clinical trials and the interpretation of their results. In the present review we summarize current knowledge about RIC pathophysiology and the data about its cardioprotective efficacy.

  14. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    mitochondrial damage, hereby reinforcing a vicious circle. Ischemic preconditioning has been proven protective in acute ischemia, but the subject of chronic ischemic preconditioning has not been explored in humans. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory capacity would be diminished in chronic ischemic...... regions of human myocardium but that these mitochondria would be more resistant to ex vivo ischemia and, second, that ROS generation would be higher in ischemic myocardium. The aim of this study was to test mitochondrial respiratory capacity during hyperoxia and hypoxia, to investigate ROS production......, and finally to assess myocardial antioxidant levels. Mitochondrial respiration in biopsies from ischemic and nonischemic regions from the left ventricle of the same heart was compared in nine human subjects. Maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity in fresh muscle fibers was lower in ischemic compared...

  15. Intestinal spirochetosis and colon diverticulosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Marcus Aurelho de

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of intestinal spirochetosis in a 62-year-old white male is reported. The condition was characterized by chronic flatulence and episodes of intestinal hemorrhage, in addition to the evidence of hypotonic diverticular disease, with a large number of slender organisms in the colon epithelium and cryptae. Spirochetes were demonstrated by Whartin-Starry stain. The serologic tests for syphilis and HIV were positive. Spirochetosis was treated with penicillin G, and the patient remains free of intestinal complaints 20 months later.

  16. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter.

  17. Frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rezaei, Rezvan; Baharvand, Maryam; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh

    2017-01-01

    Background Referred craniofacial pain of cardiac origin might be the only symptom of ischemic heart accidents. This study aimed to determine the frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study was accomplished on 296 patients who met the criteria of having ischemic heart disease. Data regarding demographics, medical history and referred craniofacial pain were recorded in data forms. In addition, patients underwent oral ex...

  18. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  19. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cury Rezende

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning (IP is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still controversial whether diabetes may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and whether this might influence clinical outcomes. This review article looks at published reports with animal models and humans that tried to evaluate the possible influence of diabetes in myocardial ischemic preconditioning.

  20. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Paulo Cury; Rahmi, Rosa Maria; Hueb, Whady

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still controversial whether diabetes may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and whether this might influence clinical outcomes. This review article looks at published reports with animal models and humans that tried to evaluate the possible influence of diabetes in myocardial ischemic preconditioning.

  1. Ischemic postconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury by up-regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 2a

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-sheng Duanmu; Liu Cao; Jing-yu Chen; Hong-fei Ge; Rong Hu; Hua Feng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning renders brain tissue tolerant to brain ischemia, thereby alleviating ischemic brain injury. However, the exact mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, a rat model of global brain ischemia was subjected to ischemic postconditioning treat-ment using the vessel occlusion method. After 2 hours of ischemia, the bilateral common carotid arteries were blocked immediately for 10 seconds and then perfused for 10 seconds. This procedure was repeated six times. Ischemic postconditioning was found to mitigate hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage in rats with brain ischemia, and up-regulate acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression at the mRNA and protein level. These ifndings suggest that ischemic postconditioning up-regulates acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression in the rat hippo-campus after global brain ischemia, which promotes neuronal tolerance to ischemic brain injury.

  2. Tratamiento nutricional del fallo intestinal y potenciales mecanismos de estimulación Nutritional management of intestinal failure and potential stimulation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pérez de la Cruz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available El Fallo Intestinal en sus formas graves representa una de las patologías de manejo más complejo, tanto en niños como adultos. En adultos las causas más frecuentes son la Pseudoobstrucción Intestinal Crónica y el Síndrome del Intestino Corto severo que sigue a las grandes resecciones intestinales, sobre todo las debidas a isquemia mesentérica masiva, en el marco de cardiopatías que cursan con fibrilación auricular. El tratamiento fundamental tras la estabilización del paciente, está representado por el soporte nutricional por las vías parenteral y/o enteral, constituyendo la tolerancia a la dieta oral, el éxito final de la adaptación intestinal en estos procesos. La cirugía puede estar indicada en algunos casos para incrementar la superficie absortiva. La Nutrición Parenteral es una medida de apoyo fundamental, que a veces hay que mantener durante un tiempo prolongado, e incluso adquirir carácter permanente, salvo que complicaciones ligadas a la técnica, o la evolución clínica desfavorable, obliguen a alternativas quirúrgicas extremas como el trasplante intestinal. El tratamiento hormonal con factores estimulantes del trofismo abre nuevas alternativas que ya se están ensayando en humanos.Severe forms of intestinal failure represent one of the most complex pathologies to manage, in both children and adults. In adults, the most common causes are chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and severe short bowel syndrome following large intestinal resections, particularly due to massive mesenteric ischemic, within the context of cardiopathies occurring with atrial fibrillation. The essential management after stabilizing the patient consists in nutritional support, either by parenteral or enteral routes, with tolerance to oral diet being the final goal of intestinal adaptation in these pathologies. Surgery may be indicated in some cases to increase the absorptive surface area. Parenteral nutrition is an essential support measure

  3. Intestinal acariasis in Anhui Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Pin Li; Jian Wang

    2000-01-01

    The mites found in stored food and house comprise a large group of subclass Acari, belonging to the suborder Acardida of the order Acarifornes. They can be found in dust and vacuum samples from floors, furniture, mattresses, Chinese herbal medicine, dry fruit, grain, flour, sugar, and bedding. These mites are nidicolous and feed on organic debris, including sloughed human skin, fungi, spilled food, pollen, etc. These mites are particularly prevalent in Chinese herbal medicine, dry fruit, grain, flour, sugar, beds, though carpeted floors near beds or couches may also have large numbers. The most common species are Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae , Dermatophagoides farinae , D . pteronyssinus, Glycyphagus domesticus, G. Ornatus, Carpoglyphus lactis and Tarsonemus granarius, etc. The viability of mites in storage is quite strong and they can invade and parasitize the intestines of humans[1 -15]. They can cause pulmonary acariasis[16-25] , urinary acariasis[26-33] and so on. The dejecta of mites is a quite strong allergen and can cause different allergic diseases[34-44]. Intestinal acariasis can be caused by some mites related to the way of diet intake and invading against intestinal mucosa, intestinal muscle[45-5a]. The first report of intestinal acariasis caused by these mites was made by Hinman et al (1934)[45]. From then on, all kinds of studies on the disease have been reported gradually. In order to make an epidemiological survey of intestinal acariasis the investigation of the disease was taken in some areas of Anhui Province from 1989 to 1996.

  4. Haemorrhage and intestinal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilia M. Pizzini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of coeliac disease is around 1% in general population but this is often unrecognised. The classical presentation of adult coeliac disease is characterized by diarrhoea and malabsorption syndrome, but atypical presentations are probably more common and are characterized by iron deficiency anaemia, weight loss, fatigue, infertility, arthralgia, peripheral neuropathy and osteoporosis. Unusual are the coagulation disorders (prevalence 20% and these are due to vitamin K malabsorption (prolonged prothrombin time. Clinical case: A 64-year-old man was admitted to our Department for an extensive spontaneous haematoma of the right leg. He had a history of a small bowel resection for T-cell lymphoma, with a negative follow-up and he didn’t report any personal or familiar history of bleeding. Laboratory tests showed markedly prolonged prothrombin (PT and partial-thromboplastin time (PTT, corrected by mixing studies, and whereas platelet count and liver tests was normal. A single dose (10 mg of intravenous vitamin K normalized the PT. Several days before the patient had been exposed to a superwarfarin pesticide, but diagnostic tests for brodifacoum, bromadiolone or difenacoum were negative. Diagnosis of multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulationfactor deficiencies (II, VII, IX, X due to intestinal malabsorption was made and coeliac disease was detected. Therefore the previous lymphoma diagnosis might be closely related to coeliac disease. Conclusions: A gluten free diet improves quality of life and restores normal nutritional and biochemical status and protects against these complications.

  5. Adult intestinal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J., E-mail: Jdavidson@doctors.org.u [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom); Plumb, A.; Burnett, H. [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the alimentary tract to digest and absorb sufficient nutrition to maintain normal fluid balance, growth, and health. It commonly arises from disease affecting the mesenteric root. Although severe IF is usually managed in specialized units, it lies at the end of a spectrum with degrees of nutritional compromise being widely encountered, but commonly under-recognized. Furthermore, in the majority of cases, the initial enteric insult occurs in non-specialist IF centres. The aim of this article is to review the common causes of IF, general principles of its management, some commoner complications, and the role of radiology in the approach to a patient with severe IF. The radiologist has a crucial role in helping provide access for feeding solutions (both enteral and parenteral) and controlling sepsis (via drainage of collections) in an initial restorative phase of treatment, whilst simultaneously mapping bowel anatomy and quality, and searching for disease complications to assist the clinicians in planning a later, restorative phase of therapy.

  6. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Malacoplaquia intestinal Colonic malakoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto José Frem Aun

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Malacoplakia is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown origin. However immunodeficiency states (immunossuppressive medication, old people, renal transplantation, leukaemia, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition and others have been associated with patients with malacoplakia. An infectious cause of malakoplakia is suggested by the finding of coliform bacteria in the phagolysosomes of macrophages. The histologic study is characterized by a infiltrate of large macrophages (Hansenmann cells with pathognomonic inclusions containing siderocalcific structures (Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Most of the cases reported in literature, involve the genitourinary tract, but other structures can be affected (brain, bone, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, intestine, and others. A 66-year-old man whith a abdominal mass, went to our hospital with a colonic tumour diagnosis. The patient was submitted to a surgery, with resection of the rigth colon. The disease was invading a portion of the retroperitoneal tissue that was removed. The histopatologic study showed the pathognomonic sign of malakoplakia (Hansenmann cells and Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Norfloxacin have been used to the complementar treatment with total cure of the patient.

  8. Polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism signature in ischemia differs from reperfusion in mouse intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gobbetti

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA metabolites are bioactive autoacoids that play an important role in the pathogenesis of a vast number of pathologies, including gut diseases. The induction and the resolution of inflammation depend on PUFA metabolic pathways that are favored. Therefore, understanding the profile of n-6 (eicosanoids/n-3 (docosanoids PUFA-derived metabolites appear to be as important as gene or protein array approaches, to uncover the molecules potentially implicated in inflammatory diseases. Using high sensitivity liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we characterized the tissue profile of PUFA metabolites in an experimental model of murine intestinal ischemia reperfusion. We identified temporal and quantitative differences in PUFA metabolite production, which correlated with inflammatory damage. Analysis revealed that early ischemia induces both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory eicosanoid production. Primarily, LOX- (5/15/12/8-HETE, LTB4, LxA4 and CYP- (5, 6-EET metabolites were produced upon ischemia, but also PGE3, and PDx. This suggests that different lipids simultaneously play a role in the induction and counterbalance of ischemic inflammatory response from its onset. COX-derived metabolites were more present from 2 to 5 hours after reperfusion, fitting with the concomitant inflammatory peaks. All metabolites were decreased 48 hours post-reperfusion except for to the pro-resolving RvE precursor 18-HEPE and the PPAR-γαμμα agonist, 15d-PGJ2. Data obtained through the pharmacological blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid-4, which can be activated by 5, 6-EET, revealed that the endogenous activation of this receptor modulates post-ischemic intestinal inflammation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that different lipid pathways are involved in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion processes. Some metabolites, which expression is severely changed upon intestinal ischemia-reperfusion could provide

  9. Improved technique of vascular anastomosis for small intestinal transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xin Li; Jie Shou Li; Ning Li

    2000-01-01

    AIM To establish a new improved vascular anastomotic technique to simplify the surgical technique and increase the survivsl rate of small intestinal transplantation in rats. METHODS The graft removed en bloc consisted of entire small intestine, portal vein and aortic segment with superior mesenteric artery. The graft was perfused in situ and the gut lumen was irrigated during the operation.Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed by microvascular end-to-side anastomosis between the donor aortic segment with superior mesenteric artery and the recipient abdominal aorta, and by the formation of a "Cuff" anastomosis between the donor portal vein and the recipient left renal vein. Both ends of the grafts were exteriorized as stomas. RESULTS A total of 189 intestinal transplantations were performed in rats, 33 of which were involved in the formal experimental group, with a survival rate of 84.8%. The average time for the donor surgery was 80min ±10min; for graft repair 10min ± 3min; and for recipient surgery 95min ± 15min. The average time for the arterial anastomosis and the vein anastomosis was 18min ± 5min and imin,respectively. The warm ischemic time and cold ischemic time were 22min ± 5min and less than 60min, respectively. The whole operation was completed by a single surgeon, the operative time being about 3 hours. CONCLUSION The vascular anastomosis used in this study could simplify surgical technique,reduce the operative time and elevate the survival rate of small intestinal transplantation in rats.

  10. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  11. Gene Variants Associated With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, May M.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Rowland, Charles M.; Shiffman, Dov; Bare, Lance A.; Arellano, Andre R.; Longstreth, W.T.; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Kenneth; Tracy, Russell P.; Devlin, James J.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which had been associated with coronary heart disease, are associated with incident ischemic stroke. Methods Based on antecedent studies of coronary heart disease, we prespecified the risk allele for each of the 74 SNPs. We used Cox proportional hazards models that adjusted for traditional risk factors to estimate the associations of these SNPs with incident ischemic stroke during 14 years of follow-up in a population-based study of older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). Results In white CHS participants, the prespecified risk alleles of 7 of the 74 SNPs (in HPS1, ITGAE, ABCG2, MYH15, FSTL4, CALM1, and BAT2) were nominally associated with increased risk of stroke (one-sided PDMXL2, and ABCG2) were nominally associated with stroke (one-sided P<0.05, false discovery rate=0.55). The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 was associated with stroke in both white (hazard ratio, 1.46; 90% CI, 1.05 to 2.03) and black (hazard ratio, 3.59; 90% CI, 1.11 to 11.6) participants of CHS. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 10-year cumulative incidence of stroke were greater among Val allele homozygotes than among Met allele carriers in both white (10% versus 6%) and black (12% versus 3%) participants of CHS. Conclusions The Val12Met SNP in ABCG2 (encoding a transporter of sterols and xenobiotics) was associated with incident ischemic stroke in white and black participants of CHS. PMID:19023099

  12. Cytoprotective roles of GSH, SOD and solcoseryl against ischemic damage and reperfusion injury to warm ischemic lung. Study of Canine warm ischemic lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Hideki; Kawahara, Katsunobu; Nakasone, Tomonori; Ikari, Hideki; Honjoh, Seiji; Hisano, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takao; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Ayabe, Hiroyoshi; Tomita, Masao

    1990-01-01

    This study was performed to clarify the roles of reduced glutathion (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and solcosaryl in ischemic damage and reperfusion injury to the warm ischemic lungs of experimental animals. Fifty-one warm ischemic canine lungs were made by hilar stripping and clamping of the left PA, PV and bronchus for 2-3 hours. In the Non-perfusion group, GSH (50mg/ kg, I. V.: Group II) and solcoseryl (50mg/kg, I. V.: Group III) were administered. In the perfusion group, Euro-Collins ...

  13. Metabolically healthy obesity and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Netterstrøm, Marie K.; Johansen, Nanna B.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Recent studies have suggested that a subgroup of obese individuals is not at increased risk of obesity-related complications. This subgroup has been referred to as metabolically healthy obese. Objective: To investigate whether obesity is a risk factor for development of ischemic heart...... disease (IHD) irrespective of metabolic health. Design: In all, 6238 men and women from the Danish prospective Inter99 study were followed during 10.6 (standard deviation = 1.7) years. Setting: General community. Participants: Participants were classified according to body mass index and four metabolic...

  14. Ischemic cardiac complications following G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Peter M; Bertog, Stefan C; Wilson, Robert F; Henry, Timothy D

    2010-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used in bone marrow transplant donors to increase the number of circulating progenitor cells. G-CSF has also been studied following myocardial infarction, but concern has been raised about the risks of G-CSF administration in patients with coronary artery disease. We present two cases of ischemic cardiac complications that are likely to be related to administration of G-CSF and provide a contemporary overview of the literature on the cardiovascular risks of G-CSF.

  15. Cardiogenic embolism producing crescendo transient ischemic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Patrick J; Oak, Jack; Choi, Eric T

    2005-09-01

    Lateralizing, repetitive transient ischemic attacks are characteristic of symptomatic carotid bifurcation atherosclerotic plaques. We report a case in which a cardiogenic embolus, after lodging at the left carotid bifurcation, produced crescendo episodes of expressive aphasia and mild right upper extremity weakness. Complete neurological recovery was achieved following emergent carotid embolectomy and endarterectomy. This case demonstrates that the laminar nature of internal carotid blood flow may result in the localization of embolic events to a single region of the cerebral vasculature, regardless of the source lesion in the carotid artery. The role of endoluminal techniques in the diagnosis and management of such lesions is discussed.

  16. Changes of resting cerebral activities in subacute ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to detect the difference in resting cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants, define the abnormal site, and provide new evidence for pathological mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, prognosis prediction and efficacy evaluation of ischemic stroke. At present, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies focus on the motor dysfunction and the acute stage of ischemic stroke. This study recruited 15 right-handed ischemic stroke patients at subacute stage (15 days to 11.5 weeks and 15 age-matched healthy participants. A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed on each subject to detect cerebral activity. Regional homogeneity analysis was used to investigate the difference in cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants. The results showed that the ischemic stroke patients had lower regional homogeneity in anterior cingulate and left cerebrum and higher regional homogeneity in cerebellum, left precuneus and left frontal lobe, compared with healthy participants. The experimental findings demonstrate that the areas in which regional homogeneity was different between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants are in the cerebellum, left precuneus, left triangle inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate. These locations, related to the motor, sensory and emotion areas, are likely potential targets for the neural regeneration of subacute ischemic stroke patients.

  17. Takayasu Arteritis Presenting with Ischemic Stroke: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergane Memmodova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu arteritis is a rare vasculitic disease characterized with inflamation of vessels. It commonly results stenosis and dilatations of aort and aortic branches. Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease is one of the major complications of Takayasu arteritis. In this report we concluded two Takayasu arteritis cases in the light of current data whom presented with ischemic stroke clinical symptoms.

  18. Perceived stress and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Kristensen, Tage Søndergård; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear whether the commonly recognized link between stress and cardiovascular disease is causal or the result of reporting bias. The objective of this study was to address the association between perceived stress and first incidence of ischemic heart disease and to evaluate the suggested...... reporting bias by addressing subdiagnoses of ischemic heart disease separately....

  19. Changes of resting cerebral activities in subacute ischemic stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wu; Fang Zeng; Yong-xin Li; Bai-li Yu; Li-hua Qiu; Wei Qin; Ji Li; Yu-mei Zhou; Fan-rong Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the difference in resting cerebral activities between ischemic stroke pa-tients and healthy participants, deifne the abnormal site, and provide new evidence for pathological mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, prognosis prediction and efifcacy evaluation of ischemic stroke. At present, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies focus on the motor dysfunc-tion and the acute stage of ischemic stroke. This study recruited 15 right-handed ischemic stroke patients at subacute stage (15 days to 11.5 weeks) and 15 age-matched healthy participants. A rest-ing-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed on each subject to detect cerebral activity. Regional homogeneity analysis was used to investigate the difference in cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants. The results showed that the ischemic stroke patients had lower regional homogeneity in anterior cingulate and left cerebrum and higher regional homogeneity in cerebellum, left precuneus and left frontal lobe, compared with healthy participants. The experimental ifndings demonstrate that the areas in which regional homogeneity was different between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants are in the cerebellum, left precuneus, left triangle inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate. These locations, related to the motor, sensory and emotion areas, are likely po-tential targets for the neural regeneration of subacute ischemic stroke patients.

  20. Multiple Silent Lacunes Are Associated with Recurrent Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Skjøth, Flemming; Yavarian, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    .16 (0.61-2.22) and 1.51 (0.86-2.66) for cardiovascular events. Conclusions: In this large cohort of patients with incident ischemic stroke and no AF, an increasing number of silent lacunes was associated with increasing incidence rates of ischemic stroke recurrence. In the adjusted Cox proportional...

  1. Complications of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke : a CT perfusion evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankbaar, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the use of CT-perfusion (CTP) imaging in the evaluation of the most severe complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)) and ischemic stroke was explored. These complications are delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after SAH and damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after ischemic str

  2. Intra‐arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhemer, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in the field of acute ischemic stroke. The main objective has been to proof the effectiveness and safety of intra-arterial treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MR CLEAN was the first study to proof the safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial

  3. Plasma biomarkers in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Kim, Myung Chun; Lee, Woo In

    2010-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis and timely treatment improves the outcome in patients with ischemic stroke, but a rapid and sensitive blood test for ischemic stroke does not exist. This study tested whether a panel of biomarkers might be useful in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke presenting to the emergency department of a university hospital in Korea were enrolled. Plasma specimens were assayed for brain natriuretic peptide, D-dimer, matrix metalloproteinase-9, S100β, and a proprietary composite multimarker index (MMX). There were 139 patients in this study, 89 of whom were diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke, 11 with acute cerebral hemorrhage, and 39 with other brain disorders. The MMX value was significantly higher in the patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison to 57 healthy controls (p acute ischemic stroke vs those with acute cerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.884). The discriminatory capacity of MMX was modest, with an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.714 for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke was not diagnosed by any of the biochemical markers individually. Although the data suggest that MMX may be helpful to diagnose an acute stroke, it does not discriminate between acute ischemic stroke and acute hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  5. Nonfasting glucose, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; McCarthy, Mark I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI).......The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI)....

  6. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report...

  7. Dynamic changes in DNA methylation in ischemic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mediators of gene expression are hypothesized to regulate transcriptomic responses to preconditioning ischemia and ischemic tolerance. Here we utilized a methyl-DNA enrichment protocol and sequencing (ChIP-seq to identify patterns of DNA methylation in an established model of ischemic tolerance in neuronal cultures (oxygen and glucose deprivation: OGD. We observed an overall decrease in global DNA methylation at 4h following preconditioning ischemia (30min OGD, harmful ischemia (120min OGD and in ischemic tolerant neuronal cultures (30min OGD, 24h recovery, 120min OGD. We detected a smaller cohort of hypermethylated regions following ischemic conditions, which were further analyzed revealing differential chromosomal localization of methylation, and a differential concentration of methylation on genomic regions. Together these data show that the temporal profiles of DNA methylation with respect to chromatin hyper – and hypo-methylation following various ischemic conditions, are highly dynamic and may reveal novel targets for neuroprotection.

  8. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lemmens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. Since atrial fibrillation can result in ischemic stroke, one might assume that genetic determinants of this cardiac arrhythmia are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Ischemic stroke is a multifactorial, complex disease where multiple environmental and genetic factors interact. Whether genetic variants associated with a risk factor for ischemic stroke also increase the risk of a particular vascular endpoint still needs to be confirmed in many cases. Here we review the current knowledge on the genetic background of atrial fibrillation and the consequences for cerebrovascular disease.

  9. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellanger Jérôme

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool α1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other

  10. Brain caspase-3 and intestinal FABP responses in preterm and term rats submitted to birth asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Figueira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal asphyxia can cause irreversible injury of multiple organs resulting in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. This injury is dependent on time, severity, and gestational age, once the preterm babies need ventilator support. Our aim was to assess the different brain and intestinal effects of ischemia and reperfusion in neonate rats after birth anoxia and mechanical ventilation. Preterm and term neonates were divided into 8 subgroups (n=12/group: 1 preterm control (PTC, 2 preterm ventilated (PTV, 3 preterm asphyxiated (PTA, 4 preterm asphyxiated and ventilated (PTAV, 5 term control (TC, 6 term ventilated (TV, 7 term asphyxiated (TA, and 8 term asphyxiated and ventilated (TAV. We measured body, brain, and intestine weights and respective ratios [(BW, (BrW, (IW, (BrW/BW and (IW/BW]. Histology analysis and damage grading were performed in the brain (cortex/hippocampus and intestine (jejunum/ileum tissues, as well as immunohistochemistry analysis for caspase-3 and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP. IW was lower in the TA than in the other terms (P<0.05, and the IW/BW ratio was lower in the TA than in the TAV (P<0.005. PTA, PTAV and TA presented high levels of brain damage. In histological intestinal analysis, PTAV and TAV had higher scores than the other groups. Caspase-3 was higher in PTAV (cortex and TA (cortex/hippocampus (P<0.005. I-FABP was higher in PTAV (P<0.005 and TA (ileum (P<0.05. I-FABP expression was increased in PTAV subgroup (P<0.0001. Brain and intestinal responses in neonatal rats caused by neonatal asphyxia, with or without mechanical ventilation, varied with gestational age, with increased expression of caspase-3 and I-FABP biomarkers.

  11. Intestinal dysfunction associated with acute thoracolumbar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschiera, J L; Beerman, S P

    1990-03-01

    The frequency of intestinal dysfunction, particularly intestinal ileus, among patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise was assessed. We reviewed the medical records of 70 patients who met specific criteria. Only four (6%) of these patients developed intestinal dysfunction, manifested by vomiting, abdominal distention, diminished bowel sounds, or an intestinal ileus documented by an abdominal roentgenogram. Conservative initial nutritional management of the patients did not reduce the incidence of intestinal dysfunction. This study suggests that patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise are not at substantial risk of intestinal dysfunction and that nasogastric suction and restriction of oral intake are unnecessary in the initial management of these patients.

  12. Sonography of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim Nylund; Svein (φ)degaard; Trygve Hausken; Geir Folvik; Gülen Arslan Lied; Ivan Viola; Helwig Hauser; Odd-Helge Gilja

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been substantial development in the diagnostic possibilities for examining the small intestine. Compared with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy, ultrasonography has the advantage of being cheap, portable, flexible and user- and patient-friendly, while at the same time providing the clinician with image data of high temporal and spatial resolution. The method has limitations with penetration in obesity and with intestinal air impairing image quality. The flexibility ultrasonography offers the examiner also implies that a systematic approach during scanning is needed. This paper reviews the basic scanning techniques and new modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, strain rate imaging, hydrosonography, allergosonography, endoscopic sonography and nutritional imaging, and the literature on disease-specific findings in the small intestine. Some of these methods have shown clinical benefit, while others are under research and development to establish their role in the diagnostic repertoire. However, along with improved overall image quality of new ultrasound scanners, these methods have enabled more anatomical and physiological changes in the small intestine to be observed. Accordingly, ultrasound of the small intestine is an attractive clinical tool to study patients with a range of diseases.

  13. Small intestinal sulphoxidation of albendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, C; Alvarez, A I; Redondo, P; Voces, J; Del Estal, J L; Prieto, J G

    1995-05-01

    1. The in vitro sulphoxidation of Albendazole (ABZ) by rat intestinal microsomes has been examined. The results revealed intestinal sulphoxidation of ABZ by intestinal microsomes in a NADPH-dependent enzymatic system. The kinetic constants for sulphoxidase activity were Vmax = 46 pmol/min/mg protein and Michaelis constant Km = 6.8 microM. 2. The possible effect of inducers (Arochlor 1254 and ABZ pretreatment) and inhibitors (erythromycin, methimazole, carbon monoxide and fenbendazole), was also studied. In rat pretreated with Arochlor 1254, Vmax was 52 pmol/min/mg protein, whereas oral administration of ABZ increased the intestinal sulphoxidation of the drug, Vmax being 103 pmol/min/mg protein. 3. Erythromycin did not change the enzymatic bioconversion of ABZ, but methimazole and carbon monoxide inhibited the enzyme activity by approximately 60 and 30% respectively. Fenbendazole (a structural analogue of ABZ) was a competitive inhibitor of the sulphoxidation process, characterized by a Ki or 69 microM. 4. These data demonstrate that the intestinal enzymes contributing to the initial sulphoxidation of ABZ may be similar to the hepatic enzymes involved in the biotransformation process by the P450 and FMO systems, a conclusion that needs to be further established.

  14. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xing Liu; Hai-Tao Niu; Shu-Yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target.Data Sources:This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30,2015.Articles were selected using the following search temps:"Intestinal microbiota","trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)","trimethylamine (TMA)","cardiovascular",and "atherosclerosis".Study Selection:Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis.Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included.Results:A new CVD risk factor,TMAO,was recently identified.It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota,resulting in TMA release.TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver.Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD,particularly atherosclerosis;however,the details of this relationship remain unclear.Conclusions:Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management.

  15. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasert Saichua; Choosak Nithikathkul; Natthawut Kaewpitoon

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand.

  16. Parenteral nutrition in intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurkchubasche AG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arlet G Kurkchubasche,1 Thomas J Herron,2 Marion F Winkler31Department of Surgery and Pediatrics, 2Department of Surgery, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 3Department of Surgery/Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Intestinal failure is a consequence of extensive surgical resection resulting in anatomic loss and/or functional impairment in motility or absorptive capacity. The condition is clinically characterized by the inability to maintain fluid, energy, protein, electrolyte, or micronutrient balance when on a conventionally accepted, normal diet. Parenteral nutrition (PN is the cornerstone of management until intestinal adaptation returns the patient to a PN-independent state. Intestinal length, residual anatomic segments and motility determine the need for and duration of parenteral support. The goals of therapy are to provide sufficient nutrients to enable normal growth and development in children, and support a healthy functional status in adults. This review addresses indications for PN, the formulation of the PN solution, patient monitoring, and considerations for prevention of PN-associated complications. With the ultimate goal of achieving enteral autonomy, the important role of diet, pharmacologic interventions, and surgery is discussed.Keywords: intestinal failure, short-bowel syndrome, parenteral nutrition, home nutrition support, intestinal rehabilitation

  17. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  18. Ischemic stroke susceptibility gene in a Northern Han Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiping Wang; Shujuan Shi; Wenjing Yan; Yan Song; Jingjing Zhan; Chen Zhang; Haiji Wang

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-18 gene promoter polymorphisms are potential risk factors for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and the-607C al ele may increase ischemic stroke risk in the Han Chinese population. In the present study, we recruited 291 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease from the Affi-liated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical Col ege, China, and 226 healthy controls. Both pa-tients and controls were from the Han population in northern China. Immunoresonance scattering assays detected increased serum amyloid A protein, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-18 levels in ischemic cerebrovascular disease patients compared with healthy controls. Analysis of the-607C/A (rs1946518) polymorphism in the interleukin-18 gene promoter showed ischemic cerebrovascular disease patients exhibited increased frequencies of the CC genotype and C al eles than healthy controls. Genotype and al ele frequencies of the interleukin-18-137G/C (rs187238) polymorphism and the-13T/C (rs11024595) polymorphism in the 5'-flanking region of serum amyloid A, showed no significant difference between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis on the interleukin-18 promoter A/C genetic locus, for correction of age, gender, history of smoking, hyper-tension, diabetes mel itus, hypercholesteremia, and an ischemic stroke family history, showed ischemic cerebrovascular disease risk in individuals without the A al ele (C homozygotes) was 2.2-fold greater than in A al ele carriers. Overal , our findings suggest that the-13T/C (rs11024595) polymorphism in the 5′-flanking region of serum amyloid A has no correlation with ischemic cere-brovascular disease, but the C al ele of the-607C/A (rs1946518) polymorphism in the interleukin-18 promoter is a high-risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the Han population of northern China. In addition, the A al ele is likely a protective gene for ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

  19. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting,such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partⅠ, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors,epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part Ⅱ will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids.

  20. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  1. Green space and mortality following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa H; Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Spengler, John; Wellenius, Gregory A; Mittleman, Murray A

    2014-08-01

    Residential proximity to green space has been associated with physical and mental health benefits, but whether green space is associated with post-stroke survival has not been studied. Patients ≥ 21 years of age admitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) between 1999 and 2008 with acute ischemic stroke were identified. Demographics, presenting symptoms, medical history and imaging results were abstracted from medical records at the time of hospitalization for stroke onset. Addresses were linked to average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, distance to roadways with more than 10,000 cars/day, and US census block group. Deaths were identified through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index. There were 929 deaths among 1645 patients with complete data (median follow up: 5 years). In multivariable Cox models adjusted for indicators of medical history, demographic and socioeconomic factors, the hazard ratio for patients living in locations in the highest quartile of green space compared to the lowest quartile was 0.78 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.63-0.97) (p-trend = 0.009). This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for residential proximity to a high traffic road. Residential proximity to green space is associated with higher survival rates after ischemic stroke in multivariable adjusted models. Further work is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for this association, and to better understand the exposure-response relationships and susceptibility factors that may contribute to higher mortality in low green space areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ye Zhang, Hong Deng, Chao Pan, Yang Hu, Qian Wu, Na Liu, Zhouping Tang Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Stroke is a clinical disease with high incidence, high disability rate, and high mortality. But effective and safe therapy for stroke remains limited. Adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs perform a variety of therapeutic functions. MSC delivery improves neurological outcomes in ischemic stroke models via neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects such as angiogenic effects, promoting endogenous proliferation, and reducing apoptosis and inflammation. MSC secretome also showed powerful therapeutic effects as a cell-based therapy in animal experiments. Several clinical trials on MSC implantation via different routes have now been completed in patients with stroke. Although challenges such as immunogenicity of allo-MSCs and large-scale production strategies need to be overcome, MSCs can be considered as a promising potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Keywords: mesenchymal stromal cell, stroke, therapy, transplantation, exosomes

  3. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  4. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Complement in the Homeostatic and Ischemic Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawieh, Ali; Elvington, Andrew; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a component of the immune system involved in both recognition and response to pathogens, and it is implicated in an increasing number of homeostatic and disease processes. It is well documented that reperfusion of ischemic tissue results in complement activation and an inflammatory response that causes post-reperfusion injury. This occurs following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and triggers secondary damage that extends beyond the initial infarcted area, an outcome that has rationalized the use of complement inhibitors as candidate therapeutics after stroke. In the central nervous system, however, recent studies have revealed that complement also has essential roles in synaptic pruning, neurogenesis, and neuronal migration. In the context of recovery after stroke, these apparent divergent functions of complement may account for findings that the protective effect of complement inhibition in the acute phase after stroke is not always maintained in the subacute and chronic phases. The development of effective stroke therapies based on modulation of the complement system will require a detailed understanding of complement-dependent processes in both early neurodegenerative events and delayed neuro-reparatory processes. Here, we review the role of complement in normal brain physiology, the events initiating complement activation after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the contribution of complement to both injury and recovery. We also discuss how the design of future experiments may better characterize the dual role of complement in recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:26322048

  6. Genistein: A Boon for Mitigating Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Daglia, Maria; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Sobarzo-Sanchez, Eduardo; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In last decades, diet and dietary components have been regarded as important strategies to prevent the development or mitigate numerous chronic diseases, including inflammation, cardiovascular pathologies, cancer, etc. One of the most common dietary components of Asian population is soy. A plethora of research shows the promising effect of soy soy-based foodstuffs and genistein, which is one of the predominant isoflavone compounds, in the prevention and mitigation of stroke. Growing evidence shows that genistein, which is a selective estrogen receptor modulator, mitigates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the modification of oxidative stress and molecular pathways. The promising pharmacological role of genistein is attributed to its ability to suppress nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and Akt signaling pathway, direct antioxidant action, and targeting estrogen and androgen-mediated molecular pathways which help to mitigate stroke damages and prolong cell survival. In this work, we systematically review the current reports on the therapeutic role of genistein against ischemic stroke and its molecular mechanism of actions.

  7. Prevalence of electrocardiographic ST-T changes during acute ischemic stroke in patients without known ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Bak, Søren; Flemming Høilund-Carlsen, Poul;

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated characteristics and prevalence of ST-segment depression and/or T-wave inversion in the resting electrocardiogram of 244 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, but without ischemic heart disease. The prevalence of ST-T changes ranged from 13% to 16% and this is what to expect...

  8. Diagnosing Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Ischemic Strokes and Transient Ischemic Attacks Using Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Atrium Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Kristoffer Grundtvig; Christensen, Hanne; Høst, Nis;

    2016-01-01

    AF in patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We retrospectively analyzed 219 patients who after acute IS or TIA underwent a transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients were designated as patients with paroxysmal AF if they had one or more reported incidents...

  9. Effects of ischemic preconditioning on cyclinD1 expression during early ischemic reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Gang Cai; Jian-Sheng Xiao; Qi-Fa Ye

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of ischemic preconditioning on cyclinD1 expression in rat liver cells during early ischemic reperfusion.METHODS: Fifty-four SD rats were randomly divided into ischemic preconditioning group (IP), ischemia/reperfusion group (IR) and sham operation group (SO). The IP and IR groups were further divided into four sub-groups (n = 6). Sham operation group (SO)served as the control group (n = 6). A model of partial liver ischemia/reperfusion was used, in which rats were subjected to liver ischemia for 60 min prior to reperfusion. The animals in the IP group underwent ischemic preconditioning twice for 5 min each time prior to the ischemia/reperfusion challenge. After 0, 1, 2, and 4 h of reperfusion, serum and liver tissue in each group were collected to detect the level of serum ALT, liver histopathology and expression of cyclinD1 mRNA and protein. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell cycle as the quantity indicator of cell regeneration.RESULTS: Compared with IR group, IP group showed asignificantly lower ALT level in 1 h to 4 h sub-groups (P< 0.05). Proliferation index(PI) indicated by the S-phase and G2/M-phase ratio [(S+G2/M)/(G0/G1+S+G2/M)] was significantly increased in IP group at 0 and 1 h (26.44± 7.60% vs 18.56 ± 6.40%,41.87 ± 7.27% vs 20.25 ±6.70%, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, cyclinD1 protein expression could be detected in IP group. But in IR group, cyclinD1 protein expression occurred 2 h after reperfusion. The expression of cyclinD1 mRNA increased significantly in IP group at 0 and 1 h (0.568 ± 0.112 vs 0.274 ± 0.069, 0.762± 0.164 vs 0.348 ± 0.093, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Ischemic preconditioning can protect liver cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury, which may be related to cell proliferation and expression of cyclinD1 during early ischemic reperfusion.

  10. The Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke (DIAS) clinical trial program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kummer, Rüdiger; Albers, Gregory W; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Desmoteplase is a novel, highly fibrin-specific thrombolytic agent in phase III of clinical development. In comparison to alteplase, it has high fibrin selectivity, is associated with minimal or no neurotoxicity, and has no apparent negative effect on the blood-brain barrier. The safety and efficacy of desmoteplase is being studied in the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program. Three studies (Dose Escalation Study of Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-2) have been completed, two large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials are ongoing at >200 sites worldwide (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-3 and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-4, n = 800; DIAS-3 and DIAS-4), and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation phase II trial is ongoing in Japan (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Japan, n = 48; DIAS-J). The objective of DIAS-3 and DIAS-4 is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single IV bolus injection of 90 μg/kg desmoteplase given three- to nine-hours after onset of ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 4-24, age 18-85 years). The objective of DIAS-J is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of desmoteplase 70 and 90 μg/kg three- to nine-hours after ischemic stroke onset in Japanese patients. Patients are included with occlusion or high-grade stenosis (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 0-1) in proximal cerebral arteries on magnetic resonance or computed tomography angiography but excluded with extended ischemic edema on computed tomography or diffusion-weighted imaging. Desmoteplase is the only thrombolytic agent in late-stage development for acute ischemic stroke that is now tested in patients with proven stroke pathology. The results of the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program will show whether patients with major artery occlusions

  11. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  12. The intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Samuel J; Brandt, Lawrence J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has been and continues to be an epidemic in the United States. Obesity has been addressed in multiple health initiatives, including Healthy People 2010, with no state meeting the proposed goal of a prevalence of obesity fad diets, incentive-based exercise programs, and gastric bypass surgery; none of which have been optimal. In a murine model, it was shown that the majority of the intestinal microbiome consists of two bacterial phyla, the Bacteroidetes and the Firmicutes, and that the relative abundance of these two phyla differs among lean and obese mice; the obese mouse had a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (50% greater) than the lean mouse. The same results were appreciated in obese humans compared to lean subjects. The postulated explanation for this finding is that Firmicutes produce more complete metabolism of a given energy source than do Bacteroidetes, thus promoting more efficient absorption of calories and subsequent weight gain. Researchers were able to demonstrate that colonizing germ-free mice with the intestinal microbiome from obese mice led to an increased total body fat in the recipient mice despite a lack of change in diet. The converse, that, colonizing germ-free obese mice with the intestinal microbiome of thin mice causing a decreased total body fat in the recipient mice, has not yet been done. Other possible mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiome affects host obesity include induction of low-grade inflammation with lipopolysaccharide, regulation of host genes responsible for energy expenditure and storage, and hormonal communication between the intestinal microbiome and the host. The following review discusses the microbiome-obesity relationship and proposed mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota is hypothesized to influence weight gain.

  13. Small intestinal tophus mimicking tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Katoch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 72 year old male with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2 and previous gouty arthritis presented with weight loss, nausea, and vomiting. Ultrasound and CT scanning of the abdomen revealed a circumscribed tumor mass of the jejunum, 3.7 cm in diameter. Microscopic examination of the resected jejunum revealed the tumor to be a gouty tophus. To the best of our knowledge, three cases of tophi in the large intestine have previously been reported but none in the small intestine.

  14. Chronic pancreatitis: Maldigestion, intestinal ecology and intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency caused by chronic pancreatitis results from various factors whichregulate digestion and absorption of nutrients. Pancreatic function has been extensively studied over the last 40 years, even if some aspects of secretion and gastrointestinal adaptation are not completely understood. The main clinical manifestations of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency are fat malabsorption, known as steatorrhea, which consists of fecal excretion of more than 6 g of fat per day, weightloss, abdominal discomfort and abdominal swelling sensation. Fat malabsorption also results in a deficit of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) with consequent clinical manifestations. The relationships between pancreatic maldigestion, intestinal ecology and intestinal inflammation have not received particular attention, even if in clinical practice these mechanisms may be responsible for the low efficacy of pancreatic extracts in abolishing steatorrhea in some patients. The best treatments for pancreatic maldigestion should be re-evaluated, taking into account not only the correction of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extracts and the best duodenal pH to permit optimal efficacy of these extracts, but we also need to consider other therapeutic approaches including the decontamination of intestinal lumen, supplementation of bile acids and, probably, the use of probiotics which may attenuate intestinal inflammation

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  16. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  17. Microbiota, Intestinal Immunity, and Mouse Bustle

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglov, A.; Nedospasov, S

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota is regulated by the immune system. This paper discusses the role of cytokines and innate immunity lymphoid cells in the intestinal immune regulation by means of IgA.

  18. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welters, C.F.M.; Dejong, C.H.C.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Heineman, E.

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Welters CF, Dejong CH, Deutz NE, Heineman E. Department of Surgery, Academic Hospital and University of Maastricht, The Netherlands. Regaining enteral autonomy after extensive small bowel resection is dependent on intestinal adaptation. This adaptationa

  19. Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were......-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking...... randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program...

  20. PTEN degradation after ischemic stroke: a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Huang, R; Chen, Z; Yan, L-J; Simpkins, J W; Yang, S-H

    2014-08-22

    Tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is highly expressed in neurons and PTEN inhibition has been reported to be neuroprotective against ischemic stroke in experimental models. On the other hand, PTEN deletion has been shown to lead to cognitive impairment. In the current study, we examined the expression and functions of PTEN in an ischemic stroke rodent model. We found rapid S-nitrosylation and degradation of PTEN after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PTEN degradation leads to activation of Akt. PTEN partial deletion or PTEN inhibition increased the expression of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) γ2 subunit and enhanced GABAA receptor current. After cerebral ischemia, increased expression of GABAAR γ2 subunit was observed in the ischemia region and the penumbra area. We also observed PTEN loss in astrocytes after cerebral ischemia. Astrocytic PTEN partial knockout increased astrocyte activation and exacerbated ischemic damage. We speculated that ischemic stroke induced neuronal PTEN degradation, hence enhanced GABAA receptor-medicated neuronal activity inhibition which could attenuate excitotoxicity and provide neuroprotection during the acute phase after stroke, while inhibiting long-term functional recovery and contributing to vascular cognitive impairment after stroke. On the other hand, ischemic stroke induced astrocytic PTEN loss and enhanced ischemic damage and astrogliosis. Taken together, our study indicates that ischemic stroke induces rapid PTEN degradation in both neurons and astrocytes which play both protective and detrimental action in a spatiotemporal- and cell-type-dependent manner. Our study provides critical insight for targeting PTEN signaling pathway for stroke treatment.

  1. Correlation study on cystatin C and ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Rong-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between serum cystatin C (Cys C and patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of 115 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 110 controls were recorded and analyzed. Results The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group [(1.15 ± 0.34 mg/L] were higher than that of the control group [(0.99 ± 0.25 mg/L]. The difference between two groups was significant after correction of age and cardiovascular risk factors (t = ? 3.889, P = 0.000. It was found that age, Cys C, homocysteine (Hcy, type 2 diabetes mellitus [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fructosamine (FRU], smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension and intima-media thickness (IMT were risk factors for ischemic stroke on univariate Logistic regression analysis. The difference of serum Cys C level between the patients and controls was significant (P = 0.000, but through covariance analysis, after adjusted other risk factors, it was not significant (P = 0.875. Conclusion The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group is higher than the control group. It can be used as an indicator in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The elevation of serum Cys C is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but not an independent risk factor.

  2. Dyslipidemia and Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tian; ZHANG Jin Tao; YANG Mei; ZHANG Huan; LIU Wen Qing; KONG Yan; XU Tan; ZHANG Yong Hong

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the relationship between dyslipidemia and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MethodsData about 1 568 patients with acute ischemic stroke werecollected from 4 hospitals in Shandong Province from January 2006 to December 2008. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >10 at discharge or death was defined as the outcome. Effect of dyslipidemia on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis, respectively. ResultsThe serum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C were significantly associated with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis showed that the ORs and 95% CIs were 3.013 (1.259, 7.214)/2.655 (1.298, 5.43), 3.157(1.306, 7.631)/3.405(1.621, 7.154), and 0.482 (0.245, 0.946)/0.51 (0.282, 0.921), respectively, for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test showed no significant difference in observed and predicted risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke (chi-square=8.235, P=0.411). ConclusionSerum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C are positively related with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Central Nervous System Agents for Ischemic Stroke: Neuroprotection Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Mao, Lijuan; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Shuanhu; Zeng, Jiang; Popp, A. John; Wang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and disability in the United States. Ischemic stroke constitutes 85% of all stroke cases. However, no effective treatment has been found to prevent damage to the brain in such cases except tissue plasminogen activator with narrow therapeutic window, and there is an unmet need to develop therapeutics for neuroprotection from ischemic stroke. Studies have shown that mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, immune modulation, and oxidative stress and mediators such as excitatory amino acids, nitric oxide, inflammatory mediators, neurotransmitters, reactive oxygen species, and withdrawal of trophic factors may lead to the development of the ischemic cascade. Hence, it is essential to develop neuroprotective agents targeting either the mechanisms or the mediators leading to development of ischemic stroke. This review focuses on central nervous system agents targeting these biochemical pathways and mediators of ischemic stroke, mainly those that counteract apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidation, and well as glutamate inhibitors which have been shown to provide neuroprotection in experimental animals. All these agents have been shown to improve neurological outcome after ischemic insult in experimental animals in vivo, organotypic brain slice/acute slice ex vivo, and cell cultures in vitro and may therefore aid in preventing long-term morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:21521165

  4. Imaging of cerebral ischemic edema and neuronal death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kummer, Ruediger von [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Dresden (Germany); Dzialowski, Imanuel [Elblandklinikum Meissen, Neurologische Rehabilitationsklinik Grossenhain, Meissen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In acute cerebral ischemia, the assessment of irreversible injury is crucial for treatment decisions and the patient's prognosis. There is still uncertainty how imaging can safely differentiate reversible from irreversible ischemic brain tissue in the acute phase of stroke. We have searched PubMed and Google Scholar for experimental and clinical papers describing the pathology and pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia under controlled conditions. Within the first 6 h of stroke onset, ischemic cell injury is subtle and hard to recognize under the microscope. Functional impairment is obvious, but can be induced by ischemic blood flow allowing recovery with flow restoration. The critical cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold for irreversible injury is ∝15 ml/100 g x min. Below this threshold, ischemic brain tissue takes up water in case of any residual capillary flow (ionic edema). Because tissue water content is linearly related to X-ray attenuation, computed tomography (CT) can detect and measure ionic edema and, thus, determine ischemic brain infarction. In contrast, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) detects cytotoxic edema that develops at higher thresholds of ischemic CBF and is thus highly sensitive for milder levels of brain ischemia, but not specific for irreversible brain tissue injury. CT and MRI are complimentary in the detection of ischemic stroke pathology and are valuable for treatment decisions. (orig.)

  5. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  6. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Ghandehari, Kavian

    2012-10-01

    The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Ischemic Stroke (IS) was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males) with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000) respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020). Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occurrence of IS and IHD.

  7. Migration of neural stem cells to ischemic brain regions in ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiong; Li, Shan-Quan; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Hao; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jia, Feng; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2013-09-27

    An established rat model of ischemic stroke, produced by temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R), was used in the evaluation of organ migration of intra-arterial (IA) transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Immediately after transplantation, ischemic rats (n=8) transplanted with either NSCs (MCAO/R+NSC group) or NSC growth medium (MCAO/R+medium group) exhibited neurological dysfunction but rats in a sham+NSCs group (n=5) did not. During the post-operative period, neurological function improved to a similar extent in both MCAO/R groups. At 10 and 14 days post-transplantation, neurological function in the MCAO/R+NSC group was superior to that in the MCAO/R+medium group (pcells had begun differentiating into neurons and astrocytes. Rat NSCs can migrate into the ischemic region, survive, and differentiate into astrocytes and neurons, and thereby potentially improve neurologic function after cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of the collapse of pial collaterals by remote ischemic perconditioning during acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junqiang; Ma, Yonglie; Dong, Bin; Bandet, Mischa V; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Winship, Ian R

    2017-08-01

    Collateral circulation is a key variable determining prognosis and response to recanalization therapy during acute ischemic stroke. Remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) involves inducing peripheral ischemia (typically in the limbs) during stroke and may reduce perfusion deficits and brain damage due to cerebral ischemia. In this study, we directly investigated pial collateral flow augmentation due to RIPerC during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in rats. Blood flow through pial collaterals between the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and the MCA was assessed in male Sprague Dawley rats using in vivo laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) during distal MCAo. LSCI and TPLSM revealed that RIPerC augmented collateral flow into distal MCA segments. Notably, while control rats exhibited an initial dilation followed by a progressive narrowing of pial arterioles 60 to 150-min post-MCAo (constricting to 80-90% of post-MCAo peak diameter), this constriction was prevented or reversed by RIPerC (such that vessel diameters increased to 105-110% of post-MCAo, pre-RIPerC diameter). RIPerC significantly reduced early ischemic damage measured 6 h after stroke onset. Thus, prevention of collateral collapse via RIPerC is neuroprotective and may facilitate other protective or recanalization therapies by improving blood flow in penumbral tissue.

  9. Cerebral Microbleeds and Cognitive Function in Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolu; Wong, Adrian; Liu, Wenyan; Yang, Jie; Chu, Winnie C W; Au, Lisa; Lau, Alexander; Chan, Anne; Xiong, Yunyun; Soo, Yannie; Leung, Thomas; Wong, Lawrence K S; Mok, Vincent C T

    2015-01-01

    We explored the association between cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and cognitive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA). A total of 488 ischemic stroke/TIA patients received magnetic resonance imaging. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was used to evaluate global cognitive function and cognitive domains. The association of CMB quantity with cognitive function and the impact of CMB locations (strictly lobar, strictly deep, and mixed regions) on cognitive impairment were examined in regression models with adjustments for confounders. A total of 113 subjects (23.2%) had ≥1 CMB. Strictly lobar, strictly deep, and mixed CMBs were identified in 36, 40, and 37 patients, respectively. The presence of ≥5 CMBs or strictly deep CMBs was associated with the MoCA total score (p = 0.007 and 0.020, respectively). Of all MoCA domains tested, a lower score in the attention domain was related to the presence of ≥5 CMBs (p = 0.014) and strictly deep CMBs (p = 0.028). CMBs were associated with cognitive dysfunction in stroke/TIA patients, especially in the attention domain. This association was mainly driven by CMBs in the deep region, underlining the role of hypertensive microangiopathy in stroke-related cognitive impairment.

  10. The TNO gastro-intestinal model (TIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minekus, M.

    2015-01-01

    The TNO Gastro–Intestinal Model (TIM) is a multi–compartmental model, designed to realistically simulate conditions in the lumen of the gastro–intestinal tract. TIM is successfully used to study the gastro–intestinal behavior of a wide variety of feed, food and pharmaceutical products. Experiments i

  11. Glucocorticoids potentiate ischemic injury to neurons: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapolsky, R M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1985-09-27

    Sustained exposure to glucocorticoids, the adrenocortical stress hormones, is toxic to neurons, and such toxicity appears to play a role in neuron loss during aging. Previous work has shown that glucocorticoids compromise the capacity of neurons to survive a variety of metabolic insults. This report extends those observations by showing that ischemic injury to neurons in rat brain is also potentiated by exposure to high physiological titers of glucocorticoids and is attenuated by adrenalectomy. The synergy between ischemic and glucocorticoid brain injury was seen even when glucocorticoid levels were manipulated after the ischemic insult. Pharmacological interventions that diminish the adrenocortical stress response may improve neurological outcome from stroke or cardiac arrest.

  12. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Shaafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries.

  13. An update on brain imaging in transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillard-Scemama, R; Tisserand, M; Calvet, D; Jumadilova, D; Lion, S; Turc, G; Edjlali, M; Mellerio, C; Lamy, C; Naggara, O; Meder, J-F; Oppenheim, C

    2015-02-01

    Neuroimaging is critical in the evaluation of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and MRI is the recommended modality to image an ischemic lesion. The presence of a diffusion (DWI) lesion in a patient with transient neurological symptoms confirms the vascular origin of the deficit and is predictive of a high risk of stroke. Refinement of MR studies including high resolution DWI and perfusion imaging using either MRI or CT further improve the detection of ischemic lesions. Rapid etiological work-up includes non-invasive imaging of cervical and intracranial arteries to search for symptomatic stenosis/occlusion associated with an increased risk of stroke.

  14. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Citicoline for ischemic stroke: ICTUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data available in the literature on the use of citicoline in an experimental model of ischemic stroke (IS and in randomized multicenter placebo-controlled trials. It analyzes the results of the ICTUS trial in which 2298 patients with IS who received randomly citicoline or placebo for 24 hours after the onset of symptoms (I000 mg intravenously every I2 hours during the first 3 days, then orally as one 500-mg tablet every 12 hours during 6 weeks. The results of the trial confirmed the safety of citicoline used in IS, but failed to show its significant advantage over placebo in reducing the degree of disability (global improvement 90 days later. However, to pool the results of the ICTUS trial with those of other randomized multicenter placebo-controlled studies demonstrates a significant decrease in the degree of disability in IS patients treated with citicoline.

  16. [Current registry studies of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltkamp, R; Jüttler, E; Pfefferkorn, T; Purrucker, J; Ringleb, P

    2012-10-01

    Study registries offer the opportunity to evaluate the effects of new therapies or to observe the consequences of new treatments in clinical practice. The SITS-MOST registry confirmed the validity of findings from randomized trials on intravenous thrombolysis concerning safety and efficacy in the clinical routine. Current study registries concerning new interventional thrombectomy techniques suggest a high recanalization rate; however, the clinical benefit can only be evaluated in randomized, controlled trials. Similarly, the experiences of the BASICS registry on basilar artery occlusion have led to the initiation of a controlled trial. The benefit of hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been demonstrated by the pooled analysis of three randomized trials. Numerous relevant aspects are currently documented in the DESTINY-R registry. Finally, the recently started RASUNOA registry examines diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurring during therapy with new oral anticoagulants.

  17. The effects of estrogen in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellhoffer, Edward C; McCullough, Louise D

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and the most common cause of long-term disability in the USA. Women have a lower incidence of stroke compared with men throughout most of the lifespan which has been ascribed to protective effects of gonadal steroids, most notably estrogen. Due to the lower stroke incidence observed in pre-menopausal women and robust preclinical evidence of neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of estrogen, researchers have focused on the potential benefits of hormones to reduce ischemic brain injury. However, as women age, they are disproportionately affected by stroke, coincident with the loss of estrogen with menopause. The risk of stroke in elderly women exceeds that of men and it is clear that in some settings estrogen can have pro-inflammatory effects. This review will focus on estrogen and inflammation and its interaction with aging.

  18. Remote ischemic conditioning: Current clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Page, Sophie; Prunier, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) constitutes a promising method in which a tissue or organ is exposed to intermittent ischemia/reperfusion periods enabling it to provide protection to a distant target organ. RIC has been tested in various clinical settings through its simple application by means of intermittent inflation of a blood pressure cuff placed on a limb, primarily evaluating its potential abilities to decrease myocardial injury biomarkers. Its use on other organs, such as the kidneys or brain, has recently been a topic of research. To date, no study has yet been powerful enough to reach a conclusion on the potential benefit of RIC on clinical outcomes. The future role of RIC in the clinical arena could be clarified by the large phase III trials currently underway targeting major outcomes as primary endpoints.

  19. Acute ischemic stroke. Imaging and intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Lev, M.H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Neuroradiology Div.; Hirsch, J.A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Interventional Neuroradiology and Endovascular Neurosugery Service; Koroshetz, W.J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Acute Stroke Service; Schaefer, P. (eds.) [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Neuroradiology

    2006-07-01

    This timely book provides basic, practical and up-to-date information on how to use imaging to diagnose and treat patients with acute ischemic stroke. Written by physicians from the Massachusetts General Hospital and faculty from the Harvard Medical School, the book distills years of experience in the day-to-day management of acute stroke patients, as well as leading-edge basic and clinical research, into a practical guide. With the growing awareness that modern CT and MR imaging can meaningfully improve the outcome of the acute stroke patient, this book provides the practical information to advance the capacities of providers in delivering the most advanced care for this disease. (orig.)

  20. Targeting Neovascularization in Ischemic Retinopathy: Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Elsherbiny, Mohamed; Nussbaum, Julian; Othman, Amira; Megyerdi, Sylvia; Tawfik, Amany

    2014-01-01

    Pathological retinal neovascularization (RNV) is a common micro-vascular complication in several retinal diseases including retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and central vein occlusion. The current therapeutic modalities of RNV are invasive and although they may slow or halt the progression of the disease they are unlikely to restore normal acuity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop treatment modalities, which are less invasive and therefore associated with fewer procedural complications and systemic side effects. This review article summarizes our understanding of the pathophysiology and current treatment of RNV in ischemic retinopathies; lists potential therapeutic targets; and provides a framework for the development of future treatment modalities. PMID:25598837

  1. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; DEMONCHY, JGR; HEYMANS, HSA

    1992-01-01

    The role of the physiologic barrier function of the small bowel and its possible role in health and disease has attracted much attention over the past decade. The intestinal mucosal barrier for luminal macromolecules and microorganism is the result of non-immunologic and immunologic defense mechanis

  2. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peristaltic). They occur mostly in the upper small intestine and fade out before moving too far down-stream. They occur in most people at infrequent intervals, but in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) they may be associated with abdominal pain. ...

  3. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  4. Entomoftoromicose intestinal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábia Aparecida Carvalho

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de entomoftoromicose intestinal causada por Entomophthorales, em indivíduo de 19 anos, agricultor e sem doença associada. O paciente foi submetido a ressecção intestinal e o diagnóstico foi feito após análise da peça cirúrgica. Após revisão da literatura, são discutidos a evolução clínica, as características clinicopatológicas, as dificuldades no diagnóstico e o tratamento dessa entidade rara.A case of intestinal entomophthoramycosis caused by Entomophthorales in a man with 19 years-old, farmer and without associated disease. The patient was submitted to a intestinal ressection and diagnosis was carried through after analisys of the surgical specimen. After a review of the literature, the clinical evolution, clinico-pathologic features, difficulties in diagnosis and treatment are discussed.

  5. Drug Transporters in the Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    The enterocyte monolayer in the intestinal membrane impacts on the bioavailability (BA) of many orally administered active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The monolayer expresses a multitude of membrane transporters belonging to the solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) families ...

  6. Milk products and intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, R; Bovee-Oudenhoven, IMJ; Sesink, ALA; Kleibeuker, JH

    1998-01-01

    Milk products may improve intestinal health by means of the cytoprotective effects of their high calcium phosphate (CaPi) content. We hypothesized that this cytoprotection may increase host defenses against bacterial infections as well as decrease colon cancer risk. This paper summarizes our studies

  7. Management of refractory ischemic priapism: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capece M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marco Capece,1 Arianna Gillo,2 Andrea Cocci,3 Giulio Garaffa,1 Massimiliano Timpano,4 Marco Falcone4 1The Institute of Urology, University College of London Hospital (UCLH, London, UK; 2Department of Urology, “Umberto Parini” Hospital, Aosta, 3Department of Urology, Careggi Hospital, Firenze, 4Department of Urology, University of Turin, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin, Italy Objectives: The aim of the present manuscript is to review the current literature on priapism, focusing on the state-of-the-art knowledge of both the diagnosis and the treatment of the refractory ischemic priapism (IP.Methods: Pubmed and EMBASE search engines were used to search for words “priapism”, “refractory priapism”, “penile prosthesis”, “diagnosis priapism”, “priapism treatment”, “penile fibrosis”, “priapism therapy”. All the studies were carefully examined by the authors and then included in the review.Results: First-line treatment involves ejaculation, physical exercise and cold shower followed by corporal blood aspiration and injection of α-adrenoceptor agonists. Subsequently, a distal or proximal shunt may be considered. If none of the treatment is effective or the priapism episode lasts >48 hours penile prosthesis implantation could be the only option to solve the priapism and treat the ongoing erectile dysfunction.Conclusion: The management of IP is to achieve detumescence of persistent penile erection and to preserve erectile function after resolution of the priapic episode. On the other hand, penile fibrosis and following shortening should be prevented. Early penile prosthesis implantation in patients with refractory IP is able to solve both the priapic episode and prevent the otherwise certain penile shortening. Penile prosthesis implantation is the actual gold standard of care in cases of refractory IP. Keywords: priapism, ischemic priapism, penile fibrosis, penile prosthesis, shunt 

  8. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  9. Influence of remote ischemic preconditioning on cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow indexes of patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Lu; Ning-Ning Cui; Bin-Cheng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the influence of remote ischemic preconditioning on cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow indexes of patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Methods:A total of 58 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease in our hospital from April 2015 to January 2016 were selected as the study object, and 58 patients were randomly divided into two groups, 29 patients in control group were treated with routine treatment, 29 patients in observation group were treated with remote ischemic preconditioning on the basic treatment of control group, then the cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow indexes of two groups before the treatment and at first, third and sixth month after the treatment were respectively detected and compared.Results:The cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow indexes of two groups before the treatment all showed no significant differences (allP>0.05), while the cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow indexes of observation group at first, third and sixth month after the treatment were all significantly better than those before the treatment, and the results were all significantly better than those of control group at the same time too (allP>0.05).Conclusions: The influence of remote ischemic preconditioning on cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow indexes of patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease are better, and its application value for the patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease is higher.

  10. Early electrocortical changes consistent with ischemic preconditioning in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagrean, L.; Moldovan, M.; Munteanu, Ana-Maria

    2002-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) of the brain describes the neuroprotection induced by a short, conditioning ischemic episode (CIE) to a subsequent severe (test) ischemic episode (TIE). Most of the supporting evidence for IPC is based on histological assessment, several days after TIE. The aim...... of this study is to investigate if changes induced by IPC can be detected within 30 min of reperfusion following the ischemic episode. A rat model of "four-vessel occlusion" transient global cerebral ischemia and parametric analysis of electrocorticogram were used. A control group was subjected directly to a 10...... min TIE, and in a preconditioned group TIE was induced 48 h after a 3 min CIE. Quantitative histology was performed 48 h after TIE. Our key finding is that, 30 min after reperfusion, there is a significant increase in the electrocortical slow activity in the control group but not in the preconditioned...

  11. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  12. Ischemia reperfusion injury, ischemic conditioning and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejay, Anne; Fang, Fei; John, Rohan; Van, Julie A D; Barr, Meredith; Thaveau, Fabien; Chakfe, Nabil; Geny, Bernard; Scholey, James W

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion, which is characterized by deficient oxygen supply and subsequent restoration of blood flow, can cause irreversible damages to tissue. Mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of ischemia reperfusion injury are complex, multifactorial and highly integrated. Extensive research has focused on increasing organ tolerance to ischemia reperfusion injury, especially through the use of ischemic conditioning strategies. Of morbidities that potentially compromise the protective mechanisms of the heart, diabetes mellitus appears primarily important to study. Diabetes mellitus increases myocardial susceptibility to ischemia reperfusion injury and also modifies myocardial responses to ischemic conditioning strategies by disruption of intracellular signaling responsible for enhancement of resistance to cell death. The purpose of this review is twofold: first, to summarize mechanisms underlying ischemia reperfusion injury and the signal transduction pathways underlying ischemic conditioning cardioprotection; and second, to focus on diabetes mellitus and mechanisms that may be responsible for the lack of effect of ischemic conditioning strategies in diabetes.

  13. Therapeutically Targeting Neuroinflammation and Microglia after Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  14. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in acute ischemic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Suryapranata (Haryanto)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractAcute myocardial ischemic syndromes are apparently related to the underlying pathophysiology leading to the clinical instability. Depending on the completeness and the duration of blood deprivation, different clinical syndromes result, such as sudden death, acute transmural infarction, n

  15. Factors influencing ischemic cerebrovascular disease complicated by hyperhomocysteinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongping An; Yonghong Xing; Sha Jin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia, as an important risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease is receiving increasing attention.OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether differences of gender, age, cerebrovascular disease typing, and disease conditions exist when ischemic cerebrovascular disease occurs together with hyperhomocysteinemia. DESIGN: A controlled observation. SETTING: Department of Neurology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 601 acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease inpatients, comprising 386 males and 215 females, aged 33-90 years old, were admitted to the Department of Stroke, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital between August 2005 and April 2007, and were recruited for this study. All included patients consisted of 342 aged patients (≥ 60 years old) and 92 middle-aged and young patients ( 0.05). No significant difference in incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia existed between mild, moderate, and severe cerebrovascular disease patients (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: There is a greater chance of ischemic cerebrovascular disease complicated by hyperhomocysteinemia in older, male patients.

  16. Arterial hypertension, microalbuminuria, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    2000-01-01

    Albumin excretion in urine is positively correlated with the presence of ischemic heart disease and atherosclerotic risk factors. We studied prospectively whether a slight increase of urinary albumin excretion, ie, microalbuminuria, adds to the increased risk of ischemic heart disease among...... hypertensive subjects. In 1983 and 1984, blood pressure, urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio, plasma total and HDL cholesterol levels, body mass index, and smoking status were obtained in a population-based sample of 2085 subjects, aged 30 to 60 years, who were free from ischemic heart disease......, diabetes mellitus, and renal or urinary tract disease. Untreated arterial hypertension or borderline hypertension was present in 204 subjects, who were followed until 1993 by the National Hospital and Death Certificate Registers with respect to development of ischemic heart disease. During 1978 person...

  17. School-Aged Outcomes After Neonatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa Czech; Pardo, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the Accident Vasculaire Cérébral de nouveau-né (AVCnn) Study Group, a multicenter registry in France, examined outcomes at 7 years of age in children previously identified with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS).

  18. School-Aged Outcomes After Neonatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Theresa; Pardo, Andrea C

    2016-02-01

    Investigators from the Accident Vasculaire Cérébral de nouveau-né (AVCnn) Study Group, a multicenter registry in France, examined outcomes at 7 years of age in children previously identified with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS).

  19. White Matter Hyperintensities Improve Ischemic Stroke Recurrence Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders;

    2017-01-01

    -based, observational cohort study, we included 832 patients (mean age 59.6 (SD 13.9); 42.0% females) with incident ischemic stroke and no AF. We assessed the severity of white matter hyperintensities using MRI. Hazard ratios stratified by the white matter hyperintensities score and adjusted for the components......BACKGROUND: Nearly one in 5 patients with ischemic stroke will invariably experience a second stroke within 5 years. Stroke risk stratification schemes based solely on clinical variables perform only modestly in non-atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and improvement of these schemes will enhance...... their clinical utility. Cerebral white matter hyperintensities are associated with an increased risk of incident ischemic stroke in the general population, whereas their association with the risk of ischemic stroke recurrence is more ambiguous. In a non-AF stroke cohort, we investigated the association between...

  20. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  1. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  2. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  3. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS...

  4. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ahsan Aftab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is due to either local thrombus formation or emboli that occlude a cerebral artery, together with chronic kidney disease represent major mortality and morbidity. Here wer present a case of 53 years old Malay man, admitted to a hospital in Malaysia complaining of sudden onset of weakness on right sided upper and lower limb associated with slurred speech. Patient was also suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 4, and diabetes mellitus(un controlled. He was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke with cranial nerve 7 palsy (with right hemiparesis, acute on chronic kidney disease precipitated by dehydration and ACE inhibitor, and hyperkalemia. Patients with ischemic disease and chronic kidney disaese require constant monitering and carefull selected pharmacotherapy. Patient was placed under observation and was prescribed multiple pharamacotherpay to stabalise detoriating condition. Keywords: ischemic disease; chronic kidney disease; uncontrolled hypertension. | PubMed

  5. Ischemic Stroke:Therapy of Risk and Benefit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2005-01-01

    @@ Therapeutic thrombolysis is an immense opportunity in acute stroke care. For the first time, there is a treatment that has a high probability of being effective if given early enough to patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  7. Effect of Meconium on the Contractility of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A Clue to Intestinal Damage in Gastroschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuş, Osman Z; Solmaz, Bora; Ateş, Oğuz; Ateş, Mehmet; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza M

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal damage has been shown to occur when intra-amniotic meconium concentration exceeds threshold level. However, the mechanism of the meconium-induced intestinal damage is still unclear. Intestinal ischemia can cause intestinal damage in gastroschisis. This study was aimed to determine the effects of intra-amniotic meconium on the contractility of superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Eighteen-day-old fertilized chick embryos (Gallus Domesticus) were extirpated and intestines were harvested. The SMA specimens were prepared as 4 mm segments in the organ bath with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. The isometric contraction responses of the SMA specimens were evaluated with norepinephrine, different meconium concentrations, and clear amniotic fluid. Maximum isometric contractions responses (MICR) of the SMA specimens were recorded with an amplifier system on a computer. In the norepinephrine group, MICR was found as 2.92 ± 0.57 mN. While MICR of the 1/100 meconium group (highest meconium concentration) was found as 1.56 ± 0.40 mN, MICR of the clear amniotic fluid group was 0.41 ± 0.07 mN. The MICR of the norepinephrine group was significantly increased compared with the 1/100 meconium and clear amniotic fluid groups. MICR of the 1/100 meconium group was also found to be significantly increased compared with clear amniotic fluid group. No statistically significant difference was found among the meconium subgroups. Intra-amniotic meconium in fetuses with gastroschisis might cause ischemic intestinal damage by reducing the intestinal blood flow. Further studies are needed to show the outcomes of the vasoactive effect of meconium on the SMA blood flow. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Stem Cells in Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Weilin Xu; Jingwei Zheng; Liansheng Gao; Tao Li; Jianmin Zhang; Anwen Shao

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke, the most common subtype of stroke, has been one of the leading causes of mobility and mortality worldwide. However, it is still lacking of efficient agents. Stem cell therapy, with its vigorous advantages, has attracted researchers around the world. Numerous experimental researches in animal models of stroke have demonstrated the promising efficacy in treating ischemic stroke. The underlying mechanism involved antiapoptosis, anti-inflammation, promotion of angiogenesis and ne...

  9. Deaths from ischemic disease, anthropometry and cardiac biometry

    OpenAIRE

    Leal, A; de Oliveira, J.; Amado, J.; Gomes, L.; Magalhaes, T.

    2005-01-01

    Rev Port Cardiol. 2005 Apr;24(4):521-30. Deaths from ischemic disease, anthropometry and cardiac biometry. [Article in English, Portuguese] Leal A, Oliveira J, Amado J, Gomes L, Magalhães T. Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas Abel Salazar-Saúde Comunitária, Porto, Portugal. Abstract INTRODUCTION: The relation between body mass index (BMI)/obesity and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in ischemic heart disease (IHD) has not been completely established, based o...

  10. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Cury Rezende; Rosa Maria Rahmi; Whady Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still c...

  11. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  12. A Multicenter Trial of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning for Heart Surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Brosteanu, Oana; Cremer, Jochen; Gruenewald, Matthias; Stoppe, Christian; Coburn, Mark; Schaelte, Gereon; Böning, Andreas; Niemann, Bernd; Roesner, Jan; Kletzin, Frank; Strouhal, Ulrich; Reyher, Christian; Laufenberg-Feldmann, Rita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is reported to reduce biomarkers of ischemic and reperfusion injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but uncertainty about clinical outcomes remains. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, double-blind, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving adults who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass under total anesthesia with intravenous propofol. The trial compared upper-limb RIPC with a s...

  13. Life style modification for patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, V

    2013-01-01

    With a view to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle modification in patients with ischemic heart disease, a quasi-experimental study with quantitative approach was undertaken on 60 patients of ischemic heart disease. Purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the patients. The results showed that educating the patients about cessation of smoking, taking proper diet, anxiety reduction and counselling helped in preventing the progression of ischaemic heart disease.

  14. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchao; Lin, Yanlin; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Bin; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between serum uric acid levels and neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke reported conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to assess the impact of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched through September 26, 2014 to identify eligible published or unpublished studies on the association between serum uric acid levels and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Hazard ratio (HR) for poor outcome or mean differences of serum uric acid levels with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were pooled using meta-analysis. The primary outcome was occurrence of poor outcomes, while the secondary outcome was the mean differences of serum uric acid levels in patients with good or poor outcomes. Ten eligible studies with a total of 8131 acute ischemic stroke patients were included into the meta-analysis. Compared with low serum uric acid level, high serum uric acid level was associated better outcome after acute ischemic stroke (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.88, P = 0.0001). Sensitivity analysis further identified the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Patients with good outcomes had a higher serum uric acid level compared with those with poor outcome (mean difference = 30.61 μmol/L, 95% CI 20.13-41.08, P acute ischemic stroke. High uric acid level at the onset is a biomarker of better prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  15. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development.

  16. Electrophysiologic Effects of Propafenone on Ischemic Ventricular Tachyarrhythmias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Musheng; Ma Yanfeng; Guo Zhibin

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To observe the electrophysiologic effects of propafenone (Prop) on ischemic ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods A canine ischemic ventricular tachyarrhythmia model was established in open-chest dogs subjected to programmed electrical stimulation (PES) on 5~8 days after acute myocardial infarction. The electrophysiologic effects of propafenone were observed in the model. Results Propafenone distinctly lengthened the QTc interval (P> 0.01) and effective refractory period (ERP) of normal and ischemic ventricular myocardium (NERP and IERP) respectively (P > 0.01), decreased the dispersion of ERP in ischemic myocardium and in left ventricle (P > 0.01), and increased the diastolic excitability threshold of normal and ischemic ventricular myocardium remarkably (P > 0.01). Propafenone effectively prevented PES-induced ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF)(P > 0.01) and ischemia-induced VT/VF (P > 0.05).Conclusions The results indicated that the canine model produced by our methods is a worthy and reliable one, propafenone may be effective in preventing the onset of VT/VF after myocardial ischemic damage in dogs, and deserve further attention as an antifibrillatory agent.

  17. Functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hao; ZHANG Shao-cheng; TAN Zhang-yong; ZHU Hong-wei; ZHANG Qiu-lin; LI Ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the method of functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb and propose a classification protocol for ischemic contracture in the lower limb based on its severity and prognosis.Methods: Atotal of 42 patients with ischemic contracture in the lower limb were included in this study. According to different types of disturbance and degrees of severity,surgical reconstructions consisting of nerve decompression,tendon lengthening or transfer, intrinsic foot muscle release and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis were performed in every patient.Results: Postoperatively, all patients were able to walk on flat ground. Drop foot was corrected in 10 patients,and 5 patients still felt some difficulty during stair activity.Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon was performed in 12 patients, and their walking stability was improved. Seven patients accepted ipsilateral suraltibial nerve anastomosis, and sensitivity recovery reached to S2 in 2 patients and S3 in 5 patients.Conclusions: Ischemic contracture in the lower limb is a devastating complication after lower limb trauma. The prevention of contracture is much more important than the treatment of an established contracture. Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis, which was initially implemented by us, could improve the functional recovery of ischemic contracture in lower limbs, and thus provides a new alternative for functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb.

  18. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter; Jensen, Gorm B; Benn, Marianne

    2011-04-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population. A total of 7,579 women and 6,372 men from the Copenhagen City Heart Study with measurements of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol at baseline in 1976-1978 were followed for up to 33 years; of these, 837 women and 837 men developed ischemic stroke during follow-up, which was 100% complete. The fluctuation of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol over 15 years was similar. In both women and men, stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides were associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. Compared to women with triglycerides triglyceride levels of 1.00-1.99 mmol/liter to 3.9 (95%CI, 1.3-11.1) for triglyceride levels ≥ 5 mmol/liter (trend: p cholesterol levels were not associated with risk of ischemic stroke except in men with cholesterol levels ≥ 9.00 mmol/liter vs triglycerides were associated with increasing risk of ischemic stroke while increasing cholesterol levels were not. In men, these results were similar except that cholesterol ≥ 9.00 mmol/liter was associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  19. Hepatitis isquémica Ischemic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Amuchástegui (h

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La hepatitis isquémica es una complicación sumamente infrecuente de cirugía cardiovascular. Las biopsias muestran necrosis centrolobulillar. El término de "hepatitis" fue propuesto debido al aumento de transaminasas similar a aquellas de origen infeccioso, e "isquémica" por falla en la perfusión hepática. Posteriormente se definió el término de hepatitis isquémica como cuadro de elevación aguda y reversible (dentro de las 72 horas de transaminasas de hasta 20 veces el valor normal, asociado a trastornos en la perfusión hepática, luego de haber excluido otras causas de hepatitis aguda o daño hepatocelular. Se describe el caso de un paciente de 53 años que consulta por dolor epigástrico de 12 h de evolución sin fiebre, náuseas ni vómitos, resistente a la medicación. Tenía antecedentes inmediatos de reemplazo de válvula aórtica, y estaba anticoagulado. Evolucionó con shock y fallo multiorgánico. El examen evidenció marcada ictericia y signos de taponamiento pericárdico, asociado a un aumento considerable de enzimas hepáticas. Un ecocardiograma informó signos de taponamiento cardíaco y ausencia de disección aórtica. Se decidió pericardiocentesis, extrayéndose 970 cc. de líquido sanguinolento, y hemodiálisis, con notable mejoría de su estado hemodinámico. Los valores enzimáticos disminuyeron. Los marcadores virales fueron negativos.Ischemic hepatitis is an uncommon cardiovascular surgery complication. Hepatic biopsies show centrolobulillar necrosis. The term "hepatitis" was proposed because of a raise in hepatic enzymes similar with infectious disease, and "ischemic" because of failure in hepatic perfusion. Ischemic hepatitis was then defined as an acute and reversible elevation of hepatic enzymes (within 72 h, associated with disturbance in hepatic perfusion after excluding other causes of acute hepatitis. A 53 year-old male presented complaining of a 12 h epigastric pain, without nausea or vomiting, resistant

  20. Statin Prescription Adhered to Guidelines for Patients Hospitalized due to Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Oh, Mi Sun; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Byung-Chul; ,

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Secondary stroke prevention guidelines recommend statins for the management of dyslipidemia in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). This study assessed the guideline-based statin prescription (GBSP) rate in Korea and the associated physician and patient factors. Methods A survey was conducted to assess Korean neurologists' knowledge of and attitude toward the current dyslipidemia management guidelines. The characteristics and discharge statin prescriptio...

  1. Low ankle-brachial index predicts cardiovascular risk after acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Markus A; Lutz, Katrin; Röhl, Jens-Eric; Neuner, Bruno; Masuhr, Florian

    2009-12-01

    A low ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) is an established risk marker for cardiovascular disease and mortality in the general population, but little is known about its prognostic value in individuals with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). An inception cohort of 204 patients with acute ischemic stroke or TIA was followed up for a mean of 2.3 years. At baseline, patients underwent ABI measurement and were assessed for risk factors, cardiovascular comorbidities, and cervical or intracranial artery stenosis. The association between low ABI (stroke, myocardial infarction, or death was examined by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. A low ABI was found in 63 patients (31%) and was associated with older age, current smoking, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease, and cervical or intracranial stenosis. During a total of 453.0 person-years of follow-up, 37 patients experienced outcome events (8.2% per person-year), with a higher outcome rate per person-year in patients with low ABI (12.8% vs 6.3%, P=0.03). In survival analysis adjusted for age and stroke etiology, patients with a low ABI had a 2 times higher risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death than those with a normal ABI (hazard ratio=2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.5). Additional adjustment for risk factors and cardiovascular comorbidities did not attenuate the association. A low ABI independently predicted subsequent cardiovascular risk and mortality in patients with acute stroke or TIA. ABI measurement may help to identify high-risk patients for targeted secondary stroke prevention.

  2. Enterocyte shedding and epithelial lining repair following ischemia of the human small intestine attenuate inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijsen, Robert A; Derikx, Joep P M; Kuipers, Dian; van Dam, Ronald M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Buurman, Wim A

    2009-09-15

    Recently, we observed that small-intestinal ischemia and reperfusion was found to entail a rapid loss of apoptotic and necrotic cells. This study was conducted to investigate whether the observed shedding of ischemically damaged epithelial cells affects IR induced inflammation in the human small gut. Using a newly developed IR model of the human small intestine, the inflammatory response was studied on cellular, protein and mRNA level. Thirty patients were consecutively included. Part of the jejunum was subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and variable reperfusion periods (mean reperfusion time 120 (+/-11) minutes). Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Increased plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) levels indicated loss in epithelial cell integrity in response to ischemia and reperfusion (pintestine, thirty minutes of ischemia followed by up to 4 hours of reperfusion, does not seem to lead to an explicit inflammatory response. This may be explained by a unique mechanism of shedding of damaged enterocytes, reported for the first time by our group.

  3. Pretreatment with adenosine and adenosine A1 receptor agonist protects against intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Haktan Ozacmak; Hale Sayan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of adenosine and A1 receptor activation on reperfusion-induced small intestinal injury.METHODS: Rats were randomized into groups with sham operation, ischemia and reperfusion, and systemic treatments with either adenosine or 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, A1 receptor agonist or 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, A1 receptor antagonist, plus adenosine before ischemia. Following reperfusion, contractions of ileum segments in response to KCl, carbachol and substance P were recorded. Tissue myeloperoxidase,malondialdehyde, and reduced glutathione levels were measured.RESULTS: Ischemia significantly decreased both contraction and reduced glutathione level which were ameliorated by adenosine and agonist administration. Treatment also decreased neutrophil infiltration and membrane lipid peroxidation. Beneficial effects of adenosine were abolished by pretreatment with A1 receptor antagonist.CONCLUSION: The data suggest that adenosine and A1 receptor stimulation attenuate ischemic intestinal injury via decreasing oxidative stress, lowering neutrophil infiltration, and increasing reduced glutathione content.

  4. Role of homocysteine in the ischemic stroke nad development of ischemic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lehotsky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a toxic, sulfur-containing intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy, as a consequence of impaired Hcy metabolism or defects in crucial co-factors that participate in its recycling, is assumed as an independent human stroke risk factor. Neural cells are sensitive to prolonged hHcy treatment, because Hcy cannot be metabolized either by the transsulfuration pathway or by the folate/vitamin B12 independent remethylation pathway. Its detrimental effect after ischemia-induced damage includes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and posttranslational modifications of proteins via homocysteinylation and thiolation. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC is an adaptive response of the CNS to sub-lethal ischemia, which elevates tissues tolerance to subsequent ischemia. The main focus of this review is on the recent data on homocysteine metabolism and mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. In this context, the review documents an increased oxidative stress and functional modification of enzymes involved in redox balance in experimentally induced hyperhomocysteinemia. It also gives an interpretation whether hyperhomocysteinemia alone or in combination with IPC affects the ischemia-induced neurodegenerative changes as well as intracellular signalling. Studies document that hHcy alone significantly increased Fluoro-Jade C- and TUNEL-positive cell neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus as well as in the cortex. IPC, even if combined with hHcy, could still preserve the neuronal tissue from the lethal ischemic effects. This review also describes the changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK protein pathways following ischemic injury and IPC. These studies provide evidence for the interplay and tight integration between ERK and p38 MAPK signalling mechanisms in response to the hHcy and also in association of hHcy with ischemia/IPC challenge in the rat brain. Further investigations of the protective factors

  5. [Chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, T; Navarrete, J; Celestina, A

    1989-01-01

    Much has been written about gastric mucosae behavior and the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to learn something more about these matters in peruvian population. We selected 100 patients with endoscopically no localized lesions between 30 to 70 years of age. We took 8 samples of gastric mucosae in each patient which were carefully examined for the presence of inflammatory changes, settle the line type between antral and fundic mucosae and the frequency of intestinal metaplasia finding. The results showed disagreement between endoscopic and histological findings, so we conclude it is better to diagnose chronic gastritis on the basis of histological parameters. The line between antral and fundic mucosae was of the close type one found in 87% of all cases and it advanced proximally with increasing age. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 46% of the whole number of patients and the rate of occurrence increased in 50% over 50 years age. These findings will let us compare future investigations of gastric mucosae behavior with localized benign or malign lesions.

  6. Hirschsprung's disease - Postsurgical intestinal dysmotility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tresoldi das Neves Romaneli

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the case of an infant with Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis, which, after surgical resection of the aganglionic segment persisted with irreversible functional intestinal obstruction; discuss the difficulties in managing this form of congenital aganglionosis and discuss a plausible pathogenetic mechanism for this case. Case description: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis was established in a two-month-old infant, after an episode of enterocolitis, hypovolemic shock and severe malnutrition. After colonic resection, the patient did not recover intestinal motor function that would allow enteral feeding. Postoperative examination of remnant ileum showed the presence of ganglionic plexus and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in the proximal bowel segments. At 12 months, the patient remains dependent on total parenteral nutrition. Comments: Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis has clinical and surgical characteristics that differentiate it from the classic forms, complicating the diagnosis and the clinical and surgical management. The postoperative course may be associated with permanent morbidity due to intestinal dysmotility. The numerical reduction or alteration of neural connections in the interstitial cells of Cajal may represent a possible physiopathological basis for the condition.

  7. Intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-yi; WANG Fang; FENG Jie-xiong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on the observation that coagulation necrosis occurs in the majority of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) patients,it is clear that intestinal ischemia is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of NEC.However,the published studies regarding the role of intestinal ischemia in NEC are controversial.The aim of this paper is to review the current studies regarding intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and NEC,and try to elucidate the exact role of intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction in NEC.Data sources The studies cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms used were "intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction" and "neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis".Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators in the field were selected.Results Immature regulatory control of mesentery circulation makes the neonatal intestinal microvasculature vulnerable.When neonates are subjected to stress,endothelial cell dysfunction occurs and results in vasoconstriction of arterioles,inflammatory cell infiltration and activation in venules,and endothelial barrier disruption in capillaries.The compromised vasculature increases circulation resistance and therefore decreases intestinal perfusion,and may eventually progress to intestinal necrosis.Conclusion Intestinal ischemia plays an important role through the whole course of NEC.New therapeutic agents targeting intestinal ischemia,like HB-EGF,are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of NEC.

  8. Immunogenetic control of the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietta, Eric; Rishi, Abdul; Taneja, Veena

    2015-07-01

    All vertebrates contain a diverse collection of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, on their various body surfaces, and the ecological community of these microorganisms is referred to as the microbiota. Mucosal sites, such as the intestine, harbour the majority of microorganisms, and the human intestine contains the largest community of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. This intestinal community of bacteria is diverse, and there is a significant variability among individuals with respect to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Both genetic and environmental factors can influence the diversity and composition of the intestinal bacteria with the predominant environmental factor being diet. So far, studies have shown that diet-dependent differences in the composition of intestinal bacteria can be classified into three groups, called enterotypes. Other environmental factors that can influence the composition include antibiotics, probiotics, smoking and drugs. Studies of monozygotic and dizygotic twins have proven that genetics plays a role. Recently, MHC II genes have been associated with specific microbial compositions in human infants and transgenic mice that express different HLA alleles. There is a growing list of genes/molecules that are involved with the sensing and monitoring of the intestinal lumen by the intestinal immune system that, when genetically altered, will significantly alter the composition of the intestinal microflora. The focus of this review will be on the genetic factors that influence the composition of the intestinal microflora.

  9. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Scalzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF and cerebral blood volume (CBV, mean transit time (MTT, time-to-peak (TTP, and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely.

  10. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kevin N.; Simard, J. Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous (IV) formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. Early phase II study of MRI and plasma biomarkers support the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase IIb study and definitive efficacy studies are urgently needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  11. Curbing Inflammation in the Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto B. Evora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modern concept considers acute coronary syndrome as an autoinflammatory disorder. From the onset to the healing stage, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction has been well documented since the 1940s and 1950s, including increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the C-reactive protein analysis, and the determination of serum complement. It is surprising to note, based on a wide literature overview including the following 30 years (decades of 1960, 1970, and 1980, that the inflammatory acute myocardium infarction lost its focus, virtually disappearing from the literature reports. The reversal of this historical process occurs in the 1990s with the explosion of studies involving cytokines. Considering the importance of inflammation in the pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease, the aim of this paper is to present a conceptual overview in order to explore the possibility of curbing this inflammatory process.

  12. Management of refractory ischemic priapism: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Marco; Gillo, Arianna; Cocci, Andrea; Garaffa, Giulio; Timpano, Massimiliano; Falcone, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present manuscript is to review the current literature on priapism, focusing on the state-of-the-art knowledge of both the diagnosis and the treatment of the refractory ischemic priapism (IP). Pubmed and EMBASE search engines were used to search for words "priapism", "refractory priapism", "penile prosthesis", "diagnosis priapism", "priapism treatment", "penile fibrosis", "priapism therapy". All the studies were carefully examined by the authors and then included in the review. First-line treatment involves ejaculation, physical exercise and cold shower followed by corporal blood aspiration and injection of α-adrenoceptor agonists. Subsequently, a distal or proximal shunt may be considered. If none of the treatment is effective or the priapism episode lasts >48 hours penile prosthesis implantation could be the only option to solve the priapism and treat the ongoing erectile dysfunction. The management of IP is to achieve detumescence of persistent penile erection and to preserve erectile function after resolution of the priapic episode. On the other hand, penile fibrosis and following shortening should be prevented. Early penile prosthesis implantation in patients with refractory IP is able to solve both the priapic episode and prevent the otherwise certain penile shortening. Penile prosthesis implantation is the actual gold standard of care in cases of refractory IP.

  13. Radiology of ischemic strokes in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raybaud, C.A.; Jiddane, M.; Livet, M.O.; Pinsard, N.

    1985-11-01

    Arterial ischemic strokes are a relatively frequent diagnostic occurrence in pediatric neuroradiology. They occur mostly in three main etiologic contexts: 1) congenital heart disease; 2) neonatal distress; 3) infections, focal or general inducing vasculitis, but many cases are considered as idiopathic. The positive diagnosis is made by CT; in neonates, however, ultrasound appears as a promising tool. The CT features are basically similar at that age and in adults, although the site of the infarct may result from pathologies more particular to children (e.g. basal ganglia infarction due to arteritis of the carotid syphon and its branches). Infarcts may be multiple and also more frequently hemorrhagic at that age, the homorrhagic phenomena affecting only the gray matter except in young infants in which the subcortical white matter may be affected also. Anatomical sequels include focal atrophy and asymmetry of the brain. Data regarding the etiology can be gathered from angiography which may show the degree of impairment of the arterial bed, its extent, the collateral blood supply and the morphological type of arterial lesion responsible for the cerebral damage. The most particular picture at that age is that of the often diffuse vasculitis, with its various expressions (segmental narrowing of the lumen, dissecting aneurysm, string-of-beads appearance). (orig.).

  14. Estrogen and ischemic heart disease in females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević-Gajić Vesna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although ischemic heart disease (IHD develops in both genders under the influence of the same risk factors, it is much less frequent among female population, which is mostly assigned to favorable effects of estrogen. Objective: Since latest investigations have pointed to higher incidence of disease in female population, the objective of our study was to examine the relation between estrogen and other clinical and biochemical parameters significant for its manifestation. Method: The relation between estrogen levels and frequency of obesity, diabetes, hypertension as well as the levels of total, HDL, LDL i VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, Lp(a, apoprotein A i B i PAI-1 was analyzed in 50 (25 pre- and postmenopausal patients, treated due to IHD in the Health Center, Krusevac, in 2002 year. Results: Low concentration of estrogen was found in 22 (44% patients. In addition, frequency of diabetes, obesity and risky levels of high atherogenic lipid fractions (total and LDL cholesterol, Lp(a, apoprotein B was insignificantly higher, whereas the concentrations of PAI 1, triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were lower, with significant correlation between estrogen level and PAI-1 (T=0.32, p<0.05. Conclusion: Despite all past investigations, numerous questions related to high incidence of IHD among premenopausal women, have remained open - whether it occurs as a consequence of reduced estrogen synthesis, lower expression of estrogen receptors, their modified function or maybe concomitant influence of other risk factors, not necessarily connected with sex, that eliminate protective effects of this hormone.

  15. Aquaporin-4 and ischemic brain edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saihong Dun; Yang Guo

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and brain edema.DATA SOURCES: Using the terms of "aquaporin-4, brain edema", we searched PubMed database to identify studies published from January 1997 to April 2006 in the English languages. Meanwhile, we also searched China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for related studies.STUDY SELECTION: The collected data were selected firstly. Studies on AQP4 and brain edema were chosen and their full-texts were searched for, and those with repetitive or review studies were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 146 related studies were collected, 42 of them were involved and the other 104 studies were used for reading reference data.DATA SYNTHESIS: AQP4 is a selective water permeable integral membrane protein. It is mainly expressed in astrocytes and ependymocyte, and is the important structural basis for water regulation and transportation between glial cells and cerebrospinal fluid or vessels. Phosphorylation is involved in the regulation of AQP4.AQP4 participates in the formation of brain edema caused by various factors. Studies on the structure and pathological changes of AQP4 are still in the initial stage, and the role and mechanism of AQP4 in the formation of brain edema is very unclear.CONCLUSION: AQP4 plays a critical regulating role in the formation of ischemic brain edema, but whether it is regulated by drugs lacks reliable evidence.

  16. Angiographic findings of ischemic stroke in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, R; Sato, S; Yoshimoto, T

    1992-12-01

    A cooperative study was undertaken in the Tohoku district of Japan to investigate the relatively rare phenomenon of cerebral infarction in children. The purpose of the present paper is to describe the cerebral angiographic findings in 48 children whose ischemic lesions were confirmed by CT scan. The majority of lesions were considered to be idiopathic. The areas of cerebral infarction appearing in the CT scans were located in the territory of the middle cerebral artery including the basal ganglia. Angiographical abnormalities were observed in 40 patients (83%). The majority occurred in the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and in the cisternal portion of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Multiple lesions, such as in the C1, A1, and M1 or the C1, M1, and M2 segments were observed in 22 cases. These lesions generally appeared in continuation; no bilateral intracranial lesions were observed. Repeated angiography was performed in 22 cases, and in 55% of these some recovery of the lesions was seen.

  17. Pediatric ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Mohandas, Surath

    2014-10-01

    Dengue infection is an important arboviral infection in southeast Asia, especially in India. Neurological manifestations of dengue are increasingly recognized. We report an ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis in an 8-year-old child. We present a girl with a short febrile illness followed by episodic severe headache, with gradually progressive hemiparesis and visual impairment. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple infarctions in the anterior and posterior circulation. The magnetic resonance angiogram revealed irregular narrowing of bilateral middle cerebral arteries, right anterior cerebral artery, left posterior cerebral, and bilateral vertebral arteries suggestive of vasculitis. Her dengue serology was strongly positive for immunoglobulin M with 68.9 panbio units. The rest of the evaluation for pediatric stroke was unremarkable. She was treated with intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids and recovered totally with resolution of vasculitis on magnetic resonance angiogram over the next 3 months. This child illustrates possible immune-mediated vasculitis caused by dengue infection which is rather a rare presentation in a child who subsequently recovered well. One should consider dengue in childhood strokes in endemic regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of selective head cooling for resuscitating damaged neurons during post-ischemic reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段满林; 李德馨; 徐建国

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and the mechanism of application of selective head cooling on neuronal morphological damage during postischemic reperfusion in a rabbit model. Methods 168 New Zealand rabbits were randomized into three groups. Group Ⅰ [n=24, (38±0.5)℃, non-ischemic control]; Group Ⅱ [n=72, (38±0.5)℃, normothermic reperfusion]; Group Ⅲ [n=72, (28±0.5)℃, selective head cooling, initiated at the beginning of reperfusion). Animals in three subgroups (n=24, each) of Group Ⅱ and Group Ⅲ had reperfused lasting for 30, 180 and 360 min respectively. Using computerized image analysis technique on morphological changes of nucleus, the degree of neuronal damage in 12 regions were differentiated into type A (normal), type B (mild damaged), type C (severely damaged) and type D (necrotic). Fourteen biochemical parameters in brain tissues were measured. Results As compared with Group Ⅰ, the counts of type A neuron decreased progressively, and those of type B, C and D increased significantly in Group Ⅱ during reperfusion (P<0.01). In Group Ⅱ, vasoactive intestinal peptide, b-endorphine, prostacyclin, T3 and Na+, K+-ATPase were correlated with the changes of type A; b-endorphine and thromboxane with type B; glucose and vasopressin with type C; Na+, K+-ATPase, glutamic acid, T3 and vasoactive intestinal peptide with type D (P<0.05). As compared with Group Ⅱ, the counts of type A increased, and those of type C and D significantly decreased in Group Ⅲ (P<0.01). In Group Ⅲ, Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase were correlated with the changes of type A, C and D (P<0.01). Conclusion Selective head cooling for sex hours during postischemic reperfusion does improve neuronal morphological outcomes in terms of morphological changes.

  19. Risk factors of severe ischemic biliary complications after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-FengWang; Zhong-Kui Jin; Da-Zhi Chen; Xian-Liang Li; Xin Zhao; Hua Fan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemia-related biliary tract complications remain high after orthotopic liver transplantation. Severe ischemic biliary complications often involve the hepatic duct bifurcation and left hepatic duct, resulting finally in obstructive jaundice. Prevention and management of such complications remain a challenge for transplant surgeons. METHODS: All 160 patients were followed up for at least 180 days after transplantation. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparative univariate analysis were made using 3 groups (no complications; mild complications;severe complications), to analyze risk factors associated with biliary complications. Multiple logistic regression and linear regression analysis were used to analyze independent risk factors for severe ischemic biliary complications, after excluding other confounding factors. RESULTS: By ANOVA and comparative univariate analysis, the risk factors associated with biliary complications were preoperative bilirubin level (P=0.007) and T-tube stenting of the anastomosis (P=0.016). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the use of T-tube and preoperative serum bilirubin were not independent risk factors for severe ischemic biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation. Chi-square analysis indicated that in the incidence of severe ischemic biliary lesions, bile duct second warm ischemic time longer than 60 minutes was a significant risk factor. Linear regression demonstrated a negative correlation between cold preservation time and warm ischemia time. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative serum bilirubin level and the use of T-tube stenting of the anastomosis were independent risk factors for biliary complications after liver transplantation, but not for severe ischemic biliary complications. The second warm ischemia time of bile duct longer than 60 minutes and prolonged bile duct second warm ischemia time combined with cold preservation time were significant risk factors for severe

  20. Dobutamine stress echocardiographyin distinguishing ischemic from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloradović Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography for detection of coronary artery disease in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Detection of regional wall motion abnormalities at rest does not reliably distinguish ischemic from nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Material and methods To distinguish between ischemic and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, we studied 50 patients with left ventricular dysfunction (20 ischemic and 30 nonischemic, detected by coronary angiography using dobutamine stress echocardiography. Echocardiographic images were obtained at baseline, low and paek dose of dobutamine. Rest and stress left ventricular wall motion scores were derived from analysis of regional wall motion. Results Dobutamine infusion was terminated after achievement of the target heart rate or maximal protocol dose in 16 (80% patients with ischemic heart disease and in 23 (73.3% patients with nonischemic heart disease. At rest, there were more normal segments (p<0.001 and a trend toward more akinetic segments (p, not significant per ischemic than per nonischemic DCM patients. However, either at rest or with low-dose dobutamine, individual data largely overlapped. At peak dose, in ischemic DCM, regional contraction worsened in many normal or dyssinergic regions at rest (in some cases after inprovement with low-dose dobutamine; in contrast, in nonischemic DCM, further mild impovement was observed in a variable number of left ventricular areas. Thus, with peak-dose dobutamine, more akinetic and less normal segments were present per ishemic than per nonischemic DCM patient (both, p<0.001. A value of six or more akinetic segments was 90% sensitive and 98% specific for ischemic DCM. Conclusions Our data show that analysis of regional contraction by dobutamine stress echocardiography can distinguish between.

  1. Paradoxical centrally increased diffusivity in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stence, Nicholas V.; Mirsky, David M.; Deoni, Sean C.L. [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Armstrong-Wells, Jennifer [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) and OB/GYN, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Restricted diffusion on acute MRI is the diagnostic standard for perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. In a subset of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, primarily those with large infarct volumes, we noted a core of centrally increased diffusivity with a periphery of restricted diffusion. Given the paradoxical diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) appearance observed in some children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, we sought to determine its significance and hypothesized that: (1) centrally increased diffusivity is associated with larger infarcts in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and (2) this tissue is irreversibly injured (infarcted). We reviewed all perinatal arterial ischemic stroke cases in a prospective cohort study from Aug. 1, 2000, to Jan. 1, 2012. Infarct volumes were measured by drawing regions of interest around the periphery of the area of restricted diffusion on DWI. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare means between groups. Of 25 eligible cases, centrally increased diffusivity was seen in 4 (16%). Cases with centrally increased diffusivity had larger average infarct volumes (mean 117,182 mm{sup 3} vs. 36,995 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.008), higher average apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the infarct core (1,679 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 611 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s, P < 0.0001), and higher ADC ratio (1.2 vs. 0.5, P < 0.0001). At last clinical follow-up, children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and centrally increased diffusivity were more often treated for ongoing seizures (75% vs. 0%; P < 0.001) than those without. Centrally increased diffusivity was associated with larger stroke volume and the involved tissue was confirmed to be infarcted on follow-up imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual appearance of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke in order to avoid underestimating infarct volume or making an incorrect early diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Biodegradable intestinal stents:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanhui Wang; Nan Li; Rui Li; Yawei Li; Liqun Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents are an attractive alternative to self-expanding metal stents in the treatment of intestinal strictures. Biodegradable stent can be made of biodegradable polymers and biodegradable metals (magnesium alloys). An overview on current biodegradable intestinal stents is presented. The future trends and perspectives in the development of biodegradable intestinal stents are proposed. For the biodegradable polymer intestinal stents, the clinical trials have shown promising results, although improved design of stents and reduced migration rate are expected. For the biodegradable magnesium intestinal stents, results of preliminary studies indicate magnesium alloys to have good biocompatibility. With many of the key fundamental and practical issues resolved and better methods for adjusting corrosion resistance and progressing biocompatibilities of magnesium alloys, it is possible to use biodegradable intestinal stents made of magnesium alloys in hospital in the not too distant future.

  3. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  6. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  7. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Matthew A; Hsieh, Michael K H; Njoroge, Linda W; Thompson, J Will; Soderblom, Erik J; Feger, Bryan J; Troupes, Constantine D; Hershberger, Kathleen A; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Nagel, Whitney L; Landinez, Gina P; Shah, Kishan M; Burns, Virginia A; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D; Foster, Matthew W; Milano, Carmelo A; Moseley, M Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (pfailure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  8. Intrapulmonary shunt is a potentially unrecognized cause of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushora, Mohannad Y; Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Alnabki, Ziad; Shenoy, Mohan; Alshaher, Motaz; Stoddard, Marcus F

    2013-07-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability. Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a harbinger of stroke. The etiology of stroke in as many as 40% of patients remains undetermined after extensive evaluation. It was hypothesized that intrapulmonary shunt is a potential facilitator of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or TIA. Patients undergoing clinically indicated transesophageal echocardiography were prospectively enrolled. Comprehensive multiplane transesophageal echocardiographic imaging was performed and saline contrast done to assess for intrapulmonary shunt and patent foramen ovale. Three hundred twenty-one patients with either nonhemorrhagic CVA (n = 262) or TIA (n = 59) made up the stroke group. Three hundred twenty-one age-matched and gender-matched patients made up the control group. Intrapulmonary shunt occurred more frequently in the stroke group (72 of 321) compared with the control group (32 of 321) (22% vs 10%, P CVA and/or TIA (odds ratio, 2.6; P CVA or TIA (n = 71), intrapulmonary shunt occurred more frequently (25 of 71) than in the control group (5 of 71) (35% vs 7%, P CVA or TIA in patients with cryptogenic CVA or TIA (odds ratio, 6.3; P CVA and TIA, especially in patients with cryptogenic CVA and TIA. Future studies assessing the prognostic significance of intrapulmonary shunt on cerebral vascular event recurrence rates in patients after initial CVA or TIA would be of great interest. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  10. Regulation of intestinal lactase in adult hypolactasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, M.; Mevissen, G; Fischer, M; Olsen, W.; Goodspeed, D; Genini, M; Boll, W; Semenza, G; Mantei, N

    1992-01-01

    Relative deficiency of intestinal lactase activity during adulthood, adult hypolactasia, is a common condition worldwide. We studied the regulation of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in normal and adult hypolactasic subjects by correlating transcript abundance in intestinal biopsies with relative synthetic rates for the protein in cultured intestinal explants. After metabolic labelling studies in six subjects, precursor lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was identified in amounts directly proportional t...

  11. Appendicular Tourniquet: A Cause of Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Santhosh Chikkanayakanahalli; Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Varghese, Edison Vadakkenchery

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is one of the common surgical emergencies seen in daily practice. Postoperative adhesions are notorious for being the most common cause for intestinal obstruction. Occasionally, laparotomy findings do come as a surprise to surgeons. Here one such case is discussed. A patient was operated on with suspicion of intestinal obstruction secondary to postoperative adhesions. However, laparotomy revealed the appendix to be inflamed, curled around the terminal ileum and acting as a tourniquet. PMID:27437300

  12. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Eiichi [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Hosokawa, Masaya [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Faculty of Human Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University, Osaka (Japan); Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Geriatric Medicine, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita (Japan); Seino, Yutaka [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation (JST), Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  13. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  14. Intestinal myiasis caused by Muscina stabulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivekar, S; Senthil, K; Srinivasan, R; Sureshbabu, L; Chand, P; Shanmugam, J; Gopal, R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal maggots were isolated from a patient, who had reported to the Department of General Medicine of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry, in southern India with complaints of abdominal distress, bloating of abdomen and intestinal hurry following a meal. He was diagnosed as a case of intestinal myiasis. Maggots obtained from his stool were identified to be Muscina stabulans based on characteristic patterns of posterior spiracles. He was treated with purgatives and albendazole. This intestinal myiasis case caused by M. stabulans is reported here because of its rare occurrence and the need to establish a correct diagnosis.

  15. Intestinal myiasis caused by Muscina stabulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivekar S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal maggots were isolated from a patient, who had reported to the Department of General Medicine of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry, in southern India with complaints of abdominal distress, bloating of abdomen and intestinal hurry following a meal. He was diagnosed as a case of intestinal myiasis. Maggots obtained from his stool were identified to be Muscina stabulans based on characteristic patterns of posterior spiracles. He was treated with purgatives and albendazole. This intestinal myiasis case caused by M. stabulans is reported here because of its rare occurrence and the need to establish a correct diagnosis.

  16. Cancer-associated ischemic stroke is associated with elevated D-dimer and fibrin degradation product levels in acute ischemic stroke with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Tomoyuki; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takeda, Ikuko; Aoki, Shiro; Sueda, Yoshimasa; Ishihara, Kayoko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yamawaki, Takemori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2012-07-01

    Although several studies have reported various causes of ischemic stroke in patients with cancer, only a few have evaluated the clinical relevance of ischemic stroke pathogenesis to cancer. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics of cancer-associated ischemic stroke. We evaluated 154 ischemic stroke patients without cancer and 57 ischemic stroke patients with cancer who had either received continuous treatment for cancer within 5 years before to the onset of ischemic stroke, or who had been diagnosed with cancer within 1 year after the onset of ischemic stroke. Cancer patients were grouped into "cancer-associated ischemic stroke," the "conventional ischemic stroke," or "other." A total of 15 patients (26%) were classified into the cancer-associated ischemic stroke in cancer patients. In univariate analysis of the cancer-associated ischemic stroke and the others, there were significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and advanced cancer (clinical stage IV), and the levels of d-dimer, fibrin degradation product and hemoglobin. With multivariate regression analysis of those factors, the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and advanced cancer (clinical stage IV), and the levels of D-dimer and fibrin degradation product remained as statistically independent factors, which were associated with cancer-associated ischemic stroke (n = 111, χ(2) =67.21, P acute ischemic stroke, the cancer-associated ischemic stroke is associated with elevated D-dimer and fibrin degradation products, even after controlling hypertension, hyperlipidemia and advanced cancer (clinical stage IV). © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Systematic review of risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Yang; Fanyi Kong; Ming Liu; Zilong Hao

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke, and to prevent onset and make a prognosis of disease, the present study systemically evaluated 19 cohort studies and 10 case-controlled studies of progressive ischemic stroke.SEARCH STRATEGY: A computer-based, online, literature search of PubMed (1966/2007), China Biological Medicine Database (CBM-disc, 1979/2007) and CNKI (www.cnki.net, 1979/2007) was performed to screen for related studies.DATA SELECTION: Cohort or case-controlled studies that focused on risk factors of progressive ischemic stroke were selected for review.Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines.Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan software.MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT: Risk factors for progressive ischemic stroke.RESULTS: Using the inclusion criteria, 29/781 studies published in English and Chinese were initially reviewed, including 19 cohort studies and 10 case-control studies.Despite variations in determination of progressive ischemic stroke and the intervals between 2 evaluations, all studies described the diagnostic criteria for progressive ischemic stroke.Logistic analysis was employed in 20 of the studies.Meta-analysis of primary data in the related studies determined that the following factors that significantly correlated with progressive ischemic stroke: fever[risk ratio (RR)=2.26,95% confidence interval (Cl):1.20-4.26, P = 0.01;odds ratio (OR)=2.85,95% Cl: 1.64-4.98, P<0.01)1; diabetes (RR= 1.38, 95% Cl: 1.18-1.61,P < 0.01;OR= 2.48, 95% CI: 1.93-3.19, P < 0.01);coronary heart disease (RR= 1.22, 95% Cl: 1.08-1.38, P< 0.01); neuroimaging transformation (RR=1.55, 95%Cl: 1.34-1.80, P < 0.01; OR=2.29,95% Cl: 1.47-.58, P<0.01); and hyperglycemia (RR=2.62, 95% Cl: 1.86-3.68, P<0.01;OR=3.49,95% Cl: 1.92-6.35, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Fever, diabetes, coronary heart disease, neuroimaging transformation, and hyperglycemia are

  18. Gender and post-ischemic recovery of hypertrophied rat hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Kirill M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender influences the cardiac response to prolonged increases in workload, with differences at structural, functional, and molecular levels. However, it is unknown if post-ischemic function or metabolism of female hypertrophied hearts differ from male hypertrophied hearts. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that gender influences post-ischemic function of pressure-overload hypertrophied hearts and determined if the effect of gender on post-ischemic outcome could be explained by differences in metabolism, especially the catabolic fate of glucose. Methods Function and metabolism of isolated working hearts from sham-operated and aortic-constricted male and female Sprague-Dawley rats before and after 20 min of no-flow ischemia (N = 17 to 27 per group were compared. Parallel series of hearts were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 5.5 mM [5-3H/U-14C]-glucose, 1.2 mM [1-14C]-palmitate, 0.5 mM [U-14C]-lactate, and 100 mU/L insulin to measure glycolysis and glucose oxidation in one series and oxidation of palmitate and lactate in the second. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance. The sequential rejective Bonferroni procedure was used to correct for multiple comparisons and tests. Results Female gender negatively influenced post-ischemic function of non-hypertrophied hearts, but did not significantly influence function of hypertrophied hearts after ischemia such that mass-corrected hypertrophied heart function did not differ between genders. Before ischemia, glycolysis was accelerated in hypertrophied hearts, but to a greater extent in males, and did not differ between male and female non-hypertrophied hearts. Glycolysis fell in all groups after ischemia, except in non-hypertrophied female hearts, with the reduction in glycolysis after ischemia being greatest in males. Post-ischemic glycolytic rates were, therefore, similarly accelerated in hypertrophied male and female hearts and higher in

  19. Strictly lobar microbleeds are associated with executive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Simone M; Scheffler, Grit; Jäger, Hans R; Yousry, Tarek A; Brown, Martin M; Kallis, Constantinos; Cipolotti, Lisa; Werring, David J

    2013-05-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are a marker of small vessel diseases, including hypertensive arteriopathy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and may be associated with cognitive impairment. The relationship between CMBs and cognitive function in ischemic cerebrovascular disease remains uncertain. We, therefore, investigated the cognitive impact of CMBs in a cohort of patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. All patients underwent detailed and comprehensive neuropsychological testing and standardized MRI, including fluid attenuation inversion recovery, T1, T2, and gradient-recalled echo T2*-weighted sequences. CMBs, white matter changes, lacunes, and territorial cortical infarcts (defined by standardized criteria) were identified, and associations with cognition assessed. Three hundred twenty patients with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack were included. Of these, 72 (22.5%) had at least 1 CMB. Of all the cognitive domains tested, only executive impairment was more prevalent in patients with CMBs than without (38% versus 25%; P=0.039). In univariate analysis, the presence of strictly lobar (but not deep) CMBs was associated with executive impairment (odds ratio, 2.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-5.36; P=0.019). In adjusted multivariate analyses, the presence (OR, 2.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-5.09; P=0.031) and number (OR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.69; P=0.022) of strictly lobar CMBs were significantly associated with executive impairment. CMBs were not associated with impairment in other cognitive domains. Strictly lobar CMBs are independently associated with executive dysfunction in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Our findings suggest that a microangiopathy related to strictly lobar CMBs (eg, cerebral amyloid angiopathy) contributes to cognitive impairment in this population.

  20. Mortality study for a decade: ischemic stroke in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier J. García Zacarías

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are among the top three causes of death in Cuba and the world, about 80 % of these patients belong to Ischemic Stroke. The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical and developmental profile of patients who died of Ischemic Stroke. A descriptive, prospective research, cross- sectional study was made, the sample included all deaths from ischemic stroke at the University Hospital "Camilo Cienfuegos" Sancti Spiritus, between January 1st, 2001 and December 31, 2010, and persons over 60 years of age with necropsy performed. Atherothrombotic stroke was the most frequent category, the highest mortality rates were observed in persons over 80 years of age and in females, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and transient ischemic attack were the main significant medical history; most patients were admitted in the stroke unit and died in Middle Progressive Care, cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension and hypostatic bronchopne umonia were complications and specific main causes of most frequent death. Value of cerebral edema and hypostatic bronchopneumonia as clinical complications and causes of death in patients investigated is confirmed.

  1. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  2. Rotating night shift work and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Devin L; Feskanich, Diane; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Schernhammer, Eva S; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2009-06-01

    Rotating night shift work disrupts circadian rhythms and is associated with coronary heart disease. The relation between rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke is unclear. The Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing cohort study of registered female nurses, assessed in 1988 the total number of years the nurses had worked rotating night shifts. The majority (69%) of stroke outcomes from 1988 to 2004 were confirmed by physician chart review. The authors used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relation between years of rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke, adjusting for multiple vascular risk factors. Of 80,108 subjects available for analysis, 60% reported at least 1 year of rotating night shift work. There were 1,660 ischemic strokes. Rotating night shift work was associated with a 4% increased risk of ischemic stroke for every 5 years (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.01). This increase in risk was similar when limited to the 1,152 confirmed ischemic strokes (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.10) and may be confined to women with a history of 15 or more years of rotating shift work. Women appear to have a modestly increased risk of stroke after extended periods of rotating night shift work.

  3. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  5. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  6. Anticoagulant therapy for ischemic stroke: A review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Shahpouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, anticoagulants have been used in the emergent treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Anticoagulants are prescribed in an effort to prevent first or recurrent stroke, especially among patients with cardioembolism due to arterial fibrillation and large-artery atherosclerotic disease. Despite the widespread use, efficacy and safety of anticoagulants are controversial. Experts have given a broad spectrum of opinions. Surveys of practitioners have also demonstrated a lack of consensus on the use of anticoagulants for ischemic stroke. The uncertainty is due, in large part, to the lack of definitive clinical data. A review by the panel of the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association found no strong evidence for effectiveness of anticoagulants in treating acute ischemic stroke. Several clinical trials have suggested that utility of emergent anticoagulation has no significant effect in improving clinical outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In the present review, we have attempted to provide a framework for the emergent use of anticoagulants in acute ischemic stroke patients.

  7. Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage concomitant with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Makoto; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) rarely occurs subsequent to acute ischemic stroke. The incidence, clinical background characteristics, and outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with cSAH were investigated. Our stroke center database was reviewed to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) who demonstrated acute cSAH within 14 days of admission between 2005 and 2011. Background characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes at discharge and 3 months after onset were investigated in these patients. Of 4953 acute stroke/TIA patients, cSAH was observed in 8 (.14%) patients (7 men, mean age 71 years): 7 were detected incidentally, and the other was found immediately after a convulsion. Two patients died during their hospital stay, 1 died after discharge, and 3 were dependent at 3 months. Major artery occlusion or severe stenosis was observed in 5 patients. Two patients subsequently developed subcortical hemorrhage. On gradient echo imaging, lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed in 2 patients, and chronic superficial siderosis was observed in 2 patients. In this retrospective review of cases with ischemic stroke and cSAH, over half of patients had occlusion of major arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging findings and subsequent events in 3 patients. The overall outcome was unfavorable although the causal relationship with cSAH was unclear. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ischemic contracture of the left ventricle. Production and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, D C; Wilson, G J; Tanaka, S; Holness, D E; Lixfeld, W; Silver, M D; Rubis, L J; Goldstein, W; Gunstensen, J; Bigelow, W G

    1975-12-01

    Ischemic contracture of the left ventricle ("stone heart") is a recognized complication of prolonged periods of interruption of the coronary circulation during open-heart surgery. We have examined the effects of moderate hypothermia (28 degrees C.) and preoperative beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol, 0.5 mg. per kilogram; 1.0 mg. per kilogram) on contracture development during ischemic arrest of the heart. Four groups of 8 dogs each were placed on total cardiopulmonary bypass, and ischemic arrest of the heart was produced by cross-clamping the ascending aorta and venting the left ventricle. Intramyocardial carbon dioxide tension was continuously monitored by mass spectrometry. When anaerobic energy production ceased, as indicated by a final plateau in the intramyocardial carbon dioxide accumulation curve, the ischemic arrest was terminated and the contractile state of the heart observed. These results are given in the text. We conclude that beta-adrenergic blockade delays, but does not prevent, the onset of ischemic contracture of the left ventricle under normothermic conditions. Moderate hypothermia appears to prevent this complication completely.

  9. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations, and stroke outcomes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther S; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Ayata, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression (SD) are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous SD waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced SD susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct SDs and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to SD is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses SD susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. We measured the cortical susceptibility to SD and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcomes after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduced the susceptibility to KCl-induced or electric stimulation-induced SDs as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes were improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug was ineffective. These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Kovbasnjuk (Olga); N.C. Zachos (Nicholas C.); J. Foulke-Abel (Jennifer); J. In (Julie); E. Blutt, E. (Sarah); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); M. Estes (Mary); M. Donowitz (Mark)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIdentification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate “indefinite” ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed “mini-intesti

  11. Application of Three-Dimensional Imaging to the Intestinal Crypt Organoids and Biopsied Intestinal Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor’s intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs in the muscle layer, while the recipient’s intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients.

  12. Eleven years of management of children with intestinal failure and not candidates for intestinal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Spagnuolo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available MI Spagnuolo, MP Cicalese, E Bruzzese, MA Caiazzo, S Di Caro, V Squeglia, A GuarinoDepartment of Paediatrics, University Federico II, Naples, ItalyBackground: Children with intestinal failure need parenteral nutrition to survive, and the only alternative is intestinal transplantation which still entails high mortality. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes in candidates and noncandidates for intestinal transplantation, and to compare the outcomes with and without transplant surgery.Patients and methods: The clinical records of children admitted to hospital from 1997 to 2008 because of intestinal failure were reviewed for etiology of intestinal failure, age at start of parenteral nutrition, duration of parenteral nutrition, indications for intestinal transplantation, and outcome.Results: Thirty-four children were enrolled. Median age at start of parenteral nutrition was 13.1 (median 20.7 months. There was no difference in survival rate between candidates and noncandidates for intestinal transplantation. Survival was significantly higher in candidates who did not undergo intestinal transplantation than in children who underwent intestinal transplantation (P < 0.001.Conclusion: Candidates for intestinal transplantation who did not undergo transplant surgery had a better outcome than children who underwent transplant surgery.Keywords: intestinal transplantation, intestinal failure, parenteral nutrition, children

  13. RESCUING THE ISCHEMIC PENUMBRA—OUR EXPIRIENCE

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    Milosavljevic Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Over one million strokes per year are occurring in Europe. Brain stroke is one of the most important death and disability causes in Europe and USA. The main role of perfusion is to determine the border of insult core and ischemic penumbra. Penumbra can be saved with thrombolytic therapy but core have irreversible injuries and represent death of brain cells. Aim: to determine the role of CT brain perfusion in cases of acute brain stroke and following thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We examined 64 patients with acute brain stroke who received thrombolytic therapy after that. All patients were examining on 16 MDCTwith 50 ml of iodine contrast agent following the standard procedure for CT perfusion. Patients were 34 male and 30 female with middle age of 64 years. MRI was made after thrombolytic therapy and compare with perfusion results before therapy. Results: Using an artery and a vein as reference three parameters were measured — blood flow (CBF, blood volume (CBV and mean transit time (MTT, for each patient. Hemorrhagic was find in 9 (14.01% patients after thrombolytic therapy. 4 (6.25% other patients develop new stroke of same but mostly other side of brain. 8 (12.50% more patients finished lethally. From other 42 patientswith thrombolytic therapywe can positively say that in 31 (48.44% patients penumbrawas rescued. For other 11 (17.19% stroke was same size like firstly involved core and penumbra but not bigger. Conclusion: CT perfusion plays major role by showing a curable parts of tissue in brain strokes

  14. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  15. Rescuing the ischemic penumbra: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosavljević Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Over one million strokes per year are occurring in Europe. Brain stroke is one of the most important death and disability causes in Europe and USA. The main role of perfusion is to determine the border of insult core and ischemic penumbra. Penumbra can be saved with thrombolytic therapy but core have irreversible injuries and represent death of brain cells. Aim: to determine the role of CT brain perfusion in cases of acute brain stroke and following thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We examined 64 patients with acute brain stroke who received thrombolytic therapy after that. All patients were examining on 16 MDCT with 50 ml of iodine contrast agent following the standard procedure for CT perfusion. Patients were 34 male and 30 female with middle age of 64 years. MRI was made after thrombolytic therapy and compare with perfusion results before therapy. Results: Using an artery and a vein as reference three parameters were measured - blood flow (CBF, blood volume (CBV and mean transit time (MTT, for each patient. Hemorrhagic was find in 9 (14.01% patients after thrombolytic therapy. 4 (6.25% other patients develop new stroke of same but mostly other side of brain. 8 (12.50% more patients finished lethally. From other 42 patients with thrombolytic therapy we can positively say that in 31 (48.44% patients penumbra was rescued. For other 11 (17.19% stroke was same size like firstly involved core and penumbra but not bigger. Conclusion: CT perfusion plays major role by showing a curable parts of tissue in brain strokes.

  16. Cerebral perfusion SPECT in transient ischemic attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, D.-L. E-mail: dlyou@mail.kfcc.org.tw; Shieh, F.-Y.; Tzen, K.-Y.; Tsai, M.-F.; Kao, P.-F

    2000-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of cerebral perfusion single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with TIA were collected for study. All patients had transient focal neurological symptoms or signs with complete recovery within 24 h after onset. The patients underwent cerebral perfusion SPECT between 6 h and 11 days after onset, with 10 cases performed within 24 h (group A), nine cases performed between 1 and 3 days (group B), 11 cases performed between 3 and 5 days (group C), and seven cases performed after more than 5 days (group D). A semi-quantitative method was used for analyzing the SPECT data, and the difference ratios between lesion side and contralateral normal side were calculated on each pair of regions of interest. Results: In total, 78.4% (29/37) of patients had reduced perfusion in the cerebral cortical regions or deep nuclei, and the regions with reduced perfusion corresponded with clinical presentations of the patients. The abnormal rate with reduced perfusion was 90.0% in group A, 77.8% in group B, 72.7% in group C and 71.4% in group D. Cross cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) was present in seven patients, and all of the primary cerebral perfusion defects of these patients were located at the territory of left or right middle cerebral artery. Conclusion: Cerebral perfusion SPECT is a potential tool to detect cerebral perfusion defects and CCD in patients with TIA. Although the perfusion defect may persist more than 5 days after onset, we suggest cerebral perfusion SPECT should be performed as soon as possible.

  17. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  18. Dietary influences on intestinal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Marc; Brucklacher-Waldert, Verena

    2012-10-01

    The function of the gastrointestinal tract relies on a monolayer of epithelial cells, which are essential for the uptake of nutrients. The fragile lining requires protection against insults by a diverse array of antigens. This is accomplished by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, which constitute a highly organized immune organ. In this Review, we discuss several recent findings that provide a compelling link between dietary compounds and the organization and maintenance of immune tissues and lymphocytes in the intestine. We highlight some of the molecular players involved, in particular ligand-activated nuclear receptors in lymphoid cells.

  19. Inflammatory mediators and intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, M S; MacKendrick, W

    1994-06-01

    Although the causes of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are not well understood, there is compelling evidence to suggest that the inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This article examines the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and other mediators on the development of NEC, and attempts to explain the association of the putative NEC risk factors with altered mediator production and subsequent intestinal injury. The authors hypothesize that PAF is a key mediator in the final common pathway leading to NEC.

  20. Intestinal inflammation and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Lilian; Bourreille, Arnaud; Dietrich, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal inflammation results in the production of inflammatory pain-inducing mediators that may directly activate colon sensory neurons. Endogenous opioids produced by mucosal effector CD4(+) T lymphocytes identified as colitogenic may paradoxically counterbalance the local pro-algesic effect of inflammatory mediators by acting on opioid receptors expressed on sensory nerve endings. The review will focus on the endogenous immune-mediated regulation of visceral inflammatory pain, current pain treatments in inflammatory bowel diseases and prospectives on new opioid therapeutic opportunities to alleviate pain but avoiding common centrally-mediated side effects.

  1. [Intestinal complications from vascular prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, C; Calvete, J; García, J; Buch, E; Castells, P; Lledó, S

    1993-01-01

    Secondary FAE is a rare complication, usually located at the duodenum. The typical clinical presentation is like a digestive hemorrhage or a sepsis. We report two cases of FAE with atypical manifestations. The first case presented a lower digestive hemorrhage produced by the fistulization to the sigma. The second case appeared like an intestinal obliteration caused by the full emigration of a prosthesis to the jejunum. We wish to remark the importance of the clinical suspicion of a FAE (Key of diagnosis), and the sparing relevance of the complementary examinations and the urgency of a surgical treatment in order to avoid the high rate of morbi-mortality associated with this complication.

  2. Modification of end-loop ileostomy for the treatment of ischemic or radiation enteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Tepetes; Paraskevi Liakou; Ioannis Balogiannis; Maria Kouvaraki; Konstantinos Hatzitheofilou

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a new technique of temporary ileal anastomotic stoma,following small bowel resection,in patients where the anastomosis is anticipated to have borderline margins with dubious viability.METHODS: Five patients underwent enterectomy and partially anastomosed end-loop ileostomy at the University Hospital of Larissa between 2000 and 2006.Enterectomy was performed because of conditions such as mesenteric vascular occlusive disease,radiation entritis and small bowel injury.RESULTS: Postoperatively,none of the patients developed any stoma-related or anastomotic complications.There were no major complications.All patients were discharged between the 8th and 15th day after the procedure,and the stoma was closed 3 wk to 4 wk later.CONCLUSION: We believe that our proposed modification of end-loop ileostomy is a simple,quick and safe technique with minimal stoma-related morbidity,and with simple and safe reversion.This technique can be considered as a useful option in the treatment of ischemic or radiation-induced enteritis,and in the management of severe intestinal trauma.

  3. Frequency of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Among Hospitalized Neonates in West Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Eghbalian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is brain damage from a shortage of oxygen or blood flow to the tissues[1,2] and is characterized by clinical and laboratory evidence of acute or subacute brain injury due to asphyxia[1-6]. It is a major contributor to neonatal death and morbidity[4-6]. 15%-20% of HIE cases die during the neonatal period and 30% of those who survive suffer from neurodevelopmental disorders[1,3,6].An estimated 23% of the 4 million neonatal deaths and 8% of all deaths at <5 years of age throughout the world each year are associated with signs of asphyxia at birth[1,4]. Even at referral centers in developed countries, death or moderate to severe disability occurs for 53% to 61% of infants diagnosed as having moderate to severe HIE[1,4,6]. Children with moderate/severe neonatal encephalopathy are at risk for reduced school performance, whereas those with mild encephalopathy have school performance scores similar to those of their peers[1,6]. HIE is one of the most common causes of cerebral palsy and other severe neurologic deficits in children occurring in two to nine of every 1000 live births [1-6]. The incidence of HIE reported in different studies varies widely[2-6], which may be explained by the selection criteria for studies of HIE during the neonatal period[3,4].The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of hypoxic-ischemic encephalo-pathy in hospitalized neonates with seizure in Hamedan (west Iran in a two year period.This is a retrospective cross sectional study on 34 neonates from 2004 to 2006.Inclusion criteria were: all neonates with seizures due to HIE asphyxia having pH below 7, 5th minute Apgar score between 0 and 3, decreased muscle tone and consciousness, cortical atrophy in brain CT scan and multiple organ involvement (eg, kidney, lungs, liver, heart, intestines. Neonates with jitteriness were excluded from the study.The study was based on the recorded files of the patients. CT scan findings, blood

  4. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    .... Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke...

  5. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  6. Prematurity reduces functional adaptation to intestinal resection in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Thymann, Thomas; Qvist, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement ...

  7. Enterocyte shedding and epithelial lining repair following ischemia of the human small intestine attenuate inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Matthijsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, we observed that small-intestinal ischemia and reperfusion was found to entail a rapid loss of apoptotic and necrotic cells. This study was conducted to investigate whether the observed shedding of ischemically damaged epithelial cells affects IR induced inflammation in the human small gut. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a newly developed IR model of the human small intestine, the inflammatory response was studied on cellular, protein and mRNA level. Thirty patients were consecutively included. Part of the jejunum was subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and variable reperfusion periods (mean reperfusion time 120 (+/-11 minutes. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Increased plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP levels indicated loss in epithelial cell integrity in response to ischemia and reperfusion (p<0.001 vs healthy. HIF-1alpha gene expression doubled (p = 0.02 and C3 gene expression increased 4-fold (p = 0.01 over the course of IR. Gut barrier failure, assessed as LPS concentration in small bowel venous effluent blood, was not observed (p = 0.18. Additionally, mRNA expression of HO-1, IL-6, IL-8 did not alter. No increased expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, TNFalpha release, increased numbers of inflammatory cells (p = 0.71 or complement activation, assessed as activated C3 (p = 0.14, were detected in the reperfused tissue. CONCLUSIONS: In the human small intestine, thirty minutes of ischemia followed by up to 4 hours of reperfusion, does not seem to lead to an explicit inflammatory response. This may be explained by a unique mechanism of shedding of damaged enterocytes, reported for the first time by our group.

  8. Morinda citrifolia fruit juice prevents ischemic neuronal damage through suppression of the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Kamiya, Kohei; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Satake, Toshiko; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2010-10-01

    Fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (Noni juice) is a well-known health drink and has various pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We have hitherto found the protective effect of Noni juice on brain damage caused by ischemic stress in mice. In addition, we also recently reported that regulation of post-ischemic glucose intolerance might be important for good prognosis. Here, we focused on the effect of Noni juice on the development of the post-ischemic glucose intolerance as a cerebral protective mechanism. Noni juice was obtained from the mature fruit grown in Okinawa (about 1.5 L/4 kg of fruit; 100% ONJ). Male ddY mice were given 10% ONJ in drinking water for 7 days. Then, mice were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Ingestion of 10% ONJ suppressed the development of neuronal damage after MCAO. Interestingly, glucose intolerance observed on the 1st day after MCAO completely disappeared after 10% ONJ administration. Furthermore, ONJ treatment significantly increased serum insulin levels much further than the control group on the 1st day, while serum adiponectin levels were not affected at all. These results suggest that ONJ could facilitate insulin secretion after ischemic stress and may attenuate the development of glucose intolerance. These mechanisms may contribute to the neuronal protective effect of ONJ against ischemic stress.

  9. Characterization of pericardial and plasma ghrelin levels in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Balazs; Merkely, Béla; Túri, Katalin; Nagy, Andrea; Ahres, Abdelkrim; Hartyánszky, István; Hüttl, Tivadar; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Cseh, Károly; Kékesi, Violetta

    2013-09-10

    Ghrelin is an endocrine regulatory peptide with multiple functions including cardioprotective effects. It is produced in various tissues among others in the myocardium. Pericardial fluid has been proven to be a biologically active compartment of the heart that communicates with the myocardial interstitium. Thus, pericardial level of certain agents may reflect their concentration in the myocardium well. In our study we measured acylated (active) and total (acylated and non-acylated) pericardial and plasma ghrelin levels of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Pericardial fluid and plasma samples were obtained from patients with coronary artery disease (ISCH, n=54) or valvular heart disease (VHD, n=41) undergoing cardiac surgery. Acylated pericardial ghrelin concentrations were found to be significantly higher in patients with ischemic heart disease (ISCH vs. VHD, 32±3 vs. 16±2pg/ml, pheart disease as compared to non-ischemic patients suggesting an increased ghrelin production of the chronically ischemic myocardium. According to our results, pericardial ghrelin content is negatively influenced by left ventricular hypertrophy and insulin resistance.

  10. Detection of atrial fibrillation with concurrent holter monitoring and continuous cardiac telemetry following ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Marc A; Krishnan, Kousik; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for recurrent ischemic stroke. We aimed to compare the detection rate of AF using continuous cardiac telemetry (CCT) versus Holter monitoring in hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Between June 2007 and December 2008, 133 patients were admitted to an academic institution for ischemic stroke or TIA and underwent concurrent inpatient CCT and Holter monitoring. Rates of AF detection by CCT and Holter monitoring were compared using the McNemar paired proportion test. Among the 133 patients, 8 (6.0%) were diagnosed with new-onset AF. On average, Holter monitoring was performed for 29.8 hours, and CCT was performed for 73.6 hours. The overall rate of AF detection was higher for Holter monitoring compared with CCT (6.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-11.6 vs 0; 95% CI, 0-3.4; P = .008). Holter detection of AF was even higher in specific subgroups (those with an embolic infarct pattern, those age >65 years, and those with coronary artery disease). Holter monitoring detected AF in 6% of hospitalized ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with higher proportions in high-risk subgroups. Compared with CCT, Holter monitoring is significantly more likely to detect arrhythmias.

  11. A Case Of Transient Ischemic Attack Presenting As Hemichroea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chorea is defined as; involuntary movements of the distal parts of limbs which have arrhythmic, rapid, bouncing or smooth, simple or complex properties. Choreiform movements occur when putamen, globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus are affected. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Chorea may be a rare symptom of cerebral hypoperfusion. Transient ischemic attack is an event that occurs in short term characterized by a temporary ischemia of brain. A wide variety of symptoms can be seen depending on the localization of cerebral hypoperfusion. Hemichorea is a very rare finding observed during transient ischemic attacks. In this article hemichorea in a case of symptomatic transient ischemic attack is discussed with relevant literature.

  12. The tole of ischemic preconditioning in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Anđelka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Ischemic preconditioning is a phenomenon in which brief episodes of ischemia and reperfusion increase myocardial tolerance and substantially reduce the infarction size. Case report Two patients with acute left anterior descending artery occlusion received fibrinolytic therapy within 6 hours of symptom onset, but nevertheless developed myocardial infarctions of different size. The first patient, without a history of preinfarction angina, developed a large anterior infarction, because there was no time for ischemic preconditioning or development of coronary collateral vessels. The second patient, with a 4-day history of preinfarction angina, had a more favorable outcome-he developed apical necrosis, with greater myocardial viability in the infarct-related area. Conclusion The beneficial effects of angina occurring 24-48h before infarction are resulting from ischemic preconditioning, which reduces cardiac mortality, infarct size and occurrence of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. .

  13. Persimmon leaf flavonoid induces brain ischemic tolerance in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsan Miao; Xuexia Zhang; Linan Wang

    2013-01-01

    The persimmon leaf has been shown to improve cerebral ischemic outcomes; however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, mice were subjected to 10 minutes of ischemic preconditioning, and persimmon leaf flavonoid was orally administered for 5 days. Results showed that the persimmon leaf flavonoid significantly improved the content of tissue type plasminogen activator and 6-keto prostaglandin-F1 α in the cerebral cortex, decreased the content of thromboxane B2, and reduced the content of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mice. Following optical microscopy, persimmon leaf flavonoid was also shown to reduce cell swelling and nuclear hyperchromatism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. These results suggested that persimmon leaf flavonoid can effectively inhibit brain thrombosis, improve blood supply to the brain, and relieve ischemia-induced pathological damage, resulting in brain ischemic tolerance.

  14. Analysis of a Mathematical Model of Ischemic Cutaneous wounds

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner; Xue, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a major public health problem affecting 6.5 million people in the United States. Ischemia represents a serious complicating factor in wound healing. In this paper we analyze a recently developed mathematical model of ischemic dermal wounds. The model consists of a coupled system of partial differential equations in the partially healed region, with the wound boundary as a free boundary. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is assumed to be viscoelastic, and the free boundary moves with the velocity of the ECM at the boundary of the open wound. The model equations involve the concentrations of oxygen, cytokines, and the densities of several types of cells. The ischemic level is represented by a parameter which appears in the boundary conditions, 0 <= gamma < 1; gamma near 1 corresponds to extreme ischemia and gamma = 0 corresponds to normal non-ischemic conditions. We establish global existence and uniqueness of the free boundary problem and study the dependence of the free boundary on...

  15. Stroke intervention: catheter-based therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Cates, Christopher U; Levy, Elad I; McMullan, Paul W; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Weinberger, Jesse M; Wholey, Mark H

    2011-07-05

    The majority (>80%) of the three-quarters of a million strokes that will occur in the United States this year are ischemic in nature. The treatment of acute ischemic stroke is very similar to acute myocardial infarction, which requires timely reperfusion therapy for optimal results. The majority of patients with acute ischemic stroke do not receive any form of reperfusion therapy, unlike patients with acute myocardial infarction. Improving outcomes for acute stroke will require patient education to encourage early presentation, an aggressive expansion of qualified hospitals, and willing providers and early imaging strategies to match patients with their best options for reperfusion therapy to minimize complications. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advances in the Critical Care Management of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Given recent advances in diagnostic modalities and revascularization capabilities, clinicians are not only able to rapidly and accurately identify acute ischemic stroke, but may also be able to aggressively intervene to minimize the extent of infarction. In those cases where revascularization cannot occur and/or the extent of infarction is large, there are multiple strategies to prevent secondary decompensation as the stroke evolves, for instance, if malignant cerebral edema should develop. In this paper, we will review the indications for specialized ICU care for an ischemic stroke patient, the treatment principles, and strategies employed by neurointensivists to minimize secondary neuronal injury, the literature in support of such strategies (and the questions to be addressed by future studies, all with the ultimate goal of increasing the likelihood of favorable neurologic outcomes in our ischemic stroke population.

  17. Depression: links with ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, Steven P

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among depression, ischemic heart disease, and erectile dysfunction. Depression is an independent risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease, and depression in the post-myocardial infarction patient is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction are also frequently comorbid and share many common risk factors including age, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking. Depression and erectile dysfunction often occur together; however, the causal relation may be difficult to determine because erectile dysfunction may be a symptom of depression, social distress accompanying erectile dysfunction may precipitate depressive symptoms, or both conditions may result from a common factor such as vascular disease.

  18. STUDY OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Ischemic stroke is the 3rd leading cause of death after AMI and cancer. Stroke is also the leading cause of hospital admission causing disability. The study was based on 100 patients with ischemic stroke admitted to the JJM Medical College, Davangere. This study was done to estimate the role of C-reactive protein as a marker of acute inflammation following ischemic stroke and also to determine, its prognostic role, by assessing the functional outcome of patient using modified Barthel index scoring (ADL. Patients with CRP 6 mg/dl suffered severe disease with poor functional outcome. P value <0.05, significant, suggests CRP is a good tool for prognostic indicator

  19. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physical...... activity of these patients. Twenty hospitalized patients with acute ischemic stroke trained on a treadmill twice daily for 30 min for 5 days and on day 30. Physical activity was measured as activity counts (AC) from accelerometers. A total of 196 of 224 initiated training sessions were completed. Training...... with increasing number of days, with the median AC being 133% higher on day 5 than on day 1. AC in the paretic leg during 60 min of training constituted median 53% of the daytime AC. Early intensive treadmill training in acute ischemic stroke patients is thus feasible and contributes considerably toward...

  20. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  1. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Niels P; Zhou, Zhigang; Oyen, Wim J G; Jaspers, Rogier; Ramakers, Bart P; Brouwer, Rene M H J; Boerman, Otto C; Steinmetz, Neil; Smits, Paul; Rongen, Gerard A

    2006-08-15

    We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. In vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury was assessed in the thenar muscle by 99mTc-annexin A5 scintigraphy. Forty-two healthy volunteers performed forearm ischemic exercise. In 24 subjects, this was preceded by a stimulus for IP. In a randomized double-blinded design, the subjects received caffeine (4 mg/kg) or saline intravenously before the experiment. At reperfusion, 99mTc-annexin A5 was administered intravenously. Targeting of annexin was quantified by region-of-interest analysis, and expressed as percentage difference between experimental and contralateral hand. In vitro, we assessed recovery of contractile function of human atrial trabeculae, harvested during heart surgery, as functional end point of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Field-stimulated contraction was quantified at baseline and after simulated ischemia-reperfusion, in a paired approach with and without 5 min of IP, in the presence (n=13) or absence (n = 17) of caffeine (10 mg/l). Ischemic preconditioning reduced annexin targeting in the absence of caffeine (from 13 +/- 3% to 7 +/- 1% at 1 h, and from 19 +/- 2% to 9 +/- 3% at 4 h after reperfusion, p = 0.006), but not after caffeine administration (targeting 11 +/- 2% and 16 +/- 3% at 1 and 4 h). In vitro, IP improved post-ischemic functional recovery in the control group, but not in the caffeine group (8 +/- 3% vs. -8 +/- 5%, p=0.003). Caffeine abolishes IP in 2 human models at a dose equivalent to the drinking of 2 to 4 cups of coffee. (The Effect of Caffeine on Ischemic Preconditioning; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00184912?order=1; NCT00184912).

  2. Apoptosis and Acute Brain Ischemia in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Djordje; Katsiki, Niki; Resanovic, Ivana; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Sudar-Milovanovic, Emina; Zafirovic, Sonja; Mousad, Shaker A; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis may contribute to a significant proportion of neuron death following acute brain ischemia (ABI), but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Brain ischemia may lead to stroke, which is one of the main causes of long-term morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. Therefore, stroke prevention and treatment is clinically important. There are two important separate areas of the brain during ABI: the ischemic core and the ischemic penumbra. The ischemic core of the brain experiences a sudden reduction of blood flow, just minutes after ischemic attack with irreversible injury and subsequent cell death. On the other hand, apoptosis within the ischemic penumbra may occur after several hours or days, while necrosis starts in the first hours after the onset of ABI in the ischemic core. ABI is characterized by key molecular events that initiate apoptosis in many cells, such as overproduction of free radicals, Ca2+ overload and excitotoxicity. These changes in cellular homeostasis may trigger either necrosis or apoptosis, which often depends on cell type, cell age, and location in the brain. Apoptosis results in DNA fragmentation, degradation of cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins, cross-linking of proteins, formation of apoptotic bodies, expression of ligands for phagocytic cell receptors and finally uptake by phagocytic cells. This review focuses on recent findings based on animal and human studies regarding the apoptotic mechanisms of neuronal death following ABI and the development of potential neuroprotective agents that reduce morbidity. The effects of statins on stroke prevention and treatment as well as on apoptotic mediators are also considered. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Lymphoma caused by intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L; Schiestl, Robert H

    2014-09-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma.

  4. Intestinal proteome changes during infant necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Smith, Birgitte; Qvist, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Changes in the intestinal and colonic proteome in patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may help to characterize the disease pathology and identify new biomarkers and treatment targets for NEC. Methods: Using gel-based proteomics, proteins in NEC-affected intestinal and coloni...

  5. Microbial functionality in the human intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The extent of metabolic interactions between symbiotic intestinal microbes and the human host, and their system-wide effects on the host physiology are beginning to be understood. The metabolic capacity encoded by the intestinal microbiome significantly extends that of the host, making many of man's

  6. Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Diseases: Pharmacological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of studies show that alterations in intestinal microbiota are linked with metabolic diseases. Here, we propose that intestinal microbiota regulation by polyphenols may be an important mechanism underlying their therapeutic benefits for metabolic diseases. This helps elucidate the intriguing pharmacology of polyphenols and optimize the treatment of metabolic diseases.

  7. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  8. Intestinal cholesterol secretion : future clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakulj, L.; Besseling, J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Groen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Together with the liver, the intestine serves as a homeostatic organ in cholesterol metabolism. Recent evidence has substantiated the pivotal role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). RCT is a fundamental antiatherogenic pathway, mediating the removal of cholesterol from tissues

  9. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  10. Intestinal cholesterol secretion : future clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakulj, L.; Besseling, J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Groen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Together with the liver, the intestine serves as a homeostatic organ in cholesterol metabolism. Recent evidence has substantiated the pivotal role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). RCT is a fundamental antiatherogenic pathway, mediating the removal of cholesterol from tissues

  11. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  12. Clinical radiology of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlinger, H.; Maglinte, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book discussed embryology, anatomy, physiology, and immunology of the small intestine. Radiographic procedures in the small intestine especially enterolysis are presented. Focus is on the role of other types of imaging techniques including sonography, computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, angiography, biopsy, and enteroscopy.

  13. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  14. Pyruvate metabolism and transport in intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Lamers (Jos)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractThe small intestinal mucosa is known to have a high rate of aerobic glycolysis. The absence of a Pasteur effect in the small intestine is related to this observation. It was questioned whether this is an artefact. The knowledge of the rate-limiting factors of glycolysis is therefore impo

  15. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Schechter

    Full Text Available The molecular differences between ischemic (IF and non-ischemic (NIF heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05 when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  16. Transient ischemic attack and acute ischemic stroke: associations with retinal microvascular signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie Jin; Baker, Michelle L; Hand, Peter J; Hankey, Graeme J; Lindley, Richard I; Rochtchina, Elena; Wong, Tien Y; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Small vessel disease plays a role in cerebral events. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and patterns of retinal microvascular signs (surrogates for cerebral small vessel disease) among patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute stroke and population control subjects. Patients with TIA or acute stroke aged ≥49 years admitted to hospitals in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia, were recruited to the Multi-Centre Retina and Stroke Study (n=693, 2005 to 2007). Control subjects were Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged ≥49 years without TIAs or stroke (n=3384, 1992 to 1994, west of Sydney). TIA, ischemic stroke, or primary intracerebral hemorrhage was classified using standardized neurological assessments, including neuroimaging. Retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking, enhanced arteriolar light reflex) were assessed from retinal photographs masked to clinical information. Patients with TIA or acute stroke were older than control subjects and more likely to have stroke risk factors. After adjustment for study site and known risk factors, all retinal microvascular signs were more common in patients with TIA or acute stroke than in control subjects (OR, 1.9 to 8.7; Pischemic stroke had similar prevalences of nondiabetic retinopathy (26.9% versus 29.5%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.6), diabetic retinopathy (55.5% versus 50.0%; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.4 to 3.6), focal arteriolar narrowing (15.6% versus 18.4%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4 to 1.5), and arteriovenous nicking (23.0% versus 17.8%; OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7 to 2.7). Patients with TIA and acute stroke may share similar risk factors or pathogenic mechanisms.

  17. Intravenous tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouz, Réza

    2014-06-01

    Tenecteplase in a genetically engineered variant of alteplase. Although the two have the same mechanism of action, tenecteplase has properties that makes it a seemingly more advantageous thrombolytic. Because of its rapid single-bolus administration, its use is favored over alteplase in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Over the past few years, several clinical studies have been conducted to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke. In spite of the mixed results of these studies, experimentation with tenecteplase continues in from of clinical trials. In this article, the utility of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke will be discussed.

  18. The protective roles of autophagy in ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jun YAN; Hai-long DONG; Li-ze XIONG

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,a process for the degradation of protein aggregates and dysfunctional organelles,is required for cellular homeostasis and cell survival in response to stress and is implicated in endogenous protection.Ischemic preconditioning is a brief and nonlethal episode of ischemia,confers protection against subsequent ischemia-repenfusion through the up-regulation of endogenous protective mechanisms.Emerging evidence shows that autophagy is associated with the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning.This review summarizes recent progress in research on the functions and regulations of the autophagy pathway in preconditioning-induced protection and cellular survival.

  19. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  20. Ischemic colitis after mesotherapy combined with anti-obesity medications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong; Bin; Kim; Won; Moon; Seun; Ja; Park; Moo; In; Park; Kyu-Jong; Kim; Jae; Nam; Lee; Seong; Joo; Kang; Lee; La; Jang; Hee; Kyung; Chang

    2010-01-01

    Mesotherapy and anti-obesity medications are gradually gaining worldwide popularity for purposes of body contouring and weight loss.Their adverse effects are various,but there is a tendency to disregard them.Ischemic colitis is one of the most common diseases associated with non-obstructive blood vessel disorders.However,there have been no case reports about the adverse effects resulting from mesotherapy only or in combination with anti-obesity medications.We report on an interesting case of ischemic coliti...

  1. Mechanism of troponin elevations in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Atar, Dan; Mickley, Hans

    2007-01-01

    the introduction of troponin in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, this marker has been measured in a number of other conditions as well. One of these conditions is acute ischemic stroke, causing diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. Because various electrocardiographic alterations have also been reported......Ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases frequently co-exist in the same patient, and similar risk factors are shared. For 60 years, experimental, observational, and clinical trial data have incessantly indicated that neurologically induced myocardial injury exists. Since...

  2. A STUDY ON INTRACRANIAL STENOSIS IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute ischemic stroke is very common cause of significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The causes of acute ischemic stroke could be intracranial or extra cranial. Prevention of the acute episode could be decreased by surgically treating ex tra - cranial vascular disease but the prevention of intracranial cause is only medical. Various risk factors are also associated with development of ischemic stroke. However, the association between these and the pattern of vascular involvement is not clear . AIM: The aim of the study was to 1. Identify the location of the vessel involved in different cases of ischemic stroke 2. To study the various risk factors associated with the development of ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: This was a prospective study conducted between the years 2010 and 2012. All adult patients with acute ischemic stroke which was confirmed by MRI and less than two weeks duration were included in the study. Parameters recorded were presence of pre - existing comorbid conditions, n eurological examination findings, Cardiovascular system examination findings, Blood pressures, blood sugar levels and pattern of vascular involvement. This was assessed using MR angiography or four vessel Doppler. Statistical analysis was done using the SP SS software. RESULTS: Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study. Pure extracranial stenosis was present in 21.5%, extracranial with intracranial stenosis in 34%, and pure intracranial stenosis in 44.5%, which was predominant and resembled other Indi an studies. 15.5% of patients had significant carotid stenosis based on Doppler study and were suitable candidates for carotid endarterectomy. Middle cerebral artery was commonly involved (55%. Hypertension (63.5%, diabetes mellitus (48%, alcoholism (20 .5% and smoking (18.5% were the common risk factors. Prevalence of these risk factors was more in those with intracranial stenosis in our study, elevated total

  3. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  4. Effects of rhynchophylline on monoamine transmitters of striatum and hippocampus in cerebral ischemic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUYuan-Fu; XIEXiao-Long; WUQin; WENGuo-Rong; YANGSu-Fen; SHIJing-Shan

    2004-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of rhynchophylline ( Rhy on monoamine transmitters and its metabolites in striatum and hippocampus of cerebral ischemic rats. METItODS The cerebral ischemic injury of rat was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The extracellular fluid of striatum and hippocampus in cerebral ischemic rats was collected by using

  5. Improving prediction of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population using apolipoprotein B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels predict fatal myocardial infarction. Whether apoB also predicts nonfatal ischemic cardiovascular events is unclear. We tested the following hypotheses: apoB predicts ischemic cardiovascular events, and apoB is a better predictor of ischemic cardiovascular events tha...

  6. Prothrombin and risk of venous thromboembolism, ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Juul, Klaus; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that Prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity associate with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) in the general population and re-tested risk of IHD and ICVD in two case......-control studies. METHODS: 9231 individuals from the Danish general population were followed for VTE (VTE=DVT+PE), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), ICVD, and ischemic stroke (IS) for a median of 24 years. Case-control studies included 2461 IHD cases and 867.......0(1.0-3.8) for MI, 1.4(0.7-3.1) for ICVD, and 2.1(0.8-5.4) for IS. CONCLUSION: Prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity alone and in combination with Factor V Leiden R506Q heterozygosity predicts 1.5 and 6.0 fold risk of IHD compared to non-carriers....

  7. Factors predicting poor prognosis in ischemic colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramón A(n)ón; Marta Maia Boscá; Vicente Sanchiz; Joan Tosca; Pedro Almela; Cirilo Amorós; Adolfo Benages

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical, analytical and endoscopic factors related to ischemic colitis (IC) severity. METHODS: A total of 85 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study from January 1996 to May 2004.There were 53 females and 32 males (age 74.6 ± 9.4 years, range 45-89 years). The patients were diagnosed as IC. The following variables were analyzed including age, sex, period of time from the appearance of symptoms to admission, medical history, medication, stool frequency, clinical symptoms and signs, blood tests (hemogram and basic biochemical profile), and endoscopic findings. Patients were divided in mild IC group and severe IC group (surgery and/or death). Qualitative variables were analyzed using chi-square test and parametric data were analyzed using Student's t test (P < 0.05).RESULTS: The mild IC group was consisted of 69 patients (42 females and 27 males, average age 74.7 ±12.4 years). The severe IC group was composed of 16 patients (11 females and 5 males, average age of 73.8 ± 12.4 years). One patient died because of failure of medical treatment (no surgery), 15 patients underwent surgery (6 after endoscopic diagnosis and 9 after peroperatory diagnosis). Eight of 85 patients (9.6%) died and the others were followed up as out-patients for 9.6 ± 3.5 mo. Demographic data, medical history, medication and stool frequency were similar in both groups (P >0.05). Seriously ill patients had less hematochezia than slightly ill patients (37.5% vs 86.9%, P = 0.000). More tachycardia (45.4% vs 10.1%, P = 0.011) and a higher prevalence of peritonism signs (75% vs 5.7%, P = 0.000) were observed in the severe IC group while the presence and intensity of abdominal pain were similar between two groups. Two patients with severe IC had shock when admitted. Regarding analytical data, more seriously ill patients were found to have anemia and hyponatremia than the mildly ill patients (37.5% vs 10.1%, P = 0.014 and 46.6% vs 14.9%, P = 0.012, respectively

  8. The intestinal lesion of autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-08-01

    This editorial briefly reviews the significance of lymphoid nodular hyperplasia in the intestinal tract of children with autistic spectrum disorder. The distinction between physiological and pathological lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestinal tract is of importance in the context of a possible causative link with autism. A primary intestinal lesion may occur as part of the broad spectrum of immunological disorders to which autistic children are prone. This could result in increased intestinal permeability to peptides of dietary origin which may then lead to disruption of neuroregulatory mechanisms required for normal brain development. Alternatively, there could be a primary defect in the translocation and processing of factors derived from the intestinal lumen. These possibilities deserve further investigation and should not be lost in the fog of the controversy regarding the role of measles/mumps/rubella vaccination in the aetiology of autistic spectrum disorder.

  9. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga Mart(I)nez-Augustin; Ferm(I)n Sánchez de Medina

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (Bas) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives,due to their amphipatic characteristics.Bas are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver v/a transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated.The transport and synthesis of Bas are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors.In addition to their primary effect,Bas have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer,intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport.Bas are not equivalent in any of these biological activities,and structural requirements have been generally identified.In particular,some Bas may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease,although further research is necessary in this field.This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology.

  10. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease......The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout...

  11. Gallstone ileus resulting in strong intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Szajnbok

    Full Text Available Mechanic intestinal obstruction, caused by the passage of biliary calculus from vesicle to intestine, through fistulization, although not frequent, deserve study due to the morbi-mortality rates. Incidence in elder people explains the association with chronic degenerative diseases, increasing complexity in terms of therapy decision. Literature discusses the need and opportunity for the one or two-phase surgical attack of the cholecystenteric fistule, in front of the resolution on the obstructive urgency and makes reference to Gallstone Ileus as an exception for strong intestinal obstruction. The more frequent intestinal obstruction observed is when it occurs a Gallstone Ileus impacting in terms of ileocecal valve. The authors submit a Gallstone Ileus manifestation as causing strong intestinal obstruction, discussing aspects regarding diagnostic and treatment.

  12. ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS: THERAPEUTICAL TACTICS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Surkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intestinal infections are quite common among children. Their clinical presentations include intoxication syndrome (drowsiness, low appetite, fever etc, infectious toxic syndrome (toxicosis with exicosis, neurotoxicosi, hypovolemic or infectious-toxic shockand diarrhea syndrome. Sometimes intestinal infections can be quite severe and even lethal. However disease duration and outcome depend on timelines and adequacy of prescribed treatment. Main guidelines of intestinal infections treatment include probiotics. That is why the right choice of probiotics is important for a pediatrician. The article contains basic information upon etiopathogenesis, classification, diagnostic criteria and acute pediatric intestinal infections treatment guidelines.Key words: acute intestinal infections, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic criteria, treatment, probiotics, children. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 141–147

  13. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  14. Pre-ischemic treadmill training alleviates brain damage via GLT-1-mediated signal pathway after ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Yang, S-D; Li, W-B; Ren, S-Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-08-22

    Physical exercise could play a neuroprotective role in both human and animals. However, the involved signal pathways underlying the neuroprotective effect are still not well established. This study was to investigate the possible signal pathways involved in the neuroprotection of pre-ischemic treadmill training after ischemic stroke. Seventy-two SD rats were randomly assigned into three groups (n=24/group): sham surgery group, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group and MCAO with exercise group. Following three weeks of treadmill training exercise, ischemic stroke was induced by occluding the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in rat for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after MCAO/reperfusion, 12 rats in each group were evaluated for neurological deficit scores and then sacrificed to measure the infarct volume (n=6) and cerebral edema (n=6). Six rats in each group were sacrificed to measure the expression level of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), protein kinase C-α (PKC-α), Akt, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (n=6). Two hundred and eighty minutes (4.67 h) after occlusion, six rats in each group were decapitated to detect the mRNA expression level of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit type 2B (NR2B) (n=6).The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training exercise reduced brain infarct volume, cerebral edema and neurological deficits, also decreased the over expression of PKC-α and increased the expression level of GLT-1, Akt and PI3K after ischemic stroke (pdamage after ischemic stroke, which might be involved in two signal pathways: PKC-α-GLT-1-Glutamate and PI3K/Akt-GLT-1-Glutamate.

  15. HIF-1α, MDM2, CDK4, and p16 expression in ischemic fasciitis, focusing on its ischemic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Izumi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Kuma, Yuki; Ito, Takamichi; Koda, Kenji; Kisanuki, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Manabu; Yoshimura, Michiko; Furue, Masutaka; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic fasciitis is a benign myofibroblastic lesion, occurring in the sacral region or proximal thigh of elderly or bedridden individuals. The pathogenesis of ischemic fasciitis is thought to be based on ischemic condition; however, it has never been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the expression of ischemia-associated proteins in ischemic fasciitis by immunohistochemical and genetic methods. Specifically, this study aimed to reveal the expression of HIF-1α, MDM2, CDK4, p16, and gene amplification of MDM2 gene. Seven cases of ischemic fasciitis from among the soft-tissue tumors registered at our institution were retrieved. Histopathological findings were as follows: poorly demarcated nodular masses, a proliferation of spindle-shaped fibroblastic or myofibroblastic cells with oval nuclei and eosinophilic or pale cytoplasm, zonal fibrinous deposition, pseudocystic degeneration, granulation-like proliferation of capillary vessels, ganglion-like cells, myxoid or hyalinized stroma, and chronic inflammatory infiltration. Immunohistochemically, the spindle cells were positive for HIF-1α (7/7 cases), MDM2 (4/7 cases), CDK4 (4/7 cases), p16 (7/7 cases), p53 (2/7 case), cyclin D1 (7/7 cases), and alpha-smooth muscle actin (6/7 cases). Neither MDM2 gene amplification nor USP6 gene split signal was detected in any case. Overexpression of the above proteins may be associated with the pathogenic mechanism of ischemic fasciitis. It is noted that the immunohistochemical positivity of MDM2, CDK4, and p16 do not necessarily indicate malignant neoplasm such as dedifferentiated liposarcoma.

  16. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa Zacarias F(o)ohrding; Arne Macher; Stefan Braunstein; Wolfram Trudo Knoefel; Stefan Andreas Topp

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma.The patient initially presented with anemia and melena.Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding.The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation,which was treated with a stent.Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the in-testinal bleeding,leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement.However,an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found,and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively.The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative,which showed multiple bleeding sites,predominately in the jejunal wall.A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed.The histological analysis revealed a lessdifferentiated tumor with characteristic CD31,cytokeratin,and vimentin expression,which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma.Consequently,the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation,and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned.Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality.Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome.A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity,nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function,nonspecific abdominal pain,severe melena,and acute abdominal signs.Therefore,a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim.

  17. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darcy Shaw; Kartik Gohil; Marc D Basson

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis.The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation,short-gut syndrome,obesity,and bariatric surgery.Broadly,these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation.These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal,immune,dietary,nervous,and mechanical stimuli.It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation.This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation,delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention,and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan.Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  18. Relationship between vascular dysfunction in peripheral arteries and ischemic episodes during daily life in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva; Møller, Jacob E; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well established that endothelial dysfunction is present in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia. Some of these patients will have signs of transient myocardial ischemia during Holter monitoring. We sought to describe the correlation between daily life...... cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate a significant relationship between ischemic episodes and vascular dysfunction in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia and may justify an aggressive preventive therapy targeted directly at the endothelium....

  19. NLRP3 deficiency ameliorates neurovascular damage in experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Ziying; Wei, Xinbing; Han, Huirong; Meng, Xianfang; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Weichen; Li, Fengli; Xin, Tao; Pang, Qi; Yi, Fan

    2014-04-01

    Although the innate immune response to induce postischemic inflammation is considered as an essential step in the progression of cerebral ischemia injury, the role of innate immunity mediator NLRP3 in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke is unknown. In this study, focal ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in NLRP3(-/-), NOX2(-/-), or wild-type (WT) mice. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Evans blue permeability, and electron microscopic analyses, we found that NLRP3 deficiency ameliorated cerebral injury in mice after ischemic stroke by reducing infarcts and blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. We further showed that the contribution of NLRP3 to neurovascular damage was associated with an autocrine/paracrine pattern of NLRP3-mediated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release as evidenced by increased brain microvessel endothelial cell permeability and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Finally, we found that NOX2 deficiency improved outcomes after ischemic stroke by mediating NLRP3 signaling. This study for the first time shows the contribution of NLRP3 to neurovascular damage and provides direct evidence that NLRP3 as an important target molecule links NOX2-mediated oxidative stress to neurovascular damage in ischemic stroke. Pharmacological targeting of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory response at multiple levels may help design a new approach to develop therapeutic strategies for prevention of deterioration of cerebral function and for the treatment of stroke.

  20. Ischemic tolerance protects the rat retina from glaucomatous damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Belforte

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a leading cause of acquired blindness which may involve an ischemic-like insult to retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve head. We investigated the effect of a weekly application of brief ischemia pulses (ischemic conditioning on the rat retinal damage induced by experimental glaucoma. Glaucoma was induced by weekly injections of chondroitin sulfate (CS in the rat eye anterior chamber. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mmHg for 5 min; this maneuver started after 6 weekly injections of vehicle or CS and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. Glaucoma was evaluated in terms of: i intraocular pressure (IOP, ii retinal function (electroretinogram (ERG, iii visual pathway function (visual evoked potentials, (VEPs iv histology of the retina and optic nerve head. Retinal thiobarbituric acid substances levels were assessed as an index of lipid peroxidation. Ischemic conditioning significantly preserved ERG, VEPs, as well as retinal and optic nerve head structure from glaucomatous damage, without changes in IOP. Moreover, ischemia pulses abrogated the increase in lipid peroxidation induced by experimental glaucoma. These results indicate that induction of ischemic tolerance could constitute a fertile avenue for the development of new therapeutic strategies in glaucoma treatment.

  1. Ischemic Preconditioning of One Forearm Enhances Static and Dynamic Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Rasmussen, Mads Reinholdt; Jattu, Timo

    2014-01-01

    served as control because the warm-up for rowing regularly encompasses intense exercise and therefore reduced muscle oxygenation. METHODS: Six divers performed a dry static breath hold, 11 divers swam underwater in an indoor pool, and 14 oarsmen rowed "1000 m" on an ergometer. RESULTS: Ischemic...

  2. Development of acute ischemic heart failure in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihaylov, D; Reintke, H; Blanksma, P; De Jong, ED; Elstrodt, J; Rakhorst, G

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to develop a large animal model of acute ischemic left ventricular heart failure (LVHF) that can be used to assess the influence of the PUCA pump on the heart and circulatory system under realistic conditions. We tested the hypothesis that mild stenosis of the coron

  3. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total l...

  4. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study wa...

  5. Treatment and partial recovery of ischemic stroke hemiplegy through acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a patient with hemiplegy and dysphonia due to an ischemic stroke in the pons who was treated through classical systemic and scalpean acupuncture and electroacupuncture, presenting considerable improvement in speaking, walking and moving her right arm after three months of treatment.

  6. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Xinchun Ye; Jinxia Hu; Guiyun Cui

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke.

  7. Echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, Sjoerd Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a decreased left ventricular (LV) function after myocardial infarction has demonstrated to be of considerable clinical importance. In this thesis, the role of 2D echocardiography to evaluate LV function in ischemic heart disease was investigated. In the first part of the thesis, rece

  8. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from...

  9. Community Level Disadvantage and the Likelihood of First Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Boden-Albala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Residing in “disadvantaged” communities may increase morbidity and mortality independent of individual social resources and biological factors. This study evaluates the impact of population-level disadvantage on incident ischemic stroke likelihood in a multiethnic urban population. Methods. A population based case-control study was conducted in an ethnically diverse community of New York. First ischemic stroke cases and community controls were enrolled and a stroke risk assessment performed. Data regarding population level economic indicators for each census tract was assembled using geocoding. Census variables were also grouped together to define a broader measure of collective disadvantage. We evaluated the likelihood of stroke for population-level variables controlling for individual social (education, social isolation, and insurance and vascular risk factors. Results. We age-, sex-, and race-ethnicity-matched 687 incident ischemic stroke cases to 1153 community controls. The mean age was 69 years: 60% women; 22% white, 28% black, and 50% Hispanic. After adjustment, the index of community level disadvantage (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7–2.1 was associated with increased stroke likelihood overall and among all three race-ethnic groups. Conclusion. Social inequalities measured by census tract data including indices of community disadvantage confer a significant likelihood of ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors.

  10. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Caffes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1–transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1–Trpm4 channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1–Kir6.2 channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  11. Clinical analysis on neuroprotection of transient ischemic attacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitar Maslarov; Desislava Drenska

    2011-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is an acute cerebrovascular incident, and is generally considered the best opportunity for early neuroprotective treatment against cerebral ischemia. This study retrospectively analyzed 80 patients with TIA (38 males and 42 females). Among 61 patients who received neuroprotective cerebrolysin treatment within 24 hours after TIA onset, 13 (21.31%)patients suffered subsequent strokes. Among 19 patients who received neuroprotective

  12. Ischemic Colitis of the Left Colon in a Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios J. Karayiannakis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus may affect the gastrointestinal tract possibly as a result of autonomic neuropathy. Here we present a 68-year-old male with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who presented with prolonged watery diarrhea and in whom imaging studies demonstrated ischemic colitis of the left colon. Resection of the affected colon resulted in sustained disappearance of symptoms.

  13. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  14. [Ischemic colitis after renal transplantation:etiology and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperovich, G; Idiarte, L; Besasso, O; Avagnina, A

    2003-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a well-recognized complication occurring in renal transplant recipients. It has often been associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) vasculitis. However, the diagnosis of this pathology in the absence of CMV suggests that other etiological factors might be involved. Drugs inducing mesenteric vasoconstriction, such as non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclosporine could be related to this entity.

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Mygind, Naja Dam; Qayyum, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    Although, treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD) has improved considerably within the last decades, it is still the main cause of death worldwide. Despite maximum treatment, many IHD patients suffer from refractory angina and heart failure, which severely limits their daily lives. Moreover, IHD...

  16. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Michel M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; van der Harst, Pim; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more consiste

  17. Mental vulnerability--a risk factor for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Jørgensen, Torben; Birket-Smith, Morten

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to examine whether mental vulnerability is a risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD) after adjustment for well-established risk factors. METHODS: In three prospective cohort studies in Copenhagen County, Denmark, we recorded the leve...

  18. Ischemic Segment Detection using the Support Vector Domain Description

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Sjöstrand, Karl

    2007-01-01

    and registration of the myocardium provided pixel-wise signal intensity curves that were analyzed using the Support Vector Domain Description (SVDD). In contrast to normal SVDD, the entire regularization path was calculated and used to calculate a generalized distance. The results corresponded well to the ischemic...

  19. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Weissenborn, Karin; Prange, Hilmar; Schneider, Dietmar; Weimar, Christian; Wartenberg, Katja; Schellinger, Peter D.; Bohn, Matthias; Becker, Harald; Wegrzyn, Martin; Jaehnig, Peter; Herrmann, Manfred; Knauth, Michael; Baehr, Mathias; Heide, Wolfgang; Wagner, Armin; Schwab, Stefan; Reichmann, Heinz; Schwendemann, Guenther; Dengler, Reinhard; Kastrup, Andreas; Bartels, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Numerous preclinical findings and a clinical pilot study suggest that recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) provides neuroprotection that may be beneficial for the treatment of patients with ischemic stroke. Although EPO has been considered to be a safe and well-tolerated dru

  20. Update on the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano S. A. Capettini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are considered as key mediators in the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. In particular, they have been shown to reduce the ischemic injury after acute cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. These protective and anti-inflammatory properties on peripheral tissues and circulating inflammatory have been demonstrated to involve their binding with both selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 and type 2 (CB2 transmembrane receptors. On the other hands, the recent discoveries of novel different classes of cannabinoids and receptors have increased the complexity of this system in atherosclerosis. Although only preliminary data have been reported on the activities of novel cannabinoid receptors, several studies have already investigated the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in ischemic stroke. While CB1 receptor activation has been shown to directly reduce atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, controversial data have been shown on neurotransmission and neuroprotection after stroke. Given its potent anti-inflammatory activities on circulating leukocytes, the CB2 activation has been proven to produce protective effects against acute poststroke inflammation. In this paper, we will update evidence on different cannabinoid-triggered avenues to reduce inflammation and neuronal injury in acute ischemic stroke.