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Sample records for nonobturated root canal

  1. The Root Canal Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der L.W.M.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Chávez de Paz, E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root cana

  2. Root canal irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van der Sluis; C. Boutsioukis; L.M. Jiang; R. Macedo; B. Verhaagen; M. Versluis

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root cana

  3. Root canal irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-10-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were 'root canal irrigants' and 'endodontic irrigants.' The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  4. Retention of Root Canal Posts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Flury, S;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc......] and a self-etch adhesive resin cement [Panavia F2.0]) were used. After removal of the crowns of 360 extracted premolars, canines, or incisors, the root canals were prepared with a parallel-sided drill system to three different final diameters. Half the posts did not receive any pretreatment. The other half...... received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement...

  5. Clinical management of infected root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R M

    1996-08-01

    Several hundred different species of bacteria are present in the human intraoral environment. Bacterial penetration of root canal dentin occurs when bacteria invade the root canal system. These bacteria may constitute a reservoir from which root canal reinfection may occur during or after endodontic treatment. The learning objective of this article is to review endodontic microbiology, update readers on the role of bacteria in pulp and periapical disease, and discuss the principles of management of infected root canal dentin. Complete debridement, removal of microorganisms and affected dentin, and chemomechanical cleansing of the root canal are suggested as being the cornerstones of successful endodontic therapy, followed by intracanal medication to remove residual bacteria, when required.

  6. Tissue engineering in endodontics: root canal revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit Madhu Chanda; Hegde, K Sundeep; Bhat, Sham S; Sargod, Sharan S; Mantha, Somasundar; Chattopadhyay, Sayan

    2014-01-01

    Root canal revascularization attempts to make necrotic tooth alive by the use of certain simple clinical protocols. Earlier apexification was the treatment of choice for treating and preserving immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This procedure promoted the formation of apical barrier to seal the root canal of immature teeth and nonvital filling materials contained within root canal space. However with the success of root canal revascularization to regenerate the pulp dentin complex of necrotic immature tooth has made us to rethink if apexification is at the beginning of its end. The objective of this review is to discuss the new concepts of tissue engineering in endodontics and the clinical steps of root canal revascularization.

  7. How to bond to root canal dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  8. Two root canals in maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Almeida Gomes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The success of endodontic treatment requires the knowledge of tooth morphology and its variations. Case report: This clinical article reports an unusual root canal configuration that was detected in a maxillary central incisor with two root canals, demonstrated by radiographic and computerized tomography exams. Conclusion: Knowledge of endodontic anatomy as well as the obtainment of both preoperative radiographs and tomography is important to detect abnormal tooth morphology.

  9. Type III apical transportation of root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv P Mantri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural accidents leading to complications such as canal transportation have been ascribed to inapt cleaning and shaping concepts. Canal transportation is an undesirable deviation from the natural canal path. Herewith a case of apical transportation of root canal resulting in endodontic retreatment failure and its management is presented. A healthy 21-year-old young male presented discomfort and swelling associated with painful endodontically retreated maxillary incisor. Radiograph revealed periradicular radiolucency involving underfilled 11 and overfilled 12. Insufficiently obturated 11 exhibited apical transportation of canal. This type III transportation was treated by periradicular surgery and repair using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Comfortable asymptomatic patient presented uneventful healing at third and fourth month recall visits. A decrease in the size of radiolucency in radiograph supported the clinical finding. In the present case, MTA is useful in repairing the transportation defect. The result of these procedures is predictable and successful.

  10. Effect of two contemporary root canal sealers on root canal dentin microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Successful root canal treatment depends on proper cleaning, disinfecting and shaping of the root canal space. Pulpless teeth have lower dentin microhardness value compared to that of vital teeth. A material which can cause change in dentin composition may affect the microhardness. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two root canal sealers on dentin microhardness. Material and Methods Forty two single rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 equal groups; Apexit, iRootSP and control groups (n=14) Each group was then divided into 2 subgroups according to the post evaluation period; 1 week and 2 months (n=7). Root canal procedure was done in the experimental groups and obturation was made using either; Apexit, iRootSP or left unprepared and unobturated in the control group. Roots were sectioned transversely into cervical, middle and apical segments. The three sections of each root were mounted in a plastic chuck with acrylic resin. The coronal dentin surfaces of the root segments werepolished. Microhardness of each section was measured at 500 µm and 1000 µm from the canal lumen. Results Four way-ANOVA revealed that different tested sealer materials, canal third, measuring distance from the pulp and time as independent variables had statistically non significant effect on mean microhardness values (VHN) at p≤0.001. Among iRootSP groups there was a statistically significant difference between iRoot SP at coronal root portion (87.79±17.83) and iRoot SP at apical root portion (76.26±9.33) groups where (p=0.01). IRoot SP at coronal canal third had higher statistically significant mean microhardness value (87.79±17.83) compared to Apexit at coronal third (73.61±13.47) where (p=0.01). Conclusions Root canal sealers do not affect dentin microhardness. Key words:Root canal, dentin, sealers, microhardness, bioceramic. PMID:28149466

  11. Root canal cleaning through cavitation and microstreaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, B.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the flow from a needle using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations and high-speed imaging experiments on sub-millimeter fluidic channels. These have shown that the flow is not effective in delivering the bleach near the bacteria, due to the complex geometry of the root canal.

  12. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  13. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal post is a device made of austenitic alloys...

  14. Root canal filling using Resilon: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D J

    2011-07-01

    Root canal treatment is achieved by chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system followed by filling. The filling material \\'entombs\\' residual bacteria and acts as a barrier which prevents the entrance of oral microorganisms and reinfection of the root canal system through microleakage. However, filling with contemporary root filling materials such as gutta-percha offers limited long-term resistance to microorganisms; as a result other materials such as Resilon have been investigated as alternatives. The aim of this review was to analyse the literature to consider whether Resilon is a suitable root canal filling material. A MEDLINE and Cochrane library search including various keyword searches identified several papers which investigated or discussed Resilon or RealSeal\\/Epiphany. Analysis of the literature demonstrated that the bulk of the literature is in vitro in nature, based largely on leakage-type studies, and demonstrates a wide variety of methodologies with conflicting findings; as a result meaningful conclusions are difficult. Within the limit of these in vitro studies Resilon appears to perform adequately in comparison to gutta-percha, however, as a result of the questionable merit of such studies, it cannot presently be considered an evidence-based alternative to the current gold standard gutta-percha. It is imperative that before Resilon is considered as a replacement material, a better understanding of the physical properties of the resin sealer and the reality of the adhesive \\'monoblock\\' are elucidated. The literature also demonstrates a paucity of quality long-term clinical outcome studies which will need to be addressed before firm conclusions can be reached.

  15. Root canal debridement: an online study guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will present root canal debridement including subdivisions on canal access, canal debridement, orifice enlargement and preflaring, crown-down technique, balanced force, nickel titanium and other shape memory alloys, rotary engine-driven techniques, endodontic instruments, irrigation, electronic apex locators, sonics/ultrasonics, smear layer, and intracanal medicaments.

  16. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps.

  17. Comparison of the rheological properties of four root canal sealers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seok Woo Chang; Kwang Shik Bae; Young-Kyu Lee; Qiang Zhu; Won Jun Shon; Woo Cheol Lee; Kee Yeon Kum; Seung Ho Baek; In Bog Lee; Bum-Soon Lim

    2015-01-01

    The flowability of a root canal sealer is clinically important because it improves the penetration of the sealer into the complex root canal system. The purpose of this study was to compare the flowabilities of four root canal sealers, measured using the simple press method (ISO 6876), and their viscosities, measured using a strain-controlled rheometer. A newly developed, calcium phosphate-based root canal sealer (Capseal) and three commercial root canal sealers (AH Plus, Sealapex and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT) were used in this study. The flowabilities of the four root canal sealers were measured using the simple press method (n55) and their viscosities were measured using a strain-controlled rheometer (n55). The correlation between these two values was statistically analysed using Spearman’s correlation test. The flow diameters and the viscosities of the root canal sealers were strongly negatively correlated (r520.8618). The viscosity of Pulp Canal Sealer EWT was the lowest and increased in the following order:AH Plus,Sealapex,Capseal (P,0.05). All of the tested root canal sealers showed characteristic time-and temperature-dependent changes in their rheological properties. The viscosities measured using the strain-controlled rheometer were more precise than the flowabilities measured using the simple press method, suggesting that the rheometer can accurately measure the rheological properties of root canal sealers.

  18. Optimizing the chemical aspect of root canal irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. de Macedo

    2013-01-01

    Root canal treatment is aimed at the removal of inflamed and infected tissue present in the root canal system. It will prevent the entrance of new microorganisms or nutrients in order to maintain or create a healthy environment around the root. There is sufficient evidence that shows that traditiona

  19. Endodontic management of a maxillary second premolar with an S-shaped root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex and unusual root canal morphology is an often occurring phenomenon. Understanding the unusual root canal morphology contributes to success in endodontic treatment. One such variant root canal morphology is the ′S′ shaped or bayonet shaped root canal. This case report discusses endodontic treatment of a maxillary second premolar with an ′S′ shaped root canal.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification...

  1. Antimicrobial irrigants in endodontic therapy: 1. Root canal disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, Shiyana; Briggs, Peter F; Porter, Richard W J

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of root canal disinfection. It discusses the different endodontic irrigants available and comments on how these can be used most effectively. Eliminating bacteria from the root canal system is an essential stage in endodontic therapy. Practitioners should be adequately informed and skilled in this vital aspect of endodontics.

  2. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-15

    Jul 15, 2014 ... junction. Canal length was determined by placing a size 10 K-file. The working .... at the root tip of each tooth to prevent the flow of irrigants through ..... Sotokawa T. An analysis of clinical breakage of root canal instruments.

  3. Evaluation of torque within manual preparation with root canal instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Gorski, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Used root canal instruments are often deformed; they can fracture, persist and reinfect teeth. There are no evident studies consulting torque and manual preparation of root canals. Thus, the purpose of this study is the evaluation of torque within manual preparation in connection with its impact on file deformation. With the aid of torque measurement a change in dental education could potentially be achieved.

  4. Three root canals in the maxillary second premolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Almeida-Gomes Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report an endodontic treatment of the maxillary second premolar with three root canals and distinct foramens. The possibility of three root canals in this tooth is quite small; however, it must be taken into account in clinical and radiographic evaluation during endodontic treatment. Many times, their presence is noticed only after canal treatment due to continuing post-operative discomfort.

  5. Assessment of the wetting behavior of three different root canal sealers on root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar Tummala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the wetting behavior of three different root canal sealers on the root canal dentin surface treated with irrigants and their combination. Materials and Methods: Decoronation and apical third resections of 27 extracted single-rooted human mandibular premolars were done. The roots were then split longitudinally into two halves, and randomly assigned into three treatment groups (n=18. The root dentin surfaces in Group1, Group 2 and Group 3 were treated with 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA, 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and combination of 17% EDTA and 3% NaOCl, respectively. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of 6 specimens each, depending on the the sealer used, i.e. sub group A. zinc oxide (ZnOE, sub group B. AH plus, subgroup C. Guttaflow sealer, respectively. The contact angle was measured using First Ten Angstroms (FTA 200 dynamic contact angle analyzer. Results: The contact angle values for AH Plus sealer were significantly lower when compared to the other two sealer groups. Conclusion: The wettability of AH Plus sealer on the root surface dentin was found to be better than Gutta-Flow and ZnOE sealer.

  6. Root canal morphology of South asian Indian mandibular premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian mandibular premolars using a tooth clearing technique. Two hundred mandibular premolar teeth were collected from different dental schools and clinics in India. After pulp tissue removal and root canal staining with Indian ink, the specimens were decalcified with 5% nitric acid, dehydrated in ethyl alcohol, and subsequently cleared in methyl salicylate. Of the 200 mandibular premolars, 100 were first premolars and 100 were second premolars. Of the first premolars, 94% had a single root, whereas 6% were 2 rooted. Seventy-six percent had a single canal, 22% had 2 canals, and 2% had 3 canals. Eighty-two percent had a single apical foramen, 16% had 2 foramens, and 2% teeth had 3 apical foramens. Eighty percent of teeth had type I, 6% had type II, 10% had type IV, 2% had type V, and 2% teeth had type IX root canal anatomy. Of the 100 second premolars, 92% had a single root, whereas 8% teeth were 2 rooted and fused. Fifty-eight percent of teeth had a single canal, and 42% had two canals. Eighty-eight percent had a single apical foramen, and 12% had 2 foramens. Sixty-six percent had type I, 30% had type II, and 4% had type V root canal anatomy. A high prevalence of 2 canals was noted in the first and second premolars. Also, 20% of first premolars and 34% of second premolars had a root canal anatomy other than type I. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. VARIATION OF MAXILLARY FIRST PREMOLAR WITH THREE ROOT CANALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful endodontic treatment requires effective biomechanical preparation of the root canals and three-dimensional obturation of the root canal system. This can be achieved only by knowing and identifying the variations in the root canal system of the endodontically treated teeth. The Aim: The aim of this article is to present cases of endodontic treatment of maxillary first premolar with three root canals – different types. Material and Methods: Five clinical cases of successful endodontic treatment of patients with maxillary first premolar and three root canals are described. Result and Discussion: It is noted that good endodontic practice requires good knowledge of dental anatomy and possible variations, accurate X-ray images, as well as use of magnifying equipment. Conclusion: Knowledge of dental anatomy is fundamental for good endodontic practice.

  8. Root canals-from concretion to patency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakar Chaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Teeth with calcification provide an endodontic treatment challenge; traumatized teeth usually develop partial or total pulpal obliteration which is characterized by apparent loss of the pulp space radiographically and a yellow discoloration of the clinical crown. Since only 7-27% of such teeth develop pulp necrosis with radiographic signs of apical periodontitis, it is difficult to decide whether to treat these teeth immediately upon detection of the pulpal obliteration or to wait until signs and symptoms of pulp and/or apical periodontitis occur. This article reviews the etiology, prevalence, classification, mechanism, diagnosis as well as treatment options for teeth with pulp obliteration and the various management approaches and treatment strategies for overcoming potential complications. A search of articles from "PubMed" and "Medline" from 1965 to present was done with the keywords dental trauma, discoloration, pathfinding instruments, pulp canal obliteration, and root canal treatment was conducted. A total of 94 abstracts were collected, of which 70 relevant articles were read and 31 most relevant articles were included in this article.

  9. Bacterial coronal leakage after obturation with three root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpawat, S; Amornchat, C; Trisuwan, W R

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bacterial leakage of root canals obturated with three root canal sealers, using Endodontalis faecalis as a microbial tracer to determine the length of time for bacteria to penetrate through the obturated root canal to the root apex. Seventy-five, single-rooted teeth with straight root canals had the crown cut off at the cementoenamel junction. Root canals were instrumented by a step-back technique. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 19 teeth each and another 2 groups as positive and negative controls (9 teeth each). The experimental groups were dependent on the sealer used: AH-Plus, Apexit, and Ketac-Endo. The root canals were obturated using a lateral condensation technique. After 24 h the teeth were attached to microcentrifuge tubes with 2 mm of the root apex submerged in Brain Heart Infusion broth in glass test tubes. The coronal portions of the root canal filling materials were placed in contact with E. faecalis. The teeth were observed for bacterial leakage daily for 30 and 60 days. With the chi2 test for comparing pairs of groups at the 0.05 level (p 0.06), but Apexit had significantly higher leakage (p 0.05), but Apexit leaked more than AH-Plus. The conclusion drawn from this experiment was that epoxy resin root canal sealer was found to be more adaptable to the root canal wall and filling material than a calcium hydroxide sealer when bacterial coronal leakage was studied.

  10. Root canal treatment of bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In endodontics, several anatomic variations occur in teeth, both externally and in the internal root morphology, which play a very significant role in the diagnosis and treatment outcome. A thorough knowledge of the root canal anatomy, careful interpretation of the angled radiographs, proper endodontic access cavity preparation, and exploration of the root canal are the prerequisites for endodontic success. In a maxillary first premolar, it is rare to find extra roots and canals, and the aim of the present article is to report a case about the successful diagnosis and clinical management of bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars, with three independent root canals.

  11. A maxillary central incisor with four root canals

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    Fábio de Almeida-Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to present a case report of endodontic treatment of a maxillary central incisor with 1 root and 4 root canals. The success of endodontic treatment requires knowledge of dental anatomy and its variations. This clinical article reports an unusual anatomy detected in a maxillary central incisor with 4 root canals with an associated periapical lesion. The incidence of 4 root canals in this tooth is rare. However, it must be taken into consideration, the clinical and radiographic evaluations during the endodontic treatment in order to enhance the diagnostic. Many times, the presence of a supernumerary canal is noticed only after canal treatment due to continuing post-operative discomfort or treatment failure.

  12. Assessment of three root canal preparation techniques on root canal geometry using micro-computed tomography: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikha M Al-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the effects of three root canal preparation techniques on canal volume and surface area using three-dimensionally reconstructed root canals in extracted human maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted Human Maxillary Molars having three separate roots and similar root shape were randomly selected from a pool of extracted teeth for this study and stored in normal saline solution until used. A computed tomography scanner (Philips Brilliance CT 64-slice was used to analyze root canals in extracted maxillary molars. Specimens were scanned before and after canals were prepared using stainless steel K-Files, Ni-Ti rotary ProTaper and rotary SafeSiders instruments. Differences in dentin volume removed, the surface area, the proportion of unchanged area and canal transportation were calculated using specially developed software. Results: Instrumentation of canals increased volume and surface area. Statistical analysis found a statistically significant difference among the 3 groups in total change in volume (P = 0.001 and total change in surface area (P = 0.13. Significant differences were found when testing both groups with group III (SafeSiders. Significant differences in change of volume were noted when grouping was made with respect to canal type (in MB and DB (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The current study used computed tomography, an innovative and non destructive technique, to illustrate changes in canal geometry. Overall, there were few statistically significant differences between the three instrumentation techniques used. SafeSiders stainless steel 40/0.02 instruments exhibit a greater cutting efficiency on dentin than K-Files and ProTaper. CT is a new and valuable tool to study root canal geometry and changes after preparation in great details. Further studies with 3D-techniques are required to fully understand the biomechanical aspects of root canal preparation.

  13. Comparison of Curved Root Canals Prepared with Various Chelating Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Dental ,  Philadelphia,  PA,  USA). After instrumentation, lengths were re-measured and all the teeth were re-scanned. Using computer software... teeth , intra-operative complications were shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of initial treatment (2). In teeth where the canal anatomy ...is altered during retreatment, healing is significantly decreased compared to when canal anatomy is respected (3). Teeth with complex root canal

  14. Interactions between root canal irrigants, sealers and dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelakantan, P.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to determine the interactions between root filling materials and root dentin and to investigate if root canal irrigating solutions had an impact on these interactions. The following outcomes were assessed in the studies encompassed in this thesis: (i) dislocation res

  15. Comparative evaluation of root canal disinfection by conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-25

    Mar 25, 2013 ... Objective: The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate in vivo the disinfecting ... laser containing the gallium aluminum and arsenic, which emitted 980 nm wavelengths. .... canal with pulp necrosis mainly involving obligate anaerobes .... 99.98% of the bacteria injected in the root canal could be.

  16. Incidence of dentinal defects after root canal filling procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wu, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To compare the incidence of dentinal defects (cracks and craze lines) after root canal preparation, lateral compaction and continuous wave compaction of gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. Methodology  Two hundred mandibular premolar teeth were divided into four groups with similar average canal diam

  17. Comparison of antimicrobial substantivity of root canal irrigants in instrumented root canals up to 72 h: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, M N; Subba Reddy, V V

    2011-01-01

    Disinfection of the root canal system is one of the primary aims of root canal treatment. This can be achieved through the use of various antimicrobial agents in the form of irrigants and medicaments. The antimicrobial substantivity of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 1% povidone iodine, 2.5% hydrogen peroxide followed by 2% sodium hypochlorite, and 2% sodium hypochlorite alone as irrigants was assessed in instrumented root canals. 2% chlorhexidine showed antimicrobial substantivity lasting up to 72 h, followed by 1% povidone iodine, and 2% sodium hypochlorite. Thus 2% chlorhexidine should be used as a final rinse irrigant in endodontic treatment protocols.

  18. Comparison of antimicrobial substantivity of root canal irrigants in instrumented root canals up to 72 h: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Shahani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinfection of the root canal system is one of the primary aims of root canal treatment. This can be achieved through the use of various antimicrobial agents in the form of irrigants and medicaments. The antimicrobial substantivity of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 1% povidone iodine, 2.5% hydrogen peroxide followed by 2% sodium hypochlorite, and 2% sodium hypochlorite alone as irrigants was assessed in instrumented root canals. 2% chlorhexidine showed antimicrobial substantivity lasting up to 72 h, followed by 1% povidone iodine, and 2% sodium hypochlorite. Thus 2% chlorhexidine should be used as a final rinse irrigant in endodontic treatment protocols.

  19. Atypical situations in root canals anatomy of human mandibular premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício SCAINI

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the teeth internal anatomy that will receive endodontic treatment is very important for the success of the treatment and prognosis of those teeth. In this study, the morphological variations that may occur in relation to the number of root canals present in the premolar mandibular teeth group were discussed, as well as the most efficient methods to diagnose the existence of these variations, in order to have a clearer diagnosis of the number of root canals to be treated.A case of an endodontic treatment of a mandibular premolar with 4 root canals was reported and some cases of endodontic treatment in mandibular premolars with 1, 2 and 3 root canals were shown.

  20. Root canal treatment of mandibular second premolar tooth with taurodontism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujašković Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Taurodontism is a morphoanatomical change in the shape of a tooth. An enlarged body of a tooth with smaller than usual roots is a characteristic feature. Internal tooth anatomy correlates with this appearance, which means that a taurodontal tooth has a large pulp chamber and apically positioned furcations. This dental anomaly may be associated with different syndromes and congenital discoders. CASE OUTLINE The case report presents the patient of a rare case of taurodontism in the mandibular second premolar with chronic periodontitis. Endodontic treatment was performed after dental history and clinical examination. Special care is required in all segments of endodontic treatment of a taurodontal tooth from the identification orifice, canal exploration, determining working length, cleaning and shaping and obturation of the root canal. Precurved K-file was used for canal exploration and location of the furcation. One mesial and one distal canal with the buccal position were identified in the apical third of the root canal. The working lengths of two canals were determined by radiographic interpretation with two K-files in each canal and verified with the apex locator. During canal instrumentation, the third canal was located in the disto-lingual position. The working length of the third canal was established using the apex locator. CONCLUSION Thorough knowledge of tooth anatomy and its variations can lead to lower percentage of endodontic failure. Each clinical case involving these teeth should be investigated carefully, clinically and radiographically to detect additional root canals. High quality radiographs from different angles and proper instrumentarium improve the quality of endodontic procedure.

  1. Root canal irrigants: a review of their interactions, benefits, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Amit; Sahoo, Sanjit Kumar; Govind, Shashirekha

    2015-04-01

    Endodontic treatment success depends on a combination of appropriate instrumentation, effective irrigation and decontamination of root canal spaces to apices, and obturation of the root canals. Irrigation of the root canal is paramount in determining periapical tissue healing. This article reviews presently available root canal irrigants, their interactions, advantages, and limitations. For this review, the authors performed a Medline search for all English language articles published through January 2014 with "root canal irrigants" and "endodontic irrigants" as keywords.

  2. Long-term cytotoxic effects of contemporary root canal sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Joao Nogueira Leal da SILVA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of root canal sealers on the cytotoxicity of 3T3 fibroblasts during a period of 5 weeks. Material and Methods Fibroblasts (3T3, 1×105 cells per well were incubated with elutes of fresh specimens from eight root canal sealers (AH Plus, Epiphany, Endomethasone N, EndoREZ, MTA Fillapex, Pulp Canal Sealer EWT, RoekoSeal and Sealapex and with elutes of the same specimens for 5 succeeding weeks after immersing in simulated body fluid. The cytotoxicity of all root canal sealers was determined using the MTT assay. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results RoekoSeal was the only sealer that did not show any cytotoxic effects (p<0.05. All the other tested sealers exhibited severe toxicity initially (week 0. MTA Fillapex remained moderately cytotoxic after the end of experimental period. Toxicity of the other tested sealers decreased gradually over time. The evaluated root canal sealers presented varying degrees of cytotoxicity, mainly in fresh mode. Conclusions RoekoSeal had no cytotoxic effect both freshly mixed and in the other tested time points. MTA Fillapex was associated with significantly less cell viability when compared to the other tested root canal sealers.

  3. Nanodiamond-Gutta Percha Composite Biomaterials for Root Canal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Kim, Sue Vin; Limansubroto, Adelheid Nerisa; Yen, Albert; Soundia, Akrivoula; Wang, Cun-Yu; Shi, Wenyuan; Hong, Christine; Tetradis, Sotirios; Kim, Yong; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K; Ho, Dean

    2015-11-24

    Root canal therapy (RCT) represents a standard of treatment that addresses infected pulp tissue in teeth and protects against future infection. RCT involves removing dental pulp comprising blood vessels and nerve tissue, decontaminating residually infected tissue through biomechanical instrumentation, and root canal obturation using a filler material to replace the space that was previously composed of dental pulp. Gutta percha (GP) is typically used as the filler material, as it is malleable, inert, and biocompatible. While filling the root canal space with GP is the standard of care for endodontic therapies, it has exhibited limitations including leakage, root canal reinfection, and poor mechanical properties. To address these challenges, clinicians have explored the use of alternative root filling materials other than GP. Among the classes of materials that are being explored as novel endodontic therapy platforms, nanodiamonds (NDs) may offer unique advantages due to their favorable properties, particularly for dental applications. These include versatile faceted surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and their role in improving mechanical properties, among others. This study developed a ND-embedded GP (NDGP) that was functionalized with amoxicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used for endodontic infection. Comprehensive materials characterization confirmed improved mechanical properties of NDGP over unmodified GP. In addition, digital radiography and microcomputed tomography imaging demonstrated that obturation of root canals with NDGP could be achieved using clinically relevant techniques. Furthermore, bacterial growth inhibition assays confirmed drug functionality of NDGP functionalized with amoxicillin. This study demonstrates a promising path toward NDGP implementation in future endodontic therapy for improved treatment outcomes.

  4. Assessment of periapical health, quality of root canal filling, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... 2016 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow ... Inadequately dense root canal filling was observed in 141 teeth, whereas ... Conclusion: The results indicate that the quality of both the root filling and ... seeking implant applications and oral pathology diagnoses. Clinic ...

  5. Root canal preparation in endodontics: conventional versus laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.; Moskowitz, Emrey

    1992-06-01

    Conventional cleaning and shaping of root canal systems employs hand and/or rotary instrumentation to remove the contents of the canal and shape the canal to receive a filling material. With the advent of the Nd:YAG laser system another method of accomplishing proper cleaning and shaping is evaluated. Single rooted teeth were radiographed bucco- lingually and mesio-distally and were divided into 2 groups. The first group was accessed and the root canal systems cleaned and shaped with a step back technique utilizing hand files and gates glidden burs. At completion of the procedure the teeth were again radiographed at the same positions as those prior to the procedure. The teeth were split longitudinally and examined under scanning electron microscopy to assess cleaning. The second group of teeth were accessed, and cleaning and shaping was accomplished using the Nd:YAG laser in combination with hand files and rotary instruments. These teeth were subjected to the same analysis as those in the first group. The before and after radiographs of each group were subjected to image analysis to determine effectiveness of the two methods in shaping the canal systems. We will discuss the ability of Nd:YAG to clean and shape root canal spaces and remove smear layer and organic tissue remnants from those areas.

  6. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Brajkovic, Denis [Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia); Ilic, Dragan [Department of Restorative Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany); Rakocevic, Zlatko [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute for Nuclear Science “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Busse, Björn, E-mail: b.busse@uke.uni-hamburg.de [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different irrigation solutions and disinfectants were used for treatment of root canal dentine and gutta-percha points. • Materials surface characteristics were assessed using quantitative backscattered electron imaging, reference point indentation, and contact angle analyzer. • The most significant differences in mineralization, indentation, and adhesive outcomes were observed after ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid treatment. • Irrigation solutions confer to superior sealing ability of endodontic filling materials. • Micromechanical characteristics of dentine after irrigation are considerable reduced. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples’ microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  7. Review of root canal irrigant delivery techniques and devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Jee Yoo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Eliminating the residual debris and bacteria in the root canal system is one of the main purposes of the endodontic treatment. However, the complexity on the anatomy of the root canal system makes it difficult to eliminate the bacterial biofilm existing along the root canal surface and necrotic pulp tissue by mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation. Recently, more effective irrigant delivery systems for root canal irrigation have been developed. The purpose of this review was to present an overview of root canal irrigant delivery techniques and devices available in endodontics. Review The contents of this paper include as follows; - syringe-needle irrigation, manual dynamic irrigation, brushes - sonic and ultrasonic irrigation, passive ultrasonic irrigation, rotary brush, RinsEndo, EndoVac, Laser Conclusion Though technological advances during the last decade have brought to fruition new agitation devices that rely on various mechanisms, there are few evidence based study to correlate the clinical efficacy of these devices with improved outcomes except syringe irrigation with needle and ultrasonic irrigation. The clinicians should try their best efforts to deliver antimicrobial and tissue solvent solutions in predictable volumes safely to working length.

  8. Risk of airway embarrassment during root canal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Robert J; Clarkson, Earl

    2013-01-01

    Root canal therapy (RCT) is a commonly performed dental procedure that has a good success rate. Complications of RCT usually are minor, but severe complications can occur. A 59-year-old Hispanic man with no history of coagulopathy started to hemorrhage profusely from the mesiolingual canal of the right mandibular first molar (tooth no. 30) during RCT. The general dentist practitioner briefly controlled the hemorrhaging by packing a gutta-percha point into the mesiolingual canal. Shortly afterward, the patient developed an expanding hematoma in the submandibular space. The authors extracted tooth no. 30, raised buccal and lingual flaps, and evacuated the hematoma. It is possible for clinicians to encounter significant hemorrhaging and airway compromising swelling when performing root canal therapy. Clinicians must recognize and understand how to manage such complications when they occur.

  9. Retrospective Study of Root Canal Configurations of Mandibular Third Molars Using CBCT- Part-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Pavithra; Rawtiya, Manjusha; Wadhwani, Shefali; Uthappa, Roshan; Shivagange, Vinay; Khan, Sheeba

    2017-06-01

    Abnormal root canal morphologies of third molars can be diagnostically and technically challenging during root canal treatment. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of mandibular third molars in Central India population by using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) analysis. CBCT images of 171 mandibular third molars were observed and data regarding number of roots, number of canals, Vertucci's classification in each root, prevalence of C shaped canal, gender and topographical relation of morphology in mandibular third molar was statistically evaluated. Majority of mandibular third molars had two roots (84.2%) and three canals (64.3%). Most mesial root had Vertucci Type II (55.6%) and Vertucci Type IV (22.2%), distal root had Type I canals (87.5%). Over all prevalence of C shaped canals in mandibular third molars was 9.4%. There was a high prevalence of two rooted mandibular third molars with three canals.

  10. Rehabilitation of teeth with root canal treatment. Multidisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Flores Concha, Pompeyo H.; Residente 3° año, Segunda Especialidad en Rehabilitación Oral, UNMSM.; Canales Huarhua, Johnny; Residente 2°año, Segunda Especialidad en Periodoncia, UNMSM.; García Linares, Sixto; Especialidad en Periodoncia y Coordinador de Posgrado en Periodoncia, UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    This clinical case details the teeth reconstruction and root canal retreatment, with recovery of the lost biological space invaded by maladjusted crowns and its subsequent reconstruction with fiberglass preformed poles for the cementation of splinted crowns by the decrease of the crown-root proportion. It is concluded that we must take into account the amount of remaining dental tissue, the periodontal status (biological width), the aesthetic requirements, the root morphology, the location of...

  11. Evolution of root canal sealers: An insight story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Tyagi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attainment of ideal root canal treatment comprises various essential factors such as proper instrumentation, biomechanical preparation, obturation, and ultimately depending upon the case, post-endodontic restoration. Main objective of the treatment is to get absolute rid of microbial entity and prevent any future predilection of re-infection. In order to achieve that, proper seal is required to cut down any chance of proliferation of bacteria and future occurrence of any pathology. Although gutta-percha has been the standard obturating material used in root canal treatment, it does not reinforce endodontically treated roots owing to its inability to achieve an impervious seal along the dentinal walls of the root canal. Gutta-percha does not from a monoblock even with the use of a resin-based sealer such as AH Plus because the sealer does not bind to gutta-percha. As a result, a monoblock is formed (consisting of Resilon core material, Resin sealer, bonding agent/primer, and dentin. Another reason of Resilon being a better obturating material could be that the removal of smear layer by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA after biomechanical preparation may have allowed the root canal filling material and root canal sealers to contact the canal wall and penetrate in the dentinal tubules, which may increase the strength of roots. New silicone-based sealers like Roekoseal automix and the most recent GuttaFlow have some affirmative results regarding solubility and biocompatibility, as compared to other sealers. Methacrylate resin-based sealers and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA-based sealers have opened a new horizon for sealers.

  12. Variations in the Root Form and Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Mandibular First Molars in a Sri Lankan Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Peiris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the number of roots and morphology of the root canal system of permanent mandibular first molars (M1 in a Sri Lankan population. Sample of 529 M1 teeth was used. The number of roots was examined and the lengths of the mesial and distal roots were measured to the nearest 0.01 mm. Vacuum injection protocol was used to inject China ink into the root canal system, making it transparent. Root canal morphology was recorded using Vertucci’s classification. Presence of furcation canals, position of lateral canals, intercanal communications, level of bifurcation, and convergence of the root canal system were recorded. M1 showed three roots in 4.1% of the sample. Commonest root canal morphology of the mesial root was type IV and the distal root was type I. The level of bifurcation of the root canals was commonly observed in the cervical one-third of the root while convergence was observed in the apical one-third in both roots. Prevalence of three rooted mandibular first molars is less than 5%. Mesial root showed the most variable canal morphology. Prevalence of furcation canals was 1.5% while that of middle mesial canals was 0.2%.

  13. Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Ab Aziz, Zeti A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioceramic-based root canal sealers are considered to be an advantageous technology in endodontics. The aim of this review was to consider laboratory experiments and clinical studies of these sealers. An extensive search of the endodontic literature was made to identify publications related to bioceramic-based root canal sealers. The outcome of laboratory and clinical studies on the biological and physical properties of bioceramic-based sealers along with comparative studies with other sealers was assessed. Several studies were evaluated covering different properties of bioceramic-based sealers including physical properties, biocompatibility, sealing ability, adhesion, solubility, and antibacterial efficacy. Bioceramic-based sealers were found to be biocompatible and comparable to other commercial sealers. The clinical outcomes associated with the use of bioceramic-based root canal sealers are not established in the literature. PMID:27242904

  14. A new strategy in root canal therapy: there is a lot going on in endodontic disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Apical periodontitis (AP) is the inflammatory response in the surrounding tissues at the root tip of a tooth to a microbial infection of the root canal system inside the tooth. AP can only resolve after thorough root canal disinfection. However at present, state-of-the-art root canal treatment does

  15. Evaluation of pre-fabricated root canal posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Y S; Purton, D G; Love, R M

    2001-03-01

    In this in vitro study, properties of a titanium alloy post recently introduced to the market (IntegraPost), were compared with those of a clinically proven stainless steel post (ParaPost). The IntegraPost has a unique, perforated, spherical head and a microknurled shank surface. The posts were tested for rigidity, for retention within the root canals of extracted teeth and for ability to retain composite resin cores. The two post types exhibited similar properties in core and root canal retention, however, the IntegraPost was significantly less rigid than the ParaPost.

  16. Mineral trioxide aggregate root canal filling of traumatized immature tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Maha A Kanfar; Al-Nazhan, Saad A.

    2013-01-01

    An 8-year-old female patient reported to the dental clinic seeking a help to save her traumatized maxillary left central incisor. The tooth had been treated with a temporary filling by a general dentist. The coronal tooth structure was intact, discolored, and a temporary filling was placed on the access opening. She gave a history of trauma about 3 years back. An intraoral periapical radiograph revealed an open apex and dentin bridge in the middle of the root canal. The root canal and the acc...

  17. Atypical situations in root canals anatomy of human mandibular premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrício SCAINI; Fabio Leal BRAGA; Irdival Cristino FIGUEIREDO JÚNIOR; Rafael Brandão FERREIRA; Baratto Filho,Flares; de SOUSA NETO, Manoel Damião

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of the teeth internal anatomy that will receive endodontic treatment is very important for the success of the treatment and prognosis of those teeth. In this study, the morphological variations that may occur in relation to the number of root canals present in the premolar mandibular teeth group were discussed, as well as the most efficient methods to diagnose the existence of these variations, in order to have a clearer diagnosis of the number of root canals to be treated.A cas...

  18. Three distal root canals in mandibular first molar with different canal configurations: Report of two cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of reports of aberrant root canal morphology, the clinician needs to be aware of the variable anatomy. Various case reports have been published with the finding of middle mesial canal in mandibular first molar, however finding of three distal canals in distal roots of mandibular first molar is rare. This article reports endodontic management of two mandibular first molars presented with three distal canals present in a single distal root (Sert and Bayirli type XVIII and distal and distolingual root.

  19. Evaluation of complications of root canal treatment performed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mothanna K. AlRahabi

    2017-07-05

    Jul 5, 2017 ... Lower molars (43.1%) and upper incisors (19.2%) exhibited the highest and ... assessment process is important because the quality of root canal ... preclinical full-year endodontic course in the third year of their six-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery. CONTACT ..... —healing and functionality. J Calif Dent ...

  20. Root canal length measurement in teeth with electrolyte compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, K C; Kim, S C; Lee, S J; Kim, Y J; Kim, N G; Kim, D W

    2002-03-01

    Electronic root canal length measurement devices have made it easier and faster to measure the root canal length of a tooth compared with the conventional radiographic method. Of these electronic apex locators, the frequency-dependent type features greater accuracy and convenience in operation. However, its accuracy is still influenced by the presence of blood and/or the various electrolytes used in root canal therapy. This study describes the development of a new frequency-dependent electronic apex locator featuring electrolyte compensation, utilising an impedance ratio and voltage difference technique to minimise the influence of electrolytes on the accuracy of root canal length measurement. The errors for distances from file tips to apical constrictions were determined in vivo with the device operating with electrolyte compensation. The measured lengths were compared with the true lengths of the extracted teeth determined using a microscope. The mean error was +0.14+/-0.27mm, and 95.2% of the measurements were within the clinical tolerance of +/-0.5mm. It was also found that the degree of accuracy was not dependent on the size of the apical foramen (p = 0.74).

  1. Solubility evaluation of different root canal sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Emre; Dalat, Dilek; Bayram, Melike

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the solubility of five different root canal sealers (AH Plus Jet, RealSeal SE, MTA Fillapex, Tubli-Seal, and Acroseal) in chloroform, eucalyptol and Endosolv-E solvents. Ninety root canal sealer samples were prepared and then divided into three groups for immersion in a solvent for 2, 5 or 10 minutes. The mean values of the root canal sealers' dissolution in the solvents were obtained by the difference between the preimmersion original weight and the post-immersion weight on a digital analytical scale. Data were statistically analyzed by a Kruskal-Wallis test with a Bonferroni correction. Chloroform was a more effective solvent than eucaly-ptol or Endosolv E for all root canal sealers, except for RealSeal SE, at all time points (p materials, and eucaly-ptol was found to be the least effective solvent in this study. This study can help to the clinicians about which solvent should be preferred for solving the filling materials in retreatment cases.

  2. Bacteriologic results from 4,000 root canal cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, K.C.; Amerongen, J. van

    1959-01-01

    The bacteriologic results from more than 4,000 root canal cultures are discussed. Streptococci form 61 per cent of the isolated organisms. Among these, the group of hemolytic, indifferent, and indifferent anaerobic streptococci, mainly belonging to serologic groups F, G, and C, seem the most serious

  3. Independent and Confluent Middle Mesial Root Canals in Mandibular First Molars: A Report of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanavelu Deepalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable variations with respect to number of roots and root canals. The possibility of additional root canals should be considered even in teeth with a low frequency of abnormal root canal anatomy. This paper discusses the endodontic management of the rare anatomical complexity middle mesial canals in mandibular first molar and also serves to remind the clinicians that such anatomical variations should be taken into account during the endodontic treatment of the mandibular molars.

  4. Role of the confinement of a root canal on jet impingement during endodontic irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, B.; Boutsioukis, C.; Heijnen, G. L.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Versluis, M.

    2012-01-01

    During a root canal treatment the root canal is irrigated with an antimicrobial fluid, commonly performed with a needle and a syringe. Irrigation of a root canal with two different types of needles can be modeled as an impinging axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric jet. These jets are investigated exper

  5. Geminated Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Two Root Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Nayara; Souza-Flamini, Luis Eduardo; Mendonça, Isabela Lima; Silva, Ricardo Gariba

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a case of gemination in a maxillary lateral incisor with two root canals and crown-root dilaceration. A 16-year-old male patient was referred for endodontic treatment of the maxillary left lateral incisor and evaluation of esthetic and functional complaints in the anterior region. The patient reported trauma to the anterior primary teeth. There was no spontaneous pain, but the tooth responded positively to the vertical percussion test and negatively to the pulp vitality test. Clinical examination showed esthetic and functional alterations and normal periodontal tissues. CBCT imaging confirmed the suspicion of gemination and crown-root dilaceration and also revealed the presence of two root canals and periapical bone rarefaction. The root canals were instrumented with Reciproc R40 and 1% NaOCl irrigation and were filled by lateral condensation of gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The tooth was definitely restored with composite resin to recover esthetics. Continued follow-up over 6 months has shown absence of pain or clinical alterations as well as radiographic image suggestive of apical repair. PMID:28119787

  6. [Electronic determination of the length of the root canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehon, P; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P

    1999-01-01

    The endpoint of an endodontic treatment must be situated at the cemen-to-dentinal junction to preserve the biological potential of the periapical area and to realize a complete disinfection of the principal root canal system. Thus, the determination of working length is a crucial factor in endodontic therapy. The conventional radiographic method cannot provide the accurate location of the apical constriction. For this reason, the electronic apex locators have been developed. Now, the last generation of apex locators has become more sophisticated and the electronic measurements seem to be accurate and reliable with electrolytic solutions in the canal.

  7. A Clinical Update on the Different Methods to Decrease the Occurrence of Missed Root Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Asgary, Saeed; Shalavi, Sousan; V. Abbott, Paul

    2016-01-01

    One of the main causes of endodontic treatment failure is the clinician’s inability to localize all the root canals. Due to the complex anatomy of the root canal system, missed canals are not uncommon. There are several strategies to decrease the possibility of missed root canals starting with good pre-operative radiographies. In order to overcome the limitations of conventional radiographies, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be considered. A correct access cavity preparation is of pivotal importance in localizing the orifices of the root canals. Furthermore, ultrasonics are very important devices to find missed canals. Increasing magnification and illumination enhance the possibility of finding all root canals during root canal treatment. The purpose of the present paper was to review all of the above techniques and devices. PMID:27471533

  8. The effect of four different irrigation systems in the removal of a root canal sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grischke, J; Müller-Heine, A; Hülsmann, M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of sonic, ultrasonic, and hydrodynamic devices in the removal of a root canal sealer from the surface and from simulated irregularities of root canals. Fifty-three root canals with two standardized grooves in the apical and coronal parts of longitudinally split roots were covered with AH Plus root canal sealer. Compared were the effects of (control) syringe irrigation, (1) CanalBrush, (2) passive ultrasonic irrigation, (3) EndoActivator, and (4) RinsEndo on the removal of the sealer. The specimens were divided into four groups (N = 12) and one control group (N = 5) via randomization. The amount of remaining sealer in the root canal irregularities was evaluated under a microscope using a 4-grade scoring system, whereas the remaining sealer on the root canal surface was evaluated with a 7-grade scoring system. Passive ultrasonic irrigation is more effective than the other tested irrigation systems or syringe irrigation in removing sealer from root canal walls (p ultrasonic irrigation shows a superior effect on sealer removal from the root canal surface during endodontic retreatment. Cleaning of lateral grooves seems not to be possible with one of the techniques investigated. Incomplete removal of root canal sealer during re-treatment may cause treatment failure. Passive Ultrasonic irrigation seems to be the most effective system to remove sealer from a root canal.

  9. Quality improvement of photopolimerizable-cement root canal obturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis A.; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto; Kuranaga, Carlos; Dias da Silva, Marcos; do Carmo de Andrade Nono, Maria; Cerquiera Rezende, Mirabel

    2003-06-01

    The sealing cements commonly used for endodontic applications are of the type cured through chemical reactions. During the polymerization process, mechanical contractions are not uncommon, leading to a non-perfect sealing. Photopolymerizable cements usually presents superior performance as compared to those chemically activated. However, difficulties in carrying the light to difficult-to-reach regions like the dental apex preclude those material of being accepted in the dental office routine. This work reports on a novel technique which allow the light curing of photopolymerizable cements in endodontic applications. A special light guide had been developed to allow the curing light to reach and polymerize the sealing cement in the apex region. The technique was tested by using single-root human teeth with normal canal morphology. The Ultradent EndoREZ root canal sealer and a resin-based photopolymerizable filler specially developed for the current application had been used. The cone-shaped light guide was introduced into treated canals filled with the photopolymerizable material, up to the apical region. Light from an argon laser was launched onto the light guide for polymerization. All test samples were immersed in methylene-blue solution for microleakage testing. All samples treated with the self-polymerizable material presented dye penetration to some extent. No sample within the group which had the filling material polymerized by using the light guide presented dye penetration through the canal wall.

  10. A comparison of methods used in root canal sealability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matloff, I.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Singer, L.; Tabibi, A.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare several methods that have been used to assess marginal leakage of root canal fillings. Sixty-three extracted, single-rooted teeth were instrumented and filled in a standardized manner. Teeth were randomly divided into groups of twenty and exposed to solutions containing methylene blue dye, calcium-45, carbon-14-labeled urea, and iodine-125-labeled albumin for 48 hours to compare the degree of leakage indicated by each technique. Methylene blue dye was found to penetrate farther up the canal than any of the isotope tracers. Carbon-14-labeled urea penetrated farther than the calcium-45- or iodine-125-labeled albumin. The mean volume of solution penetrating the teeth was exceedingly small (0.0011 ml) and probably unimportant physiologically.

  11. Anatomical evaluation of the root canal diameter and root thickness on the apical third of mesial roots of molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Josué; Tatsch, Gustavo Henrique; Tatsch, Augusto César; Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Ferrer-Luque, Carmen María

    2011-09-01

    The purpose was to determine the diameter of the main root canal and wall thickness in the apical dentin in mesial roots of maxillary and mandibular molars. Forty mesiobuccal and mesial root specimens were sectioned horizontally at 1, 2 and 3 mm from the apex, and measured at each top surface by using optical microscopy to an accuracy of ×20 magnification. The anatomical parameters were established as the following points of reference: AB, two points connected by a line from the outer edge of the mesial wall to the outer edge of the distal one through the center of the root canal to measure the thickness of the root and mesiodistal diameter of the root canal (CD). A second line (EF) was designed to evaluate the diameter of the root canal in the buccolingual direction. All data were summarized, and values were assessed statistically by ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons. The buccolingual (BL) root canal diameters at 1, 2 and 3 mm in the mandibular and maxillary molars were greater than in the mesiodistal (MD), showing statistically significant differences (p maxillary molars were statistically significant (p maxillary molars was 1.741 mm. The BL diameters in maxillary and mandibular molars were higher than the MD diameter. The thickness (MD) of maxillary and mandibular molars decreased as a function of apical proximity.

  12. Comparative study of sealing ability of three root canal sealers

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    Khedmat S.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Complete obturation of the prepared root canal is an essential step in endodontic treatment. Combination of gutta-percha and a sealer is widely used in clinical practice for root canal obturation, thus microleakage studies on sealing properties of these materials constitute an important part of endodontic researches. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of three root canal sealers: Apexit, AH26 and Dorifill by electrochemical method.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 55 extracted human maxillary and mandibular cuspids were used. The coronal part of teeth were removed and the root canals were prepared using the step-back technique. The specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 17 samples each. Teeth in each group were filled with one of the sealers and gutta-percha by lateral condensation technique. 4 specimens served as positive and negative controls. An electrochemical method was used for evaluation of apical leakage with the electrical source potential of 10 V. Measurements of current flow through the test system were recorded every 72 hours. Data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis and Mann Whitney tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: All specimens of the three groups showed low initial leakage that increased during the test period. The mean leakage in Apexit group was higher than AH26 and Dorifill groups. The lowest mean leakage was related to Dorifill group. Although no statistically significant difference was observed between this sealer and AH26.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the best apical seal was obtained using Dorifill and AH26 sealers. The poorest result was observed in Apexit.

  13. Endodontic management of mandibular second premolar with three roots and three root canals: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Shrivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High level of success in endodontic treatment requires an understanding of root canal anatomy and morphology. The clinician must be prepared to identify those teeth that tend to vary generally from norm. Thorough debridement and obturation of such teeth can be challenging and failing to do so can lead to treatment failure. Mandibular premolars have earned the reputation for having aberrant anatomy. However, the occurrence of three separate canals with three separate foramina in mandibular premolars is very rare. The incidence of three canals is as high as 23% in mandibular first premolars, whereas in second premolars incidence is as low as 0.4%. Three rooted mandibular second premolar is reported to be 0.2%. This case report describes endodontic management of one such tooth with unusual morphological variations in canal anatomy of mandibular second premolar.

  14. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  15. Phytic acid: an alternative root canal chelating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Tamura, Yukihiko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Tagami, Junji

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of phytic acid, inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), as a final rinse on the surface of instrumented root canals and smear-layered flat dentin surfaces treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and to evaluate its effect on the viability and alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1). The universally accepted chelating agent EDTA was used as the control in all conducted experiments. Root canals of human canines were instrumented with rotary files and irrigated with 5% NaOCl, followed by a final rinse of 17% EDTA (1 minute), 1% IP6 (1 minute or 30 seconds), or distilled water. NaOCl-treated flat coronal dentin surfaces were also treated with 17% EDTA (1 minute), 1% IP6 (1 minute or 30 seconds), or distilled water. The presence or absence of smear layer was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Cell viability and alkaline phosphatase assays were performed to evaluate the effect of IP6 and EDTA on cultured MC3T3-E1 cells. The results demonstrated the ability of IP6 to remove the smear layer from instrumented root canals and flat coronal dentin surfaces. When compared with EDTA, IP6 was less cytotoxic and did not affect the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. IP6 shows the potential to be an effective and biocompatible chelating agent. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  17. Monoblocks in root canals: a hypothetical or a tangible goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2007-04-01

    The term monoblock has become familiar in the endodontic literature with recent interest in the application of dentin adhesive technology to endodontics. Endodontic monoblocks have generated controversial discussions among academicians and clinicians as to whether they are able to improve the quality of seal in root fillings and to strengthen roots. This review attempts to provide a broader meaning to the term monoblock and to see how this definition may be applied to the materials that have been used in the past and present for rehabilitation of the root canal space. The potential of currently available bondable materials to achieve mechanically homogeneous units with root dentin is then discussed in relation to the classical concept in which the term monoblock was first employed in restorative dentistry and subsequently in endodontics.

  18. Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Second Premolar with Three Roots and Three Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex root canal system with atypical variations is a common finding among mandibular premolars. Endodontic treatment in these teeth may not be successful due to the failure to recognise and treat multiple canals. This paper presents endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and three canals.

  19. Comparison of 2 flushing methods used during passive ultrasonic irrigation of the root canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Lucas; Wu, Min-Kai; Wesselink, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of irrigation time on the removal of dentin debris from root canals irrigated with passive ultrasonic irrigation comparing 2 flushing methods. Method and Materials: Root canals with a standardized groove in 1 canal wall, which was filled with dentin debris, were ir

  20. The clinical success of different root canal treatments in primary molars

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    Çiğdem Güler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Objectives: To examine the success rate of root canal treatment in primary molars with the use two different root canal instrumentation ways, irrigation solutions and root canal sealers.

    Materials and Methods: Root canal treatment was applied to 120 second primary molars of 69 children between 5-8 years old. The teeth were divided in 8 groups randomly according to instrumentation ways [conventional stainless-steel hand files / Nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti rotary files], irrigation solutions [0.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and 0.9% saline solution combination / 0.4% chlorhehexidine (CHX] and root canal sealers [Zinc oxide eugenol cement (ZOE and Apexit Plus (AP]. All teeth were restored with stainless steel crowns. The teeth were followed 12 months both clinically and radiographically. All data was analyzed statistically by χ2 and Wilcoxon test.

    Results: Statistical significance were found according to “age” and “root canal sealers” factors on success rate of root canal treatment (p<0.05. No statistical significance were found according to gender, jaw, tooth type, root canal instrumentation ways and irrigation solutions  on success rate of root canal treatment (p>0.05. The clinically and radiographically success rate of ZOE and AP were 98.3% and 68.3%, respectively.

    Conclusions: Root canal treatment is a successful treatment in primary molars. Ni-Ti rotary files and CHX can be a good alternative for root canal treatment in primary molars. The most effective factor to obtain clinical success of root canal treatment is properties of using root canal sealer.

  1. Endodontic management of a two rooted, three canaled mandibular canine with a fractured instrument

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath

    2014-01-01

    .... This case reports the use of dental operating microscope for the successful endodontic management of a two rooted and three canaled mandibular canine with the fractured instrument in the middle canal...

  2. Discrimination potential of root canal treated tooth in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, K; Yousif, S; Satti, A

    2016-07-01

    Forensic Odontology is a vital component of forensic science and one branch involves the application of dental science to the identification of unknown human remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the discriminatory potential for identification of the radiographic morphology of obturated single root canals. Thirty periapical radiographs of patients having endodontic treatment of single rooted canals were selected randomly from the data bank of the digital X- ray system present in the restorative department, University of Science and Technology, Sudan. The post-operative radiographs were considered as an ant-mortem data "Set 1". Ten radiographs from the thirty were reprinted, labelled from (A-J) and considered as a post-mortem data "Set 2". This post-mortem group of 10 radiographs "Set 2" would be compared with the ante-mortem group of 30 radiographs comprising "Set 1". These two sets of radiographs would be examined by 40 dentally trained personnel. The thirty radiographs comprising "Set 1" and the 10 radiographs comprising "Set 2" were provided to each of the examiners who were asked to match the individual post-mortem radiographs ("Set 2") with the ante-mortem radiographs ("Set1"). The result demonstrated that 34 examiners achieved a success rate of 100%, 4 examiners achieved a success rate of 97.5% (1 mismatch) and 2 examiners achieved a success rate of 95% (2 mismatches). The radiographic images of obturated single-rooted teeth in this study were shown to have highly- specific morphological features. It is proposed that, in cases where the ante and post-mortem radiographs of a single-rooted obturated canal show similar morphology, this commonality of morphology can be used as a tool in the identification process.

  3. Root and Canal Morphology of Mandibular Third Molars in an Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Kuzekanani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. A through knowledge of the root canal morphology is required for successful endodontic therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of mandibular third molars in Kerman, a province in southeast of Iran. Materials and methods. One-hundred-fifty extracted mandibular third molars were collected randomly from different dental clinics in Kerman. The root canal anatomy and morphology of each tooth was carefully studied using a clearing technique. Root number and morphology, number of canals per root, root canal configuration according to Vertucci classification, and incidence of dilacerated roots and C-shaped canals in mandibular third molars were evaluated under stereomicroscope with ×2 to ×3 magnifications. Results. From the total of 150 mandibular third molars studied, 21% had one root. The majority of teeth (73% had two roots. 5.5% of the teeth had three roots. The incidence of C-shaped canal was 3.5% in this study and 8% of the teeth had at least one dilacerated root. Conclusion. Although root canal anatomy and morphology of mandibular third molars is very variable having two roots seems to be the normal anatomy for these teeth.

  4. Bilateral presence of two root canals in maxillary central incisors: A rare case study

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    M Kavitha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning and shaping followed by complete obturation of the canal system. Therefore, endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy, and its variations in presentation. The internal anatomy of the maxillary central incisor is well-known and usually presents one root canal system. This case report describes an endodontic treatment of traumatized both maxillary central incisors with two canal systems. Knowledge of dental anatomy is fundamental for proper endodontic practice. When root canal treatment is performed, the clinician should be aware that both external and internal anatomy may be abnormal.

  5. Bilateral presence of two root canals in maxillary central incisors: A rare case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, M; Gokul, Kannan; Ramaprabha, B; Lakshmi, Amudha

    2014-04-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning and shaping followed by complete obturation of the canal system. Therefore, endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy, and its variations in presentation. The internal anatomy of the maxillary central incisor is well-known and usually presents one root canal system. This case report describes an endodontic treatment of traumatized both maxillary central incisors with two canal systems. Knowledge of dental anatomy is fundamental for proper endodontic practice. When root canal treatment is performed, the clinician should be aware that both external and internal anatomy may be abnormal.

  6. Endodontic Management of a Maxillary First Molar with Seven Root Canals Using Spiral Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Hemant Kumar; Saini, Gaurav Kumar; Chhabra, Harpreet Singh; Panwar, Pratyaksha Singh

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this case report is to present a rare root canal configuration of maxillary molar with seven root canals; three mesiobuccal, two palatal and two distobuccal canals diagnosed during treatment procedure confirmed by spiral computed tomography. A thorough knowledge of root canal morphology, proper clinical and radiographic examination, and use of dental operating microscopes are necessary for successful clinical outcomes. This article highlights the variations in the morphology of maxillary first molar and use of the latest techniques in successful diagnosis and negotiation of the additional canals. PMID:28293666

  7. Endodontic Management of a Maxillary First Molar with Seven Root Canals Using Spiral Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar Yadav

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this case report is to present a rare root canal configuration of maxillary molar with seven root canals; three mesiobuccal, two palatal and two distobuccal canals diagnosed during treatment procedure confirmed by spiral computed tomography. A thorough knowledge of root canal morphology, proper clinical and radiographic examination, and use of dental operating microscopes are necessary for successful clinical outcomes. This article highlights the variations in the morphology of maxillary first molar and use of the latest techniques in successful diagnosis and negotiation of the additional canals.

  8. Endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems

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    Dilip Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal anatomy of pulp is complex. The first mandibular molars typically have two roots, one mesial with two root canals and another distal root, which contains one or two canals. A 20-year-old female patient reported with intermittent pain and incomplete root canal treatment in left lower back region since 1-week. Refined access cavity revealed initially two canals in mesial and two canals in the distal root. With operating microscope and cone beam computerized tomography, two additional canals (L-mesio-buccal and B-mesio-lingual were identified in mesial root. One-year follow-up showed patient was asymptomatic and complete healing of periapical radiolucency.

  9. Reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in curved root canals after various sizes and tapers of canal preparation

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    Amir Abbas Moshari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in curved root canals after various sizes and tapers of the canal preparation. Materials and Methods: Mandibular first molars (n = 103 with curved mesiobuccal canals were divided into one control (n = 5 and 7 experimental (n = 14 groups, were inoculated with E. faecalis (ATTC 29212 and prepared with the following RaCe files (FKG Dentaire as master apical file: Groups: 25.04, 25.06, 30.04, 30.06, 35.04, 35.06 and 40.06. All the experimental groups were irrigated with 2 mL of 1% sodium hypochlorite during instrumentation and finally rinsed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA (2 mL followed by 5.25% NaOCl (2 mL and sterile distilled water. Colony counting was performed after incubation. Statistical Analysis Used: Resulting data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey′s post-hoc test, (P < 0.05. Results and Conclusions: All the experimental groups showed significant bacterial reduction (P < 0.001. Although the greater the size/taper or both led to more decreased amount of bacteria, differences between the groups with the identical size and different tapers, and among the groups with the same taper and different sizes were not significant. Based on this study, 25.04 along with using 2 mL of 1% NaOCl during instrumentation, and using 17% EDTA and 5.25% NaOCl as final rinse successively after the termination of preparation, can effectively reduce intra-canal bacteria and preserve root structure.

  10. Choice of root canal irrigants by Serbian dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosić, Goran; Miladinović, Milan; Kovaević, Milorad; Stojanović, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment is considered to be the one of the most important procedures in endodontic treatment. To irrigate the root canal it is most common to use sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexodine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), local anesthetic solution, while the most used in Serbia is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The aim of this survey was to reveal the preferred root canal irrigants used by general dental practitioners in Serbia and to determine the influence of the continuing education program, delivered over the 3-year observation period, on work habits of dental practitioners. This was the first comprehensive survey of this nature carried out in Serbia. The survey was conducted in two instances, a 4-month observation period each, from November 1, 2009 to March 1, 2010 and from November 1, 2012 to March 1, 2013. Internet Web Page Survey was posted on the official web site of the Serbian Association of Private Dentists. In the first survey, 569 completed questionnaires were subjected to analysis. In the next attempt (3 years later), the survey was launched again and 615 completed questionnaires were analyzed using the same criteria. The statistical analysis was carried out with simple descriptive statistics applying the x2 test, at a significance level of p irrigant solution was H2O2 in 2009, while in 2012 it was yet H2O2, but also NaOCl, chlorhexodine, and a little less EDTA. This study shows significant changes in the irrigation protocol applied in Serbian dental community. After 3 years of observation, NaOCl became widely accepted as the irrigant of choice, whereas H2O2 lost its popularity.

  11. Using a dental operating microscope for endodontic management of a mandibular central incisor with 3 root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswinkumar, Vijayakumar; Nandini, Suresh; Velmurgan, Natanasabapathy

    2013-08-01

    Endodontic management of teeth with aberrant root canal morphology can be challenging. This article presents a case in which multiple angulated radiographs and a dental operating microscope clearly revealed the presence of 3 root canals in a right mandibular central incisor with 2 different canal patterns. This case report emphasizes the importance of utilizing a dental operating microscope to understand unusual root canal morphology.

  12. Root and Canal Morphology of Mandibular Third Molars in an Iranian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Kuzekanani; Jahangir Haghani; Hossein Nosrati

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims. A through knowledge of the root canal morphology is required for successful endodontic therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of mandibular third molars in Kerman, a province in southeast of Iran. Materials and methods. One-hundred-fifty extracted mandibular third molars were collected randomly from different dental clinics in Kerman. The root canal anatomy and morphology of each tooth was carefully studied using a clea...

  13. Effect of relining on fiber post retention to root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luís; Pedrosa-Filho, Celso de Freitas; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Silveira, Daniele Machado da; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2009-01-01

    One of the clinically relevant problems dentists face when restoring endodontically treated teeth is the mismatch between fiber post and post space diameters, which results in an excessively thick resin cement layer. Fiber post relining appears as a solution for this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber post relining with composite resin on push-out bond strength. Twenty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. The crowns were removed below the cementoenamel junction and the root canals were treated endodontically and flared with diamond burs. The roots were allocated into two groups (n=10): G1: fiber posts without relining and G2: fiber posts relined with composite resin. The posts were cemented with a dual-cured resin cement and the specimens were sectioned transversally. Three 1.5-mm thick slabs were obtained per root and identified as cervical, medium and apical thirds. The push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. The failure mode of fractured specimens was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by split-plot ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Relined fiber posts presented higher retention values than non-relined post in all thirds. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found among thirds for relined posts. All failures occurred at the interface between resin cement and root dentin. Relining with composite resin seems to be an effective method to improve the retention of fiber posts to flared root canals.

  14. Effect of relining on fiber post retention to root canal

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    André Luís Faria-e-Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the clinically relevant problems dentists face when restoring endodontically treated teeth is the mismatch between fiber post and post space diameters, which results in an excessively thick resin cement layer. Fiber post relining appears as a solution for this problem. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber post relining with composite resin on push-out bond strength. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. The crowns were removed below the cementoenamel junction and the root canals were treated endodontically and flared with diamond burs. The roots were allocated into two groups (n=10: G1: fiber posts without relining and G2: fiber posts relined with composite resin. The posts were cemented with a dual-cured resin cement and the specimens were sectioned transversally. Three 1.5-mm thick slabs were obtained per root and identified as cervical, medium and apical thirds. The push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. The failure mode of fractured specimens was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by split-plot ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. RESULTS: Relined fiber posts presented higher retention values than non-relined post in all thirds. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05 were found among thirds for relined posts. All failures occurred at the interface between resin cement and root dentin. CONCLUSIONS: Relining with composite resin seems to be an effective method to improve the retention of fiber posts to flared root canals.

  15. In vitro comparison of passive and continuous ultrasonic irrigation in curved root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Varela-Patiño, Purificación; Cantatore, Giuseppe; Domínguez-Perez, Ana; Ruíz-Piñón, Manuel; Martín-Biedma, Benjamín

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of endodontic irrigation procedures can be compromised by the complexity of the root canal system. Delivering irrigants to the apical third of curved canals presents a particular challenge to endodontists. This study compared the effects of two ultrasonic irrigation techniques on the penetration of sodium hypochlorite into the main canal and simulated lateral canals of curved roots in extracted teeth. Material and Methods Two sets of simulated lateral canals were created at 2, 4, and 6 mm from the working length in 60 single-rooted teeth (6 canals/tooth, n = 360 canals). The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental irrigation groups: group 1 (n = 20), positive pressure irrigation (PPI); group 2 (n = 20), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI); and group 3 (n = 20), continuous ultrasonic irrigation (CUI). To assess the irrigation solution penetration, 20% Chinese ink (Sanford Rotring GmbH, Hamburg, Germany) was added to a 5% sodium hypochlorite solution and delivered into the curved root canals. The penetration of contrast solution into the simulated lateral canals was scored by counting the number of lateral canals (0-2) penetrated to at least 50% of the total length. Results The CUI group showed significantly higher (P irrigant penetration into the lateral canals and into the apical third of the main canals. The PPI group showed significantly lower sodium hypochlorite penetration (P irrigant penetration was observed in the PUI group than the PPI group. Conclusions Using CUI as the final rinse significantly increased the penetration of irrigant solution into the simulated lateral canals and apical third of curved roots. Key words:Continuous ultrasonic irrigation, curved root canals, passive ultrasonic irrigation, positive pressure irrigation, root canal irrigation.

  16. Postoperative Pain after Root Canal Treatment: A Prospective Cohort Study

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    M. Gotler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the incidence and severity of postendodontic treatment pain (PEP subsequent to root canal treatment (RCT in vital and necrotic pulps and after retreatment. Methodology. A prospective study. Participants were all patients (=274 who underwent RCT in teeth with vital pulp, necrotic pulp, or vital pulp that had been treated for symptomatic irreversible pulpitis or who received root canal retreatment, by one clinician, during an eight-month period. Exclusion criteria were swelling, purulence, and antibiotic use during initial treatment. A structured questionnaire accessed age, gender, tooth location, and pulpal diagnosis. Within 24 h of treatment, patients were asked to grade their pain at 6 and 18 hours posttreatment, using a 1–5 point scale. Results. RCT of teeth with vital pulp induced a significantly higher incidence and severity of PEP (63.8%; 2.46 ± 1.4, resp. than RCT of teeth with necrotic pulp (38.5%; 1.78 ± 1.2, resp. or of retreated teeth (48.8%; 1.89 ± 1.1, resp.. No statistical relation was found between type of pain (spontaneous or stimulated and pulp condition. Conclusion. RCT of teeth with vital pulp induced a significantly higher incidence and intensity of PEP compared to teeth with necrotic pulp or retreated teeth.

  17. Root Anatomy and Root Canal Configuration of Human Permanent Mandibular Premolars: A Systematic Review

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    Jojo Kottoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mandibular premolars have been reported with complex anatomical aberrations, making them one of the most difficult teeth to manage endodontically. Methodology. An exhaustive search was undertaken to identify associated anatomic studies of mandibular premolars through MEDLINE/PubMed database using keywords, and a systematic review of the relevant articles was performed. Chi-square test with Yates correction was performed to assess the statistical significance of any anatomic variations between ethnicities and within populations of the same ethnicity. Documented case reports of variations in mandibular premolar anatomy were also identified and reviewed. Results. Thirty-six anatomic studies were analyzed which included 12,752 first premolars and nineteen studies assessing 6646 second premolars. A significant variation in the number of roots, root canals, and apical foramen was observed between Caucasian, Indian, Mongoloid, and Middle Eastern ethnicities.The most common anatomic variation was C-shaped canals in mandibular first premolars with highest incidence in Mongoloid populations (upto 24% while dens invaginatus was the most common developmental anomaly. Conclusions. A systematic review of mandibular premolars based on ethnicity and geographic clusters offered enhanced analysis of the prevalence of number of roots and canals, their canal configuration, and other related anatomy.

  18. [Clinical management of mandibular incisors with multiple root canals using dental operating microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Liu, Hong-yan; Ling, Jun-qi; Luo, Dan-feng

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the role of dental operating microscope in clinical treatment of lower incisors with multiple root canals. 143 mandibular incisors in 128 patients were treated endodontically. Two kinds of preoperative radiographs were taken for each tooth, using straight projection and eccentric projection. The root canal morphology was recorded according to Vertucci's classification. Under dental operating microscope, the teeth with multiple root canals were shaped using Ni-Ti rotary instruments Hero 642, cleaned using sodium hypochlorite, and obturated with vertical condensation technique. The following information was recorded: The number of teeth that were found to have multiple canals in two kinds of preoperative radiographs, and when using and without using microscope. The efficiency of preparation and obturation was analyzed with radiographs before, during and after operation. The mandibular central incisor with one canal was 73.53% and multiple canals was 26.47% in treated teeth. The mandibular lateral incisor with one canal was 70.67% and multiple canals was 29.33% in treated teeth. By eccentric projection radiograph and treatment using microscope, more teeth with multiple canals were found. No complication was found during root canal preparation. 134 teeth were well filled and 9 showed slight over-filling. With dental operating microscope, the mandibular incisors with multiple root canals could be treated well in combination with rotary instrumentation and vertical condensation technique.

  19. CANAL CONFIGURATION IN THE ROOTS OF MAXILLARY SECON D PREMOLAR: A CLINICAL STUDY

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    Ganesh.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Modified access cavity preparation and X ray- interpre tation were used clinically to find out the additional canals in the root of maxil lary second premolars. In 85% of the case two canals were located and treated, of these 30% had t wo separate apical foramen and 50.66% had two canal, joined at the apical third in 5% of the cases, two roots with two different canals were located and in 15% of the cases, one canal was loca ted KEY WORDS: Access Preparation, Apical Foramen.

  20. Maxillary first molar with seven root canals diagnosed with cone-beam computed tomography scanning

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    Anil Munavalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsurgical endodontic therapy of a right maxillary first molar with three roots and seven root canals. This unusual morphology was diagnosed using a dental operating microscope (DOM and confirmed with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT images. CBCT axial images showed that both the palatal and distobuccal root have a Vertucci type II canal pattern, whereas the mesiobuccal root showed a Sert and Bayirli type XVIII canal configuration. The use of a DOM and CBCT imaging in endodontically challenging cases can facilitate a better understanding of the complex root canal anatomy, which ultimately enables the clinician to explore the root canal system and clean, shape, and obturate it more efficiently.

  1. The best radiographic method for determining root canal morphology in mandibular first premolars: A study of Chinese descendants in Taiwan

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    Yu Sun

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Combined X-ray analyses, such as performing the buccolingual view for identification of canal bifurcation and canal continuity, may increase the accuracy of identifying complex root canal morphology.

  2. Maxillary lateral incisors with two canals and two separate curved roots

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    Ajit George Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in the roots and root canal anatomy seems to be the norm rather than an exception. For a successful endodontic treatment, a clinician should have a thorough knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy and its variations. Maxillary lateral incisors usually exhibit single canal with a single root. In this case, clinical examination and radiographs clearly demonstrates the presence of two root canals with two separate curved roots. This case report emphasizes the need for attention during endodontic management of maxillary lateral incisors.

  3. In vitro biocompatibility, inflammatory response, and osteogenic potential of 4 root canal sealers: Sealapex, Sankin apatite root sealer, MTA Fillapex, and iRoot SP root canal sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seok-Woo; Lee, So-Youn; Kang, Soo-Kyung; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity, inflammatory response, osteogenic effect, and the signaling mechanism of these biologic activities of 4 calcium compound-based root canal sealers (ie, Sealapex [Sybron Kerr, WA], apatite root sealer [ARS; Dentsply Sankin, Tokyo, Japan], MTA Fillapex [Angelus Indústria de Produtos Odontológicos S/A, Londrina, PR, Brazil], and iRoot SP [Innovative BioCreamix Inc, Vancouver, Canada]) in human periodontal ligament cells. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Levels of inflammatory mediators were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. Osteogenic potential was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and marker genes by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The signal transduction pathways were examined by Western blotting. None of the sealers were cytotoxic. ARS, MTA Fillapex, and iRoot SP induced a lower expression of proinflammatory mediators than Sealapex. All sealers increased ALP activity and the formation of mineralized nodules and up-regulated the expression of osteoblastic marker messenger RNA. ARS, MTA Fillapex, and iRoot SP showed superior osteogenic potential compared with Sealapex. The expression and/or activation of integrin receptors and downstream signaling molecules, including focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor κB, was induced by ARS, MTA Fillapex, and iRoot SP treatment but not by Sealapex treatment. We show for the first time that ARS, MTA Fillapex, and iRoot SP induce a lower expression of inflammatory mediators and enhance osteoblastic differentiation of PDLCs via the integrin-mediated signaling pathway compared with Sealapex. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A quantitative analysis of rotary, ultrasonic and manual techniques to treat proximally flattened root canals

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    Fabiana Soares Grecca

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The efficiency of rotary, manual and ultrasonic root canal instrumentation techniques was investigated in proximally flattened root canals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty human mandibular left and right central incisors, lateral incisors and premolars were used. The pulp tissue was removed and the root canals were filled with red die. Teeth were instrumented using three techniques: (i K3 and ProTaper rotary systems; (ii ultrasonic crown-down technique; and (iii progressive manual technique. Roots were bisected longitudinally in a buccolingual direction. The instrumented canal walls were digitally captured and the images obtained were analyzed using the Sigma Scan software. Canal walls were evaluated for total canal wall area versus non-instrumented area on which dye remained. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found between the instrumentation techniques studied (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study showed that no instrumentation technique was 100% efficient to remove the dye.

  5. Maxillary first molar with 7 root canals diagnosed using cone-beam computed tomography

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    Evaldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Root canal anatomy is complex, and the recognition of anatomic variations could be a challenge for clinicians. This case report describes the importance of cone beam computed tomographyic (CBCT imaging during endodontic treatment. A 23 year old woman was referred by her general dental practitioner with the chief complaint of spontaneous pain in her right posterior maxilla. From the clinical and radiographic findings, a diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis was made and endodontic treatment was suggested to the patient. The patient underwent CBCT examination, and CBCT scan slices revealed seven canals: three mesiobuccal (MB1, MB2, and MB3, two distobuccal (DB1 and DB2, and two palatal (P1 and P2. Canals were successfully treated with reciprocating files and filled using single-cone filling technique. Precise knowledge of root canal morphology and its variation is important during root canal treatment. CBCT examination is an excellent tool for identifying and managing these complex root canal systems.

  6. Maxillary first molar with 7 root canals diagnosed using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Evaldo; Braitt, Antônio Henrique; Galvão, Bruno Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    Root canal anatomy is complex, and the recognition of anatomic variations could be a challenge for clinicians. This case report describes the importance of cone beam computed tomographyic (CBCT) imaging during endodontic treatment. A 23 year old woman was referred by her general dental practitioner with the chief complaint of spontaneous pain in her right posterior maxilla. From the clinical and radiographic findings, a diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis was made and endodontic treatment was suggested to the patient. The patient underwent CBCT examination, and CBCT scan slices revealed seven canals: three mesiobuccal (MB1, MB2, and MB3), two distobuccal (DB1 and DB2), and two palatal (P1 and P2). Canals were successfully treated with reciprocating files and filled using single-cone filling technique. Precise knowledge of root canal morphology and its variation is important during root canal treatment. CBCT examination is an excellent tool for identifying and managing these complex root canal systems.

  7. Disinfection of the root canal by sonic, ultrasonic and laser-activated irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Verhaagen, B.; Macedo, R.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Cohenca, N.

    2014-01-01

    Irrigants are chemically inactivated after their reaction with the biofilm and therefore need to be mixed with fresh irrigants. Insight in the flow of the irrigant during a root canal treatment is crucial to understand the importance of the disinfection of the root canal system. This chapter

  8. Uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in curved root canals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retsas, A.; Koursoumis, A.; Tzimpoulas, N.; Boutsioukis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of file type and activation time on the uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in prepared curved root canals. Methods: Seventy-two curved mesial root canals of human mandibular molars were prepared

  9. Sealing ability of a new polydimethylsiloxane-based root canal filling material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozok, Ahmet R.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wu, Min-Kai; Wesselink, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the sealing ability of GuttaFlow, RoekoSeal, and AH26 in root canals. Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were filled with AH26 (lateral compaction), RoekoSeal, or GuttaFlow (modified single-cone). The sealing ability of the root canal fi

  10. Laser-activated irrigation within root canals: cleaning efficacy and flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.D.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim  To test ex vivo the efficiency of laser-activated irrigation in removing dentine debris from the apical part of the root canal and to visualize in vitro the fluid dynamics during the activation of the irrigant by laser, using high-speed imaging at a relevant timescale. Methodology  Root canals

  11. Laser-activated irrigation within root canals : cleaning efficacy and flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S. D.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Wu, M. -K.; Wesselink, P. R.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    P>Aim To test ex vivo the efficiency of laser-activated irrigation in removing dentine debris from the apical part of the root canal and to visualize in vitro the fluid dynamics during the activation of the irrigant by laser, using high-speed imaging at a relevant timescale. Methodology Root canals

  12. An unusual presentation of all the mandibular anterior teeth with two root canals - A case report

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    Tiku A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of two root canals in all mandibular anterior teeth is presented. The patient initially reported for the treatment of mandibular right central and lateral incisors. However, radiographic evaluation revealed variant root canal and apical foramen patterns.

  13. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  14. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan-based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Shon, Won-Jun; Woo, Kyung-Mi; Lee, WooCheol

    2016-01-01

    The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan-based (Pz-) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and Pz-MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz-MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin-material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz-MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment.

  15. An evaluation of the influence of passive ultrasonic irrigation on the seal of root canal fillings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Shemesh, H.; Wu, M. K.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the influence of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) on the seal of root canal fillings. Methodology A total of 40 mandibular premolars were distributed equally into two groups and the root canals were cleaned and shaped; they were then filled with gutta-percha and AH26 (sealer) usin

  16. Uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in curved root canals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retsas, A.; Koursoumis, A.; Tzimpoulas, N.; Boutsioukis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of file type and activation time on the uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in prepared curved root canals. Methods: Seventy-two curved mesial root canals of human mandibular molars were prepared

  17. Effect of needle insertion depth and root canal curvature on irrigant extrusion ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psimma, Z.; Boutsioukis, C.; Kastrinakis, E.; Vasiliadis, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle type and insertion depth, apical preparation size, and root canal curvature on irrigant extrusion by using a recently introduced method. Methods Sixteen human teeth with a straight root canal (group A) and 16 with a moderatel

  18. Effects of Self-Adjusting File, Mtwo, and ProTaper on the root canal wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hin, E.S.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.; Shemesh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this ex vivo study was to observe the incidence of cracks in root dentin after root canal preparation with hand files, self-adjusting file (SAF), ProTaper, and Mtwo. Methods One hundred extracted mandibular premolars with single canals were randomly selected. Two angulate

  19. Micro-computed tomographic analysis of the root canal morphology of the distal root of mandibular first molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filpo-Perez, Carolina; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Villas-Boas, Marcelo Haas; Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; Versiani, Marco Aurélio; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphologic aspects of the root canal anatomy of the distal root of a mandibular first molar using micro-computed tomographic analysis. One-hundred distal roots of mandibular first molars were scanned using a micro-computed tomographic device at an isotropic resolution of 19.6 μm. The percentage frequency distribution of the morphologic configuration of the root canal was performed according to the Vertucci classification system. Two-dimensional parameters (area, perimeter, roundness, aspect ratio, and major and minor diameters) and the cross-sectional shape of the root canal were analyzed in the apical third at every 1-mm interval from the main apical foramen in roots presenting Vertucci types I and II configurations (n = 79). Data were statistically compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests with a significance level set at 5%. Seventy-six percent of the distal roots had a single root canal. Two, three, and four canals were found in 13%, 8%, and 3% of the sample, respectively. In 13 specimens, the configuration of the root canal did not fit into Vertucci's classification. Overall, 2-dimensional parameter values significantly increased at the 3-mm level (P molars showed a high prevalence of single root canals. The prevalence of long oval and flattened canals increased in the coronal direction. In 13% of the samples, canal configurations that were not included in Vertucci's configuration system were found. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparison between radiovisiography and clearing technique in the study of the root canal types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daming Wu; Younong Wu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the radiovisiography (RVG) with the clearing technique using Kappa value in the study of the root canal types. Methods: One hundred recently extracted human maxillary first premolars were used. Standard periapical RVG images were taken from a buccolingual and mesiodistal direction. The specimens were then accessed, injected with ink, demineralized,dehydrated, and finally were cleared. The RVG images and the transparent teeth were examined by a trained endodontist, and the date of root canal types following Wu's classification was collected. Results: The reliability of RVG was high for studies on simple root canals,but was poor for the studies on the multiple root canals. The Kappa value between the two techniques was 0.3793, indicating the agreement was poor. Conclusion: It is concluded that the limited value of RVG alone when studying certain aspect of the root canal system. The resolution of the RVG system should be enhanced.

  1. Retreatment of a Maxillary Lateral Incisor With Two Separate Root Canals Confirmed With Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Seda; Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Sinanoglu, Alper; Ozel, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a maxillary lateral incisor exhibiting two separate root canals confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 65-year-old female patient with an esthetic complaint regarding her maxillary left lateral incisor was referred to our clinic. During a radiographical examination, an endodontically treated root canal and an extra root canal with an apical lesion were observed. The retreatment was performed. CBCT findings confirmed the root canal mophology of the maxillary left lateral with two distinct canals. We conclude that the CBCT imaging is an adjunctive tool for better assessment of complex root canal systems. PMID:26015823

  2. Evaluation of alginate as a substitute for root-surrounding tissues in electronic root canal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipski, Mariusz; Trąbska-Świstelnicka, Marlena; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Dembowska, Elżbieta; Droździk, Agnieszka

    2013-12-01

    Alginate as a substitute for root-surrounding tissue was investigated. The electronic working lengths of root canals under clinical conditions were compared with an in vitro simulation of the same teeth extracted and embedded in alginate. The working lengths in 26 teeth were determined on two occasions using an electronic apex locator, before extraction and after extraction with the same teeth embedded in an alginate mass. The apical 4 mm of the root canals were exposed following the measurements, and the distances between the apical constrictions and the tips of files repositioned in the canals were measured and recorded. The mean distance between the file tip and the constriction was +0.33 mm (±0.38) in vivo and +0.32 mm (±0.30) in vitro. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicated that these means were not significantly different. The apical constriction was assessed to be within the limits of 0.5 mm in 80.7% of in vivo cases and in 76.9% of extracted teeth. Statistical analysis demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the results recorded in vivo and in vitro regarding apical constriction localisation. Based on the results of this study, the alginate mass is a useful tool in evaluating the performance of electronic apex locators.

  3. Root canal morphology of mandibular first premolar in a gujarati population - an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Atul; Bahuguna, Rachana

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about root canal morphology and its frequent variations can exert considerable influence on the success of endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to survey the root canal morphology of mandibular first premolar teeth in a Gujarati population by decalcification and clearing technique. One hundred thirty eight extracted mandibular first premolar teeth were collected from a Gujarati population. After decalcifying and clearing, the teeth were examined for tooth length, number of cusps and roots, number and shape of canal orifices and canal types. The average length of mandibular first premolar teeth was 21.2 mm. All the teeth had 2 cusps. One hundred thirty four teeth (97.1%) had one root, and just 4 teeth (2.89%) had two roots. Mesial invagination of root was found in 21 teeth (15.21%). One canal orifice was found in 122 teeth (88.4%) and two canal orifices in 16 teeth (11.59%). Shape of orifices was found to be round in 46 teeth (33.33%), oval in 72 teeth (52.17%) and flattened ribbion in 20 teeth (14.49%). According to Vertucci's classification, Type I canal system was found in 93 teeth (67.39%), Types II,III,IV,V,and VI in 11 teeth (7.97%), 5 teeth (3.62%), 4 teeth (2.89%), 24 teeth (17.39%), and 1 tooth (0.72%) respectively. Mandibular first premolar teeth were mostly found to have one root and Type I canal system.

  4. Root Canal Configuration of Maxillary First Permanent Molars in an Iranian Population

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    Saeed Rahimi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. It is critical to have a proper knowledge of the normal anatomy of the pulp and its variations for the success of endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the root canal system of maxillary first permanent molars in an Iranian population.

    Materials and methods. In this study, 137 maxillary first molars were decalcified, dye-injected, cleared and studied.

    Results. The results demonstrated that 37.96% of the maxillary first molars under study had three canals, 58.4% had four canals and 3.64% had five canals.

    Conclusion. According to the results of this study and considering variations in the root canal systems of maxillary first molars, it seems that great care should be taken in the root canal treatment of these teeth.

  5. Shaping ability of nickel-titanium rotary instruments in curved root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ali; Moradi, Saeed; Forghani, Maryam; Monajemzadeh, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection and subsequent obturation of the root canal space require adequate mechanical enlargement of the canals. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shaping ability of Mtwo, RaCe and Medin rotary instruments during the preparation of curved root canals. Sixty mesiobuccal root canals of mandibular molars with severe curvatures between 25-35(°) and radius of 4-9 mm were randomly divided into three groups of 20 canals each. Using pre- and post-instrumentation radiographs, straightening of the canal and the apical transportation were determined with AutoCAD software. The data were analyzed using Chi square, analysis of variance, and post-hoc tests and the significance level was set at P0.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, Mtwo instruments seemed superior to the two other rotary instruments.

  6. Materials for retrograde filling in root canal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiangyu; Li, Chunjie; Jia, Liuhe; Wang, Yan; Liu, Wenwen; Zhou, Xuedong; Johnson, Trevor M; Huang, Dingming

    2016-12-17

    Root canal therapy is a sequence of treatments involving root canal cleaning, shaping, decontamination and obturation. It is conventionally performed through a hole drilled into the crown of the affected tooth, namely orthograde root canal therapy. For teeth that cannot be treated with orthograde root canal therapy, or for which it has failed, retrograde root filling, which seals the root canal from the root apex, is a good alternative. Many materials, such as amalgam, zinc oxide eugenol and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), are generally used. Since none meets all the criteria an ideal material should possess, selecting the most efficacious material is of utmost importance. To determine the effects of different materials used for retrograde filling in children and adults for whom retrograde filling is necessary in order to save the tooth. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 13 September 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 13 September 2016); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 13 September 2016); Embase Ovid (1980 to 13 September 2016); LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (1982 to 13 September 2016); and OpenSIGLE (1980 to 2005). ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We also searched Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (in Chinese, 1978 to 20 September 2016); VIP (in Chinese, 1989 to 20 September 2016); China National Knowledge Infrastructure (in Chinese, 1994 to 20 September 2016); and Sciencepaper Online (in Chinese, to 20 September 2016). No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) only that compared different retrograde filling materials, with reported success rate that was assessed by clinical or

  7. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P ProTaper and K3XF groups when compared to LSX group. Canal transportation was significantly more (P ProTaper group when compared to K3XF and LSX groups. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems. PMID:27656062

  8. Artefacts in Cone Beam CT Mimicking an Extrapalatal Canal of Root-Filled Maxillary Molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Carla Cristina; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Quintino, Alex Carvalho; de Paula, Adrianne Freire; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the images provided by this diagnostic tool can produce artifacts and compromise accurate diagnostic assessment. This paper describes an endodontic treatment of a maxillary molar where CBCT images suggested the presence of a nonexistent third root canal in the palatal root. An endodontic treatment was performed in a first maxillary molar with palatal canals, and the tooth was restored with a cast metal crown. The patient returned four years later presenting with a discomfort in chewing, which was reduced after occlusal adjustment. CBCT was prescribed to verify additional diagnostic information. Axial scans on coronal, middle, and apical palatal root sections showed images similar to a third root canal. However, sagittal scans demonstrated that these images were artifacts caused by root canal fillings. A careful interpretation of CBCT images in root-filled teeth must be done to avoid mistakes in treatment.

  9. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended.

  10. Computed Tomography Evaluation of Canal Transportation and Volumetric Changes in Root Canal Dentin of Curved Canals Using Mtwo, ProTaper and ProTaper Next Rotary System-An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Mayuri Biccodu; Jayasheel, Arun; Kenchanagoudra, Mallikarjun Goud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Complete cleaning and shaping of root canal system is of paramount importance to achieve a successful root canal treatment. There are various rotary Ni-Ti systems available in the market to achieve mechanical goal of root canal preparation. But aggressive preparation of root canal with such systems would result in canal transportation and excess root dentin removal that would be one of the major reasons to decide the prognosis of root canal treated tooth. Aim The present study was conducted to compare the root canal preparation in terms of canal transportation and volumetric changes in the root canal dentin among three Ni-Ti file systems, namely Mtwo, ProTaper (PT) and ProTaper NEXT (PTN) file system, using Computed Tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A total of 45 mesiobuccal root canals of extracted first molar teeth with completely formed root apices and angle of curvature ranging between 10°- 35° were selected. These teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups containing 15 teeth each, based on rotary system used. Group-I: Mtwo files, Group-II: PT files and Group-III: PTN files. Pre-instrumentation CT images were obtained at three cross-sectional planes – 3mm, 7mm and 11mm from apical end of the root. Similarly, post-instrumentation images were obtained. Shortest distance from the edge of the canal to the periphery of the root was analyzed by using Analysis of Variance. Results All three file systems tested in the present study presented similar behaviour with respect to the root canal transportation. Lesser canal transportation was recorded in Mtwo. But no statistically significant difference was seen in terms of canal transportation and volume of dentin removed between all three rotary systems (p>0.05). Conclusion Mtwo, PT and PTN rotary systems have similar behaviour with respect to canal transportation and volume of dentin removed. PMID:28050495

  11. Root Canal Anatomy and Morphology of Mandibular First Molars in a Selected Iranian Population: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid; Khalilak, Zohreh; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Saman; Pirmoradi, Sakineh; Fazlyab, Mahta; Safavi, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate root canal anatomy of mandibular first molars (MFM) in a selected Iranian Population using clearing technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 150 extracted MFMs were cleared. The root canal morphology (including the root numbers and root length) and the anatomy of the root canal system (including is the number and type of canals based on Vertucci’s classification, canal curvature according to Schneider's method and the presence of isthmus) was evaluated using the buccolingual and mesiodistal parallel x-rays and stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test. Results: Two and three roots were present in 96.7% and 33% of the teeth, respectively (P=0.0001). All the teeth (100%) had two canals in the mesial root, while 61.3% of the samples had one distal root canal (P=0.006). The root canal configuration in the mesial canal included type IV (55.3%) and type II (41.3%) (P=0.0001). In doubled-canalled distal roots, 68.8% and 24.3% were type II and type IV, respectively (P=0.0001). Isthmii were observed in 44.6% of mesial and 27.3% of distal roots (P=0.0001). Conclusion: The notable prevalence of type IV configuration in both roots of mandibular first molars, presence of isthmus and root curvature, necessitates the careful negotiation and cleaning of all accessible canal spaces. PMID:28179932

  12. Radiographic evaluation of root canal cleaning, main and laterals, using different methods of final irrigation

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    Gisselle Moraima CHÁVEZ-ANDRADE

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI using intermittent or continuous flushing and conventional manual irrigation (CMI on the cleaning of main and simulated lateral root canals.MATERIAL AND METHOD: The root canals of 24 artificial teeth were prepared and simulated lateral canals were made in the medium and apical thirds of the root. The specimens were divided into three groups: G1- CMI, G2- PUI 1 (intermittent flushing and G3- PUI 2 (continuous flushing. Root canals were filled with contrast solution and the roots were radiographed pre- and post-irrigation. The digital images were transferred to Image Tool 3.0 software and the areas of root canal completely filled with contrast, and after irrigation with contrast remnant, were measured to obtain percentage data. Statistical analysis between groups was performed by ANOVA and Tukey tests.RESULT: In the apical third, G2 and G3 (PUI groups showed higher percentage of cleaning than G1 (CMI (p<0.05.CONCLUSION: Passive ultrasonic irrigation using intermittent flushing promoted a higher cleaning of simulated lateral canals than conventional manual irrigation in the apical third. There were no differences between groups in the main root canal and the middle third.

  13. Microleakage of adhesive resinous materials in root canals

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    Jason Gilbert Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro micro-leakage resistance of adhesive resin materials to long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers. Materials and Methods: Seven materials, five test (Real Seal, Real Seal XT, Panavia F 2.0, Infinity Syringeable, GCEM and two controls (Tubliseal, AH Plus, were evaluated for micro-leakage resistance in a bovine incisor root model, with 12 roots per material. Teeth were root canal treated, stored in water, artificially aged by thermal-cycling, stained with silver nitrate, sectioned to yield eight measurement points per tooth (four coronal and four apical, giving 672 measurement points. Stain penetration was measured using digital positioners and a toolmakers microscope; then analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons testing ( P < 0.05. Results: All modern adhesive resinous materials leaked significantly less than long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers ( P < 0.05. Mean leakage values and their associated (standard deviations in mm were: Infinity Syringeable 2.5 (1.5, Real Seal XT 3.2 (1.4, Real Seal 3.4 (1.6, Panavia F 2.0 3.8 (2.7, GCEM 4.2 (1.8, Tubli-seal 5.4 (2.8, AH Plus 6.3 (2.3. Overall, more leakage occurred apically than coronally ( P < 0.0001. Many materials exhibited dimensional instability: Marked contraction, expansion, or lack of cohesion. Conclusion: A variety of adhesive resinous materials, endodontic sealers and crown cements, reduced micro-leakage in comparison to long and widely used zinc oxide- eugenol and epoxy sealers.

  14. Evaluation of Root and Canal Morphology of Mandibular First Molars: A Clearing Method in an Iranian Population

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    Shirkavand

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Successful endodontic treatment is dependent on the knowledge of root canal anatomy. Objectives This study aims to investigate the root canal anatomy of mandibular first molars in an Iranian population. Materials and Methods One hundred human mandibular first molars were collected and stored in 5.25% NaOCl. Radiographic images of the teeth were taken in mesial, distal, and buccal aspects using digital radiography. The root numbers were recorded, and the teeth were covered with lacquer. Access cavities were prepared, pulp tissue was dissolved, the apex was covered with liquid glue, and the root canals were injected with methylene blue. Decalcification of the teeth meant they were kept in 10% nitric acid, and final dehydration meant they were kept in 100% Isopropyl alcohol for 72 hours and rendered clear by immersion in methyl salicylate. The number of root canals per tooth, the number of canals per root, and canal configuration in each tooth were recorded. Results Ninety-nine of the 100 teeth had two roots and the other had three roots. The teeth were classified based on the number of canals; there were 2% with two canals, 59% with three canals, and 39% with four canals. Based on the Vertucci classification, the most prevalent canal configurations in the mesial root were types II and IV, and type I in the distal root. Conclusions The most common root morphology is the two rooted morphology with three canals. Both the mesial and distal roots show wide variations in canal anatomy with type IV and type I canal configuration predominating in the mesial and distal roots, respectively. Iranian mandibular first molar teeth exhibit features close to the average Caucasian, Jordanian, and Kuwaiti’s root and canal morphology.

  15. Comparative Study the Physical Properties of Flow, Solubility and Disintegration of Some Root Canal Sealers

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    Mirian Fátima Zacarro SCELZA

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate comparatively the physical properties of solubility, disintegration and flow of some root canal sealers: SEALAPEX™, PULP CANAL SEALER™, TUBLISEAL™, AH PLUS™, AH 26™, TOP SEAL™, SEALER PLUS™, SEALER 26™ and ENDOFILL™. Method: Methodology used was according ISO 6786 which test the physicochemical properties using five proof specimens for each test. Results: In terms of solubility, the root canal sealers analyzed have been classified in the following decreasing order: ENDOFILL™, SEALAPEX™, PULP CANAL SEALER™, AH 26™, TUBLISEAL™, SEALER PLUS™, AH PLUS™, TOP SEAL™ and SEALER 26™, where a statistically significant difference was found at a 1% level. Between TOP SEAL™ and SEALER™ 26 root canal sealers there was no statistically significant difference. None of the sealers above have shown disintegration. Regarding flow, the root canal sealers in the study have been classified in the following decreasing order: TUBLISEAL™ root canal sealer, followed by ENDOFILL™, SEALAPEX™, PULP CANAL SEALER™, AH PLUS™, TOP SEAL™, AH 26™, SEALER 26™ and SEALER PLUS™, where a statistically significant difference was found at a 1% level. Conclusion: The solubility, only the SEALAPEX™ and ENDOFILL™ have shown a limit above determined by ISO 6786.

  16. Reinforcement of thin-walled root canal structures for placement of esthetic dowels: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-01-01

    Thin-walled root canals always present a challenge to dentists to select a restorative treatment that does not further weaken the thin tooth structure. The prognosis of dowel and core restorations can be unpredictable. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with extensive caries extending into the root canal of an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor. The use of a flowable composite resin in combination with a quartz fiber reinforced post is described, resulting in the rehabilitation of a structurally compromised root canal with satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes.

  17. Fluoride varnish as root canal sealer: a scanning electron microscopy and bacterial penetration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; Talebizad, Mohammad; Forghani, Farshid Reza; Haghdoost, Ali Akabar; Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Goddousi, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the bacterial leakage of root canal fillings when cavity varnish containing 5% fluoride (Duraflur) was used as root canal sealer. Root canals of 88 straight single-rooted teeth were prepared. Eighty teeth were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=20) and two positive and negative control groups of ten each. The roots in group I and II were obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer using lateral condensation technique. The root canal walls in group II were coated with a layer of varnish before obturation. In group III the canals were obturated with gutta-percha and fluoride varnish as the sealer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) was used to determine the bacterial leakage during 90 days. The Kaplan Meier survival analysis was used for assessing the leakage and log rank test was used for pairwise comparison. The rest of eight single rooted teeth were selected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation with 5000× magnification. Leakage occurred between 20 to 89 days. Group III showed significantly less bacterial penetration than groups I and II (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between group I and II (P>0.05). SEM evaluation showed that the varnish had covered all dentinal tubules. The present study showed promising results for the use of fluoride varnish as root canal sealer but further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed.

  18. Effectiveness of gutta-percha and Resilon in filling lateral root canals using thermomechanical technique

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    Mário Tanomaru-Filho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of gutta-percha and Resilon in filling lateral root canals in cervical, middle, and apical third using a thermomechanical technique. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Root canals of artificial teeth were prepared using a standard preparation. The lateral canals were fabricated using a 0.3-mm-diameter bur at 3 parts of each root. By using Tagger's hybrid technique with a McSpadden thermomechanical compactor, the root canal was filled using the following filling materials: Dentsply gutta-percha, Endopoint gutta-percha, and Resilon cones. The root canal fillings were evaluated using digitized radiographs and the Image Tool software. The percentage of filled area of each lateral canal was determined. The data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey tests at a 5% significance level. RESULT: Resilon showed better effectiveness as a filling material. When the three thirds were compared, Resilon was more effective in the apical third than in the cervical third (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Resilon is an effective filling material for lateral root canals using a thermomechanical technique.

  19. Mandibular premolars with unusual root canal configuration: A report of two cases

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    Sarah Abdulla Essa Al-Mahroos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the normal root canal morphology and its variation is essential to ensure a successful root canal therapy. The aim of this report is to describe the endodontic treatment of two mandibular premolars with aberrant root canal morphology with the aid of dental operating microscope. A 29-year-old Saudi male with three mandibular left premolars was referred by the Prosthodontic Department for endodontic evaluation prior to placement of final coronal restorations. The first premolar was diagnosed as having necrotic pulp while the third premolar was previously treated. Root canal treatment and nonsurgical root canal retreatment were performed for the first and third premolars, respectively. The first premolar had a C-shaped configuration and Vertucci′s Type V (1-2 canal system while the third premolar had Type III configuration (1-2-1. One year later, the teeth were asymptomatic with normal periapical tissues radiographically. Root canal aberrations may occur in any tooth type, and the clinicians should always assume the presence of these aberrations and use all the available tools to detect and manage them.

  20. Root Canal Configuration of One-rooted Mandibular Canine in an Iranian Population:An In Vitro Study

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    Shermin Abdollahzadeh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. A perfect endodontic treatment necessitates proper understanding of the morphology of canal and pulpal variations. This in vitro study was conducted to demonstrate the internal anatomy of mandibular canine teeth in an Iranian population.

    Materials and methods. The samples consisted of 100 extracted mandibular permanent canines. The roots of the teeth were molded in acrylic boxes. The crowns of the teeth were cut and 2 mm cross sections were made from CEJ to the apex. Sections were examined using stereomicroscope to reveal the number and location of root canals.

    Results. From 100 evaluated teeth, 12 (12% had 2 canals from which 5 had type II canal configuration and 7 (7% had type III. 88% of the specimens had one canal and none were seen to be of type IV.

    Conclusion. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of dentist's knowledge of variations in root canal morphology, since leaving a canal untreated is one of the main reasons of endodontic failures. When treating mandibular canines, the existence of a second canal should be taken into consideration.

  1. In-depth morphological study of mesiobuccal root canal systems in maxillary first molars: review

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    Seok-Woo Chang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A common failure in endodontic treatment of the permanent maxillary first molars is likely to be caused by an inability to locate, clean, and obturate the second mesiobuccal (MB canals. Because of the importance of knowledge on these additional canals, there have been numerous studies which investigated the maxillary first molar MB root canal morphology using in vivo and laboratory methods. In this article, the protocols, advantages and disadvantages of various methodologies for in-depth study of maxillary first molar MB root canal morphology were discussed. Furthermore, newly identified configuration types for the establishment of new classification system were suggested based on two image reformatting techniques of micro-computed tomography, which can be useful as a further 'Gold Standard' method for in-depth morphological study of complex root canal systems.

  2. Ultrastructural investigation of root canal dentine surface after application of active ultrasonic method

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    Mitić Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The basic work principle of all ultrasonic techniques is the piezoelectric effect of producing high frequency ultrasounds of small length, which are transmitted over the endodontic extensions or canal instruments into the root canal. When in contact with the tissue, ultrasonic vibrations are converted into mechanical oscillations. Ultrasonic waves and the obtained oscillations along with the synergic effect of irrigation bring about the elimination of smear layer from the root canal walls. OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to ultrastucturally examine the effect of smear layer removal from the walls of canals by the application of the active ultrasonic method without irrigation, that is by the application of ultrasound and irrigation using distilled water and 2.5% NaOCl. METHOD The investigation comprised 35 single-canal, extracted human teeth. After removal of the root canal content, experimental samples were divided into three groups. According to the procedure required, the first group was treated by ultrasound without irrigation; the second one by ultrasound with irrigation using distilled water; and the third group was treated by ultrasound and irrigation using 2.5% NaOCl solution. The control samples were treated by machine rotating instruments (Pro-File and were rinsed by distilled water. RESULTS The obtained results showed that the ultrasonic treatment of the root canal without irrigation did not remove the smear layer. The dentine canals are masked, and big dentine particles are scattered on the intertubular dentine. The ultrasonic treatment by using irrigation with distilled water provides cleaner dentine walls and open dentine tubules but with smaller particles on the intertubular dentine. The ultrasound treatment by using irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl solution provides a clean intertubular dentine surface without a smear layer and clearly open dentine tubules. CONCLUSION Instrumentation of the root canal by application of

  3. Assessment of smear layer removal protocols in curved root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, William; Raldi, Denise Pontes; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Mello, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    This study sought to assess if the final rinse protocol interferes with the smear layer removal in the apical area of curved canals. Sixty-four extracted human mandibular molars with curved mesial roots were instrumented with rotary files and divided into six experimental groups for final rinse: 1EDTA (syringe irrigation with 1 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) ), 5EDTA (syringe irrigation with 5 mL of 17% EDTA), 1EDTA-P (syringe irrigation with 1 mL of 17% EDTA + pumping with gutta-percha point), 5EDTA-P (syringe irrigation with 5 mL of 17% EDTA + pumping with gutta-percha point), 1EDTA-EA (syringe irrigation with 1 mL of 17% EDTA + EndoActivator) and 5EDTA-EA (syringe irrigation with 5 mL of 17% EDTA + EndoActivator). Final rinsing was carried out over 3 min. The specimens were split lengthwise and observed under a scanning electron microscope using a score criterion. Comparison among the groups showed statistically significant difference only between the 5EDTA-EA group and the other groups (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post-hoc tests, P protocols used.

  4. Assessment of Root Canal Filling Removal Effectiveness Using Micro-computed Tomography: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Ahmed, Hany Mohamed Aly

    2017-04-01

    The removal of obturation materials from the root canal system is a primary objective in root canal retreatment procedures. This systematic review aims to discuss the effectiveness of different instrumentation procedures in removing root-canal filling materials assessed by micro-computed tomography. An electronic search in PubMed and major endodontic journals was conducted using appropriate key words to identify investigations that examined the effectiveness of obturation material removal assessed by micro-computed tomography. Among 345 studies, 22 satisfied the inclusion criteria. Seven studies compared hand instrumentation with Nickel-Titanium rotary or reciprocating systems. Three studies investigated rotary systems, and another three studies explored reciprocation. Eight studies compared rotary systems and reciprocation in removing filling materials from the root canal system. Other factors, such as the role of solvents and irrigant agitation, were discussed. The application of different instrumentation protocols can effectively, but not completely, remove the filling materials from the root canal system. Only hand instrumentation was not associated with iatrogenic errors. Reciprocating and rotary systems exhibited similar abilities in removing root filling material. Retreatment files performed similarly to conventional ones. Solvents enhanced penetration of files but hindered cleaning of the root canal. The role of irrigant agitation was determined as controversial. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of smear layer removal on the obturation of root canal ramifications

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    Elaine Vianna Freitas Fachin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated whether smear layer removal has any influence on the filling of the root canal system, by examining the obturation of lateral canals, secondary canals and apical deltas. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty maxillary and mandibular canines were randomly divided into two groups, according to their irrigation regimen. Both groups were irrigated with 1% NaOCl during canal shaping, but only the teeth in Group II received a final irrigation with 17% EDTA for smear layer removal. The root canals were obturated with lateral condensation of gutta-percha and the specimens were cleared, allowing for observation under the microscope. RESULTS: In Groups I and II, 42.5% and 37.5% of the teeth, respectively, presented at least one filled canal ramification. Although a larger number of obturated ramifications was found in Group I, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (p = 0.4957. CONCLUSIONS: Smear layer removal under the conditions tested in this study did not affect the obturation of root canal ramifications when lateral condensation of gutta-percha was the technique used for root canal filling.

  6. Passive ultrasonic irrigation of the root canal : a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Versluis, M.; Wu, M. K.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasonic irrigation of the root canal can be performed with or without simultaneous ultrasonic instrumentation. When canal shaping is not undertaken the term passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) can be used to describe the technique. In this paper the relevant literature on PUI is reviewed from a M

  7. Thermal Changes in the Hard Dental Tissue at Diode Laser Root Canal Treatment

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    Uzunov Ts.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The laser coagulation at the apical part of the root canal after vital extirpation is a proper method of preventing complications such as pain, bleeding, remaining vital pulp. The aim of the present survey is to register the thermal changes that occur on the tooth surfaces during laser treatment of the root canal after vital extirpation. An in vitro study of 30 extracted teeth has been conducted. The teeth have been prepared with ProTaper nickel-titanium machine tools and wiped dry. During the course of laser treatment of root canals with a diode laser DenLase temperatures, changes of the surface of the hard dental tissues have been recorded with infrared camera FLIR T330. The captured thermal images have been processed with software product Flir Reporter Pro 9. In conclusion, temperature changes in hard dental tissues at diode laser treatment of the root canal are biocompatible.

  8. Evaluating root and canal configuration of mandibular first molars with cone beam computed tomography in a Turkish population

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    Ozkan Miloglu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results showed a low frequency (2.4% of three-rooted MFMs in a Turkish population. This close to the average root number among people of European descent. Root and canal configurations of MFMs were consistent with previously reported data. CBCT may be recommended as an effective diagnostic modality for identifying root and canal configuration.

  9. Root and canal symmetry in the mandibular anterior teeth of patients attending a dental clinic: CBCT study

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    Guven KAYAOGLU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the number of roots/root canals in the mandibular anterior teeth of a Turkish population, to assess the relationship between gender or age and the frequency of two canals in a single root, and to determine the symmetry in root/root canal numbers between contralateral sides among patients. Cone-beam computed tomography images (n = 1128; 6253 teeth taken at the Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology of the Faculty of Dentistry of Gazi University were examined by three observers and a supervisor, all of whom were blinded to patient gender and age. Axial, sagittal, and cross-sectional slices with a thickness of 1 mm were used. Numbers of roots and canals for each type of tooth were recorded. Most teeth had a single root and single root canal. Roots with two canals were more frequent in the incisors (14.9%, 17.2%, and 6.1% of the central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines, respectively. Teeth with two roots were more frequent in the canines (3.1%vs. 0% or 0.1%. Females more often had canines with double root canals (p < 0.001. When at least one tooth had two root canals, bilateral symmetry between contralateral teeth was found in 45.0%, 29.0%, and 28.0% of cases for central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines, respectively. Patients older than 56 years had fewer teeth with double root canals (p ≤ 0.001. A small proportion of the mandibular anterior teeth had two roots or root canals. Double root canals were mostly unilateral. Age and gender were associated with the number of root canals.

  10. Adherence in vitro of Enterococcus faecalis on the surface of some root canal sealers

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Valadares Araújo

    2005-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis represent one of the most important microrganisms related to failure of endodontic treatments. That cements employed in root canal sealers should have antimicrobial properties, in order to prevent the bacterial growth on their surfaces. The aim of this study was to assess, in vitro, the adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to the surface of some root canal sealers used in endodontics. Ten samples of five types of endodontic cements were produced (Sealer 26, N-Rickert, Seal...

  11. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Ionela Elisabeta Ciobanu; Darian Rusu; Stefan-Ioan Stratul; Andreea Cristina Didilescu; Corina Marilena Cristache

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presen...

  12. Complication of improper management of sodium hypochlorite accident during root canal treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Faras, Fatemah; Abo-Alhassan, Fawaz; Sadeq, Abdullah; Burezq, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) is a common irrigation solution used in root canal treatment. It has strong antibacterial and tissue dissolving properties. Nevertheless, it has some serious complications, some of which are life-threatening. A young male presented with severe chemical burn of the right infraorbital area and partial necrosis of the hard palate resulting from extrusion of NaOCl during root canal treatment of the upper right 2nd molar tooth. The patient had a facial scar, and mucosal...

  13. Radiographic quality of root canal fillings performed in a postgraduate program in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Suelleng Maria Cunha; Soares, Janir Alves; César, Carlos Augusto Santos; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami de

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the standard quality of 1,347 root fillings performed by postgraduate students in Endodontics according to 3 radiographic quality parameters. The analyzed quality parameters included apical extension (AE), taper (TA) and homogeneity (HO), which received scores S2 (ideal standard), S1 (slight deviation) or S0 (accentuated deviation). A perfect filling (PF) received S2 for all parameters. In the absence of one or two S2 score, the fillings were deemed as satisfactory (SF) or deficient (DF), respectively. The results showed 51.7%, 41.5% and 6.8% of PF, SF, and DF, respectively. AE, TA, and HO presented equivalent quality parameters in root-filled canals of mandibular incisors and mandibular premolars (p>0.05). Conversely, in maxillary incisors, canines and distal root of mandibular molars, significant differences (p<0.05) were found between 2 parameters. Besides, there were significant differences (p<0.05) among the measured parameters in root-filled canals of maxillary premolars, all root canals of the maxillary molars and mesial root of the mandibular molars. AE showed the lowest frequency of S2 score for all groups. In conclusion the prevalence of perfect, satisfactory and deficient fillings varied significantly according to the root canal group. The quality parameters categorized fillings in 3 complexity degrees. AE was the most critical parameter of quality in root canal fillings.

  14. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis in saliva and filled root canals of teeth associated with apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Chu, Chun-Hung; Zhu, Xiao-Fei

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis in saliva and filled root canals of patients requiring endodontic retreatment for apical periodontitis. Patients with apical periodontitis who were referred for endodontic retreatment were examined. The type and quality of the restoration, symptoms, quality of obturation were recorded. During retreatment, an oral rinse sample and root canal sample were cultured using brain-heart infusion agar and bile esculinazide agar to select for E. faecalis. The 16S rRNA technique was used to identify E. faecalis. A total of 32 women and 22 men (mean age: 38 years; s.d.: 11 years) and 58 teeth were studied. The prevalence of E. faecalis was 19% in the saliva and 38% in the root canals. The odds that root canals harbored E. faecalis were increased if the saliva habored this bacterium (odds ratio=9.7; 95% confidence interval=1.8-51.6; Pfaecalis is more common in root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis than in saliva. The prevalence of E. faecalis in root canals is associated with the presence of E. faecalis in saliva.

  15. LPS levels in root canals after the use of ozone gas and high frequency electrical pulses

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    Tiago André Fontoura de MELO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study aims to verify the effect of ozone gas (OZY® System and high frequency electric pulse (Endox® System systems on human root canals previously contaminated with Escherichia colilipopolysaccharide (LPS. Fifty single-rooted teeth had their dental crowns removed and root lengths standardized to 16 mm. The root canals were prepared up to #60 hand K-files and sterilized using gamma radiation with cobalt 60. The specimens were divided into the following five groups (n = 10 based on the disinfection protocol used: OZY® System, one 120-second-pulse (OZY 1p; OZY® System, four 24-second-pulses (OZY 4p; and Endox® System (ENDOX. Contaminated and non-contaminated canals were exposed only to apyrogenic water and used as positive (C+ and negative (C- controls, respectively. LPS (O55:B55 was administered in all root canals except those belonging to group C-. After performing disinfection, LPS samples were collected from the canals using apyrogenic paper tips. Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL was used to quantify the LPS levels, and the data obtained was analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The disinfection protocols used were unable to reduce the LPS levels significantly (p = 0.019. The use of ozone gas and high frequency electric pulses was not effective in eliminating LPS from the root canals.

  16. New fluoride MI Varnish as root canal sealer: An in vitro analysis of bacterial leakage

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    Dhanu G Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the sealing ability of root canal obturation after the application of fluoride varnish (MI Varnish containing 5% sodium fluoride and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate, fluoride varnish, and AH Plus and AH-Plus as root canal sealer by bacterial penetration test. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 65 single-rooted and single-canalled teeth were prepared. They were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 and two control groups (n = 10. The root canal walls in Group I were coated with AH Plus, Group II were coated with AH Plus and fluoride varnish, and Group III were coated with fluoride varnish. All the teeth were obturated with gutta-percha using the lateral condensation technique. Enterococcus faecalis were used as test bacteria to determine the leakage during 100 days. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results: Group III showed significantly less bacterial penetration as compared to Group I (P = 0.01 and Group II (P = 0.03. However, there was no statistical significance between Groups I and II (P = 0.672. Conclusions: It can be concluded from the present study that fluoride varnish can be used as a root canal sealer. However, further in vitro and in vivo studies are required.

  17. New fluoride MI Varnish as root canal sealer: An in vitro analysis of bacterial leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Dhanu G; Trivedi, Malay Vishnuprasad; Havale, Raghavendra; Shrutha, S P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the sealing ability of root canal obturation after the application of fluoride varnish (MI Varnish) containing 5% sodium fluoride and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate, fluoride varnish, and AH Plus and AH-Plus as root canal sealer by bacterial penetration test. Root canals of 65 single-rooted and single-canalled teeth were prepared. They were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15) and two control groups (n = 10). The root canal walls in Group I were coated with AH Plus, Group II were coated with AH Plus and fluoride varnish, and Group III were coated with fluoride varnish. All the teeth were obturated with gutta-percha using the lateral condensation technique. Enterococcus faecalis were used as test bacteria to determine the leakage during 100 days. The data were analyzed using log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Group III showed significantly less bacterial penetration as compared to Group I (P = 0.01) and Group II (P = 0.03). However, there was no statistical significance between Groups I and II (P = 0.672). It can be concluded from the present study that fluoride varnish can be used as a root canal sealer. However, further in vitro and in vivo studies are required.

  18. Ecology of the microbiome of the infected root canal system: A comparison between apical and coronal root segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özok, A.R.; Persoon, I.F.; Huse, S.M.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Wesselink, P.R.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the microbial ecology of the coronal and apical segments of infected root canal systems using a complete sampling technique and next-generation sequencing. Methodology The roots of 23 extracted teeth with apical periodontitis were sectioned in half, horizontally, and cryo-pulverized.

  19. A Review on Root Anatomy and Canal Configuration of the Maxillary Second Molars

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    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Samiei, Mohammad; Frough Reyhani, Mohammad; Ranjkesh, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The complexity of the root canal system presents a challenge for the practitioner. This systematic review evaluated the papers published in the field of root canal anatomy and configuration of the root canal system in permanent maxillary second molars. Methods and Materials: All articles related to the root morphology and root canal anatomy of the permanent maxillary second molars were collected by suitable keywords from PubMed database. The exhaustive search included all publications from 1981 to December 2015. The articles relevant to the study were evaluated and data was extracted. The author/year of publication, country, number of the evaluated teeth, type of study (method of the evaluation), number of roots and the canals, type of canals and the morphology of the apical foramen was noted. Results: The highest studied populations were in Brazil and United States. A total of 116 related papers were found, which had investigated 11945 teeth in total. Across all the studied populations, the three-rooted anatomy was most common, while the four-rooted anatomy had the lowest prevalence. The presence of the second mesiobuccal canal ranged from 11.53 % to 93.7%, where type II (2-1) configuration was the predominant type in Brazil and USA and types II and III (1-2-1) in Chinese populations. In 8.8-44% of cases, fusion was observed. The main reported cases were related to palatal root. The major method of anatomical investigation in case reports was periapical radiography, and the chief method in morphological studies was CBCT. Conclusion: The clinicians should be aware of normal morphology and anatomic variations to reduce the treatment failure. PMID:28179915

  20. Root canal morphology of mandibular first premolar in a Gujarati population - An in vitro study

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    Atul Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge about root canal morphology and its frequent variations can exert considerable influence on the success of endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to survey the root canal morphology of mandibular first premolar teeth in a Gujarati population by decalcification and clearing technique. Methods : One hundred thirty eight extracted mandibular first premolar teeth were collected from a Gujarati population. After decalcifying and clearing, the teeth were examined for tooth length, number of cusps and roots, number and shape of canal orifices and canal types. Results: The average length of mandibular first premolar teeth was 21.2 mm. All the teeth had 2 cusps. One hundred thirty four teeth (97.1% had one root, and just 4 teeth (2.89% had two roots. Mesial invagination of root was found in 21 teeth (15.21%. One canal orifice was found in 122 teeth (88.4% and two canal orifices in 16 teeth (11.59%. Shape of orifices was found to be round in 46 teeth (33.33%, oval in 72 teeth (52.17% and flattened ribbion in 20 teeth (14.49%. According to Vertucci′s classification, Type I canal system was found in 93 teeth (67.39%, Types II,III,IV,V,and VI in 11 teeth (7.97%, 5 teeth (3.62%, 4 teeth (2.89%, 24 teeth (17.39%, and 1 tooth (0.72% respectively. Conclusion: Mandibular first premolar teeth were mostly found to have one root and Type I canal system.

  1. CBCT-Aided Microscopic and Ultrasonic Treatment for Upper or Middle Thirds Calcified Root Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Ming; Guo, Bin; Guo, Li-Yang; Yang, Yan; Hong, Xiao; Pan, Hong-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Root canal calcification is considered a great challenge during root canal treatment. Although the application of ultrasonic instruments and dental operating microscope (DOM) has advantages, dealing with calcified root canals still suffers a great risk of failure because of limited information about the location, length, and direction of obliteration on periapical radiographs. In this work, a cone-beam computed tomography- (CBCT-) aided method aimed at solving complicated calcified root canals in which conventional approaches could not work was proposed. Thirteen teeth with sixteen calcified canals (12 calcified in the upper third, 4 calcified in the middle third), which cannot be negotiated with conventional methods, were treated with the aid of CBCT. The location of calcification and depth of instrumentation and operating direction were calculated and assessed in three dimensions with ultrasonic instruments under DOM. In all thirteen teeth, canals with upper and middle thirds calcification were treated successfully. Finally, a guideline was proposed to help achieve consistent apical patency in calcified canals. PMID:27525269

  2. Management of foreign object in the root canal of central incisor tooth

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    Mothanna Alrahabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several reports describing the impaction of foreign objects into the exposed pulp chambers and canals by patients, especially children as they often have the habit of inserting foreign objects in the oral cavity. These objects will become a potent source of infection.This case report describes the retrieval of a foreign object impacted into the root canal of a 12-year-old male patient who was referred to the endodontic specialty clinic at Taibah University College of Dentistry. The patient′s chief complaint was a pain in the upper left central tooth. Clinical examination revealed a complicated enamel-dentin fracture with a large caries cavity. A periapical radiographic image showed a radiopaque object in the root canal system. Stainless steel Hedstrom files were used to retrieve the object from the canal. Following a proper cleaning and shaping of the root canal system, an intra-canal calcium hydroxide dressing was placed for 1 week. The root canal system was then filled with sealer and gutta-percha using the lateral compaction technique and the tooth received an aesthetic restoration.

  3. A Comparison of Viscoelastic Properties of Three Root Canal Sealers

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    Malihe Pishvaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Handling of endodontic sealers is greatly dependent on their elasticity and flow ability. We compared the viscoelastic properties of three root canal sealers.Materials and Methods: AH Plus (Dentsply, De Trey, Konstanz, Germany, Endofill (Dentsply Hero, Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and AH26 (Dentsply, De Trey, Konstanz, Germany were mixed according to the manufacturers' instructions. The resulted pastes were placed on the plate of a rheometer (MCR 300, Anton-Paar, Graz, Austria. The experiments were performed at 25˚C and 37˚C. Viscoelastic properties of the sealers including loss modulus (G", storage modulus (G´ and complex viscosity (η* were studied using dynamic oscillatory shear tests. The shear module versus frequency (from 0.01 to 100 S-1 curves were gained using frequency deformation sweep test. Three samples of each material were examined at each temperature. The mean of these three measurements were recorded.Results: The storage modulus of AH plus was higher than its loss modulus at two temperatures. Endofill exhibited a crossover region in which the storage modulus crosses the loss modulus in both temperatures. At 25ºC the loss modulus of AH26 was higher than the storage modulus (G">G¢. In contrast, at 37ºC G¢was greater than G² (G¢>G². Both shear modules of AH Plus and Endofill decreased as the temperature raised from 25ºC to 37ºC. On the contrary, the loss modulus and storage modulus of AH26 increased at 37ºC.Conclusion: In both test temperatures, AH Plus behaved like viscoelastic solids and Endofill exhibited a gel-like viscoelastic behavior. AH26 at 25ºC behaved like liquids, while at 37ºC it was an elastic solid-like material

  4. In vitro leakage associated with three root-filling techniques in large and extremely large root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Werner, Sabine; Koch, Martin Jean; Henschel, Volkmar; Legner, Milos; Staehle, Hans Joerg; Friedman, Shimon

    2007-03-01

    This study assessed the apical leakage of ultrasonically condensed root fillings in extremely large canals, compared to cold lateral condensation and thermoplastic compaction. Ninety single-rooted teeth were used. In 45 teeth canals were enlarged to size 70 (large). The remaining 45 canals were enlarged to size 140 (extremely large). Each set of teeth was subdivided into three root-filling groups (n = 15): (1) cold lateral condensation (LC); (2) thermoplastic compaction (TC); and (3) ultrasonic lateral condensation (UC). Teeth in all six subgroups were subjected to drawing ink penetration, cleared, and evaluated for linear apical dye leakage. Significantly deeper dye penetration (p < 0.04, Wilcoxon rank-sum test) was observed for LC than for UC. TC did not differ significantly from LC and UC. Dye penetration was significantly deeper (p < 0.0001) in canals enlarged to size 140 than to size 70, independent of root-filling method. Apical leakage associated with ultrasonically condensed root fillings was less than that with cold lateral condensation. It was consistently greater in extremely large canals than that in large ones.

  5. Root Canal Morphology of Mandibular Canine in an Iranian Population: A CBCT Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani, Ali; Namaryan, Nafiseh; Moudi, Ehsan; Gholinia, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was conducted to assess the morphology of mandibular canines using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a north Iranian population. Methods and Materials: For the morphological assessment of mandibular canines, 150 CBCT images taken from patients for different reasons were used. The mandibular canines were examined in sagittal, coronal and axial dimensions. The canal pattern, number of roots/canals, the tooth length, the orientation of the roots and the position of the apical foramina were evaluated and the effect of gender on each variable was assessed. The obtained data were analyzed using the Chi-square and student’s t-tests. Results: According to the Vertucci’s criteria, the most common pattern was type I morphology (89.7%), followed by types III (5.7%), II (3.7%) and V (1%). No significant differences were observed between the male and female patients in terms of canal type (P>0.05). Gender difference is a factor which affected the root length and the number of mandibular canine root and root canal. There were 296 single-root and four double-root canines. The double-root canines and mandibular canine with two canals were significantly more common among men than women (P=0.00). The apical foramen was laterally positioned in 68.3% and centrally in 31.7% of the cases, and the root curvatures were mostly oriented toward the buccal region. No significant statistical difference was observed for mentioned parameters in right and left half of the jaw. Conclusion: Due the diverse morphology and the potential presence of a second mandibular canine among Iranians, dentists should perform endodontic treatments with greater care. CBCT is an accurate tool for the morphological assessment of root canals. PMID:28179930

  6. Influence of the endodontic irrigation needle and root canal enlargement on endodontic cleaning efficacy

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    Livia Etchebehere de Loiola

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: The irrigation of root canals aims to their cleaning and disinfection, improving endodontic treatment success. Objective: To investigate the influence of the diameter and type of irrigation needle and the root canal enlargement on the mechanical efficacy of endodontic irrigation. Material and methods: Twelve human single-rooted mandibular incisors were used. During some instrumentation stages (enlargement by #20, #30, and #40 K file, root canals were filled with radiographic contrast solution mixed to propyleneglycol and zinc oxide. Needles with different diameters and designs were employed: G1 – 23G and lateral opening; G2 – 22G and apical opening; G3 – 30G and lateral opening; G4 – 30G and apical opening. The needles were inserted up to resistance, with 1 mm step-back to avoid root canal obliteration. The irrigation was performed with 2 mL of distilled water. Before and after irrigation/aspiration, teeth were radiographed at bucco-lingual and mesiodistal direction, using a digital radiographic system. Then, root canal areas, before (filled by contrast solution and after irrigation (remnant of contrast solution, were submitted to image subtraction with Adobe Photoshop CS4 software. Subsequently, the areas were measured by Image Tool 3.0 software, allowing the obtaining of the cleaning percentage for each modality. Data were analysed byusing Anova and Tukey’s test. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: For all root canal enlargements, 30G needles (G3 e G4 presented a better cleaning efficacy. In all groups, higher cleaning efficacy percentage was observed at #30 and #40 K file enlargement. Conclusion: Regardless their design, thinner needles were more effective; a better cleaning efficacy occurred in more enlarged root canals.

  7. Endodontic Treatment of the Mandibular First Molar with Six Roots Canals – Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The most common configuration of the mandibular first molar is the presence of two roots and three root canals. The objective of this work is to present two rare anatomic configurations with six root canals on two mandibular left first molars diagnosed during endodontic therapy. Root canal therapy was performed using a dental operating microscope. Ultrasonic troughing in the grooves in between the mesial root canals and in between the distal root canals was able to show the middle root canals. Large samples population characterization researches and systematic reviews were unable to detect a single case of six root canals configuration in a mandibular first molar in their investigations. Although it is a rare configuration, a six root canal configuration is possible to be found in the mandibular first molar. Three different pulp chamber configurations are possible to be found. Two or three roots may be present and the root configuration more common in the mesial root is the Type 8 and Type 12 for the distal root. Some concepts about the required technique to approach these cases are also debated. PMID:26023651

  8. Micro-computed Tomographic Analysis of Mandibular Second Molars with C-shaped Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso-Silva, Pablo Andrés; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Gutmann, James L; del Carpio-Perochena, Aldo; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the morphometric aspects of the internal anatomy of the root canal system of mandibular second molars with C-shaped canals. Fifty-two extracted second mandibular molars with C-shaped canals, fused roots, and radicular grooves were selected from a Brazilian population. The samples were scanned with a micro-computed tomographic scanner at a voxel size of 19.6 μm. The root canal cross sections were recorded as C1, C2, C3, and C4 root canal configurations according to the modified Melton classification. Morphometric parameters, including the major and minor diameters of the root canals, the aspect ratio, the roundness, and the tridimensional configuration (merging, symmetric, and asymmetric), were evaluated. The 3-dimensional reconstruction images of the teeth indicated an even distribution within the sample. The analysis of the prevalence of the different cross-sectional configurations of the C-shaped molars revealed that these were predominantly of the C4 and C3 configurations (1 mm from the apex) and the C1 and C2 configurations in the cervical third. According to the morphometric parameters, the C1 and the distal aspect of the C2 configurations exhibited the lowest roundness values and higher values for the area, major diameter, and aspect ratio in the apical third. Mandibular molars with C-shaped root canals exhibited similar distributions of symmetric, asymmetric, and merging type canals. The C1 configuration and the distal aspect of the C2 configuration exhibited the highest area values, low roundness values, and large apical diameters. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of vertical forces during root canal filling with three different obturation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalinić, Ivan; Baraba, Anja; Glavicić, Snjezana; Segović, Sanja; Anić, Ivica; Miletić, Ivana

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and compare vertical forces exerted during root canal obturation with the cold lateral condensation technique, Thermafil technique and ProTaper guttapercha. Fourty-five single-rooted permanent teeth were used in the study. All specimens were instrumented using the ProTaper rotating technique and were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 per group). In the first group, root canals were obturated using the cold lateral condensation technique. In the second group, the Thermafil technique was used to obturate root canals. In the last group, a ProTaper gutta-percha of the same taper as the instrumented root canals was used for root canal obturation. Vertical forces were measured using the device developed for simulation of endodontic treatment. The results showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0001) for vertical forces when cold lateral condensation obturation technique was used in comparison to other techniques. No statistically significant difference was found for vertical forces during obturation with Thermafil and ProTaper gutta-percha (p = 0.16). The cold lateral condensation technique exerted higher vertical forces in comparison to the Thermafil and ProTaper obturation techniques.

  10. Root Canal Anatomy Visualization using Three-Dimensional Computed- Tomography and Transparent Preparation

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    Alexey V. Silin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional Computed Tomography (CT is used to analyze the topography of the root canal anatomy in order to make a decision in choosing root canal preparation method. There is a method that make extracted teeth transparent maintaining its anatomical shape and size. It is important to compare the accuracy of the two visualization methods. Objective: To compare the transmission accuracy of root canals anatomy by two visualization methods, three-dimensional CT and transparent tooth preparation. Methods: Mandibular third molar was used as sample. The three-dimensional CT scan was performed before extracting the teeth. Then teeth were extracted and placed in solutions that made them transparent. Results: Despite the fact that the character of dental origin in terms of the angle of the crown, the curvature of the crown, the deviation of the root showed in three-dimensional CT, other tooth anatomical parameters were equally well detected using a transparent tooth preparation. Overall, the curvature of the root canals is more clearly shown by transparent tooth preparation. Conclusion: Transparent tooth preparation provides superior visualization of real root canal anatomy compared to three-dimensional CT, however the later could give us more information about the relation of the tooth within the jaw.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.152

  11. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 4. Root canal disinfection in 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, S V; de Soet, J J

    2015-12-01

    Apical periodontitis is an inflammatory response around the root tip of a tooth to microbial infection of the root canal system. Therefore, disinfection of the root canal system is the most important aim of root canal treatment. There are various mechanical and chemical ways to clean and disinfect. Most methods, however, cannot be relied upon to fully decontaminate in all cases. There are problems, for example, with the proper concentrations of disinfectant agents, like sodium hypochlorite. But the more recent agents, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, calcium hydroxide or antibiotic pastes also have disadvantages, which are mostly a result of poor access of the irrigant to the biofilm bacteria in the affected root canals. Currently, a new strategy with a modified salt solution is under investigation that offers the prospect of being used as a root canal irrigant. At this moment the preferred treatment still seems to be to remove infected tissue as much as possible and to create access for irrigation procedures. The best results are achieved with 1-2% sodium hypochlorite as a disinfectant, possibly alternating with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as a cleansing agent. There is no scientific evidence for the successful use of calcium hydroxide.

  12. BACTERICIDAL EFFECTS OF VARIOUS IRRIGATION SOLUTIONS AGAINST STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN HUMAN ROOT CANAL

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    Recai Zan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and to compare the antibacterial effects of various irrigation solutions against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus in human root canals. Materials and Methods: 120 single-root mandibular premolar teeth were selected. The teeth were prepared and sterilized. S. aureus was incubated in the root canals and kept at 37°C for 24h. The infected root canals were divided into one positive (saline and one negative (sodium hypochlorite control, and four experimental groups [Ethylene-diaminetetra-aceticacid, Chlorhexidine Gluconate, Super-oxidized water(SPO, Aqueous ozone] (n=20. Flow rate of irrigation was applied with 5 mL/min flow rate for 3 min to ensure standardization among all study groups. Following the irrigation, paper points were placed in the root canals and then transferred in sterile eppendorf. Remaining bacteria were counted on blood agar plates and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Although there were statistically significant differences among SPO and other experimental groups (p0.05. Conclusion: Super-oxidized water may be recommended as an alternative irrigation solution instead of NaOCl against S. aureus in root canals.

  13. Cytotoxicity of 5% Tamarindus indica extract and 3% hydrogen peroxide as root canal irrigation

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    Erawati Wulandari

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preparation of root canal is an important stage in endodontic treatment. During conducting preparation, it is always be followed with root canal irrigation that has aim to clean root canal from necrotic tissue remains, grind down dentin powder, micro organism, wet the root canal to make preparation process of root canal easier, and solute root canal content at area that can not be reached by equipment. Flesh of Tamarindus indica (pulpa tamarindorum is used as traditional medicine and it contains vitamin C (antioxidant, protein, fat, glucose, etc. Previous research shows that 5% tamarindus indica extract can clean smear layer but it is more cytotoxicity to cell line BHK–21 than sterilized aquabides. Purpose: This research is to compare cytotoxicity between 5% Tamarindus indica extract with 3% H2O2 as root canal irrigation material. Method: Four teen culture cell line BHK 21 divides into 2 groups. Group 1 is treated with 3% H2O2 and Group 2 is treated with 5% Tamarindus indica extract, for about 2.5 minutes in every group. Then, living and death cell percentage is measured. Data is analyzed with independent t test with significant level of 0.05%. Result: The research showed that death cell in group 1 was 29.3% and in group 2 was 21.1%. There was a significant different (p < 0.05 between group 1 and group 2. Conclusion: Cytotoxicity of 5% Tamarindus indica extract to the cell line BHK–21 is lower than 3% H2O2.

  14. Laser-activated irrigation within root canals: cleaning efficacy and flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de S.D.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Wu, M.-K.; Wesselink, P.R.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To test ex vivo the efficiency of laser-activated irrigation in removing dentine debris from the apical part of the root canal and to visualize in vitro the fluid dynamics during the activation of the irrigant by laser, using high-speed imaging at a relevant timescale. - Methodology: Root cana

  15. Outcome of root canal treatment in dogs determined by periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Paula-Silva, F.W.G.; Hassan, B.; da Silva, L.A.B.; Leonardo, M.R.; Wu, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the favorable outcome of root canal treatment determined by periapical radiographs (PRs) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Ninety-six roots of dogs' teeth were used to form four groups (n= 24). In group 1, root canal treatments were performed in

  16. Zinc Oxide Eugenol-Formocresol Root Canal Treatment Fails to Treat a Deciduous Tooth with Dentoalveolar Abcess

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    Arifa Pediarahma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Irreversible pulp infection can lead to dentoalveolar abscess. Root canal treatment in deciduous teeth is indicated in irreversible pulp infection to maintain children’s health and deciduous teeth until its exfoliation period. Success rate of endodontic treatment in deciduous teeth can be enhanced by using antimicrobial root canal filling material. Combination of ZOE-formocresol as root canal filling material has a superior antimicrobial property. Unfortunately, based on some research it is also toxic to the tissue. This case report will discuss about failure of root canal treatment in deciduous tooth with dentoalveolar abscess using combination of ZOE-formocresol as obturating material. There are some factors that possibly cause the failure: complexity of deciduous molar anatomy, the choice of root canal filling material, application of root canal filling material that is not adequate, or an extend pathological condition.DOI:10.14693/jdi.v21i3.230

  17. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

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    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  18. Rigidity and retention of carbon fibre versus stainless steel root canal posts.

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    Purton, D G; Love, R M

    1996-07-01

    Two of the main requirements of a root canal post are that it is rigid so as to resist flexing under functional load, and that it is well retained in the root. This study compared these properties in two different 1-mm diameter root canal posts--smooth carbon fibre posts (Endopost) and serrated stainless steel posts (Parapost). Ten posts of each type were tested for rigidity in a three-point bend test. Ten posts of each type were cemented with resin cement into the roots of endodontically treated, extracted teeth. The tensile force required to remove the posts was recorded. The Paraposts proved to be significantly more rigid under load (P canals.

  19. Knowledge of General Dentists of Kermanshah about Root Canal Therapy in 2012

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    Roohollah Sharifi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was conducted to analyze the knowledge of general dentists of Kermanshah about root canal therapy in 2012. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a two-part questionnaire was designed and given to 93 general dentists in Kermanshah to complete. The first part of the questionnaire comprised of personal and professional information of the participant dentists and the second part of the questionnaire determined the awareness of the dentists about root canal therapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 20 using Pearson correlation coefficient, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and independent t-test. Results: A total of 84 dentists with the mean age of 39.3±7.1 completed the questionnaires. The mean for 12 correct responses was 63.3%. The highest number of correct responses (86.2% belonged to using proper intra-canal medication (calcium hydroxide and the lowest number of correct responses (41.4% was associated with the number of root canals in maxillary first molar (four canals. There was a reverse correlation between awareness and work experience (P=0.002, r=-0.337. Also, participation in retraining courses did not have significant impact on the knowledge of the dentists (P =0.82. Conclusion: General dentists have average knowledge about root canal therapy. Higher quality regular training is recommended to promote the knowledge of the dentists about endodontic therapies.

  20. Endodontic management of maxillary second molar with a single root and a single canal diagnosed with cone-beam computed tomography scanning

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    Puneet Ahuja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal treatment of maxillary molars presenting with complex root canal configurations can be diagnostically challenging. The present case describes the endodontic management of a maxillary second molar with a single root and a single canal. The clinical detection of the single canal was made using a surgical operating microscope and confirmed using cone-beam computed tomography scanning.

  1. Ex vivo evaluation of three instrumentation techniques on E. faecalis biofilm within oval shaped root canals

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    Vitor Cesar NAKAMURA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of reciprocating instrumentation in disinfecting oval-shaped root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-five human lower premolars were infected with a culture of E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 for 28 days. Five other teeth that were neither contaminated nor instrumented were used as controls. The 45 specimens were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 based on the root canal preparation technique used: manual (K-type, Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland; rotary (MTwo, VDW GmbH, Munich, Germany; and reciprocating (Reciproc R50, VDW GmbH, Munich, Germany instruments. During chemomechanical preparation, 21 mL of 2.5% NaOCl was used as the irrigating solution. Microbiological sampling was performed before (S1 and immediately after (S2 the chemomechanical preparation using sterilized paper points. Specimens were then cleaved, and 0.02 g of dentine chips was collected from the root thirds to verify the presence of microorganisms in dentinal tubules. All three preparation techniques reduced the number of microorganisms in the root canal lumen and dentine chips from the root thirds, but no significant differences were observed between the three groups (p > 0.05. Reciprocating instrumentation with Reciproc R50 was effective in reducing the number of microorganisms within the root canal system. Although this technique involves the use of only one file to perform the root canal therapy, it is as effective as conventional rotary instrumentation in reducing theE. faecalis biofilm from the root canal system. However, further clinical investigations are warranted in order to ratify these results.

  2. C-shaped root canal configuration in mandibular second premolar: Report of an unusual case and its endodontic management

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    Dipali Y Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The C-shaped root canal system is an aberration of the root canal system in which a characteristic fin or web connects individual canals, resulting in a C-shaped cross section. This configuration has been rarely reported in the mandibular second premolar. The only other known reported case of a C-shaped canal, with its configuration, in relation to mandibular second premolar is of an extracted tooth. The purpose of this report is to describe the diagnosis, configuration and endodontic management of C-shaped root canal in mandibular second premolar. Clinical techniques to addresses the challenges in endodontic disinfection as well as cleaning and shaping of the C-shaped canal, which is prone to endodontic mishaps, are also discussed in this case report. Reporting of this case emphasizes the need and added advantage of using the dental operating microscope hand in hand with conventional radiography in management of the C-shaped root canal configuration.

  3. Comparison of the effect of various irrigants on apically extruded debris after root canal preparation.

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    Parirokh, Masoud; Jalali, Shahrzad; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Abbott, Paul Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Several factors can influence the amount of apically extruded debris. The aim was to quantitatively compare the amount of debris extruded apically from root canals when 3 different irrigants were used during canal preparation with rotary instruments. Ninety-one extracted single-rooted human mandibular premolar teeth with straight root canals were used. The teeth were randomly divided into 1 control group (group 1, n = 4) and 3 experimental groups of 29 teeth each. Hero 642 instruments were used for root canal preparation in all teeth, and 3 different irrigants were used (group 2, 2% chlorhexidine; group 3, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite; group 4, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite). Seven Eppendorf tubes served as a second control group. Debris extruded from the apical foramen during root canal preparation was collected into preweighed Eppendorf tubes. The weight of the dry extruded debris was established by subtracting the preinstrumentation and postinstrumentation weight of the Eppendorf tubes for each group. The data obtained were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant difference. Group 3 (sodium hypochlorite 5.25%) had the highest amount of extruded debris, which was significantly different from the other groups (P irrigant used can affect the amount of apically extruded debris. The 5.25% solution of sodium hypochlorite had the greatest amount of debris. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative antimicrobial efficacy of selected root canal irrigants on commonly isolated microorganisms in endodontic infection.

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    Dubey, Sandeep; Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan; Dhole, Tapan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of three selected root canal irrigants (BioPure MTAD, metronidazole, aztreonam) against microbes commonly isolated from polymicrobial microbiota of root canal infection. This study was designed with four experimental groups (Group I - Bacteroides fragilis, Group II - Propionibacterium acnes, Group III - Enterococcus faecalis, Group IV - Candida albicans) based on the microbes selected for the study. Group I and Group II bacteria were used to compare and evaluate antimicrobial effect of BioPure MTAD, metronidazole, aztreonam, and normal saline. Group III and Group IV bacteria were used to compare and evaluate antimicrobial efficacy of BioPure MTAD, aztreonam, and normal saline. Normal saline was used as a control irrigant in this study. Agar disc diffusion method was applied to assess and compare the antimicrobial action of selected irrigants. Metronidazole was found to be the most effective root canal irrigant against B. fragilis and P. acnes among the tested irrigants. Mean zone of inhibition against E. faecalis has been shown to be maximum by BioPure MTAD, followed by aztreonam. Antifungal effect against C. albicans was only shown by BioPure MTAD. Overall, BioPure MTAD is the most effective root canal irrigant as it has shown an antibacterial effect against all the tested microorganisms. However, metronidazole showed maximum antibacterial effect against obligate anaerobes. Aztreonam also showed an antibacterial effect in the present study, raising its possibility to be used as a root canal irrigant in the future.

  5. Root Canal Irrigation: Chemical Agents and Plant Extracts Against Enterococcus faecalis

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    Borzini, Letizia; Condò, Roberta; De Dominicis, Paolo; Casaglia, Adriano; Cerroni, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are various microorganisms related to intra and extra-radicular infections and many of these are involved in persistent infections. Bacterial elimination from the root canal is achieved by means of the mechanical action of instruments and irrigation as well as the antibacterial effects of the irrigating solutions. Enterococcus faecalis can frequently be isolated from root canals in cases of failed root canal treatments. Antimicrobial agents have often been developed and optimized for their activity against endodontic bacteria. An ideal root canal irrigant should be biocompatible, because of its close contact with the periodontal tissues during endodontic treatment. Sodium hypoclorite (NaOCl) is one of the most widely recommended and used endodontic irrigants but it is highly toxic to periapical tissues. Objectives: To analyze the literature on the chemotherapeutic agent and plant extracts studied as root canal irrigants. In particularly, the study is focused on their effect on Enterococcus faecalis. Method: Literature search was performed electronically in PubMed (PubMed Central, MEDLINE) for articles published in English from 1982 to April 2015. The searched keywords were “endodontic irrigants” and “Enterococcus faecalis” and “essential oil” and “plant extracts”. Results: Many of the studied chemotherapeutic agents and plant extracts have shown promising results in vitro. Conclusion: Some of the considered phytotherapic substances, could be a potential alternative to NaOCl for the biomechanical treatment of the endodontic space. PMID:28217184

  6. The ability of 5% Tamarindus indica extract as cleaner of the root canal wall smear layer

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    Erawati Wulandari

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tamarindus indica is one of traditional medicines. Pulpa tamaridorum consist of organic acid that is usually used as irrigant and to remove root canal wall smear layer. The aimed of this study was to elucidate the ability of 5% Tamarindus indica extract as a root canal irrigant to remove root canal wall smear layer. Eighteen tooth samples were cut on cervical line and divided into 2 then groups were prepared with K file and irrigated. Group 1 was irrigated by sterile aquabidest and group 2 was irrigated by 5% Tamarindus indica extract. Samples were cut longitudinally and formed 7 × 2× 2 mm specimen. Each specimen was photographed by scanning electron microscope, scored and summed. The total score obtained is used as the hygiene value of root canal wall. The collected data were statistically analyzed by using independent t test at 0.05 level. The result of the study showed there was a significant difference between 5% Tamarindus indica extract and sterile aquabidest (p < 0.05, the hygiene value of 5% Tamarindus indica extract was higher than sterile aquabidest. The conclusion of this investigation showed that 5% Tamarindus indica extract remove root canal wall smear layer.

  7. Assessment of the Centralization of Root Canal Preparation with Rotary Systems

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    Lopes, Daniela Siqueira; Pessoa, Mariana Albuquerque Veiga

    2016-01-01

    Objective Apical deviations are important factors in endodontic therapy, since they can cause the treatment failure. The aim of the present study was to determine the centering capacity of ProTaper Universal™, Twisted File™ and Revo-S® rotary systems using cone beam computed tomography analysis before and after the instrumentation of root canals. Materials and Methods Thirty mesiobuccal roots from human lower first molars were divided into three groups of ten: Group 1 - ProTaper Universal™ Rotary System; Group 2 - Twisted File™ Rotary System; and Group 3 - Revo-S® Rotary System. All teeth were scanned using computed tomography to determine the condition of the root canal before and after instrumentation (4mm, 3mm and 2mm from the root apex). Images were made using ICAT VISION software for both instrumented and non-instrumented canals. Results The results were analyzed statistically using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov normality test for quantitative variables. Comparisons were made with two groups (Mann-Whitney - abnormal) and with more than two groups (Kruskal Wallis - abnormal). The level of significance was set at pProTaper Universal” and “Twisted File” systems. For the Twisted File system, a statistically significant difference was recorded between the measurements of 4mm and 3 mm. Conclusion None of the assessed instruments was completely effective in terms of the biomechanical preparation of root canals since all created deviation from the original anatomy of the canal. PMID:27847398

  8. Influence of root canal sealer on the radiographic appearance of filling voids in maxillary single-rooted teeth

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    Augusto Bodanezi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study compared the influence of three epoxy resin-based sealers with distinct radiopacities on the observers' ability to detect root canal filling voids during radiographic analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The root canals of 48 extracted maxillary canines were prepared and divided into three groups. Each group was laterally condensed with one sealer (AH Plus®, Acroseal® or a non-radiopaque sealer, and a longitudinal void was simulated in half of the specimens from each group (n=8. Buccolingual radiographs were obtained and randomly interpreted for voids by a radiologist and an endodontist in a blinded fashion. Teeth were cut and inspected under a microscope to confirm the position of void. Differences in sensitivity and specificity between groups and examiners were compared using the Fisher's Exact and McNemar tests, respectively (α=0.05. RESULTS: Significantly lower sensitivity levels (p<0.05 were observed in the coronal portion of fillings performed with both radiopaque sealers. Specificity values for Acroseal® were significantly higher (p<0.05 in the coronal and apical portions of fillings. CONCLUSIONS: The type of root canal sealer can affect the observers' ability to detect root canal filling voids during radiographic analysis of upper single-rooted teeth.

  9. Chlorhexidine as a root canal irrigant: Antimicrobial and scanning electron microscopic evaluation

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    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selection of irrigant is very important for longterm success of root canal therapy. Objective. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution (CHX against five selected microorganisms and to evaluate its efficacy in root canal cleaning. Methods. In this study, by agar diffusion test, were evaluated antimicrobial effects of three root canal irrigants: 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX. The microorganisms tested in this study were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. A scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate root canal cleaning ability of 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX and 15% EDTA. Twelve extracted single-root human teeth were divided into four groups depending on the irrigant used during instrumentation. Mechanical preparation was performed with Step back technique and K files. Data were analyzed statistically by Student’s t-test. Results 5.25% NaOCl was the most effective against all tested microorganisms. 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed antimicrobial effects against all tested microorganisms but zones of inhibition were smaller. The best results in root canal walls cleaning were obtained in the group where the irrigant was 15% EDTA (score 2.33. In 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX groups, there was more smear layer (score 4 and 5. Conclusion. 2% chlorhexidine digluconate showed strong antimicrobial effect on the tested microorganisms, but was not effective in cleaning root canal walls.

  10. Apical sealing ability of two novel root canal sealers: An ex-vivo study

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    Priyanka Setia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to compare the sealing ability of two root canal sealers viz.: Hybrid Root SEAL (Sun Medical, Tokyo, Japan and iRoot SP (Innovative BioCeramix Inc., Vancouver, Canada. Materials and Methods: A sample of 60 permanent single rooted, human maxillary central incisors of similar sizes was selected for the study. The teeth were decoronated and randomly divided into two groups viz.: Group A and Group B, comprising of thirty teeth each. In Group A, Hybrid Root SEAL and Group B, iRoot SP were used as root canal sealers along with Gutta-percha cones using lateral condensation technique to obturate the canals. After obturation roots were covered with nail paint except 2.0 mm of root and stored in 0.5% methylene blue dye for 1 week. The teeth were immersed in 10 ml of 65% nitric acid for complete dissolution and subsequently subjected to UV spectrophotometer to quantify the concentration of the dye in each sample. The data were analyzed using the unpaired t-test. Results: The mean dye leakage value in Group B (0.368 was less as compared to Group A (0.408. However, statistically the difference was nonsignificant (P = 0.053. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference among the two groups.

  11. Geometric analysis of root canals prepared by four rotary NiTi shaping systems.

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    Hashem, Ahmed Abdel Rahman; Ghoneim, Angie Galal; Lutfy, Reem Ahmed; Foda, Manar Yehia; Omar, Gihan Abdel Fatah

    2012-07-01

    A great number of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems with noncutting tips, different cross-sections, superior resistance to torsional fracture, varying tapers, and manufacturing method have been introduced to the market. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of 4 rotary NiTi preparation systems, Revo-S (RS; Micro-Mega, Besancon Cedex, France), Twisted file (TF; SybronEndo, Amersfoort, The Netherlands), ProFile GT Series X (GTX; Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), and ProTaper (PT; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), on volumetric changes and transportation of curved root canals. Forty mesiobuccal canals of mandibular molars with an angle of curvature ranging from 25° to 40° were divided according to the instrument used in canal preparation into 4 groups of 10 samples each: group RS, group TF, group GTX, and group PT. Canals were scanned using an i-CAT CBCT scanner (Imaging Science International, Hatfield, PA) before and after preparation to evaluate the volumetric changes. Root canal transportation and centering ratio were evaluated at 1.3, 2.6, 5.2, and 7.8 mm from the apex. The significance level was set at P ≤ .05. The PT system removed a significantly higher amount of dentin than the other systems (P = .025). At the 1.3-mm level, there was no significant difference in canal transportation and centering ratio among the groups. However, at the other levels, TF maintained the original canal curvature recording significantly the least degree of canal transportation as well as the highest mean centering ratio. The TF system showed superior shaping ability in curved canals. Revo-S and GTX were better than ProTaper regarding both canal transportation and centering ability. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the radiopacities of four different root canal sealers by digital radiographic technique

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    Özgür Özdemir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the radiopacities of four different root canal sealers and gutta-percha. MATERIALS AND METHOD: AH Plus, iRootSP, MTA Fillapex and Sealapex as root canal sealers and gutta-percha cones were tested. Standardized discs of the root canal sealers and the gutta-percha were prepared. Digital radiographs of the discs and an aluminum penetrometer were obtained by using a phosphor plate. The radiographic density of the sealers and the gutta-percha were measured by using the digital radiographic system’s own measurement tool, and equivalent aluminum thicknesses were determined by using an image editing software. Differences among radiopacities of the root canal sealers and the gutta-percha were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. RESULTS: Aluminum thickness equivalents of the radiopacity values of the samples, in descending order, were: AH Plus, Sealapex, iRootSP, MTA Fillapex and gutta-percha. No significant difference was found between the radiopacity values of AH Plus and Sealapex (p>0.05. There were statistically significant differences between these two groups (AH Plus and Sealapex and all other experimental groups (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: AH Plus and Sealapex exhibited the highest radiopacity values among tested groups. In addition, all tested materials fulfilled the minimum standard value requirements suggested by International Standardization Organization and American National Standards Institute.

  13. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis based on overextension of root canal filling material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarne, O; Koudstaal, M J; van Elswijk, J F A; Wolvius, E B

    2012-10-01

    In a 48-year-old woman and a 35-year-old man, a sinusitis maxillaris resulting from overextension of root canal filling material after an endodontic treatment ofa maxillary molar could be diagnosed through computed tomography. The woman complained of nasal congestion and in the man 2 radiopaque abnormalities in the maxillary sinus were discovered coincidentally. The corpora aliena were removed surgically. Root canal filling materials containing zinc oxide or hydrocortisone may cause aspergillosis of the maxillary sinus because they encountergrowth of Aspergillus species. In case ofmaxillary sinusitis, surgical removal of overextended root canal filling material from the maxillary sinus is indicated. No treatment consensus consists for cases without maxillary sinusitis symptoms.

  14. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH plus.

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    Leyhausen, G; Heil, J; Reifferscheid, G; Waldmann, P; Geurtsen, W

    1999-02-01

    Previous studies with four rapid in vitro and in vivo test systems have shown that the epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH26 may be genotoxic and cytotoxic (9). The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the new resinous root canal sealer AH Plus by means of the growth inhibition test with primary human periodontal ligament fibroblasts and permanent 3T3 monolayers, the procaryotic umu test, the eucaryotic DNA synthesis inhibition test, and the in vivo alkaline filter elution test. In addition, Ames tests were performed with extracts from AH Plus. AH Plus caused only slight or no cellular injuries. Furthermore, no genotoxicity and mutagenicity were revealed by AH Plus. These data should be taken into consideration when deciding about a root canal sealer.

  15. Root canal anatomy of mandibular first premolars in an Emirati subpopulation: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sheela Balu; Gopinath, Vellore Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the root canal anatomy of mandibular first premolar teeth in an Emirati subpopulation using a decalcification and clearing method. Materials and Methods: One hundred permanent mandibular first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes from an Emirati subpopulation from the United Arab Emirates were used for this study. They were subjected to decalcification and clearing. The tooth length, the canal orifice shape, mesial invagination, canal pattern, the location of apex, presence of lateral canals, and intercanal communications were determined. Results: The most common canal pattern was the Vertucci Type I (65%) followed by Type V (14%) and Type IV (13%). The most common type of canal orifice seen was the oval shape (36%) followed by the round shape (25%). Mesial invaginations were seen in 44% of the teeth. The mean tooth length was 19.9 mm, and apical deltas were seen in 24% of teeth. Conclusion: The Vertucci Type I canal pattern was the most prevalent in the mandibular first premolars while the occurrence of multiple canals was noted in 35% of this population. PMID:26929684

  16. Effects of different sonic activation protocols on debridement efficacy in teeth with single-rooted canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-na; Luo, Xiao-juan; Li, Guo-hua; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Mao, Jing; Chen, Ji-hua; Gutmann, James L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The effects of different EndoActivator® (EA) sonic activation protocols on root canal debridement efficacy were examined. Methods Root canals in 48 single-rooted teeth were instrumented, irrigated initially with NaOCl and divided into 6 groups (N=8) based on the application time of QMix (antimicrobial calcium-chelating irrigant), and the time and sequence of EA irrigant activation - Positive Control: 90 sec QMix; Negative Control: 90 sec saline; Group 1A: 15 sec QMix + 15 sec QMix with EA-activation; Group 1B: 30 sec QMix + 30 sec of QMix with EA-activation; Group 2A: 15 sec QMix with EA-activation + 15 sec QMix; Group 2B: 30 sec QMix with EA-activation + 30 sec QMix. Split roots were examined with scanning electron microscopy for assignment of smear and debris scores in locations along the coronal, middle and apical thirds of the canals. The overall cleanliness of pooled canal locations in the Positive Control and the 4 experimental groups were compared with chi-square tests. Results Significant differences were detected among the 5 groups (p 2A > 1A > Positive Control. Completely clean canals could not be achieved due to the absence of continuous irrigant flow for EA to clear intraradicular debris. Conclusions Irrespective of the sonic activation sequence, irrigant activation for 30 seconds during a 60-second period of QMix application appears to maximize the smear layer and debris removal potential of the EndoActivator® system. PMID:24878251

  17. Nd:YAG Lasers Treating of Carious Lesion and Root Canal In Vitro

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    Danqing Xia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a transmissible bacterial disease process, with cavities at the end, and caused by acids from bacterial metabolism. The essence of dental treatment is to clean and disinfect bacterial contamination from the tooth. In this work, we tried to demonstrate the cleaning and disinfecting effects of Nd:YAG laser irradiation on dental carious lesion and root canal in vitro. Acousto-optic Q-switched quasicontinuous and Cr3+:YAG crystal Q-switched pulse Nd:YAG lasers were employed to treat caries lesion and the root canal, respectively. Results showed that acousto-optic Q-switched quasicontinuous Nd:YAG laser irradiation and Cr3+:YAG crystal Q-switched pulse Nd:YAG laser irradiation could rapidly clean decayed material and bacterial contamination from dental carious lesion and the narrow tail end of root canal with minimally invasive in vitro, respectively. It was concluded that acousto-optic Q-switched quasicontinuous laser irradiation may be a rapid and effective alternative caries treatment, and Cr3+:YAG crystal Q-switched pulse Nd:YAG laser irradiation may be an effective method for canal cleaning and disinfecting during root canal therapy.

  18. Mineral trioxide aggregate as a root canal filling material in reimplanted teeth. Microscopic analysis in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Holland, Roberto; de Souza, Valdir; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Pedrini, Denise

    2007-10-01

    This study analyzed mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root canal filling material for the immediate reimplantation of monkey teeth. Four adult capuchin monkeys Cebus apella were used, which had their maxillary and mandibular lateral incisors on both sides extracted and reimplanted after 15 min. During the extra-alveolar period, the teeth were kept in saline solution and after reimplantation retention was performed with a stainless steel wire and composite resin for 14 days. After 7 days, the reimplanted teeth were submitted to endodontic treatment with biomechanics up to file n. 30 and irrigation with a saturated solution of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)(2)], and then divided into two study groups: group I - root canal filled with a Ca(OH)(2) paste, and group II - root canal filled with MTA. Radiographic follow up was performed at 30, 60 and 90 days postoperatively, and after 180 days the animals were killed and specimens were processed for histomorphological analysis. The results revealed that most specimens of both groups presented organized periodontal ligament with no inflammation. The resorptions observed were surface resorptions and were repaired by cementum. Both MTA and Ca(OH)(2) were good root canal filling materials for immediately reimplanted teeth, providing good repair and also allowing biological sealing of some lateral canals. There was no significant difference between the study groups (alpha = 29.60%).

  19. Effectiveness of castor oil extract on Escherichia coli and its endotoxins in root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Maekawa, Lilian Eiko; Chung, Adriana; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias; Carvalho, Claudio Antonio Talge; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of castor oil extract used as an irrigating solution on Escherichia coli and its endotoxins in root canals. Sixty single-rooted teeth were prepared (using castor oil extract as irrigating solution) and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 samples were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), Group 2 samples were treated with polymyxin B, Group 3 samples were treated with Ca(OH)2 and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX), and Group 4 samples were treated with castor oil extract. A control group used physiological saline solution as an irrigant. Canal content samples were collected at four different times: immediately after instrumentation, seven days after instrumentation, after 14 days of intracanal medication, and seven days after removal of intracanal medication. A plating method was used to assess antimicrobial activity and the quantification of endotoxins was evaluated by the chromogenic Limulus lysate assay. Data were submitted to ANOVA and a Dunn test (a = 5%). Irrigation with castor oil extract decreased E. coli counts but had no effect on the level of endotoxins. Samples taken seven days after removal of medication revealed a significant reduction in endotoxin levels in Groups 3 and 4. Compared to the saline solution irrigation, castor oil extract decreased microorganism counts in root canals immediately after canal preparation. None of the medications used completely eliminated endotoxins in the root canal.

  20. Debris and smear removal in flattened root canals after use of different irrigant agitation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Milani; Silva-Sousa, Yara T C; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Lorencetti, Karina Torales; Silva, Silvio Rocha Correa

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be used to analyze the presence of debris and smear layer on the internal walls of root canal. This study evaluated the debris and smear removal in flattened root canals using SEM after use of different irrigant agitation protocols. Fifty mandibular incisors were distributed into five groups (n = 10) according to the irrigant agitation protocol used during chemomechanical preparation: conventional syringe irrigation with NaviTip needle (no activation), active scrubbing of irrigant with brush-covered NaviTip FX needle, manual dynamic irrigation, continuous passive ultrasonic irrigation, and apical negative pressure irrigation (EndoVac system). Canals were irrigated with 5 mL of 2.5% NaOCl at each change of instrument and received a final flush with 17% EDTA for 1 min. After instrumentation, the roots were split longitudinally and SEM micrographs at ×100 and ×1,000 were taken to evaluate the amount of debris and smear layer, respectively, in each third. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post-hoc tests (α = 5%). Manual dynamic activation left significantly (p protocols, while ultrasonic irrigation and EndoVac were the most effective (p 0.05) either among the irrigant agitation protocols or between the protocol-canal third interactions. Although none of the irrigant agitation protocols completely removed debris and smear layer from flattened root canals, the machine-assisted agitation systems (ultrasound and EndoVac) removed more debris than the manual techniques.

  1. Evaluation of complications of root canal treatment performed by undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRahabi, Mothanna K

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluated the technical quality of root canal treatment (RCT) and detected iatrogenic errors in an undergraduate dental clinic at the College of Dentistry, Taibah University, Saudi Arabia. Dental records of 280 patients who received RCT between 2013 and 2016 undertaken by dental students were investigated by retrospective chart review. Root canal obturation was evaluated on the basis of the length of obturation being ≤2 mm from the radiographic apex, with uniform radiodensity and good adaptation to root canal walls. Inadequate root canal obturation included cases containing procedural errors such as furcal perforation, ledge, canal transportation, strip perforation, root perforation, instrument separation, voids in the obturation, or underfilling or overfilling of the obturation. In 193 (68.9%) teeth, RCT was adequate and without procedural errors. However, in 87 (31.1%) teeth, RCT was inadequate and contained procedural errors. The frequency of procedural errors in the entire sample was 31.1% as follows: underfilling, 49.9%; overfilling, 24.1%; voids, 12.6%; broken instruments, 9.2%; apical perforation, 2.3%; and root canal transportation, 2.3%. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the type or frequency of procedural errors between the fourth- and fifth-year students. Lower molars (43.1%) and upper incisors (19.2%) exhibited the highest and lowest frequencies of procedural errors, respectively. The technical quality of RCT performed by undergraduate dental students was classified as 'adequate' in 68.9% of the cases. There is a need for improvement in the training of students at the preclinical and clinical levels.

  2. Viability and antibacterial efficacy of four root canal disinfection techniques evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy

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    Joan Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several disinfection techniques have been recently introduced with the main objective of improving root canal disinfection in the inaccessible areas of the root canal system. This in vitro study was done to evaluate the antimicrobial effect and viability of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms using conventional irrigation, EndoActivator (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, USA, diode laser irradiation and photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 130 single rooted mandibular premolars, standardized to a uniform length of 20 mm were instrumented until finishing file, F1 (Universal Protaper Rotary System, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Specialties, USA. After smear layer removal and sterilization, five teeth were randomly selected to assure sterility before bacterial inoculation. The remaining 125 samples were contaminated with E. faecalis suspension, incubated for 21 days and divided into five groups (n = 25. In Group 1; untreated group (positive control, the root canals were not subjected to any disinfection procedure. Sampling was performed within the canals and the colony-forming unit count was evaluated for 20 samples. Five samples were selected to visualize the pattern of colonization at Level 1 (4 mm from the apex and Level 2 (1 mm from the apex by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Samples in Groups 2-5 namely conventional needle irrigation, EndoActivator, diode laser and PIPS were subjected to their respective disinfection procedures. Postdisinfection sample evaluation criteria was followed for all groups as same as that for Group 1. Results: Diode laser displayed the highest antibacterial efficacy and least viable bacteria than the other three disinfection techniques. Conclusion: Diode laser group showed better antibacterial efficacy and least viable bacteria when compared to conventional needle irrigation, PIPS and EndoActivator groups in minimally instrumented, experimentally infected root canals.

  3. Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary First Molar with Seven Root Canals Confirmed with Cone Beam Computer Tomography – Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The most common configuration of the maxillary first molar is the presence of three roots and four root canals, although the presence of several other configurations have already been reported. The objective of this work is to present a rare anatomic configuration with seven root canals diagnosed during an endodontic therapy. Endodontic treatment was performed using a dental operating microscope. Exploring the grooves surrounding the main canals with ultrasonic troughing was able expose unexpected root canals. Instrumentation with files of smaller sizes and tapers was performed to prevent root physical weakness. The anatomic configuration was confirmed with a Cone Beam Computer Tomography image analysis which was able to clearly show the presence of seven root canals. An electronic database search was conducted to identify all the published similar cases and the best techniques to approach them are discussed. PMID:25121069

  4. A rare case of maxillary first molar with single root and single canal diagnosed using spiral computed tomographic scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in dental anatomy and canal morphology are found in all teeth. Knowledge of these variations, particularly the location and treatment of all canals, plays a key role in the success of endodontic therapy. The presence of extra canals, apical ramification, or lateral canals is commonly encountered, and their incidence and significance have been well-documented. However, the clinician should also be aware of the possibility of the existence of fewer root and/or canal numbers. Here is a case report of left maxillary first permanent molar with a single root and single canal. The goal of this clinical article is to report a maxillary molar with single root and single canal and to highlight the role of spiral computed tomography (SCT as a method to confirm the three-dimensional (3D anatomy of teeth.

  5. Influence of the apical enlargement size on the endotoxin level reduction of dental root canals

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    Ariane Cassia Salustiano Marinho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria play an essential role in endodontic infections because they have virulence factors such as endotoxin. Due to its potential cytotoxic activity, special attention has been given to the removal/neutralization of this endotoxin in the root canal system. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the apical enlargement size (AES by using rotary instruments on the endotoxin level reduction of dental root canals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty root canals of the mandibular premolar teeth were used. Escherichia coli endotoxin (055: B55 was inoculated into thirty root canals. Ten teeth served as the negative control group. After the incubation period, the first endotoxin samples were collected from the root canals with a sterile/apyrogenic paper point for the analysis of the endotoxin units (EU/mL present before instrumentation (S1. Specimen instrumentation was performed with the Mtwo® rotary system in the sequence 10/.04, 15/.05, 20/.06, 25/.06, 30/.05, 35/.04 and 40/.04. To monitor the effectiveness of increasing apical enlargement on endotoxin removal, the second endotoxin samples were collected from all the root canals after instrumentation with the following instruments: #25/.06- (S2; #30/.05- (S3; # 35/.04- (S4; and #40/.04- (S5. Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL was used to quantify the levels of endotoxin. The results were statistically compared by using repeated measures of ANOVA with post hoc Tukey testing. RESULTS: Increasing levels of endotoxin removal was achieved by large sized apical enlargement: S2 (AES #25/.06- 89.2%, S3 (AES #30/.05- 95.9%, S4 (AES #35/.04- 97.8% and S5 (AES #40/.04- 98.2%. Substantial reduction of endotoxin content was obtained in S4 and S5 compared to S2 (p<0.05, however, the root canal preparation was not able to eliminate the endotoxin. CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of this study, it was concluded that the reduction of endotoxin levels of the dental root canals could be

  6. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliosa, Andre; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Silva-Souza, Yara Teresinha Correa; Alfredo, Edson, E-mail: ysousa@unaerp.br [Universidade de Ribeirao Preto (UNAERP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Versiani, Marco Aurelio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odoentologia

    2015-03-01

    The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10), according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR), Liberator (LB), ProTaper (PT), and Twisted File (TF). The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (α = 0.05). The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR); -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB); -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT); -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF). The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR); -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB); -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT); -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF). Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape. (author)

  7. Apical crown technique to model canal roots. A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortini, D; Colombo, M; Gagliani, M

    2007-09-01

    The goals of endodontic therapy are to shape and clean the root canal system in order to receive a three-dimensional and hermetic filling of the entire endodontic space. The aim of this review is to analyze the development of the different canal shaping techniques from the manual stainless-steel instruments to the recently developed rotary Ni-Ti systems. The need to provide instruments of a suitable size to reach the apex of curved root canals drove the development of preparation techniques with a greater focus on the apical part. The Crown-Down technique involves the widening of the canal orifices with Gates-Glidden drills followed by the incremental removal of organic canal contents proceeding from the canal orifice to the apical portion using manual files. Files are used from larger to smaller with no apical pressure. Nevertheless, the term ''Crown-Down'' does not define the technique in the strictest sense, nor does it provide a specific sequence for the use of instruments, but rather defines a way to use the instruments. The preparation of root canals has been revolutionised by the development of Ni-Ti alloys. The features of this alloy give instruments profound flexibility and allow the manufacture of more tapered instruments compared with traditional stainless-steel instruments. In the second part of this review, numerous examples are provided concerning the comparison between different Ni-Ti systems and their techniques for use. A Crown-Down approach provides certain advantages including early organic debris removal, the creation of a large reservoir for irrigating solutions, a straighter access to the apical region of curved canals, and greater precision with regard to the exact working length and apical size.

  8. Determination of root canal curvatures before and after canal preparation (part II): A method based on numeric calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, D; Stachniss-Carp, S; Stachniss, C; Stachniss, V

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new method based on numeric calculus to provide data on any type of root canal curvature at any point of the long axis of the canal. Twenty severely curved, simulated root canals were prepared with rotary FlexMaster and Profile instruments in the crown-down technique and manually in the step-back technique. The inner and outer curvatures were registered in a system of coordinates before and after preparation in increments of 0.5 mm. Using an equalising function, the curvatures were first represented in graphic and algebraic form. The maximum and the mean curvature as well as the length of the arc from the apical foramen to the point of maximum curvature were determined mathematically. An increase in maximum curvature was registered for all four shaping systems investigated. The radius of the inner curvature decreased by 0.5-1.2 mm in the manual systems as a result of the preparation. The Profile system displayed the smallest changes in radius (-0.9 mm) even with the outer curvature, and manual preparation with stainless steel files the most pronounced change (-1.8 mm). The point of maximum curvature at the inner curvature was displaced by 1.6 mm to the apical foramen through manual preparation with Ni-Ti files. At the outer curvature, the maximum displacement (1.8 mm) recorded was also the result of preparation with Ni-Ti hand files, while a displacement of only 0.3 mm to the apical foramen was recorded with the other systems. The method offers a means of determining curvatures precisely without random specification of reference points. The method is also capable of registering only minor changes in curvature in the two-dimensional long axis of the canal.

  9. Root canal debris removal using different irrigating needles: An SEM study

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    Sheetal Ghivari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was carried out to compare the efficacy of three irrigating needle designs in removal of debris from different parts of the root canal. Materials and Methods: Thirty human maxillary canines were prepared using HERO Shaper rotary system and irrigated with 1 ml of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl after each instrument change. Three 25-gauge irrigation needle designs - brush-covered Navi Tip FX (Group I, side-vented needle RC Twents (Group II and single-beveled (Group III irrigating needles - were tested for their efficiency in debris removal in three different parts of the root canal (n=10 canals per group. Following instrumentation, the roots were vertically sectioned and divided into coronal, middle and apical thirds for observation under scanning electron microscope (×200 magnification. Debris on the canal wall was evaluated by using a four-scale scoring system described by Paque and his co-workers. Results: The canals irrigated with brush-covered needle Navi Tip FX (Group I showed lower average debris score, indicating greater removal of debris in coronal third as compared to middle and apical thirds, whereas the canals irrigated with side-vented needle (Group II and single-beveled needle (Group III exhibited lower average score in the middle third than coronal and apical thirds. All the three needle designs exhibited higher debris score in apical third of the root canal. Tukey multiple comparisons test was applied at a significance level of P>0.05. A statistically significant difference (P<0.05 was observed in the debris removal in the coronal and middle thirds of root canals irrigated with brush-covered Navi Tip FX (Group I and side-vented (Group II needles, respectively, when compared with other needle design groups. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that all the needle designs tested were effective in certain regions of the root canal with apical third uncleaned. Side-vented needle by

  10. Residual activity of cetrimide and chlorhexidine on Enterococcus faecalis-infected root canals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carmen Mara Ferrer-Luque; Mara Teresa Arias-Moliz; Matilde Ruz-Linares; Mara Elena Martnez Garca; Pilar Baca

    2014-01-01

    Effective final irrigation regimen is an important step in order to achieve better disinfection and ensure residual antimicrobial effects after root canal preparation. The aim of this study was to compare the residual antimicrobial activity of 0.2%cetrimide, and 0.2%and 2%chlorhexidine in root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Biofilms of E. faecalis were grown on uniradicular roots for 4 weeks. After root canal preparation, root canals were irrigated with 17%ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to remove the smear layer. The roots were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n526) according to the final irrigating solution:Group I, 5 mL 0.2%cetrimide;Group II, 5 mL 0.2%chlorhexidine;and Group III, 5 mL 2%chlorhexidine. Samples were collected for 50 days to denote the presence of bacterial growth. The proportion of ungrown specimens over 50 days was evaluated using the nonparametric Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Differences among groups were tested using the log-rank test and the level of statistical significance was set at P,0.05. The highest survival value was found with 2%chlorhexidine, showing statistically significant differences from the other two groups. At 50 days, E. faecalis growth was detected in 69.23%specimens in Groups I and II, and in 34.61%specimens of Group III. There were no significant differences between 0.2%cetrimide and 0.2%chlorhexidine. Final irrigation with 2%chlorhexidine showed greater residual activity than 0.2%chlorhexidine and 0.2%cetrimide in root canals infected with E. faecalis.

  11. Computed tomography assessment of the efficiency of different techniques for removal of root canal filling material

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    Dall' agnol, Cristina; Barletta, Fernando Branco [Lutheran University of Brazil, Canoas, RS (Brazil). Dental School. Dept. of Dentistry and Endodontics]. E-mail: fbarletta@terra.com.br; Hartmann, Mateus Silveira Martins [Uninga Dental School, Passo Fundo, RS (Brazil). Postgraduate Program in Dentistry

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the efficiency of different techniques for removal of filling material from root canals, using computed tomography (CT). Sixty mesial roots from extracted human mandibular molars were used. Root canals were filled and, after 6 months, the teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups, according to the root-filling removal technique: Group A - hand instrumentation with K-type files; Group B - reciprocating instrumentation with engine-driven K-type files; and Group C rotary instrumentation with engine-driven ProTaper system. CT scans were used to assess the volume of filling material inside the root canals before and after the removal procedure. In both moments, the area of filling material was outlined by an experienced radiologist and the volume of filling material was automatically calculated by the CT software program. Based on the volume of initial and residual filling material of each specimen, the percentage of filling material removed from the root canals by the different techniques was calculated. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and chi-square test for linear trend ({alpha}=0.05). No statistically significant difference (p=0.36) was found among the groups regarding the percent means of removed filling material. The analysis of the association between the percentage of filling material removal (high or low) and the proposed techniques by chi-square test showed statistically significant difference (p=0.015), as most cases in group B (reciprocating technique) presented less than 50% of filling material removed (low percent removal). In conclusion, none of the techniques evaluated in this study was effective in providing complete removal of filling material from the root canals. (author)

  12. Analysis of gutta-percha’s root canal filling capacity through three different obturation techniques

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    Cláudio Maniglia-Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to determine gutta-percha’s root canal filling capacity through three different filling techniques. Material and methods: Sixty single-rooted human teeth were cleaned, shaped and randomly divided according to the filling technique: Group I: Lateral condensation; Group II: Hydraulic compression; Group III: Tagger’s hybrid. All procedures were performed by two previously calibrated operators. The teeth were transversely sectioned into four cuts, starting from the root apex (at 3 mm, 6 mm, 9 mm, and 12 mm, by using an Isomet diamond blade (wafering blade, series 15 high concentration, 5 inch blade, Buehler Ltd., Lake Bluff, IL, USA, mounted in an IsoMet® Low Speed Saw (Buehler Ltd., Lake Bluff, IL, USA, and water as a cooling medium. Each group’s cut was embedded in acrylic resin and polished. Root canal images were captured and then analysed by Image Tool 3.0 software (Department of Dental Diagnostic Science, University of Texas, Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas. Measurements of root canal overall area and gutta-percha-filled area were executed,therefore, obtaining the percentage of gutta-percha’s root canal filling capacity for each slice. Results: Data were analyzed by GMC software 10.0 and Kruskal-Wallis test. Tagger’s hybrid technique (95.1% was superior to the other two techniques, followed by Hydraulic compression (89.1% and lateral condensation (70.6%. The results were statistically different among the three techniques, for all cuts (p 0.05. Conclusion: These results suggest that Tagger’s hybrid technique may yield better root canal filling capacity than Hydraulic compression and lateral condensation technique, which showed the worst filling capacity of all the three techniques employed.

  13. Cleaning and shaping curved root canals: Mtwo® vs ProTaper® instruments, a lab comparison

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    Kuzekanani Maryam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare root canal preparation in curved canals in molar teeth with the rotary NiTi Mtwo and ProTaper systems in terms of canal shape and smear layer. Materials and Methods: Mesiobuccal canals of 60 molar teeth with angles of curvature between 25 and 35 degrees were prepared with a torque controlled low speed engine; 30 canals for each system. Each individual instrument was used to prepare four root canals and the time required for preparation was recorded. Standardized radiographs were taken before and following instrumentation and used to determine changes in canal curvature. Results: There was no significant difference in preparation time between the two systems. No instruments separated during use. The Mtwo system gave a statistically smaller change in canal curvature and thus was better for maintaining the original shape of the root canal, with less transportation (P less than 0.05. The greatest difference was seen for maxillary molar teeth. When prepared root canals were examined by SEM there was no difference between the two systems at the coronal, middle or apical thirds. Conclusion: Overall, the results of this study suggest that Mtwo instruments are preferable for situations where canals are curved, particularly for maxillary molars.

  14. Laser Induced Explosive Vapor and Cavitation Resulting in Effective Irrigation of the Root Canal. Part 2 : Evaluation of the Efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Blanken, Jan; Meire, Maarten; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Limited information exists regarding the efficacy of laser activated irrigation (LAI) on removal of root canal debris. This study compares the efficacy of LAI for removal of debris in root canals as compared to conventional irrigation (CI) and passive ultrasonic irrigation

  15. Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Maxillary and Mandibular Canines in Indian Population Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

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    Nikhita Somalinga Amardeep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the root canal anatomy of single-rooted permanent maxillary and mandibular canines in an Indian population using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Methodology. A total of 250 permanent maxillary canines and 250 permanent mandibular canines were selected and scanned using CBCT. The root anatomy of each tooth was evaluated for the following parameters: the pattern of the root canals, anatomic length of the crown and the root, the presence of accessory canals, the shape of the access cavity, the position of the apical foramina, root diameter, and dentin thickness of the root. Results. Majority of the teeth had a Type I canal configuration in both maxillary canines (81.6% and mandibular canines (79.6%. In maxillary canine the other canal patterns found were Type III (11.6%, Type II (2.8%, Type V (2%, Type XIX (1.2%, and Type IV (0.8%. In mandibular canines the various other canal patterns found were Type III (13.6%, Type II (3.2%, Type V (2%, and Type XIX (1.6%. Apical foramina were laterally positioned in the majority of the teeth, 70.4% and 65.6% in maxillary and mandibular canines, respectively. 12% of the maxillary canines and 12.8% of the mandibular canines had accessory canals. Conclusion. The root canal anatomy of permanent maxillary and mandibular canines varied widely in an Indian population.

  16. Biocompatibility of dental materials used in contemporary endodontic therapy: a review. Part 2. Root-canal-filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauman, C H J; Love, R M

    2003-03-01

    Root-canal-filling materials are either placed directly onto vital periapical tissues or may leach through dentine. The tissue response to these materials therefore becomes important and may influence the outcome of endodontic treatment. This paper is a review of the biocompatibility of contemporary orthograde and retrograde root-canal-filling materials.

  17. Laser Induced Explosive Vapor and Cavitation Resulting in Effective Irrigation of the Root Canal. Part 2 : Evaluation of the Efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Blanken, Jan; Meire, Maarten; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    Background and Objectives: Limited information exists regarding the efficacy of laser activated irrigation (LAI) on removal of root canal debris. This study compares the efficacy of LAI for removal of debris in root canals as compared to conventional irrigation (CI) and passive ultrasonic irrigation

  18. The effect of root canal taper on the irrigant flow: evaluation using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of root canal taper on irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two types of needles, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate irrigant flow from either a side-ve

  19. The effect of root canal taper on the irrigant flow: evaluation using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of root canal taper on irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two types of needles, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate irrigant flow from either a side-v

  20. Postoperative pain after the removal of root canal filling material using different techniques in teeth with failed root canal therapy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the intensity and duration of postoperative pain after the removal of root canal filling material in retreatment procedures of upper incisor teeth with chronic apical periodontitis, using different techniques. One hundred and thirty-five patients requiring retreatment of upper incisor teeth with chronic apical periodontitis were included in the study. The patients were assigned to three groups of 45 patients, according to the method used to remove old canal filling material. In group 1, canal filling material was removed using hand files. In group 2, the canal filling material was removed with ProTaper universal retreatment (PTUR) instruments. In group 3, Reciproc instruments were used to remove canal filling material. Teeth were then medicated with calcium hydroxide and sealed using temporary filling material. The presence of postoperative pain was assessed after 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, 7 days, and finally after 10 days. In all time intervals, except for 72 h, 7 days and 10 days, group 1 participants reported more intense postoperative pain than those in groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.02). In all time intervals, there was no difference in the pain scores between groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.08). In all groups, the intensity of postoperative pain decreased over time. The required time to remove canal filling material was less for the Reciproc group compared to the hand and ProTaper retreatment groups (p = 0.032). Hand files caused greater postoperative pain after non-surgical endodontic retreatment (NSER) of upper incisor teeth with chronic apical periodontitis compared to the ProTaper retreatment and Reciproc files.

  1. Laser welding method for removal of instruments debris from root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Ryoichi; Suehara, Masataka; Fujii, Rie; Kato, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kan-ichi; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the viability of a novel method for removing debris from broken instruments from root canals using a laser apparatus. Laser welding was performed on stainless steel or nickel titanium files using an Nd:YAG laser. Retention force between the files and extractors was measured. Increase in temperature on the root surface during laser irradiation was recorded and the irradiated areas evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Retention force on stainless steel was significantly greater than that on nickel titanium. The maximum temperature increase was 4.1°C. The temperature increase on the root surface was greater in the vicinity of the welded area than that at the apical area. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the files and extractors were welded together. These results indicate that the laser welding method is effective in removing debris from broken instruments from root canals.

  2. An in vitro comparison of root canal transportation by reciproc file with and without glide path.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiumars Nazarimoghadam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of ideal canal preparation is to prevent iatrogenic aberrations such as transportation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root canal transportation by Reciproc file with and without glide path.Thirty acrylic-resin blocks with a curvature of 60° and size#10 (2% taper were assigned into two groups (n= 15. In group 1, the glide path was performed using stainless steel k-files size#10 and 15 at working length In group 2, canals were prepared with Reciproc file system at working length. By using digital imaging software (AutoCAD 2008, the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation digital images were superimposed over, taking the landmarks as reference points. Then the radius of the internal and external curve of the specimens was calculated at three α, β and γ points (1mm to apex as α, 3mm to apex as β, and 5mm to apex as γ. The data were statically analyzed using the independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test by SPSS version 16.Glide path was found significant for only external curve in the apical third of the canal; that is, 5mm to apex (P=0.005. But in the other third, canal modification was not significant (P> 0.008.Canal transportation in the apical third of the canal seems to be significantly reduced when glide path is performed using reciprocating files.

  3. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems.

  4. Antibacterial Efficacy of Super-Oxidized Water on Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms in Root Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recai; Alacam, Tayfun; Hubbezoglu, Ihsan; Tunc, Tutku; Sumer, Zeynep; Alici, Oguzhan

    2016-01-01

    Background The success of endodontic treatment depends on a few crucial factors. One of these factors is the complete chemomechanic preparation of root canal against various bacteria. In particular, the effect of resistant bacteria may cause intense pain with flare-up and formation of periapical lesions. Therefore, the strong effect of irrigants plays an important role in terms of the complete elimination of these bacteria to achieve long-term successful treatment. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of super-oxidized water (SPO) in root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Methods One hundred twenty single-root, premolar teeth were selected. Initially, the teeth were prepared and then disinfected. E. faecalis were inoculated and kept at 37°C for 24 hours in the root canals. The re-inoculation procedure was repeated on the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth days. The infected root canals were divided into one negative (saline) and one positive (sodium hypochlorite) control group and four experimental groups (super-oxidized water: 1, 2, 3, or 5 minutes) (n = 20). Paper points were placed in the root canals to control and evaluate the biofilm formation. Biofilms were counted on blood agar plates, and data was evaluated and statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results Although sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) showed no statistically significant difference when compared with three and five minutes of SPO irrigation (P > 0.05), NaOCl showed statistically significant differences among all other groups (P faecalis biofilms. In terms of successful endodontic treatment approaches, super-oxidized water may be used as an effective irrigation solution in clinics. PMID:27800142

  5. Post space preparation timing of root canals sealed with AH Plus sealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Ri; Kim, Young Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the optimal timing for post space preparation of root canals sealed with epoxy resin-based AH Plus sealer in terms of its polymerization and influence on apical leakage. Materials and Methods The epoxy polymerization of AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey) as a function of time after mixing (8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week) was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness measurements. The change in the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the material with time was also investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fifty extracted human single-rooted premolars were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus, and randomly separated into five groups (n = 10) based on post space preparation timing (immediately after root canal obturation and 8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week after root canal obturation). The extent of apical leakage (mm) of the five groups was compared using a dye leakage test. Each dataset was statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results Continuous epoxy polymerization of the material with time was observed. Although the Tg values of the material gradually increased with time, the specimens presented no clear Tg value at 1 week after mixing. When the post space was prepared 1 week after root canal obturation, the leakage was significantly higher than in the other groups (p < 0.05), among which there was no significant difference in leakage. Conclusions Poor apical seal was detected when post space preparation was delayed until 1 week after root canal obturation. PMID:28194361

  6. Morphology of bacterial flora in root canals associated with apical abscesses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Huijie; Gao Chengzhi; Zhang Chengfei; Zheng Shuying; Yue Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Apical abscess is an inflammatory process in the peri-radicular tissues caused by biofllms in the necrotic root canal systems.Therefore,a comprehensive analysis of the bacterial colonization is required for a better understanding of the pathogenesis.This study aimed to investigate the patterns of bacterial infection of root canals of teeth with apical abscesses and to determine whether histological and microbiological findings correlated with clinical conditions.Methods Eighteen samples from 18 teeth with apical pathological lesions were analyzed.Nine patients with acute apical abscesses experienced severe pain,and nine patients were asymptomatic with a sinus tract.After extraction,each affected root was divided into two halves.One half was processed for histobacteriologic analysis and examined using light microscopy,and the other half was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the patterns of microbial colonization of the root canals.Results The appearance of each sample subjected to SEM was consistent with the histobacteriologic findings despite the presence or absence of clinical symptoms.Intraradicular biofilms comprising cocci,rods,and/or filaments of amorphous materials were observed in the apical third of the main root canals in all samples.The bacterial biofilms covering the main root canal walls also penetrated the dentinal tubules to varying depths.The morphologies of biofilms varied,and a unique pattern of intraradicular infection was not identified.Conclusion Intraradicular infections formed complex and variable multispecies biofilms and their presence did not correlate with clinical symptoms.

  7. Efficacy of manual and mechanical instrumentation techniques for removal of overextended root canal filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesim, B; Üstün, Y; Aslan, T; Topçuoğlu, H S; Şahin, S; Ulusan, Ö

    2017-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of manual and mechanical instrumentation techniques, including ProTaper Universal retreatment system, Mtwo retreatment system, Reciproc system, and Hedström files, regarding removal of overextended root canal filling material. Eighty extracted human mandibular premolar teeth were prepared at the apical foramen level using Revo-S rotary files and subsequently obturated. The root canal filling material was deliberately extruded from the apex. Samples were transferred to glass vials that simulated the periapical area. Eighty samples of overfilled teeth were randomly assigned to four equal groups (n = 20) for removal of the root filling material with ProTaper Universal retreatment files (Group 1), Mtwo retreatment files (Group 2), Reciproc system (Group 3), and hand files (Group 4). Removal of the root canal filling material and additional preparation were performed by individual instruments from each different system up to a #40 size. The external apical surface of the teeth and the surrounding glass vials were checked using a dental operation microscope with ×12.5 magnification. Samples were divided into two groups based on whether removal of the overextended root canal filling material was successful or not. The Fisher's exact test was used to detect any significant difference between the groups (α = 0.05). The success rate for removal of overextended gutta-percha was greater for the Mtwo (30%) and hand files (30%) compared with the ProTaper (20%) and Reciproc (10%). However, no significant statistical differences existed among the experimental groups (P > 0.05). This study demonstrated that all tested systems had similar efficacy in removing overextended root canal filling material.

  8. Systemic distribution of sup 14 C-labeled formaldehyde applied in the root canal following pulpectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, G.I.; Nishikawa, I.; Kawazoe, S.; Toda, T.

    1989-11-01

    The systemic distribution of {sup 14}C-labeled formaldehyde which had been placed in the root canals of the canines of cats following pulpectomies was studied using liquid scintillation counting and whole-body autoradiographic technique. Radioactive {sup 14}C which had been placed in the canals was found in the plasma 30 min after the root canal procedure. The recovery of systemic {sup 14}C radioactivity increased with time. In addition, it seemed that approximately 3% of the dose placed in the teeth was excreted in the urine within 36 h. Whole-body autoradiograms indicated extensive concentration of {sup 14}C radioactivity in tissues other than those analyzed with the liquid scintillation technique.

  9. Aetiology, incidence and morphology of the C-shaped root canal system and its impact on clinical endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A; Ziegler, A; Higuchi, N; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2014-01-01

    The C-shaped root canal constitutes an unusual root morphology that can be found primarily in mandibular second permanent molars. Due to the complexity of their structure, C-shaped root canal systems may complicate endodontic interventions. A thorough understanding of root canal morphology is therefore imperative for proper diagnosis and successful treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding C-shaped roots and root canals, from basic morphology to advanced endodontic procedures. To this end, a systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PLoS and BioMed Central databases, and many rarely cited articles were included. Furthermore, four interactive 3D models of extracted teeth are introduced that will allow for a better understanding of the complex C-shaped root canal morphology. In addition, the present publication includes an embedded best-practice video showing an exemplary root canal procedure on a tooth with a pronounced C-shaped root canal. The survey of this unusual structure concludes with a number of suggestions concerning future research efforts. PMID:24483229

  10. Endodontic management of a maxillary first molar with three roots and seven root canals with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Gurudutt; Singh, Kamal Krishan; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2015-08-01

    Variation in root canal morphology, especially in maxillary first molar presents a constant challenge for a clinician in their detection and management. This case report describes the successful root canal treatment of a three rooted right maxillary first molar presenting with three canals each in the mesiobuccal and distobuccal roots and one canal in the palatal root. The clinical detection of this morphologic aberration was made using a dental operating microscope, and the canal configuration was established after correlating and computing the clinical, radiographic and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan findings. CBCT images confirmed the configuration of the canals in the mesiobuccal and distobuccal roots to be Al-Qudah and Awawdeh type (3-2) and type (3-2-1), respectively, whereas the palatal root had a Vertucci type I canal pattern. This report reaffirms the importance of careful examination of the floor of the pulp chamber with a dental operating microscope and the use of multiangled preoperative radiographs along with advanced diagnostic aids such as CBCT in identification and successful management of aberrant canal morphologies.

  11. [Temperature variation at the external root surface during Nd: YAG laser irradiation in the root canal in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan-Gao, Li; Xiao, Wang; Kexian, Xie; Dan, Liu

    2014-10-01

    To assess the temperature variation of the root surface using Nd: YAG laser irradiation in the root canal with different power and to evaluate the safety of laser application on the periodontal region. Thirty extracted human teeth with single-roots were collected. The teeth were cross-sectioned in the cervical portion, standardizing the roots at a 12-mm length. The roots were used as specimen. The roots were radiographed in the buccal-lingual direction to measure the thickness of the proximal walls, by means of a digital radiographic system. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the laser potency (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 W). Each group was subdivided into two subgroups according to laser frequency (15 and 30 Hz). With the Nd: YAG laser irradiation for 20 s, the temperature variation of the root surface was monitored by thermocouples located at different parts of the root external wall and recorded by digital thermometers. The groups irradiated with 4.5 W presented the greatest temperature variation (above 10°C), followed by 3.0 and 1.5 W. The temperatures were statistically different (P 0.05). The apical half of the root presented statistically higher temperature rises than the cervical half of the root (P surface was associated with laser power, irradiation time, and the thickness of dentin. Application of Nd: YAG laser in the root at 1.5 W for 20 s can safely be used in endodontic treatment.

  12. CT study of the performance of reciprocating and oscillatory motions in flattened root canal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura-Netto, Cacio, E-mail: caciomn@usp.br [Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul (UNICSUL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Palo, Renato Miotto [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (ICT/UNESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia; Pinto, Larissa Fernanda; Daltoe, Gisele; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi [Universidade Ibirapuera (UNIB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    Abstract: Root canal preparation is an important step in endodontic treatment. The anatomical complexity of the middle third of the root compromises the effective cleaning of this area. Thus, advances have been made in instrumentation techniques and instruments for this purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different instrumentation systems on the enlargement of the middle thirds of root canals in mandibular incisors. The preparation methods used were the reciprocating systems Reciproc (Group I) and WaveOne (Group II) and the oscillatory system Tilos (Group III). Comparisons were made by three-dimensional image reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography before and after instrumentation. Changes in area, perimeter, centering ability, and pattern of preparation were analyzed. The results were subjected to ANOVA complemented by the Tukey’s test. Changes in area, perimeter, and tendency of transportation showed similar results among groups. The transportation index of the Tilos system was significantly lower than that of the other groups. Qualitative analysis of the preparation pattern showed that the Tilos system had a more uniform preparation, although Reciproc and WaveOne preparations appeared more rounded, incompatible with the original canal anatomy. There was similarity in the systems’ performance on flattened areas, although the Tilos system presented a better pattern of root canal preparation and a lower index of transportation. (author)

  13. Resazurin Metabolism Assay for Root Canal Disinfectant Evaluation on Dual-species Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wesselink, Paul R.; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Endodontic infections are caused by polymicrobial biofilms. Therefore, novel root canal disinfectants should be evaluated not only on single-species biofilms but also on dual- or mixed-species biofilms. A simple, high-throughput assay is urgently needed for this. In this study, the app

  14. Resazurin metabolism assay for root canal disinfectant evaluation on dual-species biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.M.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Wesselink, P.R.; Crielaard, W.; Deng, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endodontic infections are caused by polymicrobial biofilms. Therefore, novel root canal disinfectants should be evaluated not only on single-species biofilms but also on dual- or mixed-species biofilms. A simple, high-throughput assay is urgently needed for this. In this study, the appl

  15. Reliability of assessing dye penetration along root canal fillings using methylene blue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, E.M.; Pappen, F.G.; Shemesh, H.; Bonato-Estrela, C.; Bonetti-Filho, I.

    2009-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) remains the most frequently used tracer for dye penetration tests of endodontic fillings, despite its chemical reactions with different materials. This study checked whether dye penetration displayed by MB is comparable to Rhodamine B (RB). One hundred and seventy-two root canals

  16. Reliability of assessing dye penetration along root canal fillings using methylene blue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, E.M.; Pappen, F.G.; Shemesh, H.; Bonato-Estrela, C.; Bonetti-Filho, I.

    2009-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) remains the most frequently used tracer for dye penetration tests of endodontic fillings, despite its chemical reactions with different materials. This study checked whether dye penetration displayed by MB is comparable to Rhodamine B (RB). One hundred and seventy-two root canals

  17. Evaluation of a Sonic Device Designed to Activate Irrigant in the Root Canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; van der Sluis, Lucas W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to evaluate the removal of dentin debris from the root canal by sonic or ultrasonic activation of the irrigant and the physical mechanisms of sonic activation by visualizing the oscillations of the sonic tip, both inside and outside the confinement of the

  18. Evaluation of a sonic device designed to activate irrigant in the root canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.M.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to evaluate the removal of dentin debris from the root canal by sonic or ultrasonic activation of the irrigant and the physical mechanisms of sonic activation by visualizing the oscillations of the sonic tip, both inside and outside the confinement of the

  19. Evaluation of a Sonic Device Designed to Activate Irrigant in the Root Canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Verhaagen, Bram; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to evaluate the removal of dentin debris from the root canal by sonic or ultrasonic activation of the irrigant and the physical mechanisms of sonic activation by visualizing the oscillations of the sonic tip, both inside and outside the confinement of the

  20. The outcome of root-canal treatments assessed by cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Y.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, in-vivo and ex-vivo methods were utilized to assess the outcome of root canal treatments determined by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the reliability of the CBCT-findings. CBCT provided useful and reliable information leading to a better understanding of the outcome and fac

  1. Additional disinfection with a modified salt solution in a root canal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.V. van der Waal; C.A.M. Oonk; S.H. Nieman; P.R. Wesselink; J.J. de Soet; W. Crielaard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the disinfecting properties of a modified salt solution (MSS) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) in a non-direct-contact ex-vivo model. Methods Seventy-four single-canal roots infected with Enterococcus faecalis were treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite

  2. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoora Sahebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intubation procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods. Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results. Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion. Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ.

  3. Micro-CT analyses of apical enlargement and molar root canal complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Merete; Darvann, Tron Andre; Larsen, Per

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of two rotary hybrid instrumentation techniques with focus on apical enlargement in molar teeth and to quantify and visualize spatial details of instrumentation efficacy in root canals of different complexity. METHODOLOGY: Maxillary and mandibular molar teeth wer...

  4. Micro‐CT analyses of apical enlargement and molar root canal complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, M.; Darvann, Tron Andre; Larsen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Markvart M, Darvann TA, Larsen P, Dalstra M, Kreiborg S, Bjørndal L. Micro‐CT analyses of apical enlargement and molar root canal complexity. International Endodontic Journal, 45, 273–281, 2012. Aim To compare the effectiveness of two rotary hybrid instrumentation techniques with focus on apical...

  5. CT study of the performance of reciprocating and oscillatory motions in flattened root canal areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacio MOURA-NETTO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal preparation is an important step in endodontic treatment. The anatomical complexity of the middle third of the root compromises the effective cleaning of this area. Thus, advances have been made in instrumentation techniques and instruments for this purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different instrumentation systems on the enlargement of the middle thirds of root canals in mandibular incisors. The preparation methods used were the reciprocating systems Reciproc (Group I and WaveOne (Group II and the oscillatory system Tilos (Group III. Comparisons were made by three-dimensional image reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography before and after instrumentation. Changes in area, perimeter, centering ability, and pattern of preparation were analyzed. The results were subjected to ANOVA complemented by the Tukey’s test. Changes in area, perimeter, and tendency of transportation showed similar results among groups. The transportation index of the Tilos system was significantly lower than that of the other groups. Qualitative analysis of the preparation pattern showed that the Tilos system had a more uniform preparation, although Reciproc and WaveOne preparations appeared more rounded, incompatible with the original canal anatomy. There was similarity in the systems’ performance on flattened areas, although the Tilos system presented a better pattern of root canal preparation and a lower index of transportation.

  6. Factors affecting irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Psimma, Z.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and critical analysis of published data on irrigant extrusion to identify factors causing, affecting or predisposing to irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation of human mature permanent teeth. An electronic search was conducted

  7. Which is the most effective disinfection method in primary root canals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-23

    Dec 23, 2014 ... entire model system was then sterilized in ethylene oxide gas for a 12‑h cycle. .... antimicrobial effectiveness of NaOCl in root canals is reported to be a function of ... irrigating agent with antimicrobial action. The antimicrobial.

  8. Comparison of Endoflas and Zinc oxide Eugenol as root canal filling materials in primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Rewal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc oxide eugenol has long been the material of choice of pediatric dentists worldwide, although it fails to meet the ideal requirements of root canal filling material for primary teeth. Endoflas, a mixture of zinc oxide eugenol, calcium hydroxide, and iodoform, can be considered to be an effective root canal filling material in primary teeth as compared with zinc oxide eugenol. This study was carried out to compare zinc oxide eugenol with endoflas for pulpectomy in primary dentition. Aim: The objective of the study was to compare clinically and radiographically success rates of zinc oxide eugenol with endoflas for the root canal filling of primary teeth at 3, 6, and 9 months. Design: Fifty primary molars were included in the study with 26 teeth in Group I (Endoflas and 24 in Group II (zinc oxide eugenol. A single visit pulpectomy was carried out. Results: The overall success rate of zinc oxide eugenol was 83% whereas 100% success was found in the case of endoflas. The obtained results were compiled and subjected to statistical analysis using the chi-square test. The difference in the success rate between the two was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Endoflas has shown to have better results than zinc oxide eugenol. It should therefore be the material of choice for root canal treatment in deciduous dentition.

  9. Effects of various irrigation/aspiration protocols on cleaning of flattened root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Diego Henrique da Silva; Colucci, Vivian; Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Silva, Silvio Rocha Corrêa da

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate, by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the cleaning of flattened root canals, varying irrigation/aspiration protocols during biomechanical preparation. Thirdy human mandibular incisors were distributed into three groups (n = 10) according to the aspiration/irrigation protocols: conventional, conventional + brush, and apical negative pressure irrigation. Irrigation procedure was performed with 5 mL of 1% NaOCl at each change of instrument; final irrigation was conducted with 17% EDTA for 5 min. After biomechanical preparation, the roots were sectioned and prepared for SEM analysis. The images obtained were evaluated under 35× and 1,000× magnification by three calibrated examiners, following a double-blind design. All data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Canals wherein the conventional method and apical negative pressure irrigation were employed revealed less debris, statistically different from the conventional + brush group (p protocols. Comparing each root canal third revealed that the apical portion was difficult to clean as all the tested protocols showed similar high scores (p > 0.05), both for the presence of debris and smear layer. In conclusion, although none of the studied irrigation/aspiration protocols have completely cleaned flattened root canals, apical negative pressure irrigation was more effective in smear layer removal, whereas the conventional + brush protocol was the least effective in removing the debris and smear layer.

  10. A clinical and radiographic study of four different root canal fillings in primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa O Al-Ostwani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful treatment of infected primary teeth aims to preserve the child′s health. However, the complex morphology of primary root canals and the desire for shorter therapy sessions put the necessity to search for the ideal root canal paste. Aims: To evaluate pulpectomy of nonvital primary molars using four different root canal filling pastes zinc oxide and propolis (ZOP as a new paste, endoflas-chlorophenol-free as a new paste free of chlorophenol, metapex paste, and zinc oxide and eugenol (ZOE paste as a control paste. Materials and Methods: Pulpectomy of 64 nonvital primary molars were accomplished in 39 children aged 3-9 years. Teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups of 16 molars according to the type of root canal filling. Pulpectomy was performed in one stage using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite irrigation and stainless-steel crown for final restoration. Clinical and radiographic results were evaluated double-blindly for two periods of 6, 12 months. Data were analyzed using Chi-square/Fisher′s exact test, and P-value was set as 0.05. Results: The four pastes achieved convergent clinical and radiographic success within the two observation periods (P > 0.05. ZOE paste was the slowest in its resorption. Conclusions: ZOP is a promising paste with its natural antibacterial component (propolis. ZOE paste had convergent efficacy to the other pastes.

  11. Factors affecting irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Psimma, Z.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and critical analysis of published data on irrigant extrusion to identify factors causing, affecting or predisposing to irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation of human mature permanent teeth. An electronic search was conducted

  12. Centering and transportation: in vitro evaluation of continuous and reciprocating systems in curved root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vilas Navós

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that there were no differences in transportation between the evaluated systems for the preparation of curved root canals with an apical instrumentation diameter of #25. For centering ability, in the apical third, ProTaper® presented worst behavior when compared to Reciproc®.

  13. Porosity distribution in root canals filled with gutta percha and calcium silicate cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moinzadeh, A.T.; Zerbst, W.; Boutsioukis, C.; Shemesh, H.; Zaslansky, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gutta percha is commonly used in conjunction with a sealer to produce a fluid-tight seal within the root canal fillings. One of the most commonly used filling methods is lateral compaction of gutta percha coupled with a sealer such as calcium silicate cement. However, this technique may re

  14. Removal of gutta-percha from root canals using the self-adjusting file

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, K.C.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.; Shemesh, H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of the residual gutta-percha-occupied area (PRGPA) in root canals after retreatment using ProTaper retreatment files (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) with or without the additional use of Self-Adjusting Files (SAFs; ReDent

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Gramicidin S in the Treatment of Root Canal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Berditsch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An intrinsic clindamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, the most common single species present in teeth after failed root canal therapy, often possesses acquired tetracycline resistance. In these cases, root canal infections are commonly treated with Ledermix® paste, which contains demeclocycline, or the new alternative endodontic paste Odontopaste, which contains clindamycin; however, these treatments are often ineffective. We studied the killing activity of the cyclic antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S (GS against planktonic and biofilm cells of tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates of E. faecalis. The high therapeutic potential of GS for the topical treatment of problematic teeth is based on the rapid bactericidal effect toward the biofilm-forming, tetracycline-resistant E. faecalis. GS reduces the cell number of planktonic cells within 20–40 min at a concentration of 40–80 μg/mL. It kills the cells of pre-grown biofilms at concentrations of 100–200 μg/mL, such that no re-growth is possible. The translocation of the peptide into the cell interior and its complexation with intracellular nucleotides, including the alarmon ppGpp, can explain its anti-biofilm effect. The successful treatment of persistently infected root canals of two volunteers confirms the high effectiveness of GS. The broad GS activity towards resistant, biofilm-forming E. faecalis suggests its applications for approval in root canal medication.

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Gramicidin S in the Treatment of Root Canal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berditsch, Marina; Lux, Hannah; Babii, Oleg; Afonin, Sergii; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    An intrinsic clindamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, the most common single species present in teeth after failed root canal therapy, often possesses acquired tetracycline resistance. In these cases, root canal infections are commonly treated with Ledermix® paste, which contains demeclocycline, or the new alternative endodontic paste Odontopaste, which contains clindamycin; however, these treatments are often ineffective. We studied the killing activity of the cyclic antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S (GS) against planktonic and biofilm cells of tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates of E. faecalis. The high therapeutic potential of GS for the topical treatment of problematic teeth is based on the rapid bactericidal effect toward the biofilm-forming, tetracycline-resistant E. faecalis. GS reduces the cell number of planktonic cells within 20–40 min at a concentration of 40–80 μg/mL. It kills the cells of pre-grown biofilms at concentrations of 100–200 μg/mL, such that no re-growth is possible. The translocation of the peptide into the cell interior and its complexation with intracellular nucleotides, including the alarmon ppGpp, can explain its anti-biofilm effect. The successful treatment of persistently infected root canals of two volunteers confirms the high effectiveness of GS. The broad GS activity towards resistant, biofilm-forming E. faecalis suggests its applications for approval in root canal medication. PMID:27618065

  17. Comparison of efficacy of pulverization and sterile paper point techniques for sampling root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenny T; Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Shabahang, Shahrokh; Retamozo, Bonnie; Aprecio, Raydolfo M; Chen, Jung-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the pulverization and sterile paper point techniques for sampling root canals using 5.25% NaOCl/17% EDTA and 1.3% NaOCl/MTAD (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK) as irrigation regimens. Single-canal extracted human teeth were decoronated and infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Roots were randomly assigned to 2 irrigation regimens: group A with 5.25% NaOCl/17% EDTA (n = 30) and group B with 1.3% NaOCl/MTAD (n = 30). After chemomechanical debridement, bacterial samplings were taken using sterile paper points and pulverized powder of the apical 5 mm root ends. The sterile paper point technique did not show growth in any samples. The pulverization technique showed growth in 24 of the 60 samples. The Fisher exact test showed significant differences between sampling techniques (P technique showed no difference between irrigation regimens. However, 17 of the 30 roots in group A and 7 of the 30 roots in group B resulted in growth as detected by pulverization technique. Data showed a significant difference between irrigation regimens (P = .03) in pulverization technique. The pulverization technique was more efficacious in detecting viable bacteria. Furthermore, this technique showed that 1.3% NaOCl/MTAD regimen was more effective in disinfecting root canals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Influence of instrument size and varying electrical resistance of root canal instruments on accuracy of three electronic root canal length measurement devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, V; Singla, M; Bhasin, S S

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of instrument size and the effect of the electrical resistance of endodontic instruments on the accuracy of three electronic root canal length measurement devices (ERCLMDs). Thirty single-rooted extracted human teeth were divided into three groups (n = 10) on the basis of the ERCLMD used: Root ZX II (J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan); ProPex (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland); and iPex II (NSK, Tochigi, Japan). The electronic working length measurements (EWL) were made with K-files in the sequence sizes 08, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30. The actual working length (AWL) was calculated by fixing a size 30 K-file in the canal and exposing the apical 5 mm of the root. The minor foramen was identified under an optical microscope, and its distance from the file tip was calculated. The accuracy of the ERCLMDs was evaluated in terms of percentages of accurate measurements (0.0 mm tolerance) and measurements with tolerance limits of ±0.5 mm and ±1.0 mm. The findings were analysed with the McNemar test, Pearson's chi-square tests and two-way analysis of variance. The multiple comparison procedures were carried out using Holm-Sidak method. The maximum electrical resistance tolerated by ERCLMDs was evaluated by connecting commercially available resistors between the file clip and the root canal instrument. The resistance was gradually increased until it started to affect the ERCLMD readings. The ERCLMDs were able to actually locate the minor foramen in 7% of samples. File size did not affect the accuracy of ERCLMDs (P > 0.05). Overall, the ERCLMDs gave 65% readings within a tolerance limit of ±0.5 mm and 90% within a tolerance of ±1.0 mm. The electrical resistance of endodontic files was less than the maximum electrical resistance tolerated by ERCLMDs (0.6-1 Ω vs. 2500-4000 Ω). The size of the root canal instrument did not affect the accuracy of ERCLMDs in this laboratory study. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John

  19. Single visit root canal treatment: A prospective study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-31

    Aug 31, 2013 ... except third molars in the upper and lower jaws. Teeth having irreversible .... been previously root treated, required surgical endodontic treatment or had ... for pain, swelling, mobility, tenderness to percussion, and periapical ...

  20. Conventional Versus Digital Radiography in Detecting Root Canal Type in Maxillary Premolars: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahkameh Moshfeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Successful endodontic therapy depends on adequate mechanical and chemical debridement of the canal which requires knowledge of the canal morphology. Conventional radiography has been used to evaluate the canal type; however, direct digital radiography has recently been practiced for this purpose due to the shortcomings of conventional radiography. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of digital and conventional radiography taken at 0° and 30° angles in the diagnosis of the canal type of extracted maxillary premolars.Materials and Methods: This diagnostic study was performed on 90 extracted maxillary premolars. Conventional and digital radiographies were taken of all teeth at 0° and 30° horizontal angles. The images were assessed by an oral and maxillofacial radiologist. The clearing technique was used as the gold standard. The canal type was determined using Weine classification. The agreement between each one of the 4 radiographic modalities and gold standard was determined by kappa statistics.Results: The kappa values for the agreement of parallel conventional, 30° conventional, parallel digital and 30° digital modalities with the clearing technique were 0.059, 0.215, 0.043 and 0.391, respectively. Parallel modalities were unable to determine the tooth canal type. Radiographic images taken at 30° significantly determined the canal type, although only a poor level of agreement was noted between the two modalities and the clearing technique.Conclusion: All modalities had limited value to determine the root canal type in maxillary premolars. However, direct digital imaging taken at 30° angle showed the highest accuracy for canal type assessment.

  1. 自制牙胶尖在粗大根管的根管治疗中的临床观察%Homemade gutta percha root canal therapy clinical observation in the thick root canal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽君

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the use of homemade gut a percha in 25 cases of 29 thick root canal treatment and root canal therapy summarize the experience. Methods:29 root canals are not ful y developed forming residual root and crown root canal treatment, fol ow-up of 2 years of treatment effect was observed. Results:29 thick root canal in root canal treatment, 25 root canal tooth produce good results after chemical root canals, three teeth only for mechanical root canal preparation without teeth for the first time prepared for chemical root canal treatment fails, the use of chemical preparation to re-root fil ing effect is good, a recurrent fistula and tooth extraction. Homemade gut a percha is not overfil ed happen. Conclusion:The use of chemical methods for coarse root canal must be prepared, using homemade gut a percha root canal fil ing can form a good apical closure.%目的:观察采用自制牙胶尖在25例29个粗大根管的根管治疗效果并总结治疗经验。方法:对29个根管未完全发育成形的残根、残冠进行根管治疗,随访2年观察治疗效果。结果:29个粗大根管在根管治疗过程中,25个牙经化学根管预备后即产生良好的根充效果,3个牙仅作机械根管预备而未作化学预备的患牙首次根管治疗失败,采用化学预备重新根充效果良好,1个牙反复出现瘘管而拔除。自制牙胶尖未发生超充情况。结论:利用化学方法对粗大根管进行预备是必须的,采用自制牙胶尖进行根管充填能形成良好的根尖封闭。

  2. Hand and ultrasonic instrumentation for orthograde root canal treatment of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pedrazzi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Root canal treatment is a frequently performed dental procedure and is carried out on teeth in which irreversible pulpitis has led to necrosis of the dental pulp. Removal of the necrotic tissue remnants and cleaning and shaping of the root canal are important phases of root canal treatment. Treatment options include the use of hand and rotary instruments and methods using ultrasonic or sonic equipment. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this systematic review of randomized controlled trials were to determine the relative clinical effectiveness of hand instrumentation versus ultrasonic instrumentation alone or in conjunction with hand instrumentation for orthograde root canal treatment of permanent teeth. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The search strategy retrieved 226 references from the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (7, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (12, MEDLINE (192, EMBASE (8 and LILACS (7. No language restriction was applied. The last electronic search was conducted on December 13th, 2007. Screening of eligible studies was conducted in duplicate and independently. RESULTS: Results were to be expressed as fixed-effect or random-effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes with 95% confdence intervals. Heterogeneity was to be investigated including both clinical and methodological factors. No eligible randomized controlled trials were identifed. CONCLUSIONS: This review illustrates the current lack of published or ongoing randomized controlled trials and the unavailability of high-level evidence based on clinically relevant outcomes referring to the effectiveness of ultrasonic instrumentation used alone or as an adjunct to hand instrumentation for orthograde root canal treatment. In the absence of reliable research-based evidence, clinicians should base their decisions on clinical experience, individual circumstances and in conjunction with patients

  3. Er:YAG and alexandrite laser radiation propagation in root canal and its effect on bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, H; Dostálová, T; Dusková, J; Krátký, M; Miyagi, M; Shoji, S; Sulc, J; Nemec, M

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the bactericidal effect of the Er:YAG (wavelength 2.94 microm) and the Alexandrite (wavelength 0.75 microm) laser radiation. The spreading laser energy in the surrounding hard dental tissues round the root canal was evaluated and the bactericidal effect of both these different laser wavelengths was analyzed. The use of a laser to clean and shape the root canal space is the latest method used for cleaning of root canals. The interest in laser endodontics was concentrated on the possibility to extirpate the contents of the root canal, to sterilize and to "melt" the walls of the root canals. The previous reports were performed with CO2, excimer, argon, Nd:YAG, Ho:YAG, and Er:YAG lasers. Er:YAG laser system (2.94 microm, energy 100 mJ or 300 mJ, repetition rate 1 Hz, 30 pulses) and alexandrite laser system (0.75 microm, energy 250 mJ, repetition rate 1 Hz, 30 pulses) were prepared and three experimental arrangements were used during the measurements. First the energy transport through the tooth tissue was observed (frontal and side experimental setups) and then, the bactericidal effect was evaluated. It was demonstrated that due to the absorption in the hydroxyapatite and water content in the dentin, the Er:YAG laser radiation is fully absorbed in the root canal wall. This direct influence of the radiation could be expected only close to the sapphire tip. It was found that the tissue, which was not directly affected by the laser radiation, cannot be disinfected by the subablative effect of Er:YAG laser radiation. In the second part of the experiment the real bactericidal effect of Er:YAG ablative energy (300 mJ) could be observed. It was also shown that the alexandrite laser radiation with a wavelength of 0.75 microm spreads through the canal system space and leaks into the surrounding tooth tissues. Both lasers have bactericidal effect. The pulsed Er:YAG and alexandrite lasers can be efficiently used for killing dental

  4. Influence of root curvature’s initial position on apical deviation occurrence after oscillatory preparation in simulated root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago André Fontoura de Melo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: This study aimed to analyze the influence of root curvature’s initial position on apical deviation occurrence after oscillatory system preparation. Material and methods: For this purpose, we used twenty simulated root canals with 21 mm length and 30 degree angle, which were divided into two experimental groups according to curvature’s initial position: 8 mm (group A and 12 mm (group B short of the canal orifice. The canals were prepared using crown-down technique, and memory instrument was size #30. For apical deviation analysis, before and after preparation, canals were filled with Indian ink and standardly photographed with the aid of a platform. After that, the images were manipulated by Adobe Photoshop® software, through superimposing pre- and post-operative images. Deviation occurrence was measured 1 mm short of working length and at the middle of the curvature by using the ruler tool. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA with significance level set at 5%. Results: Although group B showed a significantly greater deviation mean than group A, no significant interaction was verified between the analysis site and the experimental group. Conclusion: According to the present data, it could be observed that the smaller the curvature radius, the greater the deviation. Concerning to the analysis site, it could be noted that the area 1 mm short of working length presented a higher deviation than the point at the middle of the curvature.

  5. Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Cement As a Root Canal Sealer Filling Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement for root end sealing was obtained by mixing α-tricalcium phosphate and additives with an aqueous solution of citric. Powder and liquid were mixed at a ratio of 1.25g/mL. The biocompatibility of this material was investigated primarily by subcutaneous implantation tests. Then calcium phosphate cement was used to fill three adult dogs' root canal, both calcium hydroxide paste and hydroxyapatite paste as control. The animals were killed at 4,12,20 weeks postoperatively respectively. The effects of different materials on the apical closure, restoration of periapical tissues and adaptability to the dentinal surface were examined by optical and electronic microscope. The observation at 20 weeks shows that the calcium phosphate cement has the potentialities of being a root canal sealer filling material available for pulpless teeth with open-apex and destructive periapical tissue.

  6. Comparative scanning electron microscopy evaluation of Canal Brushing technique, sonic activation, and master apical file for the removal of triple antibiotic paste from root canal (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Ashoksingh Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare and evaluate the effectiveness of Canal Brushing technique, sonic activation, and master apical file (MAF for the removal of triple antibiotic paste (TAP from root canal using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two single rooted teeth were instrumented with ProTaper up to the size number F2 and dressed with TAP. TAP was removed with Canal Brush technique (Group I, n: 6, sonic (EndoActivator (Group II, n: 6, and MAF (Group III, n: 6. Four teeth served as positive (n: 2 and negative (n: 2 controls. The roots were split in the buccolingual direction and prepared for SEM examination (×1000 at coronal, middle, and apical third. Three examiners evaluated the wall cleanliness. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Kruskal–Wallis test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Difference in cleanliness between three groups is statistically significant in cervical region only. Pairwise comparison in cervical region Canal Brush and sonic activation showed more removal of TAP than MAF. Conclusions: Canal Brush and sonic activation system showed better result than MAF in the cervical and middle third of canal. In the apical third, none of the techniques showed a better result. None of the techniques showed complete removal of TAP from the canal.

  7. Transparent tooth model: A study of root canal morphology using different reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The complexity of root canal morphology has fascinated the imaginations of many. Several techniques have been tried in the past to view the three-dimensional anatomy of the pulp canal system with varied success. It has been hypothesized in the present study that a combination of decalcifying agent and clearing agent can be used to prepare transparent tooth model. Aims: The aim of the present study was to access the efficacy of two decalcifying agent (formic acid and nitric acid and two clearing agents (methyl salicylate and eugenol to prepare transparent tooth model. Materials and Methods: The study material included 80 freshly extracted teeth both maxillary and mandibular. After decalcifying and clearing of the specimen, they were graded for transparency and haziness criteria. Results: The results of the present study indicated that methyl salicylate when used as a clearing agent showed better transparency, lower level of haziness and good root canal morphology. On the other hand samples cleared by eugenol showed good root canal morphology but lesser transparency and higher degree of haziness and yellowing of samples, more so when used in combination with nitric acid. Conclusion: It was concluded by the present study that combination of nitric acid when used with methyl salicylate proved to be the best combination for the preparation of the transparent tooth model.

  8. Radiographic Evaluation of Root Canal Fillings Accomplished by Undergraduate Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Hamidreza; Samiei, Mohammad; Shahi, Shahriar; Borna, Zahra; Abdollahi, Amir Ardalan; Ghiasvand, Negar; Shariati, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic quality of root canal fillings by fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-year undergraduate students at Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry between 2006 and 2012. Methods and Materials: A total of 1183 root canal fillings in 620 teeth were evaluated by two investigators (and in case of disagreement by a third investigator) regarding the presence or absence of under-fillings, over-fillings and perforations. For each tooth, preoperative, working and postoperative radiographs were checked. The Pearson’s chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of the data. Inter-examiner agreement was measured by Cohen’s kappa (k) values. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Total frequencies of over-filling, under-filling and perforation were 5.6%, 20.4% and 1.9%, respectively. There were significant differences between frequencies of over- and under-fillings (P<0.05). Unacceptable quality, under- and over-fillings were detected in 27.9% of 1183 evaluated canals. Conclusion: The technical quality of root canal therapies performed by undergraduate dental students using step-back preparation and lateral compaction techniques was unacceptable in almost one-fourth of the cases. PMID:25834598

  9. Comparing irradiation parameters on disinfecting enterrecoccus faecalis in root canal disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarp, Ayşe. S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Although conventional method carries all the debris, studies on persisting infections in root canals show bacteria and their toxins spread from the root canal and contaminate the apical region. Thus developes apical periodontitis or symptoms, and loss of tooth. Even if the treatment has adequate success, anatomy of root canal system can be very complexwith accessory canals. The disinfecting effect of laser radiation has only recently been used in dentistry. Laser irradiation has a bactericidal effect. Each wavelength has its own advantages and limitations according to their different absorption characteristics, depending on their 'absorption coefficient'. The sterilizing efficiency of two types of wavelengths, a new fiber laser 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser and an 2940 nm Er:YAG Laser were compared in this study. Irradiation with a power of 0.50 W with 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser disinfected 95,15% of bacteria, however irradiation with same laser power with Er:YAG Laser caused a reduction of 96,48 %. But there was no significant difference in the disinfection effect of two different laser groups ( p < 0.05, Mann- U-Whitney Test). In addition to this, Er :YAG Laser caused three times more reduction from its own positive control group where 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser caused 2,5 times effective disinfection.

  10. In vitro study of calcium hydroxide removal from mandibular molar root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingzhi; Shen, Ya; Yang, Yan; Gao, Yuan; Wan, Pan; Gan, Yan; Patel, Payal; Curtis, Allison; Khakpour, Mehrzad; Haapasalo, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the difficulty in removing calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) paste from the root canals before root filling. Mesial and distal canals of 30 mandibular molars were prepared with the WaveOne Primary (25/.08) and Large file (40/.08) (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), respectively. All canals were then filled with Ca(OH)2. The teeth were divided into the following 3 treatment groups (each with n = 10): (1) instrumentation with needle irrigation, (2) instrumentation with irrigation and passive ultrasonic activation (PUI), and (3) the GentleWave system (Sonendo, Inc, Laguna Hills, CA) without instrumentation. The irrigation time in each group was 7.5 minutes. To further test the efficiency of the GentleWave system, shorter times of 90 seconds were tested using water alone. Reconstructed micro-computed tomographic scans were used to measure the volume of the canals and Ca(OH)2 after instrumentation, initial filling of Ca(OH)2, and after its removal. The percentage of Ca(OH)2 remaining in the canals was calculated. None of the 10 teeth (30 canals) in the conventional irrigation and PUI groups were completely cleaned of Ca(OH)2 in 7.5 minutes. In the apical third of mesial and distal canals, respectively, conventional irrigation removed 47.82% ± 16.36% and 77.68% ± 12.82%, PUI removed 61.66% ± 25.54% and 88.85 ± 12.06%, and the GentleWave system removed significantly more Ca(OH)2 (P < .05) with 100% and 98.78% ± 3.84%. Additional experiments in 10 teeth, using only water as the irrigant, revealed that the GentleWave system removed 99.85% and 99.97% of Ca(OH)2 within 90 seconds without the use of any instruments in the mesial and distal canals, respectively. The study confirms the difficulty to remove Ca(OH)2 from root canals using conventional methods. The GentleWave system removed the paste within 90 seconds using water irrigation alone. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. In vivo determination of the frequency response of the tooth root canal impedance versus distance from the apical foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Marcos V H; Gamba, Humberto R; Ratzke, Alexandre S; Schneider, Fabio K; Maia, Joaquim M; Ramos, Carlos A S

    2007-01-01

    Working length (WL) determination is a key factor to the endodontic therapy or root canal treatment success. Almost all therapy procedures depend on this measure and the wrong WL determination may produce severe consequences, like post-therapeutic pain and the need of a new root canal treatment. Electronic foramen locators (EFL) have been replacing the traditional radiographic imaging as they are faster, easier to use and have a higher success rate when measuring WL. EFLs are based on the root canal impedance assessment between two electrodes: one fixed on the endodontic file that is inserted into the root canal, and the other positioned at oral mucosa membrane. There are only few reported studies that qualify or quantify the root canal impedance characteristics. The present work aims to determine the module of tooth root canal frequency response. The preliminary results show the frequency response module variation as a function of endodontic file position inside the root canal and reinforce the methods based on relative impedance over frequency analysis used in modern EFLs.

  12. [Engine-driven preparation of curved root canals: a platform to assess physical parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, O A; Kappeler, S; Bucher, W; Barbakow, F

    2001-01-01

    The number of engine-driven rotary instruments available on the market is steadily increasing. These instruments enable clinicians to prepare better shaped root canals, however, rotary instruments have a higher risk for fracture than hand instruments. Unfortunately, the stresses placed on engine-driven rotary instruments in curved canals are insufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to develop a device which could measure more accurately the physical parameters influencing rotary instruments in curved canals. For this purpose, a specially designed machine was constructed to measure the torque which develops between the rotary instrument and the motor. Apical forces and penetration depths could also be directly measured in real time. A variety of other measurements was also possible because of other special set-ups integrated into the device. In the current study torque was assessed for GT-Files, size 35 with a .12 and sizes 20 with a .12 to .06 taper. In additions to preparations in simulated canals in plastic blocks, the "ISO 3630-1 specification for fracture moment" and "number of cycles till fatigue fracture" was measured. The findings indicated that when instruments were used for preparations, torques up to 40 Nmm were present. This exceeded the static fracture load, which was less than than 13 Nmm for the size 20 with .12 taper. In contrast, the number of rotations were more than 10 times lower when shaping canals in plastic blocks with a 5 mm radius of curvature than the number of rotations to fracture in the "cyclic fatigue test". This suggests that a GT-instrument could be used in ten canals. The apical force was always greater than 1 N and occasionally, 8 N or more was recorded. Further studies on natural teeth with varying canal geometries are required using the specially developed torsional machine to reduce the incidence of instrument fracture. In this way an efficient clinical potential can be confirmed for engine-driven rotary instruments in

  13. Centering and transportation: in vitro evaluation of continuous and reciprocating systems in curved root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navós, Beatriz Vilas; Hoppe, Carolina Bender; Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Böttcher, Daiana Elizabeth; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2016-01-01

    Context: One of the goals of endodontic therapy is the shaping and cleaning of the root canal system. In recent years, there has been multiple systems instrumentation, and changes in their dynamics are central to maintain the original shape of the canal after preparation. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate centering and transportation in curved root canals after using ProTaper® and MTwo® in continuous rotation, Reciproc® in reciprocating motion, and a step-down manual instrumentation technique. Settings and Design: Mesiobuccal roots of human extracted the first and second maxillary molars were selected and the canals (n = 60) were divided into four groups according to the preparation techniques: PT-ProTaper®; MT-MTwo®; RE-Reciproc®; MI-manual instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: The final apical diameter was standardized to a size 25. Centering and transportation were evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography and Adobe Photoshop 8.0 software. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. Results: Results of transportation showed no statistical differences (P > 0.05) between groups, and significantly, difference (P ProTaper® and Reciproc® was found when evaluating centering ability in the apical third. Conclusions: We concluded that there were no differences in transportation between the evaluated systems for the preparation of curved root canals with an apical instrumentation diameter of #25. For centering ability, in the apical third, ProTaper® presented worst behavior when compared to Reciproc®. PMID:27656071

  14. Effectiveness of rotatory and reciprocating movements in root canal filling material removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal SILVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of reciprocating and rotary techniques for removing gutta-percha and sealer from root canals. Forty straight and oval single-rooted premolars were prepared up to size 30, filled with gutta-percha and sealer, and then randomly allocated to two experimental retreatment groups: ProTaper Retreatment System (PTRS and WaveOne System (WS. Procedural errors, time of retreatment and apically extruded material were recorded for all the roots. The roots were radiographed after retreatment. The percentage of residual material was calculated using image analysis software. The data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t tests, with a significance level set at 5%. No system completely removed the root filling material from the root canal. No significant differences were observed between the systems, in terms of residual filling material in any tested third (p > 0.05. WS was faster in removing filling material than PTRS (p< 0.05. Extrusion was observed in 4 cases in PTRS and in 5 cases in WS. No procedural errors were observed in either group. It can be concluded that although no differences were observed in the efficacy of PTRS and WS for removing root filling material, WS was faster than PTRS.

  15. Bacterial penetration of the root canal of intact incisor teeth after a simulated traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R M

    1996-12-01

    One of the aims in treating traumatised teeth is to maintain the vitality of the pulp or allow conditions favourable for pulp revascularisation. However, infection of the pulp and root canal system may prevent this. A number of pathways have been proposed that allow bacteria to invade the root canal system, however most of these pathways cannot account for pulp infection in teeth that did not sustain injury to the periodontal attachment. Enamel/dentine cracks have been proposed as a portal for bacterial invasion of seemingly intact teeth and the aim of this study was to determine if bacteria could invade the root canal system after a simulated traumatic episode. Twenty intact and sound upper central incisors were chosen and prepared. One tooth was selected as a sterility control and the external crown surface of the remaining 19 teeth was subjected to infection with Streptococcus gordonii in a bacterial microleakage model. Over 7 days samples of growth media from the root canal system were taken and tested for bacteria. Sixteen of the teeth did not demonstrate bacterial invasion over the time frame. These teeth were then prepared for testing in a pendulum impact device and were subjected to a blow which did not fracture the crowns or dislodge the tooth from its simulated alveolus. The teeth were then prepared and tested in the bacterial microleakage model. After impact seven of the teeth demonstrated bacterial invasion of the root canal system (P = 0.002). These teeth were then reprepared for testing in the bacterial microleakage model. The crowns of five teeth, selected at random, were coated with two layers of light cured unfilled resin, the remaining two were used as positive controls. All the teeth coated with resin did not demonstrate bacterial invasion (P = 0.00), while the positive controls demonstrated invasion. The results suggested that enamel/dentine infractions were pathways for bacterial invasion of the root canal system of traumatised teeth. The

  16. Root surface strain during canal shaping and its influence on apical microcrack development: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamleh, A; Komabayashi, T; Ebihara, A; Nassar, M; Watanabe, S; Yoshioka, T; Miyara, K; Suda, H

    2015-12-01

    To determine the root surface strain (RSS) generated during root canal shaping and its effects on apical microcrack development. Twenty-five extracted human mandibular premolars were selected and decoronated. The teeth were instrumented with either the ProTaper (PT) or WaveOne (WO) (Dentsply Maillefer) NiTi rotary systems (n = 10 per group) or used as controls (n = 5). Instrumented root canals were enlarged to ProTaper F4 (size 40, 0.06 taper) or using WaveOne LARGE (size 40, 0.08 taper) instruments according to the manufacturer's instructions. An electrical strain gage (KFG02-120-C1-16, Kyowa Dengyo, Tokyo, Japan) was fixed on the proximal root surface and connected to a strain amplifier via a bridge box in order to measure RSS. During canal shaping, the strain output of the amplifier was recorded. The instantaneous RSS induced by each instrument and the maximum RSSs were determined. All teeth were then stained with contrast media and imaged with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) at an isotropic resolution of 10 μm to detect microcracks. The mean maximum RSS values (microstrain) and mean number of microcracks recorded for both groups were tested for statistical significance using Mann-Whitney U-test. Presence/absence of microcracks in both groups was compared by chi-square tests. Increased baseline RSS from strain accumulation during canal shaping was observed, with similar maximum RSS (mean ± SD) for PT (416.6 ± 185.1 μstrain) and WO (398.2 ± 163.8 μstrain) (P = 0.94). The interevaluator reliability for microcrack detection using micro-CT had a kappa value of 0.998. Compared to the PT group, there was a trend for fewer samples with microcracks in the WO group (P = 0.051). On the micro-CT images, apical microcracks were detected in 20 PT and 11 WO samples (P = 0.10). The microcracks were observed in the buccolingual direction in all WO and 81% of PT samples. No vertical root fractures were found. The maximum RSS obtained during canal

  17. Effect of the smear layer in the removal of calcium hydroxide from root canal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Arslan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the smear layer influences the removal of calcium hydroxide from the root canal with manual or rotary instruments. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 48 freshly extracted single-rooted maxillary incisors were prepared to apical size 40 (n=40 and finally irrigated with sodium hypochlorite (group A, or ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA followed by sodium hypo chlorite (group B. 20 teeth were assigned to each group, while the remaining eight teeth served as positive and negative controls. Each group was divided into two subgroups of 10 teeth (subgroup I - calcium hydroxide was removed with master apical file; subgroup II - with profile file; and, in all removal procedures, citric acid was used for irrigation. The percentage of calcium hydroxide-[Ca(OH [Ca(OH 2 ] coated surface area was calculated by image processing analysis. Results: Considering the root canal as a whole, the removal of Ca(OH 2 from the dentinal walls in group B showed significantly better results (P<0.05 as compared to group A. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, it can be concluded that the smear layer is important in the removal of calcium hydroxide.

  18. Effect of root canal irrigating solutions on the compressive strength of tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraju, Lokhasudhan; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Gutmann, James L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of root canal irrigants on the compressive strength of hydraulic tricalcium silicate cements. Specimens (n = 60) of tricalcium silicate materials-Group 1: White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Group 2: NeoMTA Plus, Group 3: White MTA Angelus, and Group 4: Biodentine were exposed to one of the solutions (n = 20): Phosphate buffered saline (PBS; control), 3 % NaOCl, or 17 % EDTA for 5 min while being suspended in PBS. Compressive strength values were evaluated after 7 days of storage. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). Biodentine (BD) showed significantly higher compressive strength than the other materials (P Biodentine and NeoMTA Plus did not show a significant reduction in compressive strength when exposed to NaOCl. EDTA reduced the compressive strength of the cements tested. Tricalcium silicates were differentially influenced by root canal irrigants. It is essential to understand the composition of these materials prior to clinical use. Traces of irrigants from the root canal wall must be thoroughly removed.

  19. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced dental pulp stem cell migration. The root segment model in present study simulated clinical scenario and indicated that the current irrigation protocol released a significant amount of TGF-β1 but not bFGF. The growth factors released into root canal space induced dental pulp stem cell migration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical study of refractory apical periodontitis treated by apicectomy. Part 1. Root canal morphology of resected apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, M; Takase, T; Nakanuma, K; Arisue, K; Nagahama, F; Yamazaki, M

    1998-01-01

    The morphology of the root apex was analysed by observation of the anatomy of specimens obtained by apicoectomy in cases of refractory apical periodontitis that did not respond to nonsurgical root canal treatment. Apical ramifications were present in 19 (70%) of the roots, while one were found in the remaining eight (3%) roots. This frequency is far higher than that reported by other investigators, suggesting that there is a close relationship between the anatomical complexity of the root canal and the occurrence of refractory apical periodontitis.

  1. Micro-CT assessment of dentinal micro-cracks after root canal filling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, G; Belladonna, F G; Silva, E J N L; Souza, E M; Carvalhal, J C A; Perez, R; Lopes, R T; Versiani, M A

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the frequency of dentinal micro-cracks after root canal filling procedures with GuttaCore (GC), cold lateral compaction (CLC) and warm vertical compaction (WVC) techniques in mandibular molars using micro-computed tomographic analysis. Thirty mesial roots of mandibular molars, with a type II Vertucci's canal configuration, were prepared to working length with a Reciproc R40 instrument and randomly assigned to one of the three experimental groups (n = 10), according to the technique used for root filling: GC, CLC or WVC. The GC group was filled with a size 40 GC obturator, whilst CLC and WVC groups used conventional gutta-percha cones. AH Plus sealer was used in all groups. The specimens were scanned at an isotropic resolution of 14.25 μm before and after root canal preparation and after root filling. Then, all pre- and postoperative cross-sectional images of the roots (n = 41 660) were screened to identify the presence of dentinal defects. Overall, 30.75% (n = 12 810) of the pre- + post-filling images displayed dentinal defects. In the GC, CLC and WVC groups, dentinal micro-cracks were observed in 18.68% (n = 2510), 15.99% (n = 2389) and 11.34% (n = 1506) of the cross-sectional images, respectively. All micro-cracks identified in the post-filling scans were also observed in the corresponding post-preparation images. Root fillings in all techniques did not induce the development of new dentinal micro-cracks. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effectiveness of bonding fiber posts to root canals and composite core build-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Andreas; Haj-Omer, Dima; Muche, Rainer; Haller, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of fiber posts, silanization, and luting agents on the interfacial strength to root dentin and composite cores. Root canals of 120 crownless human teeth were instrumented. Three different posts (opaque and translucent), with and without silane treatment, were bonded using etch-and-rinse, self-etch, and self-adhesive luting agents. The restored roots were built up with dual-curing composite. After storage in water for 24 h at 37 degrees C, 2-mm-thick slices were cut from each sample: one from the composite core and one from the restored root. Interfacial push-out bond strengths of the posts were determined in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The post type and the luting agent had significant effects on both the post-to-dentin and post-to-core strengths. Silanization did not significantly influence post-to-dentin strengths, but enhanced post-to-core strengths. With etch-and-rinse luting agents, debonding occurred predominantly between the post and the cement, while the self-etch and self-adhesive luting agents showed more failures on root dentin. No failures occurred between the composite core and the cement. The combination of translucent posts and etch-and-rinse dual-curing luting agents can positively influence the retention of fiber posts in root canals. Silanization seems to be less relevant for intra-root canal bonding, but may have beneficial effects on post-to-core strengths.

  3. Effect of restoration technique on stress distribution in roots with flared canals: an FEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Sema; Eraslan, Öznur; Eraslan, Oğuz; Eskitaşcıoğlu, Gürcan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this finite element analysis (FEA) study was to test the effect of different restorative techniques on stress distribution in roots with flared canals. Five three-dimensional (3D) FEA models that simulated a maxillary incisor with excessive structure loss and flared root canals were created and restored with the following techniques/materials: 1) a prefabricated post: 2) one main and two accessory posts; 3) i-TFC post-core (Sun Medical); 4) the thickness of the root was increased by using composite resin and the root was then restored using a prefabricated post; 5) an anatomic post was created by using composite resin and a prefabricated glass-fiber post. Composite cores and ceramic crowns were created. A 300-N static load was applied at the center of the palatal surface of the tooth to calculate stress distributions. SolidWorks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FEA analysis. The analysis of the von Mises and tensile stress values revealed that prefabricated post, accessory post, and i-TFC post systems showed similar stress distributions. They all showed high stress areas at the buccal side of the root (3.67 MPa) and in the cervical region of the root (> 3.67 MPa) as well as low stress accumulation within the post space (0 to 1 MPa). The anatomic post kept the stress within its body and directed less stress towards the remaining tooth structure. The creation of an anatomic post may save the remaining tooth structure in roots with flared canals by reducing the stress levels.

  4. Engine-driven preparation of curved root canals: measuring cyclic fatigue and other physical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ove A; Kappeler, Stefan; Bucher, Willi; Barbakow, Fred

    2002-04-01

    An increasing number of engine-driven rotary systems are marketed to shape root canals. Although these systems may improve the quality of canal preparations, the risk for instrument fracture is also increased. Unfortunately, the stresses generated in rotary instruments when shaping curved root canals have not been adequately studied. Consequently, the aim of an ongoing project was to develop a measurement platform that could more accurately detail physical parameters generated in a simulated clinical situation. Such a platform was constructed by fitting a torque-measuring device between the rotating endodontic instrument and the motor driving it. Apically directed force and instrument insertion depth were also recorded. Additional devices were constructed to assess cyclic fatigue and static fracture loads. The current pilot study evaluated GT rotary instruments during the shaping of curved canals in plastic blocks as well as "ISO 3630-1 torque to fracture" and number of rotations required for fatigue fracture. Results indicated that torques in excess of 40 Nmm were generated by rotary GT-Files, a significantly higher figure than static fracture loads (less than 13 Nmm for the size 20. 12 GT-File). Furthermore, the number of rotations needed to shape simulated canals with a 5 mm radius of curvature in plastic blocks was 10 times lower than the number of rotations needed to fracture instruments in a "cyclic fatigue test". Apical forces were always greater than 1 N, and in some specimens, scores of 8 N or more were recorded. Further studies are required using extracted natural teeth, with their wide anatomical variation, in order to reduce the incidence of fracture of rotary instruments. In this way, the clinical potential of engine-driven rotary instruments to safely prepare curved canals can be fully appreciated.

  5. In vitro evaluation of efficacy of different rotary instrument systems for gutta percha removal during root canal retreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Mercy; Malhotra, Amit; Rao, Murali; Sharma, Abhimanyu; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Complete removal of old filling material during root canal retreatment is fundamental for predictable cleaning and shaping of canal anatomy. Most of the retreatment methods tested in earlier studies have shown inability to achieve complete removal of root canal filling. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of three different rotary nickel titanium retreatment systems and Hedstrom files in removing filling material from root canals. Material and Methods Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were decoronated to leave 15 mm root. Specimen were hand instrumented and obturated using gutta percha and AH plus root canal sealer. After storage period of two weeks, roots were retreated with three (Protaper retreatment files, Mtwo retreatment files, NRT GPR) rotary retreatment instrument systems and Hedstroem files. Subsequently, samples were sectioned longitudinally and examined under stereomicroscope. Digital images were recorded and evaluated using Digital Image Analysing Software. The retreatment time was recorded for each tooth using a stopwatch. The area of canal and the residual filling material was recorded in mm2 and the percentage of remaining filling material on canal walls was calculated. Data was analysed using ANOVA test. Results Significantly less amount of residual filling material was present in protaper and Mtwo instrumented teeth (p Protaper instruments also required lesser time during removal of filling material followed by Mtwo instruments, NRT GPR files and Hedstrom files. Conclusions None of the instruments were able to remove the filling material completely from root canal. Protaper universal retreatment system and Mtwo retreatment files were more efficient and faster compared to NRT GPR fles and Hedstrom files. Key words:Gutta-percha removal, nickel titanium, root canal retreatment, rotary instruments. PMID:27703601

  6. Ex vivo evaluation of coronal and apical microbial leakage of root canal - Filled with gutta-percha or Resilon/Epiphany root canal filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Almeida-Gomes Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This ex vivo study compared coronal and apical microleakage of root canals filled with Resilon/Epiphany (RE or gutta-percha/Grossman sealer (GP, using either lateral condensation (LC or System B (SB technique. Materials and Methods: Specimens in eight experimental groups were obturated using the following materials and techniques: Groups 1 and 3 - GP and LC; groups 2 and 4 - GP and SB; groups 5 and 7 - RE and LC; groups 6 and 8 - RE and SB. Apical and coronal leakages were tested using bacterial methods. For coronal analysis, the number of days required for complete contamination of the root canals was recorded according to observation of the brain heart infusion broth turbidity for 15 weeks. For apical analysis, the teeth were cleaved and the leakage was measured at 30 days. Data were collected for each sample and analyzed statistically with the Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results: Leakage was found in all groups. The difference between filling materials, obturation techniques, and median time of leakage was not statistically significant for coronal ( P=0.847 and apical ( P=0.5789 leakages. Conclusion: There were no differences between the different filling materials (gutta-percha/Grossman sealer and Resilon/Epiphany and obturation techniques (lateral condensation and system B technique in coronal or apical leakages.

  7. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  8. Profiling of root canal bacterial communities associated with chronic apical periodontitis from Brazilian and Norwegian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Debelian, Gilberto J; Carmo, Flávia L; Paiva, Simone S M; Alves, Flávio R F; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bacterial community profiles of the root canal microbiota associated with chronic apical periodontitis from Brazilian and Norwegian patients using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) approaches. DNA extracted from root canal samples was subjected to polymerase chain reaction using primers appropriate for further DGGE or RISA analysis. The resulting banding patterns representative of the bacterial community structures in samples from the two locations were compared. DGGE and RISA fingerprints showed a great interindividual variability in the bacterial community profiles, irrespective of the geographic location of the patient. However, similarities among the bacterial community DGGE profiles revealed the existence of a geography-related pattern.

  9. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident-An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina; Cristache, Corina Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur.

  10. [Effect of compound Chinese traditional medicine on infected root canal bacteria biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Li-li; Xia, Wen-wei; Zhu, Cai-lian; Ye, Dong-xia

    2010-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of compound Chinese traditional medicine(CTM), which composed of gallic acid, magnolol and polysaccharide of Blettila striata, against the infected root canal bacterial biofilm. Actinomyces viscosus (Av), Enterococcus faecalis (Ef), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) were composed to form biofilm, then confocal laser scan microscope (CLSM) was used to observe and study the bacterial activity. SAS6.12 software package was used for statistical analysis. The biofilm thickness reduced after treatment by both CTM and ZnO (P>0.05),while there was a significant decrease of the percentage of vital bacterias after treatment by CTM (P<0.01). The compound Chinese traditional medicine is effective on biofilm control, so that it would be an effective disinfecting drug for root canal sealers. Supported by Research Fund of Bureau of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.2008L008A).

  11. The biocompatibility evaluation of epoxy resin-based root canal sealers in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Li, Huei; Kao, Chia-Tze

    2002-01-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH26 and AH-Plus were determined in vitro. Root canal sealers were eluted for 24 h in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and diluted in culture medium. Cytotoxic effects were assessed using the MTT [tetrazolium dye, 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, C18H16N5SBr] assay for mitochondrial enzyme activity and also the cell viability. Genotoxicity assays were assessed using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) for DNA damage measurement. Result indicated that both the AH26 and AH-Plus sealers exhibited a dose-dependent increase in astrocyte toxic effects. Additionally, dose-dependent astrocyte DNA damage was also noted for both sealers. Therefore, these epoxy resin-based sealers, AH26 and AH-Plus demonstrated both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in vitro.

  12. Biocompatibility of a new epoxy resin-based root canal sealer in subcutaneous tissue of rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Neslihan; Akinci, Levent; Gecor, Orhan; Alan, Hilal; Ahmetoglu, Fuat; Taslidere, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the subcutaneous biocompatibility of two root canal sealers. Materials and Methods: Thirty female rats were distributed into two groups of 15 animals. Each received subcutaneous dorsal implants: Silicone tubes filled with AH Plus or Obtuseal. After the 11th, 14th, and 45th days, tissues were collected for biopsy and fixed and processed for histologic evaluation. Observations of the cellular inflammatory components, such as lymphocytes and macrophages, were made. The data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Connover tests (P 0.05). Conclusion: After 45 days, Obtuseal yielded a satisfactory tissue reaction; it was biocompatible when tested in subcutaneous rat tissue. On the basis of the obtained results, it was concluded that Obtuseal root canal sealer caused a satisfactory tissue reaction as AH plus, because it was biocompatible when tested in the subcutaneous tissue of rats. PMID:25713481

  13. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani, Mohsen; zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  14. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur. PMID:27672458

  15. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident—An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Elisabeta Ciobanu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur.

  16. An investigation on the antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy of cationic nanoparticulates for root canal disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, Anil; Shi, Zhilong; Shrestha, Annie; Neoh, Koon Gee

    2008-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy of cationic nanoparticulates for root canal disinfection. Experiments were performed in two stages. In stage 1, experiments were conducted to examine the physical properties of three types of nanoparticulates. The antibacterial properties of nanoparticulates alone and nanoparticulates mixed with zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer were studied. In stage 2, the ability of nanoparticulates-treated dentin to prevent bacterial adherence was examined. Zinc oxide nanoparticulates, chitosan nanoparticulates, a mixture of zinc oxide and chitosan nanoparticulates, and zinc oxide nanoparticulates with multilayered coating of chitosan were tested. This study showed that the incorporation of nanoparticulates did not alter the flow characteristics of sealer but improved the direct antibacterial property and the ability to leach out antibacterial components. There was a significant reduction in the adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to nanoparticulates-treated dentin (p < 0.05). These experiments highlighted the potential advantage of nanoparticulates in root canal disinfection.

  17. Complication of improper management of sodium hypochlorite accident during root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faras, Fatemah; Abo-Alhassan, Fawaz; Sadeq, Abdullah; Burezq, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) is a common irrigation solution used in root canal treatment. It has strong antibacterial and tissue dissolving properties. Nevertheless, it has some serious complications, some of which are life-threatening. A young male presented with severe chemical burn of the right infraorbital area and partial necrosis of the hard palate resulting from extrusion of NaOCl during root canal treatment of the upper right 2(nd) molar tooth. The patient had a facial scar, and mucosal damage healed nearly completely. Several precautions must be taken during NaOCl use to prevent the spread of the solution into surrounding tissues. Early recognition of NaOCl accident and proper immediate management are important to achieve the best possible outcome.

  18. Bismuth subcarbonate as filler particle for an Epoxy-based root canal sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schwartzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the addition of bismuth subcarbonate with different concentrations regarding the rheological properties of an experimental epoxy-based root canal sealer. Materials and Methods: Endodontic sealers were prepared with epoxy resin-based sealer with bismuth subcarbonate additions of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 100%, and 120%. Flow, film thickness, working time, setting time, dimensional change, sorption, solubility, and cytotoxicity were studied according to the ISO standards. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and Tukey multiple comparisons were used, with a significance level of 5%. Results: The flow, working time, water sorption, and solubility significantly decreased and the film thickness and dimensional change increased with higher filler particle addition. There were no statistically significant differences for setting time and cytotoxicity between the filler particle proportions. Conclusion: Experimental resin-based sealer with bismuth subcarbonate addition up to 40% can be an alternative for root canal sealer.

  19. Evaluation of imaging reformation for root and pulp canal shapes of permanent teeth using a cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jong Hyun; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To estimate the shape of root and pulp canal using a dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to evaluate the accuracy of imaging reformation. CBCT images were obtained with incisors, premolars, and molars as the destination by using PSR 9000N {sup TM} Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Inc, USA) cone beam CT unit that have different kind of detector and field of view, and compared these with the shape and the size of actual root and root canal. When the measuring value of cone beam computed tomography concerning to each root's bucco-lingual diameter and mesio-distal diameter was compared with the value of the actual root, it reveals an error range -0.49 {approx} +0.63 mm at PSR900N and -0.97 {approx} +1.14 mm at i-CAT (P>0.05). It was possible to identify and measure PSR 9000N {sup T}M Dental CT system to the limit 0.48{+-}0.06 mm (P>0.05) and i-CAT CBCT to the limit 0.86{+-}0.09 mm (P<0.05) on estimating the size and the shape of root canal. Two kinds of CBCT images revealed the useful reproducibility to estimate the shape of root, but there was the difference to estimate the shape of root according to apparatus. The reproducibility of root shape in the image of three-dimensions at PSR 900N is low such as 0.65 mm in a case of minute root canal. CBCT images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation for root and pulp and clinically CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of root and canal. However, these are different qualities of imaging reformation according to CBCT apparatus and limitation of reproducibility for minute root canals.

  20. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Sahebi, Safoora; Moazami, Fariborz; Afsa, Masoomeh; Nabavi Zade, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intuba-tion procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours) on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods Eighty patients whose ro...

  1. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šnjarić, Damir; Čarija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kovačević, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  2. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice; Giuseppina Cutroneo; Antonio Centofanti; Alessandro Artemisia; Ennio Bramanti; Angela Militi; Giuseppina Rizzo; Angelo Favaloro; Alessia Irrera; Roberto Lo Giudice; Marco Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Ob...

  3. Secondary protective seal of root canal fillings performed under simulated clinical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Johannes Roggendorf

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated sealing properties of root canal fillings with an additional composite barrier. The null hypothesis tested was that different sealers and different methods of sealer removal did not influence microleakage. Material and methods: Eighty extracted human molars with fully mature apices had root canal prepared to size 60 taper .02 and divided into eight groups: three experimental groups for each sealer and negative/positive control (n = 10 each. Teeth of experimental groups were mounted into the molar region of a training puppet to simulate clinical conditions. Root canals were filled with AH Plus or GuttaFlow and gutta-percha. Excess sealer was removed with: ethanol-moistened foam pellet only, additional preparation with a water-cooled diamond bur or additional etch-and-rinse procedure (37% phosphoric acid gel. All procedures were carried out until clean as judged by the naked eye. In all groups except the positive control Syntac was applied to the access cavity. Tetric flow was applied in two increments of 1 mm each. A dye penetration test was carried out by centrifugation for 3 min at 30 G within 5% methylene blue dye. Statistical evaluation was carried out with PASW 18.0 (α = 0.05. Results: Although the two sealers had different chemical composition, sealer exhibited no influence on the results, whereas technique of sealer removal did (Two-way-ANOVA, p < 0.001. Groups with “foam pellet” or “bur preparation” showed significantly more leakage than groups with “etch-and rinse” (SNK, p < 0.05. Conclusion: Applying an etch-and-rinse procedure prior to Syntac may be beneficial for the adhesive seal over root canal fillings.

  4. Development of a multispecies biofilm community by four root canal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez de Paz, Luis E

    2012-03-01

    The development of multispecies biofilm models are needed to explain the interactions that take place in root canal biofilms during apical periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of 4 root canal bacteria to establish a multispecies biofilm community and to characterize the main structural, compositional, and physiological features of this community. Four clinical isolates isolated from infected root canals, Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus salivarius, Streptococcus gordonii, and Enterococcus faecalis, were grown together in a miniflow cell system. Simultaneous detection of the 4 species in the biofilm communities was achieved by fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with confocal microscopy at different time points. The LIVE/DEAD BacLight technique (Molecular Probes, Carlsbad, CA) was used to assess cell viability and to calculate 3-dimensional architectural parameters such as biovolume (μm(3)). Redox fluorescence dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride was used to assess the metabolic activity of biofilm bacteria. The 4 species tested were able to form stable and reproducible biofilm communities. The biofilms formed in rich medium generally showed continuous growth over time, however, in the absence of glucose biofilms showed significantly smaller biovolumes. A high proportion of viable cells (>90%) were generally observed, and biofilm growth was correlated with high metabolic activity of cells. The community structure of biofilms formed in rich medium did not change considerably over the 120-hour period, during which E. faecalis, L. salivarius, and S. gordonii were most abundant. The ability of 4 root canal bacteria to form multispecies biofilm communities shown in this study give insights into assessing the community lifestyle of these microorganisms in vivo. This multispecies model could be useful for further research simulating stresses representative of in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2012 American

  5. Microbiome in the Apical Root Canal System of Teeth with Post-Treatment Apical Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José F.; Antunes, Henrique S.; Rôças, Isabela N.; Rachid, Caio T. C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bacteria present in the apical root canal system are directly involved with the pathogenesis of post-treatment apical periodontitis. This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in cryopulverized apical root samples from root canal-treated teeth with post-treatment disease. Methods Apical root specimens obtained during periradicular surgery of ten adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis were cryogenically ground. DNA was extracted from the powder and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. Results All samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 11 phyla and 103 genera composed by 538 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% of dissimilarity. Over 85% of the sequences belonged to 4 phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria. In general, these 4 phyla accounted for approximately 80% of the distinct OTUs found in the apical root samples. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in 6/10 samples. Fourteen genera had representatives identified in all cases. Overall, the genera Fusobacterium and Pseudomonas were the most dominant. Enterococcus was found in 4 cases, always in relatively low abundance. Conclusions This study showed a highly complex bacterial community in the apical root canal system of adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. This suggests that this disease is characterized by multispecies bacterial communities and has a heterogeneous etiology, because the community composition largely varied from case to case. PMID:27689802

  6. Tissue reaction to Endométhasone sealer in root canal fillings short of or beyond the apical foramen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Suzuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the response of periapical tissues to the endodontic sealer Endométhasone in root canal fillings short of or beyond the apical foramen. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty root canals of premolars and incisors of 2 mongrel dogs were used. After coronal access and pulp extirpation, the canals were instrumented up to a size 55 K-file and the apical cemental barrier was penetrated with a size 15 K-file to obtain a main apical foramen, which was widened to a size 25 K-file. The canals were irrigated with saline at each change of file. The root canals were obturated either short of or beyond the apical foramen by the lateral condensation of gutta-percha and Endométhasone, originating 2 experimental groups: G1: Endométhasone/short of the apical foramen; G2: Endométhasone/beyond the apical foramen. The animals were killed by anesthetic overdose 90 days after endodontic treatment. The individual roots were obtained and serial histological sections were prepared for histomorphological analysis (H&E and Brown & Brenn techniques under light microscopy. The following parameters were examined: closure of the apical foramen of the main root canal and apical opening of accessory canals, apical cementum resorption, intensity of the inflammatory infiltrate, presence of giant cells and thickness and organization of the apical periodontal ligament. Each parameter was scored 1 to 4, 1 being the best result and 4 the worst. Data were analyzed statistically by the Wilcoxon nonparametric tests (p=0.05. RESULTS: Comparing the 2 groups, the best result (p<0.05 was obtained with root canal filling with Endométhasone short of the apical foramen but a chronic inflammatory infiltrate was present in all specimens. CONCLUSIONS: Limiting the filling material to the root canal space apically is important to determine the best treatment outcome when Endométhasone is used as sealer.

  7. [Deformations occurring in the apical third of curved root canals during biomechanical preparation using manual impulsion-traction techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig Cayón, M; Basilio Monné, J; Canalda Sahli, C

    1990-01-01

    Apical deformations, specially zips and elbows, during instrumentation of the root canals, are studied. The authors study why do they appear, their effect on endodontic therapy, and the way of avoiding them.

  8. Management of a mandibular molar with C-shape root canal using spiral computed tomography as a diagnostic aid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niharika Jain; Kabbur Chandrashekar; Abhishek Gupta; Permanand Makhija

    2014-01-01

    .... An accurate assessment of this unusual morphology was made with the help of spiral CT. This report extends the range of known possible anatomical variations to include teeth with an abnormal number of roots and canals...

  9. The quality of single cone and laterally compacted gutta-percha fillings in small and curved root canals as evidenced by bidirectional radiographs and fluid transport measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.K. Wu; M.G. Bud; P.R. Wesselink

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the quality of root fillings in small and curved root canals using bidirectional radiographs and fluid transport (FT) measurements. Study design: Root canals in eighty 38°-curved mesial roots of mandibular molars were prepared using a balanced force te

  10. [Management of apicectomy and root canal obturation completed one time under direct vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi-bo; Zhu, Qiang; Cao, Zhi-zhong

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of apicectomy and root canal obturation completed one time under direct vision on chronic periapical periodontitis of anterior teeth. 34 cases(40 teeth) with RCT failing or larger periodontal lesion, which couldn't be cured depending on RCT only, were chosen for this clinical study. They were randomly divided into two groups with 20 teeth in each group. Root canal obturation was done after apicectomy under direct vision(group A),or apicectomy was done after RCT(group B).The time of filling process, the ratio of postobturation pain, the obturation quality and short-term efficiency of the treatment were assessed. The data were separately subjected to t test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test with SPSS12.0 software package. The time of filling process in group A was significantly less than group B (Papicectomy and root canal obturation completed one time under direct vision is rapid, simple and effective in treating chronic periapical periodontitis of anterior teeth.The short-term clinical therapeutic efficiency is similar to that of apicectomy done after RCT.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of New Chlorhexidine-Containing Nanoparticles for Root Canal Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Haseeb

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Root canal system disinfection is limited due to anatomical complexities. Better delivery systems of antimicrobial agents are needed to ensure efficient bacteria eradication. The purpose of this study was to design chlorhexidine-containing nanoparticles that could steadily release the drug. The drug chlorhexidine was encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol–block–poly(l-lactide (PEG–b–PLA to synthesize bilayer nanoparticles. The encapsulation efficiency was determined through thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and particle characterization was performed through microscopy studies of particle morphology and size. Their antimicrobial effect was assessed over the endodontic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The nanoparticles ranged in size from 300–500 nm, which is considered small enough for penetration inside small dentin tubules. The nanoparticles were dispersed in a hydrogel matrix carrier system composed of 1% hydroxyethyl cellulose, and this hydrogel system was observed to have enhanced bacterial inhibition over longer periods of time. Chlorhexidine-containing nanoparticles demonstrate potential as a drug carrier for root canal procedures. Their size and rate of release may allow for sustained inhibition of bacteria in the root canal system.

  12. Phenotype and Genotype of Enterococcus faecalis Isolated form Root Canal and Saliva of Primary Endodontic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Mubarak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the phenotype and genotype of E. faecalis isolated from the root canal and saliva of primary endodontic patients with periapical lesions. Eighteen adult male and female individuals suffering from primary endodontic infection, either had or had not periapical lesions, were involved in this study. Root canal scraping and saliva were collected from each subject and used for bacterial quantitation using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Enterococci were isolated using ChromAgar medium and then identified using both biochemical (Gram staining and catalase tests and molecular biology (conventional PCR methods. Gelatinase activity, polysaccharide capsul profile and mRNA ace expression level were determined using microbiological, biochemical and molecular biology approach, respectively.  Genotype of E. faecalis was determined based on nucleotide sequence of ace and gelE genes analyzed using web-based 3730xl DNA Analyze software. The results showed that high proportion of E. faecalis found in both root canal and saliva of is related to the incidence of periapical lessions in the primary endodontic patients. This is contrast to the insignificant relationship found between Cps polymorphism, gelatinase activity, and mRNA ace expression with periapical lesions in the patients, respectively.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v23i1.960

  13. Shaping Ability of Reciproc, UnicOne, and Protaper Universal in Simulated Root Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etevaldo Matos Maia Filho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to compare the shaping effects, preservation of the original curvature, and transportation of the apical foramen of Reciproc (VDW, Munich, Germany, UnicOne (Medin, Nové Město na Moravě, Czech Republic, and Protaper Universal (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland in simulated root canals. Thirty resin blocks with simulated curved root canals were distributed into three groups (n=10, and prepared using Reciproc (RCp, UnicOne (UnO and the Protaper Universal (PTu. Standardized photographs were taken before and after the instrumentation, after which they were superimposed. Measurements were taken of the quantity of resin removed from the inner and outer walls of the curvature at 6 levels, the curvature angles before and after instrumentation, and the transportation of the apical foramen. RCp obtained the highest values for amount of resin removed from the inner wall while UnO demonstrated similar shaping on both the inner and outer walls. PTu produced the greatest transportation of foramen when compared to the reciprocating instruments. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the change in angle (P>0.05. All the instruments were capable of maintaining the original curvature of the root canal; however, the UnO, which used reciprocating movement, produced more conservative shapes with lower foramen transportation.

  14. A Case of Recurrent Urticaria Due to Formaldehyde Release from Root-Canal Disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji Hoon; Park, Seung Hyun; Jang, Hang Jea; Lee, Sung Geun; Park, Jin Han; Jeong, Jae Won; Park, Chan Sun

    2017-01-01

    Although formaldehyde is well known to cause type 4 hypersensitivity, immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity to formaldehyde is rare. Here, we report a case of recurrent generalized urticaria after endodontic treatment using a para-formaldehyde (PFA)-containing root canal sealant and present a review of previous studies describing cases of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to formaldehyde. A 50-year-old man visited our allergy clinic for recurrent generalized urticaria several hours after endodontic treatment. Prick tests to latex, lidocaine, and formaldehyde showed negative reactions. However, swelling and redness at the prick site continued for several days. The level of formaldehyde-specific IgE was high (class 4). Thus, the patient was deemed to have experienced an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction caused by the PFA used in the root canal disinfectant. Accordingly, we suggest that physicians should pay attention to type I hypersensitivity reactions to root canal disinfectants, even if the symptoms occur several hours after exposure.

  15. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10: SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC; AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem. Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05. The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  16. Cleaning lateral morphological features of the root canal: the role of streaming and cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J P; Macedo, R G; Verhaagen, B; Versluis, M; Cooper, P R; van der Sluis, L W M; Walmsley, A D

    2017-06-27

    To investigate the effects of ultrasonic activation file type, lateral canal location and irrigant on the removal of a biofilm-mimicking hydrogel from a fabricated lateral canal. Additionally, the amount of cavitation and streaming was quantified for these parameters. An intracanal sonochemical dosimetry method was used to quantify the cavitation generated by an IrriSafe 25 mm length, size 25 file inside a root canal model filled with filtered degassed/saturated water or three different concentrations of NaOCl. Removal of a hydrogel, demonstrated previously to be an appropriate biofilm mimic, was recorded to measure the lateral canal cleaning rate from two different instruments (IrriSafe 25 mm length, size 25 and K 21 mm length, size 15) activated with a P5 Suprasson (Satelec) at power P8.5 in degassed/saturated water or NaOCl. Removal rates were compared for significant differences using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and/or Mann-Whitney U-tests. Streaming was measured using high-speed particle imaging velocimetry at 250 kfps, analysing both the oscillatory and steady flow inside the lateral canals. There was no significant difference in amount of cavitation between tap water and oversaturated water (P = 0.538), although more cavitation was observed than in degassed water. The highest cavitation signal was generated with NaOCl solutions (1.0%, 4.5%, 9.0%) (P streaming. The oscillatory velocities were higher inside the lateral canal 3 mm compared to 6 mm from WL and were higher for NaOCl than for saturated water, which in turn was higher than for degassed water. Measurements of cavitation and acoustic streaming have provided insight into their contribution to cleaning. Significant differences in cleaning, cavitation and streaming were found depending on the file type and size, lateral canal location and irrigant used. In general, the IrriSafe file outperformed the K-file, and NaOCl performed better than the other irrigants tested. The cavitation and

  17. Washout resistance of fast-setting pozzolan cement under various root canal irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Yeon Jang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fast-setting pozzolan cement (Endocem, Maruchi was recently developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various root canal irrigants on the washout of Endocem in comparison to the previously marketed mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot; Dentsply in a furcal perforation model. Materials and Methods ProRoot and Endocem were placed into acrylic molds on moist Oasis. Each mold was then immediately exposed to either physiologic saline, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX under gentle shaking for five minutes. Washout testing was performed by scoring scanning electron microscope (SEM images. Results Endocem exhibited higher washout resistance compared to ProRoot, especially in the NaOCl group. Conclusions These results suggest that Endocem can be considered a useful repair material for furcal perforation, especially in a single-visit scenario.

  18. The antimicrobial effect of iodine-potassium iodide after cleaning and shaping procedures in mesial root canals of mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Barbaran, Javier; Nakata, Hilda Moromi; Salcedo-Moncada, Doris; Bramante, Clovis M; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 2% iodine potassium iodide (IKI) used as a final rinse after the cleaning and shaping procedures in mesial root canals of mandibular molars infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Seventy two mandibular first molars were used. The root canals were infected with Enterococcus faecalisfor 30 days. After the infection procedures, the root canals were cleaned and shaped by using the Pro Taper rotary system and manual files. The teeth were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (N = 18). In group 1, the root canals were irrigated with sterile distilled water (control). In group 2, the root canals were irrigated with 1% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) during instrumentation. In group 3, root canals were irrigated with 1% NaOCl during instrumentation and a five minute final irrigation using 2% IKI. In group 4, the root canals were irrigated with 1% NaOCl during instrumentation and a 15 minutes final irrigation with 2% IKI. Bacteria colony-forming units (CFU) from root canals were semi-quantified and the presence of negative cultures among the groups was compared using Fisher's test (p < 0.05). The order of effectiveness was: 1% NaOCI plus 2% IKl for 15 minutes (95%), 1% NaOCl plus 2% IKl for 5 minutes (44%), 1% NaOCl (17%) and sterile distilled water (0%). Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference among the groups (p < 0.05). It was concluded that under in vitro conditions, IKI was able to eliminate the Enterococcus faecalis from infected dentin significantly in a 15-minute time frame after the cleaning and shaping procedures.

  19. Evaluation of Root Canal Preparation Using Rotary System and Hand Instruments Assessed by Micro-Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Stavileci, Miranda; Hoxha, Veton; Görduysus, Ömer; Tatar, Ilkan; Laperre, Kjell; Hostens, Jeroen; Küçükkaya, Selen; Muhaxheri, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete mechanical preparation of the root canal system is rarely achieved. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the root canal shaping efficacy of ProTaper rotary files and standard stainless steel K-files using micro-computed tomography. Material/Methods Sixty extracted upper second premolars were selected and divided into 2 groups of 30 teeth each. Before preparation, all samples were scanned by micro-computed tomography. Thirty teeth were prepared w...

  20. Effectiveness of ProTaper retreatment system associated with organic solvents in the removal of root canal filling material

    OpenAIRE

    Guiotti, Flávia Angélica [UNESP; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Renato de Toledo LEONARDO; Gisselle Moraima CHÁVEZ-ANDRADE; Magro, Miriam Graziele [UNESP; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Faria, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of ProTaper universal retreatment system in the removal of root canal filling material with thermomechanical compaction, in comparison to manualmechanical technique, associated with orange oil or eucalyptol. Materials and methods: Forty extracted lower incisors were filled with thermomechanical compaction technique. After 3 years, the root canal filling was removed by: G1 - manualmechanical technique with orange oil; G2 - manual-mechanical technique with euc...

  1. Octenidine in root canal and dentine disinfection ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandjung, L; Waltimo, T; Hauser, I; Heide, P; Decker, E-M; Weiger, R

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of octenidine on Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 in a dentine block model. Fifty-six root segments of extracted human teeth were infected with E. faecalis for 4 weeks. Octenidine-phenoxyethanol gel (1 : 1) was applied for different timing: 1 min, 10 min, 7 days and in a different formula (1 : 3) for 10 min. Three samples were chosen for the group with placebo gel and for the group without infection (negative control). Dentine samples were collected, and the total count of bacteria and colony-forming units were determined. In addition, for controls and the 10 min group with 1 : 1 gel, the proportion of viable bacteria (PVB) was assessed. Octenidine was particularly effective after incubation periods of 10 min and 7 days. The mean PVB decreased significantly from 57.2% to 5.7% after 10 min application. After 7 days, only one of 10 samples showed positive culture. The present study showed the effectiveness of octenidine against E. faecalis in dentine disinfection. Further laboratory and clinical studies are required.

  2. A STUDY OF ROOT CANAL MORPHOLOGY OF Cebus apella TEETH ESTUDO ANATÔMICO DO CANAL RADICULAR DE DENTES DE Cebus apella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Rocha Afonso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo anatômico em dentes do Cebus apella, para análise da anatomia interna do canal radicular dessa espécie, normatizando seu uso como modelo experimental. Utilizaram-se doze animais adultos. Após a remoção do tecido orgânico, os dentes foram removidos, seccionados e fotografados, sendo analisados com um estereomicroscópio. Os resultados mostraram que os dentes apresentaram características semelhantes às dos seres humanos, mas com algumas peculiaridades, tais como: a anatomia do canal radicular variou de oval para circular; nos caninos inferiores, os canais são semelhantes a um rim, o que reflete o contorno externo da raiz; nos molares superiores, os canais mesiobucal e distobucal são ovais, seguindo o contorno geral do dente. Os autores concluem que esta espécie pode ser utilizada como modelo em pesquisas odontológicas, principalmente em estudos do tratamento do sistema de canal radicular.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Anatomia, dentes, Cebus apella. An anatomic study of Cebus apella root teeth was performed to analyze the internal anatomy of permanent dentition, normalizing its use as experimental model endodontic research. Twelve adult animals were used in this study. After the removal of the organic tissue, the all teeth were removed, sectioned, analyzed and photographed with a stereomicroscope. The results showed that the anatomy of root canal of this species are similar to human dental anatomy, considering the shape, pathway and number of canals, but with some peculiarities, such as: the root canal anatomy varied from oval to circular; in the lower canines, the canals are resembled a kidney, reflecting the outside contour of the root; in the upper molars, the mesiobuccal and distobuccal canals are oval, following the general contour of the tooth. The authors conclude that this primate can be applied as models for study of root canal treatment in human beings, in special the upper central and lateral incisors

  3. Retrospective study of root canal configurations of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone beam computed tomography Part- I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawtiya, Manjusha; Somasundaram, Pavithra; Wadhwani, Shefali; Munuga, Swapna; Agarwal, Manish; Sethi, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. CBCT images of 116 maxillary third molars were observed, and data regarding the number of roots, the number of canals, and Vertucci's Classification in each root was statistically evaluated. Majority of Maxillary third molars had three roots (55.2%) and three canals (37.9%). Most MB root (43.8%), DB root (87.5%), and palatal root (100%) of maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I. Mesiobuccal root of three-rooted maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I (43.8%) and Type IV (40.6%) configuration. Overall prevalence of C-shaped canals in maxillary third molars was 3.4%. There was a high prevalence of three-rooted maxillary molars with three canals.

  4. Impact of the quality of coronal restoration and root canal filling on the periapical health in adult syrian subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafif, Hisham

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the status of periapical tissues of endodontically treated teeth according to coronal restorations and root canal fillings separately and in concomitant in adult Syrian subpopulation. 784 endodontically treated teeth from two hundred randomly selected Syrian adult patients were radiographically evaluated. According to predetermined criteria, the quality of coronal restorations and root canal filling of each tooth was scored as adequate or inadequate. The status of periapical tissues was also classified as healthy or diseased. Results were analyzed using Chi-squared test. Adequate coronal restorations were determined in 58.54% of cases which was accompanied with less periapical pathosis than that in teeth with inadequate restorations (P health. 18.5% of endodontic treatments were evaluated as adequate with less number of periapical radiolucencies than that of inadequate root canal fillings (P fillings. The rate was 88.5% in cases with only adequate root canals fillings, and about 70% in cases with only adequate coronal restorations. When the treatment was inadequate in both coronal and root canals fillings, success rate was only observed in 48.8%. The most important factor with regard to the periradicular tissue health is the quality of root canal filling without neglecting the influence of coronal restoration (regardless of its type). There is a high prevalence rate of periapical pathosis in Syrian subpopulation due to poor dental practice.

  5. Ability of root canal antiseptics used in dental practice to induce chromosome aberrations in human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Higo, Yukari; Ohno, Maki; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2008-01-08

    Root canal antiseptics are topically applied to root canals within the pulpless teeth to treat the root canal and periapical infections. Because the antiseptics that are applied to root canals can penetrate through dentin or leak out through an apical foramen into the periodontium and distribute by the systemic circulation, it is important to study the safety of these antiseptics. In the present study, we examined the ability to induce chromosome aberrations in human dental pulp cells of five root canal antiseptics, namely, carbol camphor (CC), camphorated p-monochlorophenol (CMCP), formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide, and iodoform which are most commonly used in dental practice. Statistically significant increases in the levels of chromosome aberrations were induced by CC, FC, or iodoform in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, CMCP and calcium hydroxide failed to induce chromosome aberrations in the absence or presence of exogenous metabolic activation. The percentages of cells with polyploid or endoreduplication were enhanced by FC or iodoform. Our results indicate that the root canal antiseptics that exhibited a positive response are potentially genotoxic to human cells.

  6. Comparison of Resilon and Gutta-Percha Filling Materials on Root Canal Fracture Resistance Following Restoring with Quartz Fiber Posts

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrvarzfar, P.; Rezvani, Y.; Jalalian, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Bacterial leakage and root fractures are the most important reasons of root canal treatment failure. Due to the lack of adhesion of gutta percha to the canal walls, Resilon has been introduced as a root-filling material able to bond to the root walls. Metal posts may predispose the tooth walls to oblique and vertical fracture which usually leads to tooth loss; whereas, fiber posts may reinforce the remaining tooth structure. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of Re...

  7. Effect of photodynamic therapy and non-thermal plasma on root canal filling: analysis of adhesion and sealer penetration

    OpenAIRE

    MENEZES,Marilia; PRADO,Maíra; Gomes,Brenda; Gusman, Heloisa; SIMÃO,Renata

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and non-thermal plasma (NTP) on adhesion and sealer penetration in root canals. Material and Methods Sixty single-rooted premolars were used. The teeth were prepared using a crown-down technique. NaOCl and EDTA were used for irrigation and smear layer removal, respectively. The root canals were divided into three groups: control, PDT, and NTP. After treatments, the roots were filled using gut...

  8. Retrospective study of root canal configurations of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone beam computed tomography Part- I

    OpenAIRE

    Rawtiya, Manjusha; Somasundaram, Pavithra; Wadhwani, Shefali; Munuga, Swapna; Agarwal, Manish; Sethi, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of 116 maxillary third molars were observed, and data regarding the number of roots, the number of canals, and Vertucci's Classification in each root was statistically evaluated. Results: Majority of Maxillary third molars had three roots (55.2%) and three canals (37.9%). ...

  9. Evaluation of dentinal defects during root canal preparation using thermomechanically processed nickel-titanium files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesim, Bertan; Sagsen, Burak; Aslan, Tugrul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of root cracks after root canal instrumentation with thermomechanically processed nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files with different instrumentation kinematics. A total of 150 extracted mandibular premolars with mature apices and straight root canals were divided into five groups and used in this study. In Group 1, 30 teeth were prepared using hand K-files and assigned to control group, Group 2 was instrumented using K3XF Rotary files (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA, USA) with continuous rotary motion. The teeth in Group 3 were instrumented by ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) rotary files which make asymmetric rotary motion, In Group 4, teeth were instrumented by RECIPROC (VDW, Munich, Germany) with reciprocation motion and in Group 5, teeth were instrumented by Twisted File (TF) Adaptive (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) files that use combination of continuous rotation and reciprocation motion (n = 30/per group). All the roots were horizontally sectioned 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex with a low speed saw under water cooling. Then, the slices were examined through a stereomicroscope to determine the presence of dentinal microcracks. For the apical (3-mm) and coronal (9-mm) sections, the ProTaper Next and TF Adaptive produced significantly more cracks than the hand files, RECIPROC, and K3XF (P 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, all thermal-treated Ni-Ti instruments and hand files caused microcracks in root canal dentin.

  10. The effect of different root canal medicaments on the elimination of Enterococcus faecalis ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammaschke, Till; Jung, Nina; Harks, Inga; Schafer, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine gel (CHX-G) 2%, chlorhexidine powder (CHX-P) 1%, povidone-iodine (PVP-I), polyhexanide and camphorated-and-mentholated chlorophenol (ChKM) ex vivo. For every medicament group 10 root segments (15 mm long) of extracted human teeth were prepared to ISO-size 45 and sterilized (n = 50). The root segments were then inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and aerobically incubated at 37°C. After 1 week, ten root canals were filled with one of the medicaments, respectively and aerobically incubated at 37°C for another week. Ten teeth served as positive controls and were filled with sterile saline solution. After 7 days, the medicaments were inactivated and all root canals were instrumented to ISO-size 50. The obtained dentin samples were dispersed in Ringer solution followed by the preparation of serial dilutions. 10 μl per sample were applied to an agar plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colony forming units were counted and the reduction factors (RFs) were calculated and statistically analyzed. Compared with the positive controls all medicaments exhibited an antibacterial effect against E. faecalis. The RFs for CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were significantly higher compared to PVP-I and polyhexanide (P polyhexanide, CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were able to eliminate E. faecalis from all dentin samples. Within the limitations of this ex vivo investigation, 2% CHX-G and CHX-P were as effective as ChKM against E. faecalis. Thus, when choosing a root canal medicament the better biocompatibility of CHX compared with ChKM should be taken in consideration.

  11. Effect of Imidazolium-Based Silver Nanoparticles on Root Dentin Roughness in Comparison with Three Common Root Canal Irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Melika; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Ghahramani, Yasamin; Jamshidzadeh, Akram

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nanosilver-based irrigant on dentin roughness in comparison with three commonly used root canal irrigation solutions. Three common irrigants including 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and also an imidazolium-based silver nanoparticle solution (ImSNP) (5.7×10 (-8) mol/L), were used. Distilled water was used as control. Roots of 25 human anterior teeth were sectioned longitudinally to obtain 50 dentin samples. Roughness values were evaluated by atomic force microscopy analysis on 5 groups (n=10) after each group was treated in one of the tested irrigant solutions for 10 min. Values were statistically analyzed by One-way analysis of variance, followed by a post hoc Tukey's test for pair-wise comparison. Dentin roughness significantly increased from 95.82 nm (control) to 136.02 nm, 187.07 nm, 142.29 nm and 150.92 nm with NaOCl, CHX, ImSNP and EDTA, respectively. CHX demonstrated a significantly higher roughness value compared to the other tested irrigants while no significant differences were seen in NaOCl, ImSNP and EDTA groups (P>0.242). ImSNP affected the physicochemical properties of dentin and raised its surface roughness; thus, this irrigant could impact bacterial and restorative material adhesion to root canal dentin walls.

  12. Effect of Imidazolium-Based Silver Nanoparticles on Root Dentin Roughness in Comparison with Three Common Root Canal Irrigants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Melika; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Ghahramani, Yasamin; Jamshidzadeh, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nanosilver-based irrigant on dentin roughness in comparison with three commonly used root canal irrigation solutions. Methods and Materials: Three common irrigants including 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and also an imidazolium-based silver nanoparticle solution (ImSNP) (5.7×10 -8 mol/L), were used. Distilled water was used as control. Roots of 25 human anterior teeth were sectioned longitudinally to obtain 50 dentin samples. Roughness values were evaluated by atomic force microscopy analysis on 5 groups (n=10) after each group was treated in one of the tested irrigant solutions for 10 min. Values were statistically analyzed by One-way analysis of variance, followed by a post hoc Tukey’s test for pair-wise comparison. Results: Dentin roughness significantly increased from 95.82 nm (control) to 136.02 nm, 187.07 nm, 142.29 nm and 150.92 nm with NaOCl, CHX, ImSNP and EDTA, respectively. CHX demonstrated a significantly higher roughness value compared to the other tested irrigants while no significant differences were seen in NaOCl, ImSNP and EDTA groups (P>0.242). Conclusion: ImSNP affected the physicochemical properties of dentin and raised its surface roughness; thus, this irrigant could impact bacterial and restorative material adhesion to root canal dentin walls. PMID:28179931

  13. In Vitro Stereomicroscopic Study of the Incidence and Position of Root Canal Isthmuses in Mandibular First Molars

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    Tabrizizadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Accessibility to all sites of root canal and its mechanical and chemical cleaning is mandatory for successful root canal therapy. The presence of isthmus is a major hindrance to complete root canal accessibility. Objectives The purpose of the present study was to determine the relative frequency and type of isthmuses in the apical region of mesial root of the first mandibular molar extracted in Yazd. Materials and Methods In this descriptive-laboratory study, 100 mandibular first molar teeth were collected. The mesial roots were excised at the cervical region and three horizontal sections perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the root were secured with 1-, 3-, and 5-mm distances upwards from apex region of the roots. The incised surfaces were stained using India ink and viewed under stereomicroscope with a magnifying power of ×60 and photographed. The obtained images were studied regarding the presence or absence of isthmuses and the various anatomical forms of isthmuses were recorded based on Hsu and Kim taxonomy. Results Isthmus was present in 54% of teeth. The greatest frequency of isthmuses was observed in the 5 mm from the apex. The type V isthmus was the most prevalent isthmuses between all levels of roots. Conclusions The frequency of isthmuses in the mesial root of mandibular first molars was high. The results of clinical and surgical endodontic procedures may be affected by this aspect of root canal anatomy.

  14. Diode Laser and Calcium Hydroxide for Elimination of Enterococcus Faecalis in Root Canal

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    Neda Naghavi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ultimate goal of endodontic treatment is to eliminate the bacterial infection in the root canal system. While mechanical debridement combined with chemical irrigation removes the bulk of microorganisms, residual bacteria are readily detectable in approximately one-half of teeth just prior to obturation. Laser light can be used to destroy bacteria. This in vitro study was performed to evaluate the effect of diode laser and calcium hydroxide on mono-infected dental canals.Methods: Fifty five single-rooted human premolars were prepared and contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. After three weeks of incubation, the samples were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 and two control groups (n = 5. In the first and second groups, the teeth were rinsed for 5 min with either sterile saline or 5.25% NaOCl and irradiated with a 810-nm diode laser at 1.5 W output for 5 × 4s. In the third group, the teeth were rinsed with 5.25% NaOCl and then Ca(OH2 paste was inserted in the canals for 1 week. Intracanal bacterial sampling was done and the samples were plated to determine the CFU count. Results: 5.25% NaOCl plus laser was as effective as calcium hydroxide and significantly more effective than sterile saline (P>0.05 in elimination of E. faecalis. Complete elimination of E. faecalis was seen only for the one week calcium hydroxide treatment. Conclusion: Combination therapy with NaOCl irrigation and diode laser irradiation can be recommended as an effective treatment option for elimination of E. faecalis from the root canal system.

  15. Transportation of apical root canal after removal of calcium hydroxide when used as an intracanal medicament: An in vitro evaluation

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    Nurul-Ameen Inamdar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the incidence of apical root canal transportation after the removal of calcium hydroxide in straight and curved canals. Materials and Methods: Twenty maxillary central incisors (Group A and twenty mandibular molars (Group B, mesiobuccal canal were instrumented to the working length using #15 to #45 K-file and # 15 to #30 K-file, respectively. Post instrumentation digital images were taken with the corresponding final file inserted into the canal to the working length. The root canals were then filled with Calcium hydroxide paste using Lentulo spirals and the teeth incubated at 37°C for seven days. The calcium hydroxide paste was then removed up to the working length using a #45 file for group A and a pre curved #30 file for group B. Final digital images were taken with the file inserted into the canal to the working length. Post instrumentation and final digital images were superimposed to evaluate the incidence of transportation. Result: In Group A, no transportation was detected, whereas in Group B, 8 out of 20 canals showed apical transportation. Statistically significant differences were observed between Groups A and B ( P <0.05. Conclusion: Care should be taken when removing the calcium hydroxide paste from curved root canals to avoid transportation.

  16. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post

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    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal (n = 15 and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal (n = 3. The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post; and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post. The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal (P = 0.959. There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04 and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003 and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033 when using the chemical system. Conclusion: Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  17. Identification of dental root canals and their medial line from micro-CT and cone-beam CT records

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    Benyó Balázs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shape of the dental root canal is highly patient specific. Automated identification methods of the medial line of dental root canals and the reproduction of their 3D shape can be beneficial for planning endodontic interventions as severely curved root canals or multi-rooted teeth may pose treatment challenges. Accurate shape information of the root canals may also be used by manufacturers of endodontic instruments in order to make more efficient clinical tools. Method Novel image processing procedures dedicated to the automated detection of the medial axis of the root canal from dental micro-CT and cone-beam CT records are developed. For micro-CT, the 3D model of the root canal is built up from several hundred parallel cross sections, using image enhancement, histogram based fuzzy c-means clustering, center point detection in the segmented slice, three dimensional inner surface reconstruction, and potential field driven curve skeleton extraction in three dimensions. Cone-beam CT records are processed with image enhancement filters and fuzzy chain based regional segmentation, followed by the reconstruction of the root canal surface and detecting its skeleton via a mesh contraction algorithm. Results The proposed medial line identification and root canal detection algorithms are validated on clinical data sets. 25 micro-CT and 36 cone-beam-CT records are used in the validation procedure. The overall success rate of the automatic dental root canal identification was about 92% in both procedures. The algorithms proved to be accurate enough for endodontic therapy planning. Conclusions Accurate medial line identification and shape detection algorithms of dental root canal have been developed. Different procedures are defined for micro-CT and cone-beam CT records. The automated execution of the subsequent processing steps allows easy application of the algorithms in the dental care. The output data of the image processing procedures

  18. Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Second Premolar with Type IV Wiene’s Root Canal: A Case Report

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    Noushad Matavan Chalil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes an endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with type IV root canal. A 26-year-old male patient reported pain in right mandibular second premolar. Clinical examination showed a large carious lesion with pulp exposure. Radiographs showed minimal periapical changes and slight widening of periodontal ligament space. Mandibular second premolars usually have one canal. The mandibular second premolar may present large number of anatomic variations. The clinician should be aware of the configuration of the pulp system. This case presents the diagnosis and clinical management of a mandibular second premolar with two distinct canals in the apical third of root (Type IV Wiene’s canal configuration, drawing particular attention to tactile examination of all the canal walls and obturating it with calamus 3D obturation system.

  19. Combined effects of photodynamic therapy and irrigants in disinfection of root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susila, Anand V; Sugumar, R; Chandana, C S; Subbarao, C V

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the combined effects of photodynamic therapy and irrigants in eradicating common endodontic pathogens are evaluated. Roots of 80 extracted single rooted teeth are divided into 2 groups (1) mechanical flushing; (2) antibacterial irrigation. After cleaning and shaping, they are inoculated with either (A) Streptococcus mutans or (B) Enterococcus faecalis and incubated. They are again subdivided and either only irrigated or irrigated and lased. Dentin shavings are taken from root canal walls and cultured. Statistical analysis using One-Way ANOVA and Post-hoc tests are done. The combination eradicated both bacteria. Antibacterial irrigants controlled S. mutans better than PDT (p = 0.041). The combination of PDT and antibacterial irrigation proposed in this study can be used in all primary cases for thorough and reliable disinfection of root canals but may be highly effective in resistant cases like endodontic failures, as E. faecalis is prevalent in such cases. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A new software for dimensional measurements in 3D endodontic root canal instrumentation

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    Raffaele Sinibaldi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main issue to be faced to get size estimates of 3D modification of the dental canal after endodontic treatment is the co-registration of the image stacks obtained through micro computed tomography (micro-CT scans before and after treatment. Here quantitative analysis of micro-CT images have been performed by means of new dedicated software targeted to the analysis of root canal after endodontic instrumentation. This software analytically calculates the best superposition between the pre and post structures using the inertia tensor of the tooth. This strategy avoid minimization procedures, which can be user dependent, and time consuming. Once the co-registration have been achieved dimensional measurements have then been performed by contemporary evaluation of quantitative parameters over the two superimposed stacks of micro-CT images. The software automatically calculated the changes of volume, surface and symmetry axes in 3D occurring after the instrumentation. The calculation is based on direct comparison of the canal and canal branches selected by the user on the pre treatment image stack.

  1. Antibacterial properties of root canal lubricants: a comparison with commonly used irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samantha; Mundy, Lance; Chandler, Nicholas; Upritchard, Jenine; Purton, David; Tompkins, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to assess in vitro the antibacterial activity of 10 root canal lubricants. K-Y Jelly personal lubricant, RC-Prep, File-Eze, File-Rite, EndoPrep Gel, Endosure Prep Crème 15%, Prep-Rite, Glyde, SlickGel ES and Alpha Glide were selected and compared in their antimicrobial properties to seven irrigants. Serial dilutions of each agent in tryptic soy broth were inoculated with either Enterococcus faecalis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa and incubated at 37C for 24 h. During incubation bacterial growth was measured by optical density (A(600)), and samples removed for cultivation on tryptic soy broth agar. Against both test bacteria after 1 h incubation, six lubricants recorded minimum bactericidal concentrations ranging from 1/10 to 1/80, whereas the inhibitory activity of the irrigants ranged from 1/20 to 1/640. Under these conditions, several lubricants exhibited antimicrobial activity comparable with some irrigants. Three irrigants, Consepsis (containing chlorhexidine), Endosure EDTA/C (containing cetrimide) and EndoPrep Solution (containing cetrimide), showed superior antibacterial action to lubricants against both species. The irrigants containing ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and cetrimide were the most effective against both bacterial species at all time intervals. Antimicrobial activity of the lubricants did not correlate to pH values, which ranged from 2.9 to 10.3. Root canal lubricants have antibacterial properties that may help to disinfect canals. © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  2. Minimal Apical Enlargement for Penetration of Irrigants to the Apical Third of Root Canal System: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, P; Krishna, Amaravadi Gopi; Srinivas, Siva; Reddy, E Sujayeendranatha; Battu, Someshwar; Aravelli, Swathi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine minimal apical enlargement for irrigant penetration into apical third of root canal system using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Distobuccal canals of 40 freshly extracted human maxillary first molar teeth were instrumented using crown-down technique. The teeth were divided into four test groups according to size of their master apical file (MAF) (#20, #25, #30, #35 0.06% taper), and two control groups. After final irrigation, removal of debris and smear layer from the apical third of root canals was determined under a SEM. Data was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: Smear layer removal in apical third for MAF size #30 was comparable with that of the control group (size #40). Conclusion: Minimal apical enlargement for penetration of irrigants to the apical third of root canal system is #30 size. PMID:26124608

  3. Microbiological evaluation of infected root canals and their correlation with pain

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    Nadine Luísa Soares de Lima Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the endodontic microbiota of human teeth without pulp vitality presenting radiographically visible periapical lesions and its correlation with pre- and postoperative pain symptomatology. Material and methods: Sixteen young adult patients, both genders, aging from 18 to 45 years, presenting 21 single-rooted teeth with pulp necrosis and needing endodontic treatment were selected in the multidisciplinary clinic at the University of Fortaleza (UNIFOR. After crown surgical access, the ��������������root canals were embedded with 0.9% saline solution and the material from root canals was collected ���������������������������������������������� withhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhsterile paper point. The paper points were placed into Stuart transport medium and sent to the microbiology laboratory of the University of Fortaleza. Isolation and identification of bacteria were made by culture technique. The cleaning and shaping of root canals was performed by ��������������� ����� ���������������������������� crown-down technique..............................Intra-canal medication comprised calcium hydroxide mixed with chlorhexidine and after 14 days the canals were filled. Patients were asked about the occurrence of pain before treatment and 24 hours after cleaning and shaping procedures. Results: The most prevalent microbial group was Streptococcus sp. followed by Fusobacterium nucleatum, although Gram-positive cocci, non-sporulating Gram-positive bacilli, Gram-negative bacilli, pigmented Gram-negative bacilli, Veillonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas sp. were also frequently isolated. Conclusion: According to the results, it can be concluded that Fusobacterium

  4. Method of teaching undergraduate students to perform root canal treatment: It's influence on the quality of root fillings.

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    Baaij, A; Özok, A R

    2017-06-21

    This study aimed to assess whether the method of teaching endodontology influenced the quality of root fillings made by undergraduate students. The method of teaching endodontology at our institution was revised. Changes concerned: the programme (ie method of clinical training and summative assessment), and the supervision whilst performing root canal treatment on patients. An intermediate cohort (N=91) comprised partly students attending the former programme (involving patients) and partly students attending the revised programme (without patients). After succeeding in the summative assessment, the quality of the first root filling made by the student in a patient under supervision of either a general dental practitioner or an endodontist was evaluated according to pre-determined criteria. Data were analysed using Cohen's Kappa, Chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Sixty-two per cent (47 of 76) of root fillings made by students who attended the revised programme were of good quality, in comparison with 47% (seven of 15) of those made by students who attended the former programme (P=.274). Less complex treatments had better quality root fillings if students were supervised by endodontists (88% (14 of 16) good quality) than supervised by general dental practitioners (59% (22 of 37) good quality) (P=.045). Complex treatments did not differ in quality of root fillings for the supervision types (P=.825). The quality of root fillings made by students who attended the revised programme seems at least as high as that of those who attended the former programme. Higher quality root fillings might be obtained under supervision of endodontists than under supervision of general dental practitioners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Photodynamic therapy with water-soluble phtalocyanines against bacterial biofilms in teeth root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergova, Raina; Georgieva, Tzvetelina; Angelov, Ivan; Mantareva, Vanya; Valkanov, Serjoga; Mitov, Ivan; Dimitrov, Slavcho

    2012-06-01

    The study presents the PDT with metal phthalocyanines on biofilms grown in root canals of ten representatives of the Gram-positive and the Gram-negative bacterial species and a fungus Candida albicans which cause aqute teeth infections in root canals.. The extracted human single-root teeth infected for 48 h with microorganisms in conditions to form biofilms of the above pathogens were PDT treated. The stage of biofilm formation and PDT effect of the samples of the teeth were determined by the scaning electron microscopy and with standard microbial tests. The PDT treating procedure included 10 min incubation with the respected phthalocyanine and irradiated with 660 nm Diode laser for 10 min. The most strongly antibacterial activity was achieved with zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. The other Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans were 10-100 times more resistant than the Gram-positive species. The Gram-negative Moraxella catarrhalis and Acinetobacter baumannii were more sensitive than the enterobacteria, but eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilm was insignificant. The influence of the stage of biofilm formation and the initial conditions (bacterial density, photosensitizer concentration and energy fluence of radiation) to the obtained level of inactivation of biofilms was investigated. The PDT with ZnPc photosensitizers show a powerful antimicrobial activity against the most frequent pathogens in endodontic infections and this method for inactivation of pathogens may be used with sucsses for treatment of the bacterial biofilms in the root canals.

  6. Two Palatal Root Canals in a Maxillary Right Second Molar:One Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-shan Lu; Zhong-hao Liu; Hong Li; Guang-shui Jiang

    2009-01-01

    牙根和根管的数目不是固定不变的,文献报道表明牙齿尤其是上颌磨牙根管存在着解剖变异.但是,上颌第二磨牙发生腭根双根管的可能性很低.在本文中,作者报道了一例右上颌第二磨牙腭根双根管的解剖变异.由于可能存在的上颌第二磨牙腭根管解剖变异,所以临床医生在牙髓病治疗过程中应注意术前对患牙进行影像学分析,术中可借助牙科手术显微镜等可视手段寻找可能存在的腭根解剖变异.%Clearly, the number of roots and canals can vary, and the literature demonstrates an extensive number of anatomical variations, especially for the maxillary molars.But the possibility of two palatal root canals in the maxillary second molars is very low.In this article, we report an anatomical variation of two palatal root canals in a maxillary right second molar.Because of the existence of anatomical variation of palatal root in maxillary second molar, it must be taken into account in clinical and radiographic evaluation during endodontic treatment.

  7. Efficiency of final irrigation of root canal in removal of smear layer

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    Mitić Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A smear layer forms on the root canal walls as the consequence of root instrumentation. The smear layer formed in such a way considerably influences the quality of root obturation and endodontic treatment outcome. Objective The aim of this study was to ultrastructurally analyze the surface of intracanal dentine after removal of the smear layer by the solution of doxycycline, citric acid and detergent Tween-80 (MTAD. Methods The study involved 60 single-rooted, extracted, human teeth divided into four groups. All samples were instrumented by a step-back technique and manual K-files, and rinsed during instrumentation by 2% CHX and H2O2. The first group of samples was exclusively rinsed by CHX and H2O2; in the second group, besides using CHX and H2O2, MTAD solution was used for the final irrigation. The samples which were rinsed by distilled water (+ control and the samples rinsed by 5.25% NaOCl and 17% Na EDTA (-control served as control groups. All samples were observed under the scanning electronic microscope JEOL-JSM-5300. The coronary, middle and apex thirds of the radix region were analyzed. Results The obtained results of the SEM analysis showed that the application of 2% chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide did not give clear dentine walls, and the smear layer could not be removed completely. The application of the same combination (CHX and H2O2, added by the final MTAD irrigation solution, led to the efficient removal of the smear layer, while the morphological structure of dentine surface remained unchanged. Statistical analysis showed that canal walls in the experimental group with MTAD as the final irrigation were significantly clearer compared to the control group (p<0.001. Conclusion Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that MTAD is an efficient solution for the final irrigation of the canal system.

  8. Comparison of Dentinal Crack Formation With Reciproc, Mtwo and ProTaper Root Canal Preparation Systems

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    Nazari Moghaddam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Instrumentation with rotary instruments could potentially cause dentinal cracks possibly leading to tooth fracture. Reciproc files require a single file to finalize the root canal preparation and the effect of this procedure has not been compared with other systems. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of dentinal micro-cracks following root canal preparations with ProTaper, Mtwo and Reciproc files. Materials and Methods In an experimental in vitro trial, 80 maxillary and mandibular first molars were selected and their crowns and distal roots were cut. The roots were then examined to remove any previous cracks and defects. An impression polyether material was used to simulate teeth periodontal ligament (PDL. The teeth were divided to four experimental groups (n = 20 and prepared using Reciproc, Mtwo and ProTaper or remained unprepared as a control group. The specimens were then sectioned horizontally on 3, 5 and 9 mm from the apex and number of micro-cracks was determined by stereomicroscope. The incidence of dentinal cracks on different systems or sections were statistically analyzed by means of the chi-square test. Results Dentinal defects on 3-mm, 5-mm and 9-mm sections from the apex were noted in 10 (5.6%; 7 (3.9% and 9 (5.0% samples of all, respectively. Following canal preparation using Reciproc, ProTaper and Mtwo systems, the defects were observed in 7 (3.9%, 12 (6.7% and 7 (3.9% the sections, respectively. No significant differences were observed regarding the defect incidence on the studied instrumentation files or sections. Conclusions Regarding the study limitations, dentinal cracks were observed in all files and distances from the apex. Although there was more crack incidence in ProTaper files, no significant differences were noted regarding the studied systems and sections from the apex.

  9. A scoping review of root canal revascularization: relevant aspects for clinical success and tissue formation.

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    Conde, M C M; Chisini, L A; Sarkis-Onofre, R; Schuch, H S; Nör, J E; Demarco, F F

    2016-10-22

    The aim of this scoping study was to evaluate the survival rate and nature of tissue formed inside root canals of human immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps (NIPT) under root canal revascularization (RCR). The search was performed in SciVerse Scopus®, PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science®, BIREME and in the grey literature up to November 2015. The keywords were selected using MeSH terms and DECs. Two independent reviewers scrutinized the records obtained considering specific inclusion criteria. The included studies were evaluated in accordance with a modified Arksey and O' Malley's framework. From 375 studies that were evaluated, 75 were included. A total of 367 NIPT were submitted to RCR, from which only 21 needed further endodontic treatment. The weighted mean follow-up time was 17.6 months. The data were derived mainly from case reports (69%) or small case series (15%). NaOCl [0.5-6%] was applied as the disinfecting solution in almost all studies. Triple antibiotic paste was as effective as Ca(OH)2 as on intracanal medicament. De novo tissue was cementum and poorly mineralized bone positive to bone sialoprotein (BSP) but negative to dentine sialoprotein (DSP). Failures were associated mainly with reinfection of the root canal. The majority of included studies reported a significant increase in both root length and width. However, as most of these data came from case reports, they must be interpreted with care, as most were focused on treatment successes (not failures). Therefore, well-designed randomized controlled trials comparing RCR with available apexification treatments are needed to address this gap in the literature.

  10. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

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    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  11. Root canal revascularization. The beginning of a new era in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahabi, Mothanna K; Ali, Mahmoud M

    2014-05-01

    Endodontic management of immature anterior teeth with necrotic pulps is a great challenge. Although there are different treatment procedures to deal with this problem such as apexification by using calcium hydroxide dressings or applying a barrier of mineral trioxide aggregate and gutta-percha obturation, the outcomes are still unsatisfactory and the root might still be weak. Recently, a new treatment protocol by revascularization of immature non-vital, infected teeth was introduced to regenerate dental structure and complete the root maturation. However, larger case series with longer follow-up periods are required to accept revascularization as the standard protocol for management of immature non-vital, infected teeth. In this review, we discuss the concept of root canal revascularization, revascularization mechanisms, and the structure of the regenerated tissues.

  12. Radiographic Healing after a Root Canal Treatment Performed in Single-rooted Teeth with and without Ultrasonic Activation of the Irrigant : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Yu-Hong; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Jiang, Lan; Chen, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Ying-Yi; Tian, Fu-Cong; Bao, Xu-Dong; Gao, Xue-Jun; Versluis, Michel; Wu, Min-Kai; van der Sluis, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of a root canal treatment with and without additional ultrasonic activation of the irrigant. Methods: Single-rooted teeth with radiographic evidence of periapical bone loss were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups. In both groups syr

  13. Removal efficiency of calcium hydroxide dressing from the root canal without chemically active adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Lara; Zogheib, Carla; Naaman, Alfred

    2013-03-01

    Compare the efficiency in removing two calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] preparations from root canal and apical third using single use syringe, ultrasonics and RinsEndo((®)) with saline solution. One hundred and eighty human singlerooted teeth were instrumented using ProTaper((®)) rotary system, divided into two groups according to Ca(OH)2 filling. A: Powder mixed with water, B: Pulpdent((®)). Each group was divided into three subgroups for the irrigation: A1, B1: Single use syringe; A2, B2: Ultrasonics; A3, B3: RinsEndo((®)). Teeth were split longitudinally, photographed and imported into Adobe Photoshop. The percentage ratios of Ca(OH)2 remaining in the canal and in the apical third were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using 'ANOVA two-way' and 'univariate tests'. (a) Remnants of medicament were found in all teeth, (b) no statistically significant difference in the elimination of both Ca(OH)2 from the entire canal (p = 0.436), however, mixed powder was better eliminated from the apical third (p = 0.005), (c) no statistically significant difference among the irrigation techniques in the whole canal (p = 0.608), though, RinsEndo((®)) and ultrasonics were the most effective in cleaning the apical third (p = 0.032) when mixed powder was used. None of the techniques removed completely Ca(OH)2 from the canal. In the apical third, RinsEndo((®)) and ultrasonics were the most effective when mixed powder was used. Ca(OH)2, the most commonly used intracanal dressing, should be completely eliminated before the obturation to assure a good endodontic sealing. Based on the results of this study, RinsEndo((®)) and ultrasonics were the most effective in removal of Ca(OH)2 especially the powder mixed with water presentation.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity of root canal sealers and calcium hydroxide paste

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    Alessandro L Cavalcanti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of different root canal sealers and calcium hydroxide (CH paste. Materials and Methods: The sample was composed of two sealers (Fill Canal® and Sealer 26® , one CH cement (Hydro C® , and a CH paste. The agar diffusion test was performed in Petri dishes inoculated with the following microorganisms: Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mitis, Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida tropicalis. The diameters of the zones of microbial growth inhibition were measured after 24 h. The tests were performed in triplicate. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey′s test at 5% significance level. Results: Fill Canal® exhibited the largest mean zone of microbial growth inhibition against the Candida species and differed significantly from the other groups (P < 0.001. When inhibition was observed against S. mitis and S. oralis, the CH paste presented a larger mean zone of microbial growth inhibition than those of the other materials (P < 0.05. Regarding the inhibition of S. mutans, a statistically significant difference was observed only between the CH paste and Hydro C® (P < 0.05; the paste produced the largest mean zone of microbial growth inhibition against this microorganism. Regarding the inhibition of S. salivarius, Fill Canal® presented smaller mean zone of microbial growth inhibition than Sealer 26® and CH paste (P < 0.05. Conclusion: All the materials presented zones of microbial growth inhibition against all the test bacteria. Fill Canal® presented the largest mean zone of inhibition against the Candida species. For the Streptococcus cultures, none of the sealers presented inhibition superior to that of the CH paste.

  15. Quality of root canal filling performed by undergraduate students of odontology at Kaunas University of Medicine in Lithuania.

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    Kelbauskas, Eduardas; Andriukaitiene, Laura; Nedzelskiene, Irena

    2009-01-01

    High-quality filling of root canals is one of indicators of successful endodontic treatment. However, poor-quality of the filling is still a common phenomenon in the work of general practitioners. Better training of dental students of modern odontology is possible solution of the problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of root canal filling performed by undergraduate students in single-rooted and multi-rooted teeth shaped by hand stainless-steel or rotary ProTaper instruments. We analyzed 258 post-operative radiographs under illumination and x7 magnification. 120 (46.5%) root canal were prepared using hand stainless-steel K-files, 138 (53.5%) using ProTaper rotary instruments. The filling was evaluated as adequate when it was located at 0-2 mm below the radiographic apex, under-filled>2 mm below the radiographic apex, over-filled, protruded through the radiographic apex. The filling homogeneity and condensation were also evaluated. The filling height and position in relationship to the radiographic apex showed 84.1% were filled adequately, 10.5%--under-filled, 5.42%--over-filled. Homogeneity and density in 79.5% was good, in 20.5%--poor. The quality of root canal filling was acceptable, because 84.1% cases were filled adequately. The density and homogeneity were statistically reliably better in the canals prepared using ProTaper System.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite associated with intracanal medication for Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals

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    Marcia Carneiro Valera

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the action of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl associated with an intracanal medication against Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-six human single-rooted teeth with single root canals were used. The canals were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days and were then instrumented with 1% NaOCl. The roots were divided into 3 groups (n=12 according to the intracanal medication applied: calcium hydroxide paste, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX gel, and 2% CHX gel associated with calcium hydroxide. The following collections were made from the root canals: a initial sample (IS: 21 days after contamination (control, b S1: after instrumentation, c S2: 14 days after intracanal medication placement; S3: 7 days after intracanal medication removal. The results were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test at 5% significance level. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Both 1% NaOCl irrigation and the intracanal medications were effective in eliminating E. faecalis and C. albicans inoculated in root canals.

  17. In vitro growth inhibition of intra root canal pathogenic microorganisms by Lactic Acid Bacteria, an Antibiosis method

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    A. Nakhjavani F.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Elimination of microorganisms and their byproducts from root canal system is one of important aims of root canal therapy. This object is gained by using of many chemomechanical techniques but with noncertain success. A new method is used of nonpathogenic bacteria for growth inhibition of pathogenic bacteria, Antibiosis, in root canal therapy.The aim of this study was in vitro evaluation of antimicrobial effect of probiotics, such as Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB on the infected root canal bacteria. "nMaterials and Methods: Isolated bacteria from infected root canal were grown and then scattered onto the muller Hinton agar plates which contain wells, LAB, extracted from dairy products, were added into these wells, Inhibition effected of LAB was determined. Furthermore the sample taken from the inhibition zone and possible resistant monoclonal bacteria also were identified, then 6 sensitive and 14 resistant samples were selected and E. faecalis species were added to them; Then antimicrobial effects of LAB on these samples was reevaluated. "nResults: The results showed that 66.7% of the samples were sensitive at least to one type of LAB, and 33% were resistant to all kind of LAB. Meanwhile the outgrowing anaerobic bacteria inside the inhibition zone were from the low frequency oral bacterial flora. Furthermore, adding E. faecalis to the samples caused more sensitivity of them to LAB. Mc-Neamar test recognized the difference significant. "nConclusion: This study showed that the LAB inhibit growth of the pathogenic root canal bacteriae. Furthermore, presence of E. faecalis reinforces the antimicrobial effect of LAB. It seemed that LAB maybe have potential to use in endodontic practice for elimination of root canal infections.

  18. Sodium hypochlorite accident resulting in life-threatening airway obstruction during root canal treatment: a case report

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    Al-Sebaei MO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maisa O Al-Sebaei,1 Omar A Halabi,2 Ibrahim E El-Hakim3 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, King Abdulaziz University – Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Saudi Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Aim: This case report describes a serious and life-threatening complication of the use of sodium hypochlorite as an irrigation solution in root canal therapy. Summary: This case report describes a hypochlorite accident that occurred in a healthy 42-year-old female who was undergoing routine root canal therapy for the lower right central incisor (tooth #41. After approximately 1 hour of irrigation with 3% sodium hypochlorite (for a total of 12 cc, the patient complained of severe pain and burning in the lip. The swelling progressed over the next 8 hours to involve the sublingual and submental fascial spaces with elevation of the tongue and resultant upper airway obstruction. The patient was intubated and remained on mechanical ventilation for 3 days. She recovered without any skin necrosis or nerve deficits. Key learning points: This case report highlights the importance of carefully performing root canal irrigation with sodium hypochlorite to avoid complications. Careful injection without pressure, the use of proper rubber dam isolation, and the use of the endodontic needle are necessary to avoid this type of complication. Although it is a safe root canal irrigation solution, its use may lead to life-threatening complications. Early recognition and management of the untoward effects of sodium hypochlorite are vital for the patient's safety. Keywords: complications of root canal, facial edema, root canal irrigation, root canal therapy, sodium hypochlorite, upper airway obstruction

  19. Theoretical distribution of gutta-percha within root canals filled using cold lateral compaction based on numeric calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yi; Song, Ying; Gao, Yuan; Dummer, Paul M H

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to present a new method based on numeric calculus to provide data on the theoretical volume ratio of voids when using the cold lateral compaction technique in canals with various diameters and tapers. Twenty-one simulated mathematical root canal models were created with different tapers and sizes of apical diameter, and were filled with defined sizes of standardized accessory gutta-percha cones. The areas of each master and accessory gutta-percha cone as well as the depth of their insertion into the canals were determined mathematically in Microsoft Excel. When the first accessory gutta-percha cone had been positioned, the residual area of void was measured. The areas of the residual voids were then measured repeatedly upon insertion of additional accessary cones until no more could be inserted in the canal. The volume ratio of voids was calculated through measurement of the volume of the root canal and mass of gutta-percha cones. The theoretical volume ratio of voids was influenced by the taper of canal, the size of apical preparation and the size of accessory gutta-percha cones. Greater apical preparation size and larger taper together with the use of smaller accessory cones reduced the volume ratio of voids in the apical third. The mathematical model provided a precise method to determine the theoretical volume ratio of voids in root-filled canals when using cold lateral compaction.

  20. Effect of a two-step placement procedure on the dislocation resistance of a methacrylate resin-based root canal sealer: a proof of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moinzadeh, A.T.; Mirmohammadi, H.; Veenema, T.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wu, M.K.; Shemesh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the placement of a methacrylate root canal sealer or a conventional epoxy root canal sealer in two steps increases their dislocation resistance when compared to a one-step placement procedure. Materials and Methods: Eighty single-rooted teeth were randomly allocated t

  1. Efficacy of a combined nanoparticulate/calcium hydroxide root canal medication on elimination of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Maryam; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Zarei, Mina; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Rajabi, Omid

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Ca(OH)2 with or without a silver nanoparticle suspension to eliminate Enterococcus faecalis from root canals. A total of 66 extracted human single-rooted teeth contaminated with E. faecalis were treated with 10% Ca(OH)2 alone, Ca(OH)2 with nanosilver or sterile water (as a negative control). Samples were obtained with paper points and Gates-Glidden burs at 1 and 7 days after root canal preparation and the number of colony-forming units (CFU) was determined. The number of CFUs observed after dressing with Ca(OH)2  + nanosilver was significantly less than the number observed with Ca(OH)2 alone after 1 or 7 days (P  0.05). Higher antimicrobial efficacy was observed in the Ca(OH)2 group after 7 days than 1 day (P < 0.001). This study highlighted the potential advantage of using a mixture of Ca(OH)2 and nanosilver for intracanal medicament.

  2. Effect of intracanal cryotherapy on pain after single-visit root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Özdemir, Özgür; Uzun, İsmail; Güler, Buğra

    2016-10-04

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2.5°C cold saline irrigation as final irrigant on postoperative pain after single-visit root canal treatment of teeth with vital pulps. One-hundred and seventy patients were assessed as eligible and included to the study. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (n = 85) (i.e. the control group and the cryotherapy group). In the cryotherapy group, final irrigation with 2.5°C 0.9% physiological saline solution for 5 min was performed following completion of biomechanical preparation, whereas in control group same solution stored at the root temperature was used. Treatments were performed in a single visit. Participants were asked to rate the intensity of their postoperative pain using visual analogue scale at 24 and 48 h. Data were analysed by Mann-Whitney U test and Student's t test. In the cryotherapy group level of reported postoperative pain was significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). The outcome of this investigation indicates that 2.5°C cold saline irrigation as final irrigant can result a significant reduction in postoperative pain levels in comparison to the control group. Cryotherapy is a simple, cost-effective, and non-toxic option for postoperative pain control in single visit root canal treatment.

  3. Efficacy of different irrigants in the removal of calcium hydroxide from root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödig, T; Vogel, S; Zapf, A; Hülsmann, M

    2010-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of different solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 10% citric acid and 20% EDTA) in the removal of calcium hydroxide from root canals. One hundred single-rooted maxillary incisors were prepared to size 50 and split longitudinally. Two standardized grooves were cut into the apical and coronal part of the root canal dentine and filled with calcium hydroxide. The reassembled teeth were irrigated with a syringe and a size 30 needle using the following irrigants: (i) 20% EDTA, (ii) 10% citric acid, (iii) 1% NaOCl, (iv) 10% citric acid + 1% NaOCl, (v) 20% EDTA + 1% NaOCl and (vi) water (control). Volume of irrigant was 20 mL in each group, and irrigation time was 5 min. Evaluation of cleanliness of the blinded specimens was performed by two calibrated observers under a microscope with 30x magnification using a four-grade scoring system as described by van der Sluis et al. (2007). Statistical evaluation was performed using a SAS-macro for non-parametric multifactorial analysis (P irrigation with EDTA and citric acid, whereas NaOCl and water showed the least effect. The combinations of irrigants did not result in improvement in terms of cleanliness. None of the irrigants nor their respective combinations were able to completely remove the calcium hydroxide. Chelating agents such as citric acid and EDTA showed the best results. The combination of chelators and NaOCl did not result in significant improvement of calcium hydroxide removal.

  4. A clinical study of formocresol pulpotomy versus root canal therapy of vital primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminabadi, Naser Asl; Farahani, Ramin Mostofi Zadeh; Gajan, Esrafil Balayi

    2008-01-01

    Pulpotomy of primary incisors is a serious challenge due to the lack of a distinct boundary between the coronal and the radicular pulp and the inaccuracy of the clinical indication criteria. The aim of the present study is the clinical and radiographic evaluation of pulpotomy versus root canal therapy (RCT) of vital primary incisors. A total of 100 incisors in 50 patients (female: 27, male: 23) aged 3-4 years were allocated to formocresol pulpotomy (45 teeth) and RCT (46 teeth) using zinc oxide-eugenol. The radiographic and clinical evaluation of treatment outcomes was performed at 12 and 24 months post-operatively. A history of spontaneous pain, missing restorations, recurrent caries, mobility and percussion sensitivity, parulis or fistula, erythema, and swelling were recorded. Data analysis was performed based on two sample proportional test. The clinical success rate was 86.9% for pulpotomy and 95.6% for RCT (P > 0.05). The radiographic assessment exhibited no pathologic signs in 76.08% of pulpotomy group and 91.3% of RCT group and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The most common pathologic finding was periodontal widening followed by external/internal root resorption. Periapical radiolucency and fistula in pulpotomized teeth was significantly higher than in RCT-treated teeth (P < 0.05) It may be concluded that the root canal therapy of vital primary incisors may be efficiently substituted for the pulpotomy of these teeth.

  5. The effective concentration of red betel leaf (Piper crocatum infusion as root canal irrigant solution

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    Fani Pangabdian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smear layer is a debris consisting of organic and inorganic particles of calcified tissue, necrotic tissue, pulp tissue, and dentinoblast and microorganism processes that can close the entrance to the dentin tubuli. Smear layer, will not only inhibit the penetration of disinfection materials and sealers to the dentin tubuli, but will also reduce the attachment of root canal filling material so that root canal irrigation solution is needed to dissolve the smear layer. Red betel leaf (Piper crocatum infusion, on the other hand, contains saponin characterized as “surfactants” which can dissolve smear layer. Nevertheless, the effective concentration of the red betel leaf infusion has still not been known clearly. Purpose: This study is aimed to determine the effective concentration of the red betel leaf infusion for cleaning root canal walls from smear layer. Methods: Fiveteen extracted human teeth with straight single roots were randomized into 5 groups (n=3. The specimens were then shaped by using rotary instruments up to a size of 25/.07. During instrumentation, each canal was irrigated with 10, 20, 30 and, 40% red betel leaf infusion for treatment groups, while another was irrigated with aquadest for the control group. Root canal cleanliness was observed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results: There were significant differences among treatment groups (p<0.05, except in the treatment groups irrigated with red betel leaf infusion with concentrations of 30% and 40% (p>0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that red betel leaf infusion with a concentration of 30% is effective for cleaning the root canal walls from the smear layer.Latar belakang: Smear layer adalah suatu debris yang mengandung partikel organik dan anorganik dari jaringan terkalsifikasi, jaringan nekrotik, proses dentinoblas, jaringan pulpa dan mikroorganisme yang dapat menutup jalan masuk ke tubuli dentin. Smear layer akan menghalangi penetrasi dari bahan

  6. Root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an infection that affects the pulp of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... their normal routine the next day. Until the tooth is permanently filled or covered with a crown, you should avoid rough chewing in the area.

  7. Characteristics of Streptococcus milleri and Streptococcus mitior from infected dental root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejàre, B

    1975-01-01

    Morphological and physiological characteristics of 103 streptococcal isolates obtained from positive routine cultures of material from dental root canals at filling, were studied. The majority of the isolates were those which at a primary identification not fullfilled the criteria of enterococci, Strep. sanguis, Strep. mutans or Strep. salivarius. Only a few representative strains of the latter types were included in the study as a control of the method. The resemblance of the 103 isolates to 38 reference strains were assessed with numerical methods. The isolates formed 9 clusters with reference strains occurring in all but one. Of the isolates which it was intended to identify and characterize with numerical taxonomic analysis, all but one joined one of 3 clusters and were identified as Strep. milleri or Strep. mitior (mitis). The most useful cultural characteristics to dfferentiate the two species were growth on the sulphonamide containing MC-agar and 7.5% bile blood agar by Strep. milleri and production of hydrogen peroxide by Strep. mitior. The characteristics of the strains in the nine 80-phenons are given in Table 2. Other characteristics that appeared to be of interest for differentiating Strep. milleri from Strep. mitior and these two species from other viridans streptococci are underlined in Table 2. Strep. milleri seems not earlier to have been reported to occur in infected root canals. The occurrence of Strep. milleri is in agreement with the data given on serological groups found among streptococcal isolates from routine root canal cultures. Little is known about the occurrence and distribution of Strep. milleri in the human oral cavity, which therefore warrant further investigations.

  8. Quantitative assessment of root canal roughness with calcium-based hypochlorite irrigants by 3D CLSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Juliana Santos; Raucci Neto, Walter; Faria, Natália Spadine de; Fernandes, Fernanda Silva; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Abi Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Chemical solutions play important roles in endodontic treatment and promote ultrastructural changes in dentin surface. The aim of this study was to quantify root canal roughness at different concentrations of calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fifty-two human mandibular premolars were sectioned and randomly organized into thirteen groups (n=8): saline (control); 1%, 2.5% and 5% NaOCl; 1%, 2.5% and 5% Ca(OCl)2; the hypochlorite groups were further divided into with or without EDTA. The chlorine concentrations of the different solutions were measured by iodine titration (%). The superficial roughness (Sa) was quantified by CLSM. Ca(OCl)2 presented substantial decrease in chlorine concentration that differed from the package indication, but without compromising the dentin ultrastructure changes. There were no significant differences in dentin roughness between Ca(OCl)2 or NaOCl at all studied concentrations. The combination with EDTA provided similar roughness values among the solutions (p>0.05). The 5% Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl solutions significantly increased dentin roughness and did not differ from the EDTA association (p>0.05). Ca(OCl)2 promoted similar dentin roughness as the NaOCl at the same concentrations and combined with EDTA. It may be concluded that Ca(OCl)2 modified the root canal dentin roughness similarly to NaOCl, at the same concentrations and EDTA combinations used in this study. Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl, both at 5%, significantly altered dentin roughness, overcoming EDTA association, thus Ca(OCl)2 concentrations ranging from 1% to 2.5% may be suitable solutions for root canal irrigation protocols.

  9. Antibacterial Efficacy of a New Sonic Irrigation Device for Root Canal Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Klaus W; Liebi, Melanie; Stauffacher, Simone; Eick, Sigrun; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    Passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) is the most widespread method used to activate irrigation solutions. Concerns have been raised that PUI is less effective in curved root canals and is not passive at all. Our aim was to compare a novel passive sonic irrigation (PSI) device (6000 Hz) with PUI and manual irrigation (MI) with respect to their efficiency in removing different endodontic microorganisms from curved and straight root canals. We performed 2 experiments as follows. In a 3-day infection model, we included 8 groups of single or dual microbial species that were rinsed with 0.9% sodium chloride using PSI, PUI, or MI. Colony-forming units (CFUs) were counted after incubation, and log10 transformations were performed for statistical comparisons. In a 21-d infection model, we tested the same irrigation protocols on 4 groups of microorganisms and used 1.5% sodium hypochlorite as an irrigant. Infection control samples were taken at day 0, 3, 5, and 7 after treatment and were subsequently reincubated. Using sodium chloride as an irrigant, the amount of reduction in CFUs compared with the negative control was approximately 3 log10 units for PSI at 6000 Hz, 2 log10 units for PUI, and 1 log10 unit for MI. PSI reduced the microorganism CFUs significantly better than PUI. Using sodium hypochlorite led to a significant reduction in microorganism CFUs even with MI. After 3 days, compared with MI, microorganism regrowth significantly reduced after PSI and PUI treatment, but in these groups, in at least half of the samples, microorganisms were detectable after 7 days. PSI at 6000 Hz might be at least equal to PUI with respect to reduction of the microbial load in curved and straight root canals. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. C-shaped mandibular primary first molar diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography: A novel case report and literature review of primary molars′ root canal systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gozde Ozcan; Ahmet Ercan Sekerci; Fatma Kocoglu

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different anatomical variations in root canal system of dedicious dentition will improve the practice of the pediatric dentists. The teeth with C-shaped root canal configurations are definitely a problem in endodontic treatment. Dentists who are specialists of endodontics must have adequate knowledge about various root canal morphologies of primary tooth that have a tendency for rapid progression of dental caries to achieve a technically satisfactory outcome. This report pres...

  11. In vitro evaluation of the sealing ability of three newly developed root canal sealers: A bacterial microleakage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Ehsan; Samadi-Kafil, Hossein; Pirzadeh, Ahmad; Jafari, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of MTA Fillapex, Apatite Root Canal Sealer and AH26 sealers. Material and Methods The present in vitro study was carried out on 142 extracted single-rooted human mature teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=44) and two control groups (n=5). Three root canal sealers were MTA Fillapex, Apatite Root Canal Sealer and AH26. The teeth in the control groups were either filled with no sealer or made completely impermeable. The root canals were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and one of the sealers. The teeth were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas prior to the bacterial leakage assessment using Enterococcus faecalis. Leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for 90 days. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods and chi-squared test. If the data were significant, a proper post hoc test was used. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results The positive control specimens exhibited total bacterial penetration whilst the negative control specimens showed no evidence of bacterial penetration. At the end of the study, the analysis of microleakage with chi-squared test showed no significant differences between the experimental groups (P<0.05). The results of chi-squared test analyzing the pair-wise differences between the groups considering the numerical values for leakage day indicated the lowest leakage with AH26 and the highest with Apatite root sealer. Conclusions According to the results of the present study, sealing ability of AH26 was significantly higher than that of MTA Fillapex and Apatite Root Canal Sealer. Key words:Mineral Trioxide aggregate, root canal obturation, dental seal. PMID:27957271

  12. [Behavior of different strains of Staphylococcus aureus against root canal filling cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola, J; Berástegui, E; Canalda, C; Brau, E

    1991-01-01

    The mean goal of this study is the determination of the conduct of 120 strains of Staphylococcus aureus against seven root canal sealers: Traitement Spad, Endométhasone, N2 Universal, AH26 with silver, Diaket-A, Tubli Seal and Sealapex. The agar diffusion test was employed in the determination of its bacterial growth inhibition. The results obtained have demonstrated values very different between the tested strains. Therefore we recommended to employ strains with reference in the investigation of the bacterial growth inhibition in order to repeat equal experimentation conditions.

  13. Influence of low-intensity laser radiation upon the microflora of carious cavities and root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Nekrylov, Valery; Mazo, Leonid

    1995-04-01

    Laser stomatology- a relatively young branch of stomatology -has been developing actively lately. Bactericidal action of laser radiation enables to use it widely for processing carious cavities and root canals in the treatment of caries and its complications. 113 patients were studied by us. The 40 patients had antiseptic procedure of the caries cavity and then the procedure of laser therapy, so micro-organisms were found out in 26% cases. The 63 patients had antiseptic procedure only, so micro-organisms were found out in 70% cases. Control group were consisted of patients, where laser therapy was carried out without antiseptic remedies.

  14. An update on the antibiotic-based root canal irrigation solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotics are a valuable addition to health practitioners for the management of bacterial infections. During endodontic treatment and when managing trauma to the teeth, antibiotics may be applied systemically or locally. Due to the potential risk of adverse effects of systemic applications, and the ineffectiveness of systemic prescribed antibiotics in necrotic or pulpless teeth and the periradicular tissues, the local application of antibiotics may be a more effective mode for delivering antibiotics to infected root canals. The purpose of this article is to review the history, rationale, and applications of antibiotics and antibiotic-containing irrigants in endodontics. PMID:24171012

  15. Assessment of periapical health, quality of root canal filling, and coronal restoration by using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakici, E B; Yildirim, E; Cakici, F; Erdogan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to describe the prevalence of apical health, the quality of root canal filling, and coronal restorations of endodontically treated teeth in the east Anatolian subpopulation of Turkey. CBCT scans were taken from 748 patients attending for the 1st time to the clinic at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology Department at Ataturk University's Faculty of Dentistry in Erzurum, Turkey. All images were analyzed by two research assistants who were trained using examples of CBCT images with and without the presence of periapical radiolucency. The two examiners assessed images from the experiment independently, and the readings were then compared. All data were entered on an MS Excel 2007 spreadsheet and SPSS software 15.0 which was used for statistical analysis. The Chi-square test was used to determine if a patient's periapical status was associated with the technical quality of root filling, coronal status, and to evaluate differences between tooth subgroups. In total, 147 teeth from 748 patients were found to have been treated endodontically. Sixty three teeth were found to have short root canal fillings, whereas 74 teeth had adequate root canal fillings, and the remaining 10 teeth had over extended root canal filling. A significant correlation was observed between the length of root filling and apical periodontitis (P = 0,023). Inadequately dense root canal filling was observed in 141 teeth, whereas adequately dense filling was found in only six teeth. There was a significant correlation between the density of root filling and apical periodontitis (P = 0.044). Coronal restoration was found in 90 teeth, but was not observed in all the three teeth. A crown was present in 54 teeth. There was a significant correlation between coronal restoration and apical periodontitis (P = 0.028). The results indicate that the quality of both the root filling and restoration were found to have impact on the periapical

  16. High speed imaging of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a model of a root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; Blanken, Jan; van Heeswijk, Hans; de Roode, Rowland; Klaessens, John

    2007-02-01

    Laser systems of various wavelengths and pulse characteristics have been introduced in dentistry. At present, the range of applications for the different systems is being investigated mainly differentiating between soft and hard tissue applications. For the preparation of root canals both hard and soft tissues are involved. Ideally, one would like to use one laser system for the whole treatment. In this study, we studied the characteristics of the pulsed 2,78 Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase, Waterlase Millenium), in view of root canal cleaning and desinfection. The laser energy was fiber delivered with fiber tip diameters from 400 μm down to 200 μm. Special thermal and high speed imaging techniques were applied in a transparent model of a tapered root canal and slices cut from human teeth. High speed imaging revealed the dynamics of an explosive vapor bubble at the tip of the Er laser in water and the root canal model. Typically for Erbium lasers, within a time span of several hundred μs, a longitudinal bubble expanded to maximum size of 5 mm length and 2 mm diameter at 100 mJ and imploded afterwards. In the root canal, the explosive bubble created turbulent high speed water streaming which resects soft tissue from the hard tissue. Thermal imaging showed the dynamics of all lasers heating of the canal wall up to several mm depending on the wavelength and energy settings. The mechanism of smear layer removal and sterilization in the root canal, is attributed to cavitation effects induced by the pulsed laser. The heat generation into the dentine wall was minimal.

  17. A survey of root canal treatment of molar teeth by general dental practitioners in private practice in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practice and depth of knowledge of root canal treatment by general dental practitioners working in private dental centers in different cities within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was distributed to 400 general dental practitioners. Completed questionnaires were analyzed in term of simple summary statistics. A total of 252 (63%) practitioners responded. The majority of the respondents were Syrians (59%) and Egyptians (32%). Ninety-one per cent of the respondents indicated that they performed root canal treatment. Amongst those who carried out root canal treatment, only seven practitioners (3%) used rubber dam for isolation. More than half of the respondents (55%) used saline to irrigate canals during treatment. Forty-six per cent of practitioners used formocresol as an inter appointment medicament. The standardized and step-back preparation techniques were the method of choice for the majority of the respondents (91%). Ninety-seven per cent of the practitioners used stainless steel hand instruments to prepare root canals and the majority (92%) used gutta-percha for obturation. Seventy-four per cent of the respondent used cold lateral condensation. The average number of radiographs routinely taken for root canal treatment was four. Ninety-three per cent indicated that they usually completed a root canal treatment of molar teeth in three or more visits. Eighty-eight per cent of the practitioners preferred waiting for 1 or 2 weeks to restore the teeth permanently. Results of this study confirm that many general dental practitioners are not following quality guidelines for endodontic treatment. PMID:23960485

  18. A survey of root canal treatment of molar teeth by general dental practitioners in private practice in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practice and depth of knowledge of root canal treatment by general dental practitioners working in private dental centers in different cities within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was distributed to 400 general dental practitioners. Completed questionnaires were analyzed in term of simple summary statistics. A total of 252 (63%) practitioners responded. The majority of the respondents were Syrians (59%) and Egyptians (32%). Ninety-one per cent of the respondents indicated that they performed root canal treatment. Amongst those who carried out root canal treatment, only seven practitioners (3%) used rubber dam for isolation. More than half of the respondents (55%) used saline to irrigate canals during treatment. Forty-six per cent of practitioners used formocresol as an inter appointment medicament. The standardized and step-back preparation techniques were the method of choice for the majority of the respondents (91%). Ninety-seven per cent of the practitioners used stainless steel hand instruments to prepare root canals and the majority (92%) used gutta-percha for obturation. Seventy-four per cent of the respondent used cold lateral condensation. The average number of radiographs routinely taken for root canal treatment was four. Ninety-three per cent indicated that they usually completed a root canal treatment of molar teeth in three or more visits. Eighty-eight per cent of the practitioners preferred waiting for 1 or 2 weeks to restore the teeth permanently. Results of this study confirm that many general dental practitioners are not following quality guidelines for endodontic treatment.

  19. Endodontic treatment of a C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four root canals and three apical foramina: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thikamphaa Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a unique C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four canals and three apical foramina and its endodontic management with the aid of cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT. C-shaped root canal morphology with four canals was identified under a dental operating microscope. A CBCT scan was taken to evaluate the aberrant root canal anatomy and devise a better instrumentation strategy based on the anatomy. All canals were instrumented to have a 0.05 taper using 1.0 mm step-back filing with appropriate apical sizes determined from the CBCT scan images and filled using a warm vertical compaction technique. A C-shaped mandibular second premolar with multiple canals is an anatomically rare case for clinicians, yet its endodontic treatment may require a careful instrumentation strategy due to the difficulty in disinfecting the canals in the thin root area without compromising the root structure.

  20. Large Reactional Osteogenesis in Maxillary Sinus Associated with Secondary Root Canal Infection Detected Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Porto, Olavo César Lyra; Costa, Nádia Lago; Garrote, Marcel da Silva; Decurcio, Daniel Almeida; Bueno, Mike R; Silva, Brunno Santos de Freitas

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory injuries in the maxillary sinus may originate from root canal infections and lead to bone resorption or regeneration. This report describes the radiographic findings of 4 asymptomatic clinical cases of large reactional osteogenesis in the maxillary sinus (MS) associated with secondary root canal infection detected using cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. Apical periodontitis, a consequence of root canal infection, may lead to a periosteal reaction in the MS and osteogenesis seen as a radiopaque structure on imaging scans. The use of a map-reading strategy for the longitudinal and sequential slices of CBCT images may contribute to the definition of diagnoses and treatment plans. Root canal infections may lead to reactional osteogenesis in the MS. High-resolution CBCT images may reveal changes that go unnoticed when using conventional imaging. Findings may help define initial diagnoses and therapeutic plans, but only histopathology provides a definitive diagnosis. Surgical enucleation of the periapical lesion is recommended if nonsurgical root canal treatment fails to control apical periodontitis.

  1. Leakage of bovine serum albumin in root canals obturated with super-EBA and IRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcic, Ana; Jukic, Silvana; Brzovic, Valentina; Miletic, Ivana; Anic, Ivica

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the leakage of SuperEBA and intermediate restorative material (IRM) in root canal samples, with or without orthograde filling, by evaluating bovine serum albumin (BSA) microleakage using spectrophotometry. Thirty-five single-rooted teeth were divided into five groups, instrumented, and had apices resected. Root-end cavities in groups I and II were filled with SuperEBA and IRM. The samples from the groups III, IV, and V were filled with gutta-percha and sealer. In groups IV and V, root-end cavities were filled with SuperEBA and IRM. After 60 days, the greatest microleakage of BSA was observed in group II (4.1 +/- 0.0011 ng), followed by group III (3.4 +/- 0.0064 ng), and then group I (2.6 +/- 0.0019 ng). Samples from groups IV and V leaked the least (0.7 +/- 0.0014 ng). Significantly less leakage (p IRM root-end fillings.

  2. Apical root canal transportation of different pathfinding systems and their effects on shaping ability of ProTaper Next

    OpenAIRE

    Turker, Sevinc Aktemur; Uzunoglu, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare glide path preparation of different pathfinding systems and their effects on the apical transportation of ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) in mesial root canals of extracted human mandibular molars, using digital subtraction radiography. Material and Methods The mesial canals of 40 mandibular first molars (with curvature angles between 25° and 35°) were selected for this study. The specimens were divided randomly into 4 groups ...

  3. Radiographic evaluation of apical deviation of curved root canals after the use of manual and rotary instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Bittencourt PIRES

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of root canal is notable because it is responsible for the cleaning and disinfection of the canal system and for the modeling that will allow adequate accommodation of filling material, favoring the endodontic sealing. Objective: The objective of this research was to study the occurrence of the apical deviation ofcurved root canals instrumented with a manual technique and tworotary systems (Profile and Race. Material and methods: Thirty mesiovestibular canals of inferior molars were used; they were divided into three groups and instrumented with the mixed technique defended by Holland et al. (1991, with the Profile system and with the Race system. For the evaluation of apical deviation the radiographic platform method developed by Sydney et al. (1991 was used, which allows to obtain overlapped images of the first and the last instrument used in the root canal preparation in the same x-ray. Results: The analysis of the results showed that there is no statistically significant difference among the three groups in their relation to the amount of deviated canals; however, when the quality of the deviation is evaluated, there is a significant difference only between group 1 (manual technique and group 2 (Profile system. Conclusion: When the deviation occurred, it was ignificantlysmaller in the group instrumented with the Profile system.

  4. Why not to treat the tooth canal to solve external root resorptions? Here are the principles!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, Alberto; Bittencourt, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper aims at exposing the foundations or reasons why, in cases of external tooth resorption, including those of orthodontic origin, one should not perform a root canal to treat it. That should be done only to teeth with contamination or pulp necrosis, to remove the periapical inflammation induced by microbial products. When facing cases of external tooth resorption, one's conduct must always respect the following sequence of steps: first of all, identifying the cause accurately; then, planning the therapeutic approach and, finally, adopting the conducts in a very well-founded way. The situations in which endodontic treatment is recommended for tooth resorptions are those when there are: a) pulp necrosis with microbial contamination, b) aseptic pulp necrosis, c) developing calcific metamorphosis of the pulp and d) diagnosis of internal resorption. It is not possible, through the pulp, to control the resorption process that is taking place in the external part, after all, the causes are acting in the periodontal ligament. There is no evidence that justifies applying endodontic treatment, by means of root canal, to control external resorption processes, when the pulp shows vitality. PMID:28125136

  5. Development of a novel AMX-loaded PLGA/zein microsphere for root canal disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, F F O [Capes Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Cx. Postal 365, BrasIlia DF 70359-970 (Brazil); Luzardo-Alvarez, A; Blanco-Mendez, J [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, University of Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario Sur s/n, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Perez-Estevez, A; Seoane-Prado, R, E-mail: franciscofabio.oliveira@rai.usc.e [Departament of Microbiology and Parasitology, Medical School, University of Santiago de Compostela, R/de San Francisco, s/n, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop polymeric biodegradable microspheres (MSs) of poly(d-l lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and zein capable of delivering amoxicillin (AMX) at significant levels for root canal disinfection. PLGA/zein MSs were prepared using a spray-drying technique. The systems were characterized in terms of particle size, morphology, drug loading and in vitro release. Drug levels were reached to be effective during the intracanal dressing in between visits during the endodontic treatment. In vitro release studies were carried out to understand the release profile of the MSs. Antimicrobial activity of AMX was performed by antibiograms. Enterococcus faecalis was the bacteria selected due to its prevalence in endodontic failure. Drug microencapsulation yielded MSs with spherical morphology and an average particle size of between 5 and 38 {mu}m. Different drug-release patterns were obtained among the formulations. Release features related to the MSs were strongly dependent on drug nature as it was demonstrated by using a hydrophobic drug (indomethacin). Finally, AMX-loaded MSs were efficient against E faecalis as demonstrated by the antibiogram results. In conclusion, PLGA/zein MSs prepared by spray drying may be a useful drug delivery system for root canal disinfection.

  6. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, P; Gonçalves, T; Palma, P; Santos, J M

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT) improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48%) showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5-6% concentration) used alone and 2 (7%) revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias.

  7. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48% showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5–6% concentration used alone and 2 (7% revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias.

  8. Radiopacity evaluation of root canal sealers containing calcium hydroxide and MTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Maria Guerreiro- Tanomaru

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of root canal sealers containing calcium hydroxide and MTA (Acroseal, Sealer 26, Sealapex, Endo CPM Sealer, Epiphany and Intrafill. Five disc-shaped specimens (10 x 1 mm were fabricated from each material, according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard. After setting of the materials, radiographs were taken using occlusal film and a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The dental X-ray unit (GE1000 was set at 50 kVp, 10 mA, 18 pulses/s and distance of 33.5 cm. The radiographs were digitized and the radiopacity compared to that of the aluminum stepwedge using VIXWIN-2000 software (Gendex. The data (mmAl were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at the 5% significance level. Epiphany and Intrafill presented the highest radiopacity values (8.3 mmAl and 7.5 mmAl respectively, p < 0.05 followed by Sealer 26 (6.3 mmAl, Sealapex (6.1 mmAl and Endo CPM Sealer (6 mmAl. Acroseal was the least radiopaque material (4 mmAl, p < 0.05. In conclusion, the calcium hydroxide- and MTA-containing root canal sealers had different radiopacities. However, all materials presented radiopacity values above the minimum recommended by the ISO standard.

  9. A laboratory study evaluating the pH of various modern root canal filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawińska, Małgorzata; Szczurko, Grzegorz; Kierklo, Anna; Sidun, Jarosław

    2017-01-01

    Alkaline pH is responsible for antibacterial activity and the stimulation of periapical tissue healing. It neutralizes the acidic environment of inflammatory tissues in the periapical region of the teeth and favors bone repair by activating tissue enzymes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare in vitro the pH of 8 root canal filling materials (sealers and points) -AH Plus Jet (AH), Apexit Plus (AP), Endomethasone N (END), Epiphany (EP), GuttaFlow (GF), gutta-percha (G), Resilon (R), Tubliseal (T). 0.1 g of each material (n = 6) was placed in dialysis tubes and immersed in 20 mL of deionized water. The control contained deionized water (pH 6.6) with an empty tube. The pH values were recorded immediately after immersion (baseline) and after 1, 2, 24, 48, 120, and 192 h with a pH-meter. Data were statistically analyzed using the Student's -t test and 1-way analysis of variance (p materials had pH significantly higher than the control (p materials tested at each time point (p materials studied, only EP, AP and AH Plus were able to elevate the pH level that would allow inactivation of microorganisms in the root canals and promote healing of inflamed periapical tissues. However, the low alkalizing potential of G and R can be modified by the concomitant application of sealers producing alkaline pH.

  10. Effectiveness of different formulations of Endo-PTC to promote root canal cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Evaldo; Albergaria, Sílvio; Barbosa, Gabriela L R; Santoro, Mariana; Pacheco, Paulo; Leal Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Endo-PTC are used during endodontic treatment; however, until now no study evaluated the cleaning of dentin walls after use of different Endo-PTC formulations. The aim of this study was to assess qualitatively, by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the cleaning of dentin walls of root canals after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) using Endo-PTC cream and Endo-PTC light associated to 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA). Forty single-rooted human maxillary central incisors with straight canals and fully formed apex were selected. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups depending on the type of Endo-PTC and the final rinse with 17% EDTA. After CMP, all specimens were sectioned and processed for observation of the apical thirds by using SEM. Three calibrated evaluators attributed scores to each specimen. The differences between irrigation protocols were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons. The significance level was set at α = 0.05. The use of Endo-PTC cream or Endo-PTC light did not influence the smear-layer (SL) removal (P > 0.05). When EDTA were used, it was obtained the best cleaning results with no significant difference between the substances (P PTC formulation.

  11. Why not to treat the tooth canal to solve external root resorptions? Here are the principles!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper aims at exposing the foundations or reasons why, in cases of external tooth resorption, including those of orthodontic origin, one should not perform a root canal to treat it. That should be done only to teeth with contamination or pulp necrosis, to remove the periapical inflammation induced by microbial products. When facing cases of external tooth resorption, one's conduct must always respect the following sequence of steps: first of all, identifying the cause accurately; then, planning the therapeutic approach and, finally, adopting the conducts in a very well-founded way. The situations in which endodontic treatment is recommended for tooth resorptions are those when there are: a pulp necrosis with microbial contamination, b aseptic pulp necrosis, c developing calcific metamorphosis of the pulp and d diagnosis of internal resorption. It is not possible, through the pulp, to control the resorption process that is taking place in the external part, after all, the causes are acting in the periodontal ligament. There is no evidence that justifies applying endodontic treatment, by means of root canal, to control external resorption processes, when the pulp shows vitality.

  12. Antibacterial effect of urushiol on E. faecalis as a root canal irrigant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wan Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the antibacterial activity of urushiol against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis to that of NaOCl. Materials and Methods The canals of thirty two single rooted human teeth were instrumented with Ni-Ti files (ProTaper Next X1, X2, X3, Dentsply. A pure culture of E. faecalis ATCC 19433 was prepared in sterile brain heart infusion (BHI broth. The teeth were submerged in the suspension of E. faecalis and were incubated at 37℃ for 7 days to allow biofilm formation. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups according to the irrigant used, and a negative control group where no irrigant was used (n = 8. Group 1 used physiologic normal saline, group 2 used 6% NaOCl, and group 3 used 10 wt% urushiol solution. After canal irrigation, each sample was collected by the sequential placement of 2 sterile paper points (ProTaper NEXT paper points, size X3, Dentsply. Ten-fold serial dilutions on each vials, and 100 µL were cultured on a BHI agar plate for 8 hours, and colony forming unit (CFU analysis was done. The data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-whitney U tests. Results Saline group exhibited no difference in the CFU counts with control group, while NaOCl and urushiol groups showed significantly less CFU counts than saline and control groups (p < 0.05. Conclusions The result of this study suggests 10% urushiol and 6% NaOCl solution had powerful antibacterial activity against E. faecalis when they were used as root canal irrigants.

  13. Antibacterial effect of urushiol on E. faecalis as a root canal irrigant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the antibacterial activity of urushiol against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) to that of NaOCl. Materials and Methods The canals of thirty two single rooted human teeth were instrumented with Ni-Ti files (ProTaper Next X1, X2, X3, Dentsply). A pure culture of E. faecalis ATCC 19433 was prepared in sterile brain heart infusion (BHI) broth. The teeth were submerged in the suspension of E. faecalis and were incubated at 37℃ for 7 days to allow biofilm formation. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups according to the irrigant used, and a negative control group where no irrigant was used (n = 8). Group 1 used physiologic normal saline, group 2 used 6% NaOCl, and group 3 used 10 wt% urushiol solution. After canal irrigation, each sample was collected by the sequential placement of 2 sterile paper points (ProTaper NEXT paper points, size X3, Dentsply). Ten-fold serial dilutions on each vials, and 100 µL were cultured on a BHI agar plate for 8 hours, and colony forming unit (CFU) analysis was done. The data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-whitney U tests. Results Saline group exhibited no difference in the CFU counts with control group, while NaOCl and urushiol groups showed significantly less CFU counts than saline and control groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions The result of this study suggests 10% urushiol and 6% NaOCl solution had powerful antibacterial activity against E. faecalis when they were used as root canal irrigants. PMID:28194365

  14. Comparative evaluation of cone-beam CT equipment with micro-CT in the visualization of root canal system

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    Bence Tamas Szabo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare three different cone-beam CT (CBCT instruments used in dental clinical practice with micro-CT as gold standard. Three female monkeys’ (Macaca fascicularis skulls were selected and scanned by the tested CBCT-s. The most apical visible root canal level on the CBCT images was used as reference level (RL. After the image acquisition by CBCT-s dental jaw sections were scanned by micro-CT at a resolution of 17 μm. Out of the left second and third molars 25 root canals were selected and analysed by three observers at RL and following cross sectional parameters were determined: area of the lumen, major and minor diameters, aspect ratio and mean thickness. Results suggest that only high resolution CBCT instruments allow dentists detecting the full length of the root canal.

  15. Influence of several root canal disinfection methods on pushout bond strength of self-etch post and core systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalinić, I; Glockner, K; Anić, I

    2014-02-01

    To determine the effect of four root canal disinfection protocols (2.5% sodium hypochlorite, 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate, gaseous ozone and Nd : YAG laser) on the pushout bond strength of a self-etch post and core system. Sixty anterior single-rooted permanent human teeth were used. Root canals were instrumented with ProTaper instruments (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland). Roots were divided into four groups (n = 15 each) according to the final disinfection protocol: sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine gluconate, gaseous ozone and Nd:YAG laser. Fibre-reinforced composite post preparations were created in previously filled root canals, and posts cemented according to the manufacturer's instructions. Roots were then uniformly sectioned and prepared for the pushout bond strength testing in a universal testing machine. One-way anova with post hoc Scheffe test was used for statistical analysis. SEM imaging of one sample from each group was made. The only significant difference (P = 0.004) was observed between sodium hypochlorite irrigation, which was associated with the lowest bond strength, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation, which provided the highest bond strength. There was no difference between root canal pre-treatment with sodium hypochlorite, gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine, nor between gaseous ozone, chlorhexidine and Nd : YAG laser. Sodium hypochlorite irrigation was associated with the lowest bond strength values and Nd : YAG laser irradiation with the highest bond strength values for a self-etch post and core system bonded to root canal dentine. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Adhesive dentistry and endodontics. Part 2: bonding in the root canal system-the promise and the problems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard S

    2006-12-01

    One of the recent trends in endodontics has been the development of bonded obturating materials, in an effort to provide a more effective seal coronally and apically. Materials utilizing dentin adhesive technology have been borrowed from restorative dentistry and adapted to obturating materials. This review discusses the obstacles to effective bonding in the root canal system, the progress that has been made, and possible strategies for improved materials in the future. Much of the literature reviewed and many of the principles discussed are taken from the restorative dentistry literature and applied to the unique environment of the root canal system.

  17. Neurotoxicity evaluation of three root canal sealers on cultured rat trigeminal ganglion neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Ahmet; Kalkan, Omer-Faruk; Canpolat, Sinan; Tasdemir, Tamer; Ozan, Ulku

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the possible neurotoxic effects of 3 root canal sealers (RCSs) (AH Plus, GuttaFlow, iRoot SP) on cultured rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Material and Methods Primary cultures of TG neurons were obtained from 1 to 2-day old rats. Freshly mixed RCSs were incubated in sterile phosphate buffered saline and cells were incubated with supernatants of the RCSs for different time intervals (1-, 3-, 6- and 24-h; 1 or 1/10 diluted) and viability/cytotoxicity was tested by counting the number of live cells. Pair of dishes with cells from the same culture incubated with only culture medium was considered as negative controls. Cell images were captured and acquired at x200 magnification using a microscope equipped with a camera using special image program. The viable cells were manually counted assigned from the images for each dose and incubation duration. Data was analysed by using 1-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc tests. Results There was no significant change in cell viability after short duration of incubation (1- and 3-h) with the supernatant of any of RCSs, except for undiluted-AH Plus at 3-h. When AH Plus was compared with other RCSs, for diluted supernatants, there was only significant difference between iRoot SP and AH Plus at 24-h (P<0.05). Whereas undiluted-AH Plus was significantly more cytotoxic for 3-, 6- and 24-h periods as compared to respective incubation periods of undiluted other groups (P<0.05). GuttaFlow groups had similar neurotoxic effect on cells for all test periods. Conclusions All tested RCSs exhibited a variable degree of neurotoxicity on these primary sensory neurons of orofacial tissues, depending on their chemical compositions. GuttaFlow and iRoot SP evoked a less toxic response to TG cells than AH Plus. Key words:Neurotoxicity, trigeminal ganglia, cell culture, root canal sealer, AH Plus, GuttaFlow, iRoot SP. PMID:28149460

  18. [110th year Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Tandheelkunde. 2. Root canal treatment, intra-canal disinfectants and bacterial culture: past and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorer, W R; Wesselink, P R

    2003-05-01

    Fifty years ago the Dutch Journal of Dentistry published methods and opinions concerning root canal treatment. Qualitative bacterial culture, inclusion of aggressive disinfectants, as well as antibiotics and widening of the apical constriction were carried out. Nowadays, because of several reasons, these are not clinical practice anymore. Controversy over the clinical consequences of bacterial presence in tubules and in the peri-apical area prevailed in the past and seem to be prevalent once again.

  19. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M. Grande

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware device used in this study was a desktop X-ray microfocus CT scanner (SkyScan 1072, SkyScan bvba, Aartselaar, Belgium. A specific software ResolveRT Amira (Visage Imaging was used for the 3D analysis and imaging. The authors obtained three-dimensional images from 15 teeth. It was possible to precisely visualize and analyze external and internal anatomy of teeth, showing the finest details. Among the 5 upper molars analyzed, in three cases, the MB canals joined into one canal, while in the other two molars the two mesial canals were separate. Among the lower molars two of the five samples exhibited a single canal in the mesial root, which had a broad, flat appearance in a mesiodistal dimension. In the five premolar teeth, the canals were independent; however, the apical delta and ramifications of the root canals were quite complex. Micro-CT offers a simple and reproducible technique for 3D noninvasive assessment of the anatomy of root canal systems.

  20. Characterization of mandibular molar root and canal morphology using cone beam computed tomography and its variability in Belgian and Chilean population samples

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    Torres, Andres; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Lambrechts, Paul [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Brizuela, Claudia; Cabrera, Carolina; Concha, Guillermo; Pedemonte, Maria Eugenia [Universidad de los Andes, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-06-15

    This study used cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to characterize mandibular molar root and canal morphology and its variability in Belgian and Chilean population samples. We analyzed the CBCT images of 515 mandibular molars (257 from Belgium and 258 from Chile). Molars meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed to determine (1) the number of roots; (2) the root canal configuration; (3) the presence of a curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar and (4) the presence of a C-shaped canal in the second mandibular molar. A descriptive analysis was performed. The association between national origin and the presence of a curved or C-shaped canal was evaluated using the chi-squared test. The most common configurations in the mesial root of both molars were type V and type III. In the distal root, type I canal configuration was the most common. Curvature in the cross-sectional image was found in 25% of the distal canals of the mandibular first molars in the Belgian population, compared to 11% in the Chilean population. The prevalence of C-shaped canals was 10% or less in both populations. In cases of unclear or complex root and canal morphology in the mandibular molars, CBCT imaging might assist endodontic specialists in making an accurate diagnosis and in treatment planning.

  1. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Gambarini, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Pecci, Raffaella; Bedini, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB) root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware device used in this study was a desktop X-ray microfocus CT scanner (SkyScan 1072, SkyScan bvba, Aartselaar, Belgium). A specific software ResolveRT Amira (Visage Imaging) was used for the 3D analysis and imaging. The authors obtained three-dimensional images from 15 teeth. It was possible to precisely visualize and analyze external and internal anatomy of teeth, showing the finest details. Among the 5 upper molars analyzed, in three cases, the MB canals joined into one canal, while in the other two molars the two mesial canals were separate. Among the lower molars two of the five samples exhibited a single canal in the mesial root, which had a broad, flat appearance in a mesiodistal dimension. In the five premolar teeth, the canals were independent; however, the apical delta and ramifications of the root canals were quite complex. Micro-CT offers a simple and reproducible technique for 3D noninvasive assessment of the anatomy of root canal systems.

  2. Efficacy of Electronic Foramen Locators in Controlling Root Canal Working Length during Rotary Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Lorena Arruda; Levin, Martin D; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Bernardes, Ricardo Affonso; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Vasconcelos, Bruno Carvalho de

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of electronic foramen locators (EFLs) to control root canal working length during rotary instrumentation and to assess possible reliability variations of different working lengths. Forty-eight human mandibular bicuspids were randomly divided in 2 groups according to the used device, Root ZX II (RZX) and Propex II (PRO). They were further subdivided in 2 subgroups according to the root canal preparation level (0.0 and -1.0). Preparation was performed with the Protaper rotary system using a crown-down technique. RZX was employed on its automatic auto-reverse mode (AAR) and PRO was used with the MPAS-10R contra-angle to monitor the preparation. The last used file (F3) was fixed, and the apical portion of the teeth was worn buccolingually, allowing to measure the extent between the file tip and the apical foramen (AF). The precision values of 0.0 mm and -1.0 mm were 100% and 0.0% for RZX, and 100% and 66.7% for PRO, respectively, with a range of ±0.5 mm. Statistical analysis showed no differences between the groups at 0.0 mm. However, at -1.0 mm, RZX showed the poorest results (0.96±0.11 mm), followed by PRO (0.43±0.23 mm). The difference between RZX and PRO was statistically significant. The EFLs were precise in maintaining the working length during rotary preparation when reaching the AF, but when their penetration was limited, both devices showed decreased precision; the RZX AAR failed in all instances.

  3. The Effect of Smear Layer on Antimicrobial Efficacy of Three Root Canal Irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Nazanin; Dianat, Omid; Asnaashari, Mohammad; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Zadsirjan, Saeede

    2015-01-01

    One of the main goals of endodontic treatment is to decrease the harboring bacteria within the root canal system and dentinal tubules. This experimental study attempted to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of three root canal irrigants in the presence and absence of smear layer (SL). A total of 210 sound extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared. After creating the SL and its removal in half of the samples, they were infected with Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Actinomyces israelii (A. israelii). A total of 180 specimen were used to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of the three irrigants in presence and absence of SL, 24 specimen were placed in the positive and negative controls, 2 samples were utilized for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and 2 were used for Gram staining. Then, they were exposed to irrigants including 2.61% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and 1% povidone-iodine (PI) for 5, 30 and 60 min. Presence/absence of test microorganisms was determined by incubation of specimens in test tubes containing brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth and then measuring the colony forming units (CFU) on BHI agar. A cumulative logistic model was used to analyze the ordinal response. The 2.61% solution of NaOCl was significantly more effective than 0.2% CHX and the latter was more efficient than 1% PI for decreasing fungal and microbial infection of dentinal tubules in the presence and absence of SL. The presence of smear layer decreased the efficacy of antimicrobial irrigants. The minimum time required for elimination of fungal/microbial infection was 30 min.

  4. An in vitro Evaluation on a Novel Root Canal Cleansing Method by Using Nylon Fibers

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    Shiqian Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite traditional metal-based dental files, such as NiTi being demonstrated effective in root cleaning, the tooth structure is always damaged. Thus, to fulfill the need for a minimally invasive tool for contemporary endodontics and dentistry, the use of polymer fibers might provide a good option, as it is soft, fabricable, and disposable. In this study, two types of nylon fibers with respective average diameters of 206.9 µm (fiber W and 156.4 µm (fiber B, respectively, were used as dental files, and mounted onto either a reciprocating or a low-speed rotary hand-piece. In vitro, simulated root canal models were colored red using nail varnish, and then cleaned by the fiber files mounted on the hand-pieces. Three parts of the simulated models, i.e., the apical third, the medium third, and the coronal third, were chosen to assess the cleaning the efficiency (CE of each specimen by calculating the ratio of the cross-sectional area changes, before and after cleansing, using micro-Computer Tomography (CT. A NiTi file with a low-speed hand-piece was used as a control. SEM was used to observe the nylon fiber surfaces before and after the cleansing. Micro-CT results showed that for both the nylon fibers, W and B, an average CE of 82.11% ± 9.68% for the medium third could be achieved, which is statistically higher (p < 0.01 than the coronal third and apical third. The cleansing efficiency was not affected by, the types of fibers, nor the hand-pieces according to student’s t-test. Most of the nylon fibers could withstand deformation after the cleansing. To conclude, nylon fiber files have demonstrated a certain cleansing efficiency in simulated root canals, and micro-CT is a promising method to assess CE.

  5. Comparison of Two Base Materials Regarding Their Effect on Root Canal Treatment Success in Primary Molars with Furcation Lesions

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    Volkan Arikan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare MTA with another base material, IRM, which is generally used on pulpal floor after root canal treatment, regarding their effect on the success of root canal treatment of primary teeth with furcation lesions. Materials and Methods. Fifty primary teeth with furcation lesions were divided into 2 groups. Following root canal treatment, the pulpal floor was coated with MTA in the experimental group and with IRM in the control group. Teeth were followed up considering clinical (pain, pathological mobility, tenderness to percussion and palpation, and any soft tissue pathology and sinus tract and radiographical (pathological root resorption, reduced size or healing of existing lesion, and absence of new lesions at the interradicular or periapical area criteria for 18 months. For the statistical analysis, Fisher’s exact test and Pearson’s chi-square tests were used and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results. Although there were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of treatment success, lesions healed significantly faster in the MTA group. Conclusion. In primary teeth with furcation lesions, usage of MTA on the pulpal floor following root canal treatment can be a better alternative since it induced faster healing.

  6. Study of Root Canal Anatomy in Human Permanent Teeth in A Subpopulation of Brazil's Center Region Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Bueno, Mike R; Couto, Gabriela S; Rabelo, Luiz Eduardo G; Alencar, Ana Helena G; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of roots, root canals and apical foramina in human permanent teeth using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images of 1,400 teeth from database previously evaluated were used to determine the frequency of number of roots, root canals and apical foramina. All teeth were evaluated by preview of the planes sagittal, axial, and coronal. Navigation in axial slices of 0.1 mm/0.1 mm followed the coronal to apical direction, as well as the apical to coronal direction. Two examiners assessed all CBCT images. Statistical data were analyzed including frequency distribution and cross-tabulation. The highest frequency of four root canals and four apical foramina was found in maxillary first molars (76%, 33%, respectively), followed by maxillary second molars (41%, 25%, respectively). The frequency of four root canals in mandibular first molars was 51%. Mandibular first premolars had two root canals and two apical foramina in 29% and 20% of the cases, respectively. Mandibular central and lateral incisors and canines presented two root canals in 35%, 42% and 22% of the cases, respectively. The navigation strategy in CBCT images favors a better identification of frequency and position of roots, root canals and apical foramina in human permanent teeth.

  7. Root canal morphology of Chalcolithic and early bronze age human populations of El Mirador Cave (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceperuelo, Dolors; Lozano, Marina; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Mercadé, Montse

    2014-12-01

    This study provides a morphological characterization of the inner anatomy of the root canals of permanent first and second molars in Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age human fossils using cone-beam computed tomography. The general evolutionary trend in present-day human dentition is related to morphological simplification. As little is known about when this trend appeared in Homo sapiens populations, the aim of this work is to test the presence of modern radicular morphology 4,400 years ago. Fifty-four permanent first and second maxillary and mandibular molars of 17 individuals were included in the study. All maxillary first and second molars showed three separate roots. Almost all the lower molars analyzed (100% of first molars and 75% of second molars) had two separate roots. More differences in the canal system configuration were documented in the maxillary mesiobuccal roots than in the palatal or distobuccal roots. The most variable tooth in root and canal configuration is the maxillary second molar. It should be pointed out that 12.5% of the teeth analyzed showed a C-shaped root configuration.

  8. The influence of volume, type of irrigant and flushing method on removing artificially placed dentine debris from the apical root canal during passive ultrasonic irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Der Sluis, LWM; Gambarini, G; Wu, MK; Wesselink, PR

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the influence of volume, irrigant and method of flushing on the removal of artificially-placed dentine debris from the apical part of root canals during passive ultrasonic irrigation. Methodolgy Access cavities were prepared in 15 canine teeth and their root canals instrumented to s

  9. The results of the analysis of 100 root canal treatment failure%100例根管治疗失败原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明强

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the reason of root canal treatment failure. Methods Select 100 teeth in root canal treatment failure which were treated in our clinic in 2007-2010,analysis the reason of root canal treatment failure. Results In the 100 case ,52% was owed to fil ,33% was exceed to fil , 15% was just right to fil . Conclusions Root canal anatomy factor, root canal preparation, root canal disinfection and root canal fil ing quality are associated with root canal treatment failure.%目的:探讨根管治疗失败原因。方法选取2007-2010年我科门诊完成的100例根管治疗失败牙,分析失败原因。结果100例失败病例中,根管欠填占52例,超填占33例,恰填占15例。结论根管的解剖因素、根管预备,清洗消毒及根管充填质量情况等与根管治疗失败相关。

  10. Physicochemical and biological properties of a novel injectable polyurethane system for root canal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian Wang,1 Yi Zuo,1 Minghui Zhao,1 Jiaxing Jiang,1 Yi Man,2 Jun Wu,3 Yunjiu Hu,3 Changlei Liu,4 Yubao Li,1 Jidong Li11Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Orthopedics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 4College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: A root canal sealer with antibacterial activity can be efficacious in preventing reinfection that results from residual microorganisms and/or the leakage of microorganisms. In the present study, a series of injectable, self-curing polyurethane (PU-based antibacterial sealers with different concentrations of silver phosphate (Ag3PO4 were fabricated. Subsequently, their physicochemical properties, antibacterial abilities, and preliminary cytocompatibilities were evaluated. The results indicated that the fabricated PU-based sealers can achieve a high conversion rate in a short amount of time. More than 95% of the isocyanate group of PU sealers with 3 wt% (PU3 and 5 wt% (PU5 concentrations of Ag3PO4 were included in the curing reaction after 7 hours. With the exception of those for film thickness for PU5, the results of setting time, film thickness, and solubility were able to meet the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization. The antibacterial tests showed that PU3 and PU5 exhibit stronger antimicrobial effects than that achieved with 1 wt% Ag3PO4 (PU1 and AH Plus (positive control against Streptococcus mutans. The cytocompatibility evaluation revealed that the PU1 and PU3 sealers possess good cytocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that the PU3 sealer offers good physicochemical and antimicrobial properties along with cytocompatibility, which may hold great

  11. A re-audit of the technical quality of undergraduate root canal treatment after the introduction of new technology and teaching practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, A; Coffey, D; Duncan, H F

    2017-10-01

    To revaluate through re-audit the technical quality of undergraduate nonsurgical root canal treatment (RCTx) in a dental teaching hospital as a result of recommended changes to teaching practices. The technical quality of undergraduate RCTx was evaluated radiographically after educational changes and the mandatory introduction of new technologies (nickel-titanium files, apex locators, greater taper gutta-percha points) in 182 root canals. Evaluation was based on four criteria: presence of voids, root canal filling termination (0-2 mm of radiographic apex), all roots filled and the prepared canal contained the original anatomy. Chi-squared analysis was used to determine statistically significant improvements in quality between the respective audits (P < 0.05). Twenty-three of the 40 canals in single-rooted teeth (57.5%) and 68 of the 129 (52.7%) canals in multirooted teeth analysed had an acceptable root filling. This compared with 48% of canals in single-rooted teeth and 38% of canals in multirooted teeth in the original audit. Specifically, the frequency of root canal voids and unsatisfactory apical root filling termination were reduced in multirooted teeth by 23% and 14% and in single-rooted teeth by 11% and 12%, respectively, compared with the original audit. When multirooted teeth were taken as one unit, 45.2% were considered to be acceptable, significantly better than the 18.8% multirooted teeth in the original audit (P = 0.042). Deviations from the canal anatomy on radiographic examination were rare findings in both audits. Changes to endodontic teaching practices significantly improved the technical standards of undergraduate root filling in multirooted teeth. The regular auditing of undergraduate teaching practice is necessary to inform current teaching, instigate change and improve standards. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effectiveness of syringe irrigation and ultrasonics to remove debris from simulated irregularities within prepared root canal walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S-J; Wu, M-K; Wesselink, P R

    2004-10-01

    To compare the ability of syringe irrigation and ultrasonic irrigation to remove artificially placed dentine debris from simulated canal irregularities within prepared root canals. After canal enlargement, twelve canines were split longitudinally into two halves. On the wall of one half of each root canal a standard groove of 4 mm in length, 0.2 mm in width and 0.5 mm in depth was cut, 2-6 mm from the apex, to simulate uninstrumented canal extensions. On the wall of the other half, three standard saucer-shaped depressions of 0.3 mm in diameter and 0.5 mm in depth were cut at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex to simulate uninstrumented canal irregularities. Each groove and depression were filled with dentine debris mixed with 2% NaOCl to simulate a situation when dentine debris accumulates in uninstrumented canal extensions and irregularities during canal preparation. Each tooth was re-assembled by reconnecting the two halves, using wire and an impression putty material. Two per cent NaOCl was then delivered into each canal either using syringe irrigation (n = 8) or using ultrasonic irrigation (n = 8). Before and after irrigation, images of the two halves of the canal wall were taken, using a microscope and a digital camera, after which they were scanned into a PC as TIFF images. The amount of remaining dentine debris in the grooves and depressions was evaluated by using a scoring system between 0-3: the higher the score, the more the debris. The data were analysed by means of the Mann-Whitney U-test. Both forms of irrigation reduced the debris score significantly. The debris score was statistically significantly lower after ultrasonic irrigation than after syringe irrigation (P = 0.002 for grooves, P = 0.047 for depressions). Ultrasonic irrigation ex vivo is more effective than syringe irrigation in removing artificially created dentine debris placed in simulated uninstrumented extensions and irregularities in straight, wide root canals.

  13. Effect of root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza, Angélica Moreira; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Silva, Bruno Marques; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers. Sixty single-rooted canines were prepared using ProTaper (F5) and divided into the following groups based on the root filling technique: Lateral Compaction (LC), Single Cone (SC), and Tagger Hybrid Technique (THT). The following subgroups (n = 10) were also created based on sealer material used: AH Plus and Sealer 26. Two-millimeter-thick slices were cut from all the root thirds and subjected to push-out test. Data (MPa) was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The push-out values were significantly affected by the sealer, filling technique, and root third (p < 0.05). AH Plus (1.37 ± 1.04) exhibited higher values than Sealer 26 (0.92 ± 0.51), while LC (1.80 ± 0.98) showed greater bond strength than THT (1.16 ± 0.50) and SC (0.92 ± 0.25). The cervical (1.45 ± 1.14) third exhibited higher bond strength, followed by the middle (1.20 ± 0.72) and apical (0.78 ± 0.33) thirds. AH Plus/LC (2.26 ± 1.15) exhibited the highest bond strength values, followed by AH Plus/THT (1.32 ± 0.61), Sealer 26/LC (1.34 ± 0.42), and Sealer 26/THT (1.00 ± 0.27). The lowest values were obtained with AH Plus/SC and Sealer 26/SC. Thus, it can be concluded that the filling technique affects the bond strength of sealers. LC was associated with higher bond strength between the material and intra-radicular dentine than THT and SC techniques.

  14. Working Length Determination of Root Canal of Young Permanent Tooth: An In vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwanji, A; Rathore, AS; Arora, R; Dhar, V; Madhusudan, A; Doshi, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Determination of correct working length is one of the keys to success in endodontic therapy. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of various methods to determine working length of root canal. Materials and Methods: Tactile method was assessed using digital radiography and compared with electronic method using apex locator. A total sample of 30 single rooted young permanent teeth the (mandibular first premolars) with matured apices were selected for the study. Access cavity preparation was carried out. Working length was measured by tactile method using digital radiography and electronic method using apex locator with no 15 K file. Actual working length was established by grinding of cementum and dentine from the root apex and was observed under stereomicroscope. Data was collected and statistical analysis was carried out with the help of SPSS-15. Results: The results of this study showed that there was a significant difference between tactile method assessed by digital radiography and electronic method using apex locator. Conclusion: Apex locator was found to be more reliable and accurate when compared with the actual length. PMID:25221703

  15. Comparison of three root canal preparation methods in root canal filling%三种根管预备方式对根管充填封闭性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金生; 徐俊峰

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较机用镍钛旋转锉Protaper、手用镍钛旋转锉Protaper、手用不锈钢K锉3种根管预备方式对根管充填封闭性的影响。方法将45例患者,共56颗患牙(148个根管)随机分为A、B、C 3组,每组15例,分别应用机用镍钛旋转锉Protaper、手用镍钛旋转锉Protaper、手用不锈钢K锉3种方式进行根管预备后,常规进行冷牙胶侧压充填,应用锥体束CT(CBCT)观察3种根管预备方式对患牙根管充填后封闭情况的影响。结果所有患牙根管治疗均顺利进行,A组恰填率最高,B组、C组其次;在恰填根管中,A组根管密合程度最优。结论机用镍钛旋转Protaper锉根管成形效果最好,根管充填质量高,根管充填材料封闭性最优,较少出现台阶、根管偏移情况,其余两组效果不如机用镍钛旋转锉Protaper,其中手用镍钛旋转锉Protaper次之,而手用不锈钢K锉较差。%Objective To compare the efficacy of three root canal preparation methods in root canal fil ing. Methods Forty five patients (56 teeth and 148 root canals) were randomly assigned to receive root canal preparation with rotary nickel tita-nium Protaper (group A, n=15), hand used nickel titanium Protaper(group B, n=15), or stainless steel K file (group C, n=15), then root canal fil ing was finished with gutta pertscha. The impaction on root canal fil ing in the apical 3mm- 5mm was observed with CBCT. Results Al root canal treatments were carried out smoothly. Group A had the highest exactly fil ing rate, fol owed by groups B and C and group A also had the highest close contact. Conclusion Rotary nickel titanium Protaper is best in root canal shaping and root canal fil ing close contact, less likely steps and root canal offsets, fol owed by hand used nickel titanium Protaper and stainless steel K file.

  16. Prophylactic penicillin: effect on posttreatment symptoms following root canal treatment of asymptomatic periapical pathosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, R E; Chiappinelli, J

    1993-09-01

    It has been reported that administration of prophylactic penicillin may prevent flare-ups or other undesirable posttreatment sequelae following root canal treatment. To test this hypothesis in a prospective study, 80 patients with a diagnosis of pulp necrosis and chronic apical periodontitis were divided into three groups: group A (prophylactic penicillin, AHA recommendation), group B (placebo, same regimen), and group C (no medication). Medications and evaluations were double-blinded. Patients reported their posttreatment events including incidence of flare-ups, incidence and severity of pain/swelling, and occurrence of adverse side effects. Differences in the three groups were determined statistically using chi-square tests. The outcome showed no significant difference (p = 0.68) among the three groups. That is, administration/nonadministration of penicillin prophylactically was unrelated to posttreatment signs and symptoms following canal preparation. Incidence of flare-ups was very low (1 of 80). Occurrence of pain in the mild-moderate levels was fairly high (approximately 70% overall), but was primarily in the mild category. Overall incidence of side effects was also very low (2 of 80). Severe levels of pain/swelling and flare-up incidence were low with no difference between administration or nonadministration of antibiotics. Based on our data, using penicillin (a potentially dangerous drug) prophylactically to control posttreatment symptoms is not recommended in cases of pulp necrosis and asymptomatic periapical pathosis.

  17. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Centofanti, Antonio; Artemisia, Alessandro; Bramanti, Ennio; Militi, Angela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Irrera, Alessia; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Cicciù, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm) than the middle zone (3.74 μm) and the apical zone (1.73 μm). The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2) was similar in coronal zone (46,798 ± 10,644) and apical zone (45,192 ± 10,888), while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940 ± 7,651). However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system. PMID:26413504

  18. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm than the middle zone (3.74 μm and the apical zone (1.73 μm. The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2 was similar in coronal zone (46,798±10,644 and apical zone (45,192±10,888, while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940±7,651. However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system.

  19. Misdiagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia leading to unnecessary root canal treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jong-Ki; Shin, Su-Jung

    2013-08-01

    This case report demonstrates an unnecessary endodontic treatment of teeth with florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) due to a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis and emphasizes the importance of correct diagnosis to avoid unnecessary treatment. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our institution for apicoectomies of the mandibular left canine and both the lateral incisors. The periapical lesions associated with these teeth had failed to resolve after root canal treatment over a 3-year period. Radiographic examinations revealed multiple lesions on the right canine, the second premolar, and both first molars as well as the anterior region of the mandible. Based on clinical, radiographic and histological evaluations, the patient condition was diagnosed as FCOD. The patient has been monitored for 2 years. To avoid unnecessary invasive treatment, accurate diagnosis is essential before treatment is carried out in managing FCOD.

  20. An update on the management of endodontic biofilms using root canal irrigants and medicaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Soltani, Mohammad Karim; Shalavi, Sousan

    2014-01-01

    Microbial biofilm is defined as a sessile multicellular microbial community characterized by cells that are firmly attached to a surface and enmeshed in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms play a very important role in pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the role of endodontic biofilms and the effects of root canal irrigants, medicaments as well as lasers on biofilms A Medline search was performed on the English articles published from 1982 to 2013 and was limited to papers published in English. The searched keywords were "Biofilms AND endodontics", "Biofilms AND sodium hypochlorite", "Biofilms AND chlorhexidine", "Biofilms AND MTAD", "Biofilms AND calcium hydroxide", "Biofilms AND ozone", "Biofilms AND lasers" and "Biofilms AND nanoparticles". The reference list of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information.

  1. The impact of pH on cytotoxic effects of three root canal irrigants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Delvarani, Abbas; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Nikoo, Mohsen; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Karamifar, Kasra; Asgar, Kamal; Dadvand, Sahar

    2011-01-01

    Aim Cytotoxicity of root canal irrigants is important due to their close contact with host tissues. This study was to assess the possible impact of pH on cytotoxic effects of MTAD, 17% EDTA, and 2.6% NaOCl on the human gingival fibroblasts using MTT assay. Materials and methods Human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to the irrigants and their viability was assessed after 1, 6, and 12 h. The pH of the medium was measured in each interval. Light absorption values were measured for each culture medium using Elisa Reader device. Results NaOCl had significantly less cytotoxicity than EDTA and MTAD. Also irrigants cytotoxicity decreased in 12, 1, and 6 h, respectively. Conclusion It seems that variation of the pH resulted in variation in the cytotoxicity of solutions; i.e., it follows the pattern of the pH variation. PMID:23960509

  2. The Efficacy of Passive Ultrasonic Activation of Organic Solvents on Dissolving Two Root Canal Sealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Letícia; Huerta, Isadora Razzera; Michelon, Carina; Bello, Mariana De Carlo; Pillar, Rafael; Souza Bier, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the dissolving efficacy of eucalyptol and orange oil solvents associated with passive ultrasonic activation (PUA) in zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) based and epoxy resin-based root canal sealers. Methods and Materials: Seventy samples of each sealer were prepared and then randomized according to the solvent and the time of the ultrasonic activation (n=5). The mean amount of weight loss of sealers was calculated in percentages and was analyzed by using the Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni post-hoc tests. Results: The greatest values of weight loss were obtained with the ZOE sealer groups (P0.05). Conclusion: The application of PUA with essential oils can be an effective method in dissolving ZOE based sealers. PMID:28179919

  3. Quantification of endotoxins in infected root canals and acute apical abscess exudates: monitoring the effectiveness of root canal procedures in the reduction of endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ezilmara L R; Martinho, Frederico C; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Leite, Fabio R M; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2014-02-01

    This clinical study was conducted to measure the endotoxin levels in infected root canals (RCs) and exudates related to acute apical abscesses (AAAs). In addition, the effectiveness of RC procedures in reducing the endotoxin levels in RCs was monitored. Paired samples of infected RCs and exudates from AAAs were collected from 10 subjects by using paper points. RCs samples were collected before (RCS1) and after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) (RCS2), after 17% EDTA (RCS3), and after 30 days of intracanal medication (Ca[OH]2 + chlorhexidine) (RCS4). A turbidimetric kinetic limulus amebocyte lysate assay was used for the measurement of endotoxins. Endotoxins were detected in 100% of the baseline samples of AAAs and RCs (RCS1) with median values of 175 EU/mL and 41.5 EU/mL, respectively (P < .05). After CMP (RCS2), endotoxins were reduced to a median value of 0.54 EU/mL (P < .05). Subsequent irrigation with EDTA (RCS3) failed to present a significant effectiveness in reducing the endotoxin levels (median= 0.37 EU/mL) (P = .07). However, intracanal medication for 30 days (RCS4) reduced endotoxins to median values of 0.03 EU/mL (P < .01). The present study revealed a strong association between the high levels of endotoxins found in AAAs and RCs collected from the same tooth. Moreover, the effectiveness of CMP in reducing the endotoxin levels from RCs in acute endodontic infection was improved by the use of RC medication. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interrelationships in the Variability of Root Canal Anatomy among the Permanent Teeth: A Full-Mouth Approach by Cone-Beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ove A.; Maury, Elisabeth; Telmon, Norbert; Georgelin-Gurgel, Marie; Maret, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In endodontic practice, clinicians should be aware of possible root canal anatomic variations. The aim of this study was to assess using CBCT acquisitions regarding whether one root canal anatomy of a tooth is associated with a specific anatomy of another tooth. Methods A total of 106 CBCT acquisitions were obtained using a CBCT scanner with 200μm voxel size. Numbers of roots and canals of the entire dentition were described. Bivariate analyses and logistic regressions were conducted to explore root canal anatomy on one tooth according to age, gender, jaw, side and the others teeth. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was performed to correlate the different numbers of canals profiles. Results A total of 2424 teeth were analyzed. Independently from the other variables, the presence of an additional root canal on a mandibular incisor increases the risk of having an additional root canal on a mandibular premolar (OR [95%] 3.7 [1.0;13.2]). The mandibular molar variability increases in women compared to men (OR [95%] 0.4 [0.1; 0.9]). MCA showed correspondence between 2-canals maxillary incisor and canines and 5-canals maxillary molars, and some correlation between additional canal on maxillary and mandibular premolars. Conclusions Although CBCT examinations are conducted in the first intention of making a diagnosis or prognostic evaluation, medium FOV acquisitions could be used as an initial database thus furnishing preliminary evaluations and information. In endodontic practice, clinicians should be aware of possible root canal anatomic variations. The visualization of all canals is considered essential in endodontic therapy. The use of multi-correspondence analysis for statistics in endodontic research is a new approach as a prognostic tool. PMID:27764246

  5. Micro-CT evaluation of the efficacy of hard-tissue removal from the root canal and isthmus area by positive and negative pressure irrigation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versiani, M A; Alves, F R F; Andrade-Junior, C V; Marceliano-Alves, M F; Provenzano, J C; Rôças, I N; Sousa-Neto, M D; Siqueira, J F

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the removal of accumulated hard-tissue debris (AHTD) from the root canal system of mandibular molars by positive and negative pressure irrigation systems, using micro-CT imaging analysis. Mandibular molars with a single canal in the distal root and 2 canals connected by an isthmus in the mesial root were matched based on similar morphological dimensions using micro-CT evaluation and assigned to 2 experimental groups (n = 20 mesial and 10 distal canals), according to the irrigation protocol: apical positive (conventional irrigation) or negative (EndoVac system) pressure. Changes in root canal volume and surface area as well as percentage of uninstrumented canal wall surface and accumulated hard-tissue debris (AHTD) after canal preparation were compared statistically using the independent sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test, with the significance level set at 5%. Volume, surface area and percentage of static voxels in either mesial or distal root canal systems were not significantly different between groups before or after root canal preparation (P > 0.05). After preparation, AHTD was not observed in the distal canal of both groups. However, in the mesial root canal system, the conventional irrigation group was associated with a significantly higher median percentage of AHTD (11.48%; IQR: 5.9-22.6; range: 1.86-41.98) than the EndoVac group (3.40%; IQR: 1.5-7.3; range: 0.82-12.84) (P < 0.05). Neither irrigation protocol succeeded in rendering the mesial canal system free of AHTD; however, apical negative pressure irrigation resulted in lower levels of AHTD than conventional irrigation. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Setting time affects in vitro biological properties of root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique R; Oliveira, Tatiana R; Silva, Gleyce O; Rabelo, Sylvia B; Valera, Marcia C; Cavalcanti, Bruno N

    2014-04-01

    Biocompatibility of root canal sealers is important because of the long-term contact of their eluates and/or degradation products with periapical tissues. The literature still lacks studies about the genotoxic effects of these materials and the influence of setting time on biological properties. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), a single methacrylate-based sealer (EndoRez), and a silicone-based sealer (RoekoSeal) were assessed. Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79) were cultured and exposed to different dilutions of extracts from the sealers that were left to set for 0, 12, and 24 hours before contact with culture medium. Cell viability was measured by the methyl-thiazol-diphenyltetrazolium assay. Genotoxicity was assessed by the comet assay. Data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (P Root canal sealers were statistically more cytotoxic than the untreated control group, except for the silicon-based sealer. Cell viability ranking was the following (from the most to the least cytotoxic): methacrylate-based > epoxy resin-based > silicone-based. The setting time influenced the epoxy resin-based sealer cytotoxicity (decreased at 12 hours) and the general genotoxicity (increased at 24 hours). DNA damage ranking was the following (from the most to the least genotoxic): methacrylate-based > silicone-based = epoxy resin-based. The setting time had influence on the cytotoxicity of the epoxy resin-based sealer and genotoxicity of all tested sealers. The methacrylate-based sealer was the most cytotoxic, and the silicone-based sealer was not cytotoxic. Genotoxicity was observed for all sealers. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency of Persistent Tooth Pain Following Root Canal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Moana-Filho, Estephan J.; Law, Alan S.; McGuire, Lisa A.; Hodges, James S.; John, Mike T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the frequency of persistent pain after endodontic procedures, even though pain is a core patient-oriented outcome. We estimated the frequency of persistent pain, regardless of etiology, following endondontic treatment. Methods Persistent tooth pain was defined as pain present ≥ 6 months after endodontic treatment. Endodontic procedures included in the review were pulpectomy, non-surgical root canal treatment, surgical root canal treatment, as well as retreatment. Four databases were searched electronically, complemented by hand searching. Two independent reviewers determined eligibility, abstracted data, and assessed study quality. A summary estimate of persistent all-cause tooth pain frequency was established by using a random-effects meta-analysis. Using subgroup analyses, we explored the influence of treatment approach (surgical/non-surgical), longitudinal study design (prospective/retrospective), follow-up rate, follow-up duration, initial treatment versus re-treatment, and quality of reporting (STROBE rankings) on the pain frequency estimate. Results Of 770 articles retrieved and reviewed, 26 met inclusion criteria. A total of 5,777 teeth were enrolled, and 2,996 had follow-up information regarding pain status. We identified 168 teeth with pain and derived a frequency of 5.3% (95%CI: 3.5–7.2%, ptooth pain. High and statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (I2=80%) was present. In subgroup analysis, prospective studies had a higher pain frequency (7.6%) than retrospectives studies did (0.9%). Quality of study reporting was identified as the most influential reason for study heterogeneity. Conclusions Frequency of all-cause persistent tooth pain following endodontic procedures was estimated to be 5.3%, with higher report quality studies suggesting >7%. PMID:20113779

  8. Frequency of persistent tooth pain after root canal therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Donald R; Moana-Filho, Estephan J; Law, Alan S; McGuire, Lisa A; Hodges, James S; John, Mike T

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about the frequency of persistent pain after endodontic procedures even though pain is a core patient-oriented outcome. We estimated the frequency of persistent pain, regardless of etiology, after endodontic treatment. Persistent tooth pain was defined as pain present > or = 6 months after endodontic treatment. Endodontic procedures included in the review were pulpectomy, nonsurgical root canal treatment, surgical root canal treatment, and retreatment. Four databases were searched electronically complemented by hand searching. Two independent reviewers determined eligibility, abstracted data, and assessed study quality. A summary estimate of persistent all-cause tooth pain frequency was established by using a random-effects meta-analysis. Using subgroup analyses, we explored the influence of treatment approach (surgical/nonsurgical), longitudinal study design (prospective/retrospective), follow-up rate, follow-up duration, initial treatment versus retreatment, and quality of reporting (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology rankings) on the pain frequency estimate. Of 770 articles retrieved and reviewed, 26 met inclusion criteria. A total of 5,777 teeth were enrolled, and 2,996 had follow-up information regarding pain status. We identified 168 teeth with pain and derived a frequency of 5.3% (95% confidence interval, 3.5%-7.2%, p tooth pain. High and statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 80%) was present. In subgroup analysis, prospective studies had a higher pain frequency (7.6%) than retrospectives studies did (0.9%). Quality of study reporting was identified as the most influential reason for study heterogeneity. The frequency of all-cause persistent tooth pain after endodontic procedures was estimated to be 5.3%, with higher report quality studies suggesting >7%. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A new method for real-time quantification of irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psimma, Z.; Boutsioukis, C.; Vasiliadis, L.; Kastrinakis, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim (i) To introduce a new method of quantifying extruded irrigant during root canal irrigation ex vivo. (ii) to evaluate the effect of periapical tissue simulation and pressure equalization and (iii) to determine the effect of needle type, apical preparation size and apical constriction diameter

  10. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model using high-speed imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the

  11. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model using high-speed imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Boutsioukis; B. Verhaagen; M. Versluis; E. Kastrinakis; L.W.M. van der Sluis

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the

  12. Antimicrobial effect of a modified vanadium chloroperoxidase on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms at root canal pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, I.F.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Bury, A.; Wesselink, P.R.; Hartog, A.F.; Wever, R.; Crielaard, W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Previous research showed an antimicrobial effect of vanadium chloroperoxidase (VCPO) on in vitro Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. The current study aimed to optimize the use of this enzyme at the root canal pH using a modified VCPO (mVCPO) that was adapted to function at a higher pH and

  13. Cytotoxicity evaluation of a copaiba oil-based root canal sealer compared to three commonly used sealers in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Angela Delfina Bittencourt; de Cara, Sueli Patricia Harumi Miyagi; Marques, Marcia Martins; Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; de Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2015-01-01

    Background: The constant development of new root canal sealers has allowed the solution of a large number of clinical cases in endodontics, however, cytotoxicity of such sealers must be tested before their validation as filling materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of a new Copaiba oil-based root canal sealer (Biosealer [BS]) on osteoblast-like Osteo-1 cells. Materials and Methods: The experimental groups were formed according to the culture medium conditioned with the tested sealers, as follows: Control group (CG) (culture medium without conditioning); Sealer 26 (S26) - culture medium + S26; Endofill (EF) - culture medium + EF; AH Plus (AHP) - culture medium + AHP; and BS - culture medium + BS (Copaiba oil-based sealer). The conditioned culture medium was placed in contact with 2 × 104 cells cultivated on 60 mm diameter Petri dishes for 24 h. Then, hemocytometer count was performed to evaluate cellular viability, using Trypan Blue assay. The normal distribution of data was tested by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the values obtained for cellular viability were statistically analyzed (1-way ANOVA, Tukey's test - P 0.05). Conclusion: The Copaiba oil-based root canal sealer presented promising results in terms of cytotoxicity which indicated its usefulness as a root canal sealer. PMID:25878676

  14. Antimicrobial efficacy of different root canal sealers by using real-time polymerase chain reaction: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Gnana Seelan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Root canal sealers help to minimize leakage, provides antimicrobial activity to reduce the possibility of residual bacteria, and to resolve periapical lesion. Aim: To compare five different root canal sealers against Enterococcus faecalis in an infected root canal model by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Settings and Design: Sixty human mandibular premolars were sectioned to standardize a uniform length of 14 mm. Fifty microliters of the inoculum containing E. faecalis were transferred into each microcentrifuge tube (n = 60. The samples were divided into six groups Tubli-Seal, Apexit Plus, Fillapex, AH Plus, RoekoSeal, and Positive control, respectively. Materials and Methods: Five groups after the incubation with the microorganism E. faecalis were coated with different root canal sealers and obturated using F3 ProTaper Gutta-percha point. The dentinal shavings were collected and analyzed for RT-PCR. Statistical Analysis: The mean difference between six groups was calculated using analysis of variance and post-hoc test. Results: The highest antibacterial activity was achieved with Tubli-Seal (1938.13 DNA in pictogram [pg] and least by RoekoSeal (3034.54 DNA in pg. Conclusion: The maximum antimicrobial activity was achieved AH Plus and Tubli-Seal. RT-PCR can be used as a valuable and accurate tool for testing antimicrobial activity.

  15. The effect of apical preparation size on irrigant flow in root canals evaluated using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of apical preparation size on irrigant flow inside a root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two different needles types, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate the irrigant flow from either

  16. Evaluation of irrigant flow in the root canal using different needle types by an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Wesselink, P.R.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle tip design on the irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methods A CFD model was created to simulate the irrigant flow inside

  17. Evaluation of Irrigant Flow in the Root Canal Using Different Needle Types by an Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, Christos; Verhaagen, Bram; Versluis, Michel; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios; Wesselink, Paul R.; Sluis, van der Lucas W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle tip design on the irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methods: A CFD model was created to simulate the irrigant flow insi

  18. Effect of calcium hydroxide and endodontic irrigants on fibre post bond strength to root canal dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renovato, S R; Santana, F R; Ferreira, J M; Souza, J B; Soares, C J; Estrela, C

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of calcium hydroxide paste, endodontic irrigants and time of application on the bond strength of fibre posts to root canal dentine. Seventy bovine incisors were divided into 7 groups according to removal of calcium hydroxide and distilled water (CHW) (immediate - I; 21 days - 21 days; 6 months - 6 months) and endodontic irrigant (1% sodium hypochlorite - SH; 1% sodium hypochlorite + 17% EDTA - SHE). Fibre posts were cemented (RelyX U100), after which the roots were serially sectioned and submitted to a micro-push-out test. Data were analysed using two-way anova followed by the Tukey's and the Dunnett's tests (α = 0.05). The CHW groups were not significantly different from the control group in 13 of the 18 associated factors (P > 0.05). There were significant reductions in bond strength in the cervical (P = 0.0216) and middle (P = 0.0017) thirds of the root at 6 months in groups irrigated with SH. Irrigation with SHE reduced the bond strength significantly in the middle (P = 0.0488) and apical (P = 0.0252) thirds of the roots in the immediate groups and in the middle third (P = 0.0287) in the 21-day group. Bond strength was greater in the cervical than in the apical thirds of all immediate and 21-day groups (P irrigated with SH and tested at 6 months (cervical and middle thirds). There was a predominance of adhesive failures between resin cement and dentine in all groups. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cone beam computed tomography analysis of root and canal morphology of mandibular premolars in a Spanish population

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    Llena, Carmen; Ortolani, Pablo Sebastian; Forner, Leopoldo [Dept. of of Stomatology, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Fernandez, Jaime [Ferneandez Ugedo y Chaves Clinic, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical anatomy of lower premolar roots in a Spanish population by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), correlating findings with patient gender and tooth type. Using 70 CBCT images, we evaluated 126 healthy, untreated, well-developed lower premolars. The number and morphology of roots and root canals, and the foramina number were assessed. Results for gender and tooth type were compared using the chi-squared and ANOVA tests. The average length of teeth and roots was significantly higher in men (p=0.00). All 126 premolars had a single root. One canal was found in 83.3% of the premolars, with no gender or tooth type differences; Vertucci configuration types I and V were the most prevalent. The first premolars showed significantly greater variability than the second premolars (p=0.03). A single apical foramen was found in 89.7% of the premolars, with no differences by tooth type. Women had a significantly higher prevalence of two apical foramina than men (p=0.04). Some degree of curvature was observed in 65% of the premolars, with no differences by gender or tooth type. A root angle of more than 20 degrees was found in 12.98% of the premolars, without any differences by gender or tooth. All premolars were single-rooted. One canal had the most prevalent morphology. More variability in canal anatomy was found in the first premolars. Curvatures greater than 20 degrees were found at less than 5 mm from the apex.

  20. In vitro Cytotoxicity Comparison of MTA Fillapex, AH-26 and Apatite Root Canal Sealer at Different Setting Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Farnaz; Aghazadeh, Marzieh; Jafari, Sanaz; Khaki, Faraz; Kabiri, Fahime

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of MTA Fillapex, AH-26 and Apatite root canal sealers at different times after mixing. In this in vitro study, MTA Fillapex, AH-26 and Apatite root canal sealer were spilled uniformly by 40 µm mesh in a 96-well plate. Then, human fetal foreskin fibroblast cell line (HFFF2) were added to each sealer cell culture medium. Cytotoxicity was measured using MTT assay after 24, 48 and 72 h and seven days. Multiple comparisons were done using analysis of variances (ANOVA) and Scheffe's post hoc test. All studied sealers exhibited severe cytotoxicity (more than 70%) except for Apatite sealer (95%) at 48 h after mixing. Cytotoxicity of MTA Fillapex and AH-26 were similar (P>0.05) at 24, 48 and 72 h and 7 days after mixing of sealers. Cytotoxicity of MTA Fillapex and Apatite root canal sealer, at 24 and 48 h, were significantly different (P=0.003 and P=0.000, respectively); MTA Fillapex was more cytotoxic. However in 72 h and 7 days after mixing, the difference was not significant (P>0.05). At 24 and 48 h after mixing, AH-26 was more cytotoxic (P=0.002 and P=0.000, respectively). Same as above at 72 h and 7 days after mixing, their cytotoxicity were similar (P>0.05). Overall cytotoxicity of all studied materials were severe. However, it was observed that the cytotoxicity of MTA Fillapex, AH-26 and Apatite root canal sealer decreased over time. Apatite root canal sealer exhibited the least cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity of MTA Fillapex and AH-26 were similar at different time intervals.

  1. Using Magnetic Resonance Myelography to Improve Interobserver Agreement in the Evaluation of Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis and Root Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tameemi, Haider Najim; Al-Essawi, Sattar; Shukri, Mahmud; Naji, Farah Kasim

    2017-04-01

    Cross-sectional retrospective study designed to assess interobserver agreement. To investigate if interobserver agreement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of lumbar spinal canal stenosis and root compression can be improved upon combination with magnetic resonance myelography (MRM). The interpretation of lumbar spinal MRI, which is the imaging modality of choice, often has a significant influence on the diagnosis and treatment of low back pain. However, using MRI alone, substantial interobserver variability has been reported in the evaluation of lumbar spinal canal stenosis and nerve root compression. Hardcopies of 30 lumbar spinal MRI (containing a total of 150 disk levels) as well as MRM films were separately reviewed by two radiologists and a neurosurgeon. At each intervertebral disk, the observers were asked to evaluate the thecal sac for the presence and degree of spinal stenoses (mild, moderate, or severe) and presence of root canal compression. Interobserver agreement was measured using weighted kappa statistics. Regarding lumbar spinal canal stenosis, interobserver agreement between the two radiologists was moderate (kappa, 0.4) for MRI and good (kappa, 0.6) for combination with MRM. However, the agreement between the radiologist and neurosurgeon remained fair for MRI alone or in combination with MRM (kappa, 0.38 and 033, respectively). In the evaluation of nerve root compression, interobserver agreement between the radiologists improved from moderate (kappa, 0.57) for MRI to good (kappa, 0.73) after combination with MRM; moderate agreement between the radiologist and neurosurgeon was noted for both MRI alone and after combination with MRM (kappa, 0.58 and 0.56, respectively). Interobserver agreement in the evaluation of lumbar spinal canal stenosis and root compression between the radiologists improved when MRM was combined with MRI, relative to MRI alone.

  2. Influence of antimicrobial solutions in the decontamination and adhesion of glass-fiber posts to root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARAGUSHIKU, Gisele Aihara; BACK, Eduardo Donato Eing Engelke; TOMAZINHO, Paulo Henrique; BARATTO, Flares; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of root canal disinfectants on the elimination of bacteria from the root canals, as well as their effect on glass-fiber posts bond strength. Material and Methods Fifty-three endodontically treated root canals had post spaces of 11 mm in length prepared and contaminated with E. faecalis. For CFU/ml analysis, eight teeth were contaminated for 1 h or 30 days (n=4). Teeth were decontaminated with 5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or distilled water. As control, no decontamination was conducted. After decontamination, sterile paper points were used to collect samples, and CFU/ml were counted. For push-out, three groups were evaluated (n=15): irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or sterile distilled water. A bonding agent was applied to root canal dentin, and a glass-fiber post was cemented with a dual-cured cement. After 24 h, 1-mm-thick slices of the middle portion of root canals were obtained and submitted to the push-out evaluation. Three specimens of each group were evaluated in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s T3 test (α=0.05). Results The number of CFU/ml increased from 1 h to 30 days of contamination in control and sterile distilled water groups. Decontamination with NaOCl was effective only when teeth were contaminated for 1 h. CHX was effective at both contamination times. NaOCl did not influence the bond strength (p>0.05). Higher values were observed with CHX (ppost bonding. PMID:26398518

  3. Apical microleakage of different root canal sealers after use of maleic acid and EDTA as final irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Ozgür Ilke; Nayir, Yelda; Celik, Kezban; Yaman, Sis Darendeliler

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and maleic acid (MA) on the sealing ability of various root canal sealers. Eighty root canals were instrumented and irrigated with either EDTA or MA. They were divided into eight experimental groups and obturated as follows: Group 1: MA + Hybrid Root SEAL/gutta-percha. Group 2: EDTA + Hybrid Root SEAL/gutta-percha. Group 3: MA + iRoot SP/gutta-percha. Group 4: EDTA + iRoot SP/gutta-percha. Group 5: MA + EndoREZ/EndoREZ points. Group 6: EDTA + EndoREZ/EndoREZ points. Group 7: MA + AH Plus/gutta-percha. Group 8: EDTA + AH Plus/gutta-percha. Another ten roots were used as negative and positive controls. The microleakage of each sample was measured at 2-min intervals for 8 min using the fluid filtration method. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey, and paired-samples t tests. The minimum microleakage values were obtained from the teeth obturated with AH Plus and EndoREZ selaers (p EDTA in terms of microleakage (p EDTA. The type of final irrigation solution seems to influence the postobturation apical seal. Use of AH Plus and EndoREZ sealers showed better sealing ability compared with IRoot SP and Hybrid Root SEAL.

  4. In vitro comparison rate of dental root canal transportation using two single file systems on the simulated resin blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Etesami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cleaning and shaping is one of the most important stages in endodontic treatment. Single-file systems save time and reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens. This in vitro study was aimed to compare the rate of canal transportation after the preparation of the stimulated resin root canal with two single-file systems, namely Waveone and Reciproc. Materials and Methods: Thirty stimulated resin root canal blocks with size 8/0. 02 K file were randomly divided into two study groups. The preparation in Group A and Group B was performed using Reciproc and Waveone files, respectively. Pre and post- preparation photographs were taken and the images were superimposed to evaluate the inner and outer wall’s curvature tendency at three points (apical, middle and coronal using AutoCad pragram. Data were analyzed using T-test. Results: Based on the results, the degree of transportation in the inner and outer walls of the canal was less at the level of 3 millimeters (P0.05. Conclusion: Waveone showed better performance in the middle third of canal and this system maybe recommended.

  5. ANATOMO-MORPHOLOGICAL FEUTURES OF THE ROOT CANAL SYSTEM IN GEORGIAN POPULATION - CONE-BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshkenadze, E; Chipashvili, N

    2015-10-01

    Incomplete and superficial knowledge of morphological types and anatomical variations of the root canal system will become the reason leading to the failure of endodontic treatment. cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) - it is a technologically more sophisticated, interesting, reliable, non-invasive imaging technique with high degree of visualization, considered as a particularly important and useful tool to study complexity and variability of canal system. 2753 teeth of 228 patients have been studied by CT. Ages of the patients varied within 25-55 years. Among them 122 men and 106 women. Maxillary teeth - 1394 and mandibular - 1359, respectively. The aim of our study was investigation and evaluation of: tooth length, number of roots and canals, type of configuration, root canal curvature and degree of curvature in Georgian population. The results of the study revealed interesting data and anatomical characteristics, those replicating the racial signs and differs from the data recorded by the other researchers, became evident. In studying of dental form variations were interested anatomists (description and comparison) anthropologists, biologists, palaeontologists and stomatologists. The field of human dental anatomy has not been completely explored so, the modern human teeth still remain a matter of continual curiosity and research. The knowledge of anatomical characteristics of dental root canals will help clinicians to optimize the algorithm of endodontic treatment. Thus, statistic data are not the universal criterias, however, basing on these indicators anthropometrical data of roots and canals vary according to the geographic zones and nationalities. The study of variations in tooth form has interested anatomists (description and comparison), anthropologists, biologists, palaeontologists and dentists. The field of human dental anatomy has not been completely explored and the dentition of modern man still remains a matter of continual curiosity and research

  6. A novel model for testing the efficiency of removal of calcium hydroxide from complex root canal anatomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Aksel, Hacer; Parashos, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several irrigation protocols in the removal of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2 ] from simulated internal root resorption cavities in a complex root canal anatomy model. The 20° to 35° curved mesiobuccal roots of 94 maxillary molars were sectioned longitudinally; internal resorption cavities were prepared in the apical third of the canal walls. Calcium hydroxide was placed into the cavities and the root halves reassembled. Four teeth were used as controls, and 90 teeth were randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 15), according to the irrigation protocols used: syringe irrigation; H2 O2 (HP); Navitip FX; Vibringe-syringe; Vibringe-NaviTip FX; ultrasonically activated irrigation (UAI) using an ultrasonic K-file. In the HP group, 2.5% NaOCl and 3% H2 O2 were used, while 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were used in the remaining groups. Stereomicroscope images and radiographs were used to measure the remaining Ca(OH)2 . The model proved to be suitable for simulating complex anatomy. Positive correlation was found between stereomicroscope and radiographic analyses (P efficient protocol (P < 0.05). It would appear that a reliable model has been developed that simulates complex root canal anatomy. Irrigant activation protocols enhanced Ca(OH)2 removal. © 2017 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  7. Bactericidal effect of the 908 nm diode laser on Enterococcus faecalis in infected root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Preethee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the bactericidal effect of 908 nm diode laser in conjunction with various irrigation regimes in disinfection of apical third of root dentin. Materials and Methods: Sixty prepared teeth with single canals were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. The specimens were divided into 6 groups (n = 10: Group 1 and 3 and 5 were subjected to chemo-mechanical preparation using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 17% Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; 1.3% NaOCl, MTAD (mixture of doxycycline, citric acid and a detergent (Tween 80; and, 8.5% saline, respectively followed by 908 nm diode laser irradiation; Group 2 and 4, followed the same procedure as Group1 and 3, however without laser irradiation; and, Group 6, rinsed with saline solution (control. Dentin shavings from apical third were analyzed for the presence of E. faecalis using culture method and Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR. Results: One-way Analysis of variance showed statistically significant differences between the laser irradiated groups, non irradiated groups and the control group. Conclusion: 908 nm diode used in conjunction with conventional chemomechanical techniques demonstrated a significant elimination of E. faecalis in the apical third of root dentin.

  8. Laser assisted irrigation and hand irrigation for root canal decontamination: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivi, M.; Stefanucci, M.; Todea, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to compare the bactericidal efficiency of conventional method and LAI for root canal decontamination. Material and method: 22 human single root teeth, extracted for periodontal problems, mechanically prepared up to ISO 25 at the working lenght were divided in 2 groups: after sterilization, the teeth were infected with enterococcus faecalis and incubated for 4 weeks. Group A: 10 teeth were irrigated with conventional hand technique (CI): 3ml of 5% NaClO were used for two times of 30s each and after washing with sterile bi-distilled water for 20s, a final irrigation was performed with 3ml of 17% EDTA. Group B: 10 teeth were irrigated with 3ml of NaClO and activated by erbium laser, two cycles of 30s; also the final irrigation with 3ml of 17% EDTA was activated by erbium laser. In both the groups a resting time of 30s was used between the two sessions to allow the reaction rate of NaClO. The Erbium laser 2940 nm (LightWalker AT, Fotona; Lublijana, Slovenia) was used with 50microsecond pulse duration, at 15Hz, 20mJ, with a 600micron PIPS tip. Two samples were used as positive and negative control.

  9. Micro-computed tomography and bond strength analysis of different root canal filling techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Nhata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality and bond strength of three root filling techniques (lateral compaction, continuous wave of condensation and Tagger′s Hybrid technique [THT] using micro-computed tomography (CT images and push-out tests, respectively. Materials and Methods: Thirty mandibular incisors were prepared using the same protocol and randomly divided into three groups (n = 10: Lateral condensation technique (LCT, continuous wave of condensation technique (CWCT, and THT. All specimens were filled with Gutta-percha (GP cones and AH Plus sealer. Five specimens of each group were randomly chosen for micro-CT analysis and all of them were sectioned into 1 mm slices and subjected to push-out tests. Results: Micro-CT analysis revealed less empty spaces when GP was heated within the root canals in CWCT and THT when compared to LCT. Push-out tests showed that LCT and THT had a significantly higher displacement resistance (P < 0.05 when compared to the CWCT. Bond strength was lower in apical and middle thirds than in the coronal thirds. Conclusions: It can be concluded that LCT and THT were associated with higher bond strengths to intraradicular dentine than CWCT. However, LCT was associated with more empty voids than the other techniques.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Manju Raj; Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-07-01

    Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to 'endodontic triad'. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each - a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL -1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by 'Phi' and 'Cramers' test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at p< 0.05 using SPSS software. Stainless steel hand file group showed most cracks followed by ProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed lesser number of cracks. All groups showed cracks formation

  11. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to ‘endodontic triad’. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. Aim To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each – a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL –1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by ‘Phi’ and ‘Cramers’ test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at pProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed lesser number of cracks. Conclusion All groups showed cracks formation, the stainless steel group

  12. Mechanical Behavior of a NiTi Endodontic File During Insertion in an Anatomic Root Canal Using Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, V.; Moyne, S.; Pino, L.; Arbab Chirani, S.; Calloch, S.; Chevalier, V.; Arbab Chirani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) have biomedical applications including rotary endodontic files. These alloys are used thanks to their flexibility, which is due to solid-solid martensitic transformation. Unfortunately, the intracanal file separation can occur during canal preparation. To avoid this problem and to have a good idea of the mechanical behavior of these instruments, finite elements simulations taking into account the real shape of root canals are proposed in this study. This is possible by using a well-adapted model describing all the particularities of SMA and representative limit conditions. The behavior model has been validated in previous studies under complex loadings. It is implemented in ABAQUS® finite elements software. The anatomic shapes of root canals are extracted by microtomography using a real tooth. They are applied as limit conditions in realized simulations to be as near as possible to clinical conditions. The mechanical behavior of an endodontic file is then simulated during insertion in a root canal without and with rotation. This permits to obtain different information like the loading applied to the instrument during its use, the stress, and the phase transformation fields through the file. This is useful not only for clinical use but also for new NiTi endodontic instruments design.

  13. Management of a mandibular molar with C-shape root canal using spiral computed tomography as a diagnostic aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the use of spiral computed tomography (CT in endodontic management of a mandibular molar with an unusual morphology of C-shape canal. An accurate assessment of this unusual morphology was made with the help of spiral CT. This report extends the range of known possible anatomical variations to include teeth with an abnormal number of roots and canals. This report also highlights the role of spiral CT, over conventional intra-oral periapical radiographs, as an objective method to confirm the three-dimensional anatomy of teeth.

  14. Evaluation of an ultrasonic technique to remove fractured rotary nickel-titanium endodontic instruments from root canals: clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeff R; Parashos, Peter; Messer, Harold H

    2003-11-01

    The removal of fractured rotary nickel-titanium instruments from small, curved root canals is one of the most complex operative procedures in endodontics. There have been many different devices and techniques developed to remove fractured instruments, but none are consistently successful and all show a high incidence of canal damage such as perforation. A technique using a staging platform and the use of modern ultrasonic tips with direct visualization through a dental operating microscope has recently been evaluated. The use of this technique in clinical practice is described in 24 cases and illustrated by 3 cases.

  15. Sonic versus ultrasonic activation for removal of calcium hydroxide from curved root canals: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Cid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To compare the remaining calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 coated area in the apical third of curved canals after sonic and ultrasonic activation using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Permanent mandibular molars were collected. Those which radiographically presented a curvature between 15º and 30° in the mesial root were included. A total of 39 mesiolinguales canals were instrumented with rotary ProTaper and filled with Ca(OH2 mixed with propylene glycol. They were randomly divided into three groups according to the type of removal. Group I: three inserts with File F2 and 2ml of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl irrigation between each insertion. Group II: three sonic activations, irrigattion with 2ml of 5.25% NaOCl between activations. Group III: three ultrasonic activations irrigating with 2ml of 5.25% NaOCl between activations. Three root canals were left without filling and other three were completely filled as positive and negative control, respectively. Then, they were fractured lengthwise to get two sections. The apical third of the root canal of each section was taken x-rays with SEM and subsequently, in an area of 100.000um2, the remaining Ca(OH2 coated surface from both sections was measured using ImageJ 1.47. They were analyzed with one-way ANOVA using Graph Pad-Prism (5.01. The percentage of the remaining Ca(OH2 coated area in group I was 62.93%, 51.77% in group II, and 58.90% in group III. There were no significant differences between the three groups (p>0.01. There are no significant differences in the percentage of the remaining Ca(OH2 coated area in the apical third of curved root canals when comparing sonic and ultrasonic activation using SEM.

  16. Comparative evaluation of modified canal staining and clearing technique, cone-beam computed tomography, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, spiral computed tomography, and plain and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiography in studying root canal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Prasanna; Subbarao, Chandana; Subbarao, Chandragiri V

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), spiral computed tomography (SCT), plain (plain digi), and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiographs (contrast digi) in studying root canal morphology. The root canal anatomy was analyzed in 95 teeth using CBCT, pQCT, SCT, plain digi, and contrast digi. After flushing out the radiopaque dye, access cavities were sealed, and the teeth were subject to the modified canal staining and clearing technique. The number of root canals (Vertucci classification and Gulabivala's additional classes) was calculated by three calibrated endodontists and two maxillofacial radiologists. Erroneous or unsuccessful identifications of root canals were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (p = 0.05). The modified canal staining and clearing technique identified an average of 1.8 root canals per mandibular central incisor, 2.3 per maxillary first premolar, 3.9 per maxillary first molar, 3.8 per maxillary and mandibular second molar, and 4.3 per mandibular first molar. CBCT and pQCT were erroneous in 0.29% and 2.05% cases, whereas SCT, contrast digi, and plain digi were unsuccessful in 15.58%, 14.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. There was a significant difference between all the methods (p 0.05). CBCT and pQCT were as accurate as the modified canal staining and tooth clearing technique in identifying root canal systems. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Technical quality of root canal fillings performed in a dental school and the associated retention of root-filled teeth: a clinical follow-up study over a 5-year period.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the technical quality of root canal fillings performed in a dental school and to investigate the associated effect on the survival\\/retention of root-filled teeth. A review of case notes of patients who had root canal treatment performed in the department of Restorative Dentistry, University Dental School and Hospital, Cork, Ireland was carried out. The technical quality of the root canal filling was described according to its relationship with the radiographic apex on a post-treatment radiograph. Tooth status at review was defined as \\'tooth present\\' or \\'tooth absent\\' based on the presence or absence of the root-filled tooth recorded in the treatment records at a review appointment following placement of the root canal filling. One hundred and forty-eight teeth (129 patients) were considered. Of these, 69.6% (n = 103) were of acceptable technical quality, 23.6% (n = 35) were under-extended, and 6.8% (n = 10) were overextended. An increased number of intra-treatment radiographs to confirm the relationship of the canal preparation to the radiographic apex and operator experience were significant predictors of adequate root canal fillings (P < 0.05). Eighty-three per cent (n = 123) of teeth were present at a review appointment held an average of 40 months following completion of treatment (12-60 months). The technical quality of the root canal filling was the only significant factor in predicting tooth survival (P < 0.05), while the presence of pre-treatment periapical pathology had no significant effect on survival of the root-filled tooth. Determination and maintenance of the working length of the canal system is an important feature in producing good quality root canal fillings, which in turn, is associated with increased likelihood of survival\\/retention of root-filled teeth.

  18. [Analysis of different endodontic sealers and strategies of root canal irrigation on the bond strength of fiber posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shujin; Liu, Cuiling; Zheng, Zheng; Yang, Liyuan; Gao, Xu

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of eugenol-containing and resin-containing endodontic sealers on the bond strength of fiber posts using different strategies of root canal irrigation. Forty-eight mandibular premolars were endodontically treated. The specimens were randomly assigned into two groups according to different endodontic sealers. Group A used Endofil (eugenol-containing endodontic sealer), and group B used AH-plus (resin-containing endodontic sealer). After post space preparation, each group was randomly assigned into three subgroups according to the strategies of root canal irrigation (eight premolars in each subgroup). Group Al and B1: 0.9%NaCl irrigation; Group A2 and B2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)+5.25%NaClO+0.9%NaCl irrigation; Group A3 and B3: ultrasonic agitation associated with 1 7%EDTA+5.25%NaClO+0.9%NaCl. One week after the cementation of fiber posts using RelyX™ Unicem, a push-out test was performed to measure the bond strength of the posts. The microstructure of the root canal surface was examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The bond strengths of the six groups were as follows: Al (7.96±2.23) MPa, A2 (9.95±2.89) MPa, A3 (18.88±3.69) MPa, B1 (11.41±3.71) MPa, B2 (14.00±4.04) MPa, and B3 (19.14±3.27) MPa. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the different endodontic sealers and the strategies of root canal irrigation (P0.05). SEM showed that the root canal in group A3 and B3 achieved the cleanest surface with nearly all dentine tubules opened. The eugenol-containing endodontic sealer can impair the bond strength of fiber posts compared with the resin-containing sealer when the root canal is irrigated by 0.9% NaCl or 17%EDTA+5.25%NaClO+0.9%NaC. No difference was observed between the two sealers when using 17%EDTA+5.25% NaCIO+0.9%NaCl combined with ultrasonic irrigation.

  19. An in vitro evaluation of various irrigation techniques for the removal of double antibiotic paste from root canal surfaces

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    Hakan GOKTURK

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of conventional syringe irrigations, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, Vibringe, CanalBrush, XP-endo Finisher, and laser-activated irrigation (LAI systems in removing double antibiotic paste (DAP from root canals. Material and Methods One hundred five extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented. The roots were split longitudinally. Three standard grooves were created and covered with DAP. The roots were distributed into seven groups: Group 1, beveled needle irrigation; Group 2, double side-vented needle irrigation; Group 3, CanalBrush; Group 4, XP-endo Finisher; Group 5, Vibringe; Group 6, PUI; Group 7, LAI. The amount of remaining DAP was scored under a stereomicroscope. Results Group 4, Group 6, and Group 7 removed significantly more DAP than the other protocols in the coronal region. Group 7 was more efficient in the middle region; however, no significant difference was found between Group 7 and Group 6. No differences were found between groups in the apical region either, except for the comparisons between groups 7 and 2, and groups 2 and 3. Conclusions None of the investigated protocols were able to completely remove the DAP from the grooves. The Vibringe and XP-endo Finisher systems showed results similar to those of conventional needle irrigation.

  20. A comparative evaluation of electronic and radiographic determination of root canal length in primary teeth: An in vitro study

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    Iyer Satishkumar Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the root canal length determination by Electronic apex locator (EAL (Raypex 5 and conventional radiography, and then compare them with the actual measurements obtained by direct visualization. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Subjects and Methods: One hundred single rooted primary teeth extracted due to extensive caries, trauma, serial extraction or unwillingness of the parent to save the teeth were selected. The teeth were numbered and root canal length was determined using the visual, electronic and the radiographic methods. The actual, electronic and the radiographic measurements were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using Intraclass correlation test and linear regression analysis. Results: The accuracy of EAL and radiographic methods were 92% and 72%, respectively within + 0.5 mm. Both the electronic and conventional radiographic methods showed a high correlation and agreement (ICC intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.99 and 0.98 respectively with the actual measurements. Conclusions: EALs proved to be more accurate in determining the root canal length than the radiographic method.

  1. A comparative evaluation of electronic and radiographic determination of root canal length in primary teeth: An in vitro study

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    Krishnan, Iyer Satishkumar; Sreedharan, Sheela

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the root canal length determination by Electronic apex locator (EAL) (Raypex 5) and conventional radiography, and then compare them with the actual measurements obtained by direct visualization. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Subjects and Methods: One hundred single rooted primary teeth extracted due to extensive caries, trauma, serial extraction or unwillingness of the parent to save the teeth were selected. The teeth were numbered and root canal length was determined using the visual, electronic and the radiographic methods. The actual, electronic and the radiographic measurements were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using Intraclass correlation test and linear regression analysis. Results: The accuracy of EAL and radiographic methods were 92% and 72%, respectively within + 0.5 mm. Both the electronic and conventional radiographic methods showed a high correlation and agreement (ICC intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.99 and 0.98 respectively) with the actual measurements. Conclusions: EALs proved to be more accurate in determining the root canal length than the radiographic method. PMID:23633801

  2. [The influence of the difference of caries detective methods on the bond strength for caries affected root canal dentin].

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    Otake, Shiho

    2010-03-01

    Firm adhesion of composite resin and dentin is the basic premise for building up resin composite cores successfully. To assess the efficacy of several caries detective methods (stained with Caries Detector and probing with sharp probe) for caries affected root canal dentin, microtensile bond strengths of resin composite to caries-affected root canal dentin and failure mode distribution were analyzed in this study. Color and hardness were used for assessment of root caries as follows: Dye stain group (pale pink stained with Caries Detector), Probing group (probing with sharp probe) and Sound dentin group (Control). The bond strengths (mean +/- standard deviation) of the Probing group (64.6 +/- 11.9 MPa) and the Sound dentin group (68.7 +/- 11.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those of the Dye stain group (46.9 +/- 7.9 MPa, p<0.05). However, there is no significant difference in fracture mode between the Dye stain group and the Probing group (p<0.05). This could be attributed to that the thick smear layer caused a loss of hybrid layer strength. In conclusion, the caries removal technique of the root canal dentin affected the bond strength of the resin composite.

  3. Influence of ultrasonic activation on photodynamic therapy over root canal system infected with Enterococcus faecalis--an in vitro study.

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    Ghinzelli, Guilherme Cavagnoli; Souza, Matheus Albino; Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the influence of ultrasonic activation on photodynamic therapy over root canal system infected with Enterococcus faecalis. The root canals of 50 single-rooted human extracted teeth were enlarged up to a file 60, autoclaved, inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated for 30 days. The samples were divided into five groups (n=10) according to the protocol of decontamination: G1 (control group) - no procedure was performed; G2 - photosensitizer (0.01% methylene blue); G3 - ultrasonic activation of photosensitizer (0.01% methylene blue); G4 - photodynamic therapy with no ultrasonic activation; and G5 - photodynamic therapy with ultrasonic activation. Microbiological tests (CFU counting) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to evaluate and illustrate, respectively, the effectiveness of proposed treatments. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey test (α=0.05). The microbiological test demonstrated that G5 (photodynamic therapy with ultrasonic activation) showed the lowest mean contamination (3.17 log CFU/mL), which was statistically different from all other groups (pphotodynamic therapy) showed a mean of contamination of 3.60 log CFU/mL, which was statistically different from groups 1, 2 and 3 (pphotodynamic therapy improved its potential for decontamination, resulting in the higher elimination Enterococcus faecalis from the root canal space. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of Various Endodontic Irrigants on the Micro-Hardness of the Root Canal Dentin: An in vitro Study.

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    Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Sharma, Vini; Bharadwaj, Anuj; Shrivastava, Poorvi; Saha, Mainak Kanti; Dubey, Sandeep; Kala, Shubham; Gupta, Shubhra

    2017-04-01

    Irrigating solutions used for the elimination of micro-organisms during root canal preparation may affect the chemical and the physical properties of dentin thereby rendering the tooth more susceptible to fracture. Therefore careful and judicious selection of irrigant is required which have maximum benefits with minimum undesirable properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various endodontic irrigants on the micro-hardness of the root canal dentin. This in vitro study was carried out on eighty freshly extracted mandibular premolars with single canals. They were decoronated at the cemento-enamel junction. Roots were sectioned longitudinally into two halves. They were then polished and placed in autopolymerised resin moulds with the polished surface facing outside. The samples were divided into four groups based on the irrigants in which they were immersed i.e., 3% Sodium Hypochlorite (3% NaOCl), 17% Ethylene Dioxide Tetra Acetic Acid (17% EDTA), 0.2% Chitosan and 6% Morindacitrifolia Juice (MCJ) for 15 minutes each. All the specimens were then subjected to micro-hardness testing using a Vickers micro-hardness tester. Statistical analysis was done using one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Post-Hoc Tukey test and Paired t-test to compare the pre and post immersion micro-hardness values of the selected samples. The results of the present study indicated that 17% EDTA and 0.2% Chitosan, significantly decreased the micro-hardness of root dentin whereas 6% MCJ and 3% NaOCl had no significant effect on the microhardness before and after immersing in the irrigants. A 6% MCJ and 3% NaOCl which have significant antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and smear layer removing properties showed negligible effect on the micro-hardness of root canal dentin making them suitable endodontic irrigating solution.

  5. A novel approach to evaluate the effect of medicaments used in endodontic regeneration on root canal surface indentation.

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    Yassen, Ghaeth H; Chu, Tien-Min G; Gallant, Maxime A; Allen, Matthew R; Vail, Mychel M; Murray, Peter E; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of a novel reference point indentation apparatus to test the indentation properties of root canal surface dentine treated with three intracanal medicaments used in endodontic regeneration. Immature human premolars were selected (n = 22). Four specimens were obtained from each root and randomly assigned to three treatment groups and a control group. Each specimen was exposed to one of the three treatment pastes (triple antibiotic (TAP), double antibiotic (DAP), or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)) or neutral deionized water (control) for 1 or 4 weeks. After each time interval, the indentation properties of the root canal dentine surfaces were measured using a BioDent reference point indenter. Two-way ANOVA and Fisher's protected least significant differences were used for statistical analyses. Significant differences in indentation parameters and estimated hardness between all groups at both time points were found. TAP-treated dentine had the highest significant indentation parameters, followed by DAP-treated dentine, untreated control dentine, and Ca(OH)2-treated dentine, respectively. Furthermore, TAP-treated dentine had the lowest significant estimated hardness, followed by DAP-treated dentine, untreated control dentine, and Ca(OH)2-treated dentine, respectively. BioDent reference point indenter was able to detect significant differences in indentation properties of root canal dentine treated with various medicaments. The use of a reference point indenter is a promising approach to characterize the indentation properties of root canal surfaces without any surface modification. This might provide an in vitro mechanical measurement that is more representative of the actual clinical situation.

  6. Analysis of C-shaped root canal configuration in maxillary molars in a Korean population using cone-beam computed tomography

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    Hyoung-Hoon Jo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of root fusion and C-shaped root canals in maxillary molars, and to classify the types of C-shaped canal by analyzing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in a Korean population. Materials and Methods Digitized CBCT images from 911 subjects were obtained in Chosun University Dental Hospital between February 2010 and July 2012 for orthodontic treatment. Among them, a total of selected 3,553 data of maxillary molars were analyzed retrospectively. Tomography sections in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were displayed by PiViewstar and Rapidia MPR software (Infinitt Co.. The incidence and types of root fusion and C-shaped root canals were evaluated and the incidence between the first and the second molar was compared using Chi-square test. Results Root fusion was present in 3.2% of the first molars and 19.5% of the second molars, and fusion of mesiobuccal and palatal root was dominant. C-shaped root canals were present in 0.8% of the first molars and 2.7% of the second molars. The frequency of root fusion and C-shaped canal was significantly higher in the second molar than the first molar (p < 0.001. Conclusions In a Korean population, maxillary molars showed total 11.3% of root fusion and 1.8% of C-shaped root canals. Furthermore, root fusion and C-shaped root canals were seen more frequently in the maxillary second molars.

  7. Curative effect observation of two kinds of root canal preparation for root canal filling on posterior teeth%两种根管预备方法对后牙根管充填的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江; 张恺

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价机用ProTaper镍钛锉根备后对根管充填(简称根充)的影响。方法将30例磨牙、30例前磨牙的牙髓炎和根尖炎患者平均分为两组,A组30例用机用Pro T aper镍钛锉进行根管预备,B组30例用普通K锉改良的逐步后退法进行根管预备。比较两组器械根备对根充的影响,分别从根充的时间、根备的主尖锉和根充的主牙胶尖的匹配度、根充的恰填率、根充的术后反应进行比较。结果在根充时间上A组平均前磨牙为1分30秒,磨牙为4分25秒;B组平均前磨牙为5分30秒,磨牙为11分41秒,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。A组前磨牙主尖锉和主牙胶尖的匹配度为86.37%,磨牙为88.89%;而B组前磨牙为62.50%,磨牙为26.67%,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。根充恰填率在X线片上前磨牙A组为72.73%,B组为70.83%;磨牙A组为80.00%,B组为77.78%,差异无统计学意义( P>0.05);根充的术后疼痛反应上两者都很低且弱,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论机用ProTaper镍钛锉根备后能加快根充速度,提高主尖锉和主牙胶尖的匹配度,简化根充治疗程序。%Objective To evaluate the influence of ProTaper rotary nickel-titanium files root preparation on root canal filling . Methods 30 cases of molars pulpitis and 20 cases of premolars pulpitis or periapical periodontitis were equally divided into two groups .The group A(30 cases) used the ProTaper rotary nickel-titanium files in root canal preparation and the group B (30 cases) adopted the common K files modified step-back technique for root canal preparation .The influence of the root preparation by 2 sets of apparatus on the effect of root canal filling ,and the several aspects of the root canal filling time ,the matching degree of main root canal file and master gutta-percha ,proper filling rate ,postoperative reaction of root canal

  8. Efficacy of ProTaper Universal Rotary Retreatment system for gutta-percha removal from oval root canals: a micro-computed tomography study.

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    Ma, Jingzhi; Al-Ashaw, Ahmed Jawad; Shen, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Chengfei; Haapasalo, Markus

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to use micro-computed tomography to evaluate the amount of remaining root filling material in oval canals filled by using 2 obturation techniques after retreatment with the ProTaper Universal Retreatment with or without solvent. Forty mandibular incisor teeth with oval canals were prepared to the ProTaper Universal F3 and filled with gutta-percha and iRoot SP sealer by using continuous wave of condensation or cold lateral condensation techniques. The root fillings were removed with the ProTaper Universal Retreatment system, and the canals were prepared further with ProTaper F4. The operating time was measured. Preoperative and postoperative micro-computed tomography imaging was used to assess the percentage of volume of residual filling material in the canals. Remaining filling material was observed in all specimens. The mean volume of remaining material was higher in the continuous wave of condensation groups than in the cold lateral condensation groups, especially in the apical portions of the root canals (P removal and root canal refinement than in the solvent groups (P remove all gutta-percha/sealer from the oval canals. More root filling material was left in the root canals filled by using the continuous wave condensation technique than those filled by using the cold lateral condensation technique after retreatment. In the nonsolvent groups, less time was needed to achieve satisfactory gutta-percha removal and root canal refinement than in the solvent groups. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Survey of Anatomy and Root Canal Morphology of Maxillary First Molars Regarding Age and Gender in an Iranian Population Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

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    Naseri, Mandana; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Khayat, Akbar; Eftekhar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary first molars with regards to patients’ age and gender with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: A total of 149 CBCT scans from 92 (67.1%) female and 57 (31.3%) male patients with mean age of 40.5 years were evaluated. Tooth length, presence of root fusion, number of the roots and canals, canal types based on Vertucci’s classification, deviation of root and apical foramen in coronal and sagittal planes and the correlation of all items with gender and age were recorded. The Mann Whitney U, Kruskal Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests were used to analyze these items. Results: The rate of root fusion was 1.3%. Multiple canals were present in the following frequencies: four canals 78.5%, five canals 11.4% and three canals 10.1%. Additional canal was detected in 86.6% of mesiobuccal roots in which Vertucci’s type VI configuration was the most prevalent followed by type II and I. Type I was the most common one in distobuccal and palatal roots. There was no statistically significant difference in the canal configurations in relation to gender and age as well as the incidence root or canal numbers (P>0.05). The mean tooth length was 19.3 and 20.3 mm in female and male patients, respectively which was statistically significant (P<0.05). Evaluation of root deviation showed that most commonly, a general pattern of straight-distal in the mesiobuccal and straight-straight for distobuccal and palatal roots occurred. In mesiobuccal roots, straight and distal deviations were more dominant in male and female, respectively (P<0.05). The prevalence of apical foramen deviation in mesiobuccal and palatal roots statistically differed with gender. Conclusion: The root and canal configuration of Iranian population showed different features from those of other populations. PMID:27790259

  10. Evaluation of Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Posts Cemented With Two Cements in Asymmetric Dental Root Canal

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    Atefeh Ramezani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:Debonding is one of the most common causes of failures in post fibers used in the root canalat interface of dentin-fiberpost. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the interface of the fibers post in the root canal with appropriate and inappropriate compliance with CBCT and its push-out bond strength with two types of resin cement used in the mandibular premolars. Materials and Methods:Forty (40Mandibular Premolarteeth which were extracted were useddue to theorthodontic problems. After endodontic, the teeth were randomly classified into two groups including teeth with post space in compliance with the fiber post and a group of posts space wider than fiber post. Thereafter,each group wassub-divided into two groups according to the used cement: panaviaF2.0 (Kuraray Medical Inc., Osaka, Japan, Rebilda DC(Voco, and Germany and finally, four groups were created [P.a:canal with appropriate adaptation + panavia F2.0, P.in:canal with inappropriate adaptation + panavia F2.0, R.a:canal with appropriate adaptation + Rebi